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Sample records for perinatal maternal institute

  1. Incarceration, Maternal Hardship, and Perinatal Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Dora M.; Wildeman, Christopher; Lee, Hedwig; Gjelsvik, Annie; Valera, Pamela A.; Clarke, Jennifer G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parental incarceration is associated with mental and physical health problems in children, yet little research directly tests mechanisms through which parental incarceration could imperil child health. We hypothesized that the incarceration of a woman or her romantic partner in the year before birth constituted an additional hardship for already-disadvantaged women, and that these additionally vulnerable women were less likely to engage in positive perinatal health behaviors important to infant and early childhood development. Methods We analyzed 2006-2010 data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS) to assess the association between incarceration in the year prior to the birth of a child and perinatal maternal hardships and behaviors. Results Women reporting incarceration of themselves or their partners in the year before birth of a child had 0.86 the odds (95% CI .78-.95) of beginning prenatal care in the first trimester compared to women not reporting incarceration. They were nearly twice as likely to report partner abuse and were significantly more likely to rely on WIC and/or Medicaid for assistance during pregnancy. These associations persist after controlling for socioeconomic measures and other stressors, including homelessness and job loss. Conclusions Incarceration of a woman or her partner in the year before birth is associated with higher odds of maternal hardship and poorer perinatal health behaviors. The unprecedented scale of incarceration in the U.S. simultaneously presents an underutilized public health opportunity and constitutes a social determinant of health that may contribute to disparities in early childhood development. PMID:24615355

  2. Serologic tracers (HBsAg and HBsAc) of hepatitis B virus in expectant mothers of the Perinatal Maternal Institute

    E-print Network

    Garcia, B M

    1997-01-01

    A study on hepatitis B tracers, (HBsAg and HBsAc), was conducted in women with different months of pregnancy at the Perinatal Maternal Institute in Lima, Peru. A total of 1010 mothers were studied during the period of January to October 1996, establishing by radioimmunoassay (RIA) whether they were positive or not. The results showed a prevalence rate of 1,6 for HBsAc and 1,3 for HBsAg for every 100,000 inhabitants. The incidence rate was 0,332 for HBsAc and 0,07 for HBsAg for every 100,000 inhabitants. This means that 21 expectant mothers are HBsAc positive and 5 are HBsAg positive. According to the investigations, there were different ways of transmission; promiscuity must be highlighted, as well as age -most of the mothers who were positive were between 20 and 25 years old- and origin. Most of them were immigrants from different places and live in shantytowns, which indicates that most of them have limited economic resources and have not received any orientation on family planning.

  3. A thematic analysis of factors influencing recruitment to maternal and perinatal trials

    PubMed Central

    Tooher, Rebecca L; Middleton, Philippa F; Crowther, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Background Recruitment of eligible participants remains one of the biggest challenges to successful completion of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Only one third of trials recruit on time, often requiring a lengthy extension to the recruitment period. We identified factors influencing recruitment success and potentially effective recruitment strategies. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1966 to December Week 2, 2006, the Cochrane Library Methodology Register in December 2006, and hand searched reference lists for studies of any design which focused on recruitment to maternal/perinatal trials, or if no studies of maternal or perinatal research could be identified, other areas of healthcare. Studies of nurses' and midwives' attitudes to research were included as none specifically about trials were located. We synthesised the data narratively, using a basic thematic analysis, with themes derived from the literature and after discussion between the authors. Results Around half of the included papers (29/53) were specific to maternal and perinatal healthcare. Only one study was identified which focused on factors for maternal and perinatal clinicians and only seven studies considered recruitment strategies specific to perinatal research. Themes included: participant assessment of risk; recruitment process; participant understanding of research; patient characteristics; clinician attitudes to research and trials; protocol issues; and institutional or organisational issues. While no reliable evidence base for strategies to enhance recruitment was identified in any of the review studies, four maternal/perinatal primary studies suggest that specialised recruitment staff, mass mailings, physician referrals and strategies targeting minority women may increase recruitment. However these findings may only be applicable to the particular trials and settings studied. Conclusion Although factors reported by both participants and clinicians which influence recruitment were quite consistent across the included studies, studies comparing different recruitment strategies were largely missing. Trials of different recruitment strategies could be embedded in large multicentre RCTs, with strategies tailored to the factors specific to the trial and institution. PMID:18687110

  4. Socioeconomic associations of improved maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Sajjad; Salameh, Khalil; Bener, Abdulbari; El Ansari, Walid

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective study analyzed the temporal association between socioeconomic development indices and improved maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival in the State of Qatar over a period of 35 years (1974–2008). We explored the association between reduction in poverty, improvement in maternal education, and perinatal health care on the one hand, and increased maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival on the other hand. Yearly mortality data was ascertained from the perinatal and neonatal mortality registers of the Women’s Hospital and the national database in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Hamad Medical Corporation in Doha. A total of 323,014 births were recorded during the study period. During these 35 years, there was a remarkable decline (P < 0.001) in Qatar’s neonatal mortality rate from 26.27/1000 in 1974 to 4.4/1000 in 2008 and in the perinatal mortality rate from 44.4/1000 in 1974 to 10.58/1000 in 2008. Qatar’s maternal mortality rate remained zero during 1993, 1995, and then in 1998–2000. The maternal mortality rate was 11.6/100,000 in 2008. For the rest of the years it has been approximately 10/100,000. Across the study period, the reduction in poverty, increase in maternal education, and improved perinatal health care were temporally associated with a significant improvement in maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival. The total annual births increased five-fold during the study period, with no negative impact on survival rates. Neonatal mortality rates in Qatar have reached a plateau since 2005. We also conducted a substudy to assess the association between improvements in survival rates in relation to health care investment. For this purpose, we divided the study period into two eras, ie, era A (1974–1993) during which major health care investment was in community-based, low-cost interventions, and era B (1994–2008) during which the major health care investment was in high-technology institutional interventions. Although from 1974–1993 (era A) the per capita health expenditure increased by only 19% as compared with a 137% increase in 1994–2008 (era B). The decline in neonatal and perinatal mortality rates was three times steeper during era A than in era B. The decline in neonatal and perinatal mortality rates was also significant (P < 0.001) when analyzed separately for era A and era B. We concluded that across the 35-year period covered by our study, the reduction in poverty, increased maternal education, and improved perinatal health care were temporally associated with improved maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival in the State of Qatar. From the subanalysis of era A and era B, we concluded that low-cost, community-based interventions, on the background of socioeconomic development, have a stronger impact on maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival as compared with high-cost institutional interventions. PMID:21151678

  5. Maternal Stress and Emotional Status during the Perinatal Period and Childhood Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anhalt, Karla; Telzrow, Cathy F.; Brown, Courtney L.

    2007-01-01

    An emerging literature suggests that maternal distress during the prenatal and perinatal period may adversely affect offspring development. The association between maternal stress and emotional status in the perinatal period (defined as 1 month after birth) and adjustment of first-grade children was examined in 948 mother-child dyads from the…

  6. Under-reporting of maternal and perinatal adverse events in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Cynthia; Armstrong, Sarah; Kim, Boa; Masson, Vicki; Sadler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the proportion of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity cases, identified by the Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committee (PMMRC), that are also reported within the annual serious adverse events (SAEs) reports published by the Health Quality and Safety Commission (HQSC). Setting Nationally collated data from the PMMRC and HQSC, New Zealand. Participants Analysis of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity data 2009–2012. Interventions Every SAE report published by the HQSC from 2009 to 2012 was scrutinised for maternal and perinatal cases using the case history provided by district health boards (DHB). Further detail of each case was requested from each DHB to establish whether they had been identified as maternal or perinatal mortalities or morbidities by the PMMRC. Primary outcome measure The proportion of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity cases identified by HQSC SAE reports, compared with PMMRC reporting. Results 58 maternal and perinatal SAEs were identified from the SAE reports 2009–2012. Of these, 50 fit under the PMMRC reporting definitions, all of which were also reported by the PMMRC. In the same time frame, the PMMRC captured 536 potentially avoidable maternal and perinatal mortalities and morbidities that fitted the HQSC SAE definition. Fewer than 9% of maternal and perinatal SAEs are captured by the HQSC SAE reporting process. Conclusions The rate of maternal and perinatal adverse event reporting to the HQSC is low and not improving annually, compared with PMMRC reporting of eligible events. This is of concern as these events may not be adequately reviewed locally, and because the SAE report is considered a measure of quality by the DHBs and the HQSC. Currently, the reporting of SAEs to the HQSC cannot be considered a reliable way to monitor or improve the quality of maternity services provided in New Zealand. PMID:26204910

  7. Maternal drinking water arsenic exposure and perinatal outcomes in Inner Mongolia, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to high levels of arsenic has been reported to increase adverse birth outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birthweight. This study evaluated the relationship between maternal arsenic exposure and perinatal endpoints (term birthweight, preterm ...

  8. Maternal drinking water arsenic exposure and perinatal outcomes in Inner Mongolia, China, Journal

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Bayingnormen is a region located in western Inner Mongolia China with a population that is exposed to a wide range of drinking water Arsenic concentrations. This study evaluated the relationship between maternal drinking water arsenic exposure and perinatal endpoints ...

  9. Maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zack, M.; Adami, H.O.; Ericson, A. )

    1991-07-15

    This report describes an exploratory population-based study of maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia in Sweden. The Swedish National Cancer Registry ascertained 411 cases in successive birth cohorts from 1973 through 1984 recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Using the latter, we matched five controls without cancer to each case by sex and month and year of birth. Mothers of children with leukemia were more likely to have been exposed to nitrous oxide anesthesia during delivery than mothers of controls (odds ratio (OR) = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0, 1.6). Children with leukemia were more likely than controls to have Down's syndrome (OR = 32.5; 95% CI = 7.3, 144.0) or cleft lip or cleft palate (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.0, 24.8); to have had a diagnosis associated with difficult labor but unspecified complications (OR = 4.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 18.2) or with other conditions of the fetus or newborn (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 2.1), specifically, uncomplicated physiological jaundice (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.2, 2.9); or to have received supplemental oxygen (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.3, 1.3, 4.9). Because multiple potential risk factors were analyzed in this study, future studies need to check these findings. The authors did not confirm the previously reported higher risks for childhood leukemia associated with being male, having a high birth weight, or being born to a woman of advanced maternal age.

  10. Preventing maternal and early childhood obesity: the fetal flaw in Australian perinatal care.

    PubMed

    Miller, Margaret; Hearn, Lydia; van der Pligt, Paige; Wilcox, Jane; Campbell, Karen J

    2014-01-01

    Almost half of Australian women of child-bearing age are overweight or obese, with a rate of 30-50% reported in early pregnancy. Maternal adiposity is a costly challenge for Australian obstetric care, with associated serious maternal and neonatal complications. Excess gestational weight gain is an important predictor of offspring adiposity into adulthood and higher maternal weight later in life. Current public health and perinatal care approaches in Australia do not adequately address excess perinatal maternal weight or gestational weight gain. This paper argues that the failure of primary health-care providers to offer systematic advice and support regarding women's weight and related lifestyle behaviours in child-bearing years is an outstanding 'missed opportunity' for prevention of inter-generational overweight and obesity. Barriers to action could be addressed through greater attention to: clinical guidelines for maternal weight management for the perinatal period, training and support of maternal health-care providers to develop skills and confidence in raising weight issues with women, a variety of weight management programs provided by state maternal health services, and clear referral pathways to them. Attention is also required to service systems that clearly define roles in maternal weight management and ensure consistency and continuity of support across the perinatal period. PMID:24176286

  11. Implementing a facility-based maternal and perinatal health care surveillance system in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Dott, Mary M; Orakail, Nasreen; Ebadi, Hameeda; Hernandez, Filiberto; MacFarlane, Kitty; Riley, Patricia L; Prepas, Roberta; McCarthy, Brian J

    2005-01-01

    Afghanistan has one of the highest maternal and perinatal mortality rates in the world. Lack of a health information system presented obstacles to efforts to improve the quality of care and reduce mortality. To rapidly overcome this deficit in a large women's hospital, staff implemented a facility-based maternal and perinatal surveillance system known as "BABIES," which is specially designed for intervention and evaluation in low-resource settings. During a 12-month period, 15,509 deliveries resulted in 28 maternal deaths and a perinatal mortality rate of 56 per 1000 births. When stratified by birth weight and perinatal period of death, fetuses weighing at least 2500 g who died during the antepartum period contributed the most cases of perinatal death. This finding suggests that the greatest reduction in perinatal mortality would be realized by increasing access to high-quality antepartum care. Among fetuses weighing at least 2500 g, 93 deaths occurred during the intrapartum period. These deaths will continue to be monitored to ensure that the chosen interventions are improving intrapartum care for mothers and newborns. Because of its simplicity, flexibility, and ability to identify interventions, BABIES is a valuable tool that enables clinicians and program managers to prioritize resources. PMID:15973266

  12. Severe Preeclampsia versus HELLP Syndrome: Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes at <34 and ?34 Weeks’ Gestation

    PubMed Central

    K?nay, Tu?ba; Küçük, Canan; Kay?kç?o?lu, Fulya; Karakaya, Jale

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia and Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelet (HELLP) syndrome are important disorders affecting the health of both the mother and fetus. Prediction of the maternal and perinatal outcomes at early and late gestational age is important for the management of both disorders. Aims: The purpose of the study was to investigate adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in severe preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome cases according to gestational age. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: One hundred and ninety-seven pregnancies with severe preeclampsia and 56 pregnancies with HELLP syndrome were included the study. Clinical characteristics and adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes were noted from medical records. Participants were divided into two groups at <34 and ?34 weeks’ gestation: the severe preeclampsia group and the HELLP syndrome group. The differences between the outcomes in the groups were investigated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t test, Fisher Exact test and Yates’ Chi-square test. Results: Eclampsia was more common in HELLP syndrome cases at <34 weeks’ gestation (p 0.028). However, eclampsia rates were statistically similar between groups at ?34 weeks’ gestation. The requirement for blood products transfusion was higher in the HELLP group at all gestational weeks. No statistical difference was found in perinatal outcomes between severe preeclampsia and HELLP groups at less than and more than 34 weeks’ gestation. Conclusion: Eclampsia risk increases in HELLP syndrome, especially at gestations less than 34 weeks. Perinatal morbidity at less than 34 weeks’ gestation and mortality were similar in severe preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome cases at the same gestational age.

  13. Adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in adolescent pregnancies: The Global Network’s Maternal Newborn Health Registry study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Adolescent girls between 15 and 19 years give birth to around 16 million babies each year, around 11% of births worldwide. We sought to determine whether adolescent mothers are at higher risk of maternal and perinatal adverse outcomes compared with mothers aged 20–24 years in a prospective, population-based observational study of newborn outcomes in low resource settings. Methods We undertook a prospective, population-based multi-country research study of all pregnant women in defined geographic areas across 7 sites in six low-middle income countries (Kenya, Zambia, India, Pakistan, Guatemala and Argentina). The study population for this analysis was restricted to women aged 24 years or less, who gave birth to infants of at least 20 weeks’ gestation and 500g or more. We compared adverse pregnancy maternal and perinatal outcomes among pregnant adolescents 15-19 years, <15 years, and adults 20-24 years. Results A total of 269,273 women were enrolled from January 2010 to December 2013. Of all pregnancies 11.9% (32,097/269,273) were in adolescents 15-19 years, while 0.14% (370/269,273) occurred among girls <15 years. Pregnancy among adolescents 15-19 years ranged from 2% in Pakistan to 26% in Argentina, and adolescent pregnancies <15 year were only observed in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Compared to adults, adolescents did not show increased risk of maternal adverse outcomes. Risks of preterm birth and LBW were significantly higher among both early and older adolescents, with the highest risks observed in the <15 years group. Neonatal and perinatal mortality followed a similar trend in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America, with the highest risk in early adolescents, although the differences in this age group were not significant. However, in South Asia the risks of neonatal and perinatal death were not different among adolescents 15-19 years compared to adults. Conclusions This study suggests that pregnancy among adolescents is not associated with worse maternal outcomes, but is associated with worse perinatal outcomes, particularly in younger adolescents. However, this may not be the case in regions like South Asia where there are decreasing rates of adolescent pregnancies, concentrated among older adolescents. The increased risks observed among adolescents seems more likely to be associated with biological immaturity, than with socio-economic factors, inadequate antenatal or delivery care. Trial registration number NCT01073475 PMID:26063350

  14. Maternal and perinatal health research priorities beyond 2015: an international survey and prioritization exercise

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality has declined by nearly half since 1990, but over a quarter million women still die every year of causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Maternal-health related targets are falling short of the 2015 Millennium Development Goals and a post-2015 Development Agenda is emerging. In connection with this, setting global research priorities for the next decade is now required. Methods We adapted the methods of the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative (CHNRI) to identify and set global research priorities for maternal and perinatal health for the period 2015 to 2025. Priority research questions were received from various international stakeholders constituting a large reference group, and consolidated into a final list of research questions by a technical working group. Questions on this list were then scored by the reference working group according to five independent and equally weighted criteria. Normalized research priority scores (NRPS) were calculated, and research priority questions were ranked accordingly. Results A list of 190 priority research questions for improving maternal and perinatal health was scored by 140 stakeholders. Most priority research questions (89%) were concerned with the evaluation of implementation and delivery of existing interventions, with research subthemes frequently concerned with training and/or awareness interventions (11%), and access to interventions and/or services (14%). Twenty-one questions (11%) involved the discovery of new interventions or technologies. Conclusions Key research priorities in maternal and perinatal health were identified. The resulting ranked list of research questions provides a valuable resource for health research investors, researchers and other stakeholders. We are hopeful that this exercise will inform the post-2015 Development Agenda and assist donors, research-policy decision makers and researchers to invest in research that will ultimately make the most significant difference in the lives of mothers and babies. PMID:25100034

  15. Maternal perinatal undernutrition modifies lactose and serotranferrin in milk: relevance to the programming of metabolic diseases?

    PubMed

    Wattez, J S; Delmont, A; Bouvet, M; Beseme, O; Goers, S; Delahaye, F; Laborie, C; Lesage, J; Foligné, B; Breton, C; Metges, C C; Vieau, D; Pinet, F

    2015-03-01

    A close link between intrauterine growth restriction and development of chronic adult diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension has been established both in humans and animals. Modification of growth velocity during the early postnatal period (i.e., lactation) may also sensitize to the development of metabolic syndrome in adulthood. This suggests that milk composition may have long-lasting programming/deprogramming metabolic effects in the offspring. We therefore assess the effects of maternal perinatal denutrition on breast milk composition in a food-restricted 50% (FR50) rat model. Monosaccharides and fatty acids were characterized by gas chromatography, and proteins were profiled by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis in milk samples from FR50 and control rat dams. Milk analysis of FR50 rats demonstrated that maternal undernutrition decreases lactose concentration and modulates lipid profile at postnatal day 10 by increasing the unsaturated fatty acids/saturated fatty acids and diminishes serotransferrin levels at postnatal day 21. Our data indicate that maternal perinatal undernutrition modifies milk composition both quantitatively and qualitatively. These modifications by maternal nutrition open new perspectives to identify molecules that could be used in artificial milk to protect from the subsequent development of metabolic diseases. PMID:25550282

  16. A multidisciplinary program of preparation for childbirth and motherhood: maternal anxiety and perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To study maternal anxiety and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women submitted to a Multidisciplinary Program for Childbirth and Motherhood Preparation (MPCM). Methods This is a not randomized controlled trial on 67 nulliparous pregnant women divided into two groups according to participation (MPCM Group; n = 38) or not (Control Group; n = 29) in MPCM. The program consisted of 10 meetings (between the 18th and the 38th gestational week) during which educational, physiotherapeutic and interaction activities were developed. Anxiety was quantified at the beginning and at the end of the gestational period by the Trace-State Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Results Initial maternal anxiety was equivalent between the groups. At the end of the gestational period, it was observed that anxiety levels increased in the Control Group and were maintained in the MPCM Group. A higher occurrence of vaginal deliveries (83.8%) and hospital discharge of three-day-older newborns (81.6%) as a result of MPCM was also significant. Levels of state-anxiety at the end of pregnancy showed a negative correlation with vaginal delivery, gestational age, birth weight and Apgar index at the first minute and positive correlation with the hospital period remaining of the newborns. Conclusion In the study conditions, MPCM was associated with lower levels of maternal anxiety, a larger number of vaginal deliveries and shorter hospitalization time of newborns. It was not related to adverse perinatal outcomes. PMID:21034460

  17. Outbreak of Hepatitis E in Urban Bangladesh Resulting in Maternal and Perinatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Emily S.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Paul, Repon C.; Sazzad, Hossain M. S.; Islam, M. Saiful; Parveen, Shahana; Faruque, Labib I.; Husain, Mushtuq; Ara, Khorshed; Jahan, Yasmin; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Background.?Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes outbreaks of jaundice associated with maternal mortality. Four deaths among pregnant women with jaundice occurred in an urban community near Dhaka, Bangladesh, in late 2008 and were reported to authorities in January 2009. We investigated the etiology and risk factors for jaundice and death. Methods.?Field workers identified suspected cases, defined as acute onset of yellow eyes or skin, through house-to-house visits. A subset of persons with suspected HEV was tested for immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to HEV to confirm infection. We used logistic regression analysis to identify risk factors for HEV disease and for death. We estimated the increased risk of perinatal mortality associated with jaundice during pregnancy. Results.?We identified 4751 suspected HEV cases during August 2008–January 2009, including 17 deaths. IgM antibodies to HEV were identified in 56 of 73 (77%) case-patients tested who were neighbors of the case-patients who died. HEV disease was significantly associated with drinking municipally supplied water. Death among persons with HEV disease was significantly associated with being female and taking paracetamol (acetaminophen). Among women who were pregnant, miscarriage and perinatal mortality was 2.7 times higher (95% confidence interval, 1.2–6.1) in pregnancies complicated by jaundice. Conclusions.?This outbreak of HEV was likely caused by sewage contamination of the municipal water system. Longer-term efforts to improve access to safe water and license HEV vaccines are needed. However, securing resources and support for intervention will rely on convincing data about the endemic burden of HEV disease, particularly its role in maternal and perinatal mortality. PMID:24855146

  18. Perinatal stress and food allergy: a preliminary study on maternal reports.

    PubMed

    Polloni, L; Ferruzza, E; Ronconi, L; Lazzarotto, F; Toniolo, A; Bonaguro, R; Muraro, A

    2015-01-01

    Maternal stress in fetal and early life has been associated with the development of respiratory allergies, but no studies exist about food allergy. Stressful events and the quality of caregiving provided, as they affect the emotional and physiologic regulation of the infant, could alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and immune system, facilitating an increased allergic response. This study aimed to investigate the influence of perinatal stress, as perceived by mothers, on developing food allergy in childhood. A survey on pregnancy and the first three months after giving birth was submitted to 59 Italian mothers of at least one child suffering from severe food allergy and one completely healthy child, for a total of 118 children examined. The presence of stressful events and the quality of perinatal period for each child were assessed retrospectively. The food allergic children's data were compared to siblings' data through inferential statistics. The results showed a significantly higher number of stressful events occurred during patients' perinatal period, compared to siblings, in particular bereavements in pregnancy and parenting difficulties in postpartum. Mothers reported harder pregnancies and more stressful, harder, and, in general, worse postpartum when referring to their food-allergic children, in comparison with their siblings (p < .05). Psychological aspects are demonstrated to be involved in the development of allergic diseases. This study constitutes the first step to examine the role of early stress and perinatal psychosocial factors in the pathogenesis of food allergy; further studies are necessary to understand individual psychological impact and its relations with genetic and biological factors. PMID:25531062

  19. Applying a science-based method to improve perinatal care: the institute for healthcare improvement perinatal improvement community.

    PubMed

    Bisognano, Maureen; Cherouny, Peter H; Gullo, Sue

    2014-10-01

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement applies a systems-focused, science-based approach to improving perinatal care. This approach is based on the pioneering work in quality improvement and statistical process control performed by Walter Shewhart and W. Edwards Deming, and it uses the Model for Improvement, a simple and effective tool for accelerating improvement. In 2008, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement articulated a Triple Aim for improvement-better care, better health for populations, and lower per capita costs. The Triple Aim has become a guiding framework throughout health care and also guides much of the work of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement's collaborative effort to improve perinatal care-the Perinatal Improvement Community-is an ideal example of work that pursues all three dimensions of the Triple Aim. The improvement method used in the community creates the foundation for the kind of cultural transformation that Perinatal Improvement Community leaders and participants have learned is necessary to make significant and lasting change. Using a systems-focused and science-based approach to improvement equips obstetricians and gynecologists with the knowledge, skills, and tools they need to improve the systems of care they work in so they can deliver the best evidence-based care to all of their patients, all of the time. PMID:25198257

  20. Catalase prevents maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shiao-Ying; Chen, Yun-Wen; Zhao, Xin-Ping; Chenier, Isabelle; Tran, Stella; Sauvé, Alexandre; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2012-10-01

    We investigated whether overexpression of catalase (CAT) in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) could prevent the programming of hypertension and kidney disease in the offspring of dams with maternal diabetes. Male offspring of nondiabetic and diabetic dams from two transgenic (Tg) lines (Hoxb7-green fluorescent protein [GFP]-Tg [controls] and Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg, which overexpress CAT in RPTCs) were studied from the prenatal period into adulthood. Nephrogenesis, systolic blood pressure, renal hyperfiltration, kidney injury, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1), nuclear factor erythroid 2p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was tested in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Renal dysmorphogenesis was observed in offspring of Hoxb7-GFP-Tg dams with severe maternal diabetes; the affected male offspring displayed higher renal ROS generation and developed hypertension and renal hyperfiltration as well as renal injury with heightened TGF-?1 expression in adulthood. These changes were ameliorated in male offspring of diabetic Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg dams via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system. CAT promoted Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 gene expression, seen in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In conclusion, CAT overexpression in the RPTCs ameliorated maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming, mediated, at least in part, by triggering the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system. PMID:22733796

  1. Maternal Cypermethrin Exposure during the Perinatal Period Impairs Testicular Development in C57BL Male Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chaobin; Li, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC) are a possible cause of male reproductive organ malfunction and malformation. Cypermethrin (CYP) is a widely used synthetic pyrethroid and a potential EDC. This study aimed to examine the effects of perinatal exposure to low-dose CYP on the development and function of the offspring testes. Pregnant mice were intragastrically administered 0.12 to 12 mg/kg/day CYP from embryonic day 0.5 (E0.5) to weaning (PD21.5, postnatal day 21.5). Maternal exposure to 0.12, 1.2, and 12 mg/kg/day CYP affected the body and organ weight of the offspring. Exposure of CYP led to a dose-dependent decrease in the male-to-female sex ratio. A histopathological analysis revealed a thinner seminiferous epithelium layer at PD21.5, interstitial hyperplasia at PD45.5, and germ cell vacuolization at PD90.5 in the 12 mg/kg/day CYP group. The TUNEL assay results revealed increased germ cell apoptosis in the 12 mg/kg/day CYP group. The serum testosterone (T) level decreased, whereas the estradiol level increased with age in the 1.2 and 12 mg/kg/day CYP groups. The RT-PCR analysis demonstrated decreased expression of T production-related, mitosis-related, and meiosis-related genes in the 1.2 and 12 mg/kg/day CYP groups. The in vitro experimental results demonstrated reduced expression of steroidogenesis genes and decreased T levels. It is concluded that perinatal exposure to low-dose CYP affects testes development and function in adults. PMID:24810582

  2. Effects of Deworming during Pregnancy on Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes in Entebbe, Uganda: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ndibazza, J.; Muhangi, L.; Akishule, D.; Kiggundu, M.; Ameke, C.; Oweka, J.; Kizindo, R.; Duong, T.; Kleinschmidt, I.; Muwanga, M.; Elliott, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Helminth infections during pregnancy may be associated with adverse outcomes, including maternal anemia, low birth weight, and perinatal mortality. Deworming during pregnancy has therefore been strongly advocated, but its benefits have not been rigorously evaluated. Methods In Entebbe, Uganda, 2507 pregnant women were recruited to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating albendazole and praziquantel in a 2 × 2 factorial design [ISRCTN32849447]. Hematinics and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for presumptive treatment of malaria were provided routinely. Maternal and perinatal outcomes were recorded. Analyses were by intention to treat. Results At enrollment, 68% of women had helminths, 45% had hookworm, 18% had Schistosoma mansoni infection; 40% were anemic (hemoglobin level, <11.2 g/dL). At delivery, 35% were anaemic; there was no overall effect of albendazole (odds ratio [OR], 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79–1.15) or praziquantel (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.83–1.21) on maternal anemia, but there was a suggestion of benefit of albendazole among women with moderate to heavy hookworm (OR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.21–0.98; P = .15 for interaction). There was no effect of either anthelminthic treatment on mean birth weight (difference in mean associated with albendazole: ?0.00 kg; 95% CI, ?0.05 to 0.04 kg; difference in mean associated with praziquantel: ?0.01 kg; 95% CI, ?0.05 to 0.04 kg) or on proportion of low birth weight. Anthelminthic use during pregnancy showed no effect on perinatal mortality or congenital anomalies. Conclusions In our study area, where helminth prevalence was high but infection intensity was low, there was no overall effect of anthelminthic use during pregnancy on maternal anemia, birth weight, perinatal mortality, or congenital anomalies. The possible benefit of albendazole against anemia in pregnant women with heavy hookworm infection warrants further investigation. PMID:20067426

  3. Effective Linkages of Continuum of Care for Improving Neonatal, Perinatal, and Maternal Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Enuameh, Yeetey; Yasuoka, Junko; Nanishi, Keiko; Shibanuma, Akira; Gyapong, Margaret; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Oduro, Abraham Rexford; Asare, Gloria Quansah; Hodgson, Abraham; Jimba, Masamine

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuum of care has the potential to improve maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) by ensuring care for mothers and children. Continuum of care in MNCH is widely accepted as comprising sequential time (from pre-pregnancy to motherhood and childhood) and space dimensions (from community-family care to clinical care). However, it is unclear which linkages of care could have a greater effect on MNCH outcomes. The objective of the present study is to assess the effectiveness of different continuum of care linkages for reducing neonatal, perinatal, and maternal mortality in low- and middle-income countries. Methods We searched for randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials that addressed two or more linkages of continuum of care and attempted to increase mothers’ uptake of antenatal care, skilled birth attendance, and postnatal care. The outcome variables were neonatal, perinatal, and maternal mortality. Results Out of the 7,142 retrieved articles, we selected 19 as eligible for the final analysis. Of these studies, 13 used packages of intervention that linked antenatal care, skilled birth attendance, and postnatal care. One study each used packages that linked antenatal care and skilled birth attendance or skilled birth attendance and postnatal care. Four studies used an intervention package that linked antenatal care and postnatal care. Among the packages that linked antenatal care, skilled birth attendance, and postnatal care, a significant reduction was observed in combined neonatal, perinatal, and maternal mortality risks (RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.77 to 0.89, I2 79%). Furthermore, this linkage reduced combined neonatal, perinatal, and maternal mortality when integrating the continuum of care space dimension (RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.77 to 0.93, I2 81%). Conclusions Our review suggests that continuous uptake of antenatal care, skilled birth attendance, and postnatal care is necessary to improve MNCH outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. The review was conclusive for the reduction of neonatal and perinatal deaths. Although maternal deaths were not significantly reduced, composite measures of all mortality were. Thus, the evidence is sufficient to scale up this intervention package for the improvement of MNCH outcomes. PMID:26422685

  4. Reasons for Persistently High Maternal and Perinatal Mortalities in Ethiopia: Part II-Socio-Economic and Cultural Factors

    PubMed Central

    Berhan, Yifru; Berhan, Asres

    2014-01-01

    Background The major causes of maternal and perinatal deaths are mostly pregnancy related. However, there are several predisposing factors for the increased risk of pregnancy related complications and deaths in developing countries. The objective of this review was to grossly estimate the effect of selected socioeconomic and cultural factors on maternal mortality, stillbirths and neonatal mortality in Ethiopia. Methods A comprehensive literature review was conducted focusing on the effect of total fertility rate (TFR), modern contraceptive use, harmful traditional practice, adult literacy rate and level of income on maternal and perinatal mortalities. For the majority of the data, regression analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient were used as a proxy indicator for the association of variables with maternal, fetal and neonatal mortality. Results Although there were variations in the methods for estimation, the TFR of women in Ethiopia declined from 5.9 to 4.8 in the last fifteen years, which was in the middle as compared with that of other African countries. The preference of injectable contraceptive method has increased by 7-fold, but the unmet contraceptive need was among the highest in Africa. About 50% reduction in female genital cutting (FGC) was reported although some women's attitude was positive towards the practice of FGC. The regression analysis demonstrated increased risk of stillbirths, neonatal and maternal mortality with increased TFR. The increased adult literacy rate was associated with increased antenatal care and skilled person attended delivery. Low adult literacy was also found to have a negative association with stillbirths and neonatal and maternal mortality. A similar trend was also observed with income. Conclusion Maternal mortality ratio, stillbirth rate and neonatal mortality rate had inverse relations with income and adult education. In Ethiopia, the high total fertility rate, low utilization of contraceptive methods, low adult literacy rate, low income and prevalent harmful traditional practices have probably contributed to the high maternal mortality ratio, stillbirth and neonatal mortality rates. PMID:25489187

  5. Maternal and perinatal aspects of birth defects: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Nhoncanse, Geiza César; Germano, Carla Maria R.; de Avó, Lucimar Retto da S.; Melo, Débora Gusmão

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of congenital defects and to investigate their maternal and perinatal associated aspects by reviewing Birth Certificates. Methods: Among all born alive infants from January 2003 to December 2007 in Maternidade da Santa Casa de Misericórdia of São Carlos, Southeast Brazil (12,199 infants), cases were identified as the newborns whose Birth Certificates registered any congenital defect. The same sex neonate born immediately after the case was chosen as a control. In total, 13 variables were analyzed: six were maternal related, three represented labor and delivery conditions and four were linked to fetal status. The chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare the variables, being significant p<0.05. Results: The prevalence of congenital defects was 0.38% and the association of two or more defects represented 32% of all cases. The number of mothers whose education level was equal or less than eight years was significantly higher among the group with birth defects (p=0.047). A higher frequency of prematurity (p<0.001) and cesarean delivery (p=0.004) was observed among children with birth defects. This group also showed lower birth weight and Apgar scores in the 1st and the 5th minute (p<0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of congenital defect of 0.38% is possibly due to underreporting. The defects notified in the Birth Certificates were only the most visible ones, regardless of their severity. There is a need of adequate epidemiological monitoring of birth defects in order to create and expand prevention and treatment programs. PMID:24676186

  6. Prenatal management and perinatal outcome in giant placental chorioangioma complicated with hydrops fetalis, fetal anemia and maternal mirror syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Giant placental chorioangiomas have been associated with a number of severe fetal complications and high perinatal mortality. Case presentation We report a case of giant chorioangioma with fetal hydrops, additionally complicated by severe anemia, mild cardiomegaly with hyperdinamic heart circulation and maternal mirror syndrome. Intrauterine blood transfusion and amniodrainage was performed at 29?weeks. Worsening of the fetal and maternal condition prompted us to proceed with delivery at 29?+?5?weeks. The newborn died 3 hours later due to pulmonary hypoplasia and hemodynamic failure. Maternal course was favourable, mirror syndrome resolved in the second day and the patient was discharged four days following delivery. Conclusions In the case described here, fetal condition got worse despite of the anemia correction and amniodrainage. Our outcome raises the issue whether additional intrauterine clinical intervention, as intersticial laser, should have been performed to stop further deterioration of the fetal condition when progressive severe hydrops develops. PMID:22840187

  7. Body Mass Index Development from Birth to Early Adolescence; Effect of Perinatal Characteristics and Maternal Migration Background in a Swedish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Besharat Pour, Mohsen; Bergström, Anna; Bottai, Matteo; Magnusson, Jessica; Kull, Inger; Wickman, Magnus; Moradi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Background Well documented diversity in risk of developing overweight and obesity between children of immigrant and of native mothers, might be explained by different body mass index (BMI) development trajectories in relation to maternal and perinatal characteristics of offspring. Objectives To assess BMI development trajectories among children born to immigrant and to Swedish mothers from birth to adolescence in relation to perinatal characteristics. Methods A cohort of 2517 children born in Stockholm during 1994 to 1996 was followed with repeated measurement of height and weight at eleven time points until age 12 years. We estimated changes over time for BMI in relation to maternal and perinatal characteristics of offspring using mixed linear model analysis for repeated measure data. Results We observed a significant BMI change over time in children and time interaction with maternal migration status (P<0.0001). Estimated BMI over time adjusted for maternal and perinatal characteristics of offspring, showed slower BMI growth before age of 5, followed by an earlier plateau and steeper BMI growth after 5 years among children of immigrant mothers compared with children of Swedish mothers. These differences in BMI growth were more prominent among children with mothers from outside Europe. Conclusion Beside reinforcing early childhood as a crucial period in development of overweight, the observed slower BMI development at early childhood among children of immigrants followed by a steeper increase in BMI compared with children of Swedish mothers is important for further studies and for planning of preventive public health programs. PMID:25303283

  8. Caesarean section without medical indications is associated with an increased risk of adverse short-term maternal outcomes: the 2004-2008 WHO Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is worldwide debate about the appropriateness of caesarean sections performed without medical indications. In this analysis, we aim to further investigate the relationship between caesarean section without medical indication and severe maternal outcomes. Methods This is a multicountry, facility-based survey that used a stratified multistage cluster sampling design to obtain a sample of countries and health institutions worldwide. A total of 24 countries and 373 health facilities participated in this study. Data collection took place during 2004 and 2005 in Africa and the Americas and during 2007 and 2008 in Asia. All women giving birth at the facility during the study period were included and had their medical records reviewed before discharge from the hospital. Univariate and multilevel analysis were performed to study the association between each group's mode of delivery and the severe maternal and perinatal outcome. Results A total of 286,565 deliveries were analysed. The overall caesarean section rate was 25.7% and a total of 1.0 percent of all deliveries were caesarean sections without medical indications, either due to maternal request or in the absence of other recorded indications. Compared to spontaneous vaginal delivery, all other modes of delivery presented an association with the increased risk of death, admission to ICU, blood transfusion and hysterectomy, including antepartum caesarean section without medical indications (Adjusted Odds Ratio (Adj OR), 5.93, 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI), 3.88 to 9.05) and intrapartum caesarean section without medical indications (Adj OR, 14.29, 95% CI, 10.91 to 18.72). In addition, this association is stronger in Africa, compared to Asia and Latin America. Conclusions Caesarean sections were associated with an intrinsic risk of increased severe maternal outcomes. We conclude that caesarean sections should be performed when a clear benefit is anticipated, a benefit that might compensate for the higher costs and additional risks associated with this operation. PMID:21067593

  9. Perinatal maternal feeding with an energy dense diet and/or micronutrient mixture drives offspring fat distribution depending on the sex and growth stage.

    PubMed

    Cordero, P; Gonzalez-Muniesa, P; Milagro, F I; Campion, J; Martinez, J A

    2015-10-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation influences offspring development and health. Novel studies have described the effects on next generation obesity-related features depending on maternal macro- and micro-nutrient perinatal feeding. We hypothesized that the maternal obesogenic diet during pregnancy and lactation programs an obese phenotype, while maternal micronutrient supplementation at these stages could partially prevent these features. Thus, the aim was to assess the influence of a perinatal maternal feeding with an obesogenic diet enriched in fat and sucrose and a micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy and lactation on offspring growth and obese phenotypical features during life course. Female Wistar rats were assigned to four dietary groups during pregnancy and lactation: control, control supplemented with micronutrients (choline, betaine, folic acid and vitamin B12 ), high-fat sucrose (HFS) and HFS supplemented. At weaning, the offspring were transferred to a chow diet, and weight and fat mass were measured at weeks 3, 12 and 20. At birth, both male and female offspring from mothers fed the obesogenic diet showed lower body weight (-5 and -6%, respectively), while only female offspring weight decreased by maternal micronutrient supplementation (-5%). During lactation, maternal HFS diet was associated with increased body weight, while micronutrient supplementation protected against body weight gain. Whole body fat mass content increased at weeks 3, 12 and 20 (from 16 to 65%) due to maternal HFS diet. Maternal micronutrient supplementation decreased offspring fat mass content at week 3 (-8%). Male offspring showed higher adiposity than females at weeks 12 and 20. In conclusion, maternal HFS feeding during pregnancy and lactation was associated with a low offspring weight at birth and obese phenotypical features during adult life in a sex- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, maternal methyl donor supplementation protected against body weight gain in male offspring during lactation and in female offspring also during juvenile period. PMID:25521806

  10. Daily Life or Diagnosis? Dual Perspectives on Perinatal Depression within Maternal and Child Health Home Visiting

    PubMed Central

    Price, Sarah Kye; Cohen-Filipic, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a qualitative inquiry–informing program development in a maternal and child home visiting program. Low-income women's perceptions of the meaning and experiences of depression were ascertained through focus groups and interviews. Simultaneously, the study examines staff member perceptions and roles related to depression. Specific findings from clients and staff reveal culturally situated beliefs about depression and stressful life events; comparing and contrasting these beliefs offers a novel perspective on identification and intervention for maternal depression. This study offers a foundation for a translational research agenda that will be used for program and policy development to enhance mental health services situated within maternal and child health home visiting programs. PMID:23944165

  11. Maternal HIV-1 envelope-specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission.

    PubMed

    Permar, Sallie R; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L; Overman, R Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Montefiori, David C; Denny, Thomas N; Moody, M Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-07-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1-transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score-matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1-infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3-specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT. PMID:26053661

  12. Maternal HIV-1 envelope–specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission

    PubMed Central

    Permar, Sallie R.; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E.; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L.; Overman, R. Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R.; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S. Munir; Montefiori, David C.; Denny, Thomas N.; Moody, M. Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1–transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score–matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1–infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3–specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT. PMID:26053661

  13. Effects of Perinatal HIV Infection and Early Institutional Rearing on Physical and Cognitive Development of Children in Ukraine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrova-Krol, Natasha A.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Juffer, Femmie

    2010-01-01

    To study the effects of perinatal HIV-1 infection and early institutional rearing on the physical and cognitive development of children, 64 Ukrainian uninfected and HIV-infected institutionalized and family-reared children were examined (mean age = 50.9 months). Both HIV infection and institutional care were related to delays in physical and…

  14. SCHIZOPHRENIA AND BIRTHPLACE OF PATERNAL AND MATERNAL GRANDFATHER IN THE JERUSALEM PERINATAL COHORT PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Harlap, S; Perrin, M C; Deutsch, L; Kleinhaus, K; Fennig, S; Nahon, D; Teitelbaum, A; Friedlander, Y; Malaspina, D

    2009-01-01

    Some forms of epigenetic abnormalities transmitted to offspring are manifest in differences in disease incidence that depend on parent-of-origin. To explore whether such phenomena might operate in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, we estimated the relative incidence of these conditions in relation to parent-of-origin by considering the two grandfathers' countries of birth. In a prospective cohort of 88,829 offspring, born in Jerusalem in 1964–76 we identified 637 cases through Israel's psychiatric registry. Relative risks (RR) were estimated for paternal and maternal grandfathers' countries of birth using proportional hazards methods, controlling for parents' ages, low social class and duration of marriage. After adjusting for multiple observations, we found no significant differences between descendants of maternal or paternal grandfathers born in Iraq, Iran, Turkey, Syria, Yemen, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya/Egypt, Poland, USSR, Czechoslovakia, Germany or the USA. Those with paternal grandfathers from Romania (RR=1.9, 95% CI=1.3–2.8) or Hungary (1.6, 1.0–2.6) showed an increased incidence; however, those with maternal grandfathers from these countries experienced reduced incidence (RR=0.5, 0.3–0.8 and 0.4, 0.2–0.8). In post-hoc analyses we found that results were similar whether the comparison groups were restricted to descendants of other Europeans or included those from Western Asia and North Africa; and effects of paternal grandfathers from Romania/Hungary were more pronounced in females, while effects of maternal grandfathers from these countries were similar in males and females. These post-hoc “hypothesis-generating” findings lead one to question whether some families with ancestors in Romania or Hungary might carry a variant or mutation at a parentally imprinted locus that is altering susceptibility to schizophrenia. Such a locus, if it exists, might involve the X chromosome. PMID:19361958

  15. Maternal immunization efforts of the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Fran A; Koso-Thomas, Marion; Isaacs, Maggie Brewinski; Piper, Jeanna; Read, Jennifer; Nesin, Mirjana

    2015-11-25

    Over the last 35 years, efforts at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to protect mothers and their infants against infectious diseases have involved a bench-to-bedside approach. Basic and translational research that provided a foundation for clinical trials of vaccines in pregnancy include natural history and vaccine antigen identification studies. Development of laboratory assays and reagents have been funded by NIAID; these are critical for the advancement of vaccine candidates through the preclinical and clinical steps along the maternal immunization research pathway to support vaccine efficacy. Animal models of maternal immunization have been developed to evaluate efficacy of vaccine candidates. Clinical studies required development of maternal immunization protocols to address specific pregnancy related issues, for enrollment and safety assessment of mothers and their infants. NIH has organized and participated in meetings, workshops and other collaborative efforts with partners have advanced maternal immunization efforts. Partners have included many institutes and offices at NIH as well as other Department of Health and Human Services agencies and offices (Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Vaccine Program Office), World Health Organization, academic investigators, Biotech and pharmaceutical companies, and nonprofit organizations such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. These research and development partnership are essential for advancing maternal immunization. Continued efforts are needed to promote maternal immunization to protect pregnant women and their infants against vaccine-preventable infectious disease, especially in resource-limited settings where the burden of infections is high. PMID:26458798

  16. Perinatal outcomes of maternal overweight and obesity in term infants: a population-based cohort study in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Vinturache, Angela Elena; McDonald, Sheila; Slater, Donna; Tough, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of increased pre-pregnancy maternal body mass index (BMI) on perinatal outcomes in term, singleton pregnancies who received prenatal care in community-based practices. The sample of 1996 infants included in the study was drawn from the All Our Babies Study, a prospective pregnancy cohort from Calgary. Multivariable logistic regression explored the relationship between the main outcomes, infant birth weight, Apgar score, admission to neonatal intensive care (NICU) and newborn duration of hospitalization, and BMI prior to pregnancy. Approximately 10% of the infants were macrosoms, 1.5% had a low Apgar score (<7 at 5?min), 6% were admitted to intensive care and 96% were discharged within 48?h after delivery. Although the infants of overweight and obese women were more likely to have increased birth weight as compared to infants of normal weight women, there were no differences in Apgar score, admission to NICU, or length of postnatal hospital stay among groups. This study suggests that in otherwise healthy term, singleton pregnancies, obesity does not seem to increase the risk of severe fetal impairment, neonatal admission to intensive care or duration of postnatal hospitalization. PMID:25791339

  17. Parental care and control during childhood: associations with maternal perinatal mood disturbance and parenting stress.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kerry-Ann; Bautovich, Alison; McMahon, Catherine; Reilly, Nicole; Leader, Leo; Austin, Marie-Paule

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the associations between perceived parental care and control in childhood and maternal anxiety, depression and parenting stress during the transition to parenthood. Eighty-eight women completed the Parental Bonding Instrument, self-report measures of anxiety and depression and a structured diagnostic interview (Mini-plus International Neuropsychiatric Interview) during the third trimester of pregnancy. The MINI-Plus and anxiety and depression measures were re-administered at 7 months postpartum. The Parenting Stress Index was also administered at this time. Significant associations were found between maternal 'affectionless control' and prenatal and postnatal symptom measures of anxiety and depression, p values <0.005. Compared to women who reported optimal parenting, women who recalled maternal 'affectionless control' were also six times more likely to be diagnosed with an anxiety disorder during pregnancy (OR = 6.1, 95% CI = 2.17-30.11) and seven times more likely to be diagnosed with postnatal major depression (OR = 6.8, 95% CI = 1.80-25.37). Paternal 'affectionless control' was associated with significantly higher scores on symptom measures of prenatal and postnatal anxiety, p values <0.005. This study suggests that assessing a woman's own parenting history is important in identifying and managing the risk of prenatal and postnatal affective disorders and parenting stress. PMID:22695807

  18. Intrauterine Growth Restricted Rats Exercised before and during Pregnancy: Maternal and Perinatal Repercussions

    PubMed Central

    Corvino, S. B.; Volpato, G. T.; Rudge, M. V. C.; Damasceno, D. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of swimming before and during pregnancy on rats born with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and their offspring. For this, nondiabetic and streptozotocin-induced severely diabetic (SD) pregnant rats were mated and generated offspring with appropriate (control, C) and small (IUGR) for pregnancy age, respectively. Following that, C and IUGR groups were further distributed into nonexercised control (C), exercised control (Cex), nonexercised IUGR (IUGR), and exercised IUGR (IUGRex). IUGR rats presented lower mating rate than control rats. Regardless of physical exercise IUGR rats presented decreased body weight from birth to lactation. At 90 days of life, IUGR rats presented glucose intolerance. Maternal organ weights were increased and relative adiposity of IUGRex rats was lower than Cex. IUGR and IUGRex offspring presented reduced body weight than C and Cex, respectively. IUGRex dams presented an increased rate of appropriate for pregnancy age newborns. IUGEex male and female offspring relative brain weight was increased compared with Cex. Therefore, swimming before and during pregnancy prevented glucose intolerance, reduced general adiposity, and increased maternal and offspring organ weight in rats, showing the benefit of physical exercise for IUGR rats. PMID:26345406

  19. Prenatal enrichment and recovery from perinatal cortical damage: effects of maternal complex housing

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Robbin L.; Gonzalez, Claudia L. R.; Kolb, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Birth is a particularly vulnerable time for acquiring brain injury. Unfortunately, very few treatments are available for those affected. Here we explore the effectiveness of prenatal intervention in an animal model of early brain damage. We used a complex housing paradigm as a form of prenatal enrichment. Six nulliparous dams and one male rat were placed in complex housing (condomom group) for 12 h per day until the dams' delivered their pups. At parturition the dams were left in their home (standard) cages with their pups. Four dams were housed in standard cages (cagemom group) throughout pregnancy and with their pups until weaning. At postnatal day 3 (P3) infants of both groups received frontal cortex removals or sham surgery. Behavioral testing began on P60 and included the Morris water task and a skilled reaching task. Brains were processed for Golgi analyses. Complex housing of the mother had a significant effect on the behavior of their pups. Control animals from the condomom group outperformed those of the cagemom group in the water task. Condomom animals with lesions performed better than their cagemom cohorts in both the water task and in skilled reaching. Condomom animals showed an increase in cortical thickness at anterior planes and thalamic area at both anterior and posterior regions. Golgi analyses revealed an increase in spine density. These results suggest that prenatal enrichment alters brain organization in manner that is prophylactic for perinatal brain injury. This result could have significant implications for the prenatal management of infants expected to be at risk for difficult birth. PMID:25009478

  20. Perinatal Maternal Administration of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 Prevents Allergic Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Birch Pollen Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Schabussova, Irma; Hufnagl, Karin; Tang, Mimi L. K.; Hoflehner, Elisabeth; Wagner, Angelika; Loupal, Gerhard; Nutten, Sophie; Zuercher, Adrian; Mercenier, Annick; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Background The hygiene hypothesis implies that microbial agents including probiotic bacteria may modulate foetal/neonatal immune programming and hence offer effective strategies for primary allergy prevention; however their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We investigated whether oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 to mothers during gestation/lactation can protect against airway inflammation in offspring in a mouse model of birch pollen allergy, and examined the immune mechanisms involved. Methods BALB/c mice were treated daily with L. paracasei in drinking water or drinking water alone in the last week of gestation and during lactation. Their offspring were sensitized with recombinant Bet v 1, followed by aerosol challenge with birch pollen extract. Results Maternal exposure to L. paracasei prevented the development of airway inflammation in offspring, as demonstrated by attenuation of eosinophil influx in the lungs; reduction of IL-5 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage, and in lung and mediastinal lymph node cell cultures; and reduced peribronchial inflammatory infiltrate and mucus hypersecretion. While allergen-specific IgE and IgG antibody levels remained unchanged by the treatment, IL-4 and IL-5 production in spleen cell cultures were significantly reduced upon allergen stimulation in offspring of L. paracasei treated mice. Offspring of L. paracasei supplemented mothers had significantly reduced Bet v 1-specific as well as Concanavalin A-induced responses in spleen and mesenteric lymph node cell cultures, suggesting the modulation of both antigen-specific and mitogen-induced immune responses in offspring. These effects were associated with increased Foxp3 mRNA expression in the lungs and increased TGF-beta in serum. Conclusion Our data show that in a mouse model of birch pollen allergy, perinatal administration of L. paracasei NCC 2461 to pregnant/lactating mothers protects against the development of airway inflammation in offspring by activating regulatory pathways, likely through TLR2/4 signalling. PMID:22792257

  1. Perinatal and maternal outcomes in planned home and obstetric unit births in women at ‘higher risk’ of complications: secondary analysis of the Birthplace national prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y; Townend, J; Rowe, R; Brocklehurst, P; Knight, M; Linsell, L; Macfarlane, A; McCourt, C; Newburn, M; Marlow, N; Pasupathy, D; Redshaw, M; Sandall, J; Silverton, L; Hollowell, J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore and compare perinatal and maternal outcomes in women at ‘higher risk’ of complications planning home versus obstetric unit (OU) birth. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting OUs and planned home births in England. Population 8180 ‘higher risk’ women in the Birthplace cohort. Methods We used Poisson regression to calculate relative risks adjusted for maternal characteristics. Sensitivity analyses explored possible effects of differences in risk between groups and alternative outcome measures. Main outcome measures Composite perinatal outcome measure encompassing ‘intrapartum related mortality and morbidity’ (intrapartum stillbirth, early neonatal death, neonatal encephalopathy, meconium aspiration syndrome, brachial plexus injury, fractured humerus or clavicle) and neonatal admission within 48 hours for more than 48 hours. Two composite maternal outcome measures capturing intrapartum interventions/adverse maternal outcomes and straightforward birth. Results The risk of ‘intrapartum related mortality and morbidity’ or neonatal admission for more than 48 hours was lower in planned home births than planned OU births [adjusted relative risks (RR) 0.50, 95% CI 0.31–0.81]. Adjustment for clinical risk factors did not materially affect this finding. The direction of effect was reversed for the more restricted outcome measure ‘intrapartum related mortality and morbidity’ (RR adjusted for parity 1.92, 95% CI 0.97–3.80). Maternal interventions were lower in planned home births. Conclusions The babies of ‘higher risk’ women who plan birth in an OU appear more likely to be admitted to neonatal care than those whose mothers plan birth at home, but it is unclear if this reflects a real difference in morbidity. Rates of intrapartum related morbidity and mortality did not differ statistically significantly between settings at the 5% level but a larger study would be required to rule out a clinically important difference between the groups. PMID:25603762

  2. Maternal and Perinatal Outcome in Teenage Vs. Vicenarian Primigravidae - A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Indranil; Joshi, Prashant

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the maternal and foetal outcomes and complications in teenage primigravida as compared to those in primigravidae who were aged 20-29 years. Methods: Eighty teenage and one hundred sixty adult primigravidae were taken up for the study. Study duration was 24 months, from November 2010 to October 2012, at Rural Medical Research Centre in southern India. During this period, all cases were included in the study, irrespective of their booking statuses. For every teenage primigravidae, two subsequent adult primigravidae were correspondingly studied. Patients with major skeletal deformities such as kyphoscoliosis, polio, pelvic fractures, diabetes mellitus, renal disorders, morbid obesity were excluded. All cases of molar pregnancies and primigravidas who were admitted for abortions were also excluded. Results: 38.75% of teenage primigravidae were unbooked as compared to 6.9% of adults. 68.75% of teenage primigravidae were anaemic as compared to 33.75% of adults. Antenatal complications like anaemia, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, oligohydroamnios, hypothyroid were significantly more in teenagers (68.8%) as compared to those which were seen in adults(18.1%). 25% of teenagers had preterm births as compared to 5% adults who has preterm births. 43.75% of teenagers had Lower Segment Caesarean Section (LSCS) as compared to 20% adults who had LSCS. Indication was foetal distress in a majority of teenagers (68.5%). 29.2% of teenagers had low birth weight children as compared to 16.6% adults who had such children. 31.7% of teenage neonates required NICU admissions as compared to 12.27% neonates of adult mothers. Interpretation and Conclusion: It can be interpreted that teenage primigravidae had a significant number of complications in pregnancy, leading cause being anaemia, more preterm incidences and higher rates of LSCS, followed by higher number of NICU admissions. Since teenage pregnancy is a multifaceted problem, it demands multidimensional solutions. Teenage pregnancies are more common in populations with low socio-economic statuses, due to lack of education, awareness of complications of teenage pregnancies, and various other factors. Hence, awareness should be created and various programmes should be taken up, to educate mainly the poor in our rural setup. As early marriages cannot be prevented in our culture, so, possibly creating awareness on late conceptions is of utmost importance. PMID:24551664

  3. Elevated blood glucose recommendation guidelines that produce positive maternal and perinatal outcomes at the University of Kansas Obstetrics Clinic

    E-print Network

    Plumberg, Erin M.

    2013-05-31

    Abstract Background: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is a risk factor for adverse perinatal outcomes such as large for gestational age (LGA) birth, neonatal hypoglycemia and cesarean delivery. Objective: To examine the current screening...

  4. Perinatal Risk Factors and Autism in Los Angeles County: The Role of Air Pollution, Maternal Race/Ethnicity and Nativity

    E-print Network

    Becerra, Tracy Ann

    2013-01-01

    M, Zhao Y. Air Pollution and Infant Death in Southernto traffic-related air pollution and infant death has beenair pollution and suboptimal perinatal conditions related to race/ethnicity and nativity may cause infant death

  5. Maternal dietary docosahexaenoic acid supplementation attenuates fetal growth restriction and enhances pulmonary function in a newborn mouse model of perinatal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Velten, Markus; Britt, Rodney D; Heyob, Kathryn M; Tipple, Trent E; Rogers, Lynette K

    2014-03-01

    The preterm infant is often exposed to maternal and neonatal inflammatory stimuli and is born with immature lungs, resulting in a need for oxygen therapy. Nutritional intervention with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 6.3 g/kg of diet) has been shown to attenuate inflammation in various human diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that maternal DHA supplementation during late gestation and lactation attenuated hyperoxic lung injury in newborn mouse pups. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that DHA supplementation to the dam would reduce hyperoxic lung injury and growth deficits in a more severe model of systemic maternal inflammation, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neonatal hyperoxia exposure. On embryonic day 16, dams were placed on DHA (6.3 g DHA/kg diet) or control diets and injected with saline or LPS. Diets were maintained through weaning. At birth, pups were placed in room air or hyperoxia for 14 d. Improvements in birth weight (P < 0.01), alveolarization (P ? 0.01), and pulmonary function (P ? 0.03) at 2 and 8 wk of age were observed in pups exposed to perinatal inflammation and born to DHA-supplemented dams compared with control diet-exposed pups. These improvements were associated with decreases in tissue macrophage numbers (P < 0.01), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression (P ? 0.05), and decreases in soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products concentrations (P < 0.01) at 2 and 8 wk. Furthermore, DHA supplementation attenuated pulmonary fibrosis, which was associated with the reduction of matrix metalloproteinases 2, 3, and 8 (P ? 0.03) and collagen mRNA (P ? 0.05), and decreased collagen (P < 0.01) and vimentin (P ? 0.03) protein concentrations. In a model of severe inflammation, maternal DHA supplementation lessened inflammation and improved lung growth in the offspring. Maternal supplementation with DHA may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce neonatal inflammation. PMID:24453131

  6. Time window-dependent effect of perinatal maternal protein restriction on insulin sensitivity and energy substrate oxidation in adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Agnoux, Aurore Martin; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Simard, Gilles; Poupeau, Guillaume; Darmaun, Dominique; Parnet, Patricia; Alexandre-Gouabau, Marie-Cécile

    2014-07-15

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence suggests that a suboptimal environment during perinatal life programs offspring susceptibility to the development of metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that the lasting impact of perinatal protein deprivation on mitochondrial fuel oxidation and insulin sensitivity would depend on the time window of exposure. To improve our understanding of underlying mechanisms, an integrative approach was used, combining the assessment of insulin sensitivity and untargeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomics in the offspring. A hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was performed in adult male rats born from dams fed a low-protein diet during gestation and/or lactation, and subsequently exposed to a Western diet (WD) for 10 wk. Metabolomics was combined with targeted acylcarnitine profiling and analysis of liver gene expression to identify markers of adaptation to WD that influence the phenotype outcome evaluated by body composition analysis. At adulthood, offspring of protein-restricted dams had impaired insulin secretion when fed a standard diet. Moreover, rats who demonstrated catch-up growth at weaning displayed higher gluconeogenesis and branched-chain amino acid catabolism, and lower fatty acid ?-oxidation compared with control rats. Postweaning exposure of intrauterine growth restriction-born rats to a WD exacerbated incomplete fatty acid ?-oxidation and excess fat deposition. Control offspring nursed by protein-restricted mothers showed peculiar low-fat accretion through adulthood and preserved insulin sensitivity even after WD-exposure. Altogether, our findings suggest a testable hypothesis about how maternal diet might influence metabolic outcomes (insulin sensitivity) in the next generation such as mitochondrial overload and/or substrate oxidation inflexibility dependent on the time window of perinatal dietary manipulation. PMID:24808498

  7. Gestational exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin alters retinoid homeostasis in maternal and perinatal tissues of the Holtzman rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kransler, Kevin M. Tonucci, David A. McGarrigle, Barbara P. Napoli, Joseph L. Olson, James R.

    2007-10-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), one of the most widely studied environmental contaminants, causes a variety of adverse health effects including teratogenesis and altered development which may be related to disruptions in retinoid homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect that gestational administration of TCDD has on retinoid homeostasis in both pregnant Holtzman rats and developing fetuses and neonates. A single oral dose of TCDD (0, 1.5, 3, or 6 {mu}g/kg) was administered to pregnant rats on gestation day 10, with fetuses analyzed on gestation days 17 and 20, and neonates analyzed on post natal day 7. Exposure to TCDD generally produced decreases in the concentrations of retinyl esters, such as retinyl palmitate, and retinol in maternal and perinatal liver and lung, while increasing levels in the maternal kidney. Additionally, perinatal hepatic retinol binding protein 1-dependent retinyl ester hydrolysis was also decrease by TCDD. Sensitivity of the developing perinates to TCDD appeared to have an age-related component demonstrated by an increased rate of mortality and significant alterations to body weight and length on post natal day 7 relative to that observed at gestation day 20. A unique observation made in this study was a significant decrease in lung weight observed in the perinates exposed to TCDD. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TCDD significantly alters retinoid homeostasis in tissues of the developing fetus and neonate, suggesting that their unique sensitivity to TCDD may at least be in part the result of altered retinoid homeostasis.

  8. A descriptive study evaluating perinatal healthcare providers' perspectives of palliative programming in 3 Canadian institutions.

    PubMed

    Stenekes, Simone J; Ens, Carla D L; Harlos, Michael; Chochinov, Harvey Max; Mytopher, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    A paucity of research has evaluated the perspectives of the broader healthcare team regarding perinatal palliative care. This study examines the views of healthcare providers involved in perinatal palliative care in 3 tertiary care hospitals in Canada. Developing an understanding of their perspectives of care provision, as well as the interactions that took place with families and other teams while providing perinatal palliative care, was of interest. Twenty-nine healthcare providers were involved in 4 focus groups and 5 individual interviews. Data were transcribed and content analysis was undertaken. The overarching theme of communication materialized from the data. Within this theme were 3 subthemes, each highlighting an aspect of communication that impacted care provision: connecting through proximity, protected time and dedicated space, and flexibility and formality. The study also describes a model of integrated perinatal palliative care program development and explains where each of the 3 sites falls along this continuum. The development of formal programs in these facilities is varied and recommendations are included to enhance communication and assist in providing improved and integrated programming. PMID:24992245

  9. Maternal hyperuricemia in normotensive singleton pregnancy, a prenatal finding with continuous perinatal and postnatal effects, a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the association of maternal hyperuricemia with adverse pregnancy outcome and neonatal metabolic, neurologic and respiratory disturbances in normotensive singleton pregnant women. Method This prospective multicentric cohort study was conducted on 404 normotensive singleton pregnant women who were admitted for delivery in Vali-Asr and Akbar-Abadi teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Upon enrollment maternal and umbilical sera were obtained for determining uric acid levels. 1 and 5 minutes Apgar scores, the need for neonatal resuscitation and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission were recorded. In case of NICU admission a neonatal blood sample was drawn for determining uric acid, blood sugar and bilirubin levels. An intracranial ultrasound imaging was also carried out for the admittd neonates for detecting intraventricular hemorrhage. Results Maternal hyperuricemia (uric acid one standard deviation greater than the appropriate gestational age) was independently associated with preterm birth (odds ratio (OR), 3.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.1 – 4.79), small for gestational age delivery (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.04 – 2.57), NICU admission (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.12 – 2.94) and neonatal IVH (OR, 8.14; 95% CI, 1.11 – 87.1). Conclusions Maternal hyperuricemia in normotensive singleton pregnant women is significantly associated with preterm and SGA delivery and the development of neonatal IVH. PMID:24636149

  10. Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences Further Particulars: Programme and Visitor Officer (Maternity Leave Cover)

    E-print Network

    Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences Further Particulars: Programme and Visitor Officer (Maternity Leave Cover) Background The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences is a national. Location Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge CB3 0EH Terms

  11. Genetic trends in maternal and neonatal behaviors and their association with perinatal survival in French Large White swine

    PubMed Central

    Canario, Laurianne; Bidanel, Jean-Pierre; Rydhmer, Lotta

    2014-01-01

    Genetic trends in maternal abilities were studied in French Large White sows. Two lines representing old-type and modern-type pigs were obtained by inseminating modern sows with semen from boars born in 1977 or 1998. Successive generations were produced by inter-se mating. The maternal performance of sows from the second generation was compared in farrowing crates. Video analysis was performed for the 1st h after the onset of 43 and 36 farrowing events, and for the 6 first hours for 23 and 21 events, in old-type and modern-type sows, respectively. Genetic trends were estimated as twice the difference in estimates between the 2 lines. The contribution of behavior to the probability of stillbirth and piglet death in the first 2 days was estimated as the percentage of deviance reduction (DR) due to the addition of behavior traits as factors in the mortality model. Sow activity decreased strongly from the 1st to the 2nd h in both lines (P < 0.001). In the first 6 h, old-type sows sat (1st parity), stood (2nd parity) and rooted (both parities) for longer than modern-type sows, which were less active, especially in 2nd parity. In modern-type sows, stillbirth was associated positively with lying laterally in the first 6 h (4.6% DR) and negatively in the 1st h (9.1% DR). First-parity old-type sows were more attentive to piglets (P = 0.003) than modern-type sows which responded more to nose contacts at 2nd parity (P = 0.01). Maternal reactivity of modern-type sows was associated with a higher risk of piglet death (4.6% DR). Respiratory distress at birth tended to be higher in modern-type piglets than in old-type piglets (P < 0.10) and was associated with a higher risk of piglet death in both lines (2.7–3.1% DR). Mobility at birth was lower in modern-type than old-type piglets (P < 0.0001). Genetic trends show that sow and piglet behaviors at farrowing have changed. Our results indicate reduced welfare in parturient modern-type sows and their newborn piglets. PMID:25520737

  12. [Social inequalities in perinatal health].

    PubMed

    Azria, E

    2015-10-01

    Social insecurity is a known perinatal risk factor but beyond that, a social gradient in perinatal health is observable. This social gradient is particularly visible for the risk of neonatal mortality from congenital anomalies, premature delivery, and low birth weight. Analysis of mechanisms that would explain how the different dimensions of the social status of women interact with perinatal health indicators are not to this day fully understood. However, numbers of intermediate factors related to both the social status and perinatal risk have been identified. Among them, smoking, drug use, exposure to psychological and physical stress, genital infections, access to care, or drudgery. Finally, it was observed that the interaction of social conditions with the level of maternal education, geographic or ethnic origin, and the environment in which women live are complex and make the generalization of data obtained in a particular context sensitive. PMID:26299909

  13. Maternal Immunization: Opportunities for Scientific Advancement

    PubMed Central

    Beigi, Richard H.; Fortner, Kimberly B.; Munoz, Flor M.; Roberts, Jeff; Gordon, Jennifer L.; Han, Htay Htay; Glenn, Greg; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Gu, Xing Xing; Read, Jennifer S.; Edwards, Kathryn; Patel, Shital M.; Swamy, Geeta K.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization is an effective strategy to prevent and/or minimize the severity of infectious diseases in pregnant women and their infants. Based on the success of vaccination programs to prevent maternal and neonatal tetanus, maternal immunization has been well received in the United States and globally as a promising strategy for the prevention of other vaccine-preventable diseases that threaten pregnant women and infants, such as influenza and pertussis. Given the promise for reducing the burden of infectious conditions of perinatal significance through the development of vaccines against relevant pathogens, the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored a series of meetings to foster progress toward clinical development of vaccines for use in pregnancy. A multidisciplinary group of stakeholders convened at the NIH in December 2013 to identify potential barriers and opportunities for scientific advancement in maternal immunization. PMID:25425719

  14. Perinatal, Maternal, and Fetal Characteristics of Children Diagnosed with Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder: Results from a Population-Based Study Utilizing the Swedish Medical Birth Register

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafsson, Peik; Kallen, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pre- and perinatal factors on the risk of developing attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: We investigated the medical history of 237 children (206 male; 31 female) from Malmo, Sweden born between 1986 and 1996 and in whom a diagnosis of ADHD (Diagnostic and Statistical…

  15. Perinatal Care in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Beverley; Wen, Shi Wu

    2004-01-01

    Health Issue Canada's standard of perinatal care ranks among the highest in the world, but there is still room for improvement, both in terms of regional differences in care and global comparisons of approaches to care in Canada and elsewhere. Data from the Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System (CPSS) was used to evaluate morbidity and mortality among mothers and infants. Key Findings Maternal mortality rates in Canada dropped to 4.4 per 100,000 live births in 1993–1997 and are among the lowest in the world. Rates of Caesarean section increased from 15.3 per 100 deliveries in 1994 to 19.1 in 1997. Although the infant mortality rate in Canada is among the lowest in the world (5.3–8.8 per 1,000 live births 1990–2000), there are unacceptable disparities between subpopulations. In Aboriginal populations, rates of stillbirth and perinatal mortality are 2–2.5 times the Canadian average. There has been a steady increase in the proportion of births among older women who have the highest risk of preterm births and pregnancy complications. The increasing rate of multiple births has accelerated recently and is of concern as these carry a higher risk of complications and are associated with an increased risk of preterm birth. The costs to the health care system are likely to be high. Data Gaps and Recommendations CPSS data, including economic indicators, needs to be collected in a more timely and uniform manner across Canada. The CPSS should provide an evaluation of how well Canada fares in relation to international standards of perinatal care. PMID:15345091

  16. Substance Use in the Perinatal Period.

    PubMed

    Forray, Ariadna; Foster, Dawn

    2015-11-01

    Perinatal substance use remains a major public health problem and is associated with a number of deleterious maternal and fetal effects. Polysubstance use in pregnancy is common and can potentiate adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Tobacco is the most commonly used substance in pregnancy, followed by alcohol and illicit substances. The treatments for perinatal substance use are limited and consist mostly of behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Of these, contingency management has shown the most efficacy. More recently, novel interventions such as progesterone for postpartum cocaine use have shown promise. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids in the perinatal period, their effects on maternal and fetal health, and current treatments. PMID:26386836

  17. Perinatal study in Tientsin: 1978.

    PubMed

    Lyle, K C; Segal, S J; Chang, C; Ch'ien, L

    1980-01-01

    Clinical records of a total of 3320 singleton births, representing the year 1978, at the two Tientsin Medical College Hospitals, Tientsin, People's Republic of China, were studied to ascertain (a) reproductive parameters such as the average age of the mothers at first and successive births and (b) the relationships between perinatal deaths, prematurity and birth weight and the mothers's age, number of previous pregnancies, parity, maternal conditions in the prenatal and delivery period and operative procedures of delivery. PMID:6109673

  18. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Misri, Shaila; Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%-10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%-10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother-infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum. PMID:26125602

  19. Perinatal Health Statistics as the Basis for Perinatal Quality Assessment in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, Urelija; Filipovi?-Gr?i?, Boris; ?elmiš, Josip; Gliveti?, Tatjana; Juras, Josip; Mustapi?, Željka; Grizelj, Ruža

    2015-01-01

    Context. Perinatal mortality indicators are considered the most important measures of perinatal outcome. The indicators reliability depends on births and deaths reporting and recording. Many publications focus on perinatal deaths underreporting and misclassification, disabling proper international comparisons. Objective. Description of perinatal health care quality assessment key indicators in Croatia. Methods. Retrospective review of reports from all maternities from 2001 to 2014. Results. According to reporting criteria for birth weight ?500?g, perinatal mortality (PNM) was reduced by 31%, fetal mortality (FM) by 32%, and early neonatal mortality (ENM) by 29%. According to reporting criteria for ?1000?g, PNM was reduced by 43%, FM by 36%, and ENM by 54%. PNM in ?22 weeks' (wks) gestational age (GA) was reduced by 28%, FM by 30%, and ENM by 26%. The proportion of FM at 32–36?wks GA and at term was the highest between all GA subgroups, as opposed to ENM with the highest proportion in 22–27?wks GA. Through the period, the maternal mortality ratio varied from 2.4 to 14.3/100,000 live births. The process indicators have been increased in number by more than half since 2001, the caesarean deliveries from 11.9% in 2001 to 19.6% in 2014. Conclusions. The comprehensive perinatal health monitoring represents the basis for the perinatal quality assessment. PMID:26693484

  20. Perinatal depression: implications for child mental health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Perinatal depression is common and primary care holds a crucial role for detecting, treating or, if necessary, providing referrals to mental health care for affected women. Family doctors should be aware of risk factors for peripartum depression, including previous history of depression, life events and interpersonal conflict. Perinatal depression has been associated with many poor outcomes, including maternal, child and family unit challenges. Infants and young children of perinatally depressed mothers are more likely to have a difficult temperament, as well as cognitive and emotional delays. The primary care setting is uniquely poised to be the screening and treatment site for perinatal depression; however, several obstacles, both at patient and systems level, have been identified that interfere with women's treatment engagement. Current published treatment guidelines favour psychotherapy above medicines as first line treatment for mild to moderate perinatal depression, while pharmacotherapy is first choice for severe depression, often in combination with psychosocial or integrative approaches. Among mothers who decide to stop taking their antidepressants despite ongoing depression during the perinatal period, the majority suffer from relapsing symptoms. If depression continues post?partum, there is an increased risk of poor mother–infant attachment, delayed cognitive and linguistic skills in the infant, impaired emotional development and risk for behavioural problems in later life. Complex, comprehensive and multilevel algorithms are warranted to treat perinatal depression. Primary care doctors are best suited to initiate, carry out and evaluate the effectiveness of such interventions designed to prevent adverse outcomes of maternal perinatal depression on mother and child wellbeing. PMID:22477948

  1. Placental abruption and perinatal death.

    PubMed

    Kyrklund-Blomberg, N B; Gennser, G; Cnattingius, S

    2001-07-01

    Studies of risk factors for abruptio placentae (AP) are partly conflicting and studies of risk factors for perinatal death in these pregnancies are scarce. Using the population-based Swedish Birth Registry from 1987 to 1993, we were able to study these risks in 795,459 singleton pregnancies. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for risk of AP and risk of perinatal death in pregnancies with and without AP. Risk factors for AP were: age, primiparity, high parity, not cohabiting with infant's father, low education, smoking, infertility, pregestational diabetes, essential hypertension, pregnancy-induced hypertensive diseases, preterm premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) births. Risk factors for perinatal death in pregnancies with placental abruption were smoking (1--9 and > or =10 cigarettes/day; OR 1.4 and 1.7 respectively), severe pre-eclampsia (OR 2.0) and SGA (OR 1.9), whereas in pregnancies without abruption, risks were also increased in maternal age > or =35 years, primiparity, infertility, essential hypertension and pregestational diabetes. These findings support the theory that, in cases of AP, a general impairment of the placenta and/or a defect placentation may be fatal. PMID:11489159

  2. Efficacy of WHO recommendation for continued breastfeeding and maternal cART for prevention of perinatal and postnatal HIV transmission in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Ngoma, Mary S; Misir, Amita; Mutale, Wilbroad; Rampakakis, Emmanuoil; Sampalis, John S; Elong, Angela; Chisele, Sam; Mwale, Abel; Mwansa, Jonathan K; Mumba, Scholastica; Chandwe, Mula; Pilon, Richard; Sandstrom, Paul; Wu, Samantha; Yee, Kristen; Silverman, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV in developing countries, new World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend maternal combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) during pregnancy, throughout breastfeeding for 1 year and then cessation of breastfeeding (COB). The efficacy of this approach during the first six months of exclusive breastfeeding has been demonstrated, but the efficacy of this approach beyond six months is not well documented. Methods A prospective observational cohort study of 279 HIV-positive mothers was started on zidovudine/3TC and lopinavir/ritonavir tablets between 14 and 30 weeks gestation and continued indefinitely thereafter. Women were encouraged to exclusively breastfeed for six months, complementary feed for the next six months and then cease breastfeeding between 12 and 13 months. Infants were followed for transmission to 18 months and for survival to 24 months. Text message reminders and stipends for food and transport were utilized to encourage adherence and follow-up. Results Total MTCT was 9 of 219 live born infants (4.1%; confidence interval (CI) 2.2–7.6%). All breastfeeding transmissions that could be timed (5/5) occurred after six months of age. All mothers who transmitted after six months had a six-month plasma viral load >1,000 copies/ml (p<0.001). Poor adherence to cART as noted by missed dispensary visits was associated with transmission (p=0.04). Infant mortality was lower after six months of age than during the first six months of life (p=0.02). The cumulative rate of infant HIV infection or death at 18 months was 29/226 (12.8% 95 CI: 7.5–20.8%). Conclusions Maternal cART may limit MTCT of HIV to the UNAIDS target of <5% for eradication of paediatric HIV within the context of a clinical study, but poor adherence to cART and follow-up can limit the benefit. Continued breastfeeding can prevent the rise in infant mortality after six months seen in previous studies, which encouraged early COB. PMID:26140453

  3. Perinatal Mortality in Southern Nigeria; less than half a decade to the Millennium Developmental Goals

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, PC; Ugboma, HU; Onyire, N; Muoneke, U

    2011-01-01

    Background: Perinatal mortality is one of the essential indicators of the health status of a country and by extension its state of development. Reduction in perinatal mortality rate is an important aspect of the MDGs. Objectives: To determine the perinatal mortality rate (PMR) in 2 tertiary institutions in Southern Nigeria and the factors responsible for the deaths. Methods: This was a retrospective, observational study conducted amongst 2 groups of subjects (A and B) located in 2 tertiary hospitals in Southern Nigeria over a 2-year period (1st Jan 2004 to 31st Dec. 2005). Variables such as maternal age, socio-economic status of the parents, sex, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth-weight, and age of baby before death and probable cause of death were recorded. Results: During the period, the perinatal mortality rate of 62.7/ 1000 live-births was recorded. The individual contributions to this rate were 22.1/1000 live births and 40.6/1000 live births for A and B respectively. The common causes of death in the study subjects were unbooked maternal status, fresh/macerated still births, low birth weight /premature babies and severe birth asphyxia. The mean gestational age for group A was 34.7 ± 6.50 wks and 33± 1.20 wks for group B, while the mean maternal ages were 27.3± 5.75yrs and 28.6 ± 5.1yrs respectively. Majority of the deliveries were by Spontaneous Vertex Delivery (SVD), accounting for 49.4% and 56% of the total deliveries in the two groups respectively. Furthermore, the male: female ratio was 0.85: 1.0 and 0.9: 1.0, the mean birth weights were 2.60 ± 1.87kg and 2.88 ±2.08kg and the unbooked cases were 61.9% and 70.6% respectively for group A and B. Conclusion: There is high rate of perinatal deaths in Southern Nigeria. This is associated with high rates of unbooked pregnancies resulting in difficult labours, ruptured uterus, chorio-amnionitis, preterm/low-birtthweight babies and severe neonatal asphyxia. PMID:23209977

  4. Chromosomal variation and perinatal mortality in San Diego zoo Soemmerring's gazelles.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Cynthia C; Charter, Suellen J; Goddard, Natalie; Davis, Heidi; Brandt, Margot; Houck, Marlys L; Ryder, Oliver A

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations play a fundamental role in the evolution and speciation of antelopes (Antilopinae, Bovidae), with several species exhibiting polymorphism for centric fusions. For the past 35 years, the San Diego Zoo Global (SDZG) captive population of Soemmerring's gazelles has revealed complex karyotypes resulting from chromosomal translocations with diploid numbers ranging from 34 to 39. Poor reproductive performance of this species in captivity and elevated mortality the first month of life (perinatal) has been attributed to this chromosomal dynamism. We have extended the studies of karyotypic variation in the SDZG Soemmerring's gazelle population and analyzed the effect of chromosomal and genetic variation upon perinatal mortality. Karyotypes from 149 captive Soemmerring's gazelles were evaluated revealing two unreported autosomal combinations, now constituting a total of 15 distinct karyotypes for the 3 Robertsonian centric fusions originally described for this population. Among SDZG founders, distinct chromosomal variation and nuclear and mitochondrial genetic structure were detected corresponding to the institution of origin of the founders. Low levels of genetic distance and nucleotide diversity among individuals, in addition to high relatedness values, suggested that outbreeding is less of a concern than inbreeding for maintaining a sustainable captive population. Finally, analysis of karyotypes of offspring born into the SDZG Soemmerring's gazelle herds, in conjunction with the maternal karyotype showed association of chromosomal makeup with perinatal mortality. This supports the importance of continuing cytogenetic screening efforts, particularly to evaluate the presence of deleterious chromosomal rearrangements in stillborns. PMID:26011774

  5. Perinatal Pitocin as an Early ADHD Biomarker: Neurodevelopmental Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Lisa; Haussmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a potential relationship between coincidental increases in perinatal Pitocin usage and subsequent childhood ADHD onset in an attempt to isolate a specific risk factor as an early biomarker of this neurodevelopmental disorder. Method: Maternal labor/delivery and corresponding childbirth records of 172 regionally diverse,…

  6. PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL HEALTH, BAMEN, INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    For developing countries, especially in remote rural areas, measures of maternal and perinatal health may be difficult to obtain because it is not systematically collected and/or electronic data is not available. We assisted the public health officials of Bayingnormen (BaMen), In...

  7. Perinatal thrombosis: implications for mothers and neonates.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is more likely to occur in the perinatal period than any other time in childhood, and these events can lead to a lifetime of intellectual and motor disabilities, epilepsy, and behavioral challenges. This review describes the epidemiology and natural history of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (PAIS) and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT), risk factors for these complications, recent evidence regarding treatment strategies, and current gaps in knowledge. Existing evidence demonstrates the multifactorial etiology of symptomatic ischemic stroke in neonates, which includes a combination of maternal, delivery, and neonatal factors. The importance of inherited thrombophilia in the pathophysiology and long-term outcomes of perinatal stroke requires additional study. At this time, there is no evidence to support routine extensive thrombophilia screening outside of a research setting. Despite the frequency of perinatal stroke and its association with substantial morbidity, treatment strategies are currently limited, and prevention strategies are nonexistent. Anticoagulation is rarely indicated in PAIS, and more work needs to focus on neuroprotective prevention and alternate treatment strategies. Anticoagulation does appear to be safe in CSVT and may prevent thrombus progression but clinical equipoise remains, and clinical trials are needed to obtain evidence regarding short- and long-term efficacy outcomes. PMID:26637700

  8. Etiological analysis of presumed perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Kocaman, Canan; Yilmaz, Yuksel

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the maternal, pre- and perinatal, and prothrombotic factors with congenital hemiparesis due to presumed perinatal stroke (PPS). Prothrombotic risk factors including protein C and S, antithrombin III, lipoprotein (a), homocystein, factor VIII levels; anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant; methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations, factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutations were investigated. Arterial ischemic stroke was detected in 60% and periventricular venous infarction in 40%. At least one prothrombotic risk factor was present in 69%, two in 17%, and three or more in 8.5% of cases. The most common combination was methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and factor V Leiden heterozygosity. The etiology and pathogenesis of PPS is still unclear. According to this study, most of the patients with PPS might have one or more prothrombotic risk factors and certain prenatal risk factors including intrauterine growth retardation, twin gestation and preeclampsia might be related to PPS. PMID:21561729

  9. Vitamin B-12 and Perinatal Health.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Layden, Alexander J; Stover, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Vitamin B-12 deficiency (<148 pmol/L) is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, including developmental anomalies, spontaneous abortions, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (<2500 g). The importance of adequate vitamin B-12 status periconceptionally and during pregnancy cannot be overemphasized, given its fundamental role in neural myelination, brain development, and growth. Infants born to vitamin B-12-deficient women may be at increased risk of neural tube closure defects, and maternal vitamin B-12 insufficiency (<200 pmol/L) can impair infant growth, psychomotor function, and brain development, which may be irreversible. However, the underlying causal mechanisms are unknown. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links maternal vitamin B-12 status and perinatal outcomes. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency and associated risk of pregnancy complications, few prospective studies and, to our knowledge, only 1 randomized trial have examined the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of adverse perinatal outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions. PMID:26374177

  10. Maternal-fetal pharmacokinetics of methanol. (Includes the commentary of the Institute`s Health Review Committee). Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, G.M.; Brouwer, K.L.R.

    1996-06-01

    This study defines the physiological factors that govern methanol delivery to the developing fetus after maternal methanol exposure. The disposition of methanol after oral or intravenous administration was similar in pregnant and nonpregnant rats, regardless of the gestational stage (day 7, 14, or 20 after conception) at which the toxicokinetics of methanol were observed. Parallel experiments in female mice indicated that methanol elimination was approximately twice as rapid in mice due to a significantly higher maximal velocity of methanol metabolism in this smaller rodent species. During inhalation exposure in the rat, methanol absorption was mediated entirely by the nose, and absorption decreased with increasing exposure concentration. Methanol absorption from the airstream was significantly higher in the mouse than in the rat. Apparently due to these species differences in absorption during inhalation, blood methanol concentrations were two- to threefold higher in the mouse than in the rat despite the approximately twofold more rapid elimination of methanol in the mouse. Methanol elimination from the systemic circulation was nonlinear due to saturation of the metabolic pathways for the breakdown of methanol. In addition, a significant parallel linear route of methanol elimination was observed, which accounted for an increasingly significant fraction of methanol elimination as exposure or systemic concentrations increased. Using the results of this study, a toxicokinetic model based on physiologic measurements was constructed that describes methanol disposition in rats and mice during pregnancy.

  11. Ranking risk factors for perinatal mortality. Analysis of a nation-wide study.

    PubMed

    Samueloff, A; Mor-Yosef, S; Seidman, D S; Adler, I; Persitz, E; Schenker, J G

    1989-01-01

    This paper analyses data from the Israeli nationwide perinatal census, with the aim of revealing the possible causes of perinatal death, and to assess the effects of risk factors, using a logistic regression analysis. The analysis provided an estimate of the net effect of each characteristic independently, thus identifying high-risk pregnancies that should be monitored with greater intensity. Five variables were found to have a significant effect on perinatal death. Among these, in order of decreasing risk: fetal presentation, maternal diseases complicating pregnancy, number of fetuses, ethnic origin, and maternal age. Other variables such as parity, standard of hospital, the mother's country of birth and domiciliary circumstances, did not significantly affect perinatal mortality. PMID:2631538

  12. Coverage and Financial Risk Protection for Institutional Delivery: How Universal Is Provision of Maternal Health Care in India?

    PubMed Central

    Prinja, Shankar; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Gupta, Rakesh; Sharma, Atul; Rana, Saroj Kumar; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background India aims to achieve universal access to institutional delivery. We undertook this study to estimate the universality of institutional delivery care for pregnant women in Haryana state in India. To assess the coverage of institutional delivery, we analyze service coverage (coverage of public sector institutional delivery), population coverage (coverage among different districts and wealth quintiles of the population) and financial risk protection (catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment as a result of out-of-pocket expenditure for delivery). Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from a randomly selected sample of 12,191 women who had delivered a child in the last one year from the date of data collection in Haryana state. Five indicators were calculated to evaluate coverage and financial risk protection for institutional delivery—proportion of public sector deliveries, out-of-pocket expenditure, percentage of women who incurred no expenses, prevalence of catastrophic expenditure for institutional delivery and incidence of impoverishment due to out-of-pocket expenditure for delivery. These indicators were calculated for the public and private sectors for 5 wealth quintiles and 21 districts of the state. Results The coverage of institutional delivery in Haryana state was 82%, of which 65% took place in public sector facilities. Approximately 63% of the women reported no expenditure on delivery in the public sector. The mean out-of-pocket expenditures for delivery in the public and private sectors in Haryana were INR 771 (USD 14.2) and INR 12,479 (USD 229), respectively, which were catastrophic for 1.6% and 22% of households, respectively. Conclusion Our findings suggest that there is considerably high coverage of institutional delivery care in Haryana state, with significant financial risk protection in the public sector. However, coverage and financial risk protection for institutional delivery vary substantially across districts and among different socio-economic groups and must be strengthened. The success of the public sector in providing high coverage and financial risk protection in maternal health provides encouragement for the role that the public sector can play in universalizing health care. PMID:26348921

  13. The Black Box of Perinatal Ischemic Stroke Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mineyko, Aleksandra; Kirton, Adam

    2013-01-01

    An improved understanding of perinatal stroke epidemiology, classification, neuroimaging, and outcomes has emerged in recent years. Despite this, little is known regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for most cases. A multitude of possible associations and putative risk factors have been reported, but most lack definitive empirical evidence supporting primary causation. These include obstetrical and maternal factors, perinatal conditions, infectious diseases, prothrombotic abnormalities, cardiac disorders, medications, and many others. The bulk of evidence is weak, dominated by case reports and retrospective case series. Findings from the small number of case-control and cohort studies that exist are limited by heterogeneous populations and methodologies. The single largest barrier to ultimately understanding and potentially improving outcomes from this common and disabling condition is the lack of comprehensive, fully-powered risk factor studies required to definitively describe perinatal stroke pathogenesis. This review summarizes current evidence and suggests future directions for research. PMID:21670391

  14. Impact of Natural Chemokine Receptor Polymorphisms on Perinatal Transmission of

    E-print Network

    -64I/64I phenotype has no effect on HIV-1 transmission but is associated with a delayed progression-59356-C/T CCR5- 59402-A/G, CCR5- 32, and CCR2-64I- in the setting of maternal-infant HIV-1 transmission the rate of perinatal HIV-1 transmission among 667 AZT-untreated mother-infant pairs (554 uninfected

  15. The Parental Experience of Pregnancy after Perinatal Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Pamela D.; DeBackere, Katrina; Kavanaugh, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the research literature on the parental experience of pregnancy, primarily maternal, subsequent to perinatal loss. Data Sources Computerized searches on CINAHL and PubMed databases. Study Selection Articles from indexed journals relevant to the objective were reviewed from January 1997 to December 2007. Only research-based studies in English were included. Data Extraction The review was performed using the methodology of Whittemore and Knafl (2005). Data were extracted and organized under headings: author/year/setting; purpose; sample; design/instruments; results; and nursing implications for parents during a pregnancy following a perinatal loss. Data Synthesis Depression and anxiety are frequently seen in pregnant women subsequent to a perinatal loss. The parental experience is filled with intense and conflicting emotions as parents balance being hopeful while worrying about another potential loss. Conclusions It is important for health care providers to evaluate the woman's obstetric history, acknowledge and validate previous perinatal loss, and discuss with her what would be helpful during the prenatal period with respect to the previous perinatal loss. PMID:18811772

  16. Comments on: "Perinatal toxicity of cyfluthrin in Mice: developmental and behavioral effects" by Soni et al, which is accepted in Human & Experimental Toxicology (DOl: 10.1177/0960327110391386)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soni and colleagues recently reported that perinatal maternal exposure to cyfluthrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, caused fetal malformations and behavioral changes in offspring, including skeletal malformations and alterations in righting reflexes and locomotion (Soni et al., 2011)...

  17. Perinatal factors and the risk of bipolar disorder in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Chudal, Roshan; Sourander, Andre; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Lehti, Venla; Sucksdorff, Dan; Gissler, Mika; Brown, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Complications during the perinatal period have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders like schizophrenia and autism. However, similar studies on bipolar disorder (BPD) have been limited and the findings are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to examine the association between perinatal risk factors and BPD. Methods This nested case-control study, based on the Finnish Prenatal Study of Bipolar Disorders (FIPS-B), identified 724 cases and 1419 matched controls from population based registers. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine the associations between perinatal factors and BPD adjusting for potential confounding due to maternal age, psychiatric history and educational level, place of birth, number of previous births and maternal smoking during pregnancy. Results Children delivered by planned cesarean section had a 2.5-fold increased risk of BPD (95% CI: 1.32–4.78, P <0.01). No association was seen between other examined perinatal risk factors and BPD. Limitations The limitations of this study include: the restriction in the sample to treated cases of BPD in the population, and usage of hospital based clinical diagnosis for case ascertainment. In addition, in spite of the large sample size, there was low power to detect associations for certain exposures including the lowest birth weight category and pre-term birth. Conclusions Birth by planned caesarean section was associated with risk of BPD, but most other perinatal risk factors examined in this study were not associated with BPD. Larger studies with greater statistical power to detect less common exposures and studies utilizing prospective biomarker-based exposures are necessary in the future. PMID:24215899

  18. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P < 0.001), with peak risk among persons born in winter. Relative to persons born in summer (June-August), incidence rate ratios for AML were 1.72 (95 % CI 1.25-2.38; P = 0.001) for winter (December-February), 1.37 (95 % CI 0.99-1.90; P = 0.06) for spring (March-May), and 1.27 (95 % CI 0.90-1.80; P = 0.17) for fall (September-November). Other risk factors for AML included high fetal growth, high gestational age at birth, and low maternal education level. These findings did not vary by sex or age at diagnosis. Sex, birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML. PMID:26113060

  19. Early Intervention and Perinatal Depression: Is There a Need for Provider Training?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Elizabeth; Stacks, Ann M.; McComish, Judith Fry

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 5-25% of women suffer from perinatal depression (PD). If left untreated, PD can have negative consequences for maternal and child mental health. During pregnancy and the postpartum period, women are in contact with a variety of professionals and paraprofessionals such as public health nurses, early childhood providers and home…

  20. Evaluation of the natural perinatal transmission of bovine leukaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Mekata, Hirohisa; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Konnai, Satoru; Kirino, Yumi; Honkawa, Kazuyuki; Nonaka, Nariaki; Horii, Yoichiro; Norimine, Junzo

    2015-03-01

    The perinatal transmission of bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) plays a critical role in the spread and persistence of BLV infection in cattle herds. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of perinatal infections in an area in Japan and investigate some risk factors associated with infection. Altogether, 129 calves born to BLV-infected cows in a herd in Japan were tested for infection immediately after birth and again at one month of age using nested PCR. Twenty-four calves (18.6 per cent) were infected with BLV, of which 14 (10.8 per cent) and 10 (7.7 per cent) calves were infected via the transplacental and the birth canal routes, respectively. Maternal viral loads, breed, the presence or absence of assistance during parturition and the number of births per dam were evaluated to investigate risk factors associated with infection. Maternal viral load was significantly correlated with the frequency of perinatal infection, and more than 40 per cent of newborn calves born to dams with high viral loads were infected with BLV. The results of this study could contribute towards developing effective eradication programmes by providing necessary data for replacement of breeding cow in the field. PMID:25510867

  1. Useless perinatal therapies.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Henry L

    2010-06-01

    With respect to Professor Bengt Robertson whose research studies were very instrumental in the development of one of the most important and evidence-based therapies in perinatal medicine, namely surfactant therapy, I thought it might be appropriate to review some useless or harmful perinatal therapies. Although the term 'neonatology' has only been in existence for about 50 years, care of the newborn in the 19th century was largely provided by nurses and obstetricians. As an example, Pierre Budin, a Parisian obstetrician, was very aware of the importance of keeping low birth weight babies warm. More recently however, a number of useless or harmful practices were adopted by those caring for pregnant women and their babies. These included uncontrolled oxygen supplementation, inadequate temperature control, withholding feeds, and various drugs such as thalidomide, chloramphenicol, hexachlorophene, sodium bicarbonate, Epsom salts, benzyl alcohol, thyrotrophin-releasing hormone and corticosteroids. Even in the modern age, inappropriate therapies have been introduced on the basis of short-term beneficial outcomes without longer-term evaluation. Sometimes we are slow to learn the lessons of the past. PMID:20551703

  2. Perinatal Grief in Latino Parents

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Claudia; Kavanaugh, Karen; Klima, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research exists that describes the meaning of perinatal loss to some parents, but the experience of loss from the perspective of Latino parents is not clearly understood. Additionally, current perinatal bereavement practices used often to facilitate memory-making for parents (such as viewing or holding the baby, taking photographs, or collecting mementos) are based upon research done primarily with non-Latino families. Are these common practices appropriate for this population? Because there is a paucity of research on this topic, this article describes what has been written over the past 30 years on the topic of grief and perinatal loss in Latino culture. PMID:20975393

  3. Social and cultural factors associated with perinatal grief in Chhattisgarh, India.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lisa R; Montgomery, Susanne; Lee, Jerry W; Anderson, Barbara A

    2012-06-01

    Stillbirth is a globally significant public health problem with many medical causes. There are also indirect causal pathways including social and cultural factors which are particularly salient in India's traditional society. The purpose of this study was to explore women's perceptions of stillbirth and to determine how issues of gender and power, social support, coping efforts, and religious beliefs influence perinatal grief outcomes among poor women in rural Chhattisgarh, India. Structured interviews were done face-to-face in 21 randomly selected villages among women of reproductive age (N=355) who had experienced stillbirth (n=178) and compared to those who had not (n=177), in the Christian Hospital, Mungeli catchment area. Perinatal grief was significantly higher among women with a history of stillbirth. Greater perinatal grief was associated with lack of support, maternal agreement with social norms, and younger maternal age. These predictors must be understood in light of an additional finding-distorted sex ratios, which reflect gender discrimination in the context of Indian society. The findings of this study will allow the development of a culturally appropriate health education program which should be designed to increase social support and address social norms, thereby reducing psychological distress to prevent complicated perinatal grief. Perinatal grief is a significant social burden which impacts the health women. PMID:21956647

  4. Remodeled salt appetite in rat offspring by perinatal exposure to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Hui, Pengpeng; Rui, Can; Liu, Yujuan; Xu, Feichao; Wu, Jiawei; Wu, Lei; Chen, Yu; Liao, Jiawei; Mao, Caiping; Xu, Zhice

    2009-04-01

    To determine the effect of perinatal exposure to nicotine on water intake and salt appetite related to renin-angiotensin system in the offspring, maternal rats during perinatal period [gestation (G) or gestation plus lactation (G+L)] were subcutaneously administrated with nicotine. Four months after birth, intake of 1.8% NaCl and water was measured following 24h water deprivation in the adult offspring, and angiotensin receptors in the brain were determined. There was no change of blood Na(+) and K(+) concentrations following exposure to nicotine either during pregnancy or pregnancy plus lactation. To the offspring following perinatal exposure to nicotine, their salt appetite was significantly increased (during the first 2h and 24h testing periods) by 24h water deprivation. In the forebrain of the offspring with history of perinatal exposure to nicotine, expression of angiotensin AT(1) and AT(2) subtype was reduced. The results showed that spontaneous salt appetite was not changed by using nicotine during perinatal periods, while stimulated salt intake could be affected by exposure to nicotine in fetal origins, and the changed behavior (water and salt intake) by perinatal nicotine was associated with the remodeled expression of AT(1) and AT(2) receptors in the forebrain of the offspring. PMID:19162104

  5. Adverse Effects of Heavy Prenatal Maternal Smoking on Attentional Control in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motlagh, Maria G.; Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Landeros-Weisenberger, Angeli; Katsovich, Liliya; Thompson, Nancy; Scahill, Lawrence; King, Robert A.; Peterson, Bradley S.; Schultz, Robert T.; Leckman, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to heavy maternal cigarette smoking in pregnancy and severe maternal psychosocial stress during pregnancy appear to be important risk factors for the development of ADHD. This study aimed to determine whether these perinatal risk factors were associated with neuropsychological deficits commonly seen in ADHD. Method: We examined…

  6. Maternal and Fetal Well-being

    PubMed Central

    Shy, Kirk K.; Brown, Zane A.

    1984-01-01

    Pregnancy outcomes can be improved by following modern recommendations for personal health maintenance. Adequate caloric intake, reflected by a weight gain of about 10 to 12.3 kg (22 to 27 lb) for women of average build, is associated with the lowest rate of perinatal mortality. Maternal dietary protein supplementation should generally be avoided because it may be associated with low-birth-weight pregnancies. Abstinence from social drugs offers the greatest positive opportunity to modify the health of a fetus. Serious perinatal infection can be prevented by preconception immunization (rubella), food hygiene (toxoplasmosis) and attention to the expression of virus in the mother (herpes simplex). Available data do not correlate exercise programs begun before pregnancy and continued during pregnancy with adverse fetal effects. Athletic capacity need not diminish postpartum. Most employment may safely continue until delivery. Routine recommendations for prolonged maternal disability leaves are not medically warranted. PMID:6395495

  7. A Collaborative Care Telemedicine Intervention to Overcome Treatment Barriers for Latina Women with Depression during the Perinatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Baker-Ericzén, Mary J.; Connelly, Cynthia D.; Hazen, Andrea L.; Dueñas, Cecilia; Landsverk, John A.; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2013-01-01

    Maternal depression is highly prevalent (10 to 20%) during the perinatal period with rates as high as 35 to 40% for Latinas. However, few Latinas are either identified or treated during the perinatal period. To address these disparities, the Perinatal Mental Health Model (PMH) was designed to ameliorate the barriers that prevent adequate diagnoses and intervention. The PMH is a culturally sensitive, short-term telemedicine, and collaborative care intervention for addressing depression among Mexican American mothers. It attends to sociocultural and socioeconomic dimensions and is delivered by trained mental health advisors within obstetric care settings. This article describes the feasibility and acceptability of utilizing the PMH. Participants (n=79) were selected from a first year ongoing randomized trial in community obstetric clinics. The intervention seems feasible and acceptable; low-income Latinas, identified as depressed during the perinatal period, reported having access to a range of appropriate community services and high satisfaction. PMID:22709321

  8. Be vigilant for perinatal mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Tamara; Behrman, Sophie; Jones, Simon Vann; Chouliaras, Leonidas; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2015-03-01

    The postnatal period appears to be associated with higher rates of adjustment disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, and depression. Women who have a history of serious mental illness are at higher risk of developing a postpartum relapse, even if they have been well during pregnancy. Psychiatric causes of maternal death are more common than some direct causes of death. UK rates increased from 13/100,000 in 2006-2008 to 16/100,000 in 2010-2012, higher than, for example, mortality caused by haemorrhage or anaesthetic complications of childbirth. Postnatal depression is more severe than baby blues, follows a chronic course and may relapse outside the perinatal period. Although 13% of patients already have depression in pregnancy, the majority tend to be diagnosed after delivery; up to 19% from childbirth to three months postpartum. NICE recommends using the Two Question Depression Screen and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale from the booking visit through to one year postpartum. A positive response to depression or anxiety questions warrants a full assessment using either PHQ-9 or the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Bipolar disorder may present as a first depressive episode in pregnancy or the postnatal period. In the postpartum period women have a high risk of severe relapse. Postpartum psychosis has a sudden and dramatic presentation with delusions, mania, severe depression, or mixed episodes with wide fluctuations of symptoms and severe mood swings. PMID:26062269

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Chlorhexidine Vaginal and Infant Wipes to Reduce Perinatal Mortality and Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, S; Rouse, DJ; McClure, EM; Reza, T; Yahya, Y; Memon, IA; Zaidi, Anita; Khan, NH; Memon, G; Soomro, N; Pasha, O; Wright, LL; Moore, J; Goldenberg, RL

    2013-01-01

    Background Sepsis is a leading cause of perinatal death in developing countries. Vaginal organisms acquired during labor play a significant role. Prior studies suggest that chlorhexidine wiping of the maternal vagina during labor and of the neonate may reduce peripartum infections. Methods We performed a placebo-controlled, randomized trial of chlorhexidine vaginal and neonatal wipes to reduce neonatal sepsis and mortality in three hospitals in Pakistan. The primary study outcome was a composite of neonatal sepsis or 7-day perinatal mortality. Findings From 2005 to 2008, 5,008 laboring women and their neonates were randomized to receive either chlorhexidine wipes (n = 2,505) or wipes with a saline placebo (n = 2,503). The primary outcome was similar in the chlorhexidine and control groups, (3.1% vs. 3.4%; RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.67, 1.24), as was the composite rate of neonatal sepsis or 28-day perinatal mortality, (3.8% vs. 3.9%, RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.73, 1.27). At day 7, the chlorhexidine group had a lower rate of neonatal skin infection. (3.3 vs. 8.2%, p<0.0001) With the exception of less frequent 7-day hospitalization in the chlorhexidine group, there were no significant differences in maternal outcomes between the groups. Interpretation This trial provides evidence that the use of maternal chlorhexidine vaginal wipes during labor and neonatal chlorhexidine wipes does not reduce maternal and perinatal mortality or neonatal sepsis. The finding of reduced superficial skin infections on day 7 without change in sepsis or mortality suggests that this difference, although statistically significant, may not be of major importance. Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00121394 PMID:20502294

  10. Perinatal mental distress and infant morbidity in Ethiopia: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joanna; Hanlon, Charlotte; Medhin, Girmay; Alem, Atalay; Tesfaye, Fikru; Worku, Bogale; Dewey, Michael; Patel, Vikram; Prince, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives (1) To investigate the impact of perinatal common mental disorders (CMD) in Ethiopia on the risk of key illnesses of early infancy: diarrhoea, fever and acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) and (2) to explore the potential mediating role of maternal health behaviours. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Demographic surveillance site in a predominantly rural area of Ethiopia. Participants 1065 women (86.3% of eligible) in the third trimester of pregnancy were recruited and 954 (98.6%) of surviving, singleton mother–infant pairs were followed up until 2 months after birth. Main exposure measure High levels of CMD symptoms, as measured by the locally validated Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20 ?6), in pregnancy only, postnatally only and at both time-points (‘persistent’). Main outcome measures Maternal report of infant illness episodes in first 2 months of life. Results The percentages of infants reported to have experienced diarrhoea, ARI and fever were 26.0%, 25.0% and 35.1%, respectively. Persistent perinatal CMD symptoms were associated with 2.15 times (95% CI 1.39 to 3.34) increased risk of infant diarrhoea in a fully adjusted model. The strength of association was not affected by including potential mediators: breast feeding practices, hygiene, the infant's vaccination status or impaired maternal functioning. Persistent perinatal CMD was not associated with infant ARI or fever after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Persistent perinatal CMD was associated with infant diarrhoea in this low-income country setting. The observed relationship was independent of maternal health-promoting practices. Future research should further explore the mechanisms underlying the observed association to inform intervention strategies. PMID:20667895

  11. DHA suppresses chronic apoptosis in the lung caused by perinatal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mehboob; Heyob, Kathryn M; Velten, Markus; Tipple, Trent E; Rogers, Lynette K

    2015-09-01

    We have previously shown that an adverse perinatal environment significantly alters lung growth and development and results in persistently altered cardiopulmonary physiology in adulthood. Our model of maternal LPS treatment followed by 14 days of neonatal hyperoxia exposure causes severe pulmonary disease characterized by permanent decreases in alveolarization and diffuse interstitial fibrosis. The current investigations tested the hypothesis that dysregulation of Notch signaling pathways contributes to the permanently altered lung phenotype in our model and that the improvements we have observed previously with maternal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation are mediated through normalization of Notch-related protein expression. Results indicated that inflammation (IL-6 levels) and oxidation (F2a-isoprostanes) persisted through 8 wk of life in mice exposed to LPS/O2 perinatally. These changes were attenuated by maternal DHA supplementation. Modest but inconsistent differences were observed in Notch-pathway proteins Jagged 1, DLL 1, PEN2, and presenilin-2. We detected substantial increases in markers of apoptosis including PARP-1, APAF-1, caspase-9, BCL2, and HMGB1, and these increases were attenuated in mice that were nursed by DHA-supplemented dams during the perinatal period. Although Notch signaling is not significantly altered at 8 wk of age in mice with perinatal exposure to LPS/O2, our findings indicate that persistent apoptosis continues to occur at 8 wk of age. We speculate that ongoing apoptosis may contribute to persistently altered lung development and may further enhance susceptibility to additional pulmonary disease. Finally, we found that maternal DHA supplementation prevented sustained inflammation, oxidation, and apoptosis in our model. PMID:26138643

  12. Metabolic imprinting: critical impact of the perinatal environment on the regulation of energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barry E

    2006-07-29

    Epidemiological studies in humans suggest that maternal undernutrition, obesity and diabetes during gestation and lactation can all produce obesity in offspring. Animal models have allowed us to investigate the independent consequences of altering the pre- versus post-natal environments on a variety of metabolic, physiological and neuroendocrine functions as they effect the development in the offspring of obesity, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia (the 'metabolic syndrome'). During gestation, maternal malnutrition, obesity, type 1 and type 2 diabetes and psychological, immunological and pharmacological stressors can all promote offspring obesity. Normal post-natal nutrition can reduce the adverse impact of some of these pre-natal factors but maternal high-fat diets, diabetes and increased neonatal access to food all enhance the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in offspring. The outcome of these perturbations of the perinatal environmental is also highly dependent upon the genetic background of the individual. Those with an obesity-prone genotype are more likely to be affected by factors such as maternal obesity and high-fat diets than are obesity-resistant individuals. Many perinatal manipulations appear to promote offspring obesity by permanently altering the development of central neural pathways, which regulate food intake, energy expenditure and storage. Given their strong neurotrophic properties, either excess or an absence of insulin and leptin during the perinatal period are likely to be effectors of these developmental changes. Because obesity is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality and because of its resistance to treatment, prevention is likely to be the best strategy for stemming the tide of the obesity epidemic. Such prevention should begin in the perinatal period with the identification and avoidance of factors which produce permanent, adverse alterations in neural pathways which control energy homeostasis. PMID:16815795

  13. Perinatal management of fetal supraventricular tachycardia complicated by maternal pertussis.

    PubMed

    Dejong, Stephanie; Salmanian, Bahram; Shamshirsaz, Alireza A; Ruano, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal pertussis has become a concern once again with the reappearance of the disease in the USA. A 30-year-old mother whose pregnancy was complicated with fetal arrhythmia was referred for further evaluation in the third trimester. After initial treatment with antiarrhythmic medications due to continued irregular rhythm, she was revisited for persistent hacking cough at 38?weeks gestational age. PCR examination confirmed pertussis diagnosis. Owing to increased risk of digoxin toxicity with concurrent antibiotic administration, antiarrhythmic medication was discontinued. Delivery was induced 2?days after the initiation of azithromycin therapy to prevent the transmission of the disease to the neonate. A well-planned delivery in a patient with prenatal diagnosis prevents neonatal infection while considering the obstetrical dilemma for concurrent management of the intrauterine arrhythmia and antibiotic administration. PMID:26153285

  14. Perinatal depression: an update and overview.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Parrigon, Kaela; Stuart, Scott

    2014-09-01

    Over the last 3 years there have been notable developments in the screening and treatment of perinatal depression. Most importantly, the DSM-V has made only minor changes in the diagnostic criteria for perinatal depression as compared to the DSM-IV; "perinatal," as opposed to "postpartum," is a specifier for depression with a requirement that the depression onset occurs during pregnancy or the first 4 weeks postpartum. Advances in the treatment of perinatal depression have been made over the last 3 years, including both prevention and acute interventions. Additional support has emerged confirming the primary risk factors for perinatal depression: a personal or family history, low SES and poor interpersonal support. There is general agreement that universal screening be conducted for all perinatal women, by both the woman's obstetrician and the baby's pediatrician. PMID:25034859

  15. Cross-training in perinatal units.

    PubMed

    Nichols, A A; Palmer, D G

    1994-12-01

    Health care economics of the 1990s has brought many changes to nursing practice. Perinatal nursing has not escaped this change. The role of providing cost-effective, client-focused perinatal care to mothers and infants has become an increasingly difficult task. With these changes, it has become imperative for perinatal nurses to cross-train in other areas to survive into the next decade. This article presents information to plan, implement, and evaluate a successful cross-training program. PMID:7807391

  16. Psychological issues surrounding paternal perinatal mental health.

    PubMed

    Currid, Thomas J

    It has become widely accepted that the perinatal period can be a time of heightened risk for mental health problems and emotional responses in women. However, there has been less research on men in this area and it has remained a somewhat neglected area. While perinatal mental health services are increasing for women, few exist for men. While the author acknowledges the greater impact perinatal mental health problems can have on women, this article explores psychological issues relating to paternal perinatal mental health. PMID:15732493

  17. Context Modulates Outcome of Perinatal Glucocorticoid Action in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    de Kloet, E. Ronald; Claessens, Sanne E. F.; Kentrop, Jiska

    2014-01-01

    Prematurely born infants may be at risk, because of inadequate maturation of tissues. If there are signs of preterm birth, it has become common practice therefore to treat either antenatally the mother or postnatally the infant with glucocorticoids to accelerate tissue development, particularly of the lung. However, this life-saving early glucocorticoid treatment was found to increase the risk of adverse outcome in later life. In one animal study, the authors reported a 25% shorter lifespan of rats treated as newborns with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, but so far this finding has not been replicated. After a brief clinical introduction, we discuss studies in rodents designed to examine how perinatal glucocorticoid action affects the developing brain. It appears that the perinatal action of the glucocorticoid depends on the context and the timing as well as the type of administered steroid. The type of steroid is important because the endogenous glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone bind to two distinct receptor populations, i.e., mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors (GR), while synthetic glucocorticoids predominantly bind to the GR. In addition, if given antenatally hydrocortisone is inactivated in the placenta by 11?-HSD type 2, and dexamethasone is not. With respect to timing, the outcome of glucocorticoid effects is different in early vs. late phases of brain development. The context refers to the environmental input that can affect the susceptibility to glucocorticoid action in the newborn rodent brain; early handling of pups and maternal care obliterate effects of post-natal dexamethasone treatment. Context also refers to coping with environmental conditions in later life, for which the individual may have been programed epigenetically by early-life experience. This knowledge of determinants affecting the outcome of perinatal glucocorticoid exposure may have clinical implications for the treatment of prematurely born infants. PMID:25071717

  18. Identifying perinatal risk factors for infant maltreatment: an ecological approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yueqin; Hallisey, Elaine J; Freymann, Gordon R

    2006-01-01

    Background Child maltreatment and its consequences are a persistent problem throughout the world. Public health workers, human services officials, and others are interested in new and efficient ways to determine which geographic areas to target for intervention programs and resources. To improve assessment efforts, selected perinatal factors were examined, both individually and in various combinations, to determine if they are associated with increased risk of infant maltreatment. State of Georgia birth records and abuse and neglect data were analyzed using an area-based, ecological approach with the census tract as a surrogate for the community. Cartographic visualization suggested some correlation exists between risk factors and child maltreatment, so bivariate and multivariate regression were performed. The presence of spatial autocorrelation precluded the use of traditional ordinary least squares regression, therefore a spatial regression model coupled with maximum likelihood estimation was employed. Results Results indicate that all individual factors or their combinations are significantly associated with increased risk of infant maltreatment. The set of perinatal risk factors that best predicts infant maltreatment rates are: mother smoked during pregnancy, families with three or more siblings, maternal age less than 20 years, births to unmarried mothers, Medicaid beneficiaries, and inadequate prenatal care. Conclusion This model enables public health to take a proactive stance, to reasonably predict areas where poor outcomes are likely to occur, and to therefore more efficiently allocate resources. U.S. states that routinely collect the variables the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) defines for birth certificates can easily identify areas that are at high risk for infant maltreatment. The authors recommend that agencies charged with reducing child maltreatment target communities that demonstrate the perinatal risks identified in this study. PMID:17144919

  19. Perinatal and background risk factors for childhood autism in central China.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guiqin; Yao, Meiling; Ma, Yating; Zhang, Wenjing

    2014-12-15

    Perinatal and background risk factors for autism were identified in a cohort of autistic children in Zhengzhou, China, to formulate preventative and treatment strategies for high-risk families. In this case-control study, children were screened for suspected autism using the Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC) and diagnosed according to DSM-IV and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). We collected perinatal histories and clinical data of 286 confirmed autistic children treated at the Third Affiliated Hospital Children?s Psychological Clinic of Zhengzhou University from 2011 to 2013. The control group consisted of 286 healthy children from area kindergartens. Maternal age>30 years, parental introversion as measured by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, low level of parental education, smoking, abortion threat, pregnancy complications, maternal illness during pregnancy, maternal mental health, family history of mental illness, neonatal jaundice, birth asphyxia, premature rupture of the fetal membrane, and gestational age<37 weeks were significantly higher in the autism group. These factors were significantly correlated with behavioral symptoms as measured by ABC scores (Kendall rank correlation). Birth asphyxia, neonatal jaundice, maternal age, parental introversion, family history of mental illness, abortion threat, premature delivery, and smoking were identified as independent risk factors by multivariate logistic regression. PMID:25085792

  20. Perinatal nicotine/smoking exposure and carotid chemoreceptors during development.

    PubMed

    Stéphan-Blanchard, E; Bach, V; Telliez, F; Chardon, K

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is still a common habit during pregnancy and is the most important preventable cause of many adverse perinatal outcomes. Prenatal smoking exposure can produce direct actions of nicotine in the fetus with the disruption of body and brain development, and actions on the maternal-fetal unit by causing repeated episodes of hypoxia and exposure to many toxic smoke products (such as carbon monoxide). Specifically, nicotine through binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have ubiquitous effects and can affect carotid chemoreception development through structural, functional and neuroregulatory alterations of the neural circuits involved in the chemoafferent pathway, as well as by interfering with the postnatal resetting of the carotid bodies. Reduced carotid body chemosensitivity and tonic activity have thus been reported by the majority of the human and animal studies. This review focuses on the effects of perinatal exposure to tobacco smoke and nicotine on carotid chemoreceptor function during the developmental period. A description of the effects of smoking and nicotine on the control of breathing related to carotid body activity, and of the possible physiopathological mechanisms at the origin of these disturbances is presented. PMID:22743051

  1. Diagnosis and acute management of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (PAIS) can be an unrecognized cause of short- and long-term neurologic disability. Focal clonic seizure in the newborn period is the most common clinical presentation of PAIS. MRI is optimal in diagnosing PAIS; negative cranial ultrasound or CT does not rule out PAIS. Given the low rate of recurrence in combination with risk factors thought to be isolated to the maternal-fetal unit, anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment is usually not recommended. The majority of newborns with PAIS do not go on to develop epilepsy, although further research is warranted in this area. Long-term morbidity, including motor, cognitive, and behavioral disabilities, can follow PAIS, necessitating early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy initiation. PMID:25317375

  2. Prenatal and perinatal factors associated with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Bilder, Deborah A; Pinborough-Zimmerman, Judith; Bakian, Amanda V; Miller, Judith S; Dorius, Josette T; Nangle, Barry; McMahon, William M

    2013-03-01

    Prenatal and perinatal risk factors associated with intellectual disability (ID) were studied in 8-year-old Utah children from a 1994 birth cohort (N ?=? 26,108) using broad ascertainment methods and birth records following the most current recording guidelines. Risk factor analyses were performed inclusive and exclusive of children with a known or suspected underlying genetic disorder. Risk factors identified were poly/oligohydramnios, advanced paternal/maternal age, prematurity, fetal distress, premature rupture of membranes, primary/repeat cesarean sections, low birth weight, assisted ventilation greater than 30 min, small-for-gestational age, low Apgar scores, and congenital infection. Although several risk factors lost significance once children with underlying genetic disorders were excluded, socioeconomic variables were among those that maintained a prominent association with increased ID risk. PMID:23464612

  3. Perinatal Factors in Neonatal and Pediatric Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Britt, Rodney D.; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth; Martin, Richard J.; Pabelick, Christina M.; Prakash, Y.S.

    2014-01-01

    Wheezing and asthma are significant clinical problems for infants and young children, particularly following premature birth. Recurrent wheezing in infants can progress to persistent asthma. As in adults, altered airway structure (remodeling) and function (increased bronchoconstriction) are also important in neonatal and pediatric airway diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that airway disease in children is influenced by perinatal factors including perturbations in normal fetal lung development, postnatal interventions in the intensive care unit, and environmental and other insults in the neonatal period. Here, in addition to genetics, maternal health, environmental processes, innate immunity, and impaired lung development/function can all influence pathogenesis of airway disease in children. We summarize current understanding of how prenatal and postnatal factors can contribute to development of airway diseases in neonates and children. Understanding these mechanisms will help identify and develop novel therapies for childhood airway diseases. PMID:24090092

  4. Perinatal malaria and tuberculosis co-infection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Rajoo; Mallick, Debkrishna; Biswas, Biswajit

    2010-03-01

    India remains endemic for both vivax malaria and tuberculosis. In spite of the high burden of tuberculosis in the country, reports on congenital tuberculosis in the literature are limited. We report herein an unusual instance of co-occurrence of perinatal falciparum malaria and tuberculosis in a 34-day-old female newborn, who presented with symptoms of sepsis. The diagnosis was based on the demonstration of Plasmodium falciparum on peripheral blood smear and tubercle bacilli in gastric aspirate samples. The maternal history for falciparum malaria was positive during her eighth month of pregnancy and the father was an open case of sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis. She responded dramatically to combined antimalarial and antitubercular chemotherapy. A search for combined etiologies in presumed 'sepsis' in the newborn, guided by history, physical examination, and laboratory investigations, is warranted. PMID:19647462

  5. Minimal Brain Dysfunction: Associations with Perinatal Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Paul L.

    Examined with over 28,000 7-year-old children whose mothers registered for prenatal care was the relationship between perinatal complications and such characteristics as poor school achievement, hyperactivity, and neurological soft signs associated with the diagnosis of minimal brain dysfunction (MBD). Ten perinatal antecedents were studied:…

  6. Guidelines for Perinatal Care. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coll. of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.

    The basic concept emphasized in this book is that a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach within a regionalized system of perinatal care is a constant factor improving the quality of pregancy outcomes. This coordinated multidisciplinary approach has had an impact on perinatal care in three important areas: (1) improved and expanded understanding…

  7. Women's health groups to improve perinatal care in rural Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Joanna; Tamang, Suresh; Mesko, Natasha; Osrin, David; Shrestha, Bhim; Manandhar, Madan; Manandhar, Dharma; Standing, Hilary; Costello, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Background Neonatal mortality rates are high in rural Nepal where more than 90% of deliveries are in the home. Evidence suggests that death rates can be reduced by interventions at community level. We describe an intervention which aimed to harness the power of community planning and decision making to improve maternal and newborn care in rural Nepal. Methods The development of 111 women's groups in a population of 86 704 in Makwanpur district, Nepal is described. The groups, facilitated by local women, were the intervention component of a randomized controlled trial to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality rates. Through participant observation and analysis of reports, we describe the implementation of this intervention: the community entry process, the facilitation of monthly meetings through a participatory action cycle of problem identification, community planning, and implementation and evaluation of strategies to tackle the identified problems. Results In response to the needs of the group, participatory health education was added to the intervention and the women's groups developed varied strategies to tackle problems of maternal and newborn care: establishing mother and child health funds, producing clean home delivery kits and operating stretcher schemes. Close linkages with community leaders and community health workers improved strategy implementation. There were also indications of positive effects on group members and health services, and most groups remained active after 30 months. Conclusion A large scale and potentially sustainable participatory intervention with women's groups, which focused on pregnancy, childbirth and the newborn period, resulted in innovative strategies identified by local communities to tackle perinatal care problems. PMID:15771772

  8. Maternal guilt.

    PubMed

    Rotkirch, Anna; Janhunen, Kristiina

    2010-01-01

    The recent emphasis on humans as cooperative breeders invites new research on human family dynamics. In this paper we look at maternal guilt as a consequence of conditional maternal investment. Solicited texts written by Finnish mothers with under school-aged children in 2007 (n = 63) described maternal emotions perceived as difficult and forbidden. Content analysis of guilt-inducing situations showed that guilt arose from diverging interest and negotiations between the mother and child (i.e., classic parent- offspring conflict). Also cultural expectations of extensive and perpetual high-quality maternal investment or the "motherhood myth" induced guilt in mothers. We argue that guilt plays an important role in maternal-investment regulation. Maternal guilt is predicted to vary with social and cultural context but also to show universal characteristics due to parent-offspring conflict and allomaternal manipulation. Results are preliminary and intended to stimulate research into the mechanisms, gender differences and cultural variations of guilt and other social emotions in human parenting. PMID:22947781

  9. Can maternal DHA supplementation offer long-term protection against neonatal hyperoxic lung injury?

    PubMed

    Lingappan, Krithika; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2015-12-15

    The effect of adverse perinatal environment (like maternal infection) has long-standing effects on many organ systems, including the respiratory system. Use of maternal nutritional supplements is an exciting therapeutic option that could be used to protect the developing fetus. In a recent issue of the journal, Ali and associates (Ali M, Heyob KM, Velten M, Tipple TE, Rogers LK. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 309: L441-L448, 2015) specifically look at maternal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation and its effect on chronic apoptosis in the lung in a mouse model of perinatal inflammation and postnatal hyperoxia. Strikingly, the authors show that pulmonary apoptosis was augmented even 8 wk after the hyperoxia-exposed mice had been returned to room air. This effect was significantly attenuated in mice that were subjected to maternal dietary DHA supplementation. These findings are novel, significantly advance our understanding of chronic effects of adverse perinatal and neonatal events on the developing lung, and thereby offer novel therapeutic options in the form of maternal dietary supplementation with DHA. This editorial reviews the long-term effects of adverse perinatal environment on postnatal lung development and the protective effects of dietary supplements such as DHA. PMID:26361877

  10. Partner Support and Maternal Depression in the Context of the Iowa Floods

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Rebecca L.; O’Hara, Michael W.; Hart, Kimberly J.; McCabe, Jennifer E.; Williamson, J Austin; Laplante, David P.; Yu, Chunbo; King, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the role of prenatal partner support in perinatal maternal depression was conducted. Separate facets of partner support were examined (i.e., received support and support adequacy) and a multidimensional model of support was applied to investigate the effects of distinct types of support (i.e., informational, physical comfort, emotional/esteem, and tangible support). Both main and stress-buffering models of partner support were tested in the context of prenatal maternal stress resulting from exposure to a natural disaster. Questionnaire data were analyzed from N=145 partnered women using growth curve analytic techniques. Results indicate that received support interacts with maternal flood stress during pregnancy to weaken the association between stress and trajectories of maternal depression from pregnancy to 30 months postpartum. Support adequacy did not interact with stress, but was associated with levels of depressive symptoms controlling for maternal stress and received support. Results demonstrate the distinct roles of various facets and types of support for a more refined explanatory model of prenatal partner support and perinatal maternal depression. Results inform both main effect and stress buffering models of partner support as they apply to the etiology of perinatal maternal depression, and highlight the importance of promoting partner support during pregnancy that matches support preferences. PMID:25243576

  11. The National Family Planning Program: its impact on perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Arshat, H; Kader, H A; Ali, J; Noor Laily Abu Bakar

    1984-12-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study the effect of family planning on declining maternal and infant mortality rates in Malaysia since the National Family Planning Program began operation in May, 1967. Data were derived from the registration of vital events and reports from the Malaysian Family Life Survey conducted in 1978, and demonstrate declines in maternal and infant mortality rates. Although this is a result of a combination of factors (e.g., socioeconomic development, high quality health and medical services) the contribution of family planning is significant. Between 1957 and 1980 the maternal mortality rate declined by 80%. High risk births declined from 10.2% to 8.2% for mothers under age 20, and from 15% to 13.7% for mothers over age 35 during the 1967-1977 decade. From 1955 - 1980 the infant mortality rate declined by 68.2% to a level of 24.9/1000 live births; this may be partly due to the shift to lower order births (and therefore low risk) as a result of better family planning. Perinatal mortality declined 6.7% in the pre-implementation years (1957 - 1967) and 19.8% in the post-implementation years (1967 - 1977). Low birthweight is a significant correlate of infant survival, and data from this study indicate that birthweights increase with maternal age up to 30-34 years, then begin to decrease. Birthweights are also lower (and infant mortality higher) for babies born at birth intervals of less than 15 months. Therefore, concerted efforts in family planning education need to be directed to vulnerable groups such as young mothers (under 19) and older mothers (over 40). PMID:12280343

  12. Perinatal programming of murine immune responses by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    van Vlies, N; Hogenkamp, A; Fear, A L; van Esch, B C; Oosting, A; van de Heijning, B; van der Beek, E; Calder, P C; Garssen, J

    2011-04-01

    Linoleic acid and ?-linolenic acid are essential fatty acids (eFAs) and have to be acquired from the diet. eFAs are the precursors for long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (lcPUFAs), which are important immune-modulating compounds. lcPUFAs can be converted into eicosanoids and other mediators. They affect membrane structure and fluidity and can alter gene expression. There has been a marked change in dietary fatty acid intake over the last several decades. Since eFAs are acquired from the diet and immune development occurs mainly perinatally, the maternal diet may influence fetal and neonatal eFA levels, and thereby lcPUFA status, and thus immune development and function. To study whether early exposure to eFAs can program immune function, mice were fed diets varying in the ratio of ?-3 to ?-6-eFAs during pregnancy and/or lactation. After weaning, pups received a Western-style diet. At 11 weeks of age, the effects of maternal diet on the offspring's allergic and vaccination responses were examined using the T-helper 2 driven ovalbumin-induced allergy model and the T-helper 1 driven influenza-vaccination model, respectively. Offspring of dams fed a high ?-linolenic acid diet during lactation showed an enhanced vaccination response. As diets with either low or high ?-3/?-6-eFA ratio attenuated the T-helper 2 allergic response, the high ?-linolenic acid diet fed during lactation had the most pronounced effect. These results indicate that there is a programming effect of maternal diet on the offspring's immune response and that in mice the window of greatest susceptibility to maternal dietary intervention is the lactation/suckling period. PMID:25140925

  13. A retrospective chart review to identify perinatal factors associated with food allergies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gut flora are important immunomodulators that may be disrupted in individuals with atopic conditions. Probiotic bacteria have been suggested as therapeutic modalities to mitigate or prevent food allergic manifestations. We wished to investigate whether perinatal factors known to disrupt gut flora increase the risk of IgE-mediated food allergies. Methods Birth records obtained from 192 healthy children and 99 children diagnosed with food allergies were reviewed retrospectively. Data pertaining to delivery method, perinatal antibiotic exposure, neonatal nursery environment, and maternal variables were recorded. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between variables of interest and subsequent food allergy diagnosis. Results Retrospective investigation did not find perinatal antibiotics, NICU admission, or cesarean section to be associated with increased risk of food allergy diagnosis. However, associations between food allergy diagnosis and male gender (66 vs. 33; p=0.02) were apparent in this cohort. Additionally, increasing maternal age at delivery was significantly associated with food allergy diagnosis during childhood (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.017 to 1.105; p=0.005). Conclusions Gut flora are potent immunomodulators, but their overall contribution to immune maturation remains to be elucidated. Additional understanding of the interplay between immunologic, genetic, and environmental factors underlying food allergy development need to be clarified before probiotic therapeutic interventions can routinely be recommended for prevention or mitigation of food allergies. Such interventions may be well-suited in male infants and in infants born to older mothers. PMID:23078601

  14. Evaluating the Clinical Effectiveness of a Specialized Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Unit

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Brandon, Anna R.; Pearson, Brenda; Burns, Lynne; Raines, Christena; Bullard, Elizabeth; Rubinow, David

    2013-01-01

    Women experiencing severe perinatal mental illness during pregnancy or postpartum have unique needs when psychiatric hospitalization is indicated. Although many countries have established mother-baby psychiatric units, similar facilities have not been available in the US. In 2011, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill inaugurated the first Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Unit (PPIU) in the US. We describe the unique characteristics of the patient population and report clinical outcomes guiding development and refinement of treatment protocols. Ninety-two perinatal patients were admitted between September 2011 and September 2012, and 91 completed self-report measures at admission and discharge. Perinatal unipolar mood disorder was the most frequent primary diagnosis (60.43%), and eleven patients (12%) were admitted with psychosis. The data document clinically and statistically significant improvements in symptoms of depression, anxiety and active suicidal ideation between admission and discharge (p < .0001), as assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale. Overall functioning was also improved, demonstrated by a significant mean difference of ?10.96 in total scores of the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (p < 0.0001). Data suggest that delivering specialized and targeted interventions for severe maternal mental illness in a safe and supportive setting produces positive patient outcomes. PMID:24201978

  15. A Model for Maternal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Cynthia D.; Baker-Ericzen, Mary J.; Hazen, Andrea L.; Landsverk, John

    2010-01-01

    Abstract With the awareness of maternal depression as a prevalent public health issue and its important link to child physical and mental health, attention has turned to how healthcare providers can respond effectively. Intimate partner violence (IPV) and the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs are strongly related to depression, particularly for low-income women. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends psychosocial screening of pregnant women at least once per trimester, yet screening is uncommonly done. Research suggests that a collaborative care approach improves identification, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness of care. This article presents The Perinatal Mental Health Model, a community-based model that developed screening and referral partnerships for use in community obstetric settings in order to specifically address the psychosocial needs of culturally diverse, low-income mothers. PMID:20718624

  16. Peritraumatic Distress Mediates the Effect of Severity of Disaster Exposure on Perinatal Depression: The Iowa Flood Study.

    PubMed

    Brock, Rebecca L; O'Hara, Michael W; Hart, Kimberly J; McCabe-Beane, Jennifer E; Williamson, J Austin; Brunet, Alain; Laplante, David P; Yu, Chunbo; King, Suzanne

    2015-12-01

    Disaster exposure during pregnancy has received limited attention. This study examined the impact of the 2008 Iowa Floods on perinatal maternal depression and well-being, and the role of peritraumatic distress as a possible mechanism explaining this link. Perinatal women (N = 171) completed measures of depressive symptoms and general well-being at 5 timepoints from pregnancy to 30 months postpartum. Objectively assessed prenatal flood exposure was associated with greater depression (r = .15). Further, flood-related peritraumatic distress was uniquely associated with greater depression (r = .23), and was a key mechanism through which flood exposure led to depression. Prenatal flood exposure was also associated with general well-being (r = .18); however, a mechanism other than peritraumatic distress appears to have been responsible for the effect of flood exposure on well-being. We discuss the implications of these findings for informing etiological models and enhancing the efficacy of interventions for maternal psychopathology. PMID:26584403

  17. Maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcome in low-resource countries

    PubMed Central

    van Lonkhuijzen, Luc; Stekelenburg, Jelle; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Background A maternity waiting home (MWH) is a facility within easy reach of a hospital or health centre which provides emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Women may stay in the MWH at the end of their pregnancy and await labour. Once labour starts, women move to the health facility so that labour and giving birth can be assisted by a skilled birth attendant. The aim of the MWH is to improve accessibility to skilled care and thus reduce morbidity and mortality for mother and neonate should complications arise. Some studies report a favourable effect on the outcomes for women and their newborns. Others show that utilisation is low and barriers exist. However, these data are limited in their reliability. Objectives To assess the effects of a maternity waiting facility on maternal and perinatal health. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (27 January 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4 of 4), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2012), EMBASE (1980 to January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to January 2012), African Journals Online (AJOL) (January 2012), POPLINE (January 2012), Dissertation Abstracts (January 2012) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials including quasi-randomised and cluster-randomised trials that compared perinatal and maternal outcome in women using a MWH and women who did not. Data collection and analysis There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Main results There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Authors’ conclusions There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:23076927

  18. Developmental programming of brain and behavior by perinatal diet: focus on inflammatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Jessica L.; Bilbo, Staci D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is now epidemic worldwide. Beyond associated diseases such as diabetes, obesity is linked to neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Alarmingly maternal obesity and high-fat diet consumption during gestation/lactation may “program” offspring longterm for increased obesity themselves, along with increased vulnerability to mood disorders. We review the evidence that programming of brain and behavior by perinatal diet is propagated by inflammatory mechanisms, as obesity and high-fat diets are independently associated with exaggerated systemic levels of inflammatory mediators. Due to the recognized dual role of these immune molecules (eg, interleukin [IL]-6, 11-1?) in placental function and brain development, any disruption of their delicate balance with growth factors or neurotransmitters (eg, serotonin) by inflammation early in life can permanently alter the trajectory of fetal brain development. Finally, epigenetic regulation of inflammatory pathways is a likely candidate for persistent changes in metabolic and brain function as a consequence of the perinatal environment. PMID:25364282

  19. PeriStats: Perinatal Statistics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for its support of the March of Dimes PeriStats service under cooperative agreement 5U38-H000523 awarded of Maternal and Child Health Programs. The mark “CDC” is owned by the US Dept. of Health and Human Services and is ...

  20. [Introduction of the psychoprophylactic method and its influence on the prenatal care program for institutional parturition in Japan: the practice in the Central Hospital of Maternity of the Japanese Red Cross Society and Oomori Red Cross Hospital, 1953-1964].

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Satoko; Tsukisawa, Miyoko

    2014-03-01

    The psychoprophylactic method is one of the methods for providing 'painless childbirth without drugs' and was invented by applying I. Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity. In 1951, it was adopted as a national policy in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. This method was then introduced in the People's Republic of China in 1952. In 1953, it was brought to Japan by Masatomo SUGAI, an obstetrician, and was introduced into the Central Hospital of Maternity of the Japanese Red Cross Society with the support of the director, Naotarou KUJI. The practice of this method by the research team, which consisted of the obstetricians and midwives of the Central Hospital of Maternity of the Japanese Red Cross Society and Oomori Red Cross Hospital, resulted in the initiation and characterization of the prenatal care program to encourage the autonomy of the pregnant women for normal parturition in the institutions of Japan. PMID:25059048

  1. Effects of early maternal employment on maternal health and well-being

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Sara; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study uses data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study on Early Child Care to examine the effects of maternal employment on maternal mental and overall health, self-reported parenting stress, and parenting quality. These outcomes are measured when children are 6 months old. Among mothers of 6-month-old infants, maternal work hours are positively associated with depressive symptoms and parenting stress and negatively associated with self-rated overall health. However, maternal employment is not associated with quality of parenting at 6 months, based on trained assessors’ observations of maternal sensitivity. PMID:23645972

  2. More similar than you think: Frog metamorphosis as a model of human perinatal endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Daniel R

    2015-12-15

    Hormonal control of development during the human perinatal period is critically important and complex with multiple hormones regulating fetal growth, brain development, and organ maturation in preparation for birth. Genetic and environmental perturbations of such hormonal control may cause irreversible morphological and physiological impairments and may also predispose individuals to diseases of adulthood, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Endocrine and molecular mechanisms that regulate perinatal development and that underlie the connections between early life events and adult diseases are not well elucidated. Such mechanisms are difficult to study in uterus-enclosed mammalian embryos because of confounding maternal effects. To elucidate mechanisms of developmental endocrinology in the perinatal period, Xenopus laevis the African clawed frog is a valuable vertebrate model. Frogs and humans have identical hormones which peak at birth and metamorphosis, have conserved hormone receptors and mechanisms of gene regulation, and have comparable roles for hormones in many target organs. Study of molecular and endocrine mechanisms of hormone-dependent development in frogs is advantageous because an extended free-living larval period followed by metamorphosis (1) is independent of maternal endocrine influence, (2) exhibits dramatic yet conserved developmental effects induced by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones, and (3) begins at a developmental stage with naturally undetectable hormone levels, thereby facilitating endocrine manipulation and interpretation of results. This review highlights the utility of frog metamorphosis to elucidate molecular and endocrine actions, hormone interactions, and endocrine disruption, especially with respect to thyroid hormone. Knowledge from the frog model is expected to provide fundamental insights to aid medical understanding of endocrine disease, stress, and endocrine disruption affecting the perinatal period in humans. PMID:25744725

  3. Reshaping maternal services in Nigeria: any need for spiritual care?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High maternal and perinatal mortalities occur from deliveries conducted in prayer houses in Nigeria. Although some regulatory efforts have been deployed to tackle this problem, less attention has been placed on the possible motivation for seeking prayer house intervention which could be hinged on the spiritual belief of patients about pregnancy and childbirth. This study therefore seeks to determine the perception of booked antenatal patients on spiritual care during pregnancy and their desire for such within hospital setting. Method A total of 397 antenatal attendees from two tertiary health institutions in southwest Nigeria were sampled. A pretested questionnaire was used to obtain information on socio-demographic features of respondents, perception of spiritual care during pregnancy and childbirth; and how they desire that their spiritual needs are addressed. Responses were subsequently collated and analyzed. Results Most of the women, 301 (75.8%), believe there is a need for spiritual help during pregnancy and childbirth. About half (48.5%) were currently seeking for help in prayer/mission houses while another 8.6% still intended to. Overwhelmingly, 281 (70.8%) felt it was needful for health professionals to consider their spiritual needs. Most respondents, 257 (64.7%), desired that their clergy is allowed to pray with them while in labour and sees such collaboration as incentive that will improve hospital patronage. There was association between high family income and desire for collaboration of healthcare providers with one’s clergy (OR 1.82; CI 1.03-3.21; p?=?0.04). Conclusion Our women desire spiritual care during pregnancy and childbirth. Its incorporation into maternal health services will improve hospital delivery rates. PMID:24902710

  4. Perinatal mental illness: definition, description and aetiology.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Michael W; Wisner, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal mental illness is a significant complication of pregnancy and the postpartum period. These disorders include depression, anxiety disorders, and postpartum psychosis, which usually manifests as bipolar disorder. Perinatal depression and anxiety are common, with prevalence rates for major and minor depression up to almost 20% during pregnancy and the first 3 months postpartum. Postpartum blues are a common but lesser manifestation of postpartum affective disturbance. Perinatal psychiatric disorders impair a woman's function and are associated with suboptimal development of her offspring. Risk factors include past history of depression, anxiety, or bipolar disorder, as well psychosocial factors, such as ongoing conflict with the partner, poor social support, and ongoing stressful life events. Early symptoms of depression, anxiety, and mania can be detected through screening in pregnancy and the postpartum period. Early detection and effective management of perinatal psychiatric disorders are critical for the welfare of women and their offspring. PMID:24140480

  5. Genetic analysis of malformations causing perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Young, I D; Rickett, A B; Clarke, M

    1986-02-01

    An analysis of congenital malformations, other than neural tube defects, which have contributed to perinatal mortality in Leicestershire is presented for the years 1976 to 1982 inclusive. Chromosomal, single gene, or polygenic inheritance accounted for 67% of cases. PMID:3950936

  6. Genetic analysis of malformations causing perinatal mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Young, I D; Rickett, A B; Clarke, M

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of congenital malformations, other than neural tube defects, which have contributed to perinatal mortality in Leicestershire is presented for the years 1976 to 1982 inclusive. Chromosomal, single gene, or polygenic inheritance accounted for 67% of cases. PMID:3950936

  7. Ethics education in neonatal-perinatal medicine in the United States.

    PubMed

    Salih, Zeynep N Inanc; Boyle, David W

    2009-12-01

    Neonatology is one of the specialties that has immensely benefited from advances in medical technology in the last few decades. These advances have paralleled the rise of the civil rights movements and wider recognition of individual rights. As a result, ethical decision-making has become more complex, involving patients, parents, members of the health care team, and society in general. This has created a need for formal ethics education in neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship programs. In this article, we briefly explore the current published data on ethics education in pediatric residency and neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship programs. Then, we discuss the questions an academic educator may face while developing an ethics curriculum in his/her medical institution. Finally, we present the ethics curriculum that we developed in our neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship program. PMID:19914525

  8. Genetic and perinatal effects of abused substances

    SciTech Connect

    Brande, M.C.; Zimmerman, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the effects of several abused drugs, including opiates, cannabinoids, alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, with special emphasis on the actions of these substances at the molecular and cellular levels. The first half deals with genetic effects, including molecular genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, cytogenetics, and genetic toxicity. The second half focuses on perinatal effects and covers: drug abuse during pregnancy; biochemical aspects of marihuana on male reproduction; and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of perinatal alcohol exposure.

  9. Fetal risk through maternal Amanita phalloides poisoning at the end of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Annette; Riethmüller, Joachim; Zilker, Thomas; Felgenhauer, Norbert; Abele, Harald; Poets, Christian F; Goelz, Rangmar

    2009-03-01

    There is a paucity of knowledge about prenatal and perinatal risks through maternal amatoxin poisoning. No symptoms of amatoxin intoxication, except for a slight temporary increase in liver enzymes activity, occurred in a term newborn after delivery despite an Amanita phalloides intoxication of the mother 2 days before. Considering previous reports, severe fetal intoxication may not occur during the entire pregnancy. PMID:19031349

  10. Therapeutic Targets for Neurodevelopmental Disorders Emerging from Animal Models with Perinatal Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ibi, Daisuke; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2015-01-01

    Increasing epidemiological evidence indicates that perinatal infection with various viral pathogens enhances the risk for several psychiatric disorders. The pathophysiological significance of astrocyte interactions with neurons and/or gut microbiomes has been reported in neurodevelopmental disorders triggered by pre- and postnatal immune insults. Recent studies with the maternal immune activation or neonatal polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid models of neurodevelopmental disorders have identified various candidate molecules that could be responsible for brain dysfunction. Here, we review the functions of several candidate molecules in neurodevelopment and brain function and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for psychiatric disorders. PMID:26633355

  11. Antenatal and perinatal conditions correlated to handicap among 4-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Holst, K; Andersen, E; Philip, J; Henningsen, I

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of maternal prepregnancy and pregnancy-related risk factors, complicated delivery, and perinatal morbidity on subsequent handicaps in children. We surveyed a birth cohort of 4102 mothers and 4138 children in Frederiksborg County, Denmark. Maternal risk factors were defined according to guidelines published by the Danish National Board of Health, and perinatal morbidity and handicaps according to World Health Organization guidelines. The incidence of handicaps: (cerebral palsy, mental retardation [mild and severe], epilepsy, severe defects of vision and hearing); was 44 of 4038 children (twins and neonatal deaths were excluded). A combination of three or more maternal risk factors was found to be a predictor of risk for children with later handicaps; the incidence of handicaps was 11 times higher than in mothers with no risk factors. Eleven percent of all mothers had three or more risk factors and they had 43% of the handicapped children. Multiparity increased the risk in all risk categories. Of complications at delivery, intrapartum asphyxia, as evident from Apgar scores of less than 7 at 1 minute and less than 10 at 10 minutes in particular, was a strong predictor of a later handicap. Premature rupture of membranes for more than 24 hours was also significantly associated with later handicaps. Perinatal morbidity was correlated with a later handicap. The perinatal complication most strongly associated with later handicaps was low birthweight. Forty-eight percent of the affected children had a birthweight of less than 2500 gm and were small for gestational age. We conclude that the incidence of handicaps could possibly be reduced if the causes of the following maternal risk factors were identified and, if possible, eliminated: previous delivery of a child with a birthweight less than 2500 gm, previous delivery of a stillborn child, repeated abortions, severe infection during pregnancy, intrauterine growth retardation, and preterm delivery. Improved intrapartum diagnosis and prevention of asphyxia and treatment of children born with low Apgar scores would reduce the incidence of handicaps, as would intervention to prevent premature rupture of the membranes of more than 24 hour's duration. PMID:2712925

  12. Syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors associated with neural tube defects (I).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs) may be associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, such as acrocallosal syndrome, autosomal dominant brachydactyly-clinodactyly syndrome, Manouvrier syndrome, short rib-polydactyly syndrome, Disorganization ( Ds )-like human malformations, isolated hemihyperplasia, X-linked NTDs, meroanencephaly, schisis association, diprosopus, fetal valproate syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, folic acid antagonists, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors are a rare but important cause of NTDs. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors may be different from those of non-syndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert one to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt a thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling. PMID:18400576

  13. Neonatal-perinatal medicine: Diseases of the fetus and infant

    SciTech Connect

    Fanaroff, A.A.; Martin, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 40 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Perinatal services and resources; Diabetes in pregnancy; Erythroblastosis fetalis; Placental pathology; Genetic disease and chromosomal abnormalities; Perinatal ultrasound; and Diagnostic imaging.

  14. Prenatal and perinatal factors associated with brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Rosen, M G; Hobel, C J

    1986-09-01

    In April 1985, a report entitled "Prenatal and Perinatal Factors Associated with Brain Disorders" was published by the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development and the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke. A panel of ten individuals completed the report documenting the knowledge and the complexities of what is known with respect to brain damage that may develop before birth or in the neonatal period. It is clear that all stages of fetal and neonatal development influence normal outcome. Although intrapartal period events may explain a significant portion of cerebral palsy, the illness is often linked with confounding factors such as low birth weight and asphyxia. Pure epilepsy or pure mental retardation is rarely associated with intrapartal events. In general, the pathologic lesions seen in the brain may reflect many different fetal insults. The same clinical event such as asphyxia may result in varied intracranial diseases, which effects may depend on when the clinical events occurred. PMID:3737066

  15. Maternal Exposure to Synthetic Chemicals and Obesity in the Offspring: Recent Findings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Peterson, Karen E

    2015-12-01

    Experimental studies suggest perinatal exposures to synthetic chemicals may be associated with early onset obesity, although this hypothesis has not been extensively examined in humans. This article summarizes the evidence relating maternal perinatal exposure to common persistent organic compounds (polychlorinated biphenyl, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexane), perfluoroalkyls, perfluorooctane sulfonate, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and tributyltin, and nonpersistent compounds (phthalates, bisphenol A) on child obesity during sensitive developmental periods. Twenty-two epidemiologic studies published from 2011 to 2015 offer inconsistent support for the obesogenic effects of most substances and are limited by relatively small sample sizes and indirect measures of adiposity. The clearest findings suggest an influence of maternal dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene exposure on offspring overweight and obesity. Recommendations for future epidemiological research include longer follow-up of effects of pre- and postnatal exposures in large samples; utilization of direct measures of adiposity; and consideration of effect modification by sex, birth weight, dietary fat, and maternal weight status. PMID:26403844

  16. Cerebellar Purkinje cell vulnerability to prenatal nicotine exposure in sudden unexplained perinatal death.

    PubMed

    Lavezzi, Anna M; Corna, Melissa F; Repetti, Maria L; Matturri, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed at supplementing our previous investigations on the morphological features of the Purkinje cells during the autonomic nervous system development, particularly in victims of sudden perinatal death (Sudden Intrauterine Unexplained Death Syndrome and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome), given their crucial role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain as well as in the control of autonomic functions. We highlighted in these pathologies, and precisely in 21 cases of sudden foetal death and 26 cases of sudden infant death, a high percentage of developmental defects of the Purkinje cells such as heterotopia, hypoplasia, hyperplasia, mitotic and/or shrunken features and abnormal neuronal nuclear antigen expression. These alterations can be interpreted as a result of a defective maturation and/or migration of Purkinje cells in foetal cerebellum, likely consequence of exposure to injuries, particularly to maternal cigarette smoke. Interestingly, we observed in sudden perinatal deaths an association with similar developmental defects of both the dentate and the inferior olivary nuclei. This suggests the existence of a Purkinje-Olivo-Dentate network playing a fundamental role in triggering a sudden death mechanism in perinatal life in the presence of specific risk factors. PMID:24374957

  17. Perinatal Outcomes of Uninsured Immigrant, Refugee and Migrant Mothers and Newborns Living in Toronto, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Mitchell, Karline; Rummens, Joanna Anneke

    2013-01-01

    Canadian healthcare insurance is not universal for all newcomer populations. New immigrant, refugee claimant, and migrant women face various barriers to healthcare due to the lack of public health insurance coverage. This retrospective study explored the relationships between insurance status and various perinatal outcomes. Researchers examined and compared perinatal outcomes for 453 uninsured and provincially insured women who delivered at two general hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area between 2007 and 2010. Data on key perinatal health indicators were collected via chart review of hospital medical records. Comparisons were made with regional statistics and professional guidelines where available. Four-in-five uninsured pregnant women received less-than-adequate prenatal care. More than half of them received clearly inadequate prenatal care, and 6.5% received no prenatal care at all. Insurance status was also related to the type of health care provider, reason for caesarean section, neonatal resuscitation rates, and maternal length of hospital stay. Uninsured mothers experienced a higher percentage of caesarian sections due to abnormal fetal heart rates and required more neonatal resuscitations. No significant difference was found for low birth weight, preterm birth, NCIU admissions, postpartum hemorrhage, breast feeding, or intrapartum care provided. PMID:23727901

  18. Hospital-based Perinatal Outcomes and Complications in Teenage Pregnancy in India

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, R.N.; Paul, Bhaskar

    2010-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy is a worldwide problem bearing serious social and medical implications relating to maternal and child health. A cross-sectional observational study was undertaken to compare the different sociodemographic characteristics and perinatal outcomes of teenage primigravida mothers with those of adult primigravida mothers in a tertiary-care hospital in eastern India. A sample of 350 each in cases and comparison group comprised the study subjects. Data were collected through interviews and by observations using a pretested and predesigned schedule. Results revealed that the teenage mothers had a higher proportion (27.7%) of preterm deliveries compared to 13.1% in the adult mothers and had low-birth-weight babies (38.9% vs 30.4% respectively). Stillbirth rate was also significantly higher in teenage deliveries (5.1% vs 0.9% respectively). The teenage mothers developed more adverse perinatal complications, such as preterm births, stillbirths, neonatal deaths, and delivered low-birthweight babies, when compared with those of the adult primigravida mothers. Teenage pregnancy is still a rampant and important public-health problem in India with unfavourable perinatal outcomes and needs to be tackled on a priority basis. PMID:20941901

  19. Customized large-for-gestational-age birthweight at term and the association with adverse perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    SJAARDA, Lindsey A.; ALBERT, Paul S.; MUMFORD, Sunni L.; HINKLE, Stefanie N.; MENDOLA, Pauline; LAUGHON, S. Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Objective Using a cohort of 110,447 singleton, term pregnancies, we aimed to validate the previously proposed customized standard of LGA birthweight, derive an additional customized LGA model excluding maternal weight, and evaluate the association between differing definitions of customized LGA and perinatal morbidities. Study Design Three customized LGA classifications, in addition to population-based 90th percentile (LGAPop), were made according to the principals described by Gardosi: 1) customized LGA using Gardosi’s previously published coefficients (LGAGard), 2) customized LGA using coefficients derived by a similar method but from our larger cohort, and 3) derived without customization for maternal weight. Associations between the LGA classifications and various perinatal morbidity outcomes were evaluated. Results Coefficients derived here for physiologic and pathologic effects on birthweight were similar to those previously reported (LGAGard). Customized LGA (any method) generally identified more births to younger, non-white, nulliparous mothers with female neonates of lower birthweight compared to LGAPop. Rates of maternal and neonatal morbidity were greatest in births classified by both LGAPop and customized LGA (any method). However, the model which excluded customization for maternal weight, revealed a greater proportion of women previously unidentified by LGAPop who were more frequently black (40 vs. 25%) and obese (30 vs. 5.1 %), along with greater rates of shoulder dystocia, neonatal intensive care unit admission and neonatal respiratory complications, than with LGAGard. Conclusion The utility of customized methods of defining LGA was not decisively superior compared to LGAPop, but custom LGA may be improved by modification of the parameters included in customization. PMID:24035985

  20. Informing Maternal and Child Health (MCH) policy through research.

    PubMed

    Ashley, D; McCaw-Binns, A

    1998-12-01

    Maternal and Child Health (MCH) policy over the past two decades has been strongly influenced by research. The paper presents examples of some of the research undertaken and its significant influence in shaping health service delivery. Research in child health has focussed on oral rehydration therapy, immunization and perinatal morbidity and mortality. On the maternal side, morbidity and mortality have been examined with particular focus on problems which contribute to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Policies arising out of the outcome of these studies have influenced organization of service delivery, information system development, manpower development and deployment, maternal education, surveillance/auditing, quality of care, design of physical facilities and selection of equipment. The results of these studies have also led to the identification of areas requiring further study and testing of intervention to correct the deficiencies identified. These studies demonstrate that research can and does influence health policy, and has impacted positively on the quality and cost of care provided through our health services. PMID:10368617

  1. Trajectories of Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Maternal Sensitivity, and Children's Functioning at School Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Susan B.; Matestic, Patricia; von Stauffenberg, Camilla; Mohan, Roli; Kirchner, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, the authors modeled trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms from infant age 1 month to 7 years. The authors identified 6 trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms: high-chronic, moderate-increasing, high-decreasing,…

  2. Introductory engagement within the perinatal nursing relationship.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Lisa Sara

    2005-07-01

    In this article, the theme of introductory engagement is developed through the conversational interviews and participatory observations I carried out with perinatal nurses and birthing women in the context of a feminist phenomenological methodology. Positioned against the landscape of hierarchical health care practices embedded with power dynamics and disembodied practices, this research explored the ways in which perinatal nurses related to birthing women in the context of relational care. The focus of attention in this article is to describe the theme of introductory engagement by way of a storied phenomenological text. PMID:16045248

  3. Bilateral opercular syndrome caused by perinatal difficulties.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Koeda, T; Maegaki, Y; Tanaka, C; Takeshita, K

    1997-01-01

    Four patients with pseudobulbar palsy, mental retardation and various degrees of speech disturbance associated with perinatal difficulties are described as having an acquired type of opercular syndrome. There were two patients with fetal bradycardia and three with subarachnoid haemorrhage and neonatal convulsion. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed cortical atrophy in the bilateral opercula with some signal abnormalities in the underlying white matter in common. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) also confirmed the presence of hypoperfusion in the regions. Although the opercular syndrome is a clinical entity with a multitude of underlying pathologies, perinatal difficulties could be an important cause of the acquired type. PMID:10728199

  4. Perinatal Outcome in the Liveborn Infant with Prenatally Diagnosed Omphalocele

    PubMed Central

    KOMINIAREK, Michelle A.; ZORK, Noelia; PIERCE, Sara Michelle; ZOLLINGER, Terrell

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare perinatal outcomes between liveborn non-isolated and isolated omphaloceles diagnosed during a prenatal ultrasound. Study Design Fetuses (n=86) with omphalocele were identified between 1995–2007 at a single institution. Inclusion criteria were an omphalocele >14 weeks gestation, available fetal and/or neonatal karyotype, and a liveborn infant (n=46). Perinatal outcomes were compared in non-isolated (n=23) and isolated omphaloceles (n=23). Results For all omphaloceles, the majority delivered after 34 weeks by cesarean. Mean birth weight (2782 vs. 2704g), median length of stay (27 vs. 25 days), and mortality (2 in each group) was not different between the non-isolated and isolated groups, P>0.05. In the non-isolated group, 7 major anomalies were not confirmed postnatally. Of the prenatally diagnosed isolated omphaloceles, 8(35%) were diagnosed with a syndrome or other anomalies after birth. Conclusion The outcomes were similar in non-isolated and isolated prenatally diagnosed omphaloceles, but ultrasound did not always accurately determine the presence or absence of associated anomalies. PMID:21544770

  5. A Perinatal Care Quality and Safety Initiative: Hospital Costs and Potential Savings

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Sommerness, Samantha; Rauk, Phillip; Gams, Rebecca; Hirt, Charles; Davis, Stanley; Miller, Kristi K.; Landers, Daniel V.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing national focus on hospital initiatives to improve obstetric and neonatal outcomes. While costs of providing care may decrease with improved quality, the accompanying reduced adverse outcomes may impact hospital revenues. The purpose of this study was to estimate, from a hospital perspective, the financial impacts of implementing a perinatal quality and safety initiative. Methods In 2008, a Minnesota-based health system (Fairview Health Services) launched the Zero Birth Injury (ZBI) initiative, which uses evidence-based care bundles to guide management of obstetric services. We conducted a pre-post analysis of financial impacts of ZBI, using hospital administrative records to measure costs and revenues associated with changes in maternal and neonatal birth injuries before (2008) and after (2009–11) the initiative. Results After adjusting for relevant covariates, implementation of ZBI was associated with an 11% decrease in the rate of maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes between 2008 and 2011 (AOR=0.89, p=0.076). As a result of the adverse events avoided, the hospital system saved $284,985 in costs but earned $324,333 less revenue, which produced a net financial decrease of $39,348 (or a $305 net financial loss per adverse event avoided) in 2011, compared with 2008. Conclusions Adoption of a perinatal quality and safety initiative that reduced birth injuries had little net financial impact on the hospital. ZBI produced better clinical results at a lower cost, which represents potential savings for payers, but the hospital system offering increased quality reaped no clear financial rewards. These results highlight the important role for shared-savings collaborations (among patients, providers, government and third-party payers, and employers) to incentivize quality improvement. Widespread adoption of perinatal safety initiatives combined with innovative payment models may contribute to better health at reduced cost. PMID:23991507

  6. Timing of treatment initiation for mild gestational diabetes and perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik, Anna; Mele, Lisa; Landon, Mark B.; Reddy, Uma M.; Ramin, Susan M.; Carpenter, Marshall W.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Thorp, John M.; Sciscione, Anthony; Catalano, Patrick; Saade, George R.; Caritis, Steve N.; Sorokin, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between gestational age (GA) at the time of treatment initiation for gestational diabetes (GDM) and maternal and perinatal outcomes. Study Design A secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized treatment trial of mild GDM in which women with mild GDM were randomized to treatment versus usual care. The primary outcome of the original trial, as well as this analysis, was a composite perinatal adverse outcome that included neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, hyperinsulinemia, and perinatal mortality. Other outcomes examined included the frequency of large for gestational age (LGA), birth weight, neonatal intensive care unit admission (NICU), gestational hypertension / preeclampsia and cesarean delivery. The interaction between GA at treatment initiation (stratified as 24-26 weeks, 27 weeks, 28 weeks, 29 weeks, ?30 weeks) and treatment group (treated vs. routine care), with the outcomes of interest, was used to determine whether GA at treatment initiation was associated with outcome differences. Results Of 958 women analyzed, those who initiated treatment at an earlier GA did not gain an additional treatment benefit compared to those who initiated treatment at a later GA (p-value for interaction with the primary outcome is 0.44). Similarly, there was no evidence that other outcomes were significantly improved by earlier initiation of GDM treatment (LGA p=0.76; NICU admission p=0.8; cesarean delivery p=0.82). The only outcome that had a significant interaction between GA and treatment was gestational hypertension/preeclampsia (p=0.04), although there was not a clear cut GA trend where this outcome improved with treatment. Conclusion Earlier initiation of treatment of mild GDM was not associated with stronger effect of treatment on perinatal outcomes. PMID:26071920

  7. Dynamic Metabolic Disruption in Rats Perinatally Exposed to Low Doses of Bisphenol-A

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Cabaton, Nicolas J.; Canlet, Cécile; Gautier, Roselyne; Schaeberle, Cheryl M.; Jourdan, Fabien; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Vinson, Florence; Soto, Ana M.; Zalko, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Along with the well-established effects on fertility and fecundity, perinatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, and notably to xeno-estrogens, is strongly suspected of modulating general metabolism. The metabolism of a perinatally exposed individual may be durably altered leading to a higher susceptibility of developing metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes; however, experimental designs involving the long term study of these dynamic changes in the metabolome raise novel challenges. 1H-NMR-based metabolomics was applied to study the effects of bisphenol-A (BPA, 0; 0.25; 2.5, 25 and 250 ?g/kg BW/day) in rats exposed perinatally. Serum and liver samples of exposed animals were analyzed on days 21, 50, 90, 140 and 200 in order to explore whether maternal exposure to BPA alters metabolism. Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) was independently applied to each time point, demonstrating a significant pair-wise discrimination for liver as well as serum samples at all time-points, and highlighting unequivocal metabolic shifts in rats perinatally exposed to BPA, including those exposed to lower doses. In BPA exposed animals, metabolism of glucose, lactate and fatty acids was modified over time. To further explore dynamic variation, ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis (A-SCA) was used to separate data into blocks corresponding to the different sources of variation (Time, Dose and Time*Dose interaction). A-SCA enabled the demonstration of a dynamic, time/age dependent shift of serum metabolome throughout the rats’ lifetimes. Variables responsible for the discrimination between groups clearly indicate that BPA modulates energy metabolism, and suggest alterations of neurotransmitter signaling, the latter finding being compatible with the neurodevelopmental effect of this xenoestrogen. In conclusion, long lasting metabolic effects of BPA could be characterized over 200 days, despite physiological (and thus metabolic) changes connected with sexual maturation and aging. PMID:26517871

  8. First-trimester maternal factors and biomarker screening for preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Poon, Leona C; Nicolaides, Kypros H

    2014-07-01

    Preeclampsia (PE), which affects about 2% of pregnancies, is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. PE can be subdivided into early onset PE with delivery <34?weeks' gestation and late onset PE with delivery ?34?weeks. Early onset PE is associated with a higher incidence of adverse outcome. This review illustrates that effective screening for the development of early onset PE can be provided in the first-trimester of pregnancy. Screening by a combination of maternal risk factors, mean arterial pressure, uterine artery Doppler, maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A and placental growth factor can identify about 95% of cases of early onset PE for a false-positive rate of 10%. PMID:24764257

  9. Maternity Care in Russia: Issues, Achievements, and Potential.

    PubMed

    Shuvalova, Marina P; Yarotskaya, Ekaterina L; Pismenskaya, Tatiana V; Dolgushina, Nataliya V; Baibarina, Elena N; Sukhikh, Gennady T

    2015-10-01

    In this review, we provide basic facts about maternity care services within the health care system in Russia. We give a short overview of such key aspects as the demographic situation, reproductive behaviour, regulatory framework for providing health care for women and children, maternal and perinatal mortality, and the availability of medical personnel. In 2012, Russia began registration of births in accordance with the WHO recommendations (births with weight ? 500 g at ? 22 weeks' gestation). Introduction of this new registration system increased the completeness and quality of the collected information and expanded possibilities for future international comparative assessments. A three-level system of specialized medical care has been introduced in Russia for women and newborns during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. In 2014, the system included 1942 state (public) maternity hospitals providing 20 obstetric beds per 10?000 women aged 15 to 49 years. More than 100 perinatal centres (level III) are currently functioning in the country, with 32 new perinatal centres planned to open by 2016. The total number of obstetrician-gynaecologists in Russia is approximately 44?000, providing a ratio of 5.7 specialists per 10?000 women. The total number of midwives is 62?000, providing a ratio of 8.1 midwives per 10?000 women. In recent years we have succeeded in optimizing the maternity care system by increasing its accessibility and quality. This was achieved through qualitative and quantitative progress in the training of neonatologists, the development of intensive care technologies and neonatal critical care, capacity building of medical-genetic services and counselling, prenatal diagnosis, and the standardization of health care with data collection. PMID:26606698

  10. Guillain-Barré syndrome complicating pregnancy and correlation with maternal and fetal outcome in North Eastern India: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shri Ram; Sharma, Nalini; Masaraf, Hussain; Singh, Santa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is rare in pregnancy with an estimated incidence between 1.2 and 1.9 cases per 100,000 people annually, and it is generally accepted that it carries a high maternal risk. Most reports of GBS with pregnancy are case reports only. Aim: Purpose of this retrospective study was to find the correlation between pregnancy and GBS. Settings and Design: Records of patients admitted in neurology division were analyzed in a tertiary care teaching hospital in the northeastern Indian pregnant female population with GBS between 15-49 years during the period of 2009-2013. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the records of 47 patients with pregnancy and GBS, evaluated and treated in our institute from August 2009 to December 2013. This is retrospective observational study done in North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health and Medical Sciences (NEIGRIHMS), India. Result: Predominant form of GBS was acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP). The weakness started from the lower limbs in majority of patients. Ten percent of women had bifacial weakness. Most of patients had good maternal and fetal outcome. Two patients received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Only two patient required ventilator supports and one patient had intrauterine death (IUD) and died due to respiratory failure. Conclusion: Our results indicate that risk of GBS increases in third trimester and first 2 weeks after delivery. Demyelinating variety of GBS was common in our population. GBS natural course during pregnancy is mild and showed quick recovery. Maternal and perinatal outcome was good. PMID:26019422

  11. Frequency of Maternal and Newborn Birth Outcomes, Lima, Peru, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Adriane; Cabeza, Jeanne; Adachi, Kristina; Needleman, Jack; Garcia, Patricia J.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study describes the pregnancy and birth outcomes at two hospitals in Lima, Peru. The data collection and analysis is intended to inform patients, providers, and policy makers on Peru’s progress toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals and to help set priorities for action and further research. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from a sample of 237 women who delivered between December 2012 and September 2013 at the Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal or the Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza. The outcomes were recorded by a trained mid-wife through telephone interviews with patients and by review of hospital records. Associations between participant demographic characteristics and pregnancy outcomes were tested with Chi-squared, Fisher’s exact, or Student’s t-test. Results Over 37% of women experienced at least one maternal or perinatal complication, and the most frequent were hypertension/preeclampsia and macrosomia. The women in our sample had a cesarean section rate of 50.2%. Conclusion Maternal and perinatal complications are not uncommon among women in the lower socioeconomic strata of Lima. Also, the high cesarean rate underpins the need for a more comprehensive understanding of the indications for cesarean section deliveries, which could help reduce the number of unnecessary procedures and preventable complications. PMID:25806522

  12. Maternal and Child Health, FY 1983. Special Report to Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Providing several examples of current research efforts, this report describes the research on maternal and child health supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The Institute conducts a coordinated program of research and research training to advance knowledge related to pregnancy and maternal health,…

  13. Preventing the First Cesarean Delivery: Summary of a Joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Spong, Catherine Y.; Berghella, Vincenzo; Wenstrom, Katharine D.; Mercer, Brian M.; Saade, George R.

    2012-01-01

    With over one-third of pregnancies in the United States being delivered by cesarean and the growing knowledge of morbidities associated with repeat cesarean deliveries, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists convened a workshop to address the concept of preventing the first cesarean. The available information on maternal and fetal factors, labor management and induction, and non-medical factors leading to the first cesarean were reviewed as well as the implications of the first cesarean on future reproductive health. Key points were identified to assist with reduction in cesarean rates including that labor induction should be performed primarily for medical indication; if done for non-medical indications, the gestational age should be at least 39 weeks or more and the cervix should be favorable, especially in the nulliparous patient. Review of the current literature demonstrates the importance of adhering to appropriate definitions for failed induction and arrest of labor progress. The diagnosis of “failed induction” should only be made after an adequate attempt. Adequate time for normal latent and active phases of the first stage, and for the second stage, should be allowed, as long as the maternal and fetal conditions permit. The adequate time for each of these stages appears to be longer than traditionally estimated. Operative vaginal delivery is an acceptable birth method when indicated, and can safely prevent cesarean delivery. Given the progressively declining use, it is critical that training and experience in operative vaginal delivery is facilitated and encouraged. When discussing the first cesarean with a patient, counseling should include its effect on future reproductive health. PMID:23090537

  14. Status of maternal and new born care at first referral units in the state of West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Biswas, A B; Nandy, S; Sinha, R N; Das, D K; Roy, R N; Datta, S

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted in 12 First Referral Units (FRUs), selected through multistage sampling, from 6 districts of West Bengal. Infrastructure facilities, record keeping, referral system and MCH indicators related to newborn care were documented. Data was collected by review of records, interview and observation using a pre-designed proforma. Inadequate infrastructure facilities (e.g. no sanctioned posts of specialists, no blood bank at rural hospitals declared as First Referral Units etc.); poor utilization of equipment like neonatal resuscitation sets, radiant warmer etc, lack of training of the service providers were evident. Records/registers were available but incomplete. Referral system was found to be almost nonexistent. Most of the deliveries (86.1%) were normal delivery. Deliveries (87.71%) and immediate neonatal resuscitation (94.9%) were done mostly by nursing personnel. Institution based maternal, perinatal and early neonatal mortality rates were found to be 5.6, 62.4 and 25.2 per 1000 live births respectively. Eclampsia (48.9%), hemorrhage (17.7%), puerperal sepsis (7.1%) were reported to be major causes of maternal mortality. Common causes of early neonatal mortality were birth asphyxia (54.3%), sepsis (14.6%) and prematurity/LBW (12.4%). PMID:15704722

  15. Perinatal outcomes and unconventional natural gas operations in Southwest Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Shaina L; Brink, LuAnn L; Larkin, Jacob C; Sadovsky, Yoel; Goldstein, Bernard D; Pitt, Bruce R; Talbott, Evelyn O

    2015-01-01

    Unconventional gas drilling (UGD) has enabled extraordinarily rapid growth in the extraction of natural gas. Despite frequently expressed public concern, human health studies have not kept pace. We investigated the association of proximity to UGD in the Marcellus Shale formation and perinatal outcomes in a retrospective cohort study of 15,451 live births in Southwest Pennsylvania from 2007-2010. Mothers were categorized into exposure quartiles based on inverse distance weighted (IDW) well count; least exposed mothers (first quartile) had an IDW well count less than 0.87 wells per mile, while the most exposed (fourth quartile) had 6.00 wells or greater per mile. Multivariate linear (birth weight) or logistical (small for gestational age (SGA) and prematurity) regression analyses, accounting for differences in maternal and child risk factors, were performed. There was no significant association of proximity and density of UGD with prematurity. Comparison of the most to least exposed, however, revealed lower birth weight (3323 ± 558 vs 3344 ± 544 g) and a higher incidence of SGA (6.5 vs 4.8%, respectively; odds ratio: 1.34; 95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.63). While the clinical significance of the differences in birth weight among the exposure groups is unclear, the present findings further emphasize the need for larger studies, in regio-specific fashion, with more precise characterization of exposure over an extended period of time to evaluate the potential public health significance of UGD. PMID:26039051

  16. Perinatal Outcomes and Unconventional Natural Gas Operations in Southwest Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Shaina L.; Brink, LuAnn L.; Larkin, Jacob C.; Sadovsky, Yoel; Goldstein, Bernard D.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Talbott, Evelyn O.

    2015-01-01

    Unconventional gas drilling (UGD) has enabled extraordinarily rapid growth in the extraction of natural gas. Despite frequently expressed public concern, human health studies have not kept pace. We investigated the association of proximity to UGD in the Marcellus Shale formation and perinatal outcomes in a retrospective cohort study of 15,451 live births in Southwest Pennsylvania from 2007–2010. Mothers were categorized into exposure quartiles based on inverse distance weighted (IDW) well count; least exposed mothers (first quartile) had an IDW well count less than 0.87 wells per mile, while the most exposed (fourth quartile) had 6.00 wells or greater per mile. Multivariate linear (birth weight) or logistical (small for gestational age (SGA) and prematurity) regression analyses, accounting for differences in maternal and child risk factors, were performed. There was no significant association of proximity and density of UGD with prematurity. Comparison of the most to least exposed, however, revealed lower birth weight (3323 ± 558 vs 3344 ± 544 g) and a higher incidence of SGA (6.5 vs 4.8%, respectively; odds ratio: 1.34; 95% confidence interval: 1.10–1.63). While the clinical significance of the differences in birth weight among the exposure groups is unclear, the present findings further emphasize the need for larger studies, in regio-specific fashion, with more precise characterization of exposure over an extended period of time to evaluate the potential public health significance of UGD. PMID:26039051

  17. Metabolic activation/deactivation reactions during perinatal development.

    PubMed Central

    Lucier, G W; Lui, E M; Lamartiniere, C A

    1979-01-01

    The role of metabolic activation/deactivation reactions during development is evaluated in relation to developmental pharmacology and toxicology. Enzyme systems evaluated include the mixed-function oxidases (aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and oxidative demethylation), epoxide hydration and conjugation (glutathione conjugation, sulfation, and glucuronidation). Placental transfer and milk secretion of chemicals are discussed in relation to maternal, placental, and fetal metabolism. Normal patterns of enzyme development can be modified in two ways: (1) enzyme induction and (2) enzyme imprinting. Postnatal induction of the mixed-function oxidases and glucuronyl-transferase following treatment of pregnant rats with TCDD is shown to be caused primarily by newborn exposure to TCDD in milk. Structure-activity relationship are defined for the perinatal induction of hepatic enzymes by the pure PCBs. PCBs are divided into two classes: P-450 inducers and P-448 inducers. Imprinting or programming of hepatic metabolism is a function of the sexual differentiation of enzyme activity; male and female activities are similar in prepubertal animals, whereas pronounced sex differences are evident in adults. Treatment of newborn rats (days 2--6) with diethystilbestrol or testosterone resulted in a feminization (decrease) of mixed-function oxidation and glucuronidation in adult males. No changes were seen in immature males or females or adult females. This effect appears to be irreversible and is under pituitary-hypothalamic-gonadal control. In addition to the feminization of enzyme activity, neonatal exposure to hormonally active chemicals also feminizes the hepatic response to cadmium in resultant adult animals. PMID:510244

  18. DRINKING WATER ARSENIC AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking Water Arsenic and Perinatal Outcomes
    DT Lobdell, Z Ning, RK Kwok, JL Mumford, ZY Liu, P Mendola

    Many studies have documented an association between drinking water arsenic (DWA) and cancer, vascular diseases, and dermatological outcomes, but few have investigate...

  19. Perinatal Depression Treatment Preferences Among Latina Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz; Wisner, Katherine L.; Burns, Rachel M.; Chaves-Gnecco, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The study described here was designed to determine treatment preferences among Latinas to identify treatment options that meet their needs and increase their engagement. Focus group interviews were conducted with 22 prenatal and postpartum Latinas at risk for depression. The group interviews were conducted in Spanish and English using a standardized interview protocol. Focus group transcripts were analyzed to identify themes regarding perinatal depression coping strategies, preferred approaches to treating perinatal depression, and recommendations for engaging perinatal Latinas in treatment. The results suggest that Latinas’ treatment preferences consist of a pathway (i.e., hierarchical) approach that begins with the use of one’s own resources, followed by the use of formal support systems (e.g., home-visiting nurse), and supplemented with the use of behavioral therapy. Antidepressant use was judged to be acceptable only in severe cases or after delivery. The data indicate that to increase health-seeking behaviors among perinatal Latinas, practitioners should first build trust. PMID:24469693

  20. Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

  1. The Maternal Microbiome and Pregnancy Outcomes that Impact Infant Health: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mulle, Jennifer G.; Ferranti, Erin P.; Edwards, Sara; Dunn, Alexis B.; Corwin, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    The maternal microbiome is recognized as a key determinant of a range of important maternal and child health outcomes, and together with perinatal factors influences the infant microbiome. This manuscript provides a summary review of research investigating: (1) the role of the maternal microbiome in pregnancy outcomes known to adversely influence neonatal and infant health, including preterm birth, cardiometabolic complications of pregnancy such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes, and excessive gestational weight gain; (2) factors with an established link to adverse pregnancy outcomes that are known to influence the composition of the maternal microbiome; and (3) strategies for promoting a healthy maternal microbiome, recognizing that much more research is needed in this area. PMID:26317856

  2. Maternal Microbiome and Pregnancy Outcomes That Impact Infant Health: A Review.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Anne L; Mulle, Jennifer G; Ferranti, Erin P; Edwards, Sara; Dunn, Alexis B; Corwin, Elizabeth J

    2015-12-01

    The maternal microbiome is recognized as a key determinant of a range of important maternal and child health outcomes, and together with perinatal factors influences the infant microbiome. This article provides a summary review of research investigating (1) the role of the maternal microbiome in pregnancy outcomes known to adversely influence neonatal and infant health, including preterm birth, cardiometabolic complications of pregnancy such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes, and excessive gestational weight gain; (2) factors with an established link to adverse pregnancy outcomes that are known to influence the composition of the maternal microbiome; and (3) strategies for promoting a healthy maternal microbiome, recognizing that much more research is needed in this area. PMID:26317856

  3. a Comparison Between Chemically Dependent Mothers and Drug-Free Mothers: Lifestyle during the Perinatal Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uskokovic, Lila Milica

    This study compared maternal lifestyle variables pertinent to the perinatal period in groups of chemically dependent mothers and drug-free mothers. Twenty-nine cocaine -abusing mothers were compared to 29 drug-free mothers carefully matched on age, race, education, and primipara versus multipara status. The drug history of each chemically dependent woman was explicitly documented. The chemically dependent group was subdivided into two groups, mothers who abused cocaine and those who abused cocaine with concomitant opiate use. Each of these two subgroups was compared to its respective matched drug-free control group. Finally, a comparison was made between the two drug subgroups. All subjects were interviewed within 48 hours after delivery using the following measures: State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (A-State), Center for Epidemiologic Studies - Depression Scale, The Self-Esteem Scale, Maternal Adjustment and Maternal Attitude Questionnaire, The Neonatal Perception Inventory, The Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview Life Events Scale, Maternal Social Support Index, and Short Marital Adjustment Test. A t-test analysis revealed significant differences (p <.05) between the total experimental group and its matched control group on state anxiety, depression, self-esteem, maternal adjustment and attitudes, and life events. An analysis of covariance indicated that life events was the only significant variable when the influence of all other variables was removed. Comparisons made between each drug subgroup and its respective matched control group showed similar results, except that those who abused opiates with cocaine did not differ from their controls on depression and maternal adjustment and attitudes. No significant differences were obtained in the drug subgroup comparisons. These results identify increased life events and specific negative affect states that clinical intervention programs should address to assure the best possible outcome for chemically dependent mothers and their infants.

  4. Activation of paternally expressed genes and perinatal death caused by deletion of the Gtl2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yunli; Cheunsuchon, Pornsuk; Nakayama, Yuki; Lawlor, Michael W.; Zhong, Ying; Rice, Kimberley A.; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Xun; Gordon, Francesca E.; Lidov, Hart G. W.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Klibanski, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The Dlk1-Gtl2 imprinting locus is located on mouse distal chromosome 12 and consists of multiple maternally expressed non-coding RNAs and several paternally expressed protein-coding genes. The imprinting of this locus plays a crucial role in embryonic development and postnatal growth. At least one cis-element, the intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR) is required for expression of maternally expressed genes and repression of silenced paternally expressed genes. The mechanism by which the IG-DMR functions is largely unknown. However, it has been suggested that the unmethylated IG-DMR acts as a positive regulator activating expression of non-coding RNAs. Gtl2 is the first non-coding RNA gene downstream of the IG-DMR. Although its in vivo function in the mouse is largely unknown, its human ortholog MEG3 has been linked to tumor suppression in human tumor-derived cell lines. We generated a knockout mouse model, in which the first five exons and adjacent promoter region of the Gtl2 gene were deleted. Maternal deletion of Gtl2 resulted in perinatal death and skeletal muscle defects, indicating that Gtl2 plays an important role in embryonic development. The maternal deletion also completely abolished expression of downstream maternally expressed genes, activated expression of silenced paternally expressed genes and resulted in methylation of the IG-DMR. By contrast, the paternal inherited deletion did not have this effect. These data strongly indicate that activation of Gtl2 and its downstream maternal genes play an essential role in regulating Dlk1-Gtl2 imprinting, possibly by maintaining active status of the IG-DMR. PMID:20610486

  5. Maternal Cardiac Arrest: A Practical and Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Jeejeebhoy, Farida M.; Morrison, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a dedicated chapter in the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care; however, a robust maternal cardiac arrest knowledge translation strategy and emergency response plan is not usually the focus of institutional emergency preparedness programs. Although maternal cardiac arrest is rare, the emergency department is a high-risk area for receiving pregnant women in either prearrest or full cardiac arrest. It is imperative that institutions review and update emergency response plans for a maternal arrest. This review highlights the most recent science, guidelines, and recommended implementation strategies related to a maternal arrest. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the important physiological differences of, and management strategies for, a maternal cardiac arrest, as well as provide institutions with the most up-to-date literature on which they can build emergency preparedness programs for a maternal arrest. PMID:23956861

  6. Perinatal group B streptococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, G L; Garland, S M

    1983-06-11

    Predisposing factors and clinical presentations associated with early-onset group B streptococcal (GBS) infections in 60 infants were reviewed. Over a three-year period, the incidence of these infections in The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, was 2.0 per 1000 births. The clinical presentation ranged from fulminating sepsis to asymptomatic bacteraemia. In some cases, there was evidence of intrauterine fetal infection, despite intact membranes and a lack of clinical evidence of maternal infection. However, the over-all incidence of fever, before and after delivery, among the mothers of these babies was high. Early, or prophylactic, antibiotic therapy was generally associated with a favourable outcome. None of the infants who died from GBS infections had received antibiotic therapy before the onset of symptoms. The value of routine antenatal screening for vaginal carriage of group B streptococci, and the place of antibiotic prophylaxis, or immunoprophylaxis, are not yet established. However, prophylactic antibiotic therapy in mothers and babies considered to be at risk from GBS infection is recommended. PMID:6343814

  7. Perinatal Bereavement: A Principle-based Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    FENSTERMACHER, Kimberly; HUPCEY, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of perinatal bereavement. Background The concept of perinatal bereavement emerged in the scientific literature during the 1970s. Perinatal bereavement is a practice based concept, although it is not well defined in the scientific literature and is often intermingled with the concepts of mourning and grief. Design Concept Analysis. Data Sources Using the term ‘perinatal bereavement’ and limits of only English and human, Pub Med and CINAHL were searched to yield 278 available references dating from 1974 – 2011. Articles specific to the experience of perinatal bereavement were reviewed. The final data set was 143 articles. Review Methods The methods of principle-based concept analysis were used. Results reveal conceptual components (antecedents, attributes and outcomes) which are delineated to create a theoretical definition of perinatal bereavement. Results The concept is epistemologically immature, with few explicit definitions to describe the phenomenon. Inconsistency in conceptual meaning threatens the construct validity of measurement tools for perinatal bereavement and contributes to incongruent theoretical definitions. This has implications for both nursing science (how the concept is studied and theoretically integrated) and clinical practice (timing and delivery of support interventions). Conclusions Perinatal bereavement is a multifaceted global phenomenon that follows perinatal loss. Lack of conceptual clarity and lack of a clearly articulated conceptual definition impede the synthesis and translation of research findings into practice. A theoretical definition of perinatal bereavement is offered as a platform for researchers to advance the concept through research and theory development. PMID:23458030

  8. What neonatal complications should the pediatrician be aware of in case of maternal gestational diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Mitanchez, Delphine; Yzydorczyk, Catherine; Simeoni, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    In the epidemiologic context of maternal obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the incidence of gestational diabetes has significantly increased in the last decades. Infants of diabetic mothers are prone to various neonatal adverse outcomes, including metabolic and hematologic disorders, respiratory distress, cardiac disorders and neurologic impairment due to perinatal asphyxia and birth traumas, among others. Macrosomia is the most constant consequence of diabetes and its severity is mainly influenced by maternal blood glucose level. Neonatal hypoglycemia is the main metabolic disorder that should be prevented as soon as possible after birth. The severity of macrosomia and the maternal health condition have a strong impact on the frequency and the severity of adverse neonatal outcomes. Pregestational T2D and maternal obesity significantly increase the risk of perinatal death and birth defects. The high incidence of maternal hyperglycemia in developing countries, associated with the scarcity of maternal and neonatal care, seriously increase the burden of neonatal complications in these countries. PMID:26069722

  9. What neonatal complications should the pediatrician be aware of in case of maternal gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Mitanchez, Delphine; Yzydorczyk, Catherine; Simeoni, Umberto

    2015-06-10

    In the epidemiologic context of maternal obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the incidence of gestational diabetes has significantly increased in the last decades. Infants of diabetic mothers are prone to various neonatal adverse outcomes, including metabolic and hematologic disorders, respiratory distress, cardiac disorders and neurologic impairment due to perinatal asphyxia and birth traumas, among others. Macrosomia is the most constant consequence of diabetes and its severity is mainly influenced by maternal blood glucose level. Neonatal hypoglycemia is the main metabolic disorder that should be prevented as soon as possible after birth. The severity of macrosomia and the maternal health condition have a strong impact on the frequency and the severity of adverse neonatal outcomes. Pregestational T2D and maternal obesity significantly increase the risk of perinatal death and birth defects. The high incidence of maternal hyperglycemia in developing countries, associated with the scarcity of maternal and neonatal care, seriously increase the burden of neonatal complications in these countries. PMID:26069722

  10. The Impact of Cardiac Diseases during Pregnancy on Severe Maternal Morbidity and Mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Campanharo, Felipe F.; Cecatti, Jose G.; Haddad, Samira M.; Parpinelli, Mary A.; Born, Daniel; Costa, Maria L.; Mattar, Rosiane

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate maternal heart disease as a cause or complicating factor for severe morbidity in the setting of the Brazilian Network for Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity. Methods and Findings Secondary data analysis of this multicenter cross-sectional study was implemented in 27 referral obstetric units in Brazil. From July 2009 to June 2010, a prospective surveillance was conducted among all delivery hospitalizations to identify cases of severe maternal morbidity (SMM), including Potentially Life-Threatening Conditions (PLTC) and Maternal Near Miss (MNM), using the new criteria established by the WHO. The variables studied included: sociodemographic characteristics, clinical and obstetric history of the women; perinatal outcome and the occurrence of maternal outcomes (PLTC, MNM, MD) between groups of cardiac and non-cardiac patients. Only heart conditions with hemodynamic impact characterizing severity of maternal morbidity were considered. 9555 women were included in the Network with severe pregnancy-related complications: 770 maternal near miss cases and 140 maternal death cases. A total of 293 (3.6%) cases were related to heart disease and the condition was known before pregnancy in 82.6% of cases. Maternal near miss occurred in 15% of cardiac disease patients (most due to clinical-surgical causes, p<0.001) and 7.7% of non-cardiac patients (hemorrhagic and hypertensive causes, p<0.001). Maternal death occurred in 4.8% of cardiac patients and in 1.2% of non-cardiac patients, respectively. Conclusions In this study, heart disease was significantly associated with a higher occurrence of severe maternal outcomes, including maternal death and maternal near miss, among women presenting with any severe maternal morbidity. PMID:26650684

  11. “Nothing Special, Everything Is Maamuli”: Socio-Cultural and Family Practices Influencing the Perinatal Period in Urban India

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Shanti; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Kurpad, Anura; Razee, Husna; Ritchie, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Globally, India contributes the largest share in sheer numbers to the burden of maternal and infant under-nutrition, morbidity and mortality. A major gap in our knowledge is how socio-cultural practices and beliefs influence the perinatal period and thus perinatal outcomes, particularly in the rapidly growing urban setting. Methods and Findings Using data from a qualitative study in urban south India, including in-depth interviews with 36 women who had recently been through childbirth as well as observations of family life and clinic encounters, we explored the territory of familial, cultural and traditional practices and beliefs influencing women and their families through pregnancy, childbirth and infancy. We found that while there were some similarities in cultural practices to those described before in studies from low resource village settings, there are changing practices and ideas. Fertility concerns dominate women’s experience of married life; notions of gender preference and ideal family size are changing rapidly in response to the urban context; however inter-generational family pressures are still considerable. While a rich repertoire of cultural practices persists throughout the perinatal continuum, their existence is normalised and even underplayed. In terms of diet and nutrition, traditional messages including notions of ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ foods, are stronger than health messages; however breastfeeding is the cultural norm and the practice of delayed breastfeeding appears to be disappearing in this urban setting. Marriage, pregnancy and childbirth are so much part of the norm for women, that there is little expectation of individual choice in any of these major life events. Conclusions A greater understanding is needed of the dynamic factors shaping the perinatal period in urban India, including an acknowledgment of the health promoting as well as potentially harmful cultural practices and the critical role of the family. This will help plan culturally appropriate integrated perinatal health care. PMID:25369447

  12. Prenatal and perinatal analgesic exposure and autism: an ecological link

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental disorders. Susceptibility is believed to be the interaction of genetic heritability and environmental factors. The synchronous rises in autism/ASD prevalence and paracetamol (acetaminophen) use, as well as biologic plausibility have led to the hypothesis that paracetamol exposure may increase autism/ASD risk. Methods To explore the relationship of antenatal paracetamol exposure to ASD, population weighted average autism prevalence rates and paracetamol usage rates were compared. To explore the relationship of early neonatal paracetamol exposure to autism/ASD, population weighted average male autism prevalence rates for all available countries and U.S. states were compared to male circumcision rates – a procedure for which paracetamol has been widely prescribed since the mid-1990s. Prevalence studies were extracted from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Summary of Autism/ASD Prevalence Studies database. Maternal paracetamol usage and circumcision rates were identified by searches on Pub Med. Results Using all available country-level data (n?=?8) for the period 1984 to 2005, prenatal use of paracetamol was correlated with autism/ASD prevalence (r?=?0.80). For studies including boys born after 1995, there was a strong correlation between country-level (n?=?9) autism/ASD prevalence in males and a country’s circumcision rate (r?=?0.98). A very similar pattern was seen among U.S. states and when comparing the 3 main racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. The country-level correlation between autism/ASD prevalence in males and paracetamol was considerably weaker before 1995 when the drug became widely used during circumcision. Conclusions This ecological analysis identified country-level correlations between indicators of prenatal and perinatal paracetamol exposure and autism/ASD. State level correlation was also identified for the indicator of perinatal paracetamol exposure and autism/ASD. Like all ecological analyses, these data cannot provide strong evidence of causality. However, biologic plausibility is provided by a growing body of experimental and clinical evidence linking paracetamol metabolism to pathways shown to be important in autism and related developmental abnormalities. Taken together, these ecological findings and mechanistic evidence suggest the need for formal study of the role of paracetamol in autism. PMID:23656698

  13. Perinatal nurses' perceptions of competency assessments.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Brenda L; Waller-Wise, Renece; Weed, Latricia D

    2014-10-01

    Competency assessment should be a changing and continuing process. In addition, it should be appropriate for the organization and the nursing staff. Nursing educators are challenged to provide a competency assessment process that is relevant and meaningful. This qualitative research study describes perinatal nurses' perceptions of a change from a traditional testing competency assessment to a hands-on competency assessment. The setting was a medical center in southeastern Alabama. Thirteen nurses participated in the study. Focus groups were used to explore the new assessment method. Three themes were identified: I am learning, multidimensional learning together, and increasing professional confidence. As the medical center perinatal nursing competency assessment program continues to improve, the expectation is for other departments to assess and revise their competency assessment program. PMID:25280194

  14. Perinatal depression: treatment options and dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Pearlstein, Teri

    2008-07-01

    The treatment of depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period raises unique concerns about safety for the developing fetus and the infant. An increasing number of studies suggest adverse effects from untreated stress, anxiety and depression as well as adverse effects from antidepressant and other psychotropic medications. Even when studies suggest a lack of short-term adverse effects with some medications, the paucity of systematic longitudinal follow-up studies investigating the development of children exposed to medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding causes apprehension. This review's objective is to highlight what is currently known about the negative effects of untreated disease and exposure to psychotropic medication, the treatment dilemmas confronting women with perinatal depression and issues that future studies should address so that a woman with perinatal depression can make an optimally informed decision. PMID:18592032

  15. Mechanisms of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-López, David; Natarajan, Niranjana; Ashwal, Stephen; Vexler, Zinaida S

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of perinatal stroke is high, similar to that in the elderly, and produces a significant morbidity and severe long-term neurologic and cognitive deficits, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, neuropsychological impairments, and behavioral disorders. Emerging clinical data and data from experimental models of cerebral ischemia in neonatal rodents have shown that the pathophysiology of perinatal brain damage is multifactorial. These studies have revealed that, far from just being a smaller version of the adult brain, the neonatal brain is unique with a very particular and age-dependent responsiveness to hypoxia–ischemia and focal arterial stroke. In this review, we discuss fundamental clinical aspects of perinatal stroke as well as some of the most recent and relevant findings regarding the susceptibility of specific brain cell populations to injury, the dynamics and the mechanisms of neuronal cell death in injured neonates, the responses of neonatal blood–brain barrier to stroke in relation to systemic and local inflammation, and the long-term effects of stroke on angiogenesis and neurogenesis. Finally, we address translational strategies currently being considered for neonatal stroke as well as treatments that might effectively enhance repair later after injury. PMID:24667913

  16. Perinatal Asphyxia in a Nonhuman Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Misbe, Elizabeth N. Jacobson; Richards, Todd L.; McPherson, Ronald J.; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Juul, Sandra E.

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is a leading cause of brain injury in neonates, occurring in 2–4 per 1,000 live births, and there are limited treatment options. Because of their similarity to humans, nonhuman primates are ideal for performing preclinical tests of safety and efficacy for neurotherapeutic interventions. We previously developed a primate model of acute perinatal asphyxia using 12–15 min of umbilical cord occlusion. Continuing this research, we have increased cord occlusion time from 15 to 18 min and extended neurodevelopmental follow-up to 9 months. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the increase in morbidity associated with 18 min of asphyxia by comparing indices obtained from colony controls, nonasphyxiated controls and asphyxiated animals. Pigtail macaques were delivered by hysterotomy after 0, 15 or 18 min of cord occlusion, then resuscitated. Over the ensuing 9 months, for each biochemical and physiologic parameters, behavioral and developmental evaluations, and structural and spectroscopic MRI were recorded. At birth, all asphyxiated animals required resuscitation with positive pressure ventilation and exhibited biochemical and clinical characteristics diagnostic of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, including metabolic acidosis and attenuated brain activity. Compared with controls, asphyxiated animals developed long-term physical and cognitive deficits. This preliminary report characterizes the acute and chronic consequences of perinatal asphyxia in a nonhuman primate model, and describes diagnostic imaging tools for quantifying correlates of neonatal brain injury as well as neurodevelopmental tests for evaluating early motor and cognitive outcomes. PMID:21659720

  17. Changes in the Relationship Between Socioeconomic Position and Maternal Depressive Symptoms: Results from the Panel Study on Korean Children (PSKC).

    PubMed

    Bahk, Jinwook; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Kim, Yu-mi; Khang, Young-Ho

    2015-09-01

    Maternal depression is a common health problem during the perinatal period. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in the relationship between socioeconomic position and maternal depressive symptoms from prenatal to 3 years postpartum in Korean women. Prospective cohort data were collected from the Panel Study on Korean Children between 2008 and 2011. Maternal depression was assessed using the Kessler 6-Item Psychological Distress Scale. Socioeconomic position indicators used were maternal education, paternal education, maternal occupation, paternal occupation, and household income. Repeated-measures analyses with a generalized estimating equation approach were used to investigate relationships between socioeconomic position and maternal depressive symptoms during the study period. Low socioeconomic position was associated with greater levels of maternal depressive symptoms between 4 months after childbirth and 3 years postpartum, but the association was not evident between 1 month before and after childbirth. The magnitude of the significant association between socioeconomic position and maternal depression was the greatest at 1 year postpartum but then became smaller. Among the five socioeconomic position indicators included, maternal education, paternal education, and household income showed graded inverse relationships with maternal depressive symptoms, while no significant relationship was found for paternal occupation over the study period. Socioeconomic inequalities in maternal depressive symptoms emerged in early childhood in a prospective study of Korean mothers. These emerging inequalities may contribute to socioeconomic inequalities in childhood health and development. PMID:25652067

  18. Perinatal Dyadic Psychotherapy for postpartum depression: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Janice H; Prager, Joanna; Goldstein, Richard; Freeman, Marlene

    2015-06-01

    An integrated approach addressing maternal depression and associated mother-infant relationship dysfunction may improve outcomes. This study tested Perinatal Dyadic Psychotherapy (PDP), a dual-focused mother-infant intervention to prevent/decrease maternal postpartum depression and improve aspects of the mother-infant relationship related to child development. Women recruited from hospital postpartum units were screened using a three-stage process. Forty-two depressed first-time mothers and their 6-week-old infants were enrolled and randomized to receive the PDP intervention or usual care plus depression monitoring by phone. The intervention consisted of eight home-based, nurse-delivered mother-infant sessions consisting of (a) supportive, relationship-based, mother-infant psychotherapy, and (b) a developmentally based infant-oriented component focused on promoting positive mother-infant interactions. Data collected at baseline, post-intervention, and three-month follow-up included measures of maternal depression, anxiety, maternal self-esteem, parenting stress, and mother-infant interaction. Depression and anxiety symptoms and diagnoses decreased significantly, and maternal self-esteem increased significantly across the study time frame with no between-group differences. There were no significant differences between groups on parenting stress or mother-infant interaction at post-intervention and follow-up. No participants developed onset of postpartum depression during the course of the study. PDP holds potential for treating depression in the context of the mother-infant relationship; however, usual care plus depression monitoring showed equal benefit. Further research is needed to explore using low-intensity interventions as a first step in a stepped care approach and to determine what subset of at-risk or depressed postpartum mothers might benefit most from the PDP intervention. PMID:25522664

  19. Maternal and neonatal individual risks and benefits associated with caesarean delivery: multicentre prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Carroli, Guillermo; Zavaleta, Nelly; Donner, Allan; Wojdyla, Daniel; Faundes, Anibal; Velazco, Alejandro; Bataglia, Vicente; Langer, Ana; Narváez, Alberto; Valladares, Eliette; Shah, Archana; Campodónico, Liana; Romero, Mariana; Reynoso, Sofia; de Pádua, Karla Simônia; Giordano, Daniel; Kublickas, Marius; Acosta, Arnaldo

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess the risks and benefits associated with caesarean delivery compared with vaginal delivery. Design Prospective cohort study within the 2005 WHO global survey on maternal and perinatal health. Setting 410 health facilities in 24 areas in eight randomly selected Latin American countries; 123 were randomly selected and 120 participated and provided data Participants 106?546 deliveries reported during the three month study period, with data available for 97?095 (91% coverage). Main outcome measures Maternal, fetal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality associated with intrapartum or elective caesarean delivery, adjusted for clinical, demographic, pregnancy, and institutional characteristics. Results Women undergoing caesarean delivery had an increased risk of severe maternal morbidity compared with women undergoing vaginal delivery (odds ratio 2.0 (95% confidence interval 1.6 to 2.5) for intrapartum caesarean and 2.3 (1.7 to 3.1) for elective caesarean). The risk of antibiotic treatment after delivery for women having either type of caesarean was five times that of women having vaginal deliveries. With cephalic presentation, there was a trend towards a reduced odds ratio for fetal death with elective caesarean, after adjustment for possible confounding variables and gestational age (0.7, 0.4 to 1.0). With breech presentation, caesarean delivery had a large protective effect for fetal death. With cephalic presentation, however, independent of possible confounding variables and gestational age, intrapartum and elective caesarean increased the risk for a stay of seven or more days in neonatal intensive care (2.1 (1.8 to 2.6) and 1.9 (1.6 to 2.3), respectively) and the risk of neonatal mortality up to hospital discharge (1.7 (1.3 to 2.2) and 1.9 (1.5 to 2.6), respectively), which remained higher even after exclusion of all caesarean deliveries for fetal distress. Such increased risk was not seen for breech presentation. Lack of labour was a risk factor for a stay of seven or more days in neonatal intensive care and neonatal mortality up to hospital discharge for babies delivered by elective caesarean delivery, but rupturing of membranes may be protective. Conclusions Caesarean delivery independently reduces overall risk in breech presentations and risk of intrapartum fetal death in cephalic presentations but increases the risk of severe maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in cephalic presentations. PMID:17977819

  20. Maternity waiting homes and traditional midwives in rural Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Lori, Jody R.; Munro, Michelle L.; Rominski, Sarah; Williams, Garfee; Dahn, Bernice T.; Boyd, Carol J.; Moore, Jennifer E.; Gwenegale, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Objective Maternity waiting homes (MWHs) can reduce maternal morbidity and mortality by increasing access to skilled birth attendants (SBAs). The present analysis was conducted to determine whether MWHs increase the use of SBAs at rural primary health clinics in Liberia; to determine whether traditional midwives (TMs) are able to work with SBAs as a team and to describe the perceptions of TMs as they engage with SBAs; and to determine whether MWHs decrease maternal and child morbidity and mortality. Methods The present analysis was conducted halfway through a large cohort study in which 5 Liberian communities received the intervention (establishment of an MWH) and 5 Liberian communities did not (control group). Focus groups were conducted to examine the views of TMs on their integration into health teams. Results Communities with MWHs experienced a significant increase in team births from baseline to post-intervention (10.8% versus 95.2%, P<0.001), with greater TM engagement. Lower rates of maternal and perinatal death were reported from communities with MWHs. Conclusion The reduction in morbidity and mortality indicates that the establishment of MWHs is an effective strategy to increase the use of SBAs, improve the collaboration between SBAs and TMs, and improve maternal and neonatal health. PMID:23992657

  1. Perinatal nicotine exposure eliminates peak in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor response in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Britton, Angela F; Vann, Robert E; Robinson, Susan E

    2007-02-01

    Maternal smoking is a risk factor associated with nicotine abuse, so the effect of perinatal nicotine exposure was studied on the responsiveness to nicotine across adolescence in the rat. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with s.c. Alzet osmotic minipumps delivering nicotine (L-nicotine hydrogen tartrate, 2 mg/kg/day free base) or vehicle (0.9% saline) on gestational day 7. There was no effect of nicotine on dam weight gain, food consumption, or water consumption or on the number of live pups or weights at the time of birth. Pups were cross-fostered to obtain the following prenatal/postnatal exposure groups: control/control, nicotine/nicotine, nicotine/control, and control/nicotine. On postnatal days 28, 35, 49, and 63, nicotine-stimulated (86)Rb(+) efflux was measured in synaptosomes prepared from the frontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum (STR), and thalamus (THL), using a previously developed method. Significant effects of treatment and concentration were detected in all four brain regions, and significant effects of age were observed in the STR and THL. Significant interactions of age and treatment were observed in each of the four brain regions. Nicotine-stimulated (86)Rb(+) efflux peaked during adolescence in control rats. However, perinatal exposure to nicotine eliminated this peak during adolescence. These results are consistent with recent behavioral and receptor binding results from other laboratories and are the first direct evidence at the cellular level that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor response varies during adolescence and is affected by perinatal nicotine exposure. PMID:17105825

  2. Barriers in Referring Neonatal Patients to Perinatal Palliative Care: A French Multicenter Survey

    PubMed Central

    Tosello, Barthélémy; Dany, Lionel; Bétrémieux, Pierre; Le Coz, Pierre; Auquier, Pascal; Gire, Catherine; Einaudi, Marie-Ange

    2015-01-01

    Background When an incurable fetal condition is detected, some women (or couples) would rather choose to continue with the pregnancy than opt for termination of pregnancy for medical reasons, which, in France, can be performed until full term. Such situations are frequently occurring and sometimes leading to the implementation of neonatal palliative care. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the practices of perinatal care french professionals in this context; to identify the potential obstacles that might interfere with the provision of an appropiate neonatal palliative care; and, from an opposite perspective, to determine the criteria that led, in some cases, to offer this type of care for prenatally diagnosed lethal abnormality. Methods We used an email survey sent to 434 maternal-fetal medicine specialists (MFMs) and fetal care pediatric specialists (FCPs) at 48 multidisciplinary centers for prenatal diagnosis (MCPD). Results Forty-two multidisciplinary centers for prenatal diagnosis (87.5%) took part. In total, 102 MFMs and 112 FCPs completed the survey, yielding response rate of 49.3%. One quarter of professionals (26.2%) estimated that over 20% of fetal pathologies presenting in MCPD could correspond to a diagnosis categorized as lethal (FCPs versus MFMs: 24% vs 17.2%, p = 0.04). The mean proportion of fetal abnormalities eligible for palliative care at birth was estimated at 19.30% (± 2.4) (FCPs versus MFMs: 23.4% vs 15.2%, p = 0.029). The degree of diagnostic certainty appears to be the most influencing factor (98.1%, n = 207) in the information provided to the pregnant woman with regard to potential neonatal palliative care. The vast majority of professionals, 92.5%, supported considering the practice of palliative care as a regular option to propose antenatally. Conclusions Our study reveals the clear need for training perinatal professionals in perinatal palliative care and for the standardization of practices in this field. PMID:25978417

  3. Perinatal depression and omega-3 fatty acids: A Mendelian randomisation study

    PubMed Central

    Sallis, Hannah; Steer, Colin; Paternoster, Lavinia; Davey Smith, George; Evans, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been numerous studies investigating the association between omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) and depression, with mixed findings. We propose an approach which is largely free from issues such as confounding or reverse causality, to investigate this relationship using observational data from a pregnancy cohort. Methods The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort collected information on FA levels from antenatal blood samples and depressive symptoms at several time points during pregnancy and the postnatal period. Conventional epidemiological analyses were used in addition to a Mendelian randomisation (MR) approach to investigate the association between levels of two omega-3 FAs (docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)) and perinatal onset depression, antenatal depression (AND) and postnatal depression (PND). Results Weak evidence of a positive association with both EPA (OR=1.07; 95% CI: 0.99–1.15) and DHA (OR=1.08; 95% CI: 0.98–1.19) with perinatal onset depression was found using a multivariable logistic regression adjusting for social class and maternal age. However, the strength of association was found to attenuate when using an MR analysis to investigate DHA. Limitations Pleiotropy is a potential limitation in MR analyses; we assume that the genetic variants included in the instrumental variable are associated only with our trait of interest (FAs) and thus cannot influence the outcome via any other pathway. Conclusions We found weak evidence of a positive association between omega-3 FAs and perinatal onset depression. However, without confirmation from the MR analysis, we are unable to draw conclusions regarding causality. PMID:25012420

  4. Evidence for perinatal and child health care guidelines in crisis settings: can Cochrane help?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is important that healthcare provided in crisis settings is based on the best available research evidence. We reviewed guidelines for child and perinatal health care in crisis situations to determine whether they were based on research evidence, whether Cochrane systematic reviews were available in the clinical areas addressed by these guidelines and whether summaries of these reviews were provided in Evidence Aid. Methods Broad internet searches were undertaken to identify relevant guidelines. Guidelines were appraised using AGREE and the clinical areas that were relevant to perinatal or child health were extracted. We searched The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify potentially relevant reviews. For each review we determined how many trials were included, and how many were conducted in resource-limited settings. Results Six guidelines met selection criteria. None of the included guidelines were clearly based on research evidence. 198 Cochrane reviews were potentially relevant to the guidelines. These reviews predominantly addressed nutrient supplementation, breastfeeding, malaria, maternal hypertension, premature labour and prevention of HIV transmission. Most reviews included studies from developing settings. However for large portions of the guidelines, particularly health services delivery, there were no relevant reviews. Only 18 (9.1%) reviews have summaries in Evidence Aid. Conclusions We did not identify any evidence-based guidelines for perinatal and child health care in disaster settings. We found many Cochrane reviews that could contribute to the evidence-base supporting future guidelines. However there are important issues to be addressed in terms of the relevance of the available reviews and increasing the number of reviews addressing health care delivery. PMID:20350326

  5. Perinatal consequences of a category 1 caesarean section at term

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Leah; Greer, Ristan M; Kumar, Sailesh

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterise maternal demographics, obstetric risk factors and neonatal outcomes associated with term category 1 caesarean sections (CS). Design and setting and main outcome measures Retrospective study of term singleton pregnancies delivering at a major tertiary unit in Brisbane, Australia. Category 1 CS were defined as one that required a decision-to-delivery time interval of <30?min when there was an immediate threat to the life of a woman or fetus. Neonatal outcomes analysed were gestation at delivery, birth weight, Apgar scores, acidosis at birth, need for resuscitation, admission to neonatal intensive care and neonatal seizures and death. Results A total of 30?719 women delivering at term were included. Of these, 1179 (3.8%) women required a category 1 CS. A further 3527 women underwent non-category 1 CS. Most category 1 CS were performed for non-reassuring fetal status (65.9%, 777/1179). The indications for non-category 1 CS were for failure to progress (46.5%, 1641/3527) and non-reassuring fetal status (19%, 671/3527). Maternal age, body mass index and medical disease did not differ significantly between the two cohorts. Caucasian women were equally as likely to undergo a category 1 CS as a non-category 1 CS, while indigenous women and women of Asian ethnicity were more likely to undergo a category 1 CS. Significantly higher (p<0.001) perinatal complications were seen in the category 1 CS cohort—Apgar scores <7 at 1?min (20.4%, 241/1179 vs 10.7%, 377/3527) and 5?min (5.8%, 68/1179 vs 1.9%, 67/3527), umbilical arterial pH<7.2 (23.7%, 279/1179 vs 9.1%, 321/3527), neonatal resuscitation (59.9%, 706/1179 vs 51.8%, 1828/3527), neonatal intensive care unit admission (9.8%, 116/1179 vs 2.5%, 87/3527) and seizures (0.8%, 10/1179 vs 0.3%, 9/3527), respectively. Conclusions These results demonstrate significantly poorer outcomes associated with term category 1 CS compared with non-category 1 emergency CS. PMID:26224015

  6. Perinatal effects on in vivo measures of human brain serotonin synthesis in adulthood: a 27-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Booij, Linda; Benkelfat, Chawki; Leyton, Marco; Vitaro, Frank; Gravel, Paul; Lévesque, Mélissa L; Arseneault, Louise; Diksic, Mirko; Tremblay, Richard E

    2012-06-01

    There is an increasing evidence that prenatal and early postnatal stressors have life long impacts on physical and mental health problems. Animal studies have shown that this could include enduring changes to brain serotonin neurotransmission. In the present study, we tested whether perinatal adversity in humans has a long-term impact on brain serotonin neurotransmission in adulthood. Twenty-six healthy males, recruited from a 27-year longitudinal study, underwent a positron emission tomography scan with the tracer alpha-[¹¹C]methyl-L-tryptophan (¹¹C-AMT), as an index of serotonin synthesis capacity. The trapping constant is taken as a proxy for the regional 5-HT synthesis. Birth complications, especially a delivery where the fetus showed signs of physiological distress, predicted lower ¹¹C-AMT trapping in the hippocampus and medial orbitofrontal cortex. Lower ¹¹C-AMT trapping in the medial orbitofrontal cortex was also predicted by maternal smoking and lower birth weight. There were no effects of childhood or recent adversity. This is the first human study reporting associations between perinatal adversity and adult ¹¹C-AMT trapping in the hippocampus and medial orbitofrontal cortex. The associations suggest that limbic serotonin pathways may be particularly vulnerable to environmental challenges during the period when they undergo the most prominent neurodevelopmental changes. In combination with other risk factors, perinatal stressors may contribute to increased vulnerability for psychiatric disorders in which serotonin plays a major role. PMID:22257439

  7. Obstetrician-Gynecologists and Perinatal Infections: A Review of Studies of the Collaborative Ambulatory Research Network (2005–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, Meaghan A.; Gonik, Bernard; Schulkin, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Background. Maternal infection is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and ob-gyns are in a unique position to help prevent and treat infections. Methods. This paper summarizes studies completed by the Research Department of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists regarding perinatal infections that were published between 2005 and 2009. Results. Obstetrician-gynecologists are routinely screening for hepatitis B and HIV, and many counsel prenatal patients regarding hepatitis B and toxoplasmosis. However, other infections are not regularly discussed, and many cited time constraints as a barrier to counseling. A majority discusses the transmission of giardiasis and toxoplasmosis, but few knew the source of cryptosporidiosis or cyclosporiasis. Conclusions. Many of the responding ob-gyns were unaware of or not adhering to infection management guidelines. Obstetrician-gynecologists are knowledgeable regarding perinatal infections; however, guidelines must be better disseminated perhaps via a single infection management summary. This paper identified knowledge gaps and areas in which practice can be improved and importantly highlights the need for a comprehensive set of management guidelines for a host of infections, so that physicians can have an easy resource when encountering perinatal infections. PMID:21113289

  8. Organizational change in a perinatal treatment setting: integration of clinical practice and policies on tobacco and smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Martha A

    2007-12-01

    Perinatal smoking presents serious health risks to the fetus, mother, and child. Despite extensive evidence of risk and high rates of smoking among in-treatment perinatal women substance abusers, tobacco-related practice and policy change has not been widely transferred for application in drug abuse treatment programs for pregnant and parenting women. This qualitative study investigated the process of change and the resultant adoption of clinical policy and treatment innovation in a residential drug abuse treatment program that converted from tobacco-tolerant to tobacco-free with provision of smoking cessation services. Informed by the Organizational Readiness for Change Model, staff interviews and data analysis were conducted to examine program characteristics affecting adoption. An organizational climate of openness to change and the program's clarity of mission, expressed in perinatal-specific motivators for change, influenced the adoption of tobacco-related clinical practice and policy. Re-allocation of time, previously occupied by smoking behaviors, allowed for added promotion of maternal-child interaction and positive role-modeling for children. PMID:18303703

  9. Cortical Reorganization of Language Functioning Following Perinatal Left MCA Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Byars, Anna W.; Jacola, Lisa M.; Schapiro, Mark B.; Schmithorst, Vince J.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Functional MRI was used to determine differences in patterns of cortical activation between children who suffered perinatal left middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and healthy children performing a silent verb generation task. Methods: Ten children with prior perinatal left MCA stroke (age 6-16 years) and ten healthy age matched…

  10. Modifying CBT for Perinatal Depression: What Do Women Want?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mahen, Heather; Fedock, Gina; Henshaw, Erin; Himle, Joseph A.; Forman, Jane; Flynn, Heather A.

    2012-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of CBT for depression during the perinatal period is mixed. This was a qualitative study that aimed to understand the perinatal-specific needs of depressed women in an effort to inform treatment modifications that may increase the relevance and acceptability of CBT during this period. Stratified purposeful sampling…

  11. Nutritional manipulations in the perinatal period program adipose tissue in offspring.

    PubMed

    Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Eberlé, Delphine; Vieau, Didier; Breton, Christophe

    2013-11-15

    Epidemiological studies demonstrated initially that maternal undernutrition results in low birth weight with increased risk for long-lasting energy balance disorders. Maternal obesity and diabetes associated with high birth weight, excessive nutrition in neonates, and rapid catchup growth also increase the risk of adult-onset obesity. As stated by the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease concept, nutrient supply perturbations in the fetus or neonate result in long-term programming of individual body weight set point. Adipose tissue is a key fuel storage unit involved mainly in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Studies in numerous animal models have demonstrated that the adipose tissue is the focus of developmental programming events in a sex- and depot-specific manner. In rodents, adipose tissue development is particularly active during the perinatal period, especially during the last week of gestation and during early postnatal life. In contrast to rodents, this process essentially takes place before birth in bigger mammals. Despite these different developmental time windows, altricial and precocial species share several mechanisms of adipose tissue programming. Offspring from malnourished dams present adipose tissue with a series of alterations: impaired glucose uptake, insulin and leptin resistance, low-grade inflammation, modified sympathetic activity with reduced noradrenergic innervations, and thermogenesis. These modifications reprogram adipose tissue metabolism by changing fat distribution and composition and by enhancing adipogenesis, predisposing the offspring to fat accumulation. Subtle adipose tissue circadian rhythm changes are also observed. Inappropriate hormone levels, modified tissue sensitivity (especially glucocorticoid system), and epigenetic mechanisms are key factors for adipose tissue programming during the perinatal period. PMID:24045869

  12. Adverse effects of young maternal age on neonatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Gavrielle; Lim, Jia Yi; Kale, Anita Sugam; Lee, Le Ye

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Teenage pregnancy is associated with poor neonatal outcomes, which may burden the young mothers and their families. The aim of this study was to determine the effect young maternal age and single motherhood has on neonatal outcomes. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 267 infants born to mothers aged ? 21 years in National University Hospital, Singapore, from January 2011 to December 2012. We compared the maternal demographics and neonatal outcomes of single mothers with those of married mothers. The neonatal outcomes of our study cohort were also compared to the hospital’s birth cohort during the same period. RESULTS Unsatisfactory antenatal care was more prevalent among the young single mothers than among the young married mothers (odds ratio [OR] 2.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.71–4.92, p < 0.01). The infants of the young single mothers had a lower mean birth weight (p = 0.01), with a significant proportion weighing < 2.5 kg (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.35–6.37, p < 0.01). Young maternal age was linked to a higher incidence of prematurity (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.18–2.43, p < 0.01), major congenital defects (OR 4.68, 95% CI 2.10–10.13, p < 0.01), and a perinatal mortality of 18.7 per 1,000 births (OR 3.76, 95% CI 1.26–10.32, p = 0.02). CONCLUSION Young single mothers were more likely to have unsatisfactory antenatal care and lighter infants. Young maternal age was associated with a higher risk of prematurity, major congenital malformations and perinatal mortality. More studies are needed to ascertain the cause of these adverse outcomes. PMID:25532516

  13. Effect of the timing of delivery on perinatal outcomes at gestational hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Müge; Seval, Mehmet Murat; Söylemez, Feride

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the perinatal outcomes of women diagnosed with gestational hypertension and no proteinuria according to the gestational weeks. Methods We included women diagnosed with gestational hypertension between 2010 and 2014 at our institution and excluded the patients with preeclampsia and chronic hypertension. Women with gestational hypertension were grouped according to the gestational weeks. One group consisted of the pregnancies between 37 and 38*6, whereas the other group included pregnancies between 39 and 41 weeks. Then the outcomes of these pregnancies were compared with healthy women who had delivery between the same weeks (37–38*6 weeks and 39–41 weeks). We analyzed the mode of delivery, birth weight, and neonatal outcomes of these pregnancies. Results First and fifth minute Apgar scores were significantly decreased in women with gestational hypertension who had delivery between 39 and 41 weeks compared to healthy subjects (respectively, p = 0.005 and p = 0.033). Perinatal outcomes were adversely affected if the time of delivery was beyond 39 weeks in pregnancies complicated with gestational hypertension. Conclusion We concluded that perinatal outcomes were adversely affected if the time of delivery was beyond 39 weeks in pregnancies complicated with gestational hypertension, and outcomes of such pregnancies can be improved if time for delivery is <39 weeks. PMID:26120477

  14. Adverse Obstetric and Perinatal Outcomes following Treatment of Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Haggar, Fatima A.; Pereira, Gavin; Preen, David; Holman, C. D'Arcy; Einarsdottir, Kristjana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate obstetric and perinatal outcomes among female survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancers and their offspring. Methods Using multivariate analysis of statewide linked data, outcomes of all first completed pregnancies (n?=?1894) in female survivors of AYA cancer diagnosed in Western Australia during the period 1982–2007 were compared with those among females with no cancer history. Comparison pregnancies were matched by maternal age-group, parity and year of delivery. Results Compared with the non-cancer group, female survivors of AYA cancer had an increased risk of threatened abortion (adjusted relative risk 2.09, 95% confidence interval 1.51–2.74), gestational diabetes (2.65, 2.08–3.57), pre-eclampsia (1.32, 1.04–1.87), post-partum hemorrhage (2.83, 1.92–4.67), cesarean delivery (2.62, 2.22–3.04), and maternal postpartum hospitalization>5 days (3.01, 1.72–5.58), but no excess risk of threatened preterm delivery, antepartum hemorrhage, premature rupture of membranes, failure of labor to progress or retained placenta. Their offspring had an increased risk of premature birth (<37 weeks: 1.68, 1.21–2.08), low birth weight (<2500 g: 1.51, 1.23–2.12), fetal growth restriction (3.27, 2.45–4.56), and neonatal distress indicated by low Apgar score (<7) at 1 minute (2.83, 2.28–3.56), need for resuscitation (1.66, 1.27–2.19) or special care nursery admission (1.44, 1.13–1.78). Congenital abnormalities and perinatal deaths (intrauterine or ?7 days of birth) were not increased among offspring of survivors. Conclusion Female survivors of AYA cancer have moderate excess risks of adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes arising from subsequent pregnancies that may require additional surveillance or intervention. PMID:25485774

  15. Perinatal testicular torsion and medicolegal considerations.

    PubMed

    Massoni, F; Troili, G M; Pelosi, M; Ricci, S

    2014-06-01

    Perinatal testicular torsion (PTT) is a very complex condition because of rarity of presentation and diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. In presence of perinatal testicular torsion, the involvement of contralateral testis can be present also in absence of other indications which suggest the bilateral involvement; therefore, occurrences supported by literature do not exclude the use of surgery to avoid the risk of omitted or delayed diagnosis. The data on possible recovery of these testicles are not satisfactory, and treatment consists of an observational approach ("wait-and-see") or an interventional approach. The hypothesis of randomized clinical trials seems impracticable because of rarity of disease. The authors present a case of PTT, analyzing injuries due to clinical and surgical management of these patients, according to medicolegal profile. The delayed diagnosis and the choice of an incorrect therapeutic approach can compromise the position of healthcare professionals, defective in terms of skill, prudence and diligence. Endocrine insufficiency is an unfortunate event. The analysis of literature seems to support, because of high risk, a surgical approach aimed not only at resolution of unilateral pathology or prevention of a relapse, but also at prevention of contralateral testicular torsion. PMID:24826979

  16. Perinatal Oxygen in the Developing Lung

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Elizabeth R.; Britt, Rodney D.; Trinidad, Mari Charisse; Faksh, Arij; Martin, Richard J.; MacFarlane, Peter M.; Pabelick, Christina M.; Prakash, Y.S.

    2015-01-01

    Lung diseases, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), wheezing, and asthma, remain significant causes of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population, particularly in the setting of premature birth. Pulmonary outcomes in these infants are highly influenced by perinatal exposures including prenatal inflammation, postnatal intensive care unit interventions, and environmental agents. Here, there is strong evidence that perinatal supplemental oxygen administration has significant effects on pulmonary development and health. This is of particular importance in the preterm lung, where premature exposure to room air represents a hyperoxic insult that may cause harm to a lung primed to develop in a hypoxic environment. Preterm infants are also subject to increased episodes of hypoxia, which may also result in pulmonary damage and disease. Here, we summarize current understanding of the effects of oxygen on the developing lung and how low vs. high oxygen may predispose to pulmonary disease that may extend even into adulthood. Better understanding of the underlying mechanisms will help lead to improved care and outcomes in this vulnerable population. PMID:25594569

  17. Perinatal development of conjugative enzyme systems.

    PubMed Central

    Lucier, G W

    1976-01-01

    The problems and priorities involved in studying the role of conjugagive enzymes in developmental pharmacology are discussed and evaluated. The relative rates of UDP glucuronyltransferase and beta-glucuronidase were studied during perinatal development in hepatic and extrahepatic tissues to determine the net balance of glucuronidation or deglucuronidation at different developmental stages. In general, deglucuronidation predominated over glucuronidation in fetal tissues whereas the converse was evident in adults. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an extremely toxic contaminant of some organochlorine compounds, was shown to be a potent inducer of some hepatic and extrahepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes. TCDD, administered during gestation, induced the postnatal activities of p-nitrophenol glucuronyltransferase and benzpyrene hydroxylase in rats. Foster mother experiments revealed that the postnatal induction was caused primarily by newborn exposure to TCDD in the mother's milk. Tissue distribution experiments with TCDD-14C confirmed these findings. Although TCDD induced non-steroid glucuronidation, no significant effects were evident on the postnatal development of steroid glucuronidation. The synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) is metabolized primarily by glucuronidation. The postnatal development of DES glucuronidation, like the steroid pathway, was not affected by gestational TCDD treatment. The fetal distribution of DES and DES-glucuronide, at different stages of development, correlated well with the perinatal development of steroid glucuronyltransferase activity. PMID:829487

  18. Systematic review of effect of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kidney, Elaine; Winter, Heather R; Khan, Khalid S; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Meads, Catherine A; Deeks, Jonathan J; MacArthur, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Background The objective was to provide a systematic review of the effectiveness of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality. Methods We searched published papers using Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, CINAHL, BNI, CAB ABSTRACTS, IBSS, Web of Science, LILACS and African Index Medicus from inception or at least 1982 to June 2006; searched unpublished works using National Research Register website, metaRegister and the WHO International Trial Registry portal. We hand searched major references. Selection criteria were maternity or childbearing age women, comparative study designs with concurrent controls, community-level interventions and maternal death as an outcome. We carried out study selection, data abstraction and quality assessment independently in duplicate. Results We found five cluster randomised controlled trials (RCT) and eight cohort studies of community-level interventions. We summarised results as odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI), combined using the Peto method for meta-analysis. Two high quality cluster RCTs, aimed at improving perinatal care practices, showed a reduction in maternal mortality reaching statistical significance (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.98). Three equivalence RCTs of minimal goal-oriented versus usual antenatal care showed no difference in maternal mortality (1.09, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.25). The cohort studies were of low quality and did not contribute further evidence. Conclusion Community-level interventions of improved perinatal care practices can bring about a reduction in maternal mortality. This challenges the view that investment in such interventions is not worthwhile. Programmes to improve maternal mortality should be evaluated using randomised controlled techniques to generate further evidence. PMID:19154588

  19. Perinatal mortality in Germany following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Körblein, A; Küchenhoff, H

    1997-02-01

    Perinatal mortality in Germany was investigated with respect to a possible relationship to the nuclear accident in Chernobyl on April 26, 1986. Using annual data of perinatal mortality, a trend analysis based on an appropriately chosen statistical model was performed which showed a significant increase in 1987. In addition, we calculated the cesium concentration in women's bodies using data of the cesium concentration in milk. We found two peaks of cesium concentration that were associated with the observed two peaks of monthly perinatal mortality data with a delay of 7 months. PMID:9128892

  20. Parental and Perinatal Correlates of Neonatal Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standley, Kay

    This paper discusses the analyses of antecedent correlates of the behavior of 60 infants as measured by the Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Scale on the third day after birth. The data include two sets of antecedent variables: maternal adaptation to pregnancy as reported in prenatal interviews and measured describing the conditions of labor and…

  1. Cytomegalovirus myelitis in perinatally acquired HIV.

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, T; Funk, M; Linde, R; Jacobi, G; Horn, M; Kreuz, W

    1993-01-01

    A 7 year old child perinatally infected with HIV who died from progressive muscular paralysis and central nervous respiratory failure is described. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis with a special intravenous CMV hyper-immunoglobulin had been successfully conducted for more than four years. Macroscopic and microscopic immunohistochemical examination of the spinal cord revealed a diffuse CMV infiltration of the entire myelon. CMV infected cells were identified as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, macrophages, ependymal, endothelial, and Schwann cells. Other organs had no signs of CMV infection. Central nervous spinal CMV infection was most probably due to insufficient penetration of the blood-brain barrier by the CMV hyper-immunoglobulin. In suspicious cases early spinal magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 tesla) combined with an examination of urine and cerebrospinal fluid for CMV is recommended. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8385439

  2. Physical Activity and Excess Weight in Pregnancy Have Independent and Unique Effects on Delivery and Perinatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Kelly L.; Rahman, Muhammad A.; Hill, Rebecca A.; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Bijlsma, Gunnar; Khanom, Ashrafunnesa; Lyons, Ronan A.; Brophy, Sinead T.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study examines the effect of low daily physical activity levels and overweight/obesity in pregnancy on delivery and perinatal outcomes. Methods A prospective cohort study combining manually collected postnatal notes with anonymised data linkage. A total of 466 women sampled from the Growing Up in Wales: Environments for Healthy Living study. Women completed a questionnaire and were included in the study if they had an available Body mass index (BMI) (collected at 12 weeks gestation from antenatal records) and/or a physical activity score during pregnancy (7-day Actigraph reading). The full statistical model included the following potential confounding factors: maternal age, parity and smoking status. Main outcome measures included induction rates, duration of labour, mode of delivery, infant health and duration of hospital stay. Findings Mothers with lower physical activity levels were more likely to have an instrumental delivery (including forceps, ventouse and elective and emergency caesarean) in comparison to mothers with higher activity levels (adjusted OR:1.72(95%CI: 1.05 to 2.9)). Overweight/obese mothers were more likely to require an induction (adjusted OR:1.93 (95%CI 1.14 to 3.26), have a macrosomic baby (adjusted OR:1.96 (95%CI 1.08 to 3.56) and a longer hospital stay after delivery (adjusted OR:2.69 (95%CI 1.11 to 6.47). Conclusions The type of delivery was associated with maternal physical activity level and not BMI. Perinatal outcomes (large for gestational age only) were determined by maternal BMI. PMID:24722411

  3. Evidence from community level inputs to improve quality of care for maternal and newborn health: interventions and findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Annually around 40 million mothers give birth at home without any trained health worker. Consequently, most of the maternal and neonatal mortalities occur at the community level due to lack of good quality care during labour and birth. Interventions delivered at the community level have not only been advocated to improve access and coverage of essential interventions but also to reduce the existing disparities and reaching the hard to reach. In this paper, we have reviewed the effectiveness of care delivered through community level inputs for improving maternal and newborn health outcomes. We considered all available systematic reviews published before May 2013 on the pre-defined community level interventions and report findings from 43 systematic reviews. Findings suggest that home visitation significantly improved antenatal care, tetanus immunization coverage, referral and early initiation of breast feeding with reductions in antenatal hospital admission, cesarean-section rates birth, maternal morbidity, neonatal mortality and perinatal mortality. Task shifting to midwives and community health workers has shown to significantly improve immunization uptake and breast feeding initiation with reductions in antenatal hospitalization, episiotomy, instrumental delivery and hospital stay. Training of traditional birth attendants as a part of community based intervention package has significant impact on referrals, early breast feeding, maternal morbidity, neonatal mortality, and perinatal mortality. Formation of community based support groups decreased maternal morbidity, neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality with improved referrals and early breast feeding rates. At community level, home visitation, community mobilization and training of community health workers and traditional birth attendants have the maximum potential to improve a range of maternal and newborn health outcomes. There is lack of data to establish effectiveness of outreach services, mass media campaigns and community education as standalone interventions. Future efforts should be concerted on increasing the availability and training of the community based skilled health workers especially in resource limited settings where the highest burden exists with limited resources to mobilize. PMID:25209692

  4. Optimizing the treatment of mood disorders in the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Jones, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The perinatal period is a time of high risk for women with unipolar and bipolar mood disorders. We discuss treatment considerations for perinatal mood disorders, including unipolar and bipolar depression as well as postpartum psychosis. We further explore the unique issues faced by women and their families across the full trajectory of the perinatal period from preconception planning through pregnancy and following childbirth. Treatment of perinatal mood disorders requires a collaborative care approach between obstetrics practitioners and mental health providers, to ensure that a thoughtful risk : benefit analysis is conducted. It is vital to consider the risks of the underlying illness versus risks of medication exposure during pregnancy or lactation. When considering medication treatment, attention must be paid to prior medication trials that were most efficacious and best tolerated. Lastly, it is important to assess the impact of individual psychosocial stressors and lifestyle factors on treatment response. PMID:26246794

  5. Perinatal Undernutrition: Accumulation of Catecholamines in Rat Brain

    E-print Network

    Wurtman, Richard

    number, Winick and his collaborators have shown that perinatal malnutrition decreases the number of cells-C group); however, it did magnify the effect of postnatal malnutrition in the D-D group. Amounts

  6. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis. PMID:26327947

  7. Getting the basic rights – the role of water, sanitation and hygiene in maternal and reproductive health: a conceptual framework

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Oona M R; Benova, Lenka; Gon, Giorgia; Afsana, Kaosar; Cumming, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore linkages between water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and maternal and perinatal health via a conceptual approach and a scoping review. Methods We developed a conceptual framework iteratively, amalgamating three literature-based lenses. We then searched literature and identified risk factors potentially linked to maternal and perinatal health. We conducted a systematic scoping review for all chemical and biological WASH risk factors identified using text and MeSH terms, limiting results to systematic reviews or meta-analyses. The remaining 10 complex behavioural associations were not reviewed systematically. Results The main ways poor WASH could lead to adverse outcomes are via two non-exclusive categories: 1. ‘In-water’ associations: (a) Inorganic contaminants, and (b) ‘water-system’ related infections, (c) ‘water-based’ infections, and (d) ‘water borne’ infections. 2. ‘Behaviour’ associations: (e) Behaviours leading to water-washed infections, (f) Water-related insect-vector infections, and (g-i) Behaviours leading to non-infectious diseases/conditions. We added a gender inequality and a life course lens to the above framework to identify whether WASH affected health of mothers in particular, and acted beyond the immediate effects. This framework led us to identifying 77 risk mechanisms (67 chemical or biological factors and 10 complex behavioural factors) linking WASH to maternal and perinatal health outcomes. Conclusion WASH affects the risk of adverse maternal and perinatal health outcomes; these exposures are multiple and overlapping and may be distant from the immediate health outcome. Much of the evidence is weak, based on observational studies and anecdotal evidence, with relatively few systematic reviews. New systematic reviews are required to assess the quality of existing evidence more rigorously, and primary research is required to investigate the magnitude of effects of particular WASH exposures on specific maternal and perinatal outcomes. Whilst major gaps exist, the evidence strongly suggests that poor WASH influences maternal and reproductive health outcomes to the extent that it should be considered in global and national strategies. PMID:25430609

  8. Mental Health in Low-to-Moderate Risk Preterm, Low Birth Weight, and Small for Gestational Age Children at 4 to 5 Years: The Role of Early Maternal Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westrupp, Elizabeth M.; Mensah, Fiona K.; Giallo, Rebecca; Cooklin, Amanda; Nicholson, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The majority of children born preterm, with low birth weight, or small for gestational age are born with low-to-moderate risk (LTM), yet most research focuses on the high-risk group. Little is known about whether children with LTM perinatal risk are at greater risk for mental health problems, or what the role of early maternal

  9. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: consensus bundle on obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-07-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and System Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation. PMID:26091046

  10. National Partnership for Maternal Safety Consensus Bundle on Obstetric Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into 4 domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and Systems Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation. PMID:26059199

  11. National Partnership for Maternal Safety: Consensus Bundle on Obstetric Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Main, Elliott K; Goffman, Dena; Scavone, Barbara M; Low, Lisa Kane; Bingham, Debra; Fontaine, Patricia L; Gorlin, Jed B; Lagrew, David C; Levy, Barbara S

    2015-07-01

    Hemorrhage is the most frequent cause of severe maternal morbidity and preventable maternal mortality and therefore is an ideal topic for the initial national maternity patient safety bundle. These safety bundles outline critical clinical practices that should be implemented in every maternity unit. They are developed by multidisciplinary work groups of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety under the guidance of the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The safety bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and System Learning. Although the bundle components may be adapted to meet the resources available in individual facilities, standardization within an institution is strongly encouraged. References contain sample resources and "Potential Best Practices" to assist with implementation. PMID:26241269

  12. The relationship between maternal attitudes and symptoms of depression and anxiety among pregnant and postpartum first-time mothers

    PubMed Central

    Epperson, C. Neill; Barber, Jacques P.

    2014-01-01

    Two studies examined the relationship between maternal attitudes and symptoms of depression and anxiety during pregnancy and the early postpartum period. In the first study, a measure of maternal attitudes, the Attitudes Toward Motherhood Scale (AToM), was developed and validated in a sample of first-time mothers. The AToM was found to have good internal reliability and convergent validity with cognitive biases and an existing measure of maternal attitudes. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses determined that the measure comprises three correlated factors: beliefs about others’ judgments, beliefs about maternal responsibility, and maternal role idealization. In the second study, we used the AToM to assess the relationship between maternal attitudes and other psychological variables. The factor structure of the measure was confirmed. Maternal attitudes predicted symptoms of depression and anxiety, and these attitudes had incremental predictive validity over general cognitive biases and interpersonal risk factors. Overall, the results of these studies suggest that maternal attitudes are related to psychological distress among first-time mothers during the transition to parenthood and may provide a useful means of identifying women who may benefit from intervention during the perinatal period. PMID:24643422

  13. Fetal undernutrition is associated with perinatal sex-dependent alterations in oxidative status.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Pilar; de Pablo, Angel Luis López; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis; Martín-Cabrejas, María Angeles; Aguilera, Yolanda; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Gutierrez-Arzapalo, Perla Y; Ramiro-Cortijo, David; Fernández-Alfonso, María Soledad; González, María Del Carmen; Arribas, Silvia M

    2015-12-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation predisposes to hypertension development, known as fetal programming. Females are less susceptible, which has been mainly attributed to estrogen influence. We hypothesize that perinatal differences in oxidative status might also contribute. We studied 21-day-old (prepuberal) and 6-month-old male and female offspring from rats fed ad libitum during gestation (Control) or with 50% of Control daily intake from day 10 to delivery (maternal undernutrition, MUN). We assessed in vivo blood pressure and the following plasma biomarkers of oxidative status: protein carbonyls, thiols, reduced glutathione (GSH), total antioxidant capacity, superoxide anion scavenging activity (SOSA) and catalase activities; we calculated a global score (oxy-score) from them. Estradiol and melatonin concentration was measured in young rats. Prepuberal MUN males were normotensive but already exhibited increased carbonyls and lower thiols, GSH, SOSA and melatonin; oxy-score was significantly lower compared to Control males. Prepuberal MUN females only exhibited reduced SOSA compared to Control females. Adult rats from all experimental groups showed a significant increase in carbonyls and a decrease in antioxidants compared to prepuberal rats; oxy-score was negative in adult rats suggesting the development of a prooxidative status as rat age. Adult MUN males were hypertensive and exhibited the highest increase in carbonyls despite similar or even higher antioxidant levels compared to Controls. Adult MUN females remained normotensive and did not exhibit differences in any of the biomarkers compared to Controls. The better global antioxidant status developed by MUN females during perinatal life could contribute to their protection against hypertension programming. PMID:26350253

  14. Maternity records in Edinburgh and Aberdeen in 1936: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, A M; Ayaz, E; Sherlock, L; Shenkin, S D

    2015-03-01

    Historians have long used maternity records to understand the evolution of maternity services. More recently, epidemiologists have become interested in obstetric hospital records as a source of data (e.g. birth weight, social class), to study the influence of early life on future health and disease: life course epidemiology. Edinburgh and Aberdeen are unusual in holding detailed records from several maternity institutions. The records of 1936 are of particular interest because all children born in this year and at school in Scotland at age 11 sat a cognitive ability test, the Scottish Mental Survey 1947. This study aims to describe the maternity services in Edinburgh and Aberdeen in 1936, between the First and Second World Wars. Understanding the richness of data in birth records, the manner in which they were recorded, and the context of the institutions in their community is essential for interpreting life course epidemiology studies. PMID:25874836

  15. Perinatal induction of Cre recombination with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Lizen, Benoit; Claus, Melissa; Jeannotte, Lucie; Rijli, Filippo M; Gofflot, Françoise

    2015-12-01

    Temporal control of site-specific recombination is commonly achieved by using a tamoxifen-inducible form of Cre or Flp recombinases. Although powerful protocols of induction have been developed for gene inactivation at adult stages or during embryonic development, induction of recombination at late gestational or early postnatal stages is still difficult to achieve. In this context, using the ubiquitous CMV-CreER(T2) transgenic mice, we have tested and validated two procedures to achieve recombination just before and just after birth. The efficiency of recombination was evaluated in the brain, which is known to be more problematic to target. For the late gestation treatment with tamoxifen, different protocols of complementary administration of progesterone and estrogen were tested. However, delayed delivery and/or mortality of pups due to difficult delivery were always observed. To circumvent this problem, pups were collected from tamoxifen-treated pregnant dams by caesarian section at E18.5 and given to foster mothers. For postnatal treatment, different dosages of tamoxifen were administered by intragastric injection to the pups during 3 or 4 days after birth. The efficiency of these treatments was analyzed at P7 using a transgenic reporter line. They were also validated with the Hoxa5 conditional allele. In conclusion, we have developed efficient procedures that allow achieving efficient recombination of floxed alleles at perinatal stages. These protocols will allow investigating the late/adult functions of many developmental genes, whose characterization has been so far restricted to embryonic development. PMID:26395370

  16. Assessment of the perinatal effects of maternal ingestion of Ipomoea carnea in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is believed that I. carnea toxicosis induces abnormal embryogenesis in livestock. Studies with rats treated with I. carnea aqueous fraction (AF) during gestation, revealed litters with decreased body weight, but the characteristic vacuolar lesions promoted by swainsonine, its main toxic principle...

  17. A thematic analysis of factors influencing recruitment to maternal and perinatal trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This literature review examines factors that affect recruitment success, including characteristics of participants, clinicians, and organizations. Strategies often cited in the literature for improving recruitment include avoiding blinding and placebos, providing telephone reminders and financial incentives, and tailoring interventions to meet the needs of underserved populations and minority groups. The authors also identified a number of strategies that were not shown to be effective.

  18. Perinatally infected adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (perinatally human immunodeficiency virus)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Leticia S; Cardoso, Claudete A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of highly potent antiretroviral treatment during the last decades has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic disease. Children that were diagnosed during the first months or years of life and received treatment, are living longer and better and are presently reaching adolescence and adulthood. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIV) and young adults may present specific clinical, behavior and social characteristics and demands. We have performed a literature review about different aspects that have to be considered in the care and follow-up of PHIV. The search included papers in the MEDLINE database via PubMed, located using the keywords “perinatally HIV-infected” AND “adolescents”. Only articles published in English or Portuguese from 2003 to 2014 were selected. The types of articles included original research, systematic reviews, and quantitative or qualitative studies; case reports and case series were excluded. Results are presented in the following topics: “Puberal development and sexual maturation”, “Growth in weight and height”, “Bone metabolism during adolescence”, “Metabolic complications”, “Brain development, cognition and mental health”, “Reproductive health”, “Viral drug resistance” and “Transition to adult outpatient care”. We hope that this review will support the work of pediatricians, clinicians and infectious diseases specialists that are receiving these subjects to continue treatment. PMID:26279988

  19. Canine perinatal mortality: a cohort study of 224 breeds.

    PubMed

    Tønnessen, R; Borge, K Sverdrup; Nødtvedt, A; Indrebø, A

    2012-06-01

    Canine perinatal mortality is known to be relatively high. However, the literature on perinatal mortality in dogs is still sparse and often refers to a single or only a few breeds. The aim of this large-scale observational study was to describe the perinatal mortality in purebred dogs of various breeds at both puppy and litter level. In addition, the influence of breed, breed size, litter size, age of the bitch, litter number and season for whelping on the risk of perinatal mortality at litter level was studied and the mean litter size at eight days and eight wks after birth was calculated. A retrospective cohort study was performed by studying 10,810 litters of 224 breeds registered in the Norwegian Kennel Club in 2006 and 2007. Perinatal mortality was defined as the sum of stillborn puppies and puppies that died during the first wk after birth (early neonatal mortality) and was present in 24.6% of the litters. Eight percent of the puppies died before eight days after birth, with 4.3% as stillbirth and 3.7% as early neonatal mortality. For most breeds the perinatal mortality was low, but for some breeds a higher perinatal mortality was found. The mean litter size at eight days and eight wks after birth was 4.97 (±0.02) and 4.92 (±0.02) puppies, respectively. Of all puppies born, only 1% died during the period from eight days to eight wks after birth. Random effects logistic regression analysis indicated that increasing litter size and age of the bitch were associated with an increased risk of stillbirth, early neonatal mortality and total perinatal mortality at the litter level (P < 0.001). The random breed effect was significant for all outcomes. Litter number also had a significant effect on stillbirth, early neonatal mortality and total perinatal mortality at the litter level, with the highest risk of perinatal mortality found in the first litter (P < 0.001). Further, the risk of early neonatal mortality was doubled in litters with stillborn puppies. No significant effect of whelping season on perinatal mortality at litter level was found. An interaction existed between the age of the bitch and litter number and the risk of stillbirth was three times as high (odds ratio = 3.00) in litters from bitches having their first litter after the age of six y. Breed was a more important determinant of perinatal mortality in litters than breed size. However, more than 90% of the variation in perinatal mortality was found at the individual litter level and efforts to minimize puppy mortality should be targeted at the management of the individual litter rather than at the breed level. PMID:22365700

  20. Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development

    PubMed Central

    Radlowski, Emily C.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common form of nutrient deficiency worldwide. It is highly prevalent due to the limited availability of high quality food in developing countries and poor dietary habits in industrialized countries. According to the World Health Organization, it affects nearly 2 billion people and up to 50% of women who are pregnant. Maternal anemia during pregnancy is especially burdensome to healthy neurodevelopment in the fetus because iron is needed for proper neurogenesis, development, and myelination. Maternal anemia also increases the risk of low birth weight, either due to premature birth or fetal growth restriction, which is associated with delayed neurocognitive development and even psychiatric illness. As rapid neurodevelopment continues after birth infants that received sufficient iron in utero, but that receive a low iron diet after 6 months of age, also show deficits in neurocognitive development, including impairments in learning and memory. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive complications of iron deficiency during critical pre- and postnatal periods of brain development are difficult to remedy, persisting into adulthood. Thus, preventing iron deficiency in the pre- and postnatal periods is critical as is devising new means to recapture cognitive function in individuals who experienced early iron deficiency. This review will discuss the prevalence of pre- and postnatal iron deficiency, the mechanism, and effects of iron deficiency on brain and cognitive development. PMID:24065908

  1. A new plan for the 800-pound Gorilla (Guerrilla): perinatal mortality in Afghanistan: a 21st century counterinsurgency model for Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Thomas C

    2011-01-01

    Afghanistan has the highest perinatal mortality rate in the entire world. One Afghani woman dies every 30 minutes from perinatal- related event. One of eight Afghani women will die from perinatal events. Maternal mortality is (use percentage, not fractions) 1600/100,000 vs 13 /100,000 in the United States. Afghanistan is one of the only countries in the world in which the average woman?s life expectancy is shorter than a males- despite the active, nationwide combat fought primarily by Afghani males. Meaning, women in Afghanistan are not routinely involved in combat, yet are more likely to die than a man of the same age. This article presents an alternative model Medical Seminar (MEDSEM) for a successful Special Forces (SF) medical counterinsurgency (COIN) plan that can obtain real results by addressing the mission of the Afghan Ministry of Health versus clinging to old notions. This model forms around the medical capabilities of the SF Operational Detachment (ODA)- Alpha (A) and preventinmaternal-infant complications. PMID:22173597

  2. A Cluster Randomised Controlled Effectiveness Trial Evaluating Perinatal Home Visiting among South African Mothers/Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Tomlinson, Mark; le Roux, Ingrid M.; Harwood, Jessica M.; Comulada, Scott; O'Connor, Mary J.; Weiss, Robert E.; Worthman, Carol M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Interventions are needed to reduce poor perinatal health. We trained community health workers (CHWs) as home visitors to address maternal/infant risks. Methods In a cluster randomised controlled trial in Cape Town townships, neighbourhoods were randomised within matched pairs to 1) the control, healthcare at clinics (n?=?12 neighbourhoods; n?=?594 women), or 2) a home visiting intervention by CBW trained in cognitive-behavioural strategies to address health risks (by the Philani Maternal, Child Health and Nutrition Programme), in addition to clinic care (n?=?12 neighbourhoods; n?=?644 women). Participants were assessed during pregnancy (2% refusal) and 92% were reassessed at two weeks post-birth, 88% at six months and 84% at 18 months later. We analysed 32 measures of maternal/infant well-being over the 18 month follow-up period using longitudinal random effects regressions. A binomial test for correlated outcomes evaluated overall effectiveness over time. The 18 month post-birth assessment outcomes also were examined alone and as a function of the number of home visits received. Results Benefits were found on 7 of 32 measures of outcomes, resulting in significant overall benefits for the intervention compared to the control when using the binomial test (p?=?0.008); nevertheless, no effects were observed when only the 18 month outcomes were analyzed. Benefits on individual outcomes were related to the number of home visits received. Among women living with HIV, intervention mothers were more likely to implement the PMTCT regimens, use condoms during all sexual episodes (OR?=?1.25; p?=?0.014), have infants with healthy weight-for-age measurements (OR?=?1.42; p?=?0.045), height-for-age measurements (OR?=?1.13, p<0.001), breastfeed exclusively for six months (OR?=?3.59; p<0.001), and breastfeed longer (OR?=?3.08; p<0.001). Number of visits was positively associated with infant birth weight ?2500 grams (OR?=?1.07; p?=?0.012), healthy head-circumference-for-age measurements at 6 months (OR?=?1.09, p?=?0.017), and improved cognitive development at 18 months (OR?=?1.02, p?=?0.048). Conclusions Home visits to neighbourhood mothers by CHWs may be a feasible strategy for enhancing maternal/child outcomes. However, visits likely must extend over several years for persistent benefits. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00996528 PMID:25340337

  3. Interleukin-1 Receptor Blockade in Perinatal Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Jason M.; Lei, Jun; Burd, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a potent inflammatory cytokine that can be produced by a variety of cell types throughout the body. While IL-1 is a central mediator of inflammation and response to infection, the role of IL-1 signaling in adult and pediatric brain injury is becoming increasingly clear. Although the mechanisms of IL-1 expression are largely understood, the downstream effects and contributions to excitotoxicity and oxidative stress are poorly defined. Here, we present a review of mechanisms of IL-1 signaling with a focus on the role of IL-1 in perinatal brain injury. We highlight research models of perinatal brain injury and the use of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) as an agent of therapeutic potential in preventing perinatal brain injury due to exposure to inflammation. PMID:25340046

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Perinatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Freeman, Marlene P.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies are increasingly sought out by patients with psychiatric disorders. This article provides a review of the evidence for several commonly utilized CAM therapies (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids, folate, S-adenosyl-methionine (SAMe), St. John’s Wort, bright light therapy, exercise, massage, and acupuncture) in the treatment of perinatal depression. A number of these treatments may be reasonable to consider for women during pregnancy or the postpartum, but the safety and efficacy of these relative to standard treatments must still be systematically determined. Evidence based use of CAM treatments for perinatal depression is discussed. Adequately powered systematic studies are necessary to determine the role of CAM in the treatment of perinatal depression. PMID:24041861

  5. Non-psychotic mental disorders in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Howard, Louise M; Molyneaux, Emma; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Rochat, Tamsen; Stein, Alan; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2014-11-15

    Mental disorders are among the most common morbidities of pregnancy and the postnatal period, and can have adverse effects on the mother, her child, and family. This Series paper summarises the evidence about epidemiology, risk factors, identification, and interventions for non-psychotic mental disorders. Although the phenomenology and risk factors for perinatal mental disorders are largely similar to those for the disorders at other times, treatment considerations differ during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Most randomised controlled trials have examined psychosocial and psychological interventions for postnatal depression, with evidence for effectiveness in treating and preventing the disorder. Few high-quality studies exist on the effectiveness or safety of pharmacological treatments in the perinatal period, despite quite high prescription rates. General principles of prescribing of drugs in the perinatal period are provided, but individual risk-benefit analyses are needed for decisions about treatment. PMID:25455248

  6. [The application of music therapy in maternity nursing].

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Chen; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2004-10-01

    Music therapy has been used in the care of patients in a variety of fields, to decrease anxiety and enhance health, and has shown promising results. It is reported that pregnancy and childbirth may result in stressful consequences for some women. This article describes the systematic applications of music therapy to perinatal women and their families. The use of music for the childbearing family is appropriate because it enhances learning, improves the birth experience, and promotes closer relationships. The labor nurses are charged with the tasks of assuring the positive aspects of pregnancy and childbirth and meeting the demands of the women in these stressful situations. In order to create a caring environment, we suggest that music therapy be incorporated into standard maternity care. PMID:15614664

  7. Perinatal nicotine exposure alters AT 1 and AT 2 receptor expression pattern in the brain of fetal and offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Mao, Caiping; Zhang, Hong; Xiao, Daliao; Zhu, Liyan; Ding, Yang; Zhang, Yuying; Wu, Lei; Xu, Zhice; Zhang, Lubo

    2008-12-01

    The present study determined the effect of maternal nicotine exposure during the early developmental period on AT(1)R and AT(2)R mRNA and protein abundance in the rat brain. Pregnant rats of day-4 gestation were implanted with osmotic minipumps that delivered nicotine at a dose rate of 6 mg/kg/day for 28 days. Neither fetal nor offspring brain weight was significantly altered by the nicotine treatment. Nicotine significantly increased brain AT(1)R in fetuses at gestation 15 and 21 days and decreased central AT(2)R at gestation day 21. In the offspring, perinatal nicotine significantly increased brain AT(1)R protein in males but not females at 30 days, and increased it in both males and females at 5-month-old. AT(2)R protein levels were significantly decreased by nicotine in both male and female offspring regardless of ages. Whereas brain AT(1)R mRNA abundance did not change during postnatal development, AT(2)R mRNA levels in both sexes significantly decreased in 5-month-old, as compared with 30-day-old offspring. Nicotine significantly increased brain AT(1)R mRNA in the female offspring. In contrast, it decreased AT(2)R mRNA in the brain to the same extent in males and females. In control offspring, there was a developmental increase in the AT(1)R/AT(2)R mRNA ratio in the brain of adult animals, which was significantly up-regulated in nicotine-treated animals with females being more prominent than males. The results demonstrate that perinatal nicotine exposure alters AT(1)R and AT(2)R gene expression pattern in the developing brain and suggest maternal smoking-mediated pathophysiological consequences related to brain RAS development in postnatal life. PMID:18926802

  8. Role of maternal nutrition in programming adiposity in the offspring: potential implications of glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Breton, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    The epidemiological studies initially indicated that maternal undernutrition leading to a low birth weight may predispose to the long-lasting energy balance disorders. A high birth weight due to maternal obesity or diabetes, inappropriate early postnatal nutrition, and rapid catch-up growth, may also sensitize to an increased risk of obesity. As stated by the developmental origin of health and disease concept, the perinatal perturbation of the fetus/neonate nutrient supply might be a crucial determinant of the individual programming of the body weight set point. The adipose tissue is considered as the main fuel storage unit involved in the maintenance of the energy homeostasis. Several models have demonstrated that this tissue is a prime target of the developmental programming in a gender- and depot-specific manner. In the rodents, the perinatal period of life corresponds largely to the period of adipogenesis. In contrast, this phenomenon essentially takes place before birth in bigger mammals. Despite these different developmental time windows, the altricial and precocial species share several common offspring programming mechanisms. Thus, the adipose tissue of the offspring from malnourished dams exhibited impaired glucose uptake and leptin/insulin resistance with increased proinflammatory markers. It also displayed a modified sympathetic activity, circadian rhythm, fatty acid composition, and thermogenesis. This might lead to the reprogrammed metabolism and distribution of the adipose tissue with enhanced adipogenesis and fat accumulation predisposing to adiposity. The inappropriate glucocorticoid (GC) levels and modified tissue sensitivity might be key actors of perinatal programming and long-lasting altered adipose tissue activity in the offspring. Following maternal malnutrition, the epigenetic mechanisms might also be responsible for the adipose tissue programming. PMID:25436718

  9. Impact of the Jamaican birth cohort study on maternal, child and adolescent health policy and practice.

    PubMed

    McCaw-Binns, A; Ashley, D; Samms-Vaughan, M

    2010-01-01

    The Jamaica Perinatal Morbidity and Mortality Survey (JPMMS) was a national study designed to identify modifiable risk factors associated with poor maternal and perinatal outcome. Needing to better understand factors that promote or retard child development, behaviour and academic achievement, we conducted follow-up studies of the birth cohort. The paper describes the policy developments from the JPMMS and two follow-up rounds. The initial study (1986-87) documented 94% of all births and their outcomes on the island over 2 months (n = 10 508), and perinatal (n = 2175) and maternal deaths (n = 62) for a further 10 months. A subset of the birth cohort, identified by their date of birth through school records, was seen at ages 11-12 (n = 1715) and 15-16 years (n = 1563). Findings from the initial survey led to, inter alia, clinic-based screening for syphilis, referral high-risk clinics run by visiting obstetricians, and the redesign and construction of new labour wards at referral hospitals. The follow-up studies documented inadequate academic achievement among boys and children attending public schools, and associations between under- and over-nutrition, excessive television viewing (>20 h/week), inadequate parental supervision and behavioural problems. These contributed to the development of a television programming code for children, a National Parenting Policy, policies aimed at improving inter-sectoral services to children from birth to 5 years (Early Childhood Commission) and behavioural interventions of the Violence Prevention Alliance (an inter-sectoral NGO) and the Healthy Lifestyles project (Ministry of Health). Indigenous maternal and child health research provided a local evidence base that informed public policy. Collaboration, good communication, being vigilant to opportunities to influence policy, and patience has contributed to our success. PMID:20078824

  10. Role of foetal echocardiography in predicting perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Grover, A; Dogra, M; Ghosh, K; Narang, A; Anand, I S

    1991-01-01

    To establish foetal cardiovascular parameters as predictors of perinatal outcome in pregnancy, M-Mode, 2-D echocardiography and pulse Doppler study was performed at 24-32 weeks of gestation in 65 pregnancies. These pregnancies were followed up for perinatal outcome. The studied population included 24 normal pregnancies, 21 pregnant women with heart disease (14 rheumatic and 7 congenital heart disease) and 20 high risk pregnancies (bad obstetric history in 7, suspected intrauterine growth retardation in 4, hypertensive disease of pregnancy in 6 and diabetes mellitus in 3). There was no perinatal mortality. Two foetuses were born with complete heart block and one with a small ventricular septal defect; 6 neonates had intrauterine growth retardation and two of these had neonatal asphyxia with APGAR score less than 6 at one minute. Anatomically normal heart was correctly diagnosed in all 64 foetuses and ventricular septal defect was detected antenatally in one. Antenatal diagnosis of complete heart block was correctly made in two foetuses. One new born with complete heart block required a permanent pacemaker, which was implanted. The ratio of peak velocity across mitral valve during atrial systole (A) to peak velocity during early diastolic ventricular filling (E) was chosen to correlate with perinatal outcome. The ratio was less than 1.0 in 6 foetuses, all of whom were subsequently confirmed to have intrauterine growth retardation. In normal pregnancies A/E ratio was more than 1.0. We conclude that foetal echocardiography is a useful tool for predicting perinatal outcome and may be helpful in screening patients who require specific perinatal management. PMID:1752617

  11. New Insights on the Maternal Diet Induced-Hypertension: Potential Role of the Phenotypic Plasticity and Sympathetic-Respiratory Overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Silva, João H.; de Brito-Alves, José L.; Barros, Monique Assis de V.; Nogueira, Viviane Oliveira; Paulino-Silva, Kássya M.; de Oliveira-Lira, Allan; Nobre, Isabele G.; Fragoso, Jéssica; Leandro, Carol G.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and affects worldwide population. Current environment including life style coupled with genetic programming have been attributed to the rising incidence of hypertension. Besides, environmental conditions during perinatal development such as maternal malnutrition can program changes in the integration among renal, neural, and endocrine system leading to hypertension. This phenomenon is termed phenotypic plasticity and refers to the adjustment of a phenotype in response to environmental stimuli without genetic change, following a novel or unusual input during development. Human and animal studies indicate that fetal exposure to an adverse maternal environment may alter the renal morphology and physiology that contribute to the development of hypertension. Recently, it has been shown that the maternal protein restriction alter the central control of SAH by a mechanism that include respiratory dysfunction and enhanced sympathetic-respiratory coupling at early life, which may contribute to adult hypertension. This review will address the new insights on the maternal diet induced-hypertension that include the potential role of the phenotypic plasticity, specifically the perinatal protein malnutrition, and sympathetic-respiratory overactivity. PMID:26635631

  12. [Perinatal asphyxia as incorrect explanation for mental retardation].

    PubMed

    Tuerlings, J H A M; Smits, A P T; van den Berg, P P

    2002-09-21

    Three women, aged 21, 34 and 32 and with a family history of mental retardation said to be caused by perinatal asphyxia, each gave birth to a child with mental retardation. A chromosomal translocation, fragile X syndrome, and myotonic dystrophy could be diagnosed, respectively. In retrospect, the diagnosis of perinatal asphyxia in the family history had been too readily accepted. In reality the mental retardation was caused by a genetic disorder. Physicians are used to making a diagnosis, and when a diagnosis is not (yet) possible, they try to establish a working diagnosis or differential diagnosis. Too often such a working diagnosis becomes, through time, a definite diagnosis. PMID:12369434

  13. Media representation of maternal neonaticide 

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Jocelyn Renee

    2008-10-10

    of mothers who commit neonaticide. Both fictional and non-fictional media sources exhibited aspects of the monstrous maternal theme and the strain defense theme. The monstrous maternal theme consists of words and statements that indicate the descriptions...

  14. Neuroendocrine control of maternal behaviour 

    E-print Network

    Caughey, Sarah Dawn

    2011-11-25

    Maternal behaviour during the peri-partum period, albeit in differing forms, can be observed in all mammals, thus it must serve an important evolutionary purpose in enabling the successful raising of offspring. Maternal ...

  15. Increased maternal nighttime cortisol concentrations in late gestation alter glucose and insulin in the neonatal lamb

    PubMed Central

    Antolic, Andrew; Feng, Xiaodi; Wood, Charles E; Richards, Elaine M; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that a modest chronic increase in maternal cortisol concentrations impairs maternal glucose metabolism and increases the incidence of perinatal stillbirth. The dramatic outcomes prevented our ability to study the effects of maternal hypercortisolemia on neonatal growth, glucose metabolism, and hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenal axis response. Therefore, we developed a model in which pregnant ewes are infused for 12 h/day at 0.5 mg·kg–1·day–1 from day 115 of gestation until delivery (˜145), elevating nighttime plasma cortisol concentrations. This pattern of elevation of cortisol mimics that in patients with elevated evening cortisol concentrations, as in Cushing’s syndrome or chronic depression. Plasma cortisol, glucose, insulin, and electrolytes were measured during pregnancy and postpartum in control and cortisol-infused ewes and their postnatal lambs for the first 14 days after delivery. Neonatal growth and plasma ACTH, aldosterone, renin activity, and electrolytes, and organ weights at 14 days of age were also measured. Infusion of cortisol increased maternal plasma cortisol during pregnancy but not postpartum, and did not alter neonatal ACTH or cortisol. Although maternal glucose and insulin concentrations were not changed by the maternal infusion of cortisol, neonatal plasma glucose was increased and plasma insulin was decreased compared to those in the control group. Neonatal ponderal index and kidney weight were reduced, left ventricular wall thickness was increased, and plasma sodium and creatinine were increased after maternal cortisol infusion. These results suggest that excess maternal cortisol concentrations in late gestation alter growth, glucose and insulin regulation, and organ maturation in the neonate. PMID:26371232

  16. IL-1 Receptor Blockade Prevents Fetal Cortical Brain Injury But Not Preterm Birth in a Mouse Model of Inflammation-Induced Preterm Birth and Perinatal Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Kirstin; Shammary, Mofeedah Al; McLane, Michael; Johnston, Michael V.; Elovitz, Michal A.; Burd, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Problem Exposure to intrauterine inflammation, associated with preterm birth, has been linked to a devastating spectrum of neurobehavioral disorders. Mechanisms of this injury are unknown. Using a mouse model of intrauterine inflammation, we have observed a disruption of fetal neuronal morphology along with a marked elevation of Interleukin (IL)-1? in the fetal brain and placenta. In the current study, we hypothesized that IL-1 plays a key role in perinatal brain injury. Method of Study Utilizing a mouse model of inflammation-induced preterm birth, we investigated the role of IL-1 in fetal cortical injury as well as preterm birth. In these studies, dams received systemic treatment with IL-1 receptor antagonist prior to administration of intrauterine inflammation. Results Systemic maternal antagonism of IL-1 improved fetal cortical neuronal injury associated with the exposure to intrauterine inflammation, without affecting the phenotype of preterm birth. IL-1 receptor antagonist blocked activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in perinatal cortex, a key enzyme implicated in neurotoxicity. Conclusion Our data suggest that fetal cortical brain injury and preterm birth may occur by divergent mechanisms. Furthermore, our studies indicate maternal administration of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) blocked neuronal nitric oxide synthase activation observed in the brain cortex and, we speculate, that this alteration in activation leads to demonstrated decreased neurotoxicity. PMID:24592965

  17. Prevention of Perinatal Hepatitis B Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Noele P.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, the most common form of chronic hepatitis worldwide, is a major public health problem affecting an estimated 360 million people globally. Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) is responsible for more than one third of chronic HBV infections worldwide. An estimated 15%–40% of persons chronically infected develop HBV-related complications, such as cirrhosis and hepatic carcinoma, and 25% die from these complications. MTCT can occur during pregnancy or during delivery. Screening pregnant women for HBV infection, providing infant postexposure prophylaxis, and maternal treatment with antiviral medications are strategies for reducing MTCT transmission rates and the global burden of new chronic HBV infections. Administration of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) and hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine within 24 hours of birth, followed by completion of the vaccine series, is 85%–95% efficacious for prevention of MTCT. Despite timely post-exposure prophylaxis, MTCT occurs in 5%–15% of infants. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive, hepatitis e antigen (HBeAg) positive mothers with HBV DNA level ?106 copies/mL (>200 000 IU/mL) are at greatest risk of transmitting HBV to their infants. Consensus recommendations and evidence-based guidelines for management of chronic HBV infection and screening of pregnant women have been developed. The safety and efficacy of antiviral drug use during pregnancy are areas of ongoing research. Substantial advances have been achieved globally in reducing MTCT, but MTCT remains an ongoing health problem. Attaining a better understanding of the mechanisms of MTCT, implementing existing policies on maternal screening and infant follow-up, and addressing research gaps are critical for further reductions in MTCT transmission. PMID:25232477

  18. Disparities and Trends in Birth Outcomes, Perinatal and Infant Mortality in Aboriginal vs. Non-Aboriginal Populations: A Population-Based Study in Quebec, Canada 1996–2010

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Xiao, Lin; Auger, Nathalie; Torrie, Jill; McHugh, Nancy Gros-Louis; Zoungrana, Hamado; Luo, Zhong-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Aboriginal populations are at substantially higher risks of adverse birth outcomes, perinatal and infant mortality than their non-Aboriginal counterparts even in developed countries including Australia, U.S. and Canada. There is a lack of data on recent trends in Canada. Methods We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study (n = 254,410) using the linked vital events registry databases for singleton births in Quebec 1996–2010. Aboriginal (First Nations, Inuit) births were identified by mother tongue, place of residence and Indian Registration System membership. Outcomes included preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age, large-for-gestational-age, low birth weight, high birth weight, stillbirth, neonatal death, postneonatal death, perinatal death and infant death. Results Perinatal and infant mortality rates were 1.47 and 1.80 times higher in First Nations (10.1 and 7.3 per 1000, respectively), and 2.37 and 4.46 times higher in Inuit (16.3 and 18.1 per 1000, respectively) relative to non-Aboriginal (6.9 and 4.1 per 1000, respectively) births (all p<0.001). Compared to non-Aboriginal births, preterm birth rates were persistently (1.7–1.8 times) higher in Inuit, large-for-gestational-age birth rates were persistently (2.7–3.0 times) higher in First Nations births over the study period. Between 1996–2000 and 2006–2010, as compared to non-Aboriginal infants, the relative risk disparities increased for infant mortality (from 4.10 to 5.19 times) in Inuit, and for postneonatal mortality in Inuit (from 6.97 to 12.33 times) or First Nations (from 3.76 to 4.25 times) infants. Adjusting for maternal characteristics (age, marital status, parity, education and rural vs. urban residence) attenuated the risk differences, but significantly elevated risks remained in both Inuit and First Nations births for the risks of perinatal mortality (1.70 and 1.28 times, respectively), infant mortality (3.66 and 1.47 times, respectively) and postneonatal mortality (6.01 and 2.28 times, respectively) in Inuit and First Nations infants (all p<0.001). Conclusions Aboriginal vs. non-Aboriginal disparities in adverse birth outcomes, perinatal and infant mortality are persistent or worsening over the recent decade in Quebec, strongly suggesting the needs for interventions to improve perinatal and infant health in Aboriginal populations, and for monitoring the trends in other regions in Canada. PMID:26397838

  19. The calming effect of maternal carrying in different mammalian species

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Gianluca; Setoh, Peipei; Yoshida, Sachine; Kuroda, Kumi O.

    2015-01-01

    Attachment theory postulates that mothers and their infants possess some basic physiological mechanisms that favor their dyadic interaction and bonding. Many studies have focused on the maternal physiological mechanisms that promote attachment (e.g., mothers’ automatic responses to infant faces and/or cries), and relatively less have examined infant physiology. Thus, the physiological mechanisms regulating infant bonding behaviors remain largely undefined. This review elucidates some of the neurobiological mechanisms governing social bonding and cooperation in humans by focusing on maternal carrying and its beneficial effect on mother–infant interaction in mammalian species (e.g., in humans, big cats, and rodents). These studies show that infants have a specific calming response to maternal carrying. A human infant carried by his/her walking mother exhibits a rapid heart rate decrease, and immediately stops voluntary movement and crying compared to when he/she is held in a sitting position. Furthermore, strikingly similar responses were identified in mouse rodents, who exhibit immobility, diminished ultra-sonic vocalizations and heart rate. In general, the studies described in the current review demonstrate the calming effect of maternal carrying to be comprised of a complex set of behavioral and physiological components, each of which has a specific postnatal time window and is orchestrated in a well-matched manner with the maturation of the infants. Such reactions could have been evolutionarily adaptive in mammalian mother–infant interactions. The findings have implications for parenting practices in developmentally normal populations. In addition, we propose that infants’ physiological response may be useful in clinical assessments as we discuss possible implications on early screening for child psychopathology (e.g., autism spectrum disorders and perinatal brain disorders). PMID:25932017

  20. Prevalence and perinatal mortality associated with preterm births in a tertiary medical center in South East Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iyoke, Chukwuemeka Anthony; Lawani, Osaheni Lucky; Ezugwu, Euzebus Chinonye; Ilechukwu, Gideon; Nkwo, Peter Onubiwe; Mba, Sunday Gabriel; Asinobi, Isaac Nwabueze

    2014-01-01

    Background Preterm birth is a high risk condition associated with significant mortality and morbidity in the perinatal, neonatal, and childhood periods, and even in adulthood. Knowledge of the epidemiology of preterm births is necessary for planning appropriate maternal and fetal care. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, pattern, and perinatal mortality associated with preterm births at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, South East Nigeria. Methods This was a review of prospectively collected routine delivery data involving preterm deliveries that occurred between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. Data analysis involved descriptive and inferential statistics at 95% level of confidence using SPSS version 17.0 for Windows. Results There were 3,760 live births over the 5-year study period out of which 636 were preterm births, giving a prevalence rate of 16.9%. Spontaneous preterm births occurred in approximately 57% of preterm births while provider-initiated births occurred in 43%. The mean gestational age at preterm deliveries was 32.6±3.2 weeks while the mean birth weight was 2.0±0.8 kilograms. Approximately 89% of preterm births involved singleton pregnancies. Sixty-eight percent of preterm births were moderate to late preterm. The male:female ratio of preterm babies born during the period was 1.2:1. The adjusted perinatal mortality rate for preterm babies in the study center was 46.1% (236/512). The stillbirth rate for preterm babies was 22.0% (149/678) and the adjusted early neonatal death rate was 24.0% (87/363). Conclusion The prevalence of preterm births and associated perinatal mortality were high which may be a reflection of suboptimal prenatal and newborn care. An urgent improvement in prenatal and newborn care is therefore needed in the study center in order to improve the capacity to prevent or abate preterm labor, and preterm premature rupture of membranes; and to reduce avoidable stillbirths. Further upgrading of personnel and facilities in the newborn special care unit is also required to minimize early neonatal deaths. PMID:25378955

  1. Adiponectin supplementation in pregnant mice prevents the adverse effects of maternal obesity on placental function and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Aye, Irving L. M. H.; Rosario, Fredrick J.; Powell, Theresa L.; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mothers with obesity or gestational diabetes mellitus have low circulating levels of adiponectin (ADN) and frequently deliver large babies with increased fat mass, who are susceptible to perinatal complications and to development of metabolic syndrome later in life. It is currently unknown if the inverse correlation between maternal ADN and fetal growth reflects a cause-and-effect relationship. We tested the hypothesis that ADN supplementation in obese pregnant dams improves maternal insulin sensitivity, restores normal placental insulin/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and nutrient transport, and prevents fetal overgrowth. Compared with dams on a control diet, female C57BL/6J mice fed an obesogenic diet before mating and throughout gestation had increased fasting serum leptin, insulin, and C-peptide, and reduced high-molecular-weight ADN at embryonic day (E) 18.5. Placental insulin and mTORC1 signaling was activated, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?) phosphorylation was reduced, placental transport of glucose and amino acids in vivo was increased, and fetal weights were 29% higher in obese dams. Maternal ADN infusion in obese dams from E14.5 to E18.5 normalized maternal insulin sensitivity, placental insulin/mTORC1 and PPAR? signaling, nutrient transport, and fetal growth without affecting maternal fat mass. Using a mouse model with striking similarities to obese pregnant women, we demonstrate that ADN functions as an endocrine link between maternal adipose tissue and fetal growth by regulating placental function. Importantly, maternal ADN supplementation reversed the adverse effects of maternal obesity on placental function and fetal growth. Improving maternal ADN levels may serve as an effective intervention strategy to prevent fetal overgrowth caused by maternal obesity. PMID:26417088

  2. Maternal anthropometry for prediction of pregnancy outcomes: memorandum from a USAID/WHO/PAHO/MotherCare meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The meeting discussed two main areas concerning maternal anthropometry in developing countries: (1) how various anthropometric indicators can be best utilized for assessing and monitoring the nutritional status of women at different times in their reproductive lives, and (2) the predictive value of various anthropometric indicators for identifying benefit or risk for maternal and perinatal/neonatal health and nutritional outcomes of pregnancy. The indicators discussed were prepregnancy weight, height, weight gain in pregnancy, arm circumference, weight-for-height and body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)2). Some 50 experts reached consensus on the tools for assessing maternal nutritional status for widespread field application in developing countries, and on priority research needs. This Memorandum summarizes the general recommendations which have important and immediate field applications, as well as priority research issues related to specific indicators. PMID:1959155

  3. Maternity Leave in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Joyce Yen; Han, Wen-Jui

    2010-01-01

    Using the first nationally representative birth cohort study in Taiwan, this paper examines the role that maternity leave policy in Taiwan plays in the timing of mothers returning to work after giving birth, as well as the extent to which this timing is linked to the amount of time mothers spend with their children and their use of breast milk…

  4. Maternal Sexuality and Breastfeeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Alison

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I consider the ways in which lactation has been discussed as a form of maternal sexuality, and the implications this carries for our understanding of breastfeeding practices and sexuality. Drawing on knowledge constructed in the western world during the last half of the twentieth century, the paper identifies a shift between the…

  5. Prenatal and Perinatal Risk Factors for Autism in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xin; Lv, Cong-Chao; Tian, Jiang; Miao, Ru-Juan; Xi, Wei; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Qi, Lihong

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study using 190 Han children with and without autism to investigate prenatal and perinatal risk factors for autism in China. Cases were recruited through public special education schools and controls from regular public schools in the same region (Tianjin), with frequency matching on sex and birth year. Unadjusted…

  6. Prenatal and Perinatal Factors Associated with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilder, Deborah A.; Pinborough-Zimmerman, Judith; Bakian, Amanda V.; Miller, Judith S.; Dorius, Josette T.; Nangle, Barry; McMahon, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal and perinatal risk factors associated with intellectual disability (ID) were studied in 8-year-old Utah children from a 1994 birth cohort (N = 26,108) using broad ascertainment methods and birth records following the most current recording guidelines. Risk factor analyses were performed inclusive and exclusive of children with a known or…

  7. Perinatal mortality in West Germany following atmospheric nuclear weapons tests.

    PubMed

    Körblein, Alfred

    2004-11-01

    Using trend analysis, the author sought a possible association between perinatal mortality rates in West Germany, 1955-1993, and the fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the years 1952-1993. The regression model used a continuously falling trend and a superimposed extra term that reflects the average strontium content in pregnant women. Mortality rates show an upward deviation that peaked in 1970. The model attributes more than 100,000 excess perinatal deaths to strontium in the fallout. The dose-response curve is curvilinear with a power of dose of 1.81 +/- 0.23. In addition, using a combined regression model, the author analyzed the two data subsets of perinatal mortality (i.e., stillbirth rate and early neonatal mortality). The strontium effect is 3.4 times greater on early infant deaths than on stillbirths. According to the prevailing wisdom, the fetus is protected against damage from ionizing radiation by a threshold dose of 50-200 mSv, but the doses from strontium in the fallout were well below 1 mSv/yr in Germany. The results reported here seem to contradict the existence of a threshold dose for perinatal mortality at low doses. PMID:16599009

  8. Behavioral Differences in School Age Children after Perinatal Stroke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trauner, Doris A.; Panyard-Davis, Jan L.; Ballantyne, Angela O.

    1996-01-01

    The Personality Inventory for Children was administered to parents of 17 school-age children who had had perinatal strokes and 23 comparisons. Data suggest that focal brain lesions may predispose a child to social and cognitive defects, and that brain localization for cognitive and social skills may be determined early in development. (SLD)

  9. Perinatal Antidepressant Use: Understanding Women’s Preferences and Concerns

    PubMed Central

    BATTLE, CYNTHIA L.; SALISBURY, AMY L.; SCHOFIELD, CASEY A.; ORTIZ-HERNANDEZ, SAMIA

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent and linked with a host of adverse consequences for women and newborns. Rates of engagement in depression treatment are, however, strikingly low among pregnant and postpartum women, with the majority of affected women receiving no mental health treatment. Research indicates that perinatal women are extremely reluctant to take antidepressant medications, yet the nature of women’s concerns and treatment decisionmaking patterns have not been well documented. Developing a clearer understanding of women’s treatment preferences and behaviors may help identify solutions to the under-treatment of perinatal depression. In this mixed methods study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 61 pregnant women, approximately half of whom were experiencing clinical levels of depression. In addition to assessing psychiatric diagnoses, symptoms, and functional impairment, we conducted qualitative interviews addressing women’s preferences for depression treatment, concerns, and decision-making patterns. Consistent with prior reports, women were significantly more likely to voice a preference for non-pharmacologic depression treatments, as opposed to antidepressant medications. Many depressed women reported a great degree of uncertainty regarding how to treat their depression, and those with more severe depression symptoms were more likely to endorse decisional conflict. Analysis of qualitative comments yielded detailed information about the nature of women’s concerns and preferences related to use of antidepressant medications and other aspects of treatment engagement. We discuss findings in the context of improving patient-centered care for perinatal depression. PMID:24241498

  10. An Endangered Generation: Impact of Perinatal Drug Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Melanie M.

    This article reviews some of the literature on educational approaches for drug-exposed children. Common effects of prenatal and perinatal drug use on the female user, the developing fetus, and the neonate are reviewed. It is noted that female drug users have an increased incidence of medical complications during pregnancy; that the specific…

  11. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Monitoring Devices § 884.2740...

  12. Assessing the knowledge of perinatal mental illness among student midwives.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Louise

    2015-11-01

    The experience of perinatal mental illness (mental illness occurring around the time of pregnancy) currently affect 1 in 10 women and can have adverse effects on the mother and her child (Massie and Szajnberg, 2002; O'Connor et al., 2002). The care and effective management of women experiencing perinatal mental illness is therefore an important issue for health care staff, managers, psychiatrists, commissioners and campaigners. Midwives play a significant part in caring for women throughout their pregnancies, during labour and up to the first month after birth. Midwives are in a unique position to assess a woman's well-being and to offer appropriate support. However, previous research has revealed that midwives often have poor understanding and knowledge of perinatal mental health issues and require improved training (Ross-Davie et al, 2006; McCann and Clark, 2010). This research project aims to systematically assess student midwives awareness of perinatal mental illness. The findings of this study will inform curriculum development for graduate and post-graduate midwifery students therefore improving the care and support women with mental illness receive from antenatal services. The findings from this study will also be used for the formation of an educational web-based programme for student and qualified midwives. PMID:25300675

  13. Perinatal systemic gene delivery using adeno-associated viral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Karda, Rajvinder; Buckley, Suzanne M. K.; Mattar, Citra N.; Ng, Joanne; Massaro, Giulia; Hughes, Michael P.; Kurian, Manju A.; Baruteau, Julien; Gissen, Paul; Chan, Jerry K. Y.; Bacchelli, Chiara; Waddington, Simon N.; Rahim, Ahad A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative monogenic diseases often affect tissues and organs beyond the nervous system. An effective treatment would require a systemic approach. The intravenous administration of novel therapies is ideal but is hampered by the inability of such drugs to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and precludes efficacy in the central nervous system. A number of these early lethal intractable diseases also present devastating irreversible pathology at birth or soon after. Therefore, any therapy would ideally be administered during the perinatal period to prevent, stop, or ameliorate disease progression. The concept of perinatal gene therapy has moved a step further toward being a feasible approach to treating such disorders. This has primarily been driven by the recent discoveries that particular serotypes of adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery vectors have the ability to cross the BBB following intravenous administration. Furthermore, safety has been demonstrated after perinatal administration mice and non-human primates. This review focuses on the progress made in using AAV to achieve systemic transduction and what this means for developing perinatal gene therapy for early lethal neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25452713

  14. Perinatal Staff Nurse Medical Device Use and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Edwina A.

    1998-01-01

    Survey responses from 48 perinatal nurses found that most learned about medical devices by reading manuals; 75% had received inservice training; and 95% learned from other staff. Inadequate knowledge was related to fear of causing patient harm. Initial learning method influenced what was learned, and hands-on experience was considered efficacious.…

  15. Perinatal mortality in Bavaria, Germany, after the Chernobyl reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Grosche, B; Irl, C; Schoetzau, A; van Santen, E

    1997-06-01

    As has been shown by the authors of a paper recently published in this journal, a deviation from a long-term trend in perinatal mortality within the former Federal Republic of Germany occurred in 1987, i.e. 1 year following the Chernobyl disaster. It is the aim of this study to make a comparison between the areas of the state Bavaria. Germany, with different fallout levels as well as between the observed and expected numbers of perinatal deaths relating to these areas. The expected numbers of perinatal deaths, defined as external standard, were derived from the remainder of the former FRG. Testing an a priori formulated hypothesis revealed no differences in the temporal development of perinatal mortality between the areas with different fallout levels and subsequent exposure. Including May 1986 into the analysis revealed a significant increase during the first 3 months after the accident, which is due to an excess in May alone. Since no elevated radiation risks for the last days in utero are known, the additional Chernobyl radiation exposure is not plausible as a causative agent. Further analyses on stillbirths showed an increase in Southern Bavaria during the first 2 years following the accident. Later on, the rates were comparable to the expected values again. PMID:9271801

  16. Perinatal Mental Health: Supporting New Families through Vulnerability and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Zero to Three is a single focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that because the perinatal periodfrom the later stages of pregnancy through the first 6 months of the infants lifeis a period of…

  17. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors...

  18. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors...

  19. National Child and Maternal Health Education Program (NCMHEP) Continuing Medical Education CME Course

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland · Jane Lamp, MS, RN-BC, CNS, ClinicalNational Child and Maternal Health Education Program (NCMHEP) Continuing Medical Education CME a "free-flowing" roundtable discussion with four experts in the field of maternal and child health: Format

  20. Psychosocial impact of perinatal loss among Muslim women

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Women of reproductive age are vulnerable to psychosocial problems, but these have remained largely unexplored in Muslim women in developing countries. The aim of this study was to explore and describe psychosocial impact and social support following perinatal loss among Muslim women. Methods A qualitative study was conducted in a specialist centre among Muslim mothers who had experienced perinatal loss. Purposive sampling to achieve maximum variation among Muslims in relation to age, parity and previous perinatal death was used. Data was collected by focus group discussion and in-depth unstructured interview until the saturation point met. Sixteen mothers who had recent perinatal loss of wanted pregnancy, had received antenatal follow up from public or private health clinics, and had delivery in our centre participated for the study. All of them had experienced psychological difficulties including feelings of confusion, emptiness and anxiety over facing another pregnancy. Results Two out of sixteen showed anger and one felt guilt. They reported experiencing a lack of communication and privacy in the hospital during the period of grief. Family members and friends play an important role in providing support. The majority agreed that the decision makers were husbands and families instead of themselves. The respondents felt that repetitive reminder of whatever happened was a test from God improved their sense of self-worth. They appreciated this reminder especially when it came from husband, family or friends closed to them. Conclusion Muslim mothers who had experienced perinatal loss showed some level of adverse psychosocial impact which affected their feelings. Husbands and family members were the main decision makers for Muslim women. Health care providers should provide psychosocial support during antenatal, delivery and postnatal care. On-going support involving husband should be available where needed. PMID:22708998

  1. From the field: a maternal-child health nursing competence validation model.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Kathleen Eaton; Leff, Ellen W; Luce, Margaret M; Grady, Martha D; Clark, Edith M; Allen, Elizabeth R

    2004-01-01

    This group of Vermont community health nurses from different agencies collaborated to develop a competence validation framework for maternal and child health nursing in the practice areas of perinatal client teaching, breastfeeding, and prenatal, postpartum, and newborn nursing care. The framework is based on the work of Benner, using the "competent" level of nursing practice, and delineates three parameters of competence: technical skills, interpersonal skills, and critical thinking skills. Learning resource materials, including newborn and maternal assessment guidelines, were developed for each competence area. The four competence validation tools were successfully tested for validity and reliability as well as efficiency and effectiveness by nurses in all 13 home health agencies and 12 public health district offices in Vermont. This system of competence validation is now used to support a consistently high quality of care for all recipients of Vermont's Healthy Babies, Kids, and Families services, and is available for use in other care settings. PMID:15238748

  2. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and maternal and foetal outcome: a case controlled study.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S; Saxena, U; Yadav, R; Gupta, S

    1997-10-01

    A case controlled prospective study of 250 cases of hypertension complicating pregnancy (study group) and 400 normal pregnant women (control group) was carried out to determine the effect of hypertension on maternal and foetal outcome. Pregnancy induced hypertension was present in 96% cases and chronic hypertension in 4% cases. Preterm delivery (28.8% versus 3%), labour induction rate (52.8% versus 3.25%), caesarean section rate (14.8% versus 3.5%), stillbirth rate (4.8% versus 0.25%) and overall perinatal mortality rate (14.8% versus 1%) were higher in study group compared to controls. In study group (40%) babies required special nursery care compared to controls (6.75%). From these results it can be concluded that maternal hypertension is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. PMID:9567600

  3. [Cerebral palsy in children and its relationship with perinatal medical care].

    PubMed

    Okumura, T; Miyata, H; Uetani, Y; Nakamura, H

    1993-11-01

    We studied the etiology of 76 children with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 3 to 6 years, who visited the Himeji City Center for the Handicapped for neurological follow up. The patients for this study composed of 30 cases with severe handicap. 8 cases of CP with mental retardation and 10 cases of CP without mental retardation. Nine cases of CP had congenital anomalies of central nervous system, of which 8 cases showed severe handicap. Main perinatal factors were asphyxia, dyspneic condition needed for mechanical ventilation, prolonged apneic spells, and hyperbilirubinemia. All full-term birth children were accompanied with asphyxia, in which 43% had intracranial hemorrhage. A cooperative network between neonatal intensive care unit and an institute for the handicapped is essential for the care of infants with cerebral palsy. PMID:8260206

  4. Pregnancy in women with perinatally acquired HIV-infection: Outcomes and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Usha K.; Rosenberg, Michael G.; Dobroszycki, Joanna; Katz, Mindy; Sansary, Jorge; Golatt, Mindy A.; Wiznia, Andrew A.; Abadi, Jacobo

    2011-01-01

    This is a retrospective comparison of pregnant women with perinatally acquired HIV-infection (PAH) with a cohort of pregnant women with behaviorally acquired HIV-infection (BAH). PAH cases (11 women) included all pregnant adolescents followed at our HIV clinic from January 2000 to January 2009. BAH cases (27 women) were randomly selected from all deliveries within the study period at the same institution. Demographics, mode of delivery, CD4+ counts, and viral loads (VLs) before, during, and six months postpartum, as well as neonatal outcomes, were reviewed. CD4 counts were significantly lower in the PAH group. VLs were statistically higher in the PAH group. VLs were undetectable at delivery in 60% of the PAH group compared with 88% of the BAH group. No cases of vertical transmission occurred. PAH women may be at a higher risk for HIV-related disease progression. This may increase vertical transmission risks. Further studies and interventions with this growing population are warranted. PMID:21562997

  5. Perinatal choline supplementation improves cognitive functioning and emotion regulation in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moon, J.; Chen, M.; Gandhy, S.U.; Strawderman, M.; Levitsky, D.A.; Maclean, K.N.; Strupp, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to mental retardation, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) also develop the neuropathological changes typical of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the majority of these individuals become demented. The Ts65Dn mouse model of DS exhibits key features of these disorders, including early degeneration of cholinergic basal forebrain (CBF) neurons and impairments in functions dependent on the two CBF projection systems; namely, attention and explicit memory. Herein, we demonstrate that supplementing the maternal diet with excess choline during pregnancy and lactation dramatically improved attentional function of the adult trisomic offspring. Specifically, the adult offspring of choline-supplemented Ts65Dn dams performed significantly better than unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice on a series of five visual attention tasks, and in fact, on some tasks did not differ from the normosomic (2N) controls. A second area of dysfunction in the trisomic animals, heightened reactivity to committing an error, was partially normalized by the early choline supplementation. The 2N littermates also benefited from increased maternal choline intake on one attention task. These findings collectively suggest that perinatal choline supplementation might significantly lessen cognitive dysfunction in DS and reduce cognitive decline in related neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. PMID:20528079

  6. Maternal high fat diet programs stress-induced behavioral disorder in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Lin, ChengCheng; Shao, Bei; Huang, HuanJie; Zhou, YuLei; Lin, YuanShao

    2015-12-01

    Early life exposure to specific environmental factors can contribute to development of behavioral disorders in adulthood. Although maternal high fat diet (HFD) consumption during the perinatal period has been reported to program offspring behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of maternal HFD on offspring behavior under nonstressed and stressful conditions, using male Sprague-Dawley offspring, which mothers were fed with HFD or normal diet (ND), receiving chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) in the adulthood. We found that although the detrimental effects of maternal HFD consumption on offspring depressive behavior did not persist into adulthood, it markedly aggravated the behavioral disorder response to stressful challenge in adult offspring. Moreover, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentration in CSF and hippocampus were increased in the HFD+CUMS rats, compared to the ND+CUMS subjects. Another separate groups were fitted with intracerebroventricular (icv) cannulae. Central infusion of ?CGRP8-37, a CGRP antagonist, produced antidepressant effects in HFD+CUMS rats, implying that the programming of maternal HFD on offspring behavior responses to stress may be mediated partially by endogenous central CGRP signaling. Moreover, we found that maternal HFD significantly exacerbated HPA profile response to acute restraint stress and attenuated the habituation of HPA responses to repeated restraint stress, suggesting that maternal HFD may program the changes of HPA-regulatory mechanisms. Overall, our findings suggest that maternal HFD influence adult depressive disorder response to stressful challenge, through the modulation of endogenous central CGRP signaling and HPA-regulatory components. PMID:26423785

  7. The cellularity of offspring's adipose tissue is programmed by maternal nutritional manipulations.

    PubMed

    Lecoutre, Simon; Breton, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies initially demonstrated that maternal undernutrition leads to low birth weight with increased risk of adult-onset obesity. Maternal obesity and diabetes associated with high birth weight, excessive nutrition in neonates, and rapid catch-up growth also predispose offspring to fat accumulation. As stated by the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease concept, nutrient supply perturbations in the fetus or neonate result in long-term programming of individual body weight set-point. Adipose tissue is a key fuel storage unit mainly involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Studies in numerous animal models have demonstrated that the adipose tissue is the focus of developmental programming events in a gender- and depot-specific manner. This review summarizes the impact of maternal nutritional manipulations on cellularity (i.e., cell number, size, and type) of adipose tissue in programmed offspring. In rodents, adipose tissue development is particularly active during the perinatal period, especially during the last week of gestation and during early postnatal life. In contrast to rodents, this process essentially takes place before birth in bigger mammals. Despite these different developmental time windows, altricial and precocial species share several mechanisms of adipose tissue programming. Maternal nutritional manipulations result in increased adipogenesis and modified fat distribution and composition. Inflammation changes such as infiltration of macrophages and increased inflammatory markers are also observed. Overall, it may predispose offspring to fat accumulation and obesity. Inappropriate hormone levels, modified tissue sensitivity, and epigenetic mechanisms are key factors involved in the programming of adipose tissue's cellularity during the perinatal period. PMID:26317049

  8. The cellularity of offspring's adipose tissue is programmed by maternal nutritional manipulations

    PubMed Central

    Lecoutre, Simon; Breton, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies initially demonstrated that maternal undernutrition leads to low birth weight with increased risk of adult-onset obesity. Maternal obesity and diabetes associated with high birth weight, excessive nutrition in neonates, and rapid catch-up growth also predispose offspring to fat accumulation. As stated by the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease concept, nutrient supply perturbations in the fetus or neonate result in long-term programming of individual body weight set-point. Adipose tissue is a key fuel storage unit mainly involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Studies in numerous animal models have demonstrated that the adipose tissue is the focus of developmental programming events in a gender- and depot-specific manner. This review summarizes the impact of maternal nutritional manipulations on cellularity (i.e., cell number, size, and type) of adipose tissue in programmed offspring. In rodents, adipose tissue development is particularly active during the perinatal period, especially during the last week of gestation and during early postnatal life. In contrast to rodents, this process essentially takes place before birth in bigger mammals. Despite these different developmental time windows, altricial and precocial species share several mechanisms of adipose tissue programming. Maternal nutritional manipulations result in increased adipogenesis and modified fat distribution and composition. Inflammation changes such as infiltration of macrophages and increased inflammatory markers are also observed. Overall, it may predispose offspring to fat accumulation and obesity. Inappropriate hormone levels, modified tissue sensitivity, and epigenetic mechanisms are key factors involved in the programming of adipose tissue's cellularity during the perinatal period. PMID:26317049

  9. Sonographic assessment of placental location: a mere notional description or an important key to improve both pregnancy and perinatal obstetrical care? A large cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Vitagliano, Amerigo; Quaranta, Michela; Giovanni, Valentina Di; Borgato, Shara; Saccardi, Carlo; D’Antona, Donato

    2015-01-01

    During a standard obstetrical sonogram, the assessment of placental location (PL) is often limited to a mere notional description without formulating any association to possible implications on pregnancy and childbirth. The aim of the study was to speculate if different sites of PL may have a role in influencing fetal presentation-(FP) at birth and if certain pregnancy-complications may be more closely associated with one rather than with another PL. We conducted an observational-prospective-cohort study on pregnant women referred to the Ob/Gyn Unit of Padua University for routine third-trimester ultrasound scan. For all eligible patients we evaluated the correlation between sites of PL and perinatal maternal/fetal outcomes. Non-cephalic presentation was found in 1.4% of anterior, 8.9% of posterior, 6.2% of fundal and 7.2% of lateral insertions. FP at the beginning of the third trimester as opposed to presentation at birth was concordant in 90.3% of anterior, 63.3% of posterior and 76.5% of lateral insertions. Considering only non-cephalic fetuses we observed a decreasing probability for spontaneous rotation in the following lies: 88% anterior-PL, 80% posterior-PL, 77% lateral-PL, and 70% fundal-PL. Patients with posterior-PL (significantly associated with previous-CS) had a significantly higher CS-rate (due to previous-CS and breech-presentation). Significant differences were found in terms of gestational-hypertension and fresh-placental-weight between different sites of PL. In conclusion our data showed that an understanding of the role that PL plays in influencing the incidence of certain maternal-fetal conditions may assist Clinicians in improving perinatal maternal/fetal outcomes. PMID:26550228

  10. Children Who Acquire HIV Infection Perinatally Are at Higher Risk of Early Death than Those Acquiring Infection through Breastmilk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Becquet, Renaud; Marston, Milly; Dabis, François; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Gray, Glenda; Coovadia, Hoosen M.; Essex, Max; Ekouevi, Didier K.; Jackson, Debra; Coutsoudis, Anna; Kilewo, Charles; Leroy, Valériane; Wiktor, Stefan Z.; Nduati, Ruth; Msellati, Philippe; Zaba, Basia; Ghys, Peter D.; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background Assumptions about survival of HIV-infected children in Africa without antiretroviral therapy need to be updated to inform ongoing UNAIDS modelling of paediatric HIV epidemics among children. Improved estimates of infant survival by timing of HIV-infection (perinatally or postnatally) are thus needed. Methodology/Principal Findings A pooled analysis was conducted of individual data of all available intervention cohorts and randomized trials on prevention of HIV mother-to-child transmission in Africa. Studies were right-censored at the time of infant antiretroviral initiation. Overall mortality rate per 1000 child-years of follow-up was calculated by selected maternal and infant characteristics. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival curves by child's HIV infection status and timing of HIV infection. Individual data from 12 studies were pooled, with 12,112 children of HIV-infected women. Mortality rates per 1,000 child-years follow-up were 39.3 and 381.6 for HIV-uninfected and infected children respectively. One year after acquisition of HIV infection, an estimated 26% postnatally and 52% perinatally infected children would have died; and 4% uninfected children by age 1 year. Mortality was independently associated with maternal death (adjusted hazard ratio 2.2, 95%CI 1.6–3.0), maternal CD4<350 cells/ml (1.4, 1.1–1.7), postnatal (3.1, 2.1–4.1) or peri-partum HIV-infection (12.4, 10.1–15.3). Conclusions/Results These results update previous work and inform future UNAIDS modelling by providing survival estimates for HIV-infected untreated African children by timing of infection. We highlight the urgent need for the prevention of peri-partum and postnatal transmission and timely assessment of HIV infection in infants to initiate antiretroviral care and support for HIV-infected children. PMID:22383946

  11. Impact of maternal under nutrition on obstetric outcomes.

    PubMed

    Triunfo, S; Lanzone, A

    2015-01-01

    Maternal malnutrition, ranging from under nutrition to over dietary intake before and in the pregnant state, is worldwide problem with significant consequences, not only for survival and increased risk for acute and chronic diseases both in mother and child, but also for economic productivity of individuals in the societies and additional costs on health system. Inter alia, pre-pregnancy underweight and insufficient gestational weight gain are considered as individual risk factors for the occurrence of spontaneous interruption, preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and hypertensive disorders, strongly associated with poorer perinatal outcome. In a portion of this population, major eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia nervosa), once thought to be rare, but nowadays enlarged due to cultural pressure on the drive for thinness, have been identified as the etiology of an abnormal nutritional condition in developed countries, in contrast to long standing food deprivation in developing countries. Actually, even if without a complete weight management guidance for these selected pregnant women, an appropriate weight gain is recommended during pregnancy. Mainly, therapeutic approach is prevention using specific programs of improving weight before pregnant status. In this article, a review of the literature on selected obstetrical risks associated with maternal underweight has been performed and both the target prevention and management strategies have been described. PMID:25194427

  12. Phenylketonuria and maternal phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Purnell, H

    2001-07-01

    Phenylketonuria is a genetic disease affecting 1:10,000 to 14,000 live births. In NSW there is an average of nine cases diagnosed each year (Dietitians Working Party 1996). This paper discusses the management of phenylketonuria, and in particular the value of breastfeeding, complemented with a low phenylalanine infant formula, in facilitating easier maintenance of satisfactory phenylalanine blood levels. The 'diet for life' approach to managing phenylketonuria is to avoid long-term neurological deficits and, in particular, the risk that maternal PKU, which is not under strict dietary control, will have adverse effects on infants born of mothers with the disease. There have been 31 successful pregnancies to 1997 managed by the Nutrition and Dietetics Department of The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney. The Maternal PKU diet is presented with the case of a client with phenylketonuria who has achieved two normal pregnancies and breastfed her second child for six months. PMID:11550601

  13. Maternal serum screening.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Maternal serum screening (MSS) measures three serum markers: alpha-fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and unconjugated estriol, from which the risk of fetal Down syndrome or open neural tube defect is calculated. Initially, 8% of women will have positive results. I present a protocol for investigating these women. Family physicians should be informed about MSS so they can give their patients information and guidance. PMID:7524838

  14. Improving Perinatal Care in the Rural Regions Worldwide by Wireless Enabled Antepartum Fetal Monitoring: A Demonstration Project

    PubMed Central

    Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Lyford, Shelley; Saucedo, Rodrigo; Casale, Michael; Gallardo, Hector; Becerra, Karen; Mack, Jonathan; Mujica, Ricardo; Estrada, Daniel; Sanchez, Antonio; Sabido, Ramon; Meier, Carlos; Smith, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background. Fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality are significant problems in developing countries; remote maternal-fetal monitoring offers promise in addressing this challenge. The Gary and Mary West Health Institute and the Instituto Carlos Slim de la Salud conducted a demonstration project of wirelessly enabled antepartum maternal-fetal monitoring in the state of Yucatán, Mexico, to assess whether there were any fundamental barriers preventing deployment and use. Methods. Following informed consent, high-risk pregnant women at 27–29 weeks of gestation at the Chemax primary clinic participated in remote maternal-fetal monitoring. Study participants were randomized to receive either prototype wireless monitoring or standard-of-care. Feasibility was evaluated by assessing technical aspects of performance, adherence to monitoring appointments, and response to recommendations. Results. Data were collected from 153 high-risk pregnant indigenous Mayan women receiving either remote monitoring (n = 74) or usual standard-of-care (n = 79). Remote monitoring resulted in markedly increased adherence (94.3% versus 45.1%). Health outcomes were not statistically different in the two groups. Conclusions. Remote maternal-fetal monitoring is feasible in resource-constrained environments and can improve maternal compliance for monitoring sessions. Improvement in maternal-fetal health outcomes requires integration of such technology into sociocultural context and addressing logistical challenges of access to appropriate emergency services. PMID:25691900

  15. Dose-Dependent Incidence of Hepatic Tumors in Adult Mice following Perinatal Exposure to Bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Weinhouse, Caren; Anderson, Olivia S.; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Vandenbergh, David J.; Gyekis, Joseph P.; Dingman, Marc A.; Yang, Jingyun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume chemical with hormone-like properties that has been implicated as a potential carcinogen. Early-life exposure has been linked to increased risk for precancerous lesions in mammary and prostate glands and the uterus, but no prior study has shown a significant association between BPA exposure and cancer development. Objective: We explored the effects of BPA exposure during gestation and lactation on adult incidence of hepatic tumors in mice. Methods: Isogenic mice were perinatally exposed to BPA through maternal diets containing one of four environmentally relevant doses of BPA (0, 50 ng, 50 ?g, or 50 mg per kilogram of diet), and we followed approximately one male and one female per litter until they were 10 months of age. Animals were tested for known risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma, including bacterial and viral infections. Results: We found dose-dependent incidence of hepatic tumors in 10-month-old BPA-exposed mice. Of the offspring examined, 23% presented with hepatic tumors or preneoplastic lesions. We observed a statistically significant dose–response relationship, with an odds ratio for neoplastic and preneoplastic lesions of 7.23 (95% CI: 3.23, 16.17) for mice exposed to 50 mg BPA/kg diet compared with unexposed controls. Observed early disease onset, absence of bacterial or viral infection, and lack of characteristic sexual dimorphism in tumor incidence support a nonclassical etiology. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report of a statistically significant association between BPA exposure and frank tumors in any organ. Our results link early-life exposure to BPA with the development of hepatic tumors in rodents, and have potential implications for human health and disease. Citation: Weinhouse C, Anderson OS, Bergin IL, Vandenbergh DJ, Gyekis JP, Dingman MA, Yang J, Dolinoy DC. 2014. Dose-dependent incidence of hepatic tumors in adult mice following perinatal exposure to bisphenol A. Environ Health Perspect 122:485–491;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307449 PMID:24487385

  16. Maternal exposure to the mixture of organophosphorus pesticides induces reproductive dysfunction in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Yang, Aimin; Zhang, Jinghua; Hu, Senke

    2013-09-01

    Organophosphorus pesticide residues are found in many food samples due to increasing use of multiple organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) in agriculture. Toxicity of individual organophosphorus has been well-studied in previous epidemiological and laboratory investigations. This study focused on reproductive toxicity of perinatal exposure to the mixture of organophosphorus pesticides (MOPs). The MOPs consists of three most commonly used pesticides, i.e., Dichlorovos, Dimethoate, and Malathion which individually does not cause significant effects on the reproductive system at the similar concentration levels based on previous studies. Using the Sprague-Dawley rats, we established a perinatal exposure model by oral gavage and observed significant endometrial hyperplasia and thickened uterine walls in the F0 rats after administration of high doses of the MOPs. We further monitored several key developmental and behavioral indices in the F1 generation after maternal exposure to the MOPs, and observed significantly delayed physical development and weakened mental development. Moreover, we found increased weights of the reproductive organs (the uterus and the testis) and abnormal levels of key sex hormones (progestin and testosterone) in the MOPs groups. It is more important that we observed a significantly lower pregnancy rate and live birth rate in the high-dose MOPs group. These results indicate that the MOPs may be more detrimental to the maternal endometria and the reproductive functions in the offspring than individual organophosphorus. PMID:21793158

  17. Attitudes of midwives and maternal child health nurses towards suicide: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Rosalind; McCauley, Kay; Barnfield, Jakqui; Moss, Cheryle; Cross, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    Perinatal women are at risk of depression and/or suicidality. Suicide is the highest cause of indirect maternal deaths in the perinatal period. Midwives and maternal child health nurses (MCHN), as key clinicians, need to be able to detect these mental health issues. Little is known about these clinicians' attitudes to suicide. In this paper, we report on the results of a cross-sectional study of midwives' and MCHN attitudes to suicide. A convenience sample of midwives (n?=?95) and MCHN (n?=?86) from south-eastern Victoria, Australia, was recruited into the study. Participants completed the Attitudes to Suicide Prevention Scale. The results showed that MCHN have more positive attitudes towards suicide prevention than midwives, and younger participants have more positive attitudes to suicide prevention compared to older participants. Midwives and MCHN could benefit from continuing professional education to build their knowledge and skills in assessing suicide risk for childbearing women and their families, increasing positive attitudes, improving detection, and mental health referrals. PMID:26350295

  18. Maternal multiple micronutrient supplementation and pregnancy outcomes in developing countries: meta-analysis and meta-regression

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelman, Donna; Shankar, Anuraj H; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To systematically review randomized controlled trials comparing the effect of supplementation with multiple micronutrients versus iron and folic acid on pregnancy outcomes in developing countries. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched. Outcomes of interest were birth weight, low birth weight, small size for gestational age, perinatal mortality and neonatal mortality. Pooled relative risks (RRs) were estimated by random effects models. Sources of heterogeneity were explored through subgroup meta-analyses and meta-regression. Findings Multiple micronutrient supplementation was more effective than iron and folic acid supplementation at reducing the risk of low birth weight (RR:?0.86, 95% confidence interval, CI:?0.79–0.93) and of small size for gestational age (RR:?0.85; 95% CI: 0.78–0.93). Micronutrient supplementation had no overall effect on perinatal mortality (RR:?1.05; 95% CI:?0.90–1.22), although substantial heterogeneity was evident (I2?=?58%; P for heterogeneity?=?0.008). Subgroup and meta-regression analyses suggested that micronutrient supplementation was associated with a lower risk of perinatal mortality in trials in which >?50% of mothers had formal education (RR:?0.93; 95% CI:?0.82–1.06) or in which supplementation was initiated after a mean of 20 weeks of gestation (RR:?0.88; 95% CI:?0.80–0.97). Conclusion Maternal education or gestational age at initiation of supplementation may have contributed to the observed heterogeneous effects on perinatal mortality. The safety, efficacy and effective delivery of maternal micronutrient supplementation require further research. PMID:21673856

  19. The hypothalamus-adipose axis is a key target of developmental programming by maternal nutritional manipulation.

    PubMed

    Breton, Christophe

    2013-02-01

    Epidemiological studies initially demonstrated that maternal undernutrition leading to low birth weight may predispose for energy balance disorders throughout life. High birth weight due to maternal obesity or diabetes, inappropriate early post-natal nutrition and rapid catch-up growth may also sensitise to increased risk of obesity. As stated by the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease concept, the perinatal perturbation of foetus/neonate nutrient supply might be a crucial determinant of individual programming of body weight set point. The hypothalamus-adipose axis plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of energy homoeostasis controlling the nutritional status and energy storage level. The perinatal period largely corresponds to the period of brain maturation, neuronal differentiation and active adipogenesis in rodents. Numerous dams and/or foetus/neonate dietary manipulation models were developed to investigate the mechanisms underlying perinatal programming in rodents. These models showed several common offspring hypothalamic consequences such as impaired neurogenesis, neuronal functionality, nuclei structural organisation and feeding circuitry hardwiring. These alterations led to a persistent reprogrammed appetite system that favoured the orexigenic pathways, leptin/insulin resistance and hyperphagia. Impaired hypothalamic sympathetic outflow to adipose tissue and/or reduced innervation may also account for modified fat cell metabolism. Thus, enhanced adipogenesis and/or lipogenesis capacities may predispose the offspring to fat accumulation. Abnormal hypothalamus-adipose axis circadian rhythms were also evidenced. This review mainly focuses on studies in rodents. It highlights hormonal and epigenetic mechanisms responsible for long-lasting programming of energy balance in the offspring. Dietary supplementation may provide a therapeutic option using a specific regimen for reversing adverse programming outcomes in humans. PMID:23108716

  20. Improving communication and coordination of complex perinatal patients.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sara; Aydam, Joan; Hamm, Kenna; Rocha, Morgan; Northcut, Andrea; Roberson, Becky; Shook, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant women with complex medical problems require comprehensive communication among members of their healthcare team. Using the Magnet Hospital model, our Patient and Perinatal Interprofessional Team at Seton Medical Center Austin focused on improving communication and patient satisfaction by initiating Perinatal Patient Care Conferences. Pregnant women with medical or obstetric complications and their families became a part of care plan development prior to admission to promote consistent communication and excellent care. We report our 7-year history of proactive meetings with pregnant women and their families in a nonclinical environment to discuss diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. A collaborative written plan of care is developed that accommodates the woman's needs and wishes and is then disseminated among the healthcare team. This process has decreased women's and caregivers' anxiety and supported a culture of safety across the continuum of care. PMID:25919209

  1. Perinatal and Early Childhood Environmental Factors Influencing Allergic Asthma Immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaffin, Jonathan M.; Kanchongkittiphon, Watcharoot; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of asthma has increased dramatically over the past several decades. While hereditary factors are highly important, the rapid rise outstrips the pace of genomic variation. Great emphasis has been placed on potential modifiable early life exposures leading to childhood asthma. Methods We reviewed the recent medical literature for important studies discussing the role of the perinatal and early childhood exposures and the inception of childhood asthma. Results and Discussion Early life exposure to allergens (House dust mite (HDM), furred pets, cockroach, rodent and mold)air pollution (nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and particulate matter (PM)) and viral respiratory tract infections (Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (hRV)) have been implicated in the development of asthma in high risk children. Conversely, exposure to microbial diversity in the perinatal period may diminish the development of atopy and asthma symptoms. PMID:24952205

  2. Marfan syndrome and pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Curry, RA; Gelson, E; Swan, L; Dob, D; Babu-Narayan, SV; Gatzoulis, MA; Steer, PJ; Johnson, MR

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report outcomes in a recent series of pregnancies in women with Marfan syndrome (MFS). Design Retrospective case note review. Setting Tertiary referral unit (Chelsea and Westminster and Royal Brompton Hospitals). Sample Twenty-nine pregnancies in 21 women with MFS between 1995 and 2010. Methods Multidisciplinary review of case records. Main outcome measures Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity of patients with MFS and healthy controls. Results There were no maternal deaths. Significant cardiac complications occurred in five pregnancies (17%): one woman experienced a type–A aortic dissection; two women required cardiac surgery within 6 months of delivery; and a further two women developed impaired left ventricular function during the pregnancy. Women with MFS were also more likely to have obstetric complications (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.30–8.34), the most frequent of which was postpartum haemorrhage (OR 8.46, 95% CI 2.52–28.38). There were no perinatal deaths, although babies born to mothers with MFS were delivered significantly earlier than those born to the control group (median 39 versus 40 weeks of gestation, Mann–Whitney U–test, P = 0.04). These babies were also significantly more likely to be small for gestational age (24% in the MFS group versus 6% in the controls; OR 4.95, 95% CI 1.58–15.55). Conclusions Pregnancy in women with MFS continues to be associated with significant rates of maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications. Effective pre-pregnancy counselling and meticulous surveillance during pregnancy, delivery, and the puerperium by an experienced multidisciplinary team are warranted for women with MFS. PMID:24418012

  3. Inflammatory response in maternal serum during preterm labour

    PubMed Central

    Tency, I.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth?(PTB), defined as a delivery before 37?weeks of gestation, is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diagnosis of preterm labour as well as accurate prediction of PTB is notoriously difficult. Preterm birth is initiated by multiple mechanisms including infection or inflammation which is the only pathological process for which a firm causal link with PTB has been established. Intrauterine infection evokes an immune response that involves the release of cytokines and chemokines, prostaglandins and matrix-degrading enzymes. These substances trigger uterine contractions, membrane rupture and cervical ripening. Most intra-uterine infections are chronic and subclinical in nature and consequently hard to diagnose before labour or rupture of the membranes. The best studied site of infection is amniotic fluid, but this requires an invasive procedure. A non-invasive approach seems to be more relevant to clinical practice. However, few studies have investigated the maternal inflammatory response during preterm labour. Therefore, the overall objective of this study was to determine several inflammatory markers in maternal serum from pregnant women in labour?(either term or preterm) vs. non-labouring controls. We completed a nested case control study in which singleton pregnancies were recruited at Ghent University Hospital and divided into groups according to gestational age and labour status. Multiple proteins were evaluated in maternal serum using enzyme-linked or multiplex bead immunoassays including soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1?(sTREM-1), matrix metalloproteinases?(MMP)-9 and MMP-3, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases?(TIMP)-1, TIMP-2, TIMP-3 and TIMP-4 and a panel of 30?cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. PMID:25009722

  4. Perinatal asphyxia: CNS development and deficits with delayed onset.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Neira-Pena, Tanya; Rojas-Mancilla, Edgardo; Espina-Marchant, Pablo; Esmar, Daniela; Perez, Ronald; Muñoz, Valentina; Gutierrez-Hernandez, Manuel; Rivera, Benjamin; Simola, Nicola; Bustamante, Diego; Morales, Paola; Gebicke-Haerter, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia constitutes a prototype of obstetric complications occurring when pulmonary oxygenation is delayed or interrupted. The primary insult relates to the duration of the period lacking oxygenation, leading to death if not re-established. Re-oxygenation leads to a secondary insult, related to a cascade of biochemical events required for restoring proper function. Perinatal asphyxia interferes with neonatal development, resulting in long-term deficits associated to mental and neurological diseases with delayed clinical onset, by mechanisms not yet clarified. In the experimental scenario, the effects observed long after perinatal asphyxia have been explained by overexpression of sentinel proteins, such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), competing for NAD(+) during re-oxygenation, leading to the idea that sentinel protein inhibition constitutes a suitable therapeutic strategy. Asphyxia induces transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory factors, in tandem with PARP-1 overactivation, and pharmacologically induced PARP-1 inhibition also down-regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide has been proposed as a suitable PARP-1 inhibitor. Its effect has been studied in an experimental model of global hypoxia in rats. In that model, the insult is induced by immersing rat fetus into a water bath for various periods of time. Following asphyxia, the pups are delivered, treated, and nursed by surrogate dams, pending further experiments. Nicotinamide rapidly distributes into the brain following systemic administration, reaching steady state concentrations sufficient to inhibit PARP-1 activity for several hours, preventing several of the long-term consequences of perinatal asphyxia, supporting the idea that nicotinamide constitutes a lead for exploring compounds with similar or better pharmacological profiles. PMID:24723845

  5. Older maternal age is associated with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in young adult female offspring.

    PubMed

    Tearne, Jessica E; Robinson, Monique; Jacoby, Peter; Allen, Karina L; Cunningham, Nadia K; Li, Jianghong; McLean, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    The evidence regarding older parental age and incidence of mood disorder symptoms in offspring is limited, and that which exists is mixed. We sought to clarify these relationships by using data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. The Raine Study provided comprehensive data from 2,900 pregnancies, resulting in 2,868 live born children. A total of 1,220 participants completed the short form of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21) at the 20-year cohort follow-up. We used negative binomial regression analyses with log link and with adjustment for known perinatal risk factors to examine the extent to which maternal and paternal age at childbirth predicted continuous DASS-21 index scores. In the final multivariate models, a maternal age of 30-34 years was associated with significant increases in stress DASS-21 scores in female offspring relative to female offspring of 25- to 29-year-old mothers. A maternal age of 35 years and over was associated with increased scores on all DASS-21 scales in female offspring. Our results indicate that older maternal age is associated with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in young adult females. Further research into the mechanisms underpinning this relationship is needed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26569038

  6. Assessment of risk of perinatal death in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, R; Ashley, D

    1994-04-01

    Data from the Jamaican Perinatal Mortality Survey had been used to create a statistical model using logistic regression. From this a simple additive scoring system to predict perinatal death was devised and tested on the 2 cohort months of the study. The score had a theoretical range of 0-28 points, with the higher the score, the greater the likelihood of a perinatal death. For a cut-point of 7, sensitivity was 43% and specificity 84%. A cut-point of 8 resulted in 27% sensitivity and 94% specificity. Higher cut-points resulted in much reduced sensitivity but enhanced specificity (e.g. cut-point 10: 11% sensitivity, 99% specificity). However, it is likely that these estimates are optimistically high, and to achieve unbiased estimates of sensitivity and specificity the score needs to be tested on a sample of the population from which it was not derived before implementation takes place. Meanwhile, the cut-off level for implementation will depend on appropriate resources available. PMID:8072898

  7. The role of inflammation in perinatal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hagberg, Henrik; Mallard, Carina; Ferriero, Donna M.; Vannucci, Susan J.; Levison, Steven W.; Vexler, Zinaida S.; Gressens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is increasingly recognized as being a critical contributor to both normal development and injury outcome in the immature brain. The focus of this Review is to highlight important differences in innate and adaptive immunity in immature versus adult brain, which support the notion that the consequences of inflammation will be entirely different depending on context and stage of CNS development. Perinatal brain injury can result from neonatal encephalopathy and perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke, usually at term, but also in preterm infants. Inflammation occurs before, during and after brain injury at term, and modulates vulnerability to and development of brain injury. Preterm birth, on the other hand, is often a result of exposure to inflammation at a very early developmental phase, which affects the brain not only during fetal life, but also over a protracted period of postnatal life in a neonatal intensive care setting, influencing critical phases of myelination and cortical plasticity. Neuroinflammation during the perinatal period can increase the risk of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease throughout childhood and adulthood, and is, therefore, of concern to the broader group of physicians who care for these individuals. PMID:25686754

  8. The Perinatal Anxiety Screening Scale: development and preliminary validation.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Susanne; Dedman, Kellie; Hagan, Rosemary; Oxnam, Elizabeth; Wettinger, Michelle; Byrne, Shannon; Coo, Soledad; Doherty, Dorota; Page, Andrew C

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a scale (Perinatal Anxiety Screening Scale, PASS) to screen for a broad range of problematic anxiety symptoms which is sensitive to how anxiety presents in perinatal women and is suitable to use in a variety of settings including antenatal clinics, inpatient and outpatient hospital and mental health treatment settings. Women who attended a tertiary obstetric hospital in the state of Western Australia antenatally or postpartum (n = 437) completed the PASS and other commonly used measures of depression and anxiety. Factor analysis was used to examine factor structure, and ROC analysis was used to evaluate performance as a screening tool. The PASS was significantly correlated with other measures of depression and anxiety. Principal component analyses (PCA) suggested a four-factor structure addressing symptoms of (1) acute anxiety and adjustment, (2) general worry and specific fears, (3) perfectionism, control and trauma and (4) social anxiety. The four subscales and total scale demonstrated high to excellent reliabilities. At the optimal cutoff score for detecting anxiety as determined by ROC analyses, the PASS identified 68 % of women with a diagnosed anxiety disorder. This was compared to the EPDS anxiety subscale which detected 36 % of anxiety disorders. The PASS is an acceptable, valid and useful screening tool for the identification of risk of significant anxiety in women in the perinatal period. PMID:24699796

  9. No global consensus: a cross-sectional survey of maternal weight policies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests that maternal prepregnancy weight and gestational weight gain are risk factors for perinatal complications and subsequent maternal and child health. Postpartum weight retention is also associated with adverse birth outcomes and maternal obesity. Clinical guidelines addressing healthy weight before, during, and after pregnancy have been introduced in some countries, but at present a systematic accounting for these policies has not been conducted. The objective of the present study was to conduct a cross-national comparison of maternal weight guidelines. Methods This cross sectional survey administered a questionnaire online to key informants with expertise on the subject of maternal weight to assess the presence and content of preconceptional, pregnancy and postpartum maternal weight guidelines, their rationale and availability. We searched 195 countries, identified potential informants in 80 and received surveys representing 66 countries. We estimated the proportion of countries with guidelines by region, income, and formal or informal policy, and described and compared guideline content, including a rubric to assess presence or absence of 4 guidelines: encourage healthy preconceptional weight, antenatal weighing, encourage appropriate gestational gain, and encourage attainment of healthy postpartum weight. Results Fifty-three countries reported either a formal or informal policy regarding maternal weight. The majority of these policies included guidelines to assess maternal weight at the first prenatal visit (90%), to monitor gestational weight gain during pregnancy (81%), and to provide recommendations to women about healthy gestational weight gain (62%). Guidelines related to preconceptional (42%) and postpartum (13%) weight were less common. Only 8% of countries reported policies that included all 4 fundamental guidelines. Guideline content and rationale varied considerably between countries, and respondents perceived that within their country, policies were not widely known. Conclusions These results suggest that maternal weight is a concern throughout the world. However, we found a lack of international consensus on the content of guidelines. Further research is needed to understand which recommendations or interventions work best with respect to maternal weight in different country settings, and how pregnancy weight policies impact clinical practices and health outcomes for the mother and child. PMID:24884985

  10. Child Health, Maternal Marital and Socioeconomic Factors, and Maternal Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbarski, Dana; Witt, Whitney P.

    2013-01-01

    Although maternal socioeconomic status and health predict in part children's future health and socioeconomic prospects, it is possible that the intergenerational association flows in the other direction such that child health affects maternal outcomes. Previous research demonstrates that poor child health increases the risk of adverse…

  11. Maternal Depression, Maternal Expressed Emotion, and Youth Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompson, Martha C.; Pierre, Claudette B.; Boger, Kathryn Dingman; McKowen, James W.; Chan, Priscilla T.; Freed, Rachel D.

    2010-01-01

    Across development, maternal depression has been found to be a risk factor for youth psychopathology generally and youth depression specifically. Maternal Expressed Emotion (EE) has been examined as a predictor of outcome among youth with depression. The present study explored the associations between youth psychopathology and two…

  12. Maternal or Infant Antiretroviral Drugs to Reduce HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chasela, Charles S.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Kayira, Dumbani; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kourtis, Athena P.; Martinson, Francis; Tegha, Gerald; Knight, Rodney J.; Ahmed, Yusuf I.; Kamwendo, Deborah D.; Hoffman, Irving F.; Ellington, Sascha R.; Kacheche, Zebrone; Soko, Alice; Wiener, Jeffrey B.; Fiscus, Susan A.; Kazembe, Peter; Mofolo, Innocent A.; Chigwenembe, Maggie; Sichali, Dorothy S.; van der Horst, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Background We evaluated the efficacy of a maternal triple-drug antiretroviral regimen or infant nevirapine prophylaxis for 28 weeks during breast-feeding to reduce postnatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in Malawi. Methods We randomly assigned 2369 HIV-1–positive, breast-feeding mothers with a CD4+ lymphocyte count of at least 250 cells per cubic millimeter and their infants to receive a maternal antiretroviral regimen, infant nevirapine, or no extended postnatal antiretroviral regimen (control group). All mothers and infants received perinatal prophylaxis with single-dose nevirapine and 1 week of zidovudine plus lamivudine. We used the Kaplan–Meier method to estimate the cumulative risk of HIV-1 transmission or death by 28 weeks among infants who were HIV-1–negative 2 weeks after birth. Rates were compared with the use of the log-rank test. Results Among mother–infant pairs, 5.0% of infants were HIV-1–positive at 2 weeks of life. The estimated risk of HIV-1 transmission between 2 and 28 weeks was higher in the control group (5.7%) than in either the maternal-regimen group (2.9%, P = 0.009) or the infant-regimen group (1.7%, P<0.001). The estimated risk of infant HIV-1 infection or death between 2 and 28 weeks was 7.0% in the control group, 4.1% in the maternal-regimen group (P = 0.02), and 2.6% in the infant-regimen group (P<0.001). The proportion of women with neutropenia was higher among those receiving the antiretroviral regimen (6.2%) than among those in either the nevirapine group (2.6%) or the control group (2.3%). Among infants receiving nevirapine, 1.9% had a hypersensitivity reaction. Conclusions The use of either a maternal antiretroviral regimen or infant nevirapine for 28 weeks was effective in reducing HIV-1 transmission during breast-feeding. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00164736.) PMID:20554982

  13. The Quality and Completeness of 2008 Perinatal and Under-five Mortality Data from Vital Registration, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    McCaw-Binns, A; Mullings, J; Holder, Y

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the completeness and timeliness of registration of stillbirths and under-five deaths and the validity of the certification and coding process. Subjects and Methods: Registered stillbirths and under-five deaths occurring in 2008 were compared to hospital, police, forensic pathologist and coroner's records. Missed cases and new information such as birthweight, gestation and date of birth were added to the database. A 10% random sample was evaluated to measure the quality of certification and coding. Results: Of 646 stillbirths [? 1000 g] and 933 under-five deaths, 69% and 79%, respectively were registered by December 31, 2009, for inclusion in the 2008 final demographic returns. Non-reporting of stillbirths was associated with infant gender, region and place of death [seven of 21 public hospitals accounted for 96% of unregistered stillbirths). Among under-five deaths, age at death, region, place and cause of death were important. Injury and community deaths increased with age. Registration delays including non-registration were associated with coroner's inquests. Most (80%) stillbirth certificates lacked usable cause of death data. Neonatal deaths due to prematurity and perinatal asphyxia were often misclassified by coders. The stillbirth (? 1000 g), infant and under-five mortality rates were 15, 20 and 22/1000 births/live births, respectively. Conclusions: While registration of stillbirths and under-five deaths improved between 1998 and 2008, persistent under-reporting reduced official rates by 20–31%. A new perinatal death certificate documenting maternal and fetal causes of death and risk factors such as birthweight, gestation and age at death would improve stillbirth and neonatal death (0–28 days) data quality. PMID:26035810

  14. Perinatal Exogenous Nitric Oxide in Fawn-Hooded Hypertensive Rats Reduces Renal Ribosomal Biogenesis in Early Life

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, Sebastiaan; Essers, Paul B.; Koeners, Maarten P.; Pereboom, Tamara C.; Braam, Branko; van Faassen, Ernst E.; MacInnes, Alyson W.; Joles, Jaap A.

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to depress ribosome biogenesis in vitro. In this study we analyzed the influence of exogenous NO on ribosome biogenesis in vivo using a proven antihypertensive model of perinatal NO administration in genetically hypertensive rats. Fawn-hooded hypertensive rat (FHH) dams were supplied with the NO-donor molsidomine in drinking water from 2 weeks before to 4 weeks after birth, and the kidneys were subsequently collected from 2?day, 2 week, and 9 to 10-month-old adult offspring. Although the NO-donor increased maternal NO metabolite excretion, the NO status of juvenile renal (and liver) tissue was unchanged as assayed by EPR spectroscopy of NO trapped with iron-dithiocarbamate complexes. Nevertheless, microarray analysis revealed marked differential up-regulation of renal ribosomal protein genes at 2?days and down-regulation at 2 weeks and in adult males. Such differential regulation of renal ribosomal protein genes was not observed in females. These changes were confirmed in males at 2 weeks by expression analysis of renal ribosomal protein L36a and by polysome profiling, which also revealed a down-regulation of ribosomes in females at that age. However, renal polysome profiles returned to normal in adults after early exposure to molsidomine. No direct effects of molsidomine were observed on cellular proliferation in kidneys at any age, and the changes induced by molsidomine in renal polysome profiles at 2 weeks were absent in the livers of the same rats. Our results suggest that the previously found prolonged antihypertensive effects of perinatal NO administration may be due to epigenetically programmed alterations in renal ribosome biogenesis during a critical fetal period of renal development, and provide a salient example of a drug-induced reduction of ribosome biogenesis that is accompanied by a beneficial long-term health effect in both males and females. PMID:22303348

  15. The role of maternal obesity in the risk of neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Heidi M.; Christiansen, Kelly J.; Sullivan, Elinor L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that perinatal exposure to maternal obesity, metabolic disease, including diabetes and hypertension, and unhealthy maternal diet has a long-term impact on offspring behavior and physiology. During the past three decades, the prevalence of both obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders has rapidly increased. Epidemiologic studies provide evidence that maternal obesity and metabolic complications increase the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorders, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, eating disorders (food addiction, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa), and impairments in cognition in offspring. Animal models of maternal high-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity also document persistent changes in offspring behavior and impairments in critical neural circuitry. Animals exposed to maternal obesity and HFD consumption display hyperactivity, impairments in social behavior, increased anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviors, substance addiction, food addiction, and diminished cognition. During development, these offspring are exposed to elevated levels of nutrients (fatty acids, glucose), hormones (leptin, insulin), and inflammatory factors (C-reactive protein, interleukin, and tumor necrosis factor). Such factors appear to permanently change neuroendocrine regulation and brain development in offspring. In addition, inflammation of the offspring brain during gestation impairs the development of neural pathways critical in the regulation of behavior, such as serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and melanocortinergic systems. Dysregulation of these circuits increases the risk of mental health disorders. Given the high rates of obesity in most developed nations, it is critical that the mechanisms by which maternal obesity programs offspring behavior are thoroughly characterized. Such knowledge will be critical in the development of preventative strategies and therapeutic interventions. PMID:26150767

  16. Mendelian randomization supports causality between maternal hyperglycemia and epigenetic regulation of leptin gene in newborns.

    PubMed

    Allard, C; Desgagné, V; Patenaude, J; Lacroix, M; Guillemette, L; Battista, M C; Doyon, M; Ménard, J; Ardilouze, J L; Perron, P; Bouchard, L; Hivert, M F

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that acts in the central nervous system and regulates energy balance. Animal models and human observational studies have suggested that leptin surge in the perinatal period has a critical role in programming long-term risk of obesity. In utero exposure to maternal hyperglycemia has been associated with increased risk of obesity later in life. Epigenetic mechanisms are suspected to be involved in fetal programming of long term metabolic diseases. We investigated whether DNA methylation levels near LEP locus mediate the relation between maternal glycemia and neonatal leptin levels using the 2-step epigenetic Mendelian randomization approach. We used data and samples from up to 485 mother-child dyads from Gen3G, a large prospective population-based cohort. First, we built a genetic risk score to capture maternal glycemia based on 10 known glycemic genetic variants (GRS10) and showed it was an adequate instrumental variable (? = 0.046 mmol/L of maternal fasting glucose per additional risk allele; SE = 0.007; P = 7.8 × 10(-11); N = 467). A higher GRS10 was associated with lower methylation levels at cg12083122 located near LEP (? = -0.072 unit per additional risk allele; SE = 0.04; P = 0.05; N = 166). Direction and effect size of association between the instrumental variable GRS10 and methylation at cg12083122 were consistent with the negative association we observed using measured maternal glycemia. Lower DNA methylation levels at cg12083122 were associated with higher cord blood leptin levels (? = -0.17 log of cord blood leptin per unit; SE = 0.07; P = 0.01; N = 170). Our study supports that maternal glycemia is part of causal pathways influencing offspring leptin epigenetic regulation. PMID:25800063

  17. Progress on the Maternal Mortality Ratio Reduction in Wuhan, China in 2001–2012

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaoping; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Jinzhu; Wang, Jing; Flick, Louise; Qian, Zhengmin; Zhang, Dan; Mei, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background Most maternal deaths occur in developing countries and most maternal deaths are avoidable. China has made a great effort to reduce MMR by three quarters to meet the fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG5). Methods This retrospective study reviewed and analyzed maternal death data in Wuhan from 2001 to 2012. Joinpoint regression and multivariate Poisson regression was conducted using the log-linear model to measure the association of the number of maternal deaths with time, cause of death, where the death occurred, and cognitive factors including knowledge, attitude, resource, and management stratified. Results The MMR declined from 33.41 per 100,000 live births in 2001 to 10.63 per 100,000 live births in 2012, with a total decline of 68.18% and an average annual decline of 9.89%. From 2001–2012, the four major causes of maternal death were obstetric hemorrhage (35.16%), pregnancy complications (28.57%), amniotic fluid embolism (16.48%) and gestational hypertension (8.79%). Multivariate Poisson regression showed on average the MMR decreased by.17% each year from 2001–2006 and stayed stagnant since 2007–2012. Conclusions With the reduction in MMR in obstetric death (e.g. obstetric hemorrhage), there had been a remarkable reduction in MMR in Wuhan in 2001–2012, which may be due to (1) the improvement in the obstetric quality of perinatal care service on prevention and treatment of obstetric hemorrhage and emergency care skills, and (2) the improvement in the maternal health management and quality of prenatal care. Interventions to further reduce the MMR include several efforts such as the following: (1) designing community-based interventions, (2) providing subsidies to rural women and/hospitals for hospital delivery, (3) screening for pregnancy complications, and (4) establishing an emergency rescue system for critically ill pregnant women. PMID:24586836

  18. Child Characteristics and Maternal Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolak, Linda

    1987-01-01

    An eight-month longitudinal study measuring infants' (N=8) temperament characteristics of activity level, task persistence, and affect and discourse and pragmatic features of their mothers' speech revealed complex interactions between maternal speech and infant temperament. It is argued that nonlinguistic child behaviors may influence maternal

  19. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...device used to show graphically the relationship between maternal labor and the fetal heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors with appropriate displays of the well-being of the fetus...

  20. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...device used to show graphically the relationship between maternal labor and the fetal heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors with appropriate displays of the well-being of the fetus...

  1. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...device used to show graphically the relationship between maternal labor and the fetal heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors with appropriate displays of the well-being of the fetus...

  2. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...device used to show graphically the relationship between maternal labor and the fetal heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors with appropriate displays of the well-being of the fetus...

  3. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...device used to show graphically the relationship between maternal labor and the fetal heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors with appropriate displays of the well-being of the fetus...

  4. Birth weight and other perinatal factors and childhood CNS tumors: A case–control study in California

    PubMed Central

    Oksuzyan, S.; Crespi, C.M.; Cockburn, M.; Mezei, G.; Kheifets, L.

    2013-01-01

    Aims We conducted a large registry-based study in California to investigate the association of perinatal factors and childhood CNS tumors, with analysis by tumor subtype. Methods We linked California cancer and birth registries to obtain information on 3308 cases and 3308 controls matched on age and sex. We examined the association of birth weight, gestational age, birth order, parental ages, maternal conditions during pregnancy, newborn abnormalities and the risk of childhood CNS tumors using conditional logistic regression, with adjustment for potential confounders. Results The odds ratio (OR) per 1000 g increase in birth weight was 1.11 (95% CI: 0.99–1.24) for total childhood CNS tumors, 1.17 (95% CI: 0.97–1.42) for astrocytoma and 1.28 (95% CI: 0.90–1.83) for medulloblastoma. Compared to average-for-gestational age, large-for-gestational age infants were at increased risk of glioma (OR= 1.86, 95% CI: 0.99-3.48), while small-for-gestational age infants were at increased risk of ependimoma (OR = 2.64,95% CI: 1.10–6.30). Increased risk of childhood CNS tumors was observed for 5-year increase in maternal and paternal ages (OR = 1.06,95% CI: 1.00–1.12 and 1.05,95% CI: 1.00–1.10 respectively). Increased risk of astrocytoma was detected for 5-year increase in paternal age (OR= 1.08; 95% CI: 1.00–1.16) and increased risk of glioma for maternal age > 35 years old (OR = 1.87; 95% CI: 1.00–3.52). Maternal genital herpes during pregnancy was associated with a pronounced increase in risk of total CNS tumors (OR = 2.74; 95% CI: 1.16-6.51). Other (non-sexually transmitted) infections during pregnancy were associated with decreased risk of total CNS tumors (OR = 0.28,95% CI: 0.09–0.85). Maternal blood/immune disorders during pregnancy were linked to increased risk of CNS tumors (OR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.08–4.83) and medulloblastoma (OR = 7.13, 95% CI: 0.82-61.03). Newborn CNS abnormalities were also associated with high risk of childhood CNS tumors (OR = 4.08, 95% CI: 1.13–14.76). Conclusions Our results suggest that maternal genital herpes, blood and immunological disorders during pregnancy and newborn CNS abnormalities were associated with increased risk of CNS tumors. Maternal infections during pregnancy were associated with decreased risk of CNS tumors. Advanced maternal and paternal ages may be associated with a slightly increased risk of CNS tumors. Factors associated with CNS tumor subtypes varied by subtype, an indicator of different etiology for different subtypes. PMID:23562044

  5. Longitudinal associations between maternal disrupted representations, maternal interactive behavior and infant attachment: a comparison between full-term and preterm dyads.

    PubMed

    Hall, R A S; Hoffenkamp, H N; Tooten, A; Braeken, J; Vingerhoets, A J J M; van Bakel, H J A

    2015-04-01

    This prospective study examined whether or not a mother's representations of her infant were more often disrupted after premature childbirth. Furthermore, the study examined if different components of maternal interactive behavior mediated the relation between maternal disrupted representations and infant attachment. The participants were mothers of full-term (n = 75), moderately preterm (n = 68) and very preterm infants (n = 67). Maternal representations were assessed by the Working Model of the Child Interview at 6 months post-partum. Maternal interactive behavior was evaluated at 6 and 24 months post-partum, using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Early Care Research Network mother-infant observation scales. Infant attachment was observed at 24 months post-partum and was coded by the Attachment Q-Set. The results reveal that a premature childbirth does not necessarily generate disrupted maternal representations of the infant. Furthermore, maternal interactive behavior appears to be an important mechanism through which maternal representations influence the development of infant attachment in full-term and preterm infants. Early assessment of maternal representations can identify mother-infant dyads at risk, in full-term and preterm samples. PMID:24875043

  6. A 10-year appraisal of cesarean delivery and the associated fetal and maternal outcomes at a teaching hospital in southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onoh, Robinson Chukwudi; Eze, Justus Ndulue; Ezeonu, Paul Olisaemeka; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni; Iyoke, Chukwuemeka Anthony; Nkwo, Peter Onubiwe

    2015-01-01

    Background The global rise in cesarean delivery rate has been a major source of public health concern. Aim To appraise the cesarean deliveries and the associated fetal and maternal outcomes. Materials and methods The study was a case series with data collected retrospectively from the records of patients delivered by cesarean section at the Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki over a 10-year period, from January 2002 to December 2011. Ethical approval was obtained. Results Of 14,198 deliveries, 2,323/14,198 (16.4%) were by cesarean deliveries. The overall increase of cesarean delivery was 11.1/10 (1.1%) per annum from 184/1,512 (12.2%) in 2002 to 230/986 (23.3%) in 2011. Of 2,097 case folders studied, 1,742/2,097 (83.1%) were delivered at term, and in 1,576/2,097 (75.2%), the cesarean deliveries were emergencies. The common indications for cesarean delivery were previous cesarean scars 417/2,097 (19.9%) and obstructed labor 331/2,097 (15.8%). There were 296 perinatal deaths, giving a perinatal mortality rate of (296/2,197) 134.7/1,000 births. Also, 129/2,097 (6.1%) maternal case fatalities occurred, giving a maternal mortality rate of 908.6/100,000 total births. Hemorrhage 57/129 (44.2%) and sepsis 41/129 (32.6%) were the major causes. Conclusion The study recorded a significant increase in cesarean delivery rate. Previous cesarean scars and obstructed labors were the main indications. Perinatal and maternal case fatalities were huge. Hence, there is need for continued community education for its reduction. PMID:25999769

  7. The content and delivery of psychological interventions for perinatal depression by non-specialist health workers in low and middle income countries: A systematic review?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, Neerja; Sikander, Siham; Atif, Najia; Singh, Neha; Ahmad, Ikhlaq; Fuhr, Daniela C.; Rahman, Atif; Patel, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    Psychological interventions delivered by non-specialist health workers are effective for the treatment of perinatal depression in low- and middle-income countries. In this systematic review, we describe the content and delivery of such interventions. Nine studies were identified. The interventions shared a number of key features, such as delivery provided within the context of routine maternal and child health care beginning in the antenatal period and extending postnatally; focus of the intervention beyond the mother to include the child and involving other family members; and attention to social problems and a focus on empowerment of women. All the interventions were adapted for contextual and cultural relevance; for example, in domains of language, metaphors and content. Although the competence and quality of non-specialist health workers delivered interventions was expected to be achieved through structured training and ongoing supervision, empirical evaluations of these were scarce. Scalability of these interventions also remains a challenge and needs further attention. PMID:24054170

  8. 77 FR 23487 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ...Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis...Neuroplasticity and the Maternal Brain. Date: April 30, 2012. Time...Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  9. 76 FR 61721 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ...Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Special Emphasis...Neuroplasticity and the Maternal Brain. Date: October 26, 2011...Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  10. Marketing and Quality of Life: A Model for Improving Perinatal Health Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, G. E. Alan; Smith, Leah T.; Stamps, Bunnie V.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: A marketing/business model using non-traditional Quality of Life measures was developed to assess perinatal health status on a micro-geographic level. This perinatal health status needs assessment study for Georgia South Central Region was conducted for the years 1994-1999. The model may be applied to any geographic unit in the…

  11. Preventing Perinatal Depression in Low-Income Home Visiting Clients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, S. Darius; Perry, Deborah F.; Mendelson, Tamar; Kemp, Karen; Leis, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of a 6-week cognitive-behavioral intervention in preventing the onset of perinatal depression and reducing depressive symptoms among low-income women in home visitation programs. Method: Sixty-one women who were pregnant or who had a child less than 6 months of age and who were assessed as at risk for perinatal

  12. PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL HEALTH, INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA, DECEMBER 1996-DECEMBER 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnancy and Perinatal Health, Inner Mongolia, China, December 1996- December 1999
    Subtitle: Pregnancy and Perinatal Health, Inner Mongolia, China
    Authors: Z. Liu1, D.T. Lobdell2, L. He1, M. Yang1, R. Kwok2, J. Mumford2
    Affiliations:
    1 Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, ...

  13. Perinatal Factors, Parenting Behavior, and Reactive Aggression: Does Cortisol Reactivity Mediate This Developmental Risk Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Stacy R.; Schechter, Julia C.; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms of action that link perinatal risk and the development of aggressive behavior. The aim of this study was to examine whether perinatal risk and parenting interacted to specifically predict reactive aggression, as opposed to general aggressive behavior, and to examine cortisol reactivity as a mediator of this…

  14. Why Perinatal Depression Matters Scotland Mia Why Perinatal Depression Matters 160 pages £7.99 Pinter and Martin 9781780665603 1780665601 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    One in ten women is affected by perinatal depression, according to the NHS. This book, aimed at women who are pregnant or have a new baby, offers advice, reassurance and support for them and their partners. PMID:26530576

  15. Comparison of abuse experiences of rural and urban African American women during perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Shreya; Bullock, Linda F C; Richardson, Jeanita W; Kimeto, Pamela; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2015-07-01

    A subsample of 12 African American women (6 urban and 6 rural) were selected from a larger longitudinal, randomized control trial, Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation (DOVE-R01 900903 National Institute of Nursing Research [NINR]/National Institutes of Health [NIH]). All African American women were chosen to control for any racial- and/or race-related cultural differences that may exist among women across geographical areas. The experiences of abuse during the perinatal period are drawn from in-depth interviews conducted at five points in time during pregnancy and the post-partum period. The analysis describes three major themes that highlight the similarities and differences among rural and urban women. The main themes found were (1) types of abuse, (2) location of abuse, and (3) response to abuse. In addition, two sub-themes (a) defiance and compliance and (b) role of children were also identified. Implications for universal screening for women of reproductive age, safer gun laws, and the need for further research are discussed. PMID:25315478

  16. Comparison of Abuse Experiences of Rural and Urban African American Women During Perinatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Shreya; Bullock, Linda F. C.; Richardson, Jeanita W.; Kimeto, Pamela; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Sharps, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    A subsample of 12 African American women (6 urban and 6 rural) were selected from a larger longitudinal, randomized control trial, Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation (DOVE-R01 900903 National Institute of Nursing Research [NINR]/National Institutes of Health [NIH]). All African American women were chosen to control for any racial- and/or race-related cultural differences that may exist among women across geographical areas. The experiences of abuse during the perinatal period are drawn from in-depth interviews conducted at five points in time during pregnancy and the post-partum period. The analysis describes three major themes that highlight the similarities and differences among rural and urban women. The main themes found were (1) types of abuse, (2) location of abuse, and (3) response to abuse. In addition, two sub-themes (a) defiance and compliance and (b) role of children were also identified. Implications for universal screening for women of reproductive age, safer gun laws, and the need for further research are discussed. PMID:25315478

  17. Impact of perinatal somatic and common mental disorder symptoms on functioning in Ethiopian women: The P-MaMiE population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Senturk, Vesile; Hanlon, Charlotte; Medhin, Girmay; Dewey, Michael; Araya, Mesfin; Alem, Atalay; Prince, Martin; Stewart, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known of the relationship between perinatal somatic and common mental disorder (CMD) symptoms and impaired functioning in women from settings where the burden of undernutrition and infectious disease morbidity is high. Methods A population-based sample of 1065 women from Butajira, Ethiopia, was recruited in pregnancy (86.4% of those eligible) and reassessed two months postnatal (954 with singleton, live infants). At both time-points, women were administered a modified version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 and the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (locally-validated) to assess somatic and CMD symptoms, respectively. Negative binomial regression was used to investigate associations of CMD and somatic symptoms with functional impairment (World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Scale, version-II), after adjusting for maternal anthropometric measures, physical ill-health and sociodemographic factors. Results In pregnancy, somatic and CMD symptoms were independently associated with worse maternal functional impairment after adjustment for confounders (WHODAS-II score multiplied by 1.09 (95%CI 1.06, 1.13) and 1.11 (95%CI 1.08, 1.14) respectively for each additional symptom). In the postnatal period, the size of association between somatic symptoms and functional impairment was diminished, but the association with CMD symptoms was virtually unchanged (multiplier value 1.04 (95%CI 1.00, 1.09) and 1.11 (95%CI 1.07, 1.16) respectively). Limitations Use of largely self-report measures. Conclusions Somatic and CMD symptoms were independently associated with functional impairment in both pregnancy and the postnatal period, with CMD symptoms showing a stronger and more consistent association. This emphasises the public health relevance of both CMD and somatic symptoms in the perinatal period. PMID:22196052

  18. Maternal Phenylketonuria (MPKU)

    PubMed Central

    Schoonheyt, W.E.; Hanley, W.B.; Clarke, J.T.R.; Austin, V.; Howe, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Untreated maternal phenylketonuria (MPKU) is a major cause of microcephaly, congenital heart disease, intrauterine growth retardation and mental retardation in the offspring of mothers who have the disease. There is evidence, however, that dietary restriction of phenylalanine in the mother before conception and throughout the pregnancy will reduce the risk of these congenital anomalies in the fetus. It is important to be alert to this preventable cause of developmental retardation and congenital abnormalities in all pregnancies until the stage is reached where every woman of child-bearing age has been through the neonatal PKU-screening program. Family physicians are advised to consider prenatal or premarital screening for PKU of all female patients of child-bearing age for the next generation. PMID:21267327

  19. Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls alters social behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Jolous-Jamshidi, Banafsheh; Cromwell, Howard C; McFarland, Ashley M; Meserve, Lee A

    2010-11-30

    Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) leads to significant alterations of neural and hormonal systems. These alterations have been shown to impair motor and sensory development. Less is known about the influence of PCB exposure on developing emotional and motivational systems involved in social interactions and social learning. The present study examined the impact of perinatal PCB exposure (mixture of congeners 47 and 77) on social recognition in juvenile animals, conspecific-directed investigation in adults and on neural and hormonal systems involved in social functions. We used a standard habituation-dishabituation paradigm to evaluate juvenile recognition and a social port paradigm to monitor adult social investigation. Areal measures of the periventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus were obtained to provide correlations with related hormone and brain systems. PCB exposed rats were significantly impaired in social recognition as indicated by persistent conspecific-directed exploration by juvenile animals regardless of social experience. As adults, PCB exposure led to a dampening of the isolation-induced enhancement of social investigation. There was not a concomitant alteration of social investigation in pair-housed PCB exposed animals at this stage of development. Interestingly, PVN area was significantly decreased in juvenile animals exposed to PCB during the perinatal period. Shifts in hypothalamic regulation of hormones involved in social behavior and stress could be involved in the behavioral changes observed. Overall, the results suggest that PCB exposure impairs context or experience-dependent modulation of social approach and investigation. These types of social-context deficits are similar to behavioral deficits observed in social disorders such as autism and other pervasive developmental disorders. PMID:20813172

  20. Perinatal Changes in Mitral and Aortic Valve Structure and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Elizabeth H.; Post, Allison D.; Laucirica, Daniel R.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2015-01-01

    At birth, the mechanical environment of valves changes radically as fetal shunts close and pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances change. Given that valves are reported to be mechanosensitive, we investigated remodeling induced by perinatal changes by examining compositional and structural differences of aortic and mitral valves (AVs, MVs) between 2-day-old and 3rd fetal trimester porcine valves using immunohistochemistry and Movat pentachrome staining. Aortic valve composition changed more with birth than the MV, consistent with a greater change in AV hemodynamics. At 2 days, AV demonstrated a trend of greater versican and elastin (P = 0.055), as well as greater hyaluronan turnover (hyaluronan receptor for endocytosis, P = 0.049) compared with the 3rd-trimester samples. The AVs also demonstrated decreases in proteins related to collagen synthesis and fibrillogenesis with birth, including procollagen I, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, biglycan (all P ? 0.005), and decorin (P = 0.059, trend). Both AVs and MVs demonstrated greater delineation between the leaflet layers in 2-day-old compared with 3rd-trimester samples, and AVs demonstrated greater saffron-staining collagen intensity, suggesting more mature collagen in 2-day-old compared with 3rd-trimester samples (each P < 0.05). The proportion of saffron-staining collagen also increased in AV with birth (P < 0.05). The compositional and structural changes that occur with birth, as noted in this study, likely are important to proper neonatal valve function. Furthermore, normal perinatal changes in hemodynamics often do not occur in congenital valve disease; the corresponding perinatal matrix maturation may also be lacking and could contribute to poor function of congenitally malformed valves. PMID:20536360

  1. [Maternal death: an avoidable tragedy].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, C E

    1992-01-01

    Although statistics show that maternal mortality has declined during this century, high levels persist in the developing world. There are 100 to 1000 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in developing countries, compared to 7 to 15 deaths per 100,000 live births in developed countries. Most of these deaths in developing countries are avoidable by effective maternal care interventions. A book edited by Unicamp on maternal mortality has made an important contribution to the debate that has been going on in scientific circles and among planners and health professionals. The quality of data for analysis of maternal mortality is implicated also because of erroneous classification of maternal deaths as nonmaternal, imprecision in the death certification, and omission of the status of pregnancy associated with illegal abortion. The identification of these errors means that medical files, hospital registers, family interviews, and autopsies have to be consulted. Research carried out in Sao Paulo demonstrated that at the end of the 1980s the maternal mortality rate was in fact 99.5/100,000 live births, whereas original records showed only 44.5/100,000 live births. Even in the United States during 1980-85, 33% of maternal deaths were underreported. In England the level of underreporting amounted to 41% during 1970-72. The World Health Organization has encouraged the formation of committees to study the prevention of maternal mortality. Two such committees were started in the state of Sao Paulo with the objectives of making professionals aware of the importance of accurate death records; immediate notification of maternal deaths to the regional committee; means from the proper authorities for the correction of deficiencies detected; and continuous evaluation of maternal mortality rates. The committee of Marilia, in the interior of the state of Sao Paulo, demonstrated that 72% of maternal deaths during 1986-88 were avoidable by medical-obstetrical means, prenatal care, or social assistance. 61% of deaths were attributed to cesarean section, which indicates the major risk of surgical complications. PMID:12286240

  2. My approach to performing a perinatal or neonatal autopsy

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, H C

    2006-01-01

    An opportunity to determine the cause of death, factors that may have a role in it, and the extent and cause of malformations is provided by perinatal autopsy. The family may be assisted in finding closure after the death of their infant by the information obtained. Insight into classifying infants appearing normal into one of three groups, small, appropriate and large for gestational age, has been provided, as each group tends to have specific causes of death. In infants with congenital anomalies, patterns of malformation may lead us to the diagnosis. An accurate diagnosis is required to provide counselling for a subsequent pregnancy. PMID:16803946

  3. Perinatal infection and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Amaia; Arnaez, Juan; Suarez, Joaquín; Megias, Gregoria; Cabrerizo, María; Garcia-Alix, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a synergic effect of infection and hypoxia-ischemia in the causation of perinatal brain damage. We conducted a prospective pilot study on the presence of infection in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), focusing on neurotropic viruses. Sixteen newborns with HIE were included in the study. There were no confirmed cases of viral infection. There was a case of bacterial early onset sepsis and four cases of suspected sepsis due to clinical and/or analytical signs, but with negative cultures. Our results do not support universal screening for viral infection in cases of HIE. PMID:25423183

  4. An effort to upgrade perinatal nursing practice in Albania.

    PubMed

    Freda, M C; DeVore, N; Gibeau, A; Griggs, S; Valley-Haye, S; Russell, B

    1998-01-01

    In 1994 the Jacobi Medical Center in Bronx, New York, and the University Hospital in Tirana, Albania, entered into a partnership designed to upgrade certain aspects of the health care system in Albania. During a 2-week trip, an American contingent of nurses and nurse-midwives worked to increase the knowledge base of Albanian nurses about some of the most important issues in perinatal care and of the roles of nurses and nurse-midwives in the United States as patient advocates and educators. PMID:9549708

  5. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Substance Use Among Perinatally HIV-Infected and Perinatally Exposed but Uninfected Youth

    PubMed Central

    Alperen, Julie; Brummel, Sean; Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Mellins, Claude A.; Kacanek, Deborah; Smith, Renee; Seage, George R.; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study examines risk factors associated with recent substance use (SU) among perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) and perinatally exposed, uninfected (PHEU) youth and compares SU lifetime prevalence with the general population of United States (US) adolescents. Methods We conducted cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of 511 PHIV+ and PHEU youth (mean age at study entry 13.2 years, 51% female, 69% PHIV+, 72% African American) enrolled in a US multi-site prospective cohort study between 2007–2009. SU data were collected by audio computer-assisted self interview. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System and Monitoring the Future data were used to compare SU lifetime prevalence to US samples. Results Perinatal HIV infection was not a statistically significant risk factor for alcohol or marijuana use. Risk factors for alcohol use among PHIV+ youth included higher severity of emotional and conduct problems and alcohol and marijuana use in the home by the caregiver/others. Risk factors for marijuana use among PHIV+ youth included marijuana use in the home, higher severity of conduct problems, and stressful life events. Similar SU risk factors among PHEU youth included SU in the home and higher severity of conduct and emotional problems. Overall lifetime prevalence of SU by age was similar to that in national surveys. Conclusions Although SU lifetime prevalence and risk factors for PHIV+ and PHEU adolescents were similar to national norms, the negative consequences are potentially greater for PHIV+ youth. Prevention efforts should begin before SU initiation and address the family and social environment and youth mental health status. PMID:24239286

  6. Animal models for clinical and gestational diabetes: maternal and fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Ana CI; Lima, Paula HO; Sinzato, Yuri K; Takaku, Mariana; Takeno, Marisa A; Rudge, Marilza VC; Damasceno, Débora C

    2009-01-01

    Background Diabetes in pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remains a significant medical challenge. Diabetes during pregnancy may be divided into clinical diabetes and gestational diabetes. Experimental models are developed with the purpose of enhancing understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases that affect humans. With regard to diabetes in pregnancy, experimental findings from models will lead to the development of treatment strategies to maintain a normal metabolic intrauterine milieu, improving perinatal development by preventing fetal growth restriction or macrosomia. Based on animal models of diabetes during pregnancy previously reported in the medical literature, the present study aimed to compare the impact of streptozotocin-induced severe (glycemia >300 mg/dl) and mild diabetes (glycemia between 120 and 300 mg/dl) on glycemia and maternal reproductive and fetal outcomes of Wistar rats to evaluate whether the animal model reproduces the maternal and perinatal results of clinical and gestational diabetes in humans. Methods On day 5 of life, 96 female Wistar rats were assigned to three experimental groups: control (n = 16), severe (n = 50) and mild diabetes (n = 30). At day 90 of life, rats were mated. On day 21 of pregnancy, rats were killed and their uterine horns were exposed to count implantation and fetus numbers to determine pre- and post-implantation loss rates. The fetuses were classified according to their birth weight. Results Severe and mild diabetic dams showed different glycemic responses during pregnancy, impairing fetal glycemia and weight, confirming that maternal glycemia is directly associated with fetal development. Newborns from severe diabetic mothers presented growth restriction, but mild diabetic mothers were not associated with an increased rate of macrosomic fetuses. Conclusion Experimental models of severe diabetes during pregnancy reproduced maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnant women presenting uncontrolled clinical diabetes. On the other hand, the mild diabetes model caused mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy, although it was not enough to reproduce the increased rate of macrosomic fetuses seen in women with gestational diabetes. PMID:19840387

  7. Maternal collapse: Training in resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Mergan

    2015-11-01

    The National Committee for the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths (NCCEMD) of South Africa has recommended in the Sixth Saving Mothers Report that health-care professionals (HCPs) training in managing obstetric emergencies be improved. One such measure is to ensure that the Essential Steps in Managing Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE) with its Emergency Obstetric Simulation Training (EOST) be rolled out to every HCP working in the obstetric environment. The programme has been strengthened and rolled out in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. This review focuses on the various teaching methods used to improve maternal resuscitation training in a South African context. Evidence-based interventions in maternal resuscitation will be highlighted, and recommendations for clinical practice will be suggested. Common causes of maternal collapse will be explored, and measures to improve training in these areas will be outlined. In order to ensure sustainability, quality improvement measures need to be introduced and evaluated. PMID:26277335

  8. Reduced placental amino acid transport in response to maternal nutrient restriction in the baboon.

    PubMed

    Pantham, Priyadarshini; Rosario, Fredrick J; Nijland, Mark; Cheung, Alex; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Powell, Theresa L; Galan, Henry L; Li, Cun; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction increases the risk of perinatal complications and predisposes the infant to diabetes and cardiovascular disease in later life. Mechanisms by which maternal nutrient restriction (MNR) reduces fetal growth are poorly understood. We hypothesized that MNR decreases placental amino acid (AA) transporter activity, leading to reduced transplacental transfer of AAs. Pregnant baboons were fed either a control (ad libitum, n = 7), or MNR diet (70% of control diet, n = 7) from gestational day (GD) 30. At GD 165 (0.9 gestation), placentas (n = 7 in each group) were collected, and microvillous plasma membrane vesicles (MVM) isolated. MVM system A and system L AA transport was determined in vitro using radiolabeled substrates and rapid filtration techniques. In vivo transplacental AA transport was assessed by infusing nine (13)C- or (2)H-labeled essential AA as a bolus into the maternal circulation (n = 5 control, n = 4 MNR) at cesarean section. A fetal vein-to-maternal artery mole percent excess ratio for each essential AA was calculated. Fetal and placental weights were significantly reduced in the MNR group compared with controls (P < 0.01). The activity of system A and system L was markedly reduced by 73 and 84%, respectively, in MVM isolated from baboon placentas at GD 165 following MNR (P < 0.01). In vivo, the fetal vein-to-maternal artery mole percent excess ratio was significantly reduced for leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, and tryptophan in MNR baboons (P < 0.05). This is the first study to investigate placental AA transport in a nonhuman primate model of MNR. We demonstrate that the downregulation of system A and system L activity in syncytiotrophoblast MVM in MNR leads to decreased transplacental AA transport and, consequently, reduced circulating fetal AA concentrations, a potential mechanism linking maternal undernutrition to reduced fetal growth. PMID:26246504

  9. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying mechanisms of protection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease. PMID:25451133

  10. Cerebral gene expression and neurobehavioural development after perinatal exposure to an environmentally relevant polybrominated diphenylether (BDE47).

    PubMed

    Haave, Marte; Folven, Kristin Ingvaldsen; Carroll, Thomas; Glover, Chris; Heegaard, Einar; Brattelid, Trond; Hogstrand, Christer; Lundebye, Anne-Katrine

    2011-10-01

    Nutrients in seafood are known to be beneficial for brain development. Effects of maternal exposure to 2,2',4,4' tetrabromo diphenylether (BDE47) was investigated, alongside the potential ameliorating impact of seafood nutrients, through assessment of neurobehaviour and gene expression in brain and liver. Developing mice were exposed during gestation and lactation via dams dosed through casein- or salmon-based feed, spiked with BDE47. Two concentrations were used: a low level (6 ?g/kg feed) representing an environmentally realistic concentration and a high level (1,900 ?g/kg feed) representing a BDE47 intake much higher than expected from frequents consumption of contaminated seafood. Experimental groups were similar with respect to reproductive success, growth and physical development. Minor, transient changes in neurobehavioural metrics were observed in groups given the highest dose of BDE47. No significant differences in behaviour or development were seen on postnatal day 18 among maternally exposed offspring. Cerebral gene expression investigated by microarray analyses and validated by RT-qPCR showed low fold changes for all genes, despite dose-dependent accumulation of BDE47 in brain tissue. The gene for glutamate ammonia ligase was upregulated compared to control in the casein-based high BDE47diet, suggesting potential impacts on downstream synaptic transmission. The study supported a previously observed regulation of Igfbp2 in brain with BDE47 exposure. Genes for hepatic metabolic enzymes were not influenced by BDE47. Potential neurotoxic effects and neurobehavioural aberrations after perinatal exposure to high levels of BDE47 were not readily observed in mice pups with the present experimental exposure regimes and methods of analysis. PMID:21630132

  11. Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Providers Advocacy Policy Initiatives Policy Partners FIMR/HIV Coding Global Health Corner Perinatal Quality Foundation Government relations ... 35th Annual Meeting Page Oasis Abstract Management SMFM Coding Course CME/CEU Information ABOG-SMFM Distinguished Lecture ...

  12. High maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy are associated with more psychiatric symptoms in offspring at age of nine - A prospective study from Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, J; Lindblad, F; Valladares, E; Högberg, U

    2015-12-01

    Maternal exposure to stress or adversity during pregnancy has been associated with negative health effects for the offspring including psychiatric symptoms. Programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been suggested as one mediating process. In order to investigate possible long term effects of stressors during pregnancy, we followed 70 children and their mothers from pregnancy up to nine years aiming to investigate if maternal cortisol levels and distress/exposure to partner violence were associated with child psychiatric symptoms and child cortisol levels at follow-up. Maternal distress was evaluated using The Self Reporting Questionnaire, exposure to partner violence by an instrument from WHO and child psychiatric symptoms with Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). We adjusted the analyses for gestational week, gender, SES, perinatal data and maternal distress/exposure to partner violence at child age of nine years. Elevated maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy, as a possible marker of maternal stress load, were correlated with higher CBCL-ratings, especially concerning externalizing symptoms. Maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy were not associated with child cortisol levels at child age of nine years. Maternal distress and exposure to partner violence during pregnancy were neither associated with child psychiatric symptoms nor child cortisol levels. To conclude, intrauterine exposure to elevated cortisol levels was associated with higher ratings on offspring psychopathology at nine years of age. The lack of association between maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy and child cortisol levels does not support the hypothesis of fetal programming of the HPA-axis, but reliability problems may have contributed to this negative finding. PMID:26458013

  13. Evaluation of the estrogenic effects of dietary perinatal Trifolium pratense

    PubMed Central

    Daglioglu, Suzan

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential estrogenic effects of perinatal dietary phytoestrogens on the rat uterus. Pregnant rats were divided to three groups provided the following diets: (1) rat chow, (2) rat chow with 7.5% Trifolium (T.) pratense, or (3) rat chow supplemented with 17?-estradiol (0.5 mg/kg). The dams in each group were kept on the same diet during pregnancy and lactation. Female offspring were euthanized on day 21 at which time body and organ weights were recorded and tissue samples were taken for histology. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect estrogen receptor alpha (ER?) and progesterone receptor (PR) levels. Our results revealed estrogen-like biological effects of perinatal T. pratense exposure. Relative uterus and ovary weights in the experimental groups were increased compared to control. The number of uterine glands and luminal epithelium heights were also increased. However, there were no statistically significant changes detected in the immunostaining intensity of ER? and PR between the groups. PMID:21586870

  14. Gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Sarmento, Melina Vaz; Polli, Janaina Borges; Groff, Daniela de Paoli; Petry, Patrícia; de Mattos, Vinícius Freitas; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Trevisan, Patrícia; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome (PS). METHODS: The study enrolled patients with PS consecutively evaluated during 38 years in a Clinical Genetics Service of a pediatric referral hospital in Southern Brazil. The clinical data and the results of cytogenetic analysis were collected from the medical records. For statistical analysis, the two-tailed Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test with Yates' correction were used, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The sample was composed of 27 patients, 63% were male, with a median age of nine days at the first evaluation. Full trisomy of chromosome 13 was the main cytogenetic finding (74%). Only six patients were submitted to obstetric ultrasound and none had prenatal diagnosis of PS. The patients' demographic characteristics, compared to born alive infants in the same Brazilian state showed a higher frequency of: mothers with 35 years old or more (37.5%); multiparous mothers (92.6%); vaginal delivery (77%); preterm birth (34.6%); birth weight <2500g (33.3%), and Apgar scores <7 in the 1st (75%) and in the 5th minute (42.9%). About half of them (53%) died during the first month of life. CONCLUSIONS: The understanding of the PS patients' gestational, perinatal and family findings has important implications, especially on the decision about the actions to be taken in relation to the management of these patients. PMID:24473950

  15. Human trophoblasts confer resistance to viruses implicated in perinatal infection.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Bayer A; Delorme-Axford E; Sleigher C; Frey TK; Trobaugh DW; Klimstra WB; Emert-Sedlak LA; Smithgall TE; Kinchington PR; Vadia S; Seveau S; Boyle JP; Coyne CB; Sadovsky Y

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Primary human trophoblasts were previously shown to be resistant to viral infection, and able to confer this resistance to nontrophoblast cells. Can trophoblasts protect nontrophoblastic cells from infection by viruses or other intracellular pathogens that are implicated in perinatal infection?STUDY DESIGN: Isolated primary term human trophoblasts were cultured for 48-72 hours. Diverse nonplacental human cell lines (U2OS, human foreskin fibroblast, TZM-bl, MeWo, and Caco-2) were preexposed to either trophoblast conditioned medium, nonconditioned medium, or miR-517-3p for 24 hours. Cells were infected with several viral and nonviral pathogens known to be associated with perinatal infections. Cellular infection was defined and quantified by plaque assays, luciferase assays, microscopy, and/or colonization assays. Differences in infection were assessed by Student t test or analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction.RESULTS: Infection by rubella and other togaviruses, human immunodeficiency virus-1, and varicella zoster was attenuated in cells preexposed to trophoblast-conditioned medium (P < .05), and a partial effect by the chromosome 19 microRNA miR-517-3p on specific pathogens. The conditioned medium had no effect on infection by Toxoplasma gondii or Listeria monocytogenes.CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that medium conditioned by primary human trophoblasts attenuates viral infection in nontrophoblastic cells. Our data point to a trophoblast-specific antiviral effect that may be exploited therapeutically.

  16. Human trophoblasts confer resistance to viruses implicated in perinatal infection

    PubMed Central

    BAYER, Avraham; DELORME-AXFORD, Elizabeth; SLEIGHER, Christie; FREY, Teryl K.; TROBAUGH, Derek W.; KLIMSTRA, William B.; EMERT-SEDLAK, Lori A.; SMITHGALL, Thomas E.; KINCHINGTON, Paul R.; VADIA, Stephen; SEVEAU, Stephanie; Boyle, Jon P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Primary human trophoblasts were previously shown to be resistant to viral infection, and able to confer this resistance to non-trophoblast cells. Can trophoblasts protect non-trophoblastic cells from infection by viruses or other intracellular pathogens that are implicated in perinatal infection? Study Design Isolated primary term human trophoblasts were cultured for 72 h. Diverse non-placental human cell lines (U2OS, HFF, TZM-bl, MeWo, and Caco-2) were pre-exposed to either trophoblast conditioned, non-conditioned medium, or miR-517-3p for 24 h. Cells were infected with several viral and non-viral pathogens known to be associated with perinatal infections. Cellular infection was defined and quantified by plaque assays, luciferase assays, microscopy, and/or colonization assays. Differences in infection were assessed by Student's t-test or ANOVA with Bonferroni's correction. Results Infection by rubella and other togaviruses, HIV-1, and varicella zoster, was attenuated in cells pre-exposed to trophoblast conditioned medium (p <0.05), and a partial effect by the Ch.19 microRNA miR-517-3p on specific pathogens. The conditioned medium had no effect on infection by Toxoplasma gondii or Listeria monocytogenes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that medium conditioned by primary human trophoblasts attenuate viral infection in non-trophoblastic cells. Our data point to a trophoblast-specific antiviral effect that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:25108145

  17. Metabolomic Profiling in Perinatal Asphyxia: A Promising New Field

    PubMed Central

    Denihan, Niamh M.; Boylan, Geraldine B.; Murray, Deirdre M.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics, the latest “omic” technology, is defined as the comprehensive study of all low molecular weight biochemicals, “metabolites” present in an organism. As a systems biology approach, metabolomics has huge potential to progress our understanding of perinatal asphyxia and neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, by uniquely detecting rapid biochemical pathway alterations in response to the hypoxic environment. The study of metabolomic biomarkers in the immediate neonatal period is not a trivial task and requires a number of specific considerations, unique to this disease and population. Recruiting a clearly defined cohort requires standardised multicentre recruitment with broad inclusion criteria and the participation of a range of multidisciplinary staff. Minimally invasive biospecimen collection is a priority for biomarker discovery. Umbilical cord blood presents an ideal medium as large volumes can be easily extracted and stored and the sample is not confounded by postnatal disease progression. Pristine biobanking and phenotyping are essential to ensure the validity of metabolomic findings. This paper provides an overview of the current state of the art in the field of metabolomics in perinatal asphyxia and neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We detail the considerations required to ensure high quality sampling and analysis, to support scientific progression in this important field. PMID:25802843

  18. Pregnant African American women's attitudes toward perinatal depression prevention.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Sherryl H; Dimidjian, Sona; Williams, Kristen G

    2013-01-01

    Depression during the perinatal period is common, debilitating, and consequential for women and their children, particularly among low income African American women. Viable approaches to prevention of depression have emerged. Yet little is known about women's preferences for approaches to preventing depression. A sample of 60 pregnant, low-income African American women seeking routine prenatal care was presented with standardized descriptions of three approaches to depression prevention (pharmacotherapy and two psychosocial approaches) and measures of preferences, perceived credibility, and personal reactions to each approach. Women also completed measures of perceived barriers and facilitators and current depression. Consistent with expectations, both of the psychosocial approaches were rated as more strongly preferred, more credible, and associated with more positive personal reactions relative to the pharmacotherapy approach. Depression did not alter women's preferences among the approaches. Contrary to prediction, women with clinically significant levels of depression did not find the pharmacotherapy approach to be more credible or to have more favorable personal reactions to it than women with low depression symptom levels. Exploration of women's perceptions of barriers revealed the importance of logistics, beliefs, and stigma barriers whereas women reported that concern about depression being impairing and ease of pragmatics would both facilitate engagement with preventive interventions. The findings suggest the need to examine the role of preferences in tests of the effectiveness of approaches to the prevention of perinatal depression in order to enhance service delivery among low income African American women. PMID:23356356

  19. Bone health in children and adolescents with perinatal HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Siberry, George K

    2013-01-01

    The long-term impact on bone health of lifelong HIV infection and prolonged ART in growing and developing children is not yet known. Measures of bone health in youth must be interpreted in the context of expected developmental and physiologic changes in bone mass, size, density and strength that occur from fetal through adult life. Low bone mineral density (BMD) appears to be common in perinatally HIV-infected youth, especially outside of high-income settings, but data are limited and interpretation complicated by the need for better pediatric norms. The potential negative effects of tenofovir on BMD and bone mass accrual are of particular concern as this drug may be used more widely in younger children. Emphasizing good nutrition, calcium and vitamin D sufficiency, weight-bearing exercise and avoidance of alcohol and smoking are effective and available approaches to maintain and improve bone health in all settings. More data are needed to inform therapies and monitoring for HIV-infected youth with proven bone fragility. While very limited data suggest lack of marked increase in fracture risk for youth with perinatal HIV infection, the looming concern for these children is that they may fail to attain their expected peak bone mass in early adulthood which could increase their risk for fractures and osteoporosis later in adulthood. PMID:23782476

  20. The Effect of Maternal Stress Activation on the Offspring during Lactation in Light of Vasopressin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although it is obvious that preconceptional effects as well as stressors during pregnancy profoundly influence the progeny, the lactation period seems to be at least as important. Here we summarize how maternal stressors during the lactation period affect the offspring. As vasopressin is one of the crucial components both for stress adaptation and social behavior, special emphasis was given to this neuropeptide. We can conclude that stressing the mother does not have the same acute effect on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (as the main target of stress adaptation) of the pups as stressing the pups, but later endocrine and behavioral consequences can be similar. Vasopressin plays a role in acute and later consequences of perinatal stressor applied either to the mother or to the offspring, thereby contributing to transmitting the mothers' stress to the progeny. This mother-infant interaction does not necessarily mean a direct transmission of molecules, but rather is the result of programming the brain development through changes in maternal behavior. Thus, there is a time lag between maternal stress and stress-related changes in the offspring. The interactions are bidirectional as not only stress in the dam but also stress in the progeny has an effect on nursing. PMID:24550698

  1. Maternal depression in association with fathers' involvement with their infants: spillover or compensation/buffering?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Sherryl H; Lusby, Cara M; Thompson, Katina; Newport, D Jeffrey; Stowe, Zachary N

    2014-01-01

    Both concurrent and prospective associations between maternal depression and father involvement were tested to evaluate support for the spillover model (higher depressive symptom levels associated with lower father involvement) and the compensatory/buffering model (higher depressive symptom levels associated with higher father involvement). Participants in this longitudinal study were women at risk for perinatal depression in association with their histories of mood or anxiety disorders, their husbands/partners, and their infants at 3, 6, and 12 months of age. Maternal depressive symptoms were measured with depression rating scales at multiple times over the infants' first year. Paternal involvement was measured with a questionnaire (relative perceived responsibility) and a time diary (accessibility and engagement) inquiring about a recent weekday and a recent weekend, completed in a telephone interview, at infant ages 3, 6, and 12 months. Findings consistently supported the compensatory/buffering model for depression in the first 6 months' postpartum, along with an indication of spillover regarding maternal depressive symptoms that persist into the second half of the infants' first year. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for clinical practice and policy as well as suggestions for future research. PMID:25798499

  2. Prenatal Maternal Stress Predicts Childhood Asthma in Girls: Project Ice Storm

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, David P.; Brunet, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) influences risks of asthma in humans. In this small study, we sought to determine whether disaster-related PNMS would predict asthma risk in children. In June 1998, we assessed severity of objective hardship and subjective distress in women pregnant during the January 1998 Quebec Ice Storm. Lifetime asthma symptoms, diagnoses, and corticosteroid utilization were assessed when the children were 12 years old (N = 68). No effects of objective hardship or timing of the exposure were found. However, we found that, in girls only, higher levels of prenatal maternal subjective distress predicted greater lifetime risk of wheezing (OR = 1.11; 90% CI = 1.01–1.23), doctor-diagnosed asthma (OR = 1.09; 90% CI = 1.00–1.19), and lifetime utilization of corticosteroids (OR = 1.12; 90% CI = 1.01–1.25). Other perinatal and current maternal life events were also associated with asthma outcomes. Findings suggest that stress during pregnancy opens a window for fetal programming of immune functioning. A sex-based approach may be useful to examine how prenatal and postnatal environments combine to program the immune system. This small study needs to be replicated with a larger, more representative sample. PMID:24895550

  3. Maternal high-fat diet alters anxiety behavior and glucocorticoid signaling in adolescent offspring.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, A; de Vega, W; Sivanathan, S; St-Cyr, S; McGowan, P O

    2014-07-11

    Maternal obesity and overconsumption of saturated fats during pregnancy have profound effects on offspring health, ranging from metabolic to behavioral disorders in later life. The influence of high-fat diet (HFD) exposure on the development of brain regions implicated in anxiety behavior is not well understood. We previously found that maternal HFD exposure is associated with an increase in anxiety behavior and alterations in the expression of several genes involved in inflammation via the glucocorticoid signaling pathway in adult rat offspring. During adolescence, the maturation of feedback systems mediating corticosteroid sensitivity is incomplete, and therefore distinct from adulthood. In this study, we examined the influence of maternal HFD on several measures of anxiety behavior and gene expression in adolescent offspring. We examined the expression of corticosteroid receptors and related inflammatory processes, as corticosteroid receptors are known to regulate circulating corticosterone levels during basal and stress conditions in addition to influencing inflammatory processes in the hippocampus and amygdala. We found that adolescent animals perinatally exposed to HFD generally showed decreased anxiety behavior accompanied by a selective alteration in the expression of the glucocorticoid receptor and several downstream inflammatory genes in the hippocampus and amygdala. These data suggest that adolescence constitutes an additional period when the effects of developmental programming may modify mental health trajectories. PMID:24791714

  4. Maternal self-medication and provision of nevirapine to newborns by women in Rakai, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kagaayi, Joseph; Dreyfuss, Michele L; Kigozi, Godfrey; Chen, Michael Z; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Serwadda, David; Wawer, Maria J; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Nalugoda, Fred; Kiwanuka, Noah; Kiddugavu, Meddie; Gray, Ronald H

    2005-05-01

    To assess the effectiveness of maternal self-administration of nevirapine for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV, we conducted a program to provide maternal and newborn doses of nevirapine to pregnant women in rural Uganda. Women provided blood for HIV testing and were offered voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) during annual community HIV surveys. HIV-positive women who accepted VCT were offered nevirapine tablets and syrup. Blood samples were collected postpartum from women and their babies. Infants were tested for HIV by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and a subsample of maternal and infant blood was assayed for nevirapine. Among the 981 women tested for HIV, 900 (91.7%) accepted VCT, of whom 105 (11.7%) were HIV-positive. Ninety-three women accepted nevirapine, of whom 81 (87.1%) were followed postpartum; 75 (92.6%) reported receipt of the drug, and 69 reported taking the tablets (85.2%). There were 81 liveborn babies (3 sets of twins), and 67 (84.8%) received the syrup. In a subsample of 25 mothers reporting receipt of the drug, nevirapine was detected in 22 (88.0%) and 24 (96.0%) babies tested. PCR of 67 infant blood samples identified 5 HIV-positive (MTCT rate = 7.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3%-16.6%). Mothers can administer nevirapine to themselves and their newborns and can achieve low rates of perinatal HIV infection. PMID:15851922

  5. Interventions to address maternal and childhood undernutrition: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Das, Jai K

    2014-01-01

    The global burden of undernutrition remains high with little evidence of change in many countries. We reviewed the evidence of the potential nutritional interventions and estimated their effect on nutrition-related outcomes of women and children. Among the maternal interventions, daily iron supplementation results in a 69% reduction in incidence of anemia, 20% in incidence of low birthweight (LBW) and improves mean birthweight. MMN supplementation during pregnancy has been shown to significantly decrease the number of LBW infants by 14% and small for gestational age (SGA) by 13%. Balanced protein-energy supplementation reduces the incidence of SGA by 32% and risk of stillbirths by 38%. Antimalarials when given to pregnant women increase the mean birthweight significantly and were associated with a 43% reduction in LBW and severe antenatal anemia by 38%. Among the neonatal and child interventions, educational/counseling interventions increased exclusive breastfeeding by 43% at 4-6 weeks and 137% at 6 months. Vitamin A supplementation (VAS) reduces all-cause mortality by 24% and results in a 14% reduction in the risk of infant mortality at 6 months. Intermittent iron supplementation in children reduces the risk of anemia by 49% and iron deficiency by 76%, and significantly improves hemoglobin and ferritin concentration. Preventive zinc supplementation in populations at risk of zinc deficiency decreases morbidity from childhood diarrhea and acute lower respiratory infections, and increases linear growth and weight gain among infants and young children. Among the supportive interventions, hand washing with soap significantly reduces diarrhea morbidity by 48%, though it depends on access to water. The effect of water treatment on diarrhea morbidity also appears similarly large with a 17% reduction. Recent research has established linkages of preconception interventions with improved maternal, perinatal and neonatal health outcomes, and it has been suggested that several proven interventions recommended during pregnancy may be even more effective if implemented before conception. These proven interventions, if scaled up have the potential to reduce the global burden of undernutrition substantially. PMID:24504207

  6. First trimester maternal blood rheology and pregnancy induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robins, J B; Woodward, M; Lowe, G; McCaul, P; Cheyne, H; Walker, J J

    2005-11-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between the first trimester assessment of maternal rheology and the subsequent development of pregnancy induced hypertension. This is a prospective observational study based in the Glasgow Royal Maternity Hospital, Scotland. From an original population of 744 consecutive antenatal attendees a total of 579 women were booked at less than 14 weeks' gestation. The main study group is a further subset comprising 251 primigravid women booking with a singleton pregnancy without essential hypertension. Previously published data from a group of non-pregnant women of similar age drawn from the same local community was used for external comparison. Blood samples were collected at the booking visit, from which fibrinogen, red cell aggregation, haematocrit and plasma, whole blood, relative and corrected viscosities were recorded. Information was obtained from the case notes in retrospect starting approximately 1 year after the first patients had first been recruited into the trial. The overall outcome of the pregnancies was noted with particular reference to pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), birth weight, antepartum haemorrhage, pre-term labour, perinatal death, condition at delivery and neonatal complication. Our results show PIH is associated with a significantly raised mean blood viscosity and fibrinogen at time of booking. All significance disappears after adjustment for smoking, diastolic blood pressure and age. Viscosity is, however, only marginally non-significant (p = 0.07). In conclusion, blood rheology, in particular blood viscosity and fibrinogen, may play a predictive role in the development of pregnancy-induced hypertension. When combined with measurement of smoking and diastolic blood pressure at booking, these measurements could be used to calculate a risk score for the development of PIH, allowing targeting of antenatal care. Further data is required. PMID:16368576

  7. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Is Not an Early Marker of Injury in Perinatal Asphyxia and Hypoxic–Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Ann-Marie; Ahearne, Caroline; Boylan, Geraldine B.; Murray, Deirdre M.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) has been suggested as a potential biomarker for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborns (1, 2). Previous studies have shown increased levels in post-natal blood samples. However, its ability to guide therapeutic intervention in HIE is unknown. Therapeutic hypothermia for HIE must be initiated within 6?h of birth, therefore a clinically useful marker of injury would have to be available immediately following delivery. The goal of our study was to examine the ability of GFAP to predict grade of encephalopathy and neurological outcome when measured in umbilical cord blood (UCB). Infants with suspected perinatal asphyxia (PA) and HIE were enrolled in a single, tertiary maternity hospital, where UCB was drawn, processed, and bio-banked at birth. Expression levels of GFAP were measured by ELISA. In total, 169 infants (83 controls, 56 PA, 30 HIE) were included in the study. GFAP levels were not increased in UCB of case infants (PA/HIE) when compared to healthy controls or when divided into specific grades of HIE. Additionally, no correlation was found between UCB levels of GFAP and outcome at 36?months.

  8. German Maternal Phenylketonuria Study.

    PubMed

    Cipcic-Schmidt, S; Trefz, F K; Fünders, B; Seidlitz, G; Ullrich, K

    1996-07-01

    The German maternal phenylketonuria (MPKU) Study began in 1989 and since 1992 works together with the American-Canadian MPKU Study. Main goals of the study are: (1) to find women with phenylketonuria (PKU) and mild untreated hyperphenylalaninaemia (HPA); (2) to inform them about the risks of an untreated pregnancy with PKU and HPA; (3) to evaluate the efficacy of the phenylalanine (Phe) restricted dietary treatment prior to and during pregnancy by following the physical and cognitive development of offspring from treated pregnancies. An interim report of the study is presented. Until now, 43 pregnancies have been followed. They resulted in 34 live births, 24 from women with PKU and 10 form women with HPA. There are significant negative correlations between the gestational age in which the dietary control (blood Phe level < 360 mumol/l) was reached and pregnancy outcome as measured by growth parameters and early cognitive and motor developmental quotients at the age of 2 years. For minimizing risks of MPKU, preconceptional dietary control is strongly recommended. Tracking and timely information of young women about risks of MPKU is of outmost importance. PMID:8828639

  9. [Obstetric-perinatal status 1990 in the Oder region (a contribution to the obstetric-perinatal care in East Brandenburg)].

    PubMed

    Rummler, S; Schüssling, G

    1993-01-01

    On the background of the first All-German-Perinatal-Study in 1992 the results in obstetrics and perinatology in the Oder-Region (east part of the State of Brandenbourg) in 1990 are described. In comparison to the results in a previous study (1985) we found a drastical decline in the number of births (newborns 1985: 10244; 1990: 7723); in addition to the changing in the reproduction- and health-care behaviour, too, we have noted a decreasing perinatal mortality from 7.5% in 1985 to 4.9% in 1990. The ameliorated monitoring-rate (cardiotocography-rate) of the fetus (1985: 71%, 1990: 88.4%) and the decreasing still-birth-rate may be the main cause of this phenomenon. Clinic-births were the most common deliveries, the house-birth was the great exception; only 0.2% of all deliveries occurred at home or otherwhere. Our data support that there is no difference, except the birth-rate, in relation to the situation in the "old" Federal Republic of Germany. PMID:8484278

  10. Maternal mortality in a maternity hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, R A; Erkaya, S; Sipahi, T; Kutlar, I

    1995-09-01

    During 1983-1992 in Turkey, 17 maternal deaths occurred out of 100,531 live births at the Zubeyde Hanim Maternity Hospital in Ankara for a maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 16.9/100,000 live births. Hemorrhage (41.2%) and pulmonary embolism (35.3%) were the leading causes of maternal death. Cases referred to the hospital after home deliveries accounted for 57% of the hemorrhage-related deaths. Other causes of maternal death were eclampsia (11.7%), puerperal infection (5.9%), and heart failure attributed to rheumatic heart disease (5.9%). The MMR fell over time from 22.6 (1983-1984) to 12.8 (1991-1992). Women younger than 20 and those 35 and older suffered from the highest MMRs. MMR increased with parity (8 for primigravida, 10 for parity 1-2, 27.3 for parity 3-4, and 62.1 for parity =or 5). Cesarean delivery was associated with a higher MMR than vaginal delivery (44.7 vs. 14.1). This association was likely a result of pregnancy complications that led to a cesarean section rather than the cesarean section itself. PMID:7660764

  11. Homozygous factor-V mutation as a genetic cause of perinatal thrombosis and cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Harum, K H; Hoon, A H; Kato, G J; Casella, J F; Breiter, S N; Johnston, M V

    1999-11-01

    A 5-year old girl with cerebral palsy (CP), preterm birth, postnatal aortic thrombus, and cerebellar venous infarction who is homozygous for the thrombophilic factor-V Leiden (fVL) mutation is reported. The role of hereditary thrombophilic disorders in the development of perinatal vascular lesions such as aortic thrombi, renal-vein thrombosis, venous-sinus thrombosis, and cerebral infarction is unknown. This case report brings into question a potential association between fVL, perinatal vascular lesions, perinatal stroke, and CP. PMID:10576642

  12. Risk factors leading to preterm births in Morocco: a prospective study at the maternity Souissi in Rabat

    PubMed Central

    Sabiri, Nargisse; Kabiri, Meryem; Razine, Rachid; Barkat, Amina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Eminent morbidity and mortality of preterm infants is perceived, especially in developing countries. The aim of the study is to identify the main factors involved in the occurrence of premature births in Morocco. Methods This was a descriptive and analytical study conducted at the maternity Souissi in Rabat, from January 2011 to December 2011. The data were collected using interview with women in the postpartum, and via, the exploitation of obstetric and perinatal records. The data sheet was filled out for each newborn, including socio-demographic, obstetrical, maternal, childbirth and neonatal data, as well as, monitoring and surveillance of pregnancy. Results A total of 1015 births were collected. 954 were full term babies and 61 were preterms. The gestational age was between 33-34 weeks in 57.4%. Relying on Statistical analysis, many risk factors were, significantly, associated with the occurrence of prematurity, namely: low level of maternal education (p < 0.004), absence of pregnancy’ monitoring (p < 0.001), multiparity (p < 0.001), maternal chronic diseases (p < 0.001), and drug taking during pregnancy (p < 0.001). Conclusion To reduce the incidence of preterm births, reliable programs must be established, devoting all its interest, to educate the young woman in childbearing age about the appropriate ways of monitoring pregnancy, as well as, the qualitative and quantitative development of health care structures. PMID:26600920

  13. Programming of stress-related behavior and epigenetic neural gene regulation in mice offspring through maternal exposure to predator odor

    PubMed Central

    St-Cyr, Sophie; McGowan, Patrick O.

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal stress mediated through the mother can lead to long-term alterations in stress-related phenotypes in offspring. The capacity for adaptation to adversity in early life depends in part on the life history of the animal. This study was designed to examine the behavioral and neural response in adult offspring to prenatal exposure to predator odor: an ethologically-relevant psychological stressor. Pregnant mice were exposed daily to predator odors or distilled water control over the second half of the pregnancy. Predator odor exposure lead to a transient decrease in maternal care in the mothers. As adults, the offspring of predator odor-exposed mothers showed increased anti-predator behavior, a predator-odor induced decrease in activity and, in female offspring, an increased corticosterone (CORT) response to predator odor exposure. We found a highly specific response among stress-related genes within limbic brain regions. Transcript abundance of Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) was elevated in the amygdala in adult female offspring of predator odor-exposed mothers. In the hippocampus of adult female offspring, decreased Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) transcript abundance was correlated with a site-specific decrease in DNA methylation in Bdnf exon IV, indicating the potential contribution of this epigenetic mechanism to maternal programming by maternal predator odor exposure. These data indicate that maternal predator odor exposure alone is sufficient to induce an altered stress-related phenotype in adulthood, with implications for anti-predator behavior in offspring. PMID:26082698

  14. Perinatal AIDS: Permanency Planning for the African-American Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor-Brown, Susan; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Conducted a retrospective chart review utilizing Norwood's model on the families of the 83 infants whose cord blood was positive for maternal HIV antibodies or who were congenitally infected with HIV. Discusses implications for permanency planning in the context of their impact on the African-American community. (KS)

  15. Perinatal asphyxia syndrome in the foal: review and a case report

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    This report presented a brief overview of the literature on the perinatal asphyxia syndrome (PAS) in foals as a prelude to a description of the investigation and treatment of acute onset seizures in a 24-hour-old Thoroughbred colt foal. PAS can cause a wide variety of clinical abnormalities, of which seizures due to encephalopathy are the most significant. The structural and biochemical components of CNS neurones are disrupted by the shift from oxidative to anaerobic metabolism, with a resultant deficit in cellular energy. The cells succumb to the combined effects of acidosis, neurotoxic activities of glutamate, nitric oxide and free radicals, lipid peroxidation, accumulation of intracellular calcium and destructive overactivity of intracellular enzymes. Concurrently, the hypoxia affects other organ systems and management of foals presenting with CNS signs requires the veterinarian to undertake a thorough clinical examination and to institute appropriate therapy for the various derangements induced by the hypoxic-ischaemic episode. Diazepam (0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg bwt) can be used for short-term control of seizures; phenobarbital (2 to 10 mg/kg bwt) may be required for more prolonged treatment of recurrent seizures. The needs of the affected foal for nutrients, fluids and electrolytes, antimicrobial therapy and ancillary therapies were discussed in the literature review and illustrated in the case report. PMID:21851654

  16. Women's Education Level, Maternal Health Facilities, Abortion Legislation and Maternal Deaths: A Natural Experiment in Chile from 1957 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Elard; Thorp, John; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastián; Romero, Camila X.; Aguilera, Hernán; Ahlers, Ivonne

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the main factors related to maternal mortality reduction in large time series available in Chile in context of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Methods Time series of maternal mortality ratio (MMR) from official data (National Institute of Statistics, 1957–2007) along with parallel time series of education years, income per capita, fertility rate (TFR), birth order, clean water, sanitary sewer, and delivery by skilled attendants were analysed using autoregressive models (ARIMA). Historical changes on the mortality trend including the effect of different educational and maternal health policies implemented in 1965, and legislation that prohibited abortion in 1989 were assessed utilizing segmented regression techniques. Results During the 50-year study period, the MMR decreased from 293.7 to 18.2/100,000 live births, a decrease of 93.8%. Women's education level modulated the effects of TFR, birth order, delivery by skilled attendants, clean water, and sanitary sewer access. In the fully adjusted model, for every additional year of maternal education there was a corresponding decrease in the MMR of 29.3/100,000 live births. A rapid phase of decline between 1965 and 1981 (?13.29/100,000 live births each year) and a slow phase between 1981 and 2007 (?1.59/100,000 live births each year) were identified. After abortion was prohibited, the MMR decreased from 41.3 to 12.7 per 100,000 live births (?69.2%). The slope of the MMR did not appear to be altered by the change in abortion law. Conclusion Increasing education level appears to favourably impact the downward trend in the MMR, modulating other key factors such as access and utilization of maternal health facilities, changes in women's reproductive behaviour and improvements of the sanitary system. Consequently, different MDGs can act synergistically to improve maternal health. The reduction in the MMR is not related to the legal status of abortion. PMID:22574194

  17. Current Thoughts on Maternal Nutrition and Fetal Programming of the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brenseke, Bonnie; Prater, M. Renee; Gutierrez, J. Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Although the metabolic syndrome has been defined in various ways, the ultimate importance of recognizing this combination of disorders is that it helps identify individuals at high risk for both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Evidence from observational and experimental studies links adverse exposures in early life, particularly relating to nutrition, to chronic disease susceptibility in adulthood. Such studies provide the foundation and framework for the relatively new field of developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD). Although great strides have been made in identifying the putative concepts and mechanisms relating specific exposures in early life to the risk of developing chronic diseases in adulthood, a complete picture remains obscure. To date, the main focus of the field has been on perinatal undernutrition and specific nutrient deficiencies; however, the current global health crisis of overweight and obesity demands that perinatal overnutrition and specific nutrient excesses be examined. This paper assembles current thoughts on the concepts and mechanisms behind the DOHaD as they relate to maternal nutrition, and highlights specific contributions made by macro- and micronutrients. PMID:23476780

  18. Prenatal nicotine exposure in rhesus monkeys compromises development of brainstem and cardiac monoamine pathways involved in perinatal adaptation and sudden infant death syndrome: amelioration by vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Seidler, Frederic J; Spindel, Eliot R

    2011-01-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy greatly enhances perinatal morbidity/mortality and is the major risk factor for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Studies in developing rodents indicate that nicotine is a neuroteratogen that targets monoamine pathways involved in the responses to hypoxia that are in turn, hypothesized to contribute to these adverse events. We administered nicotine to pregnant Rhesus monkeys from gestational day 30 through 160 by continuous infusion, achieving maternal plasma levels comparable to those in smokers; we examined neurochemical parameters immediately after Cesarean delivery at the end of the exposure period. Nicotine evoked elevations in brainstem serotonin levels and serotonin turnover, indicating hyperactivity of these pathways. The same treatment evoked a deficit in cardiac norepinephrine levels. Both effects were offset by coadministration of the antioxidant, Vitamin C. Brainstem serotonin hyperinnervation is a hallmark of SIDS, and the hyperactivity seen here can also account for the downregulation of serotonin receptors noted in this disorder. Deficient cardiac sympathetic innervation is also consistent with increased vulnerability to hypoxia during delivery or in the agonal event in SIDS. Our results thus indicate that nicotine exposure in a primate model produces brainstem and autonomic abnormalities of the key monoamine systems that govern the response to hypoxia, indicate an important role of oxidative stress in the adverse effects, and point to potential amelioration strategies that could offset these particular effects of nicotine. PMID:21320590

  19. Learning lessons from maternal death.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Margaret

    2011-04-01

    Maternity Services and the whole team delivering care to women and their families have had the benefit of the review and recommendations from the confidential enquiries into maternal deaths since their beginnings in 1952. The maternal death enquiry continued to develop and became UK wide in the 1990s. The title of the report published in December 2007 changed to the more positive 'Saving Mothers' Lives: Reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer--2003-2005'. Midwives must be aware of the report, the findings reached and recommendations made. They must ensure that their own knowledge and clinical practice are up to date. The most recent report has just been published in March 2011. It is an ideal opportunity for midwives to be involved and work with the whole team to review the report and its recommendations. They can contribute towards ensuring that the local service and care delivered meet the standards expected, reflect the recommendations and make the service provided for local mothers and babies as safe as possible. In this article, a supervisor of midwives and regional midwifery assessor reflects on these role in relation to maternal death and the lessons that can be learnt from the actions taken and recorded in each case when this devastating event occurs. PMID:21560944

  20. Endocrine and other physiologic modulators of perinatal cardiomyocyte endowment.

    PubMed

    Jonker, S S; Louey, S

    2016-01-01

    Immature contractile cardiomyocytes proliferate to rapidly increase cell number, establishing cardiomyocyte endowment in the perinatal period. Developmental changes in cellular maturation, size and attrition further contribute to cardiac anatomy. These physiological processes occur concomitant with a changing hormonal environment as the fetus prepares itself for the transition to extrauterine life. There are complex interactions between endocrine, hemodynamic and nutritional regulators of cardiac development. Birth has been long assumed to be the trigger for major differences between the fetal and postnatal cardiomyocyte growth patterns, but investigations in normally growing sheep and rodents suggest this may not be entirely true; in sheep, these differences are initiated before birth, while in rodents they occur after birth. The aim of this review is to draw together our understanding of the temporal regulation of these signals and cardiomyocyte responses relative to birth. Further, we consider how these dynamics are altered in stressed and suboptimal intrauterine environments. PMID:26432905

  1. Perinatal undernutrition programmes thyroid function in the adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Moreno, Rosario; Racotta, Radu; Anguiano, Brenda; Aceves, Carmen; Quevedo, Lucía

    2013-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that alterations in early nutrition programme physiological changes in adulthood. In the present study, we determined the effects of undernutrition during gestation and lactation on the programming of thyroid function in adult rat offspring. Perinatal undernutrition was achieved by a 40% food restriction in female Wistar rats from the mating day to weaning. On postpartum day 21, the offspring of the control and food-restricted dams were weaned and given free access to a commercial diet until adulthood. The results showed that undernourished rats exhibited decreased 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) levels but had normal thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels at weaning; on day 90, these rats displayed a significant flip, exhibiting normalised T3 (total and free) and total T4 levels, but low free T4 and persistently higher TSH levels, which were maintained even on postnatal day 140. This profile was accompanied by a scarce fat depot, a lower RMR and an exacerbated sympathetic brown adipose tissue (BAT) tone (deiodinase type 2 expression) in basal conditions. Moreover, when a functional challenge (cold exposure) was applied, the restricted group exhibited partial changes in TSH (29 v. 100%) and T4 (non-response v. 17%) levels, a significant decrease in leptin levels (75 v. 32%) and the maintenance of a sympathetic BAT over-response (higher noradrenaline levels) in comparison with the control group. The findings of the present study suggest that undernutrition during the perinatal period produces permanent changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis with consequent low body weight and decreased RMR and facultative thermogenesis. We hypothesise that these changes predispose individuals to exhibiting adult subclinical hypothyroidism. PMID:23800456

  2. [Prevention of perinatal depression and anxiety with periconceptional care].

    PubMed

    Eros, Erika; Hajós, Anett

    2011-06-01

    In the public mind, pregnancy, childbirth and newborn care is one of the most wonderful living experiences. However, epidemiological studies have shown that the risks of psychiatric disorders in the perinatal period are multiplying. Pregnancy entails with dramatic physical, mental and social role changing. The birth is a big, irreversible life event, and it should also be nominated as "rite of passage". This process represents a normative crisis during life, which needs new coping mechanisms to be developed. The stress and anxiety during the development of the fetus causes negative consequences in the short and long-term and it causes dangerous complications for the mother, too. During postpartum period, the incidence of major depression is approximately 15-20% that most frequently occurs within 6 months after birth but until the child is 2 years old it can develop any time. Serious risks of the postpartum depression are suicide and infanticide. In addition, it also represents serious teratogenic effects of cognitive and psychomotor development of children. It makes harder to recognize that the symptoms are largely the same as in any other stage of depression occurring during lifetime, but some of the symptoms compliant of normal pregnancy and the postpartum period. In addition, the majorities of women recognize heavily the problem and visit a doctor, because based of social expectations they should feel happiness. After the disclosure of risk factors and securing preventive conditions, preparing to be a mother is effective in prevention of development of perinatal depression. The effective therapy is primarily based on the coaching approach, and requires multi-directional approach. PMID:21592949

  3. Perinatal programming of neuroendocrine mechanisms connecting feeding behavior and stress

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Feeding behavior is closely regulated by neuroendocrine mechanisms that can be influenced by stressful life events. However, the feeding response to stress varies among individuals with some increasing and others decreasing food intake after stress. In addition to the impact of acute lifestyle and genetic backgrounds, the early life environment can have a life-long influence on neuroendocrine mechanisms connecting stress to feeding behavior and may partially explain these opposing feeding responses to stress. In this review I will discuss the perinatal programming of adult hypothalamic stress and feeding circuitry. Specifically I will address how early life (prenatal and postnatal) nutrition, early life stress, and the early life hormonal profile can program the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the endocrine arm of the body's response to stress long-term and how these changes can, in turn, influence the hypothalamic circuitry responsible for regulating feeding behavior. Thus, over- or under-feeding and/or stressful events during critical windows of early development can alter glucocorticoid (GC) regulation of the HPA axis, leading to changes in the GC influence on energy storage and changes in GC negative feedback on HPA axis-derived satiety signals such as corticotropin-releasing-hormone. Furthermore, peripheral hormones controlling satiety, such as leptin and insulin are altered by early life events, and can be influenced, in early life and adulthood, by stress. Importantly, these neuroendocrine signals act as trophic factors during development to stimulate connectivity throughout the hypothalamus. The interplay between these neuroendocrine signals, the perinatal environment, and activation of the stress circuitry in adulthood thus strongly influences feeding behavior and may explain why individuals have unique feeding responses to similar stressors. PMID:23785312

  4. Fetal asphyctic preconditioning alters the transcriptional response to perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic reprogramming is thought to be, at least in part, responsible for the protective effect of brain preconditioning. Unraveling mechanisms of this endogenous neuroprotection, activated by preconditioning, is an important step towards new clinical strategies for treating asphyctic neonates. Therefore, we investigated whole-genome transcriptional changes in the brain of rats which underwent perinatal asphyxia (PA), and rats where PA was preceded by fetal asphyctic preconditioning (FAPA). Offspring were sacrificed 6 h and 96 h after birth, and whole-genome transcription was investigated using the Affymetrix Gene1.0ST chip. Microarray data were analyzed with the Bioconductor Limma package. In addition to univariate analysis, we performed Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) in order to derive results with maximum biological relevance. Results We observed minimal, 25% or less, overlap of differentially regulated transcripts across different experimental groups which leads us to conclude that the transcriptional phenotype of these groups is largely unique. In both the PA and FAPA group we observe an upregulation of transcripts involved in cellular stress. Contrastingly, transcripts with a function in the cell nucleus were mostly downregulated in PA animals, while we see considerable upregulation in the FAPA group. Furthermore, we observed that histone deacetylases (HDACs) are exclusively regulated in FAPA animals. Conclusions This study is the first to investigate whole-genome transcription in the neonatal brain after PA alone, and after perinatal asphyxia preceded by preconditioning (FAPA). We describe several genes/pathways, such as ubiquitination and proteolysis, which were not previously linked to preconditioning-induced neuroprotection. Furthermore, we observed that the majority of upregulated genes in preconditioned animals have a function in the cell nucleus, including several epigenetic players such as HDACs, which suggests that epigenetic mechanisms are likely to play a role in preconditioning-induced neuroprotection. PMID:24885038

  5. Relationships between Maternal Adult Attachment Security, Child Perceptions of Maternal Support, and Maternal Perceptions of Child Responses to Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leifer, Myra; Kilbane, Teresa; Skolnick, Linda I.

    2002-01-01

    Study assessed the relationships between maternal adult attachment style, children's perceptions of maternal support following disclosure of sexual abuse, and maternal perceptions of children's behavioral and emotional responses to sexual abuse. Findings indicate that fostering parent-child attachment is important in order to decrease the risk for…

  6. Maternal and Child Health MPH Degree Program

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Maternal and Child Health MPH Degree Program Division of Epidemiology and Community Health 2015, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, disability, public assistance status.......................................................................................................................................................... 3 1. Maternal and Child Health MPH Degree Program

  7. Improving maternal care reduces mortality.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    Reduction of maternal mortality in developing countries by community-based action is complex but possible. Deaths related to pregnancy are primarily due to bleeding, infection, toxemia and illegal abortion. The excess maternal deaths in developing countries are also related to high numbers of high-risk pregnancies, total lack of prenatal and obstetric care in some areas, poor nutrition and overwork. The basic interventions available to communities include prenatal care, improved alarm and transport systems, referral centers and improved community-based care. Prenatal care can include nutritional supplements and exams and referrals by traditional birth attendants, targeting women suffering from toxemia, bleeding and infections. Local ambulances with life-support equipment, and maternity waiting houses are examples of ways of dealing with transport problems. Referral centers should be capable of providing sterile conditions and blood transfusions. Nurses can be trained to do caesarean sections. Birth attendants can use checklists to administer antibiotics and oxytocic drugs, for example. PMID:12281272

  8. Spectrum of cardiac disease in maternity in a low-resource cohort in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sliwa, Karen; Libhaber, Elena; Elliott, Catherine; Momberg, Zoe; Osman, Ayesha; Zühlke, Liesl; Lachmann, Tony; Nicholson, Lauren; Thienemann, Friedrich; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien; Anthony, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Lack of evidence-based data on the spectrum of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in pregnancy or in the postpartum period, as well as on maternal and fetal outcome, provides challenges for treating physicians, particularly in areas of low resources. The objectives of this study were to investigate the spectrum of disease, mode of presentation and maternal and fetal outcome of patients referred to a dedicated Cardiac Disease and Maternity Clinic (CDM). Methods The prospective cohort study was conducted at a single tertiary care centre in South Africa. Two hundred and twenty-five women presenting with CVD in pregnancy, or within 6?months postpartum, were studied over a period of 2?years. Clinical assessment, echocardiography and laboratory tests were performed at baseline and follow-up visits. Prepartum, peripartum and postpartum complications were grouped into cardiac, neonatal and obstetric events. Results Ethnicity was black African (45%), mixed ethnicity (32%), white (15%), Indian/others (8%) and 12% were HIV positive. Of the 225 consecutive women (mean age 28.8±6.4), 196 (86.7%) presented prepartum and 73 in modified WHO class I. The 152 women presenting in a higher risk group (modified WHO class II–IV) were offered close follow-up at the CDM clinic and were diagnosed with congenital heart disease (32%, 15 operated previously), valvular heart disease (26%, 15 operated previously), cardiomyopathy (27%) and other (15%). Women presenting with symptoms of CVD or heart failure postpartum (n=30) presented in a higher New York Heart Association, had higher heart rates (p<0.001) and NTproBNP levels (p<0.0005). Of the 152 patients, 9 (6%) died within the 6-month follow-up period. Eight of the nine patients died >42?days postpartum. Perinatal death occurred in 1/152 (0.7%)—translating to a perinatal mortality rate of 7/1000 live births. Conclusions Disease patterns were markedly different to that seen in the developed world. However, joint obstetric–cardiac care in the low-resource cohort was associated with excellent survival outcome rates of pregnant mothers (even with complex diseases) and their offspring and was similar to that seen in the western world. Mortality typically occurred in the postpartum period, beyond the standard date of recording maternal death. PMID:25227705

  9. Epithelial cells supply Sonic Hedgehog to the perinatal dentate gyrus via transport by platelets.

    PubMed

    Choe, Youngshik; Huynh, Trung; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2015-01-01

    Dentate neural stem cells produce neurons throughout life in mammals. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is critical for maintenance of these cells; however, the perinatal source of Shh is enigmatic. In the present study, we examined the role of Shh expressed by hair follicles (HFs) that expand perinatally in temporal concordance with the proliferation of Shh-responding dentate stem cells. Specific inhibition of Shh from HFs or from epithelial sources in general hindered development of Shh-responding dentate stem cells. We also found that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of the perinatal dentate gyrus (DG) is leaky with stem cells in the dentate exposed to blood-born factors. In attempting to identify how Shh might be transported in blood, we found that platelets contain epithelial Shh, provide Shh to the perinatal DG and that inhibition of platelet generation reduced hedgehog-responsive dentate stem cells. PMID:26457609

  10. Causes of death and associated conditions (Codac) - a utilitarian approach to the classification of perinatal deaths

    E-print Network

    Froen, J. Frederik; Pinar, Halit; Flenady, Vicki; Bahrin, Safiah; Charles, Adrian; Chauke, Lawrence; Day, Katie; Duke, Charles W.; Facchinetti, Fabio; Fretts, Ruth C.; Gardener, Glenn; Gilshenan, Kristen; Gordijn, Sanne J.; Gordon, Adrienne; Guyon, Grace; Harrison, Catherine; Koshy, Rachel; Pattinson, Robert C.; Petersson, Karin; Russell, Laurie; Saastad, Eli; Smith, Gordon C. S.; Torabi, Rozbeh

    2009-06-10

    Abstract A carefully classified dataset of perinatal mortality will retain the most significant information on the causes of death. Such information is needed for health care policy development, surveillance and international comparisons, clinical...

  11. Maternity telehealth: ringing the changes.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Dorothy; Brown, Sheona

    2013-12-01

    This article describes NHS Scotland's Maternity telehealth options project and the implementation of the recommendations made. This 17-month project resulted in the development of national documentation for recording telehealth calls; the development of a self-directed eLearning tool on maternity telehealth call structure which was made available to all health boards in Scotland; a comprehensive programme of training on telehealth for student midwives; a programme of 'Train-the-trainer' events for qualified midwives to enable the cascade of learning throughout the service. The project also involved collaboration with Health Scotland, signposting for women to contact the appropriate caregiver at the appropriate time. PMID:24386706

  12. Functional autonomic innervation of mammalian cardiac pacemaker during the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Vlk, J; Vincenzi, F F

    1977-01-01

    Sinoatrial node pacemaker tissues from perinatal and adult rabbits, guinea pigs and rats were examined in vitro. Changes in spontaneous pacemaker rate produced by stimulation of intranodal vagal and sympathetic nerve endings, were taken as a measure of functional postganglionic innervation of the pacemaker. Results show marked species differences in the development of functional innervation of the cardiac pacemaker in the perinatal period. PMID:843549

  13. Perinatal Risk Factors and Autism in Los Angeles County: The Role of Air Pollution, Maternal Race/Ethnicity and Nativity

    E-print Network

    Becerra, Tracy Ann

    2013-01-01

    source air pollution impacts: a meta-analysis. BMC Publicon air pollution and I completed the data analysis with herair pollution exposures and autistic disorder, conditional logistic regression analysis

  14. Prenatal Maternal Stress Programs Infant Stress Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Glynn, Laura M.; Waffarn, Feizal; Sandman, Curt A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Prenatal exposure to inappropriate levels of glucocorticoids (GCs) and maternal stress are putative mechanisms for the fetal programming of later health outcomes. The current investigation examined the influence of prenatal maternal cortisol and maternal psychosocial stress on infant physiological and behavioral responses to stress.…

  15. Impact of a Manualized Multifocal Perinatal Home-Visiting Program Using Psychologists on Postnatal Depression: The CAPEDP Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dugravier, Romain; Tubach, Florence; Saias, Thomas; Guedeney, Nicole; Pasquet, Blandine; Purper-Ouakil, Diane; Tereno, Susana; Welniarz, Bertrand; Matos, Joana

    2013-01-01

    Context Postnatal maternal depression (PND) is a significant risk factor for infant mental health. Although often targeted alongside other factors in perinatal home-visiting programs with vulnerable families, little impact on PND has been observed. Objective This study evaluates the impact on PND symptomatology of a multifocal perinatal home-visiting intervention using psychologists in a sample of women presenting risk factors associated with infant mental health difficulties. Methods 440 primiparous women were recruited at their seventh month of pregnancy. All were future first-time mothers, under 26, with at least one of three additional psychosocial risk factors: low educational level, low income, or planning to raise the child without the father. The intervention consisted of intensive multifocal home visits through to the child’s second birthday. The control group received care as usual. PND symptomatology was assessed at baseline and three months after birth using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Results At three months postpartum, mean (SD) EPDS scores were 9.4 (5.4) for the control group and 8.6 (5.4) for the intervention group (p?=?0.18). The difference between the mean EPDS scores was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.35; 1.34). The intervention group had significantly lower EPDS scores than controls in certain subgroups: women with few depressive symptoms at inclusion (EPDS <8): difference?=?1.66 (95%CI: 0.17; 3.15), p?=?0.05, adjusted for baseline EPDS score), women who were planning to raise the child with the child’s father: difference?=?1.45 (95%CI: 0.27; 2.62), p?=?0.04 (adjusted); women with a higher educational level: difference?=?1.59 (95%CI: 0.50; 2.68) p?=?0.05 (adjusted). Conclusion CAPEDP failed to demonstrate an overall impact on PND. However, post-hoc analysis reveals the intervention was effective in terms of primary prevention and in subgroups of women without certain risk factors. Effective overall reduction of PND symptomatology for young, first-time mothers presenting additional psychosocial risk factors may require more tailored interventions. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00392847 Promoting Parental Skills and Enhancing Attachment in Early Childhood (CAPEDP) PMID:23977257

  16. Maternal PUFA ?-3 Supplementation Prevents Neonatal Lung Injuries Induced by Hyperoxia in Newborn Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dyuti; Subayi Nkembi, Armande; Aubry, Estelle; Houeijeh, Ali; Butruille, Laura; Houfflin-Debarge, Véronique; Besson, Rémi; Deruelle, Philippe; Storme, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is one of the most common complications of prematurity, occurring in 30% of very low birth weight infants. The benefits of dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids ?-3 (PUFA ?-3) during pregnancy or the perinatal period have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of maternal PUFA ?-3 supplementation on lung injuries in newborn rats exposed to prolonged hyperoxia. Pregnant female Wistar rats (n = 14) were fed a control diet (n = 2), a PUFA ?-6 diet (n = 6), or a PUFA ?-3 diet (n = 6), starting with the 14th gestation day. At Day 1, female and newborn rats (10 per female) were exposed to hyperoxia (O2, n = 70) or to the ambient air (Air, n = 70). Six groups of newborns rats were obtained: PUFA ?-6/O2 (n = 30), PUFA ?-6/air (n = 30), PUFA ?-3/O2 (n = 30), PUFA ?-3/air (n = 30), control/O2 (n = 10), and control/air (n = 10). After 10 days, lungs were removed for analysis of alveolarization and pulmonary vascular development. Survival rate was 100%. Hyperoxia reduced alveolarization and increased pulmonary vascular wall thickness in both control (n = 20) and PUFA ?-6 groups (n = 60). Maternal PUFA ?-3 supplementation prevented the decrease in alveolarization caused by hyperoxia (n = 30) compared to PUFA ?-6/O2 (n = 30) or to the control/O2 (n = 10), but did not significantly increase the thickness of the lung vascular wall. Therefore, maternal PUFA ?-3 supplementation may protect newborn rats from lung injuries induced by hyperoxia. In clinical settings, maternal PUFA ?-3 supplementation during pregnancy and during lactation may prevent BPD development after premature birth. PMID:26389878

  17. Documentation of guideline adherence in antenatal records across maternal weight categories: a chart review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Documentation in medical records fulfills key functions, including management of care, communication, quality assurance and record keeping. We sought to describe: 1) rates of standard prenatal care as documented in medical charts, and given the higher risks with excess weight, whether this documentation varied among normal weight, overweight and obese women; and 2) adherence to obesity guidelines for obese women as documented in the chart. Methods We conducted a chart review of 300 consecutive charts of women who delivered a live singleton at an academic tertiary centre from January to March 2012, computing Analysis of Variance and Chi Square tests. Results The proportion of completed fields on the mandatory antenatal forms varied from 100% (maternal age) to 52.7% (pre-pregnancy body mass index). Generally, documentation of care was similar across all weight categories for maternal and prenatal genetic screening tests, ranging from 54.0% (documentation of gonorrhea/chlamydia tests) to 85.0% (documentation of anatomy scan). Documentation of education topics varied widely, from fetal movement in almost all charts across all weight categories but discussion of preterm labour in only 20.6%, 12.7% and 13.4% of normal weight, overweight and obese women’s charts (p?=?0.224). Across all weight categories, documentation of discussion of exercise, breastfeeding and pain management occurred in less than a fifth of charts. Conclusion Despite a predominance of excess weight in our region, as well as increasing perinatal risks with increasing maternal weight, weight-related issues and other elements of prenatal care were suboptimally documented across all maternal weight categories, despite an obesity guideline. PMID:24927750

  18. Neuropsychologic outcomes in a case series of twins discordant for perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Talib, Tasneem L; Pongonis, Stephen J; Williams, Linda S; Garg, Bhuwan P; Sokol, Deborah K; Saha, Chandan; Golomb, Meredith R

    2008-02-01

    Perinatal stroke may affect cognitive development, but few studies have addressed the details of cognitive function after perinatal stroke. The present study was designed to compare the neuropsychologic features of five sets of twins discordant for perinatal stroke. All of the affected children had unilateral middle cerebral artery infarction (two left, three right); four of the five infarcts were large-branch, affecting the entire M1 territory. Three of the five affected children had comorbid epilepsy. Measures of intelligence, memory, language, attention, executive function, visual-motor integration, and fine motor skills were administered to children at a median age of 5 years (range, 5-8 years). Relative to their unaffected co-twins, the twins with perinatal stroke exhibited lower levels of full scale (p=0.005), verbal (p=0.006), and nonverbal (p=0.005) intelligence. Children with perinatal stroke also showed significant deficits on tests of verbal memory (p=0.041), receptive language (p=0.011), verbal fluency (p=0.019), and visual attention (p=0.011), compared with their unaffected co-twins. Twin gestation may be a risk factor for poor cognitive outcome after perinatal stroke. Large infarct size and comorbid epilepsy may have contributed to some of the poor cognitive outcomes in this cohort. PMID:18206793

  19. The emotional-behavioural functioning of children exposed to maternal depressive symptoms across pregnancy and early childhood: a prospective Australian pregnancy cohort study.

    PubMed

    Giallo, Rebecca; Woolhouse, Hannah; Gartland, Deirdre; Hiscock, Harriet; Brown, Stephanie

    2015-10-01

    Children exposed to maternal depression during pregnancy and in the postnatal period are at increased risk of a range of health, wellbeing and development problems. However, few studies have examined the course of maternal depressive symptoms in the perinatal period and beyond on children's wellbeing. The present study aimed to explore the relationship between both the severity and chronicity of maternal depressive symptoms across the early childhood period and children's emotional-behavioural difficulties at 4 years of age. Data from over 1,085 mothers and children participating in a large Australian prospective pregnancy cohort were used. Latent class analysis identified three distinct trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms from pregnancy to 4 years postpartum: (1) no or few symptoms (61 %), (2) persistent subclinical symptoms (30 %), and (3) increasing and persistently high symptoms (9 %). Regression analyses revealed that children of mothers experiencing subclinical and increasing and persistently high symptoms were at least two times more likely to have emotional-behavioural difficulties than children of mothers reporting minimal symptoms, even after accounting for known risk factors for poor outcomes for children. These findings challenge policy makers and health professionals to consider how they can tailor care and support to mothers experiencing a broader spectrum of depressive symptoms across the early childhood period, to maximize opportunities to improve both short-and long-term maternal and child health outcomes. PMID:25572869

  20. Maternal and newborn outcomes in Pakistan compared to other low and middle income countries in the Global Network’s Maternal Newborn Health Registry: an active, community-based, pregnancy surveillance mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite global improvements in maternal and newborn health (MNH), maternal, fetal and newborn mortality rates in Pakistan remain stagnant. Using data from the Global Network’s Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR) the objective of this study is to compare the rates of maternal mortality, stillbirth and newborn mortality and levels of putative risk factors between the Pakistani site and those in other countries. Methods Using data collected through a multi-site, prospective, ongoing, active surveillance system to track pregnancies and births in communities in discrete geographical areas in seven sites across six countries including Pakistan, India, Kenya, Zambia, Guatemala and Argentina from 2010 to 2013, the study compared MNH outcomes and risk factors. The MNHR captures more than 60,000 deliveries annually across all sites with over 10,000 of them in Thatta, Pakistan. Results The Pakistan site had a maternal mortality ratio almost three times that of the other sites (313/100,000 vs 116/100,000). Stillbirth (56.5 vs 22.9/1000 births), neonatal mortality (50.0 vs 20.7/1000 livebirths) and perinatal mortality rates (95.2/1000 vs 39.0/1000 births) in Thatta, Pakistan were more than twice those of the other sites. The Pakistani site is the only one in the Global Network where maternal mortality increased (from 231/100,000 to 353/100,000) over the study period and fetal and neonatal outcomes remained stagnant. The Pakistan site lags behind other sites in maternal education, high parity, and appropriate antenatal and postnatal care. However, facility delivery and skilled birth attendance rates were less prominently different between the Pakistani site and other sites, with the exception of India. The difference in the fetal and neonatal outcomes between the Pakistani site and the other sites was most pronounced amongst normal birth weight babies. Conclusions The increase in maternal mortality and the stagnation of fetal and neonatal outcomes from 2010 to 2013 indicates that current levels of antenatal and newborn care interventions in Thatta, Pakistan are insufficient to protect against poor maternal and neonatal outcomes. Delivery care in the Pakistani site, while appearing quantitatively equivalent to the care in sites in Africa, is less effective in saving the lives of women and their newborns. By the metrics available from this study, the quality of obstetric and neonatal care in the site in Pakistan is poor. Trial registration The study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov [NCT01073475]. PMID:26062610

  1. Perinatal Oxidative Stress May Affect Fetal Ghrelin Levels in Humans.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhong-Cheng; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Monique Nuyt, Anne; Fraser, William D; Julien, Pierre; Audibert, Francois; Xiao, Lin; Garofalo, Carole; Levy, Emile

    2015-01-01

    In vitro cell model studies have shown that oxidative stress may affect beta-cell function. It is unknown whether oxidative stress may affect metabolic health in human fetuses/newborns. In a singleton pregnancy cohort (n?=?248), we studied maternal (24-28 weeks gestation) and cord plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress [malondialdehyde (MDA), F2-isoprostanes] in relation to fetal metabolic health biomarkers including cord plasma glucose-to-insulin ratio (an indicator of insulin sensitivity), proinsulin-to-insulin ratio (an indicator of beta-cell function), insulin, IGF-I, IGF-II, leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin concentrations. Strong positive correlations were observed between maternal and cord plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress (r?=?0.33 for MDA, r?=?0.74 for total F2-isoprostanes, all p?maternal (r?=?-0.32, p?maternal and pregnancy characteristics, similar associations were observed. Our study provides the first preliminary evidence suggesting that oxidative stress may affect fetal ghrelin levels in humans. The implications in developmental "programming" the vulnerability to metabolic syndrome related disorders remain to be elucidated. PMID:26643495

  2. Perinatal Oxidative Stress May Affect Fetal Ghrelin Levels in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhong-Cheng; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Monique Nuyt, Anne; Fraser, William D.; Julien, Pierre; Audibert, Francois; Xiao, Lin; Garofalo, Carole; Levy, Emile

    2015-01-01

    In vitro cell model studies have shown that oxidative stress may affect beta-cell function. It is unknown whether oxidative stress may affect metabolic health in human fetuses/newborns. In a singleton pregnancy cohort (n?=?248), we studied maternal (24–28 weeks gestation) and cord plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress [malondialdehyde (MDA), F2-isoprostanes] in relation to fetal metabolic health biomarkers including cord plasma glucose-to-insulin ratio (an indicator of insulin sensitivity), proinsulin-to-insulin ratio (an indicator of beta-cell function), insulin, IGF-I, IGF-II, leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin concentrations. Strong positive correlations were observed between maternal and cord plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress (r?=?0.33 for MDA, r?=?0.74 for total F2-isoprostanes, all p?maternal (r?=??0.32, p?maternal and pregnancy characteristics, similar associations were observed. Our study provides the first preliminary evidence suggesting that oxidative stress may affect fetal ghrelin levels in humans. The implications in developmental “programming” the vulnerability to metabolic syndrome related disorders remain to be elucidated. PMID:26643495

  3. Maternal outcomes of cesarean sections

    PubMed Central

    Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Newbery, Sarah; Kelly, Len; Weaver, Bruce; Wilson, Scott

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare maternal outcomes of cesarean sections performed by GPs with the outcomes of those performed by specialists. DESIGN Retrospective, comorbidity-adjusted study. SETTING Mostly small isolated rural hospitals in Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan compared with all levels of specialist obstetric programs offered in Canada. PARTICIPANTS Fifteen GPs with less than 1 year of surgical training who performed cesarean sections. METHOD Using data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information’s Discharge Abstracts Database for the years 1990 to 2001, we matched each of 1448 cesarean section cases managed by these GPs to 3 cases managed by specialists and looked for comorbidity. In total, we analyzed the outcomes of 5792 cesarean sections. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Composites of major morbidity possibly attributable to surgery:death, sepsis, cardiac arrest, shock, hypotension, ileus or bowel obstruction,major puerperal infection, septic or fat embolism, postpartum hemorrhage requiring hysterectomy, need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or another operation; and all major morbidity: major surgical morbidity, acute coronary syndrome, endocarditis, pulmonary edema, cerebrovascular disorder, pneumothorax, respiratory failure, amniotic fluid embolism, complications of anesthesia, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, acute renal failure, and need for mechanical ventilation. RESULTS The rate of all major morbidity was higher among GPs’ patients than among specialists’ patients (3.1% vs 1.9%, odds ratio [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 to2.3, P = .009) as was the rate of major surgical morbidity (2.5% vs 1.6%, OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.4, P = .024). Differences in major morbidity variables were not significant if major postpartum infection was excluded (all major morbidity 1.5% vs 1.1%, major surgical morbidity 1.0% vs 0.8%). Secondary outcomes included rate of transfer to acute care institutions (6.0% vs 1.5%, OR 4.6, 95% CI 3.6 to 6.5, P < .001), mean length of hospital stay (5.2 vs 4.9 days, P= .006), need for blood transfusion (5.9% vs 7.0%, OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.5 to 1.1, P = .11) and frequency of surgical error (0.8% vs 0.7%, OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.3, P = .72). CONCLUSION Although major morbidity was higher among GPs’ patients, differences were entirely attributable to the rate of postpartum infection. Infection rates in both groups were far below expected rates. The observation that blood transfusion and surgical error rates were similar suggests that surgical technique was not the cause of differences between groups. We conclude that these GPs with a mean of 4 months’ training subsequently performed cesarean sections with an acceptable degree of safety compared with specialists. PMID:18077752

  4. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: an international Delphi consensus process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, ‘Health of Migrants’, the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital Initiative; adaptations of these recommendations specific to maternity care have yet to be elucidated and validated. We aimed to develop a questionnaire measuring migrant-friendly maternity care (MFMC) which could be used in a range of maternity care settings and countries. Methods This study was conducted in four stages. First, questions related to migrant friendly maternity care were identified from existing questionnaires including the Migrant Friendliness Quality Questionnaire, developed in Europe to capture recommended general hospital care for migrants, and the Mothers In a New Country (MINC) Questionnaire, developed in Australia and revised for use in Canada to capture the maternity care experiences of migrant women, and combined to create an initial MFMC questionnaire. Second, a Delphi consensus process in three rounds with a panel of 89 experts in perinatal health and migration from 17 countries was undertaken to identify priority themes and questions as well as to clarify wording and format. Third, the draft questionnaire was translated from English to French and Spanish and back-translated and subsequently culturally validated (assessed for cultural appropriateness) by migrant women. Fourth, the questionnaire was piloted with migrant women who had recently given birth in Montreal, Canada. Results A 112-item questionnaire on maternity care from pregnancy, through labour and birth, to postpartum care, and including items on maternal socio-demographic, migration and obstetrical characteristics, and perceptions of care, has been created - the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) – in three languages (English, French and Spanish). It is completed in 45 minutes via interview administration several months post-birth. Conclusions A 4-stage process of questionnaire development with international experts in migrant reproductive health and research resulted in the MFMCQ, a questionnaire measuring key aspects of migrant-sensitive maternity care. The MFMCQ is available for further translation and use to examine and compare care and perceptions of care within and across countries, and by key socio-demographic, migration, and obstetrical characteristics of migrant women. PMID:24916892

  5. Diagnosis of Fetal Anomaly and the Increased Maternal Psychological Toll Associated with Pregnancy Termination.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Priscilla K

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 4% of U.S. abortions occur in desired pregnancies, with many resulting from fetal anomalies. The majority of terminations occur in the second trimester; however in recent years first-trimester ultrasound measurement for nuchal translucency, calculation of risk based on maternal age, and biochemistry at 11-14 weeks gestation, have resulted in earlier prenatal diagnoses for chromosomal abnormalities. First trimester ultrasound can also now lead to diagnoses of major structural abnormalities including anecephaly, ventral wall defects, and limb abnormalities. The American College of Medical Genetics released recommendations underscoring the crucial importance of ethical counseling and substantive communication with parents facing a prenatal diagnosis of fetal anomaly. Unfortunately, the inability of health care providers to understand and empathize with the ardent desire of some parents to refuse termination is likely to be a large factor in the common practice of professionals attempting to steer expectant parents toward termination. Perinatal hospice is family-centered, comprehensive, and integrative in nature. The care provided by perinatal hospice units is delivered by an interdisciplinary team of obstetricians, pediatricians, nurses, social workers and chaplains in 130 locations throughout the U.S. Support is offered from diagnosis until death and beyond with time for "bonding, loving, and losing." "Hospice care is an interactive, and at times intense, form of care. Rather than simply 'letting nature take its course,' this approach empowers the family to take control of some of the consequences of their unfortunate situation." A primary focus of perinatal hospice is on fear reduction. Parents facing the death of an infant often fear isolation and abandonment in addition to worrying about their child experiencing pain. Parents are assured that they will be cared for and supported throughout this entire chapter of their lives, as their babies are kept comfortable and free of pain until death. The approach is realistic without shattering hope that the diagnosis was wrong or that a miracle will take place as there is recognition that hope keeps parents going. There is also recognition that building memories is essential to the grieving process and frequent use of ultrasound is designed to provide visualization experience. Perinatal hospice teams assist in the development of birth plans, address the type and location of the delivery as well as aftercare of the mother and infant. PMID:26103706

  6. University of Sussex Maternity Guide

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    is designed to help you if you are considering starting or adding to your family, or if you are already expecting a baby. It gives advice on the steps you should take before you start your maternity leave, what in which your baby is expected to be born, beginning on a Sunday. This is important as it is used

  7. Plotting Maternity in Three Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinser, Amber E.

    2012-01-01

    This performance text examines complexities of personal and maternal identity in family life. Speaking in first, second, and third person voices, the author offers autoethnographic accounts of the tensions between separateness and connectedness, normative and subjective motherhood, and novice and seasoned perspectives. The piece functions as a…

  8. 2015-16 SELF-SUPPORTING GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAM FEES Master of Advanced Study in Maternal and Child Nutrition (M.A.S.)

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Yuko

    in Maternal and Child Nutrition (M.A.S.) UCD Budget and Institutional Analysis Prepared on 8/4/2015 Program 2015-16 Student Fees Master of Advanced Study Maternal and Child Nutrition 2-year part-time evening program and Access to Student Services fee. Health insurance is charged separately. Access to Student

  9. 2015-16 PROPOSED SELF-SUPPORTING GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAM FEES Master of Advanced Study -Maternal and Child Nutrition (MAS)

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Yuko

    - Maternal and Child Nutrition (MAS) UCD Budget and Institutional Analysis Prepared on 5/19/2015 Program 2015-16 Proposed Student Fees Master of Advanced Study Maternal and Child Nutrition 2-year part the instructional program and Access to Student Services fee. Health insurance is charged separately. Access

  10. Serum Hsp70 Antigen: Early Diagnosis Marker in Perinatal Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Boskabadi, Hassan; Omidian, Masoud; Tavallai, Shima; Mohammadi, Shabnam; Parizadeh, Mostafa; Ghayour Mobarhan, Majid; Ferns, Gordon AA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perinatal asphyxia is an important cause of mortality and permanent neurological and developmental deficit. Early and accurate diagnosis would help to establish the likely prognosis and may also help in determining the most appropriate treatment. Studies in experimental animal models suggest that a protein called Hsp70 may be a good and potentially useful marker of cellular stress that may be clinically useful in determining the presence of neonatal asphyxia. Objectives: Regarding the importance of early and accurate diagnosis of asphyxia, we conducted this study, which is the first investigation of the comparison of the serum Hsp70 antigen level between asphyxiated and healthy infants. Patients and Methods: In this observational study, the serum concentrations of Hsp70 antigen were compared between neonates suffering from perinatal asphyxia (n = 50) and normal neonates (n = 51). The inclusion criteria for the cases were neonates who had reached term and had at least two clinical criteria of asphyxia. Exclusion criteria were babies with gestational age < 37 weeks, infants with congenital abnormalities or positive blood culture. Exclusion criteria in this group were the requirement to hospital stay during first week of the life or babies whose mothers had difficulties during pregnancy or delivery. Term neonates without major anomalies who had asphyxia during delivery were enrolled in the first six hours after delivery, and control group consisted of healthy term neonates without problems and normal delivery process in the first week of life. The cord blood was taken during labor to measure Hsp70 antigen level by using an in-house ELISA (The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Results: The median values of serum anti Hsp70 titers were significantly higher in asphyxiated neonates compared with non-asphyxiated neonates (0.36 [0.04 - 1.14] vs 0.24 [0.01 - 0.63]). At cutoff point = 0.3125 ng/mL, sensitivity was 58% and specificity 76% based on ROC curve. Conclusions: A significant difference between the serum concentrations of Hsp70 of the control and patient group was observed in this study. It is inferred serum concentrations of Hsp70 antigen may be a useful marker for the early diagnosis of that prenatal hypoxia. PMID:26196004

  11. The true cost of maternal death: individual tragedy impacts family, community and nations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suellen; Belizán, José M

    2015-01-01

    The death of a woman in pregnancy and childbirth is globally considered an individual tragedy and a human rights violation. Given the inequities in death that occur to marginalized, poor, and vulnerable women in low and middle income countries, there is no doubt that maternal death is a horrific injustice. However, the long term global burden of disease goes far beyond this tragedy. Recent research is demonstrating that there are disastrous consequences in infant and child mortality, loss of economic opportunities, spiraling cycles of poverty in the families and communities where women die giving birth. The journal Reproductive Health has published a supplement "The True Cost of Maternal Death," which includes original research from two major study groups. Harvard's Francois-Xavier Bagnoud (FXB) Center for Health and Human Rights conducted a multi-country, mixed methods study of the impact of maternal mortality on newborn health and survival, family functioning, interrupted education and economic degradation in four high maternal mortality countries, Tanzania, South Africa, Malawi, and Ethiopia. A collaborative group from Family Care International (FCI), the International Center of Research on Women (ICRW), and the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI)-Center for Disease Control (CDC)-Research Collaboration conducted research into true costs of maternal death in Kenya. These articles demonstrate the enormous costs that ripple out from the maternal death, and the intergenerational and multi-sectorial disruptions related to maternal mortality. It is important in this period of post-MDG strategy planning period that donors, governments, and NGOs be aware not only of the individual level tragedy of the loss of a mother's life, but also the financial and health costs associated with maternal mortality, and to keep the focus on maternal health as a key issue in all aspects of development, not just health. PMID:26081494

  12. Addressing disparities in maternal health care in Pakistan: gender, class and exclusion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background After more than two decades of the Safe Motherhood Initiative and Millennium Development Goals aimed at reducing maternal mortality, women continue to die in childbirth at unacceptably high rates in Pakistan. While an extensive literature describes various programmatic strategies, it neglects the rigorous analysis of the reasons these strategies have been unsuccessful, especially for women living at the economic and social margins of society. A critical gap in current knowledge is a detailed understanding of the root causes of disparities in maternal health care, and in particular, how gender and class influence policy formulation and the design and delivery of maternal health care services. Taking Pakistan as a case study, this research builds upon two distinct yet interlinked conceptual approaches to understanding the phenomenon of inequity in access to maternal health care: social exclusion and health systems as social institutions. Methods/Design This four year project consists of two interrelated modules that focus on two distinct groups of participants: (1) poor, disadvantaged women and men and (2) policy makers, program managers and health service providers. Module one will employ critical ethnography to understand the key axes of social exclusion as related to gender, class and zaat and how they affect women’s experiences of using maternal health care. Through health care setting observations, interviews and document review, Module two will assess policy design and delivery of maternal health services. Discussion This research will provide theoretical advances to enhance understanding of the power dynamics of gender and class that may underlie poor women’s marginalization from health care systems in Pakistan. It will also provide empirical evidence to support formulation of maternal health care policies and health care system practices aimed at reducing disparities in maternal health care in Pakistan. Lastly, it will enhance inter-disciplinary research capacity in the emerging field of social exclusion and maternal health and help reduce social inequities and achieve the Millennium Development Goal No. 5. PMID:22871056

  13. Prevalence and Predictors of Elevated Aspartate Aminotransferase-to-Platelet Ratio Index in Latin American Perinatally HIV-infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Siberry, George K.; Cohen, Rachel A.; Harris, D. Robert; Cruz, Maria Leticia Santos; Oliveira, Ricardo; Peixoto, Mario F.; Cervi, Maria Celia; Hazra, Rohan; Pinto, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic liver disease has emerged as an important problem in adults with longstanding HIV infection, but data are lacking for children. We characterized elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST)-to-platelet ratio index (APRI ), a marker of possible liver fibrosis, in perinatally HIV-infected children. Methods NISDI [NICHD (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) International Site Development Initiative] enrolled HIV-infected children (ages 0.1-20.1 years) from five Latin American countries in an observational cohort from 2002–2009. Twice yearly visits included medical history, physical examination and laboratory evaluations. The prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]) of APRI>1.5 was calculated and associations with demographic, HIV-related and liver-related variables were investigated in bivariate analyses. Results APRI was available for 1012 of 1032 children. APRI was >1.5 in 32 (3.2%, 95% CI: 2.2%-4.4%) including 2 of 4 participants with hepatitis B (HBV) infection. Factors significantly associated with APRI>1.5 (p<0.01 compared to APRI?1.5) included country, younger age, past or current HBV, higher alanine aminotransferase, lower total cholesterol, higher log10 current viral load, lower current CD4 count, lower nadir CD4 count, use of hepatotoxic non-antiretroviral (ARV) medications, and no prior ARV use. Rates of APRI>1.5 varied significantly by current ARV regimen (p=0.0002), from 8.0% for no ARV to 3.2% for non-protease inhibitor (PI) regimens to 1.5% for PI-based regimens. Conclusions Elevated APRI occurred in approximately 3% of perinatally HIV-infected children. PI-based ARVs appeared protective while inadequate HIV control appeared to increase risk of elevated APRI. Additional investigations are needed to better assess potential subclinical, chronic liver disease in HIV-infected children. PMID:23799515

  14. Maternal-fetal intervention and fetal care centers.

    PubMed

    2011-08-01

    The past 2 decades have yielded profound advances in the fields of prenatal diagnosis and fetal intervention. Although fetal interventions are driven by a beneficence-based motivation to improve fetal and neonatal outcomes, advancement in fetal therapies raises ethical issues surrounding maternal autonomy and decision-making, concepts of innovation versus research, and organizational aspects within institutions in the development of fetal care centers. To safeguard the interests of both the pregnant woman and the fetus, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Academy of Pediatrics make recommendations regarding informed consent, the role of research subject advocates and other independent advocates, the availability of support services, the multidisciplinary nature of fetal intervention teams, the oversight of centers, and the need to accumulate maternal and fetal outcome data. PMID:21788223

  15. Interventions for common perinatal mental disorders in women in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jane; Bower, Peter; Luchters, Stanley; Tran, Thach; Yasamy, M Taghi; Saxena, Shekhar; Waheed, Waquas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve the mental health of women in the perinatal period and to evaluate any effect on the health, growth and development of their offspring, in low- and middle-income (LAMI) countries. Methods Seven electronic bibliographic databases were systematically searched for papers published up to May 2012 describing controlled trials of interventions designed to improve mental health outcomes in women who were pregnant or had recently given birth. The main outcomes of interest were rates of common perinatal mental disorders (CPMDs), primarily postpartum depression or anxiety; measures of the quality of the mother–infant relationship; and measures of infant or child health, growth and cognitive development. Meta-analysis was conducted to obtain a summary measure of the clinical effectiveness of the interventions. Findings Thirteen trials representing 20?092 participants were identified. In all studies, supervised, non-specialist health and community workers delivered the interventions, which proved more beneficial than routine care for both mothers and children. The pooled effect size for maternal depression was ?0.38 (95% confidence interval: ?0.56 to ?0.21; I2?=?79.9%). Where assessed, benefits to the child included improved mother–infant interaction, better cognitive development and growth, reduced diarrhoeal episodes and increased immunization rates. Conclusion In LAMI countries, the burden of CPMDs can be reduced through mental health interventions delivered by supervised non-specialists. Such interventions benefit both women and their children, but further studies are needed to understand how they can be scaled up in the highly diverse settings that exist in LAMI countries. PMID:23940407

  16. A Pilot Study of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Therapy in the Treatment of Perinatal Depression on a Specialized Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Unit

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, Jenna; Greene, Tammy B.; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) therapy may be useful in treating the prominent anxiety features of perinatal depression. We investigated the use of this non-pharmacologic therapy among women hospitalized with severe perinatal depression. Methods Three questionnaires, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (WEMWBS), and Linear Analog Self Assessment (LASA), were administered to fifteen women in a specialized inpatient perinatal psychiatry unit. Participants were also contacted by telephone after discharge to assess continued use of HRVB techniques. Results The use of HRVB was associated with an improvement in all three scales. The greatest improvement (?13.867, p<0.001 and ?11.533, p<0.001) was among STAI scores. A majority (81.9%, n=9) of women surveyed by telephone also reported continued frequent use at least once per week, and over half (54.6%, n=6) described the use of HRVB techniques as very or extremely beneficial. Conclusions The use of HRVB was associated with statistically significant improvement on all instrument scores, the greatest of which was STAI scores, and most women reported frequent continued use of HRVB techniques after discharge. These results suggest that HRVB may be particularly beneficial in the treatment of the prominent anxiety features of perinatal depression, both in inpatient and outpatient settings. PMID:23179141

  17. Maternal exposure to perfluorinated chemicals and reduced fecundity: the MIREC study

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, M.P.; Arbuckle, T.E.; Fraser, W.D.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What is the effect of maternal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perflurooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) on female fecundity? SUMMARY ANSWER Increasing concentrations of PFOA or PFHxS in maternal plasma were associated with reduced fecundability and infertility. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are a group of synthetic compounds used in industrial production. There is a concern about the effect of PFCs on fecundity, as measured by time-to-pregnancy (TTP). Although some recent studies suggest that increasing concentrations of PFCs may decrease fecundity, divergence in the methodological approaches used to evaluate this association have prevented firm conclusions being reached. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study is a cohort study of 2,001 women recruited before 14 weeks of gestation in 10 cities across Canada between 2008 and 2011. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS A questionnaire was administered and medical chart data and biospecimens were collected from participants. After excluding women who withdrew, those for whom data were incomplete, those whose pregnancies followed birth control failure, and accounting for male fertility, 1743 participants remained. TTP was defined as the number of months of unprotected intercourse needed to become pregnant in the current pregnancy, as self-reported in the first trimester of pregnancy. Plasma concentrations of PFOA, PFOS and PFHxS measured in the first trimester were considered as a surrogate of preconception exposure. Fecundability odds ratios (FORs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models for discrete time. FOR < 1 denote a longer TTP and FORs >1 denote a shorter TTP. The odds of infertility (TTP > 12 months or infertility treatment in the index pregnancy) were estimated using logistic regression. Each chemical concentration (ng/ml) was log-transformed and divided by its SD. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The cumulative probabilities of pregnancy at 1, 6 and 12 months were 0.42 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.40–0.45), 0.81 (95% CI 0.79–0.83) and 0.90 (95% CI 0.89–0.92), respectively. The mean maternal age was 32.8 (SD 5.0) years. The geometric means (ng/ml) of PFOA, PFOS and PFHxS were 1.66 (95% CI 1.61–1.71), 4.59 (95% CI 4.46–4.72) and 1.01 (95% CI 0.97–1.05), respectively. After adjustment for potential confounders, PFOA and PFHxS were associated with a 11 and 9% reduction in fecundability per one SD increase (FOR = 0.89; 95% CI 0.83–0.94; P < 0.001 for PFOA and FOR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.86–0.97; P = 0.002 for PFHxS), while no significant association was observed for PFOS (FOR = 0.96; 95% CI 0.91–1.02; P = 0.17). In addition, the odds of infertility increased by 31% per one SD increase of PFOA (odds ratio (OR) = 1.31; 95% CI 1.11–1.53; P = 0.001) and by 27% per one SD increase of PFHxS (OR = 1.27; 95% CI 1.09–1.48; P = 0.003), while no significant association was observed for PFOS (OR = 1.14; 95% CI 0.98–1.34; P = 0.09). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION Women with the highest concentrations of PFCs might have been excluded from the study if there is a causal association with infertility. The MIREC study did not assess concentrations of PFCs in males, semen quality, menstrual cycle characteristics or intercourse frequency. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Our results add to the evidence that exposure to PFOA and PFHxS, even at lower levels than previously reported, may reduce fecundability. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) The MIREC study is supported by the Chemicals Management Plan of Health Canada, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR, grant no. MOP – 81285) and the Ontario Ministry of the Environment. M.P.V. was supported by a CIHR Fellowship Award, and a CIHR-Quebec Training Network in Perinatal Research (QTNPR) Ph.D. scholarship. W.D.F. is supported by a CIHR Canada Research Chair. There are no c

  18. Early Life Exposure to Fructose Alters Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Hepatic Gene Expression and Leads to Sex-Dependent Changes in Lipid Metabolism in Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Zoe E.; Vickers, Mark H.; Bernal, Angelica; Yap, Cassandra; Sloboda, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Fructose consumption is associated with altered hepatic function and metabolic compromise and not surprisingly has become a focus for perinatal studies. We have previously shown that maternal fructose intake results in sex specific changes in fetal, placental and neonatal outcomes. In this follow-up study we investigated effects on maternal, fetal and neonatal hepatic fatty acid metabolism and immune modulation. Methods Pregnant rats were randomised to either control (CON) or high-fructose (FR) diets. Fructose was given in solution and comprised 20% of total caloric intake. Blood and liver samples were collected at embryonic day 21 (E21) and postnatal day (P)10. Maternal liver samples were also collected at E21 and P10. Liver triglyceride and glycogen content was measured with standard assays. Hepatic gene expression was measured with qPCR. Results Maternal fructose intake during pregnancy resulted in maternal hepatic ER stress, hepatocellular injury and increased levels of genes that favour lipogenesis. These changes were associated with a reduction in the NLRP3 inflammasome. Fetuses of mothers fed a high fructose diet displayed increased hepatic fructose transporter and reduced fructokinase mRNA levels and by 10 days of postnatal age, also have hepatic ER stress, and elevated IL1? mRNA levels. At P10, FR neonates demonstrated increased hepatic triglyceride content and particularly in males, associated changes in the expression of genes regulating beta oxidation and the NLRP3 inflammasome. Further, prenatal fructose results in sex-dependant changes in levels of key clock genes. Conclusions Maternal fructose intake results in age and sex-specific alterations in maternal fetal and neonatal free fatty acid metabolism, which may be associated in disruptions in core clock gene machinery. How these changes are associated with hepatic inflammatory processes is still unclear, although suppression of the hepatic inflammasome, as least in mothers and male neonates may point to impaired immune sensing. PMID:26562417

  19. Do Malawian women critically assess the quality of care? A qualitative study on women’s perceptions of perinatal care at a district hospital in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malawi has a high perinatal mortality rate of 40 deaths per 1,000 births. To promote neonatal health, the Government of Malawi has identified essential health care packages for improving maternal and neonatal health in health care facilities. However, regardless of the availability of health services, women’s perceptions of the care is important as it influences whether the women will or will not use the services. In Malawi 95% of pregnant women receive antenatal care from skilled attendants, but the number is reduced to 71% deliveries being conducted by skilled attendants. The objective of this study was to describe women’s perceptions on perinatal care among the women delivered at a district hospital. Methods A descriptive study design with qualitative data collection and analysis methods. Data were collected through face-to-face in-depth interviews using semi-structured interview guides collecting information on women’s perceptions on perinatal care. A total of 14 in depth interviews were conducted with women delivering at Chiradzulu District Hospital from February to March 2011. The women were asked how they perceived the care they received from health workers during antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum. They were also asked about the information they received during provision of care. Data were manually analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Two themes from the study were good care and unsatisfactory care. Subthemes under good care were: respect, confidentiality, privacy and normal delivery. Providers’ attitude, delay in providing care, inadequate care, and unavailability of delivery attendants were subthemes under unsatisfactory care. Conclusions Although the results show that women wanted to be well received at health facilities, respected, treated with kindness, dignity and not shouted at, they were not critical of the care they received. The women did not know the quality of care to expect because they were not well informed. The women were not critical of the care they received because they were not aware of the standard of care. Instead they had low expectations. Health workers have a responsibility to inform women and their families about the care that women should expect. There is also a need for standardization of the antenatal information that is provided. PMID:23158672

  20. Lung eicosanoids in perinatal rats with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Ijsselstijn, H.; Zijlstra, F. J.; Van Dijk, J. P. M.; De Jongste, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Abnormal levels of pulmonary eicosanoids have been reported in infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension (PPH) and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). We hypothesized that a dysbalance of vasoconstrictive and vasodilatory eicosanoids is involved in PPH in CDH patients. The levels of several eicosanoids in lung homogenates and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of controls and rats with CDH were measured after caesarean section or spontaneous birth. In controls the concentration of the stable metabolite of prostacyclin (6-keto-PGF1?), thromboxane A2 (TxB2), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) decreased after spontaneous birth. CDH pups showed respiratory insufficiency directly after birth. Their lungs had higher levels of 6- keto-PGF1?, reflecting the pulmonary vasodilator prostacyclin (PGI2), than those of controls. We conclude that in CDH abnormal lung eicosanoid levels are present perinatally. The elevated levels of 6-keto-PGF1? in CDH may reflect a compensation mechanism for increased vascular resistance. PMID:18472832

  1. Somatosensory evoked potentials and outcome in perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, N A; Graham, M; Levene, M I

    1992-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) can be measured in the term newborn infant and given an index of function in the areas of the brain most likely to be damaged in perinatal asphyxia. We studied the median nerve SEP in 30 asphyxiated term infants over the course of their encephalopathy and until discharge from the neonatal unit. Three types of response were noted: normal waveform, abnormal waveform, or absence of cortical response. Follow up of the survivors was undertaken at a mean age of 12 months by means of a Griffiths' assessment and neurological examination. Nine infants died of their asphyxial illness and one of spinal muscular atrophy. Of the 20 survivors, three have cerebral palsy, four have minor abnormalities, and 13 are neurodevelopmentally normal. There was a close correlation between outcome and SEP. All 13 infants with normal outcome had normal SEP by 4 days of age, whereas those with abnormal or absent responses beyond 4 days had abnormalities at follow up. PMID:1586177

  2. The expression of perinatal depression in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Scorza, Pamela; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Asampong, Emmanuel; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2015-01-01

    In low- and middle-income countries, perinatal depression (PND) has been associated with poor infant health outcomes, including frequency of infant diarrheal episodes, preterm delivery and low birth weight, and discontinuation or problems breastfeeding. Yet little is known about the awareness or expression of PND depression in Ghana. A total of 12 in-depth key-informant interviews were conducted with women who had experienced PND within the previous two-and-a-half years. Three focus-group discussions were conducted with new mothers (n = 11), grandmothers (n = 8), and fathers (n = 9) for contextual and supporting information. ‘Thinking too much’ was the term most commonly used to describe PND. The women saw their distress as caused largely by poverty, lack of social support, and domestic problems. Women sought help through family and religious organizations, rather than through medical services. Problems producing breast milk or breastfeeding were nearly universal complaints and suggest significant effects on infant health in the study area. These results present evidence to support the increasing consensus that depression presents in similar and disabling ways across cultures and contexts. This formative qualitative data is required to tailor depression prevention or treatment interventions to this particular socio-cultural context. PMID:26539247

  3. Sex differential of survival during perinatal period: an immunologic phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Vernier, M C

    1975-04-01

    The sex-differential early neonatal mortality experienced by a population of 27,243 neonates has been analyzed in relation to sex-related reproductive antecedents of their mothers. An association between the risk of dying of a neonate and the sex of previous pregnancies of its mother has been found: the risk decreases with a previous pregnancy of the same sex as the neonate, and increases with one of the opposite sex. Repeated pregnancies of same sex increase the phenomenon. An immunologic hypothesis has been formulated from these results: sex-differential survival of conceptuses during the perinatal period would be due to sex-differential conceptomaternal immunologic interactions. An advantage in survival of the female fetus results from these interactions in primiparous mothers. However, immunologic behavior of the mother is altered by previous contact with fetal antigens. Consequently sex-differential survival varies with sex-related antecedents of the gravida. Previous sensitization of the gravida by male pregnancy provides an advantage in survival for a subsequent male conceptus, and previous sensitization by female pregnancy provides an advantage in survival for a subsequent female conceptus. PMID:1143953

  4. Human Papillomavirus Infections in Nonsexually Active Perinatally HIV Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy. PMID:24460009

  5. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy. PMID:24460009

  6. Anxiety symptoms and coping strategies in the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to explore the prospective relationship between anxiety symptoms and coping strategies during late pregnancy and early postpartum. Methods Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety Depression-Anxiety subscale and Carver’s Brief COPE at two time points, namely during the last trimester of pregnancy (N?=?400) and at two months postpartum (N?=?158). Results Antenatally, 18.8% of pregnant women presented severe anxiety symptoms while 20.2% of women presented severe anxiety symptoms after birth. Carver's proposed coping styles allowed to significantly distinguish between anxious and non anxious women during these two periods. Anxious women used significantly more inappropriate coping and less adaptive coping responses, such as self-blame and denial of reality, which remained associated with anxiety in the perinatal period. Our results also indicated a decrease in adaptive coping in women without anxiety after birth (e.g. acceptance, positive reframing). Conclusion Our findings confirm that antenatal and postnatal anxiety symptoms occur frequently and that inappropriate and/or non functional coping may account for persisting anxiety after childbirth. Limitations: Data were based on self-reports and participating women were predominantly primiparous. A high drop-out rate at two months postpartum must also be acknowledged. PMID:24330429

  7. Impact of Patient and Procedure Mix on Finances of Perinatal Centres – Theoretical Models for Economic Strategies in Perinatal Centres

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, T.; Kraml, F.; Wagner, S.; Hack, C. C.; Thiel, F. C.; Kehl, S.; Winkler, M.; Frobenius, W.; Faschingbauer, F.; Beckmann, M. W.; Lux, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In Germany, cost and revenue structures of hospitals with defined treatment priorities are currently being discussed to identify uneconomic services. This discussion has also affected perinatal centres (PNCs) and represents a new economic challenge for PNCs. In addition to optimising the time spent in hospital, the hospital management needs to define the “best” patient mix based on costs and revenues. Method: Different theoretical models were proposed based on the cost and revenue structures of the University Perinatal Centre for Franconia (UPF). Multi-step marginal costing was then used to show the impact on operating profits of changes in services and bed occupancy rates. The current contribution margin accounting used by the UPF served as the basis for the calculations. The models demonstrated the impact of changes in services on costs and revenues of a level 1 PNC. Results: Contribution margin analysis was used to calculate profitable and unprofitable DRGs based on average inpatient cost per day. Nineteen theoretical models were created. The current direct costing used by the UPF and a theoretical model with a 100?% bed occupancy rate were used as reference models. Significantly higher operating profits could be achieved by doubling the number of profitable DRGs and halving the number of less profitable DRGs. Operating profits could be increased even more by changing the rates of profitable DRGs per bed occupancy. The exclusive specialisation on pathological and high-risk pregnancies resulted in operating losses. All models which increased the numbers of caesarean sections or focused exclusively on c-sections resulted in operating losses. Conclusion: These theoretical models offer a basis for economic planning. They illustrate the enormous impact potential changes can have on the operating profits of PNCs. Level 1 PNCs require high bed occupancy rates and a profitable patient mix to cover the extremely high costs incurred due to the services they are legally required to offer. Based on our theoretical models it must be stated that spontaneous vaginal births (not caesarean sections) were the most profitable procedures in the current DRG system. Overall, it currently makes economic sense for level I PNCs to treat as many low-risk pregnancies and neonates as possible to cover costs. PMID:24771932

  8. Risk of retinoblastoma is associated with a maternal polymorphism in dihydrofolatereductase (DHFR) and pre-natal folic acid intake

    PubMed Central

    Orjuela, MA; Cabrera-Muñoz, L; Paul, L; Ramirez-Ortiz, MA; Liu, X; Chen, J; Mejia-Rodriguez, F; Medina-Sanson, A; Diaz-Carreño, S; Suen, IH; Selhub, J; Ponce-Castañeda, MV

    2012-01-01

    Background Incidence of unilateral retinoblastoma varies globally suggesting possible environmental contributors to disease incidence. Maternal intake of naturally occurring folate from vegetables during pregnancy is inversely associated with risk of retinoblastoma in offspring. Methods Using a case-control study design, we examined the association between retinoblastoma risk and maternal variations in the folate-metabolizing genes, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR677C>T, rs1801133) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR 19base pair deletion of intron 1a [DHFR19bpdel], rs70991108). In central Mexico, we enrolled 103 mothers of children with newly diagnosed unilateral retinoblastoma and 97 control mothers who had healthy children in an IRB approved study. Mothers were interviewed regarding perinatal characteristics including use of prenatal vitamin supplements and gave peripheral blood samples used for PCR-based genotyping of rs1801133 and rs70991108. Results The risk of having a child with unilateral retinoblastoma were associated with maternal homozygosity for DHFR19bpdel (OR=3.78, 95%CI:1.89,7.55; p=0.0002), even after controlling for child’s DHFR19bpdel genotype (OR=2.81, 95%CI:1.32,5.99; p=0.0073). In a subgroup of 167 mothers with data on prenatal intake of supplements containing folic acid (a synthetic form of folate), DHFR19bpdel-associated risk was significantly elevated only among those who reported taking folic acid supplements. Maternal MTHFR genotype was unrelated to risk of having a child with retinoblastoma. Conclusion Maternal homozygosity for a polymorphism in the DHFR gene necessary for converting synthetic folic acid into biological folate is associated with increased risk for retinoblastoma. Prenatal ingestion of synthetic folic acid supplements may be associated with increased risk for early childhood carcinogenesis in a genetically susceptible subset of the population. PMID:22648968

  9. Differential modulation of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene transplacental carcinogenesis: Maternal diets rich in indole-3-carbinol versus sulforaphane

    SciTech Connect

    Shorey, Lyndsey E.; Madeen, Erin P.; Atwell, Lauren L.; Ho, Emily; Löhr, Christiane V.; Pereira, Clifford B.; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Williams, David E.

    2013-07-01

    Cruciferous vegetable components have been documented to exhibit anticancer properties. Targets of action span multiple mechanisms deregulated during cancer progression, ranging from altered carcinogen metabolism to the restoration of epigenetic machinery. Furthermore, the developing fetus is highly susceptible to changes in nutritional status and to environmental toxicants. Thus, we have exploited a mouse model of transplacental carcinogenesis to assess the impact of maternal dietary supplementation on cancer risk in offspring. In this study, transplacental and lactational exposure to a maternal dose of 15 mg/Kg B.W. of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) resulted in significant morbidity of offspring due to an aggressive T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. As in previous studies, indole-3-carbinol (I3C, feed to the dam at 100, 500 or 1000 ppm), derived from cruciferous vegetables, dose-dependently reduced lung tumor multiplicity and also increased offspring survival. Brussels sprout and broccoli sprout powders, selected for their relative abundance of I3C and the bioactive component sulforaphane (SFN), respectively, surprisingly enhanced DBC-induced morbidity and tumorigenesis when incorporated into the maternal diet at 10% wt/wt. Purified SFN, incorporated in the maternal diet at 400 ppm, also decreased the latency of DBC-dependent morbidity. Interestingly, I3C abrogated the effect of SFN when the two purified compounds were administered in equimolar combination (500 ppm I3C and 600 ppm SFN). SFN metabolites measured in the plasma of neonates positively correlated with exposure levels via the maternal diet but not with offspring mortality. These findings provide justification for further study of the safety and bioactivity of cruciferous vegetable phytochemicals at supplemental concentrations during the perinatal period. - Highlights: • Dietary supplementation may modulate cancer risk in a mouse model of lymphoma. • Cruciferous vegetables may not contain sufficient I3C for transplacental protection. • SFN is abundant in cruciferous vegetables and may enhance risk in this model. • SFN and its mercapturic acid metabolites were measurable in neonatal plasma.

  10. Differential modulation of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene transplacental carcinogenesis: maternal diets rich in indole-3-carbinol versus sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Lyndsey E; Madeen, Erin P; Atwell, Lauren L; Ho, Emily; Löhr, Christiane V; Pereira, Clifford B; Dashwood, Roderick H; Williams, David E

    2013-07-01

    Cruciferous vegetable components have been documented to exhibit anticancer properties. Targets of action span multiple mechanisms deregulated during cancer progression, ranging from altered carcinogen metabolism to the restoration of epigenetic machinery. Furthermore, the developing fetus is highly susceptible to changes in nutritional status and to environmental toxicants. Thus, we have exploited a mouse model of transplacental carcinogenesis to assess the impact of maternal dietary supplementation on cancer risk in offspring. In this study, transplacental and lactational exposure to a maternal dose of 15mg/Kg B.W. of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) resulted in significant morbidity of offspring due to an aggressive T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. As in previous studies, indole-3-carbinol (I3C, feed to the dam at 100, 500 or 1000ppm), derived from cruciferous vegetables, dose-dependently reduced lung tumor multiplicity and also increased offspring survival. Brussels sprout and broccoli sprout powders, selected for their relative abundance of I3C and the bioactive component sulforaphane (SFN), respectively, surprisingly enhanced DBC-induced morbidity and tumorigenesis when incorporated into the maternal diet at 10% wt/wt. Purified SFN, incorporated in the maternal diet at 400ppm, also decreased the latency of DBC-dependent morbidity. Interestingly, I3C abrogated the effect of SFN when the two purified compounds were administered in equimolar combination (500ppm I3C and 600ppm SFN). SFN metabolites measured in the plasma of neonates positively correlated with exposure levels via the maternal diet but not with offspring mortality. These findings provide justification for further study of the safety and bioactivity of cruciferous vegetable phytochemicals at supplemental concentrations during the perinatal period. PMID:23566957

  11. Maternal hepatitis B and infant infection among pregnant women living with HIV in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Christopher J; Mashabela, Fildah; Cohn, Silvia; Hoffmann, Jennifer D; Lala, Sanjay; Martinson, Neil A; Chaisson, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Globally, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of liver-related mortality. Newborn vaccination, maternal antiviral therapy and administering hepatitis B immune globulin shortly after birth can greatly reduce the risk of perinatal and infant infection. However, evidence-based policy regarding these interventions in Africa is hampered by gaps in knowledge of HBV epidemiology. We describe maternal chronic hepatitis B (CHB) prevalence and infant infection during the first year of life within a cohort of women living with HIV. Methods We recruited and prospectively followed pregnant women living with HIV and their infants from prenatal clinics in an urban area of South Africa. Hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies and HBV DNA were assessed in all women. Hepatitis B testing was also performed at 6 and 52 weeks for all infants born to mothers with either positive surface antigen or detectable HBV DNA. Results We enrolled 189 women with a median age of 29 years and median CD4 count of 348 cells/mm3. Fourteen had a positive surface antigen (7.4%), of which six were positive for “e” antigen. An additional three had detectable HBV DNA without positive surface antigen. One infant developed CHB and three others had evidence of transmission based on positive HBV DNA assays. HBV vaccinations were delivered at six weeks of life to all infants. Conclusions Our findings highlight the risk of peripartum HBV transmission in this setting. Approaches to reducing this transmission should be considered. PMID:24855985

  12. Association between depression and nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy in pregnant women with perinatally acquired HIV.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Sangini S; Coleman, Jenell; Cannon, Tirza; Milio, Lorraine; Keller, Jean; Anderson, Jean; Argani, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Women with perinatally acquired HIV (PAH) face unique psychosocial challenges due to the presence of a lifelong chronic illness and often unstable living situations. With advances in HIV treatment, an increasing number of those with PAH are reaching childbearing age and becoming pregnant. Depression may be an important and common factor that complicates both treatment and pregnancy outcomes in this group. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in pregnant patients with PAH to determine if history of depression is associated with nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We reviewed charts of women with PAH receiving prenatal care at a single institution from March 1995 to December 2012. ART nonadherence was measured by patient self-report of any missed doses in the third trimester. Demographic, obstetric, and HIV infection characteristics of patients with a history of depression (dPAH) were compared to patients without a history of depression. Nine pregnancies among 6 dPAH women and 14 pregnancies among 12 PAH women without a history of depression were identified. None of the dPAH women reported 100% adherence to ART in the third trimester while 57% of women without a history of depression reported strict adherence (p = 0.04). The mean HIV RNA level at delivery was higher among dPAH women (17,399 vs. 2966 copies/Ml; p = 0.03) and fewer reached an undetectable HIV RNA level (<400 copies/mL) at delivery (p = 0.03). We concluded that a history of depression may contribute to poor medication adherence and treatment outcomes among pregnant women with PAH. Focused attention on diagnosis and treatment of depression in the preconception period may lead to more optimal medication adherence. PMID:25616659

  13. Elevated maternal cortisol leads to relative maternal hyperglycemia and increased stillbirth in ovine pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaodi; Wood, Charles E.; Richards, Elaine; Anthony, Russell V.; Dahl, Geoffrey E.; Tao, Sha

    2014-01-01

    In normal pregnancy, cortisol increases; however, further pathological increases in cortisol are associated with maternal and fetal morbidities. These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that increased maternal cortisol would increase maternal glucose concentrations, suppress fetal growth, and impair neonatal glucose homeostasis. Ewes were infused with cortisol (1 mg·kg?1·day?1) from day 115 of gestation to term; maternal glucose, insulin, ovine placental lactogen, estrone, progesterone, nonesterified free fatty acids (NEFA), ?-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and electrolytes were measured. Infusion of cortisol increased maternal glucose concentration and slowed the glucose disappearance after injection of glucose; maternal infusion of cortisol also increased the incidence of fetal death at or near parturition. The design of the study was altered to terminate the study prior to delivery, and post hoc analysis of the data was performed to test the hypothesis that maternal metabolic factors predict the fetal outcome. In cortisol-infused ewes that had stillborn lambs, plasma insulin was increased relative to control ewes or cortisol-infused ewes with live lambs. Maternal cortisol infusion did not alter maternal food intake or plasma NEFA, BHB, estrone, progesterone or placental lactogen concentrations, and it did not alter fetal body weight, ponderal index, or fetal organ weights. Our study suggests that the adverse effect of elevated maternal cortisol on pregnancy outcome may be related to the effects of cortisol on maternal glucose homeostasis, and that chronic maternal stress or adrenal hypersecretion of cortisol may create fetal pathophysiology paralleling some aspects of maternal gestational diabetes. PMID:24920731

  14. Perinatal distress and depression in Malawi: an exploratory qualitative study of stressors, supports and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert C; Umar, Eric; Gleadow-Ware, Selena; Creed, Francis; Bristow, Katie

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative studies have demonstrated that depression and anxiety in the perinatal period are common amongst women in low- and middle-income countries and are associated with a range of psychosocial and health-related stressors. In this exploratory qualitative study conducted in southern Malawi, we investigated the thoughts and emotions experienced by women in pregnancy and the postnatal period, their expectations of support from husband and others, problems and difficulties faced and the impact of these on psychological wellbeing. We conducted 11 focus group discussions with a total of 98 parous women. A thematic analysis approach was used. Three major themes were identified: pregnancy as a time of uncertainty, the husband (and others) as support and stressor, and the impact of stressors on mental health. Pregnancy was seen as bringing uncertainty about the survival and wellbeing of both mother and unborn child. Poverty, lack of support, HIV, witchcraft and child illness were identified as causes of worry in the perinatal period. Husbands were expected to provide emotional, financial and practical support, with wider family and friends having a lesser role. Infidelity, abuse and abandonment were seen as key stressors in the perinatal period. Exposure to stressors was understood to lead to altered mental states, the symptoms of which are consistent with the concept of common perinatal mental disorder. This study confirms and expands on evidence from quantitative studies and provides formative data for the development of a psychosocial intervention for common perinatal mental disorder in Malawi. PMID:24957779

  15. Reprint of "Cortical Reorganization of Language Functioning Following Perinatal Left MCA Stroke" [Brain and Language 105 (2008) 99-111

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Byars, Anna W.; Jacola, Lisa M.; Schapiro, Mark B.; Schmithorst, Vince J.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Functional MRI was used to determine differences in patterns of cortical activation between children who suffered perinatal left middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and healthy children performing a silent verb generation task. Methods: Ten children with prior perinatal left MCA stroke (age 6-16 years) and ten healthy age matched…

  16. Improving Maternal Survival in South Asia—What Can We Learn from Case Studies?

    PubMed Central

    Koblinsky, Marge

    2009-01-01

    Technical interventions for maternal healthcare are implemented through a dynamic social process. Peoples' behaviours—whether they be planners, managers, providers, or potential users—influence the outcomes. Given the complexity and unpredictability inherent in such dynamic processes, the proposed cause-and-effect relationships in any one context cannot be directly transferred to another. While this is true of all health services, its importance is magnified in maternal healthcare because of the need to involve multiple levels of the health system, multiple types of care providers from the highly skilled specialist to community-level volunteers, and multiple technical interventions, without the ability to measure significant change in the outcome, the maternal mortality ratio. Patterns can be followed however, in terms of outcomes in response to interventions. From these case studies of implementation of maternal health programmes across five states of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, some patterns stand out and seem to apply virtually everywhere (e.g. failure of systems to post staff in difficult areas) while others require more data to understand the observed patterns (e.g. response to financial incentives for improving maternal health systems; instituting available accessible safe blood). The patterns formed can provide guidance to programme managers as to what aspects of the process to track and micro-manage, to policy-makers as to what features of a context may particularly influence impacts of alternative maternal health strategies, and to governments more broadly as to the factors shaping dynamic responses that might themselves warrant intervention. PMID:19489409

  17. How Home Enrichment Mediates the Relationship between Maternal Education and Children's Achievement in Reading and Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zadeh, Zohreh Yaghoub; Farnia, Fataneh; Ungerleider, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: This article addresses the mediating role of early childhood home enrichment in the association between maternal education and academic achievement in the reading and math of 1,093 children aged 7 (Grade 1). Data were extracted from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development database. We used the bootstrapping…

  18. Early Childhood Anxious Solitude and Subsequent Peer Relationships: Maternal and Cognitive Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazelle, Heidi; Spangler, Tamara

    2007-01-01

    It was hypothesized that the relation between early anxious solitude and subsequent peer relations would be moderated by early relational (maternal sensitivity) and individual factors (child school readiness). Participants were 1364 children from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Study of Early Child Care and Youth…

  19. Maternal Employment and Child Cognitive Outcomes: The Importance of Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchinal, Margaret R.; Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison

    2007-01-01

    J. Brooks-Gunn, W. J. Han, and J. Waldfogel (2002) and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Early Child Care Research Network (ECCRN; 2000b) came to different conclusions about the effects of maternal employment--although they were addressing similar questions using the same data set. Brooks-Gunn et al. concluded that…

  20. Feminism, Ecofeminism, and the Maternal Archetype: Motherhood as a Feminine Universal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stearney, Lynn M.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that evoking the maternal archetype as a unifying principle to motivate the protection and sustenance of the environment confounds womanhood with motherhood, and fails to honor the complexity of motherhood as an ideologically and socially constructed institution. Maintains that a gender-neutral metaphor may more effectively serve both the…

  1. Perinatal features of the RASopathies: Noonan syndrome, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome and Costello syndrome.

    PubMed

    Myers, Angela; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Brennan, Marie-Luise; Curry, Cynthia; Esplin, Edward D; Fisher, Jamie; Homeyer, Margaret; Manning, Melanie A; Muller, Eric A; Niemi, Anna-Kaisa; Seaver, Laurie H; Hintz, Susan R; Hudgins, Louanne

    2014-11-01

    The RASopathies are a family of developmental disorders caused by heritable defects of the RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. While the postnatal presentation of this group of disorders is well known, the prenatal and neonatal findings are less widely recognized. We report on the perinatal presentation of 10 patients with Noonan syndrome (NS), nine with Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFCS) and three with Costello syndrome (CS), in conjunction with the results of a comprehensive literature review. The majority of perinatal findings in NS, CS, and CFCS are shared: polyhydramnios; prematurity; lymphatic dysplasia; macrosomia; relative macrocephaly; respiratory distress; hypotonia, as well as cardiac and renal anomalies. In contrast, fetal arrhythmia and neonatal hypoglycemia are relatively specific to CS. NS, CS, and CFCS should all be considered as a possible diagnosis in pregnancies with a normal karyotype and ultrasound findings of a RASopathy. Recognition of the common perinatal findings of these disorders should facilitate both their prenatal and neonatal diagnosis. PMID:25250515

  2. Obstetric and perinatal outcome in 200 infants conceived from vitrified oocytes.

    PubMed

    Chian, Ri-Cheng; Huang, Jack Y J; Tan, Seang Lin; Lucena, Elkin; Saa, Angela; Rojas, Alejandro; Ruvalcaba Castellón, Luis Arturo; García Amador, Martha Isolina; Montoya Sarmiento, Jorge Eduardo

    2008-05-01

    Cryopreservation of oocytes by vitrification is a promising new technique for assisted human reproduction. Any new technical development must be accompanied with data concerning obstetric and perinatal outcome. This study analysed the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in 165 pregnancies and 200 infants conceived following oocyte vitrification cycles in three assisted reproduction centres. The results indicate that the mean birth weight and the incidence of congenital anomalies are comparable to that of spontaneous conceptions in fertile women or infertile women undergoing in-vitro fertilization treatment. These preliminary findings may provide reassuring evidence that pregnancies and infants conceived following oocyte vitrification are not associated with increased risk of adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes. PMID:18492361

  3. Maternal hyperventilation and foetal hypocapnia in sheep.

    PubMed

    Baillie, P; Dawes, G S; Merlet, C L; Richards, R

    1971-11-01

    1. In anaesthetized foetal lambs near term, hypocapnia induced by maternal hyperventilation abolished the rise of arterial pressure and femoral vasoconstriction caused by hypoxaemia. This is consistent with interaction of P(CO2) and P(O2) on the foetal aortic bodies.2. In immature lambs (0.6-0.77 of term) maternal hyperventilation caused a fall in foetal carotid P(CO2) commensurate with that in the maternal blood. In mature lambs (at 0.9 or more of term) the fall in foetal carotid P(CO2) was less than that in maternal blood, whether the foetus was exteriorized or in utero.3. The mean transplacental gradient for P(CO2) (maternal arterial-umbilical vascular), when the foetus was replaced with a mechanical pump recirculating foetal blood, was 6.3 mm Hg. This is attributed to placental CO(2) production, and is nearly half the mean P(CO2) gradient (maternal artery-foetal carotid) of about 14 mm Hg during normal maternal ventilation.4. The mean maternal-umbilical transcotyledonary venous gradients (avoiding vascular shunts through the myometrium and intercotyledonary chorion) were for P(CO2) 1.7 mm Hg and for P(O2) 13.4 mm Hg.5. Maternal hyperventilation (P(a, CO2) approximately 20 mm Hg) caused a small fall in mean foetal carotid P(O2) (5 mm Hg), which was readily reversible with no evidence of progressive acidaemia. PMID:5133951

  4. Neonatal body water turnover: a putative index of perinatal morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    MacLennan, A.H.; Millington, G.; Grieve, A.; McIntosh, J.E.; Seamark, R.F.; Cox, L.W.

    1981-04-15

    The water metabolism of 46 newborn babies was determined during a 10 day period by means of an isotope dilution technique, and correlations were sought with the clinical assessment of the babies by multiple obstetric and pediatric clinical criteria. The babies, 48 to 72 hours of age, were given a single oral dose (2 ml/kg) of deuterated water (D/sub 2/O), a nonradioactive tracer, and the urinary excretion rate was followed by means of infrared spectrophotometry. After a period of equilibration of the D/sub 2/O with body water (20 hours), the rate of D2O clearance was found to be a single exponential decay process, thus allowing the fraction of total body water lost each hour (the rate constant) to be calculated for each baby. The median values of the rate constants X 10(4)(h-1) for 14 growth-retarded babies ws 104 (98% confidence limits, 97.8 to 122) compared with 76.3 (67.0 to 80.2) for 16 normal mature babies and 82.1 (73.4 to 90.6) for 16 normal premature babies. These data indicate that, compared with normal mature or normal premature babies, growth-retarded infants have a significantly (P less than 0.05) faster turnover of water during the first 10 days of postnatal life. Since there was little overlap in results between the normally grown and the retarded infants, the measurement of water turnover may provide a useful index of perinatal morbidity.

  5. Hemodynamic and Metabolic Correlates of Perinatal White Matter Injury Severity

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Art; Maire, Jennifer; Cai, Victor; Nguyen, Thuan; Gong, Xi; Hansen, Kelly; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Hohimer, A. Roger; Back, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the spectrum of perinatal white matter injury (WMI) in preterm infants is shifting from cystic encephalomalacia to milder forms of WMI, the factors that contribute to this changing spectrum are unclear. We hypothesized that the variability in WMI quantified by immunohistochemical markers of inflammation could be correlated with the severity of impaired blood oxygen, glucose and lactate. Methods We employed a preterm fetal sheep model of in utero moderate hypoxemia and global severe but not complete cerebral ischemia that reproduces the spectrum of human WMI. Since there is small but measurable residual brain blood flow during occlusion, we sought to determine if the metabolic state of the residual arterial blood was associated with severity of WMI. Near the conclusion of hypoxia-ischemia, we recorded cephalic arterial blood pressure, blood oxygen, glucose and lactate levels. To define the spectrum of WMI, an ordinal WMI rating scale was compared against an unbiased quantitative image analysis protocol that provided continuous histo-pathological outcome measures for astrogliosis and microgliosis derived from the entire white matter. Results A spectrum of WMI was observed that ranged from diffuse non-necrotic lesions to more severe injury that comprised discrete foci of microscopic or macroscopic necrosis. Residual arterial pressure, oxygen content and blood glucose displayed a significant inverse association with WMI and lactate concentrations were directly related. Elevated glucose levels were the most significantly associated with less severe WMI. Conclusions Our results suggest that under conditions of hypoxemia and severe cephalic hypotension, WMI severity measured using unbiased immunohistochemical measurements correlated with several physiologic parameters, including glucose, which may be a useful marker of fetal response to hypoxia or provide protection against energy failure and more severe WMI. PMID:24416093

  6. Default Mode Connectivity in Youth With Perinatally Acquired HIV

    PubMed Central

    Herting, Megan M.; Uban, Kristina A.; Williams, Paige L.; Gautam, Prapti; Huo, Yanling; Malee, Kathleen; Yogev, Ram; Csernansky, John; Wang, Lei; Nichols, Sharon; Van Dyke, Russell; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Youth with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus (PHIV+) survive longer with combination antiretroviral therapy, but remain at risk for poor cognitive outcomes. We evaluated whether markers of HIV disease severity relate to default mode resting-state functional connectivity in PHIV+ youth. We conducted resting-state functional neuroimaging and cognitive testing in a subset of 40 PHIV+ youth recruited from a single study site of the Adolescent Master Protocol study conducted by the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) network. Current and past HIV disease severity measures (nadir CD4 lymphocyte percentages and peak HIV RNA plasma levels) were obtained from medical charts. We evaluated associations of both HIV disease severity measures and cognitive functioning with between- and within- default mode network (DMN) connectivity using Analysis of Functional NeuroImaging multiple regression analyses, controlling for multiple comparisons. Of the 40 youth, 31 (mean age?=?16.5 years) with minimal motion during scans were included. We observed global alterations in DMN within- and between-network connectivity, with significant associations between disease severity and DMN BOLD correlations. Furthermore, patterns of connectivity with the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that varied as a function of peak HIV RNA were found to predict processing speed ability. Alterations in within- and between-network DMN connectivity in PHIV+ youth may reflect global reorganization of the DMN; this could lead to compensatory alterations in both the within- and between-connectivity of large-scale networks, which may ultimately relate to known cognitive processing difficulties in PHIV+ youth. PMID:26376381

  7. Evidence from Maternity Leave Expansions of the Impact of Maternal Care on Early Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; Milligan, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    We study the impact of maternal care on early child development using an expansion in Canadian maternity leave entitlements. Following the leave expansion, mothers who took leave spent 48-58 percent more time not working in their children's first year of life. This extra maternal care primarily crowded out home-based care by unlicensed…

  8. Maternal and Child Anxiety: Do Attachment Beliefs or Children's Perceptions of Maternal Control Mediate Their Association?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Natalie M.; Weems, Carl F.

    2005-01-01

    This study tested a model of the association between maternal and child anxiety that views mother and child attachment beliefs and children's perceptions of maternal control as mediators of the association. The study was conducted with mothers and their children aged 6 to 17 (N = 88). Maternal anxiety was significantly associated with child…

  9. Maternal Psychiatric Disorders, Parenting, and Maternal Behavior in the Home during the Child Rearing Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Patricia; Kasen, Stephanie; Brook, Judith S.

    2006-01-01

    Data from the Children in the Community Study, a community-based longitudinal study, were used to investigate associations between maternal psychiatric disorders and child-rearing behaviors. Maternal psychiatric symptoms and behavior in the home were assessed in 782 families during the childhood and adolescence of the offspring. Maternal anxiety,…

  10. Concurrent determination of bisphenol A pharmacokinetics in maternal and fetal rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Tucker A.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Roegge, Cindy S.; Callicott, Ralph J.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used as the monomer for polycarbonate plastic and in epoxy resins for food can liners. Worldwide biomonitoring studies consistently find a high prevalence of BPA conjugates in urine (> 90%) in amounts consistent with aggregate exposure at levels below 1 ?g/kg bw/d. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure concurrently the pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) deuterated BPA (d6) in maternal and fetal rhesus monkey serum, amniotic fluid, and placenta following intravenous injection in the dam (100 ?g/kg bw). Internal exposures of the fetus to aglycone d6-BPA (serum AUC) were attenuated by maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism to less than half that in the dam. Levels of aglycone and conjugated d6-BPA measured in whole placenta were consistent with a role in metabolic detoxification. The monotonic elimination of aglycone d6-BPA from the fetal compartment accompanied by persistent conjugate levels provides further evidence arguing against the hypothesis that BPA conjugates are selectively deconjugated by either the placenta or fetus. These results also provide benchmarks to guide the interpretation of human cord blood, amniotic fluid, and placenta sampling and measurement strategies as a basis for estimating fetal exposures to BPA. This study in a non-human primate model provides additional pharmacokinetic data for use in PBPK modeling of perinatal exposures to BPA from food contact, medical devices, and other environmental sources. - Highlights: ? Maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism attenuate fetal exposure to BPA. ? Serum AUC for aglycone BPA in fetal monkeys is less than half of that in the dam. ? BPA profiles in monkey fetus rule out selective deconjugation and accumulation. ? BPA levels in monkey placenta are similar to other metabolically active tissues. ? Some published human cord blood data for BPA are inconsistent with these measurements.

  11. Mouse early extra-embryonic lineages activate compensatory endocytosis in response to poor maternal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congshan; Velazquez, Miguel A; Marfy-Smith, Stephanie; Sheth, Bhavwanti; Cox, Andy; Johnston, David A; Smyth, Neil; Fleming, Tom P

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian extra-embryonic lineages perform the crucial role of nutrient provision during gestation to support embryonic and fetal growth. These lineages derive from outer trophectoderm (TE) and internal primitive endoderm (PE) in the blastocyst and subsequently give rise to chorio-allantoic and visceral yolk sac placentae, respectively. We have shown maternal low protein diet exclusively during mouse preimplantation development (Emb-LPD) is sufficient to cause a compensatory increase in fetal and perinatal growth that correlates positively with increased adult-onset cardiovascular, metabolic and behavioural disease. Here, to investigate early mechanisms of compensatory nutrient provision, we assessed the influence of maternal Emb-LPD on endocytosis within extra-embryonic lineages using quantitative imaging and expression of markers and proteins involved. Blastocysts collected from Emb-LPD mothers within standard culture medium displayed enhanced TE endocytosis compared with embryos from control mothers with respect to the number and collective volume per cell of vesicles with endocytosed ligand and fluid and lysosomes, plus protein expression of megalin (Lrp2) LDL-family receptor. Endocytosis was also stimulated using similar criteria in the outer PE-like lineage of embryoid bodies formed from embryonic stem cell lines generated from Emb-LPD blastocysts. Using an in vitro model replicating the depleted amino acid (AA) composition found within the Emb-LPD uterine luminal fluid, we show TE endocytosis response is activated through reduced branched-chain AAs (leucine, isoleucine, valine). Moreover, activation appears mediated through RhoA GTPase signalling. Our data indicate early embryos regulate and stabilise endocytosis as a mechanism to compensate for poor maternal nutrient provision. PMID:24504338

  12. Using ‘appreciative inquiry’ in India to improve infection control practices in maternity care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bharati; Ramani, K.V.; Mavalankar, Dileep; Kanguru, Lovney; Hussein, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections acquired during childbirth are a common cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Changing provider behaviour and organisational settings within the health system is key to reducing the spread of infection. Objective To explore the opinions of health personnel on health system factors related to infection control and their perceptions of change in a sample of hospital maternity units. Design An organisational change process called ‘appreciative inquiry’ (AI) was introduced in three maternity units of hospitals in Gujarat, India. AI is a change process that builds on recognition of positive actions, behaviours, and attitudes. In-depth interviews were conducted with health personnel to elicit information on the environment within which they work, including physical and organisational factors, motivation, awareness, practices, perceptions of their role, and other health system factors related to infection control activities. Data were obtained from three hospitals which implemented AI and another three not involved in the intervention. Results Challenges which emerged included management processes (e.g. decision-making and problem-solving modalities), human resource shortages, and physical infrastructure (e.g. space, water, and electricity supplies). AI was perceived as having a positive influence on infection control practices. Respondents also said that management processes improved although some hospitals had already undergone an accreditation process which could have influenced the changes described. Participants reported that team relationships had been strengthened due to AI. Conclusion Technical knowledge is often emphasised in health care settings and less attention is paid to factors such as team relationships, leadership, and problem solving. AI can contribute to improving infection control by catalysing and creating forums for team building, shared decision making and problem solving in an enabling environment. PMID:26119249

  13. Determinants of Maternal Near-Miss in Morocco: Too Late, Too Far, Too Sloppy?

    PubMed Central

    Assarag, Bouchra; Dujardin, Bruno; Delamou, Alexandre; Meski, Fatima-Zahra; De Brouwere, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Background In Morocco, there is little information on the circumstances surrounding maternal near misses. This study aimed to determine the incidence, characteristics, and determinants of maternal near misses in Morocco. Method A prospective case-control study was conducted at 3 referral maternity hospitals in the Marrakech region of Morocco between February and July 2012. Near-miss cases included severe hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, and prolonged obstructed labor. Three unmatched controls were selected for each near-miss case. Three categories of risk factors (sociodemographics, reproductive history, and delays), as well as perinatal outcomes, were assessed, and bivariate and multivariate analyses of the determinants were performed. A sample of 30 near misses and 30 non-near misses was interviewed. Results The incidence of near misses was 12‰ of births. Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy (45%) and severe hemorrhage (39%) were the most frequent direct causes of near miss. The main risk factors were illiteracy [OR = 2.35; 95% CI: (1.07–5.15)], lack of antenatal care [OR = 3.97; 95% CI: (1.42–11.09)], complications during pregnancy [OR = 2.81; 95% CI:(1.26–6.29)], and having experienced a first phase delay [OR = 8.71; 95% CI: (3.97–19.12)] and a first phase of third delay [OR = 4.03; 95% CI: (1.75–9.25)]. The main reasons for the first delay were lack of a family authority figure who could make a decision, lack of sufficient financial resources, lack of a vehicle, and fear of health facilities. The majority of near misses demonstrated a third delay with many referrals. The women’s perceptions of the quality of their care highlighted the importance of information, good communication, and attitude. Conclusion Women and newborns with serious obstetric complications have a greater chance of successful outcomes if they are immediately directed to a functioning referral hospital and if the providers are responsive. PMID:25612095

  14. In Search of Neural Endophenotypes of Postpartum Psychopathology and Disrupted Maternal Caregiving

    PubMed Central

    Moses-Kolko, E. L.; Horner, M. S.; Phillips, M. L.; Hipwell, A. E.; Swain, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    This is a selective review that provides the context for the study of perinatal affective disorder mechanisms and outlines directions for future research. We integrate existing literature along neural networks of interest for affective disorders and maternal caregiving: (i) the salience/fear network; (ii) the executive network; (iii) the reward/social attachment network; and (iv) the default mode network. Extant salience/fear network research reveals disparate responses and corticolimbic coupling to various stimuli based upon a predominantly depressive versus anxious (post-traumatic stress disorder) clinical phenotype. Executive network and default mode connectivity abnormalities have been described in postpartum depression (PPD), although studies are very limited in these domains. Reward/social attachment studies confirm a robust ventral striatal response to infant stimuli, including cry and happy infant faces, which is diminished in depressed, insecurely attached and substance-using mothers. The adverse parenting experiences received and the attachment insecurity of current mothers are factors that are associated with a diminution in infant stimulus-related neural activity similar to that in PPD, and raise the need for additional studies that integrate mood and attachment concepts in larger study samples. Several studies examining functional connectivity in resting state and emotional activation functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigms have revealed attenuated corticolimbic connectivity, which remains an important outcome that requires dissection with increasing precision to better define neural treatment targets. Methodological progress is expected in the coming years in terms of refining clinical phenotypes of interest and experimental paradigms, as well as enlarging samples to facilitate the examination of multiple constructs. Functional imaging promises to determine neural mechanisms underlying maternal psychopathology and impaired caregiving, such that earlier and more precise detection of abnormalities will be possible. Ultimately, the discovery of such mechanisms will promote the refinement of treatment approaches toward maternal affective disturbance, parenting behaviours and the augmentation of parenting resiliency. PMID:25059408

  15. Applying the new concept of maternal near-miss in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Lotufo, Fátima Aparecida; Parpinelli, Mary Angela; Haddad, Samira Maerrawi; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Cecatti, Jose Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The World Health Organization has recommended investigating near-misses as a benchmark practice for monitoring maternal healthcare and has standardized the criteria for diagnosis. We aimed to study maternal morbidity and mortality among women admitted to a general intensive care unit during pregnancy or in the postpartum period, using the new World Health Organization criteria. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 158 cases of severe maternal morbidity were classified according to their outcomes: death, maternal near-miss, and potentially life-threatening conditions. The health indicators for obstetrical care were calculated. A bivariate analysis was performed using the Chi-square test with Yate's correction or Fisher's exact test. A multiple regression analysis was used to calculate the crude and adjusted odds ratios, together with their respective 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Among the 158 admissions, 5 deaths, 43 cases of maternal near-miss, and 110 cases of potentially life-threatening conditions occurred. The near-miss rate was 4.4 cases per 1,000 live births. The near-miss/death ratio was 8.6 near-misses for each maternal death, and the overall mortality index was 10.4%. Hypertensive syndromes were the main cause of admission (67.7% of the cases, 107/158); however, hemorrhage, mainly due to uterine atony and ectopic pregnancy complications, was the main cause of maternal near-misses and deaths (17/43 cases of near-miss and 2/5 deaths). CONCLUSIONS: Hypertension was the main cause of admission and of potentially life-threatening conditions; however, hemorrhage was the main cause of maternal near-misses and deaths at this institution, suggesting that delays may occur in implementing appropriate obstetrical care. PMID:22473402

  16. Lactating Rats Retain Nursing Behavior and Maternal Care in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, Megan E.; Ronca, April E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, suckling mammals were flown in space for the first time as part of the NIH.R3 experiment sponsored jointly by NIH (National Institutes of Health) and NASA. Six rat dams and litters (Rattus norvegicus) were launched on an eight-day Space Shuttle mission at each of three postnatal ages (P5, P8, and P15). Dams and litters (N = 10 pups/litter) were housed within modified Animal Enclosure Modules (AEMs). Comparisons were made to ground controls. Dams and litters were videotaped daily in flight. The P8 and P15 flight litters showed excellent survival (99%) and weight gain relative to AEM ground controls, whereas P5 litters showed reduced survival (0% and 60%, respectively) and weight gain (less than 40% AEM). To examine the possibility that failures of maternal care contributed to P5 results, we analyzed the dams' in-flight nursing, licking and retrieving from four video segments ranging from twelve to fifteen minutes in length with control data derived from multiple ground segments. Video analyses revealed clear evidence of maternal care in flight. For P5 dams, frequency and duration of nursing and licking bouts fell within or above one standard deviation of control values. Retrieving was noted in the P5 and P8 groups only. The observed results suggest that factors other than maternal care contributed to the low survival rates and body weight gains of the P5 flight offspring.

  17. Altered Ultrasonic Vocalization and Impaired Learning and Memory in Angelman Syndrome Mouse Model with a Large Maternal Deletion from Ube3a to Gabrb3

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yong-hui; Pan, Yanzhen; Zhu, Li; Landa, Luis; Yoo, Jong; Spencer, Corinne; Lorenzo, Isabel; Brilliant, Murray; Noebels, Jeffrey; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2010-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurobehavioral disorder associated with mental retardation, absence of language development, characteristic electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities and epilepsy, happy disposition, movement or balance disorders, and autistic behaviors. The molecular defects underlying AS are heterogeneous, including large maternal deletions of chromosome 15q11–q13 (70%), paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15 (5%), imprinting mutations (rare), and mutations in the E6-AP ubiquitin ligase gene UBE3A (15%). Although patients with UBE3A mutations have a wide spectrum of neurological phenotypes, their features are usually milder than AS patients with deletions of 15q11–q13. Using a chromosomal engineering strategy, we generated mutant mice with a 1.6-Mb chromosomal deletion from Ube3a to Gabrb3, which inactivated the Ube3a and Gabrb3 genes and deleted the Atp10a gene. Homozygous deletion mutant mice died in the perinatal period due to a cleft palate resulting from the null mutation in Gabrb3 gene. Mice with a maternal deletion (m?/p+) were viable and did not have any obvious developmental defects. Expression analysis of the maternal and paternal deletion mice confirmed that the Ube3a gene is maternally expressed in brain, and showed that the Atp10a and Gabrb3 genes are biallelically expressed in all brain sub-regions studied. Maternal (m?/p+), but not paternal (m+/p?), deletion mice had increased spontaneous seizure activity and abnormal EEG. Extensive behavioral analyses revealed significant impairment in motor function, learning and memory tasks, and anxiety-related measures assayed in the light-dark box in maternal deletion but not paternal deletion mice. Ultrasonic vocalization (USV) recording in newborns revealed that maternal deletion pups emitted significantly more USVs than wild-type littermates. The increased USV in maternal deletion mice suggests abnormal signaling behavior between mothers and pups that may reflect abnormal communication behaviors in human AS patients. Thus, mutant mice with a maternal deletion from Ube3a to Gabrb3 provide an AS mouse model that is molecularly more similar to the contiguous gene deletion form of AS in humans than mice with Ube3a mutation alone. These mice will be valuable for future comparative studies to mice with maternal deficiency of Ube3a alone. PMID:20808828

  18. A perinatal hospice for an unborn child with a life-limiting condition.

    PubMed

    Ramer-Chrastek, Joan; Thygeson, Megan V

    2005-06-01

    Perinatal hospice is a newly developing model of hospice care, offered to the family in the prenatal period, which provides support, guidance and comfort to families who make the difficult choice to continue a pregnancy after the diagnosis of a fatal fetal anomaly. The model is based on the hospice philosophy of living life fully and enjoying each moment. This article describes a perinatal hospice programme that is currently in place at a hospice home care programme of a children's hospital in the USA. It includes a case example of one family's experience of this programme. PMID:16010223

  19. [Post-mortem perinatal imaging: State of the art and perspectives, with an emphasis on ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sarda-Quarello, L; Tuchtan, L; Bartoli, C; Bourlière-Najean, B; Petit, P; Sigaudy, S; Piercecchi-Marti, M-D; Gorincour, G

    2015-09-01

    The fields of application of post-mortem imaging have been exponentially growing for 10 years. Its potential to identify the cause of death in trauma and ballistic cases is now properly documented. In pediatric and perinatal practice, large significant series are less available, except for MRI and central nervous system analysis where scientific evidence is now robust. After a short historical and state-of-the-art review, we will try to depict the way we see the future of this sub-specialty of post-mortem imaging, especially in specific perinatal situations. PMID:26297165

  20. Parent and family impact of raising a child with perinatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Perinatal stroke is a leading cause of early brain injury, cerebral palsy, and lifelong neurological morbidity. No study to date has examined the impact of raising a child with perinatal stroke on parents and families. However, a large breadth of research suggests that parents, especially mothers, may be at increased risk for psychological concerns. The primary aim of this study was to examine the impact of raising a child with perinatal stroke on mothers’ wellbeing. A secondary aim was to examine how caring for a child with perinatal stroke differentially affects mothers and fathers. Methods In Study I, a matched case-control design was used to compare the wellbeing of mothers of children with perinatal stroke and mothers of children with typical development. In Study II, a matched case-control design was used to compare mother-father dyads. Participants completed validated measures of anxiety and depression, stress, quality of life and family functioning, marital satisfaction, and marital distress. Parents of children with perinatal stroke also completed a recently validated measure of the psychosocial impact of perinatal stroke including guilt and blame outcomes. Disease severity was categorized by parents, validated by the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure (PSOM), and compared across the above outcomes in Study I. Results A total of 112 mothers participated in Study I (n?=?56 per group; mean child age?=?7.42 years), and 56 parents participated in Study II (n?=?28 per group; mean child age?=?8.25 years). In Study I, parent assessment of disease severity was correlated with PSOM scores (??=?0.75, p?perinatal stroke adapt well, mothers of children with moderate/severe conditions appear to be at higher risk for psychological concerns. PMID:25018138

  1. Maternal depression screening during prenatal and postpartum care at a Navy and Marine Corps military treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Spooner, Shawn; Rastle, Marsha; Elmore, Kelly

    2012-10-01

    Maternal depression in the prenatal and postpartum periods is an important concern for women, infants, and families. Military family life may create some unique stressors, including operational deployment of an active duty husband, which increase perinatal depression challenges for women. This study examined depression screening scores, based on a modified Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale, among women receiving obstetric care at a military hospital serving a Navy and Marine Corps community. Among 3,882 surveys collected between 2007 and 2009 from women at various points in their prenatal or postpartum care, the proportion with scores indicative of high risk for clinical depression was relatively low at 4.6%. However, scores were significantly higher at the initial obstetric visit among women who reported their husband as currently deployed, and scores were significantly higher at the postpartum visit among women who reported their husband as currently deployed or planning to deploy. These results underscore the importance of evaluating all aspects of the military family life experience when providing perinatal care to women in military families. PMID:23113449

  2. Triplet pregnancy: is the mode of conception related to perinatal outcomes?

    PubMed

    Fennessy, Kristy M; Doyle, Lex W; Naud, Kentia; Reidy, Karen; Umstad, Mark P

    2015-06-01

    Many triplets are conceived as a consequence of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Concerns have been raised that triplet pregnancies conceived by ART are more complicated than those conceived spontaneously. The purpose of this study was to evaluate all triplet pregnancies managed over a 12-year period to determine if there were any differences in outcome based on the mode of conception. All triplet pregnancies between 1999 and 2011 that reached at least 20 weeks' gestation and that were managed at the Royal Women's Hospital (RWH), Melbourne, Victoria were identified. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared between ART conceived and spontaneously conceived triplets. In the study period, 53 sets of triplets managed in our institution met the eligibility criteria. Twenty-five triplet sets were conceived by ART and 28 were conceived spontaneously. More ART conceptions resulted in trichorionic triamniotic (TCTA) triplets than did spontaneous conceptions (p = .015). There were no differences between ART and spontaneously conceived triplets for any of the maternal or neonatal complications studied. Trichorionic (TC) triplets delivered at a later gestation than other triplets: 32.1 (SD 2.9) versus 30.4 (SD 3.9) weeks (p = .08). TC triplets were significantly less likely to die than monochorionic (MC) or dichorionic (DC) triplets: 3/93 (3%) versus 13/66 (20%) (p = .025). In conclusion, triplets conceived by ART are more likely to have TCTA placentation and TCTA triplet sets had lower mortality rates than other triplet combinations. Outcomes for triplets conceived by ART were similar to those of triplets conceived spontaneously. PMID:25926295

  3. Critical maternal health knowledge gaps in low- and middle-income countries for the post-2015 era.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Tamil; Langer, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Effective interventions to promote maternal health and address obstetric complications exist, however 800 women die every day during pregnancy and childbirth from largely preventable causes and more than 90% of these deaths occur in low and middle income countries (LMIC). In 2014, the Maternal Health Task Force consulted 26 global maternal health researchers to identify persistent and critical knowledge gaps to be filled to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality and improve maternal health. The vision of maternal health articulated was comprehensive and priorities for knowledge generation encompassed improving the availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of institutional labor and delivery services and other effective interventions, such as contraception and safe abortion services. Respondents emphasized the need for health systems research to identify models that can deliver what is known to be effective to prevent and treat the main causes of maternal death at scale in different contexts and to sustain coverage and quality over time. Researchers also emphasized the development of tools to measure quality of care and promote ongoing quality improvement at the facility, district, and national level. Knowledge generation to improve distribution and retention of healthcare workers, facilitate task shifting, develop and evaluate training models to improve "hands-on" skills and promote evidence-based practice, and increase managerial capacity at different levels of the health system were also prioritized. Interviewees noted that attitudes, behavior, and power relationships between health professionals and within institutions must be transformed to achieve coverage of high-quality maternal health services in LMIC. The increasing burden of non-communicable diseases, urbanization, and the persistence of social and economic inequality were identified as emerging challenges that require knowledge generation to improve health system responses and evaluate progress. Respondents emphasized evaluating effectiveness, feasibility, and equity impacts of health system interventions. A prominent role for implementation science, evidence for policy advocacy, and interdisciplinary collaboration were identified as critical areas for knowledge generation to improve maternal health in the post-2015 era. PMID:26044755

  4. 75 FR 54158 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ...National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to...National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Obstetrics and Maternal-Fetal Biology Subcommittee. Date:...

  5. Framing maternal morbidity: WHO scoping exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal morbidity estimations are not based on well-documented methodologies and thus have limited validity for informing efforts to address the issue and improve maternal health. To fill this gap, maternal morbidity needs to be clearly defined, driving the development of tools and indicators to measure and monitor maternal health. This article describes the scoping exercise conducted by the World Health Organization’s Department of Reproductive of Health and Research (WHO/RHR), as an essential first step in this process. Methods A literature review was conducted to identify the range of definitions and conditions included in various studies of maternal morbidity with a special focus on the similarities and discrepancies of the definitions used across the studies. Furthermore a questionnaire was developed which included sections on key areas identified during the review and was sent out electronically to 130 international experts in the field of maternal health. Results Maternal morbidities have been categorized in a variety of ways based on the causes, types of complications, and/or timeline. Issues regarding the time frame, severity, identification and classification and demographics were identified as key areas in the literature that require further investigation to achieve consensus on a maternal morbidity definition. Fifty-five (N?=?55) individuals responded with completed questionnaires. Respondents’ views on the time frame for the postpartum period varied from 6 weeks to beyond one year postpartum, it was noted that time frame depended on the type of complication. The majority of respondents said maternal morbidity should comprise a continuum of severity, whereas the identification of the cases should use a mixed criteria employing multiple methods. Conclusions Significant discrepancy in literature and expert opinion exists concerning elements of a maternal morbidity definition. There is a clear need for a concrete definition that would allow for consistent measurement and monitoring of maternal morbidity across settings and time. PMID:24252359

  6. Marathon Maternity Oral History Project

    PubMed Central

    Orkin, Aaron; Newbery, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore how birthing and maternity care are understood and valued in a rural community. Design Oral history research. Setting The rural community of Marathon, Ont, with a population of approximately 3500. Participants A purposive selection of mothers, grandmothers, nurses, physicians, and community leaders in the Marathon medical catchment area. Methods Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample, employing an oral history research methodology. Interviews were conducted non-anonymously in order to preserve the identity and personhood of participants. Interview transcripts were edited into short narratives. Oral histories offer perspectives and information not revealed in other quantitative or qualitative research methodologies. Narratives re-personalize and humanize medical research by offering researchers and practitioners the opportunity to bear witness to the personal stories affected through medical decision making. Main findings Eleven stand-alone narratives, published in this issue of Canadian Family Physician, form the project’s findings. Similar to a literary text or short story, they are intended for personal reflection and interpretation by the reader. Presenting the results of these interviews as narratives requires the reader to participate in the research exercise and take part in listening to these women’s voices. The project’s narratives will be accessible to readers from academic and non-academic backgrounds and will interest readers in medicine and allied health professions, medical humanities, community development, gender studies, social anthropology and history, and literature. Conclusion Sharing personal birthing experiences might inspire others to reevaluate and reconsider birthing practices and services in other communities. Where local maternity services are under threat, Marathon’s stories might contribute to understanding the meaning and challenges of local birthing, and the implications of losing maternity services in rural Canada. PMID:24452565

  7. Maternal Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chebbo, Ahmad; Tan, Susanna; Kassis, Christelle; Tamura, Leslie; Carlson, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The year 2015 marked the 200th anniversary of the birth of Ignaz Semmelweis, the Hungarian physician who identified unhygienic practices of physicians as a major cause of childbed fever or puerperal sepsis. Although such practices have largely disappeared as a factor in the development of chorioamnionitis and postpartum or puerperal endometritis, it is appropriate that this article on sepsis in pregnancy acknowledges his contributions to maternal health. This review describes the incidence and mortality of sepsis in pregnancy, methods to identify and define sepsis in this population, including scoring systems, causes, and sites of infection during pregnancy and parturition and management guidelines. PMID:26600449

  8. Paternal Factors and Inequity Associated with Access to Maternal Health Care Service Utilization in Nepal: A Community Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatta, Dharma Nand; Aryal, Umesh Raj

    2015-01-01

    Background The threat of maternal mortality can be reduced by increasing use of maternal health services. Maternal death and access to maternal health care services are inequitable in low and middle income countries.The aim of this study is to assess associated paternal factors and degree of inequity in access to maternal health care service utilization. Methods Analysis illustrates on a cross-sectional household survey that followed multistage-cluster sampling. Concentration curve and indices were calculated. Binary logistic regression analysis was executed to account paternal factors associated with the utilization of maternal health services. Path model with structural equation modeling (SEM) examined the predictors of antenatal care (ANC) and institutional delivery. Results The finding of this study revealed that 39.9% and 45.5% of the respondents’ wives made ANC visits and utilized institutional delivery services respectively. Men with graduate and higher level of education were more likely (AOR: 5.91, 95% CI; 4.02, 8.70) to have ANC of their wives than men with no education or primary level of education. Men with higher household income (Q5) were more likely (1.99, 95% CI; 1.39, 2.86) to have ANC for their wives. Similarly, higher household income (Q5) also determined (2.74, 95% CI; 1.81, 4.15) for institutional delivery of their wives. Concentration curve and indices also favored rich than the poor. SEM revealed that ANC visit was directly associated to institutional delivery. Conclusions Paternal factors like age, household wealth, number of children, ethnicity, education, knowledge of danger sign during pregnancy, and husband’s decision making for seeking maternal and child health care are crucial factors associated to maternal health service utilization. Higher ANC coverage predicts higher utilization of the institutional delivery. Wealthier population is more concentrated to maternal health services. The inequities between the poor and the rich are necessary to be addressed through effective policy and programs. PMID:26107621

  9. Putting the "M" back in the Maternal and Child Health Bureau: reducing maternal mortality and morbidity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Michael C; Highsmith, Keisher; de la Cruz, David; Atrash, Hani K

    2015-07-01

    Maternal mortality and severe morbidity are on the rise in the United States. A significant proportion of these events are preventable. The Maternal Health Initiative (MHI), coordinated by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau at the Health Resources and Services Administration, is intensifying efforts to reduce maternal mortality and severe morbidity in the U.S. Through a public-private partnership, MHI is taking a comprehensive approach to improving maternal health focusing on five priority areas: improving women's health before, during and beyond pregnancy; improving the quality and safety of maternity care; improving systems of maternity care including both clinical and public health systems; improving public awareness and education; and improving surveillance and research. PMID:25626713

  10. NATIONAL MATERNAL AND INFANT HEALTH SURVEY (NMIHS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Maternal and Infant Health Survey (NMIHS) provides data on maternal and infant health, including prenatal care, birth weight, fetal loss, and infant mortality. The objective of the NMIHS is to collect data needed by Federal, State, and private researchers to study fa...

  11. Significance of maternal periodontal health in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Khushboo; Desai, Parth; Duseja, Shilpa; Kumar, Santosh; Mahendra, Jaideep; Duseja, Sareen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present case–control study was to evaluate the association between maternal periodontitis and preeclampsia. Association studies between maternal periodontitis and elevated risk for preeclampsia have shown conflicting results. Periodontal maintenance is necessary to reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes like preeclampsia. Materials and Methods: Periodontal parameters [bleeding on probing, probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL)] of 1320 women were assessed, followed by retrieval of their demographic and medical data from the medical records. Based on the medical records, 80 women were excluded from the study, leaving 1240 females as the eligible sample for the study. The women were divided into control group (1120 non-preeclamptic women who gave birth to infants with adequate gestational age) and case group (120 preeclamptic women). Logistic regression analysis revealed that primiparity and maternal periodontitis were the two significant variables causing preeclampsia. Further analysis was carried out by matching the two groups for primiparity to find the significance of maternal periodontitis. Maternal periodontitis was defined as PD ?4 mm and CAL ?3 mm at the same site in at least four teeth. Results: The results showed that maternal periodontitis (odds ratio 19.8) was associated with preeclampsia. Maternal periodontitis also remained associated with preeclampsia after matching for primiparity, which was another significant confounding factor in the study (odds ratio 9.33). Conclusion: Maternal periodontitis is a risk factor associated with preeclampsia, emphasizing the importance of periodontal care in prenatal programs. PMID:25992334

  12. Maternal Depression and Childhood Health Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turney, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    An increasing body of literature documents considerable inequalities in the health of young children in the United States, though maternal depression is one important, yet often overlooked, determinant of children's health. In this article, the author uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 4,048) and finds that maternal

  13. Infant Communicative Behaviors and Maternal Responsiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Cynthia F.; Onwujuba, Chinwe; Baumgartner, Jennifer I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study applies attachment and transactional theories in evaluating the dyadic interactions observed between a mother and her infant. Infant communication and maternal responsivity are highlighted as the medium for positive interaction. Objective: The impact of individualized maternal training on mother infant communicative…

  14. Listeria monocytogenes Traffics from Maternal Organs

    E-print Network

    Bakardjiev, Anna

    Listeria monocytogenes Traffics from Maternal Organs to the Placenta and Back Anna I. Bakardjiev1 the role of trafficking between maternal organs and placenta in a pregnant guinea pig model of listeriosis to placenta was 103 ­104 :1. Rapid increase of bacteria in the placenta changed the ratio to 1:1 after 24 h

  15. Infant and Maternal Sensitivity to Interpersonal Timing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Anne; Striano, Tricia

    2011-01-01

    A perturbation paradigm was employed to assess 3- and 6-month-old infants' and their mothers' sensitivity to a 3-s temporal delay implemented in an ongoing televised interaction. At both ages, the temporal delay affected infant but not maternal behavior and only when implementing the temporal delay in maternal (Experiment 1, N = 64) but not infant…

  16. Autism Symptom Topography and Maternal Socioemotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekas, Naomi; Whitman, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers examining the relationship of autism "symptomatology" and maternal stress have defined symptomatology in terms of level of severity, frequency of occurrence, or symptom type. In the present study, the relationship of maternal perceptions of these dimensions, along with a fourth, symptom diversity, and negative and positive indices of…

  17. Adherence to Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Prevention Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Goins, William P.; Talbot, Thomas R.; Schaffner, William; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Craig, Allen S.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Van Dyke, Melissa K.; Griffin, Marie R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate compliance with the 2002 revised perinatal group B streptococci (GBS) prevention guidelines in Tennessee, which recommend universal GBS screening of pregnant women at 35–37 weeks of gestation and, when indicated, administration of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis. METHODS Active Bacterial Core surveillance conducts active, population-based surveillance for invasive GBS disease in 11 Tennessee counties. A retrospective case–cohort study was conducted using a stratified random sample of all live births in surveillance hospitals during 2003–2004, including all early-onset GBS cases. Factors associated with GBS screening and lack of optimal GBS chemoprophylaxis were analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS Screening was performed for 84.7% of pregnant women, but 26.3% of prenatal tests with documented test dates were performed before 35 weeks of gestation. Among women with an indication for GBS prophylaxis, 61.2% received optimal chemoprophylaxis, defined as initiation of a recommended antibiotic 4 hours or more before delivery. When the analysis was restricted to women who were admitted 4 hours or more before delivery, 70.9% received optimal chemoprophylaxis. Women not receiving optimal chemoprophylaxis were more likely to have penicillin allergy (11.7% compared with 2.5%, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 8.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.57–47.04) or preterm delivery (45.5% compared with 13.2%, adjusted OR 5.52, 95% CI 2.29–13.30) and were less likely to have received the recommended prenatal serologic testing for other infectious diseases (77.9% compared with 91.1%, adjusted OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.09–0.98). Forty cases of early-onset GBS were identified (0.36 per 1,000 live births); 25% of these neonates were born to women who received screening at 35 weeks of gestation or later and, when indicated, optimal chemoprophylaxis. CONCLUSION Universal prenatal GBS screening was implemented widely in Tennessee, although the timing of screening and administration of chemoprophylaxis often were not optimal. A substantial burden of early-onset GBS disease occurs despite optimal prenatal screening and chemoprophylaxis, suggesting that alternative strategies, such as vaccination, are needed. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE II PMID:20502293

  18. Maternal occupation and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Savitz, D A; Olshan, A F; Gallagher, K

    1996-05-01

    Few studies have addressed the effect of maternal employment on late pregnancy outcomes. The National Maternal and Infant Health Survey, a probability sample of U.S. livebirths, stillbirths, and infant deaths in 1988, provided an opportunity to evaluate mothers' jobs in relation to preterm delivery, very low birthweight ( < 1,500 gm), moderately low birthweight (1,500-2,499 gm), small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth, stillbirth, and infant death. We aggregated mothers' jobs, which were ascertained by mailed questionnaire or telephone interview, into categories for analysis. We considered jobs held at any time during pregnancy and jobs held during the fifth month of pregnancy. Relative to the referent group of clerks, textile workers had adjusted odds ratios of 1.5 or greater for all outcomes, with elevated risks also found sporadically for food service workers (preterm delivery, SGA birth, stillbirth) and electrical equipment operators (all outcomes except for still-birth and infant death). Janitors had elevated adjusted odds ratios of 2.0 or greater for preterm delivery and stillbirth. Relative to clerks, teachers and librarians tended to have reduced risks for adverse outcomes. PMID:8728440

  19. Plasma vitamin D is associated with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR in young adult males, but not females, of the Jerusalem Perinatal Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy; Hochner, Hagit; Sitlani, Colleen M; Williams, Michelle A; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; de Boer, Ian H; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Siscovick, David S; Friedlander, Yechiel; Enquobahrie, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine cross-sectional relationships between plasma vitamin D and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in young adults. Design Data were collected from interviews, physical examinations, and biomarker measurements. Total plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) was measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Associations between 25[OH]D and CMR were modeled using weighted linear regression with robust standard error estimates. Setting Individuals born in Jerusalem during 1974-1976. Subjects Participants of the Jerusalem Perinatal Study (n = 1,204) interviewed and examined at age 32 years. Participants were oversampled for low and high birthweight and for maternal pre-pregnancy obesity. Results Mean total 25[OH]D concentration among participants was 21.7 ng/mL (SD 8.9). Among males, 25[OH]D was associated with Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) (natural log-transformed, ? = -0.011, p = 0.004) after adjustment for body mass index. However, these associations were not present among females (p for sex interaction = 0.005). Conclusions We found evidence for inverse associations of 25[OH]D with markers of insulin resistance among males, but not females, in a health, young adult Caucasian population. Prospective studies and studies conducted on other populations investigating sex specific effects of vitamin D on CMR are warranted. PMID:25145881

  20. Early pregnancy maternal serum PAPP-A and urinary protein-creatinine ratio as predictive markers of pregnancy induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, B; Fatema, N; Jebunnessa, F; Shamim, S; Chowdhury, S B; Ali, L

    2010-04-01

    Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) is a major complication of pregnancy and is associated with high maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible causal association of PIH with maternal serum PAPP-A and urinary protein-creatinine ratio (UPCr) as well as to evaluate the usefulness of these two variables as predictive markers of PIH. A total 200 women of 8-16 weeks of pregnancy were enrolled in this study. All the patients were followed up till delivery for the development of pregnancy induced hypertension. Thirty patients were lost in the follow up, 3(1.76%) developed preeclampsia (PE) and 14(8.23%) gestational hypertension (GH). By a nested case-control design the 17 pregnancy induced hypertension cases were compared with 48 Controls with normal pregnancy outcome. Maternal serum PAPP-A was significantly lower in the pregnancy induced hypertension group compared to Control [mIU/ml, median (range) 1.8(0.70-4.1) vs. 5.45(2.7-10), p<0.001]. UPCr was significantly higher in the pregnancy induced hypertension group compared to Control (mg/mmol, mean+/-SD, 6.86+/-1.56 vs. 4.75+/-0.96, p<0.001). When tested as a predictive marker of pregnancy induced hypertension the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of maternal serum PAPP-A in the lowest 25th percentile were 82%, 95%, 87% and 93%. At 75th percentile the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of UPCr were 52%, 85%, 56% and 83% respectively. PMID:20395925

  1. Prenatal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Risk Factors for Specific Language Impairment: A Prospective Pregnancy Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Shelton, W. M. R.; Ing, Caleb; Newnham, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although genetic factors are known to play a causal role in specific language impairment (SLI), environmental factors may also be important. This study examined whether there are prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal factors that are associated with childhood SLI. Method: Participants were members of the Raine Study, a prospective cohort…

  2. Perinatal exposure to methoxychlor enhances adult cognitive responses and hippocampal neurogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Mariangela; Calandreau, Ludovic; Jouhanneau, Mélanie; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Keller, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    During perinatal life, sex steroids, such as estradiol, have marked effects on the development and function of the nervous system. Environmental estrogens or xenoestrogens are man-made chemicals, which animal and human population encounter in the environment and which are able to disrupt the functioning of the endocrine system. Scientific interest in the effects of exposure to xenoestrogens has focused more on fertility and reproductive behaviors, while the effects on cognitive behaviors have received less attention. Therefore, the present study explored whether the organochlorine insecticide Methoxychlor (MXC), with known xenoestrogens properties, administered during the perinatal period (from gestational day 11 to postnatal day 8) to pregnant-lactating females, at an environmentally relevant dose (20 µg/kg (body weight)/day), would also affect learning and memory functions depending on the hippocampus of male and female offspring mice in adulthood. When tested in adulthood, MXC perinatal exposure led to an increase in anxiety-like behavior and in short-term spatial working memory in both sexes. Emotional learning was also assessed using a contextual fear paradigm and MXC treated male and female mice showed an enhanced freezing behavior compared to controls. These results were correlated with an increased survival of adult generated cells in the adult hippocampus. In conclusion, our results show that perinatal exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of MXC has an organizational effect on hippocampus-dependent memory and emotional behaviors. PMID:24982620

  3. PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO THE PESTICIDE HEPTACHLOR PRODUCES ALTERATIONS IN IMMUNE FUNCTION PARAMETERS IN SPRAGUE DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO THE PESTICIDE HEPTACHLOR PRODUCES ALTERATIONS IN IMMUNE FUNCTION PARAMETERS IN SPRAGUE DAWLEY RATS. R A Matulka1, AA Rooney3, W Williams2, CB Copeland2, and R J Smialowicz2. 1Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2US EPA, ITB, ETD, NHEERL, RT...

  4. Barriers to Medication Adherence in Behaviorally and Perinatally Infected Youth Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Huszti, Heather; Belzer, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    The study explored barriers to antiretroviral medication adherence in perinatally and behaviorally HIV infected adolescents and young adults in a cross-sectional, multisite sample. The study included a subset of a convenience sample from a cross-sectional analysis. Participants were youth with HIV ages 12–24 who were prescribed HIV medication and reported missing medication in the past 7 days (n = 484, 28.4 % of protocol sample). The top barriers were similar for perinatally and behaviorally infected youth, but perinatally infected youth reported significantly more barriers. Forgetting, not feeling like taking medication and not wanting to be reminded of HIV infection were the most common barriers reported. Number of barriers was significantly correlated with percent of doses missed, viral load, and psychological distress for perinatally infected youth and with doses missed, psychological distress, and substance use for behaviorally infected youth. Interventions to improve adherence to HIV medications should not only address forgetfulness and choosing not to take medications, but also consider route of infection. PMID:23142855

  5. Plasticity in the Developing Brain: Intellectual, Language and Academic Functions in Children with Ischaemic Perinatal Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantyne, Angela O.; Spilkin, Amy M.; Hesselink, John; Trauner, Doris A.

    2008-01-01

    The developing brain has the capacity for a great deal of plasticity. A number of investigators have demonstrated that intellectual and language skills may be in the normal range in children following unilateral perinatal stroke. Questions have been raised, however, about whether these skills can be maintained at the same level as the brain…

  6. [The principles of the combined rehabilitation of patients with perinatal encephalopathy and its sequelae].

    PubMed

    Mukhamedzhanov, N Z; Kurbanova, D U; Tashkhodzhaeva, Sh I

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive examination was made of 548 patients suffering from perinatal encephalopathy or from its aftereffects. The analysis covers aftercare measures: reflex therapy, physiobalneotherapy, exercise, massage, logopedic aid, auriculotherapy with introduction of cerebrolysin or lidase into the lobule of the ear. The efficacy of the treatment was assessed at echoencephaloscopy and other procedures. PMID:1315467

  7. Factors Associated with the Academic Achievement of Perinatally HIV-Infected Elementary and Middle School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Walter L.

    2004-01-01

    It is well documented that perinatally HIV-infected children experience difficulty in learning as well as behavioral and social problems in the school setting. While the research is mixed on the effect of the HIV virus on behavioral and social problems, it is much clearer on the effect of this virus on learning. This exploratory study identifies…

  8. HIV-1 Encephalopathy among Perinatally Infected Children: Neuropathogenesis and Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 encephalopathy among perinatally infected children in the United States was initially defined by a classic triad of findings that included: (1) developmental delay, (2) secondary or acquired microcephaly, and (3) pyramidal tract neuromotor deficits. The most severe form of this disorder typically occurred among young children who developed…

  9. Sexual and Drug Use Behavior in Perinatal HIV-Infected Youth: Mental Health and Family Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellins, Claude A.; Elkington, Katherine S.; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Dolezal, Curtis; McKay, Mary; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2009-01-01

    A study found that youth and caregiver mental health problem have greater impact than key environmental factors and family functioning on sex and drug use risk behaviors in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (PHIV+) and PHIV- youths. No differences in the rates of sexual risk behavior and substance use were observed between…

  10. Sexual Behavior and Perceived Peer Norms: Comparing Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Affected Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauermeister, Jose A.; Elkington, Katherine; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Dolezal, Curtis; Mellins, Claude Ann

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children are becoming adolescents and exploring their sexuality. This study explored the prevalence of sexual behaviors (kissing, touching, engaging in oral sex, or having vaginal/anal intercourse) in a sample of predominantly ethnic minority youths (N = 339; 54.1% Black and 30.4% Latino; 51%…

  11. Current Principles and Practice of Ethics and Law in Perinatal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    BERCEANU, C.; ALBU, SIMONA ELENA; BO?, MIHAELA; GHELASE, M.?T.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most controversial discussion topics in modern bioethics, science or philosophy is represented by the beginning of the individual human life. It is ethically, medically and scientifically correct that the human conception product to be born, so to gain personality and individuality, to be treated as a patient since the intrauterine life. Intrauterine foetal interventions, performed in various therapeutic purposes are still in the experimental stage even in centres with rich experience in perinatal medicine. Progresses truly outstanding are present especially in the prenatal diagnostic methods. Non invasive prenatal testing represents without a doubt a great progress in prenatal diagnosis, but from this point of view, the role of practitioners in the field of perinatal medicine, on counselling and addressing the indication of this test becomes essential. Beyond cultural, national, social or related differences, in perinatal medicine practice is particularly important to respect and permanently reassess the ethical codes. Our paper is targeting to spotlight the essential principles and practice of ethics and law in perinatal medicine nowadays on one hand, and to bring an update review on a controversial topic on the other hand. PMID:25729600

  12. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein Antagonist Noggin Protects White Matter After Perinatal Hypoxia-ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dizon, Maria L.V.; Maa, Tensing; Kessler, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in the neonate leads to white matter injury and subsequently cerebral palsy. We find that expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) increases in the neonatal mouse brain after unilateral common carotid artery ligation followed by hypoxia. Since signaling by the BMP family of factors is a potent inhibitor of oligodendroglial differentiation, we tested the hypothesis that antagonism of BMP signaling would prevent loss of oligodendroglia (OL) and white matter in a mouse model of perinatal HI. Perinatal HI was induced in transgenic mice in which the BMP antagonist noggin is overexpressed during oligodendrogenesis (pNSE-Noggin). Following perinatal HI, pNSE-Noggin mice had more oligodendroglial progenitor cells (OPCs) and more mature OL compared to wild type (WT) animals. The increase in OPC numbers did not result from proliferation but rather from increased differentiation from precursor cells. Immunofluorescence studies showed preservation of white matter in lesioned pNSE-Noggin mice compared to lesioned WT animals. Further, following perinatal HI, the pNSE-Noggin mice were protected from gait deficits. Together these findings indicate that the BMP-inhibitor noggin protects from HI-induced loss of oligodendroglial lineage cells and white matter as well as loss of motor function. PMID:21310236

  13. PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES IN RELATION TO DRINKING WATER ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN BAMEN, INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes in Relation to Drinking Water Arsenic Exposure in BaMen, Inner Mongolia, China
    Danelle T. Lobdell, Zhixiong Ning, Richard K. Kwok, Judy Mumford, Zhi Yi Liu, Pauline Mendola

    Introduction: Close to 40 million people worldwide are exposed t...

  14. Measuring Grief Following Miscarriage: Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Perinatal Grief Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Beatrice P. Y.; Chung, Tony K. H.; Lee, Dominic T. S.; Kong, Grace W. S.; Lok, Ingrid H.

    2013-01-01

    Grief following miscarriage is a complex psychological response. This study was conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS). A total of 280 Chinese women completed the PGS immediately following a diagnosis of miscarriage (baseline) and were reassessed at 12 months follow-up. The factor…

  15. Stress and Grief of a Perinatal Loss: Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Volker; Striegel, Phil

    1995-01-01

    Examined how parents grieve loss of a baby through miscarriage or stillbirth. Interviewed 26 couples 2 weeks after a perinatal loss. Ethnographic content analysis revealed 12 themes closely related to resources, meaning of the stressful event, and coping strategies, all of which are elements, of Hill's ABC-X stress model. (JBJ)

  16. Perinatal White Matter Injury: The Changing Spectrum of Pathology and Emerging Insights into Pathogenetic Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Stephen A.

    2006-01-01

    Perinatal brain injury in survivors of premature birth has a unique and unexplained predilection for periventricular cerebral white matter. Periventricular white-matter injury (PWMI) is now the most common cause of brain injury in preterm infants and the leading cause of chronic neurological morbidity. The spectrum of chronic PWMI includes focal…

  17. Narrowly versus Broadly Defined Autism Spectrum Disorders: Differences in Pre-and Perinatal Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Janne C.; Rommelse, Nanda; Vink, Lianne; Schrieken, Margo; Oosterling, Iris J.; Gaag, Rutger J.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the differential contribution of pre-and perinatal risks in narrowly versus broadly defined autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and across core symptom domains, IQ and co-morbid problems. Children with a DSM-IV diagnosis of autistic disorder (AD) (n = 121) or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS)…

  18. Safer Beginnings: Perinatal Child-Parent Psychotherapy for Newborns and Mothers Exposed to Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Alicia F.; Diaz, Manuela A.; Van Horn, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy is a time of heightened risk for domestic violence and of increased vulnerability to traumatic events. In this article, the authors explain how the experience of domestic violence during pregnancy threatens the newborn's healthy development as well as the parent-child relationship. San Francisco General Hospital's Perinatal Child-Parent…

  19. Rates and Types of Psychiatric Disorders in Perinatally Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Youth and Seroreverters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellins, Claude Ann; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Elkington, Katherine S.; Dolezal, Curtis; Wiznia, Andrew; McKay, Mary; Bamji, Mahrukh; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine 1) the prevalence of psychiatric and substance use disorders in perinatally HIV-infected (HIV+) adolescents and 2) the association between HIV infection and these mental health outcomes by comparing HIV+ youths to HIV exposed but uninfected youths (HIV-) from similar communities. Methods: Data…

  20. Perinatal Support in Substance Abuse: The Requirements of Relationship and Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromberg, Stacey R.

    2009-01-01

    Substance abuse creates enormous risks for the developing relationship between mother and infant. Thus, the perinatal period is a critical aspect of addiction treatment. This article highlights the importance of relationships and the reflective supervision that is crucial in the delivery of integrated infant mental health service for pregnant…

  1. The Community Perinatal Care Study: Home Visiting and Nursing Support for Pregnant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, David; Tough, Suzanne; Siever, Jodi

    2006-01-01

    This article describes The Community Perinatal Care Study, a community-based study of pregnancy support that was conducted in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, between 2001 and 2004. The study was conducted to learn how to improve community-based pregnancy care and to improve prenatal care and healthy births, particularly for women with increased…

  2. Presumed Perinatal Stroke in a Child with Down Syndrome and Moyamoya Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pysden, Karen; Fallon, Penny; Moorthy, Bhagavatheswaran; Ganesan, Vijeya

    2010-01-01

    Moyamoya disease describes a cerebral arteriopathy characterized by stenosis or occlusion of the terminal internal carotid and/or the proximal middle cerebral arteries. We report a female child with trisomy 21 and bilateral moyamoya disease who presented, unusually, with a presumed perinatal cerebral infarct. The clinical, radiological, and…

  3. Relationship of Perinatal PCB Exposure to Neurodevelopmental Outcomes: Reply to Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladen, Beth C.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2004-01-01

    D.V. Cicchetti, A.S. Kaufman, and S.S. Sparrow (this issue) examine various technical issues related to six studies of perinatal PCB exposure and neurodevelopment and one study of adult PCB exposure and motor function. They raise questions about possible imperfections of the studies, but many of their assertions are unsupported or frankly…

  4. Construct Validity of the Infant Motor Profile: Relation with Prenatal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; La Bastide-Van Gemert, Sacha; Fidler, Vaclav; Middelburg, Karin J.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The Infant Motor Profile (IMP) is a qualitative assessment of motor behaviour of infants aged 3 to 18 months. The aim of this study was to investigate construct validity of the IMP through the relation of IMP scores with prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal variables, including the presence of brain pathology indicated by neonatal ultrasound…

  5. Relation of Perinatal Risk and Early Parenting to Executive Control at the Transition to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Caron A. C.; Woodward, Lianne J.

    2015-01-01

    Executive control (EC) develops rapidly during the preschool years and is central to academic achievement and functional outcome. Although children with perinatal adversity are at known risk for EC impairments, little is known about the underlying nature of these impairments or the mechanisms that contribute to their development over time. Drawing…

  6. Reaching Perinatal Women Online: The Healthy You, Healthy Baby Website and App

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, Lydia; Miller, Margaret; Lester, Leanne

    2014-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence reveals the close link between unwarranted weight gain among childbearing women and childhood adiposity. Yet current barriers limit the capacity of perinatal health care providers (PHCPs) to offer healthy lifestyle counselling. In response, today's Internet savvy women are turning to online resources to access health information, with the potential of revolutionising health services by enabling PHCPs to guide women to appropriate online resources. This paper presents the findings of a project designed to develop an online resource to promote healthy lifestyles during the perinatal period. The methodology involved focus groups and interviews with perinatal women and PHCPs to determine what online information was needed, in what form, and how best it should be presented. The outcome was the development of the Healthy You, Healthy Baby website and smartphone app. This clinically-endorsed, interactive online resource provides perinatal women with a personalised tool to track their weight, diet, physical activity, emotional wellbeing, and sleep patterns based on the developmental stage of their child with links to quality-assured information. One year since the launch of the online resource, data indicates it provides a low-cost intervention delivered across most geographic and socioeconomic strata without additional demands on health service staff. PMID:24872891

  7. Development and Preliminary Evaluation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Perinatal Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Shannon M.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Litz, Brett T.; Boisseau, Christina L.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal loss, typically defined as fetal death beyond 20 weeks gestation through infant death 1-month postpartum, is a potentially traumatizing experience for parents occurring in approximately 1% of births in the United States. Although many women recover, 15% to 25% have enduring grief-related symptomatology and functional impairment.…

  8. Spatial Analysis after Perinatal Stroke: Patterns of Neglect and Exploration in Extra-Personal Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thareja, Tarika; Ballantyne, Angela O.; Trauner, Doris A.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether school-aged children who had experienced a perinatal stroke demonstrate evidence of persistent spatial neglect, and if such neglect was specific to the visual domain or was more generalized. Two studies were carried out. In the first, 38 children with either left hemisphere (LH) or right hemisphere…

  9. Aggregate Risk of Cardiovascular Disease among Adolescents Perinatally Infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunjal; Wang, Jiajia; Jacobson, Denise L.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Landy, David C.; Geffner, Mitchell E.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Seage, George R.; Williams, Paige L.; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Siberry, George K.; Shearer, William T.; Young, Luciana; Scott, Gwendolyn B.; Wilkinson, James D.; Fisher, Stacy D.; Starc, Thomas J.; Miller, Tracie L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents may be susceptible to aggregate atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, as measured by the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) coronary arteries (CA) and abdominal aorta (AA) risk scores, due to prolonged exposure to HIV and antiretroviral therapy. Methods and Results CA and AA PDAY scores were calculated for 165 perinatally HIV-infected adolescents, using a weighted combination of modifiable risk factors: dyslipidemia, cigarette smoking, hypertension, obesity, and hyperglycemia. Demographic and HIV-specific predictors of scores ? 1 were identified and trends in scores over time were assessed. 48% and 24% of the perinatally HIV-infected adolescents had CA and AA scores ? 1, representing increased CVD risk factor burden. Significant predictors of CA scores ? 1 included male sex, history of an AIDS-defining condition, longer duration of use of a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor, and no prior use of tenofovir. Significant predictors of AA scores ? 1 included suppressed viral load, history of an AIDS-defining condition, and longer duration of boosted protease inhibitor use. No significant changes in CA and AA risk scores were observed over the 4-year study period. Conclusions A substantial proportion of perinatally HIV-infected youth have high PDAY scores reflecting increased aggregate atherosclerotic CVD risk factor burden. High scores were predicted by HIV disease severity and boosted protease inhibitor use. PDAY scores may be useful in identifying high-risk youth who may benefit from early lifestyle or clinical interventions. PMID:24366631

  10. COMPARISON OF FOUR HUMAN STUDIES OF PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO METHYLMERCURY FOR USE IN RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Newer data from human epidemiologic studies of methylmercury (MeHg) poisoning in which perinatal exposure occurred are available from four distinct populations. The results of an Iraqi grain-consuming population are compared to results from studies performed in fish-consuming gro...

  11. nature genetics volume 26 november 2000 379 Hypoglycaemia, liver necrosis and perinatal death in mice

    E-print Network

    Pollard, Daniel

    letter nature genetics · volume 26 · november 2000 379 Hypoglycaemia, liver necrosis and perinatal of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. 2Research Division, Joslin Diabetes. On the basis of expected mendelian frequencies, in a mixed genetic back- ground (129SvEv×C57Bl/6) or an inbred

  12. Women's Use of Multi sector Mental Health Services in a Community-Based Perinatal Depression Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sarah Kye

    2010-01-01

    Low-income and ethnic minority women have been described as at risk for experiencing depression during and around the time of pregnancy, a finding complicated by low levels of mental health service use within this population. This study retrospectively examined data from a community-based perinatal depression project targeting low-income women in…

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Preventive Intervention for Perinatal Depression in High-Risk Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral (CBT) intervention to prevent perinatal depression in high-risk Latinas. Method: A sample of 217 participants, predominant