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1

Maternal-perinatal calcium relationships.  

PubMed

Serum concentrations of total and ionic calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and albumin were measureed in maternal and cord blood of 115 near-term deliveries. The same measurements (except for ionic calcium) were made in blood obtained from corresponding newborns at 24 hours of age. Cord levels of all components exceeded maternal values, and maternal and cord levels correlated significantly with each other. In the case of calcium, the cord-maternal difference involved both ionic and protein-bound forms. Significant umbilical arterio-venous differences were found only in the case of total calcium, and this difference reflected variation in the protein-bound form only. During the first 24 hours postpartum, total calcium concentration fell (by an average of 0.75 mEq/liter), phosphorus levels rose (by an average of 0.63 mg/dl), and magnesium and albumin did not change significantly. Cord levels of all agents correlated significantly with corresponding neonatal values. In view of the significant positive relationships demonstrated between maternal and cord levels and between cord and neonatal levels, these results substantiate the importance of the maternal serum ionic calcium concentration in normal perinatal calcium homeostasis. PMID:760023

Schauberger, C W; Pitkin, R M

1979-01-01

2

Perinatal and maternal outcomes of fetal macrosomia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the perinatal and maternal outcome of the macrosomic infants. Study Design: A case-control, retrospective study is performed in the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, between 1988–1992. The maternal and neonatal records of infants with birthweight of at least 4000g (n=1000) were reviewed. Another 1000 cases amongst the newborns delivered in the same

Engin Oral; Arzu Ca?da?; Altay Gezer; Semih Kaleli; Kiliç Aydinli; Fahri Öçer

2001-01-01

3

Maternal diabetes and perinatal programming.  

PubMed

Alterations of the intrauterine and neonatal environment may predispose for disorders and diseases throughout later life (perinatal programming). Especially, hormones and nutrients are dose-dependent organizers of the developing organism. Studies in offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM) have paradigmatically contributed to the perception of this developmental principle and our understanding of causal mechanisms. Fetal and neonatal hyperinsulinism in consequence of materno-fetal hyperglycaemia is the pathognomic feature in ODM. Epidemiological, clinical, as well as experimental data indicate that both insulin and glucose, when occurring in elevated concentrations during perinatal life, may epigenetically program a predisposition for obesity and diabetes later on. Similar may occur due to pre- and neonatal overfeeding. From a clinical point of view, avoidance of materno-fetal overnutrition, universal diabetes screening in all pregnant women and adequate therapy of all forms of diabetes during pregnancy, as well as avoidance of neonatal overfeeding are therefore recommended. These measures might serve as causal approaches of a genuine prevention to the benefit of long-term offspring health. PMID:21945359

Plagemann, A

2011-11-01

4

Maternal nutrition and perinatal outcomes.  

PubMed

Diet and patterns of eating during pregnancy can affect perinatal outcomes through direct physiologic effects or by stressing the fetus in ways that permanently affect phenotype. Supplements are not a magic nutritional remedy, and evidence of profound benefit for most supplements remains inconclusive. However, research supports calcium supplements to decrease preeclampsia. Following a low glycemic, Mediterranean-type diet appears to improve ovulatory infertility, decrease preterm birth, and decrease the risk of gestational diabetes. Although women in the United States have adequate levels of most nutrients, subpopulations are low in vitamin D, folate, and iodine. Vitamin D has increasingly been shown to be important not only for bone health, but also for glucose regulation, immune function, and good uterine contractility in labor. To ensure adequate vitamin and micronutrient intake, especially of folate before conception, all reproductive age women should take a multivitamin daily. In pregnancy, health care providers need to assess women's diets, give them weight gain recommendations based on their body mass index measurement, and advise them to eat a Mediterranean diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids (ingested as low-mercury risk fatty fish or supplements), ingest adequate calcium, and achieve adequate vitamin D levels through sun exposure or supplements. Health care providers should continue to spend time on nutrition assessment and counseling. PMID:20974412

Barger, Mary K

2010-01-01

5

The effect of maternal HIV infection on maternal conditions and perinatal deaths in southwest Tshwane  

PubMed Central

Aim: To describe the effect of HIV infection on maternal and perinatal disease in south west Tshwane. Setting: Southwest Tshwane has a low to low-middle income urban population and is served by Pretoria West and Laudium Midwife-Obstetric Units (MOUs) and Kalafong Hospital and fourteen primary care clinics which refer to those institutions. These are all public health institutions. Methods: Only data from women from southwest Tshwane between 1 January 2006 and 30 September 2008 was used in the study. As part of routine audit, the maternal HIV status was recorded as well as major maternal antenatal and ­intrapartum complications. All perinatal deaths along with their HIV status were recorded in the Perinatal Problem Identification Programme (PPIP) and the primary obstetric cause and final neonatal cause of deaths. The causes of perinatal deaths from HIV infected, negative and unknown were analysed. Results: There were 17184 births in southwest Tshwane in the time period analysed, of which mothers (86.1%) were counselled and (81.9%) were tested, and of these 21.5% HIV infected. The incidence of hypertension in the HIV infected women was 3.2% significantly lower than the 5.0% in the HIV negative group (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.50, 0.79). There was a trend to more HIV infected women had a PPH (OR 1.21, 95% CI 0.99, 1.47). The overall caesarean section rate was 28.3% with significantly more HIV infected women having both elective and emergency caesarean sections (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10, 1.31). The perinatal mortality rate was 33.8/1000 births (>?500?g) in the HIV infected group and 26.1/1000 births in the HIV negative group (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03, 1.65) mainly due to the increased neonatal death rate. The low birth weight (LBW) rate for HIV infected women was 19.8% compared with 14.3% with HIV negative women (p?perinatal deaths due to spontaneous preterm birth, infection and intrapartum asphyxia in the HIV infected mothers. Conclusion: In southwest Tshwane a HIV infected mother has a decreased risk of hypertension, a trend towards increased postpartum haemorrhage and a thirty percent increased risk of having a perinatal death compared to an HIV negative mother, this is due mainly to spontaneous preterm birth, infections and intrapartum asphyxia.

Pattinson, R. C.; Hulsbergen, M. H.; Van Hoorick, L.

2010-01-01

6

Maternal hormone levels and perinatal characteristics: implications for testicular cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose It has been hypothesized that the risk of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) is associated with maternal hormone levels. To examine the hypothesis, some studies have used perinatal factors as surrogates for hormone levels. To determine the validity of this assumption, hormone-perinatal factor relationships were examined in the Collaborative Perinatal Project. Methods Maternal estradiol, estriol and testosterone levels in first and third trimester serum samples were correlated with perinatal factors among 300 mothers representative of populations at high (white Americans) or low (black Americans) risk of TGCT. Results Among white participants, testosterone levels, were negatively associated with maternal height (p<0.01) and age (p=0.02), and positively associated with maternal weight (p=0.02) and BMI (p<0.01), while estradiol levels were negatively associated with height (p=0.03) and positively associated with son’s birthweight (p=0.04). Among black participants, estriol levels were negatively associated with maternal weight (p=0.01), BMI (p=0.02) and gestational age p<0.01), and positively associated with son’s birthweight (p<0.01), length (p=0.04) and head circumference (p=0.03). Conclusions These findings indicate that the use of perinatal characteristics as surrogates for hormone levels should be limited to a specific ethnic group. Among white men, previously reported associations of TGCT with maternal weight and age may be due to lower maternal testosterone levels.

Zhang, Yawei; Graubard, Barry I.; Longnecker, Matthew P.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Klebanoff, Mark A.; McGlynn, Katherine A.

2013-01-01

7

Factors for change in maternal and perinatal audit systems in Dar es Salaam hospitals, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Effective maternal and perinatal audits are associated with improved quality of care and reduction of severe adverse outcome. Although audits at the level of care were formally introduced in Tanzania around 25 years ago, little information is available about their existence, performance, and practical barriers to their implementation. This study assessed the structure, process and impacts of maternal and perinatal death audit systems in clinical practice and presents a detailed account on how they could be improved. Methods A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in eight major hospitals in Dar es Salaam in January 2009. An in-depth interview guide was used for 29 health managers and members of the audit committees to investigate the existence, structure, process and outcome of such audits in clinical practice. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview 30 health care providers in the maternity wards to assess their awareness, attitude and practice towards audit systems. The 2007 institutional pregnancy outcome records were reviewed. Results Overall hospital based maternal mortality ratio was 218/100,000 live births (range: 0 - 385) and perinatal mortality rate was 44/1000 births (range: 17 - 147). Maternal and perinatal audit systems existed only in 4 and 3 hospitals respectively, and key decision makers did not take part in audit committees. Sixty percent of care providers were not aware of even a single action which had ever been implemented in their hospitals because of audit recommendations. There were neither records of the key decision points, action plan, nor regular analysis of the audit reports in any of the facilities where such audit systems existed. Conclusions Maternal and perinatal audit systems in these institutions are poorly established in structure and process; and are less effective to improve the quality of care. Fundamental changes are urgently needed for successful audit systems in these institutions.

2010-01-01

8

Socioeconomic associations of improved maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival in Qatar  

PubMed Central

This retrospective study analyzed the temporal association between socioeconomic development indices and improved maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival in the State of Qatar over a period of 35 years (1974–2008). We explored the association between reduction in poverty, improvement in maternal education, and perinatal health care on the one hand, and increased maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival on the other hand. Yearly mortality data was ascertained from the perinatal and neonatal mortality registers of the Women’s Hospital and the national database in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Hamad Medical Corporation in Doha. A total of 323,014 births were recorded during the study period. During these 35 years, there was a remarkable decline (P < 0.001) in Qatar’s neonatal mortality rate from 26.27/1000 in 1974 to 4.4/1000 in 2008 and in the perinatal mortality rate from 44.4/1000 in 1974 to 10.58/1000 in 2008. Qatar’s maternal mortality rate remained zero during 1993, 1995, and then in 1998–2000. The maternal mortality rate was 11.6/100,000 in 2008. For the rest of the years it has been approximately 10/100,000. Across the study period, the reduction in poverty, increase in maternal education, and improved perinatal health care were temporally associated with a significant improvement in maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival. The total annual births increased five-fold during the study period, with no negative impact on survival rates. Neonatal mortality rates in Qatar have reached a plateau since 2005. We also conducted a substudy to assess the association between improvements in survival rates in relation to health care investment. For this purpose, we divided the study period into two eras, ie, era A (1974–1993) during which major health care investment was in community-based, low-cost interventions, and era B (1994–2008) during which the major health care investment was in high-technology institutional interventions. Although from 1974–1993 (era A) the per capita health expenditure increased by only 19% as compared with a 137% increase in 1994–2008 (era B). The decline in neonatal and perinatal mortality rates was three times steeper during era A than in era B. The decline in neonatal and perinatal mortality rates was also significant (P < 0.001) when analyzed separately for era A and era B. We concluded that across the 35-year period covered by our study, the reduction in poverty, increased maternal education, and improved perinatal health care were temporally associated with improved maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival in the State of Qatar. From the subanalysis of era A and era B, we concluded that low-cost, community-based interventions, on the background of socioeconomic development, have a stronger impact on maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival as compared with high-cost institutional interventions.

Rahman, Sajjad; Salameh, Khalil; Bener, Abdulbari; El Ansari, Walid

2010-01-01

9

Socioeconomic associations of improved maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival in Qatar.  

PubMed

This retrospective study analyzed the temporal association between socioeconomic development indices and improved maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival in the State of Qatar over a period of 35 years (1974-2008). We explored the association between reduction in poverty, improvement in maternal education, and perinatal health care on the one hand, and increased maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival on the other hand. Yearly mortality data was ascertained from the perinatal and neonatal mortality registers of the Women's Hospital and the national database in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Hamad Medical Corporation in Doha. A total of 323,014 births were recorded during the study period. During these 35 years, there was a remarkable decline (P < 0.001) in Qatar's neonatal mortality rate from 26.27/1000 in 1974 to 4.4/1000 in 2008 and in the perinatal mortality rate from 44.4/1000 in 1974 to 10.58/1000 in 2008. Qatar's maternal mortality rate remained zero during 1993, 1995, and then in 1998-2000. The maternal mortality rate was 11.6/100,000 in 2008. For the rest of the years it has been approximately 10/100,000. Across the study period, the reduction in poverty, increase in maternal education, and improved perinatal health care were temporally associated with a significant improvement in maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival. The total annual births increased five-fold during the study period, with no negative impact on survival rates. Neonatal mortality rates in Qatar have reached a plateau since 2005. We also conducted a substudy to assess the association between improvements in survival rates in relation to health care investment. For this purpose, we divided the study period into two eras, ie, era A (1974-1993) during which major health care investment was in community-based, low-cost interventions, and era B (1994-2008) during which the major health care investment was in high-technology institutional interventions. Although from 1974-1993 (era A) the per capita health expenditure increased by only 19% as compared with a 137% increase in 1994-2008 (era B). The decline in neonatal and perinatal mortality rates was three times steeper during era A than in era B. The decline in neonatal and perinatal mortality rates was also significant (P < 0.001) when analyzed separately for era A and era B. We concluded that across the 35-year period covered by our study, the reduction in poverty, increased maternal education, and improved perinatal health care were temporally associated with improved maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival in the State of Qatar. From the subanalysis of era A and era B, we concluded that low-cost, community-based interventions, on the background of socioeconomic development, have a stronger impact on maternal, neonatal, and perinatal survival as compared with high-cost institutional interventions. PMID:21151678

Rahman, Sajjad; Salameh, Khalil; Bener, Abdulbari; El Ansari, Walid

2010-01-01

10

Maternal omega-3 fatty acid supplementation and risk for perinatal maternal depression  

PubMed Central

Objective A systematic review was conducted to assess the possible association between omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation and intake in the perinatal period and the risk of maternal perinatal depression. Methods Two PubMed searches and a BIOSIS Preview, a Web of Science and a PsychInfo search were conducted with the search terms ‘DHA, pregnancy and depression’ and ‘omega-3 fatty acids, pregnancy and depression’. Results Ten articles – three longitudinal cohort studies, five randomized controlled trials and two pilot trials– that met selection criteria were reviewed. Six found no association, two found mixed results, and two found a positive association between omega-3 PUFAs and reduced incidence of maternal perinatal depression. The heterogeneity of results can be explained by dissimilar study designs, including differences in study duration, time period of measurement and number of participants, and in varied dosages and types of supplemental PUFAs. Some of the larger studies and those that found a positive effect were more likely to be using higher doses, close to 2 g of docosahexaeonic acid (DHA) + eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and began the supplementation earlier in pregnancy. Conclusions Future RCTs to investigate the role of PUFA supplementation and risk for maternal perinatal depression should begin supplementation early in pregnancy and use a dosage closer to 2 g of DHA + EPA. Depression should also be measured using a diagnostic interview schedule in addition to a screener.

Wojcicki, Janet M.; Heyman, Melvin B.

2011-01-01

11

Association between maternal inflammatory bowel disease and adverse perinatal outcomes.  

PubMed

Objective:To examine whether inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with ischemic/inflammatory conditions during pregnancy.Study Design:A retrospective cohort study using the 2000 to 2012 Kaiser Permanente Southern California maternally-linked medical records (n=395?781). The two major subtypes of IBD, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's diseases were studied. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were used to quantify the associations.Result:A pregnancy complicated by IBD was associated with increased incidence of small-for-gestational age birth (OR=1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.14 to 1.88), spontaneous preterm birth (OR=1.32, 95% CI=1.00 to 1.76) and preterm premature rupture of membranes (OR=1.95, 95% CI=1.26 to 3.02). Further stratifying by IBD subtypes, only ulcerative colitis was significantly associated with increased incidence of ischemic placental disease, spontaneous preterm birth and preterm premature rupture of membranes.Conclusion:The findings underscore the potential impact of maternal IBD on adverse perinatal outcomes. Clinicians should be aware that the association between IBD and adverse perinatal outcome varies by IBD subtypes. PMID:24651735

Getahun, D; Fassett, M J; Longstreth, G F; Koebnick, C; Langer-Gould, A M; Strickland, D; Jacobsen, S J

2014-06-01

12

Maternal Perinatal Undernutrition Alters Postnatal Development of Chromaffin Cells in the Male Rat Adrenal Medulla  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous data suggest that the development of the sympathoadrenal system is highly sensitive to the perinatal environment. We previously reported that maternal perinatal food restriction by 50% (FR50) altered chromaffin cell (CC) organization and activity in offspring at weaning. This study investigated the effects of FR50 on the postnatal time course of CC functional and structural adaptations. FR50 pups exhibited

Olivier Molendi-Coste; Christine Laborie; Maria Cristina Scarpa; Valérie Montel; Didier Vieau; Christophe Breton

2009-01-01

13

Maternal, Perinatal, and Postneonatal Outcomes in Women With Chronic Heart Disease in Washington State  

PubMed Central

Objective To explore the association between the presence of maternal heart disease and maternal, perinatal, and infant outcomes. Methods We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using Washington State birth certificates linked with hospital discharge records of mothers noted to have maternal congenital heart disease, ischemic heart disease, heart failure or pulmonary hypertension. Women who gave birth between 1987 and 2009 (n=2,171) were compared to a sample of mothers without these conditions (n=21,710). We described characteristics of pregnant women with heart disease over time. Logistic regression estimated the association between reported chronic maternal heart disease and small for gestational age (SGA) birth, as well as perinatal, post-neonatal and maternal death. Results The proportion of births to women with reported heart disease increased 224% between the 1987-1994 and 2002-2009 calendar periods. Chronic maternal heart disease was associated with increased risk of SGA birth (62 additional SGA infants per 1,000 births, 95% CI 46-78, p <0.001), perinatal death (14 additional deaths per 1,000 births, 95% CI 8-20, p <0.001), postneonatal death (five additional deaths per 1,000 births, 95% CI 2-9, p<0.001) and maternal death (five additional deaths per 1,000 births, 95% CI 2-9, p<0.001). Conclusion The presence of chronic maternal heart disease is associated with elevated risk for poor maternal, perinatal, and postneonatal outcomes.

Leary, Peter J; Leary, Sarah ES; Stout, Karen K; Schwartz, Stephen M; Easterling, Thomas R

2014-01-01

14

Perinatal maternal stress and serotonin signaling: Effects on pain sensitivity in offspring.  

PubMed

It has been estimated that 20% of pregnant women are facing perinatal stress and depression. Perinatal maternal stress has been shown to increase pain sensitivity in offspring. For the treatment of their depressive symptoms, pregnant women are frequently prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Since the descending pain inhibitory circuit matures perinatally, perinatal SSRI exposure has been shown to affect pain sensitivity in offspring. In the present review, we summarize experimental and clinical evidence for the effect of perinatal maternal stress and SSRI exposure on pain sensitivity in offspring. Both experimental and clinical studies show the effect of perinatal maternal stress on regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system and the serotonin pain inhibitory system. Alterations in these two systems likely underlie long-term alterations in the development of pain sensitivity. This review sheds light on the effect of perinatal maternal stress and treatment with SSRIs on offspring pain sensitivity, in relation to the developing HPA system and 5-HT signaling. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 56: 885-896, 2014. PMID:24311362

Knaepen, Liesbeth; Pawluski, Jodi L; Patijn, Jacob; van Kleef, Maarten; Tibboel, Dick; Joosten, Elbert A

2014-07-01

15

Perinatal health inequalities and accessibility of maternity services in a rural French region: closing maternity units in Burgundy.  

PubMed

Maternity unit closures in France have increased travel time for pregnant women in rural areas. We assessed the impact of travel time to the closest unit on perinatal outcomes and care in Burgundy using multilevel analyses of data on deliveries from 2000 to 2009. A travel time of 30min or more increased risks of fetal heart rate anomalies, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, out-of-hospital births, and pregnancy hospitalizations; a positive but non-significant gradient existed between travel time and perinatal mortality. The effects of long travel distances on perinatal outcomes and care should be factored into closure decisions. PMID:24177417

Combier, Evelyne; Charreire, Hélène; Le Vaillant, Marc; Michaut, Francis; Ferdynus, Cyril; Amat-Roze, Jeanne-Marie; Gouyon, Jean-Bernard; Quantin, Catherine; Zeitlin, Jennifer

2013-11-01

16

Agreement between maternal report and antenatal records for a range of pre and peri-natal factors: The influence of maternal and child characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Events during pregnancy and labour may influence the future health and well-being of offspring. Many studies rely on maternal reports of pre and peri-natal factors. Both maternal and child characteristics may potentially influence the reliability and accuracy of maternal recall. However, this has not been previously examined. Aims: To examine agreement between information from maternally reported questionnaires and medical

Frances Rice; Allyson Lewis; Gordon Harold; Marianne van den Bree; Jacky Boivin; Dale F. Hay; Michael J. Owen; Anita Thapar

2007-01-01

17

The effect of stay in a maternity waiting home on perinatal mortality in rural Zimbabwe.  

PubMed

A hospital-based cohort study was carried out in a district hospital in Zimbabwe to evaluate the effect of a maternity waiting home on perinatal mortality. Information on antenatal risk factors, use of antenatal care, access to the hospital and stage of labour on arrival was collected for each woman delivering at the hospital during the period 1989-1991 (n = 6438). Women who stayed in the maternity waiting home had a lower risk of perinatal death compared to women who came directly from home to the hospital during labour. The crude relative risk of perinatal death for the women coming from home was 1.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.6; P < 0.05). After adjusting for the effect of potential confounding variables, the relative risk decreased to 1.5 (95% CI 0.95-2.5, P = 0.07). However, when the analysis was restricted to women with antenatal risk factors there was a significant 50% reduction in the risk of perinatal death for the women who stayed at the maternity waiting home compared to women who came from home during labour (adjusted relative risk 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.4; P < 0.05). The use of maternity waiting homes has the potential to reduce perinatal mortality in rural areas with low geographic access to hospitals and merits further evaluation. PMID:7636923

Chandramohan, D; Cutts, F; Millard, P

1995-08-01

18

Maternal and perinatal outcomes among eclamptic patients admitted to Bugando Medical Centre, Mwanza, Tanzania.  

PubMed

Eclampsia continues to be a major problem, particularly in developing countries such as Tanzania, contributing significantly to high maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. We conducted a study to establish the incidence of eclampsia and the associated maternal and perinatal outcomes among eclamptic patients admitted to our center. A descriptive cross-sectional study of all women presenting with eclampsia was performed from June 2009 to February 2010. Seventy-six patients presented with eclampsia out of a total 5562 deliveries during the study period (incidence of 1.37%). Antenatal attendance was 96% among patients with eclampsia; however, only 45.21% and 24.66% were screened for blood pressure and proteinuria respectively. Maternal and perinatal case fatality rates were 7.89% and 20.73% respectively. The main factors contributing to maternal deaths were acute renal failure (10.5%), pulmonary oedema (10.5%), maternal stroke (8.8%), HELLP syndrome (50.9%), and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy (3.5%). Perinatal deaths were caused by prematurity (42.9%) and birth asphyxia (57.1%). Forty-eight babies had low-birth weight (58.54%). The high incidence of eclampsia and its complications during this study period may indicate the need for earlier and more meticulous intervention at both the clinic and hospital levels. PMID:22783666

Ndaboine, Edgar M; Kihunrwa, Albert; Rumanyika, Richard; Im, H Beatrice; Massinde, Anthony N

2012-03-01

19

Maternal and perinatal factors associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among children.  

PubMed

This nested case-control study based on 1.7 million live births in Sweden explores the associations between maternal and perinatal factors and the occurrence of childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The National Swedish Cancer Registry ascertained 168 cases in successive birth cohorts from 1973 through 1989 recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. From the nationwide Birth Registry, 5 controls without NHL and alive at the date the case was diagnosed were randomly selected from the pool of children, with each case matched by gender, birth year and birth month. Standardized information on selected maternal and perinatal factors up to one month after delivery were recorded in the Medical Birth Registry. Mothers of children with NHL were more likely than mothers of controls to have undergone Cesarean section [Odds ratio (OR) 1.6] and to have been exposed to paracervical anesthesia during delivery (OR 1.8). Children with NHL were more likely than controls to have endocrine-metabolic disorders (OR 3.3). This study is one of the largest focusing on the etiology of childhood NHL. Most of the maternal and perinatal characteristics studied did not markedly affect risk for childhood NHL, which may be due to maternal and perinatal factors not included in these data or to exposures later in life. PMID:8631590

Adami, J; Glimelius, B; Cnattingius, S; Ekbom, A; Zahm, S H; Linet, M; Zack, M

1996-03-15

20

THE ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT OF PRETERM PROM STUDY: SYSTEMIC MATERNAL AND FETAL MARKERS AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES  

PubMed Central

Objectives To correlate maternal and cord blood cytokine and ICAM-1 levels with antibiotic exposure and perinatal outcomes after conservatively managed preterm PROM Methods Conservatively managed women with preterm PROM at 24–32 weeks had blood sampling at randomization (N=222) and delivery (N=121). Plasma from these, and umbilical cord blood (N=196), was stored at ?70C. IL-6, IL-10, G-CSF, TNF-alpha and ICAM-1 levels were assessed for associations with antibiotic treatment, latency, amnionitis, neonatal sepsis, pneumonia, and composite neonatal morbidity. Results Cord blood IL-6 and G-CSF were higher than maternal levels. Antibiotic treatment lowered only maternal G-CSF (p=0.01). Elevated maternal cytokine levels were associated with delivery within seven days and with development of chorioamnionitis. All umbilical cord blood markers were increased with amnionitis (p?0.01 for each). No maternal marker was associated with neonatal morbidities. Cord G-CSF and IL-6 were increased with neonatal sepsis within 72 hours of birth (p=0.004 for both), and with composite neonatal morbidity; (p=0.001 and 0.002, respectively). Maternal and umbilical cord cytokine levels demonstrated low predictive values for perinatal outcomes. Conclusions Umbilical cord blood cytokine values are higher than maternal levels, suggesting significant fetal/placental contribution. Maternal and umbilical cord cytokine levels are not adequately predictive to be used clinically.

MERCER, Brian M.; CROUSE, Dennis T.; GOLDENBERG, Robert L.; MIODOVNIK, Menachem; MAPP, Delicia C.; MEIS, Paul J.; DOMBROWSKI, Mitchell P.

2011-01-01

21

Maternal high fat diet consumption during the perinatal period programs offspring behavior.  

PubMed

The environment that a developing offspring experiences during the perinatal period is markedly influenced by maternal health and diet composition. Evidence from both epidemiological studies and animal models indicates that maternal diet and metabolic status play a critical role in programming the neural circuitry that regulates behavior, resulting in long-term consequences for offspring behavior. Maternal diet and metabolic state influence the behavior of offspring directly by impacting the intrauterine environment and indirectly by modulating maternal behavior. The mechanisms by which maternal diet and metabolic profile shape the perinatal environment remain largely unknown, but recent research has found that increases in inflammatory cytokines, nutrients (glucose and fatty acids), and hormones (insulin and leptin) affect the environment of the developing offspring. Offspring exposed to maternal obesity and high fat diet consumption during development are more susceptible to developing mental health and behavioral disorders such as anxiety, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorders. Recent evidence suggests that this increased risk for behavioral disorders is driven by modifications in the development of neural pathways involved in behavioral regulation. In particular, research indicates that the development of the serotonergic system is impacted by exposure to maternal obesity and high fat diet consumption, and this disruption may underlie many of the behavioral disturbances observed in these offspring. Given the high rates of obesity and high fat diet consumption in pregnant women, it is vital to examine the influence that maternal nutrition and metabolic profile have on the developing offspring. PMID:23085399

Sullivan, Elinor L; Nousen, Elizabeth K; Chamlou, Katherine A

2014-01-17

22

Different implications of paternal and maternal atopy for perinatal IgE production and asthma development.  

PubMed

Asthma is a hereditary disease associated with IgE-mediated reaction. Whether maternal atopy and paternal atopy have different impacts on perinatal IgE production and asthma development remains unclear. This paper reviews and summarizes the effects of maternal and paternal atopy on the developmental aspects of IgE production and asthma. Maternal atopy affects both pre- and postnatal IgE production, whereas paternal atopy mainly affects the latter. Maternally transmitted genes GSTP1 and FceRI-beta are associated with lung function and allergic sensitization, respectively. In IgE production and asthma development, the maternal influence on gene-environment interaction is greater than paternal influence. Maternal, paternal, and/or postnatal environmental modulation of allergic responses have been linked to epigenetic mechanisms, which may be good targets for early prevention of asthma. PMID:22272211

Wu, Chih-Chiang; Chen, Rong-Fu; Kuo, Ho-Chang

2012-01-01

23

Predictors of Poor Perinatal Outcome following Maternal Perception of Reduced Fetal Movements - A Prospective Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal perception of reduced fetal movement (RFM) is associated with increased risk of stillbirth and fetal growth restriction (FGR). RFM is thought to represent fetal compensation to conserve energy due to insufficient oxygen and nutrient transfer resulting from placental insufficiency. Objective To identify predictors of poor perinatal outcome after maternal perception of reduced fetal movements (RFM). Design Prospective cohort study. Methods 305 women presenting with RFM after 28 weeks of gestation were recruited. Demographic factors and clinical history were recorded and ultrasound performed to assess fetal biometry, liquor volume and umbilical artery Doppler. A maternal serum sample was obtained for measurement of placentally-derived or modified proteins including: alpha fetoprotein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), human placental lactogen (hPL), ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA), pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) and progesterone. Factors related to poor perinatal outcome were determined by logistic regression. Results 22.1% of pregnancies ended in a poor perinatal outcome after RFM. The most common complication was small-for-gestational age infants. Pregnancy outcome after maternal perception of RFM was related to amount of fetal activity while being monitored, abnormal fetal heart rate trace, diastolic blood pressure, estimated fetal weight, liquor volume, serum hCG and hPL. Following multiple logistic regression abnormal fetal heart rate trace (Odds ratio 7.08, 95% Confidence Interval 1.31–38.18), (OR) diastolic blood pressure (OR 1.04 (95% CI 1.01–1.09), estimated fetal weight centile (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.94–0.97) and log maternal serum hPL (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.02–0.99) were independently related to pregnancy outcome. hPL was related to placental mass. Conclusion Poor perinatal outcome after maternal perception of RFM is closely related to factors which are connected to placental dysfunction. Novel tests of placental function and associated fetal response may provide improved means to detect fetuses at greatest risk of poor perinatal outcome after RFM.

Dutton, Philip J.; Warrander, Lynne K.; Roberts, Stephen A.; Bernatavicius, Giovanna; Byrd, Louise M.; Gaze, David; Kroll, Josh; Jones, Rebecca L.; Sibley, Colin P.; Fr?en, J. Frederik; Heazell, Alexander E. P.

2012-01-01

24

[Perinatal research on feto-maternal anti-Kell immunization].  

PubMed

Three cases of pregnancies complicated by feto-maternal anti-Kell iso-immunisation are presented, as well as a review of the literature. The evolution of new techniques for antenatal diagnosis has made it possible to have a new approach to this fetal pathology. Chorionic villus biopsy can be carried out in the first trimester of pregnancy when there has previously been a serious incidence of anti-Kell immunisation with a couple where the husband is heterozygous for the Kell antigen. In the second and third trimesters the surveillance of the patient is essentially dependent on ultrasound examination of the fetus and placenta, which makes it possible to detect hydropic changes, and also depends on blood sampling from the cord which makes it possible to assess by direct measurement the degree of fetal anaemia. Now pulsed Doppler must be added to these classical diagnostic techniques because it allows a gross estimation of fetal haematocrit levels. PMID:2689503

Gavriil, P; Jauniaux, E; Lambermont, M; Donner, C; Avni, F E; Rodesch, F

1989-01-01

25

The Effect of Maternal Body Mass Index on Perinatal Outcomes in Women with Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the effect of increasing maternal obesity, including superobesity (body mass index [BMI] ? 50 kg/m2), on perinatal outcomes in women with diabetes. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of birth records for all live-born nonanom-alous singleton infants ? 37 weeks’ gestation born to Missouri residents with diabetes from 2000 to 2006. Women with either pregestational or gestational diabetes were included. Results There were 14,595 births to women with diabetes meeting study criteria, including 7,082 women with a BMI > 30 kg/m2 (48.5%). Compared with normal-weight women with diabetes, increasing BMI category, especially superobesity, was associated with a significantly increased risk for preeclampsia (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 3.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5, 5.2) and macrosomia (aRR 3.0, 95% CI 1.8, 5.40). The majority of nulliparous obese women with diabetes delivered via cesarean including 50.5% of obese, 61.4% of morbidly obese, and 69.8% of superobese women. The incidence of primary elective cesarean among nulliparous women with diabetes increased significantly with increasing maternal BMI with over 33% of morbidly obese and 39% of superobese women with diabetes delivering electively by cesarean. Conclusion Increasing maternal obesity in women with diabetes is significantly associated with higher risks of perinatal complications, especially cesarean delivery.

Marshall, Nicole E.; Guild, Camelia; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Caughey, Aaron B.; Halloran, Donna R.

2013-01-01

26

A population-based surveillance study on severe acute maternal morbidity (near-miss) and adverse perinatal outcomes in Campinas, Brazil: The Vigimoma Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Auditing of sentinel health events based on best-practice protocols has been recommended. This study describes a population-based investigation on adverse perinatal events including severe acute maternal morbidity (near-miss), maternal and perinatal mortality, as a health intervention to help improve the surveillance system. METHODS: From October to December 2005, all cases of maternal death (MD), near-miss (NM), fetal deaths (FD),

Eliana Amaral; João Paulo Souza; Fernanda Surita; Adriana G Luz; Maria Helena Sousa; José Guilherme Cecatti; Oona Campbell

2011-01-01

27

Impact of socioeconomic deprivation on maternal perinatal mental illnesses presenting to UK general practice  

PubMed Central

Background Although maternal perinatal mental illnesses commonly present to and are primarily treated in general practice, few population-based estimates of this burden exist, and the most affected socioeconomic groups of pregnant women remain unclear. Aim To provide estimates of maternal depression, anxiety and serious mental illness (SMI) in UK general practice and quantify impacts of socioeconomic deprivation. Design and setting Cross-sectional analysis of prospectively recorded general practice records from a UK-wide database. Method A pregnancy ending in live birth was randomly selected for every woman of childbearing age, 1994–2009. Prevalence and diagnostic overlap of mental illnesses were calculated using a combination of medical diagnoses and psychotropic drug prescriptions. Socioeconomic deprivation was assessed using multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for calendar period and pregnancy history. Results Among 116 457 women, 5.1% presented with antenatal depression and 13.3% with postnatal depression. Equivalent figures for anxiety were 2.6% and 3.7% and for SMI 1/1000 and 2/1000 women. Socioeconomic deprivation increased the risk of all mental illnesses, although this was more marked in older women. Those age 35–45 years in the most deprived group had 2.63 times the odds of antenatal depression (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.22 to 3.13) compared with the least deprived; in women aged 15–25 years the increased odds associated with deprivation was more modest (odds ratio = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.07 to 1.70). Similar patterns were found for anxiety and SMI. Conclusion Strong socioeconomic inequalities in perinatal mental illness persist with increasing maternal age. Targeting detection and effective interventions to high-risk women may reduce inequity and avoid substantial psychiatric morbidity.

Ban, Lu; Gibson, Jack E; West, Joe; Fiaschi, Linda; Oates, Margaret R; Tata, Laila J

2012-01-01

28

Maternal Cypermethrin Exposure during the Perinatal Period Impairs Testicular Development in C57BL Male Offspring  

PubMed Central

Numerous studies have demonstrated that endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC) are a possible cause of male reproductive organ malfunction and malformation. Cypermethrin (CYP) is a widely used synthetic pyrethroid and a potential EDC. This study aimed to examine the effects of perinatal exposure to low-dose CYP on the development and function of the offspring testes. Pregnant mice were intragastrically administered 0.12 to 12 mg/kg/day CYP from embryonic day 0.5 (E0.5) to weaning (PD21.5, postnatal day 21.5). Maternal exposure to 0.12, 1.2, and 12 mg/kg/day CYP affected the body and organ weight of the offspring. Exposure of CYP led to a dose-dependent decrease in the male-to-female sex ratio. A histopathological analysis revealed a thinner seminiferous epithelium layer at PD21.5, interstitial hyperplasia at PD45.5, and germ cell vacuolization at PD90.5 in the 12 mg/kg/day CYP group. The TUNEL assay results revealed increased germ cell apoptosis in the 12 mg/kg/day CYP group. The serum testosterone (T) level decreased, whereas the estradiol level increased with age in the 1.2 and 12 mg/kg/day CYP groups. The RT-PCR analysis demonstrated decreased expression of T production-related, mitosis-related, and meiosis-related genes in the 1.2 and 12 mg/kg/day CYP groups. The in vitro experimental results demonstrated reduced expression of steroidogenesis genes and decreased T levels. It is concluded that perinatal exposure to low-dose CYP affects testes development and function in adults.

Huang, Chaobin; Li, Xiangdong

2014-01-01

29

Maternal Cypermethrin Exposure during the Perinatal Period Impairs Testicular Development in C57BL Male Offspring.  

PubMed

Numerous studies have demonstrated that endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC) are a possible cause of male reproductive organ malfunction and malformation. Cypermethrin (CYP) is a widely used synthetic pyrethroid and a potential EDC. This study aimed to examine the effects of perinatal exposure to low-dose CYP on the development and function of the offspring testes. Pregnant mice were intragastrically administered 0.12 to 12 mg/kg/day CYP from embryonic day 0.5 (E0.5) to weaning (PD21.5, postnatal day 21.5). Maternal exposure to 0.12, 1.2, and 12 mg/kg/day CYP affected the body and organ weight of the offspring. Exposure of CYP led to a dose-dependent decrease in the male-to-female sex ratio. A histopathological analysis revealed a thinner seminiferous epithelium layer at PD21.5, interstitial hyperplasia at PD45.5, and germ cell vacuolization at PD90.5 in the 12 mg/kg/day CYP group. The TUNEL assay results revealed increased germ cell apoptosis in the 12 mg/kg/day CYP group. The serum testosterone (T) level decreased, whereas the estradiol level increased with age in the 1.2 and 12 mg/kg/day CYP groups. The RT-PCR analysis demonstrated decreased expression of T production-related, mitosis-related, and meiosis-related genes in the 1.2 and 12 mg/kg/day CYP groups. The in vitro experimental results demonstrated reduced expression of steroidogenesis genes and decreased T levels. It is concluded that perinatal exposure to low-dose CYP affects testes development and function in adults. PMID:24810582

Huang, Chaobin; Li, Xiangdong

2014-01-01

30

Effects of Deworming during Pregnancy on Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes in Entebbe, Uganda: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Helminth infections during pregnancy may be associated with adverse outcomes, including maternal anemia, low birth weight, and perinatal mortality. Deworming during pregnancy has therefore been strongly advocated, but its benefits have not been rigorously evaluated. Methods In Entebbe, Uganda, 2507 pregnant women were recruited to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating albendazole and praziquantel in a 2 × 2 factorial design [ISRCTN32849447]. Hematinics and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for presumptive treatment of malaria were provided routinely. Maternal and perinatal outcomes were recorded. Analyses were by intention to treat. Results At enrollment, 68% of women had helminths, 45% had hookworm, 18% had Schistosoma mansoni infection; 40% were anemic (hemoglobin level, <11.2 g/dL). At delivery, 35% were anaemic; there was no overall effect of albendazole (odds ratio [OR], 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79–1.15) or praziquantel (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.83–1.21) on maternal anemia, but there was a suggestion of benefit of albendazole among women with moderate to heavy hookworm (OR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.21–0.98; P = .15 for interaction). There was no effect of either anthelminthic treatment on mean birth weight (difference in mean associated with albendazole: ?0.00 kg; 95% CI, ?0.05 to 0.04 kg; difference in mean associated with praziquantel: ?0.01 kg; 95% CI, ?0.05 to 0.04 kg) or on proportion of low birth weight. Anthelminthic use during pregnancy showed no effect on perinatal mortality or congenital anomalies. Conclusions In our study area, where helminth prevalence was high but infection intensity was low, there was no overall effect of anthelminthic use during pregnancy on maternal anemia, birth weight, perinatal mortality, or congenital anomalies. The possible benefit of albendazole against anemia in pregnant women with heavy hookworm infection warrants further investigation.

Ndibazza, J.; Muhangi, L.; Akishule, D.; Kiggundu, M.; Ameke, C.; Oweka, J.; Kizindo, R.; Duong, T.; Kleinschmidt, I.; Muwanga, M.; Elliott, A. M.

2010-01-01

31

A matched pair cluster randomized implementation trail to measure the effectiveness of an intervention package aiming to decrease perinatal mortality and increase institution-based obstetric care among indigenous women in Guatemala: study protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal and perinatal mortality continue to be a high priority problem on the health agendas of less developed countries. Despite the progress made in the last decade to quantify the magnitude of maternal mortality, few interventions have been implemented with the intent to measure impact directly on maternal or perinatal deaths. The success of interventions implemented in less developed countries to reduce mortality has been questioned, in terms of the tendency to maintain a clinical perspective with a focus on purely medical care separate from community-based approaches that take cultural and social aspects of maternal and perinatal deaths into account. Our innovative approach utilizes both the clinical and community perspectives; moreover, our study will report the weight that each of these components may have had on reducing perinatal mortality and increasing institution-based deliveries. Methods/Design A matched pair cluster-randomized trial will be conducted in clinics in four rural indigenous districts with the highest maternal mortality ratios in Guatemala. The individual clinic will serve as the unit of randomization, with 15 matched pairs of control and intervention clinics composing the final sample. Three interventions will be implemented in indigenous, rural and poor populations: a simulation training program for emergency obstetric and perinatal care, increased participation of the professional midwife in strengthening the link between traditional birth attendants (TBA) and the formal health care system, and a social marketing campaign to promote institution-based deliveries. No external intervention is planned for control clinics, although enhanced monitoring, surveillance and data collection will occur throughout the study in all clinics throughout the four districts. All obstetric events occurring in any of the participating health facilities and districts during the 18 months implementation period will be included in the analysis, controlling for the cluster design. Our main outcome measures will be the change in perinatal mortality and in the proportion of institution-based deliveries. Discussion A unique feature of this protocol is that we are not proposing an individual intervention, but rather a package of interventions, which is designed to address the complexities and realities of maternal and perinatal mortality in developing countries. To date, many other countries, has focused its efforts to decrease maternal mortality indirectly by improving infrastructure and data collection systems rather than on implementing specific interventions to directly improve outcomes. Trial registration ClinicalTrial.gov,http://NCT01653626.

2013-01-01

32

Maternal and perinatal guideline development in hospitals in South East Asia: results from the SEA-ORCHID project  

PubMed Central

Background Recognising the potential of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to improve practice, one of the strategies of the SEA-ORCHID project was to facilitate the development of evidence-based CPGs, and to support clinical staff in each of the four countries to build their skills in development of CPGs in the nine participating hospitals in Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines and Indonesia. This study was undertaken to investigate the impact of the SEA-ORCHID project on development of evidence-based CPGs. Methods Data on the CPGs available to support maternal and perinatal healthcare were collected by SEA-ORCHID team members at each hospital before and after the intervention period of the project. Results There were only a few evidence-based CPGs available in the SEA-ORCHID hospitals before the intervention period. After the intervention period, in the SEA-ORCHID hospitals in Malaysia and Indonesia there was no change in evidence-based CPG development activity in maternal and perinatal care. In Thailand and The Philippines there was a small increase in evidence-based CPG development activity in maternal and perinatal care. Conclusion Despite the wide range of interventions to support evidence-based CPG development implemented in the hospitals participating in the SEA-ORCHID, very little change was seen in the development of evidence-based CPGs.

Thinkhamrop, Jadsada; Turner, Tari; Subramaniam, Sivasangari

2009-01-01

33

Maternal and perinatal risk factors for infantile hemangioma: a case-control study.  

PubMed

Infantile hemangioma (IH) is the most common benign tumor occurring during childhood. We hypothesized that, in addition to already known risk factors, such as female sex, prematurity, and low birthweight (LBW), antenatal vaginal bleeding and progesterone therapy would be highly associated with IH. We randomly selected 650 individuals with IH and matched them with 650 children of the same age and nationality without IH. Trained investigators used a standardized questionnaire to collect data from both groups, including demographic, prenatal, and perinatal characteristics. Prematurity (p < .001, odds ratio [OR] = 2.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44-3.41), LBW (p < .001, OR = 3.10, 95% CI = 1.87-5.16) and female sex (p < .001, OR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.65-2.58) were significantly associated with IH. Maternal vaginal bleeding during the first trimester was shown to be an independent risk factor according to logistic regression analyses (p < .001, OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.36-1.91), which was most evident in those receiving progesterone therapy to prevent miscarriage (p < .001, OR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.77-2.51). Subgroup analyses revealed that the effect was more pronounced in female than in male infants (OR = 2.82, 95% CI = 2.39-3.34). In addition to the known relationships, the present study identified a close relationship between maternal vaginal bleeding and progesterone therapy during early pregnancy and IH. Twins appeared to have a higher incidence of IH than singletons. PMID:23278441

Chen, Xiao Dong; Ma, Gang; Chen, Hui; Ye, Xiao Xiao; Jin, Yun Bo; Lin, Xiao Xi

2013-01-01

34

Effectiveness of strategies incorporating training and support of traditional birth attendants on perinatal and maternal mortality: meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the effectiveness of strategies incorporating training and support of traditional birth attendants on the outcomes of perinatal, neonatal, and maternal death in developing countries. Design Systematic review with meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, the Allied and Complementary Medicine database, British Nursing Index, Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, BioMed Central, PsycINFO, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database, African Index Medicus, Web of Science, Reproductive Health Library, and Science Citation Index (from inception to April 2011), without language restrictions. Search terms were “birth attend*”, “traditional midwife”, “lay birth attendant”, “dais”, and “comadronas”. Review methods We selected randomised and non-randomised controlled studies with outcomes of perinatal, neonatal, and maternal mortality. Two independent reviewers undertook data extraction. We pooled relative risks separately for the randomised and non-randomised controlled studies, using a random effects model. Results We identified six cluster randomised controlled trials (n=138?549) and seven non-randomised controlled studies (n=72?225) that investigated strategies incorporating training and support of traditional birth attendants. All six randomised controlled trials found a reduction in adverse perinatal outcomes; our meta-analysis showed significant reductions in perinatal death (relative risk 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 0.88, P<0.001; number needed to treat 35, 24 to 70) and neonatal death (0.79, 0.69 to 0.88, P<0.001; 98, 66 to 170). Meta-analysis of the non-randomised studies also showed a significant reduction in perinatal mortality (0.70, 0.57 to 0.84, p<0.001; 48, 32 to 96) and neonatal mortality (0.61, 0.48 to 0.75, P<0.001; 96, 65 to 168). Six studies reported on maternal mortality and our meta-analysis showed a non-significant reduction (three randomised trials, relative risk 0.79, 0.53 to 1.05, P=0.12; three non-randomised studies, 0.80, 0.44 to 1.15, P=0.26). Conclusion Perinatal and neonatal deaths are significantly reduced with strategies incorporating training and support of traditional birth attendants.

2011-01-01

35

Prenatal management and perinatal outcome in giant placental chorioangioma complicated with hydrops fetalis, fetal anemia and maternal mirror syndrome  

PubMed Central

Background Giant placental chorioangiomas have been associated with a number of severe fetal complications and high perinatal mortality. Case presentation We report a case of giant chorioangioma with fetal hydrops, additionally complicated by severe anemia, mild cardiomegaly with hyperdinamic heart circulation and maternal mirror syndrome. Intrauterine blood transfusion and amniodrainage was performed at 29?weeks. Worsening of the fetal and maternal condition prompted us to proceed with delivery at 29?+?5?weeks. The newborn died 3 hours later due to pulmonary hypoplasia and hemodynamic failure. Maternal course was favourable, mirror syndrome resolved in the second day and the patient was discharged four days following delivery. Conclusions In the case described here, fetal condition got worse despite of the anemia correction and amniodrainage. Our outcome raises the issue whether additional intrauterine clinical intervention, as intersticial laser, should have been performed to stop further deterioration of the fetal condition when progressive severe hydrops develops.

2012-01-01

36

Maternal and perinatal factors associated with hospitalised infectious mononucleosis in children, adolescents and young adults: record linkage study  

PubMed Central

Background There is current interest in the role of perinatal factors in the aetiology of diseases that occur later in life. Infectious mononucleosis (IM) can follow late primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and has been shown to increase the risk of multiple sclerosis and Hodgkin's disease. Little is known about maternal or perinatal factors associated with IM or its sequelae. Methods We investigated perinatal risk factors for hospitalised IM using a prospective record-linkage study in a population in the south of England. The dataset used, the Oxford record linkage study (ORLS), includes abstracts of birth registrations, maternities and in-patient hospital records, including day case care, for all subjects in a defined geographical area. From these sources, we identified cases of hospitalised IM up to the age of 30 years in people for whom the ORLS had a maternity record; and we compared perinatal factors in their pregnancy with those in the pregnancy of children who had no hospital record of IM. Results Our data showed a significant association between hospitalised IM and lower social class (p = 0.02), a higher risk of hospitalised IM in children of married rather than single mothers (p < 0.001), and, of marginal statistical significance, an association with singleton birth (p = 0.06). The ratio of observed to expected cases of hospitalised IM in each season was 0.95 in winter, 1.02 in spring, 1.02 in summer and 1.00 in autumn. The chi-square test for seasonality, with a value of 0.8, was not significant. Other factors studied, including low birth weight, short gestational age, maternal smoking, late age at motherhood, did not increase the risk of subsequent hospitalised IM. Conclusions Because of the increasing tendency of women to postpone childbearing, it is useful to know that older age at motherhood is not associated with an increased risk of hospitalised IM in their children. We have no explanation for the finding that children of married women had a higher risk of IM than those of single mothers. Though highly significant, it may nonetheless be a chance finding. We found no evidence that such perinatal factors as birth weight and gestational age, or season of birth, were associated with the risk of hospitalised IM.

2011-01-01

37

Maternal Antiretroviral Use during Pregnancy and Infant Congenital Anomalies: The NISDI Perinatal Study  

PubMed Central

Background We evaluated the association between maternal antiretrovirals (ARVs) during pregnancy and infant congenital anomalies (CAs), utilizing data from the NISDI Perinatal Study. Methods The study population consisted of first singleton pregnancies on study, ? 20 weeks gestation, among women enrolled in NISDI from Argentina and Brazil who delivered between September 2002 and October 2007. CAs were defined as any major structural or chromosomal abnormality, or a cluster of two or more minor abnormalities, according to the conventions of the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry. CAs were identified from fetal ultrasound, study visit, and death reports. The conventions of the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry were used. Prevalence rates [number of CAs per 100 live births (LBs)] were calculated for specific ARVs, classes of ARVs, and overall exposure to ARVs. Results Of 1229 women enrolled, 995 pregnancy outcomes (974 LBs) met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 60 infants (59 LBs and 1 stillbirth) had at least one CA. The overall prevalence of CAs (per 100 LBs) was 6.2 (95%CI = 4.6, 7.7). The prevalence of CAs after first trimester ARVs (6.2; 95%CI = 3.1, 9.3) was similar to that after second (6.8; 95%CI = 4.5, 9.0) or third trimester (4.3; 95%CI = 1.5, 7.2) exposure. The rate of CAs identified within seven days of delivery was 2.36 (95%CI: 1.4–3.3). Conclusions The prevalence of CAs following first trimester exposure to ARVs was similar to that following second or third trimester exposure. Continued surveillance for CAs among children exposed to ARVs during gestation is needed.

Joao, Esau C.; Calvet, Guilherme A.; Krauss, Margot R.; Hance, Laura Freimanis; Ortiz, Javier; Ivalo, Silvina A.; Pierre, Russell; Reyes, Mary; Watts, D. Heather; Read, Jennifer S.

2009-01-01

38

Intimate Partner Violence and Maternal Depression During the Perinatal Period: A Longitudinal Investigation of Latinas  

PubMed Central

This study assessed the course of perinatal depression amongst 210 Latinas who were and were not affected by intimate partner violence (IPV) and identified associated psychosocial factors. Peak depression prevalence occurred prenatally among 45.7% of IPV-exposed and 24.6% of non-IPV-exposed Latinas. At each assessment, depression was significantly higher for IPV-exposed compared to non-IPV-exposed mothers. Mastery and social support were associated with lower depression, while history of IPV, perceived stress and avoidant coping behaviors were associated with higher depression. Findings support recommendations for routine depression and IPV screening of Latinas in perinatal clinical settings.

Rodriguez, Michael A.; Valentine, Jeannette; Ahmed, Sawssan R.; Eisenman, David P.; Sumner, Lekeisha A.; Heilemann, MarySue V.; Liu, Honghu

2009-01-01

39

Water aerobics II: maternal body composition and perinatal outcomes after a program for low risk pregnant women  

PubMed Central

Background To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of water aerobics during pregnancy. Methods A randomized controlled trial carried out in 71 low-risk sedentary pregnant women, randomly allocated to water aerobics or no physical exercise. Maternal body composition and perinatal outcomes were evaluated. For statistical analysis Chi-square, Fisher's or Student's t-tests were applied. Risk ratios and their 95% CI were estimated for main outcomes. Body composition was evaluated across time using MANOVA or Friedman multiple analysis. Results There were no significant differences between the groups regarding maternal weight gain, BMI or percentage of body fat during pregnancy. Incidence of preterm births (RR = 0.84; 95%CI:0.28–2.53), vaginal births (RR = 1.24; 95%CI:0.73–2.09), low birthweight (RR = 1.30; 95%CI:0.61–2.79) and adequate weight for gestational age (RR = 1.50; 95%CI:0.65–3.48) were also not significantly different between groups. There were no significant differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate between before and immediately after the water aerobics session. Conclusion Water aerobics for sedentary pregnant women proved to be safe and was not associated with any alteration in maternal body composition, type of delivery, preterm birth rate, neonatal well-being or weight.

Cavalcante, Sergio R; Cecatti, Jose G; Pereira, Rosa I; Baciuk, Erica P; Bernardo, Ana L; Silveira, Carla

2009-01-01

40

Dynamic changes in lipids and proteins of maternal, fetal, and pup blood and milk during perinatal development in CD and Wistar rats.  

PubMed

An understanding of the physiological factors that regulate perinatal dosimetry is essential to improve the ability of physiologically based (PB) pharmacokinetic (PK) models to predict chemical risks to children. However, the impact of changing maternal/offspring physiology on PK during gestation and lactation remains poorly understood. This research determined lipid and protein changes in blood, milk and amniotic fluid of CD and Wistar dams, fetuses and neonates to improve the precision of perinatal PBPK modeling. Samples were collected from time-mated CD dams, fetuses, and pups on gestation day (GD) 18 and 20 (sperm positive = GD 0) or lactation day 0 (day of birth), 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 (n > or = 5 per time point). Fewer time points were sampled in Wistar rats, which showed similar patterns to CDs. Relative to nonpregnant dams, maternal serum protein levels (albumin, total protein and globulin) each decreased by approximately 20% during late gestation, whereas maternal serum lipids (triglycerides, low density lipoproteins, and phospholipids) increased up to fourfold. These physiological changes can impact maternal PK of both protein-bound and lipophilic chemicals. During lactation, triglycerides in milk were greater than 100-fold higher than maternal serum, favoring the disposition of lipophilic chemicals into milk and potentially increasing neonatal rodent exposure during critical stages of postnatal development. Serum protein levels in pups were two- to threefold lower than adults at birth, which may increase the bioavailability of protein-bound compounds. These data will aid in the interpretation of perinatal toxicity studies and improve the accuracy of predictive perinatal PBPK models. PMID:18593729

McMullin, Tami S; Lowe, Ezra R; Bartels, Michael J; Marty, Mary Sue

2008-10-01

41

Understanding and meeting the needs of women in the postpartum period: the Perinatal Maternal Health Promotion Model.  

PubMed

A new model for the care of women in the postpartum focuses on the development of life skills that promote complete well-being. The year following childbirth is a time of significant transition for women. In addition to the physiologic changes associated with the postpartum period, a woman undergoes marked psychosocial changes as she transitions into a motherhood role, reestablishes relationships, and works to meet the physical and emotional needs of her infant and other family members. It is a time when women are vulnerable to health problems directly related to childbirth and to compromised self-care, which can manifest in the development or reestablishment of unhealthy behaviors such as smoking and a sedentary lifestyle. In addition to long-term implications for women, compromised maternal health in the postpartum period is associated with suboptimal health and developmental outcomes for infants. Maternal health experts have called for a change in how care is provided for women in the postpartum period. This article presents the rationale for a health promotion approach to meeting the needs of women in the postpartum period and introduces the Perinatal Maternal Health Promotion Model. This conceptual framework is built around a definition of maternal well-being that asserts that health goes beyond merely the absence of medical complications. In the model, the core elements of a healthy postpartum are identified and include not only physical recovery but also the ability to meet individual needs and successfully transition into motherhood. These goals can best be achieved by helping women develop or strengthen 4 key individual health-promoting skills: the ability to mobilize social support, self-efficacy, positive coping strategies, and realistic expectations. While the model focuses on the woman, the health promotion approach takes into account that maternal health in this critical period affects and is affected by her family, social network, and community. Clinical implications of the model are addressed, including specific health promotion strategies that clinicians can readily incorporate into antepartum and postpartum care. PMID:24320095

Fahey, Jenifer O; Shenassa, Edmond

2013-01-01

42

Daily Life or Diagnosis? Dual Perspectives on Perinatal Depression within Maternal and Child Health Home Visiting  

PubMed Central

This study describes a qualitative inquiry–informing program development in a maternal and child home visiting program. Low-income women's perceptions of the meaning and experiences of depression were ascertained through focus groups and interviews. Simultaneously, the study examines staff member perceptions and roles related to depression. Specific findings from clients and staff reveal culturally situated beliefs about depression and stressful life events; comparing and contrasting these beliefs offers a novel perspective on identification and intervention for maternal depression. This study offers a foundation for a translational research agenda that will be used for program and policy development to enhance mental health services situated within maternal and child health home visiting programs.

Price, Sarah Kye; Cohen-Filipic, Katherine

2013-01-01

43

Maternal response to high-risk obstetric telemedicine consults when perinatal prognosis is poor.  

PubMed

This is a qualitative descriptive study evaluating the maternal response after the woman has learned her pregnancy has a poor prognosis via telemedicine rather than in a traditional, face-to-face, consultation method. In general, telemedicine was positively viewed by the participants; however, the experience may be markedly improved by implementing several simple changes in the overall consultative process. PMID:23635010

Wyatt, Stephanie N; Rhoads, Sarah J; Green, Angela L; Ott, Rachel E; Sandlin, Adam T; Magann, Everett F

2013-10-01

44

SCHIZOPHRENIA AND BIRTHPLACE OF PATERNAL AND MATERNAL GRANDFATHER IN THE JERUSALEM PERINATAL COHORT PROSPECTIVE STUDY  

PubMed Central

Some forms of epigenetic abnormalities transmitted to offspring are manifest in differences in disease incidence that depend on parent-of-origin. To explore whether such phenomena might operate in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, we estimated the relative incidence of these conditions in relation to parent-of-origin by considering the two grandfathers' countries of birth. In a prospective cohort of 88,829 offspring, born in Jerusalem in 1964–76 we identified 637 cases through Israel's psychiatric registry. Relative risks (RR) were estimated for paternal and maternal grandfathers' countries of birth using proportional hazards methods, controlling for parents' ages, low social class and duration of marriage. After adjusting for multiple observations, we found no significant differences between descendants of maternal or paternal grandfathers born in Iraq, Iran, Turkey, Syria, Yemen, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya/Egypt, Poland, USSR, Czechoslovakia, Germany or the USA. Those with paternal grandfathers from Romania (RR=1.9, 95% CI=1.3–2.8) or Hungary (1.6, 1.0–2.6) showed an increased incidence; however, those with maternal grandfathers from these countries experienced reduced incidence (RR=0.5, 0.3–0.8 and 0.4, 0.2–0.8). In post-hoc analyses we found that results were similar whether the comparison groups were restricted to descendants of other Europeans or included those from Western Asia and North Africa; and effects of paternal grandfathers from Romania/Hungary were more pronounced in females, while effects of maternal grandfathers from these countries were similar in males and females. These post-hoc “hypothesis-generating” findings lead one to question whether some families with ancestors in Romania or Hungary might carry a variant or mutation at a parentally imprinted locus that is altering susceptibility to schizophrenia. Such a locus, if it exists, might involve the X chromosome.

Harlap, S; Perrin, M C; Deutsch, L; Kleinhaus, K; Fennig, S; Nahon, D; Teitelbaum, A; Friedlander, Y; Malaspina, D

2009-01-01

45

Intracluster correlation coefficients from the 2005 WHO Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health: implications for implementation research.  

PubMed

Cluster-based studies involving aggregate units such as hospitals or medical practices are increasingly being used in healthcare evaluation. An important characteristic of such studies is the presence of intracluster correlation, typically quantified by the intracluster correlation coefficient (ICC). Sample size calculations for cluster-based studies need to account for the ICC, or risk underestimating the sample size required to yield the desired levels of power and significance. In this article, we present values for ICCs that were obtained from data on 97,095 pregnancies and 98,072 births taking place in a representative sample of 120 hospitals in eight Latin American countries. We present ICCs for 86 variables measured on mothers and newborns from pregnancy to the time of hospital discharge, including 'process variables' representing actual medical care received for each mother and newborn. Process variables are of primary interest in the field of implementation research. We found that overall, ICCs ranged from a minimum of 0.0003 to a maximum of 0.563 (median 0.067). For maternal and newborn outcome variables, the median ICCs were 0.011 (interquartile range 0.007-0.037) and 0.054 (interquartile range 0.013-0.075) respectively; however, for process variables, the median was 0.161 (interquartile range 0.072-0.328). Thus, we confirm previous findings that process variables tend to have higher ICCs than outcome variables. We demonstrate that ICCs generally tend to increase with higher prevalences (close to 0.5). These results can help researchers calculate the required sample size for future research studies in maternal and perinatal health. PMID:18298685

Taljaard, Monica; Donner, Allan; Villar, José; Wojdyla, Daniel; Velazco, Alejandro; Bataglia, Vicente; Faundes, Anibal; Langer, Ana; Narváez, Alberto; Valladares, Eliette; Carroli, Guillermo; Zavaleta, Nelly; Shah, Archana; Campodónico, Liana; Romero, Mariana; Reynoso, Sofia; de Pádua, Karla Simônia; Giordano, Daniel; Kublickas, Marius; Acosta, Arnaldo

2008-03-01

46

Maternal SDF1 3?A Polymorphism Is Associated with Increased Perinatal Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Transmission  

PubMed Central

Genetic polymorphisms in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes influence susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and disease progression, but little is known regarding the association between these allelic variations and the ability of the host to transmit virus. In this study, we show that the maternal heterozygous SDF1 genotype (SDF1 3?A/wt) is associated with perinatal transmission of HIV-1 (risk ratio [RR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0 to 3.3) and particularly postnatal breastmilk transmission (RR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 8.6). In contrast, the infant SDF1 genotype had no effect on mother-to-infant transmission. These data suggest that SDF1, which is a ligand for the T-tropic HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4, may affect the ability of a mother to transmit the virus to her infant. This suggests that a genetic polymorphism in a gene encoding a chemokine receptor ligand may be associated with increased infectivity of the index case and highlights the importance of considering transmission as well as clinical outcome in designing chemokine-based therapies for HIV-1.

John, Grace C.; Rousseau, Christine; Dong, Tao; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Nduati, Ruth; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Rostron, Tim; Kreiss, Joan K.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Overbaugh, Julie

2000-01-01

47

Inflammatory response and oxidative stress in developing rat brain and its consequences on motor behavior following maternal administration of LPS and perinatal anoxia.  

PubMed

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of locomotion, posture and movement that can be caused by prenatal, perinatal or postnatal insults during brain development. An increased incidence of CP has been correlated to perinatal asphyxia and maternal infections during gestation. The effects of maternal exposure to low doses of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) associated or not with perinatal anoxia (PA) in oxidative and inflammatory parameters were examined in cerebral cortices of newborns pups. Concentrations of TNF-?, IL-1, IL-4, SOD, CAT and DCF were measured by the ELISA method. Other newborn rats were assessed for neonatal developmental milestones from day 1 to 21. Motor behavior was also tested at P29 using open-field and Rotarod. PA alone only increased IL-1 expression in cerebral cortex with no changes in oxidative measures. PA also induced a slight impact on development and motor performance. LPS alone was not able to delay motor development but resulted in changes in motor activity and coordination with increased levels of IL-1 and TNF-? expression associated with a high production of free radicals and elevated SOD activity. When LPS and PA were combined, changes on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters were greater. In addition, greater motor development and coordination impairments were observed. Prenatal exposure of pups to LPS appeared to sensitize the developing brain to effects of a subsequent anoxia insult resulting in an increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased free radical levels in the cerebral cortex. These outcomes suggest that oxidative and inflammatory parameters in the cerebral cortex are implicated in motor deficits following maternal infection and perinatal anoxia by acting in a synergistic manner during a critical period of development of the nervous system. PMID:24140242

Stigger, Felipe; Lovatel, Gisele; Marques, Marília; Bertoldi, Karine; Moysés, Felipe; Elsner, Viviane; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues; Achaval, Matilde; Marcuzzo, Simone

2013-12-01

48

Prenatal enrichment and recovery from perinatal cortical damage: effects of maternal complex housing  

PubMed Central

Birth is a particularly vulnerable time for acquiring brain injury. Unfortunately, very few treatments are available for those affected. Here we explore the effectiveness of prenatal intervention in an animal model of early brain damage. We used a complex housing paradigm as a form of prenatal enrichment. Six nulliparous dams and one male rat were placed in complex housing (condomom group) for 12 h per day until the dams' delivered their pups. At parturition the dams were left in their home (standard) cages with their pups. Four dams were housed in standard cages (cagemom group) throughout pregnancy and with their pups until weaning. At postnatal day 3 (P3) infants of both groups received frontal cortex removals or sham surgery. Behavioral testing began on P60 and included the Morris water task and a skilled reaching task. Brains were processed for Golgi analyses. Complex housing of the mother had a significant effect on the behavior of their pups. Control animals from the condomom group outperformed those of the cagemom group in the water task. Condomom animals with lesions performed better than their cagemom cohorts in both the water task and in skilled reaching. Condomom animals showed an increase in cortical thickness at anterior planes and thalamic area at both anterior and posterior regions. Golgi analyses revealed an increase in spine density. These results suggest that prenatal enrichment alters brain organization in manner that is prophylactic for perinatal brain injury. This result could have significant implications for the prenatal management of infants expected to be at risk for difficult birth.

Gibb, Robbin L.; Gonzalez, Claudia L. R.; Kolb, Bryan

2014-01-01

49

Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women with First Trimester Vaginal Bleeding  

PubMed Central

Objective To study the pregnancy outcomes in first trimester vaginal bleeding. Materials and methods This cross sectional study was done on 60 pregnant women with first trimester vaginal bleeding referring to university hospitals affiliated to Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran. All women were evaluated for the outcomes including abortion, preterm rapture of membranes, preterm labor, second and third trimester vaginal bleeding, low birth weight and intra uterine growth retardation and the mode of delivery. Data were analyzed using SPSS- 11. Results Placenta accreta, second trimester bleeding and preterm labor were significantly more prevalent in pregnant women with first trimester bleeding (P ? 0.05). Conclusion According to results of present study vaginal bleeding in first trimester of pregnancy may predict further maternal and fetal complications. We recommend training pregnant women regarding those complications and their prevention.

Amirkhani, Zhila; Abedian, Media; Salehi, Gelareh Rabie; Zarbati, Nesa; Mogharehabed, Maryam; Arefian, Sahba; Jafarabadi, Mina

2013-01-01

50

Maternal and perinatal guideline development in hospitals in South East Asia: the experience of the SEA-ORCHID project  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are commonly used to support practitioners to improve practice. However many studies have raised concerns about guideline quality. The reasons why guidelines are not developed following the established development methods are not clear. The SEA-ORCHID project aims to increase the generation and use of locally relevant research and improve clinical practice in maternal and perinatal care in four countries in South East Asia. Baseline data highlighted that development of evidence-based CPGs according to recommended processes was very rare in the SEA-ORCHID hospitals. The project investigators suggested that there were aspects of the recommended development process that made it very difficult in the participating hospitals. We therefore aimed to explore the experience of guideline development and particularly the enablers of and barriers to developing evidence-based guidelines in the nine hospitals in South East Asia participating in the SEA-ORCHID project, so as to better understand how evidence-based guideline development could be facilitated in these settings. Methods Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were undertaken with senior and junior healthcare providers (nurses, midwives, doctors) from the maternal and neonatal services at each of the nine participating hospitals. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and a thematic analysis undertaken. Results Seventy-five individual, 25 pair and eleven group interviews were conducted. Participants clearly valued evidence-based guidelines. However they also identified several major barriers to guideline development including time, lack of awareness of process, difficulties searching for evidence and arranging guideline development group meetings, issues with achieving multi-disciplinarity and consumer involvement. They also highlighted the central importance of keeping guidelines up-to-date. Conclusion Healthcare providers in the SEA-ORCHID hospitals face a series of barriers to developing evidence-based guidelines. At present, in many hospitals, several of these barriers are insurmountable, and as a result, rigorous, evidence-based guidelines are not being developed. Given the acknowledged benefits of evidence-based guidelines, perhaps a new approach to supporting their development in these contexts is needed.

Turner, Tari J; Short, Jacki

2009-01-01

51

Time-to-Delivery after Maternal Transfer to a Tertiary Perinatal Centre  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To determine, in women transferred antenatally for acute admission with high risk pregnancies, the numbers who deliver, the average time from transfer to delivery, and whether the reason for transfer influences the time-to-delivery. Methods. A retrospective analysis of time-to-delivery was performed in a population of women transferred to the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, QLD. Data were obtained from the hospital obstetric, neonatal, and admission databases. Results. A total of 941 women were transferred antenatally with high risk pregnancies where delivery was deemed potentially imminent. Of these 821 (87%) delivered at RBWH. The remaining 120 women (13%) were discharged prior to delivery and then delivered elsewhere. Of the 821 maternal transfers that delivered, the median time to delivery was 24.4?hrs. There were 43% who delivered within 24 hours of admission and 29% who either delivered after 7 days or delivered elsewhere. Most transfers for fetal abnormality delivered in the first 24 hours while most transfers for antepartum haemorrhage and preterm prelabour membrane rupture delivered beyond 24 hours. Conclusion. There are significant differences in time-to-delivery following transfer depending on the reason for transfer and many infants transferred in utero will not deliver imminently.

Hutchinson, Fiona H.; Davies, Mark W.

2014-01-01

52

Maternal and Perinatal Outcome in Teenage Vs. Vicenarian Primigravidae - A Clinical Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the maternal and foetal outcomes and complications in teenage primigravida as compared to those in primigravidae who were aged 20-29 years. Methods: Eighty teenage and one hundred sixty adult primigravidae were taken up for the study. Study duration was 24 months, from November 2010 to October 2012, at Rural Medical Research Centre in southern India. During this period, all cases were included in the study, irrespective of their booking statuses. For every teenage primigravidae, two subsequent adult primigravidae were correspondingly studied. Patients with major skeletal deformities such as kyphoscoliosis, polio, pelvic fractures, diabetes mellitus, renal disorders, morbid obesity were excluded. All cases of molar pregnancies and primigravidas who were admitted for abortions were also excluded. Results: 38.75% of teenage primigravidae were unbooked as compared to 6.9% of adults. 68.75% of teenage primigravidae were anaemic as compared to 33.75% of adults. Antenatal complications like anaemia, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, oligohydroamnios, hypothyroid were significantly more in teenagers (68.8%) as compared to those which were seen in adults(18.1%). 25% of teenagers had preterm births as compared to 5% adults who has preterm births. 43.75% of teenagers had Lower Segment Caesarean Section (LSCS) as compared to 20% adults who had LSCS. Indication was foetal distress in a majority of teenagers (68.5%). 29.2% of teenagers had low birth weight children as compared to 16.6% adults who had such children. 31.7% of teenage neonates required NICU admissions as compared to 12.27% neonates of adult mothers. Interpretation and Conclusion: It can be interpreted that teenage primigravidae had a significant number of complications in pregnancy, leading cause being anaemia, more preterm incidences and higher rates of LSCS, followed by higher number of NICU admissions. Since teenage pregnancy is a multifaceted problem, it demands multidimensional solutions. Teenage pregnancies are more common in populations with low socio-economic statuses, due to lack of education, awareness of complications of teenage pregnancies, and various other factors. Hence, awareness should be created and various programmes should be taken up, to educate mainly the poor in our rural setup. As early marriages cannot be prevented in our culture, so, possibly creating awareness on late conceptions is of utmost importance.

Dutta, Indranil; Joshi, Prashant

2013-01-01

53

The BRAzil MAGnesium (BRAMAG) trial: a randomized clinical trial of oral magnesium supplementation in pregnancy for the prevention of preterm birth and perinatal and maternal morbidity  

PubMed Central

Background Preterm birth is the leading cause of infant mortality globally, including Brazil. We will evaluate whether oral magnesium citrate reduces the risk of placental dysfunction and its negative consequences for both the fetus and mother, which, in turn, should reduce the need for indicated preterm delivery. Methods/Design We will complete a multicenter, randomized double-blind clinical trial comparing oral magnesium citrate 150 mg twice daily (n?=?2000 women) to matched placebo (n?=?1000 women), starting at 121/7 to 206/7 weeks gestation and continued until delivery. We will include women at higher risk for placental dysfunction, based on clinical factors from a prior pregnancy (e.g., prior preterm delivery, stillbirth or preeclampsia) or the current pregnancy (e.g., chronic hypertension, pre-pregnancy diabetes mellitus, maternal age?>?35 years or pre-pregnancy maternal body mass index?>?30 kg/m2). The primary perinatal outcome is a composite of preterm birth??20 weeks gestation, neonatal death?maternal outcome is preeclampsia arising?maternal stroke during pregnancy or???7 days after delivery, or maternal death during pregnancy or???7 days after delivery. Discussion The results of this randomized clinical trial may be especially relevant in low and middle income countries that have high rates of prematurity and limited resources for acute newborn and maternal care. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02032186, registered December 19, 2013.

2014-01-01

54

Finance and faith at the Catholic Maternity Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1944-1969.  

PubMed

In 1944, the Medical Mission Sisters opened the Catholic Maternity Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico, primarily to serve patients of Spanish American descent. The Maternity Institute offered nurse-midwifery care and functioned as a school to train nurse-midwifery students. Originally planned as a home birth service, the Catholic Maternity Institute soon evolved into a service in which patients chose whether to deliver in their own homes or in a small freestanding building called La Casita. In fact, despite their idealism about home birth and strong feelings that home birth was best, the sisters experienced significant ambivalence concerning La Casita. Births there met many of the institute's pragmatic needs for a larger number of student experiences, quick and safe transfers to a nearby hospital, and more efficient use of the midwives' time. Importantly, as the sisters realized that many of their patients preferred to deliver at La Casita, they came to see that this option permitted these impoverished patients an opportunity to exercise some choice. However, the choice of many patients to deliver at La Casita--which was significantly more expensive for the Maternity Institute than home birth--eventually led to the demise of the Maternity Institute. PMID:20067097

Cockerham, Anne Z; Keeling, Arlene W

2010-01-01

55

Maternal dietary docosahexaenoic acid supplementation attenuates fetal growth restriction and enhances pulmonary function in a newborn mouse model of perinatal inflammation.  

PubMed

The preterm infant is often exposed to maternal and neonatal inflammatory stimuli and is born with immature lungs, resulting in a need for oxygen therapy. Nutritional intervention with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 6.3 g/kg of diet) has been shown to attenuate inflammation in various human diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that maternal DHA supplementation during late gestation and lactation attenuated hyperoxic lung injury in newborn mouse pups. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that DHA supplementation to the dam would reduce hyperoxic lung injury and growth deficits in a more severe model of systemic maternal inflammation, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neonatal hyperoxia exposure. On embryonic day 16, dams were placed on DHA (6.3 g DHA/kg diet) or control diets and injected with saline or LPS. Diets were maintained through weaning. At birth, pups were placed in room air or hyperoxia for 14 d. Improvements in birth weight (P < 0.01), alveolarization (P ? 0.01), and pulmonary function (P ? 0.03) at 2 and 8 wk of age were observed in pups exposed to perinatal inflammation and born to DHA-supplemented dams compared with control diet-exposed pups. These improvements were associated with decreases in tissue macrophage numbers (P < 0.01), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression (P ? 0.05), and decreases in soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products concentrations (P < 0.01) at 2 and 8 wk. Furthermore, DHA supplementation attenuated pulmonary fibrosis, which was associated with the reduction of matrix metalloproteinases 2, 3, and 8 (P ? 0.03) and collagen mRNA (P ? 0.05), and decreased collagen (P < 0.01) and vimentin (P ? 0.03) protein concentrations. In a model of severe inflammation, maternal DHA supplementation lessened inflammation and improved lung growth in the offspring. Maternal supplementation with DHA may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce neonatal inflammation. PMID:24453131

Velten, Markus; Britt, Rodney D; Heyob, Kathryn M; Tipple, Trent E; Rogers, Lynette K

2014-03-01

56

Stepped Care for Maternal Mental Health: A Case Study of the Perinatal Mental Health Project in South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

As one article in a series on Global Mental Health Practice, Simone Honikman and colleagues from South Africa provide a case study of the Perinatal Mental Health Project, which delivered mental health care to pregnant women in a collaborative, step-wise manner, making use of existing resources in primary care.

Simone Honikman; Thandi van Heyningen; Sally Field; Emily Baron; Mark Tomlinson

2012-01-01

57

Stepped care for maternal mental health: a case study of the perinatal mental health project in South Africa.  

PubMed

As one article in a series on Global Mental Health Practice, Simone Honikman and colleagues from South Africa provide a case study of the Perinatal Mental Health Project, which delivered mental health care to pregnant women in a collaborative, step-wise manner, making use of existing resources in primary care. PMID:22666181

Honikman, Simone; van Heyningen, Thandi; Field, Sally; Baron, Emily; Tomlinson, Mark

2012-01-01

58

GCN2 in the Brain Programs PPAR?2 and Triglyceride Storage in the Liver during Perinatal Development in Response to Maternal Dietary Fat  

PubMed Central

The liver plays a central role in regulating lipid metabolism and facilitates efficient lipid utilization and storage. We discovered that a modest increase in maternal dietary fat in mice programs triglyceride storage in the liver of their developing offspring. The activation of this programming is not apparent, however, until several months later at the adult stage. We found that the perinatal programming of adult hepatic triglyceride storage was controlled by the eIF2? kinase GCN2 (EIF2AK4) in the brain of the offspring, which stimulates epigenetic modification of the Ppar?2 gene in the neonatal liver. Genetic ablation of Gcn2 in the offspring exhibited reduced hepatic triglyceride storage and repressed expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (Ppar?2) and two lipid droplet protein genes, Fsp27 and Cidea. Brain-specific, but not liver-specific, Gcn2 KO mice exhibit these same defects demonstrating that GCN2 in the developing brain programs hepatic triglyceride storage. GCN2 and nutrition-dependent programming of Ppar?2 is correlated with trimethylation of lysine 4 of histone 3 (H3K4me3) in the Ppar?2 promoter region during neonatal development. In addition to regulating hepatic triglyceride in response to modest changes in dietary fat, Gcn2 deficiency profoundly impacts the severity of the obese-diabetic phenotype of the leptin receptor mutant (db/db) mouse, by reducing hepatic steatosis and obesity but exacerbating the diabetic phenotype. We suggest that GCN2-dependent perinatal programming of hepatic triglyceride storage is an adaptation to couple early nutrition to anticipated needs for hepatic triglyceride storage in adults. However, increasing the hepatic triglyceride set point during perinatal development may predispose individuals to hepatosteatosis, while reducing circulating fatty acid levels that promote insulin resistance.

Xu, Xu; Hu, Jingjie; McGrath, Barbara C.; Cavener, Douglas R.

2013-01-01

59

Maternal and perinatal characteristics and the risk of cow's milk allergy in infants up to 2 years of age: a case-control study nested in the Finnish population.  

PubMed

This study examined whether maternal background and perinatal factors were associated with the risk of cow's milk allergy (CMA) in infants up to 2 years of age in a nested case-control study. All children born in 1996-2004 in Finland and diagnosed with CMA by 2006 were identified (n = 16,237). For each case, one matched control was selected. Information on maternal and perinatal factors was derived from the Medical Birth Register. The associations were analyzed by conditional logistic regression. Cesarean section (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10, 1.27) and high maternal age (> or =35 years; adjusted OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.36) were associated with increased risk, whereas low maternal socioeconomic status (adjusted OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.71), smoking (adjusted OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.79), high number of previous deliveries (> or =5; adjusted OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.86), and multiple pregnancy (adjusted OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.82) were associated with decreased risk of CMA. In conclusion, maternal background and perinatal factors may play a role in the development of CMA, but further research is needed to clarify these associations and the underpinning biologic mechanisms. PMID:20472571

Metsälä, Johanna; Lundqvist, Annamari; Kaila, Minna; Gissler, Mika; Klaukka, Timo; Virtanen, Suvi M

2010-06-15

60

Goals and Standards for Perinatal Services.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of modern perinatal services is to maximize the quality of maternal, fetal, and neonatal care. Perinatal is defined as the period between 19 weeks gestation and 28 days after birth. Three levels of perinatal care have been defined by the Committe...

1980-01-01

61

What about the mothers? An analysis of maternal mortality and morbidity in perinatal health surveillance systems in Europe  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess capacity to develop routine monitoring of maternal health in the European Union using indicators of maternal mortality and severe morbidity. Design Analysis of aggregate data from routine statistical systems compiled by the EURO-PERISTAT project and comparison with data from national enquiries. Setting Twenty-five countries in the European Union and Norway. Population Women giving birth in participating countries in 2003 and 2004. Methods Application of a common collection of data by selecting specific International Classification of Disease codes from the ‘Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium’ chapter. External validity was assessed by reviewing the results of national confidential enquiries and linkage studies. Main outcome measures Maternal mortality ratio, with distribution of specific obstetric causes, and severe acute maternal morbidity, which included: eclampsia, surgery and blood transfusion for obstetric haemorrhage, and intensive-care unit admission. Results In 22 countries that provided data, the maternal mortality ratio was 6.3 per 100 000 live births overall and ranged from 0 to 29.6. Under-ascertainment was evident from comparisons with studies that use enhanced identification of deaths. Furthermore, routine cause of death registration systems in countries with specific systems for audit reported higher maternal mortality ratio than those in countries without audits. For severe acute maternal morbidity, 16 countries provided data about at least one category of morbidity, and only three provided data for all categories. Reported values ranged widely (from 0.2 to 1.6 women with eclampsia per 1000 women giving birth and from 0.2 to 1.0 hysterectomies per 1000 women). Conclusions Currently available data on maternal mortality and morbidity are insufficient for monitoring trends over time in Europe and for comparison between countries. Confidential enquiries into maternal deaths are recommended.

Bouvier-Colle, M-H; Mohangoo, AD; Gissler, M; Novak-Antolic, Z; Vutuc, C; Szamotulska, K; Zeitlin, J

2012-01-01

62

Association of body mass index of HIV1–infected pregnant women and infant birth weight, body mass index, length, and head circumference: the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development International Site Development Initiative Perinatal Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the relationship between the body mass index (BMI) of HIV-1–infected women and their infants' perinatal outcomes. The study population was composed of women enrolled in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development International Site Development Initiative Perinatal Study, with data allowing calculation of their BMI adjusted for length of gestation (adjBMI), who delivered singleton infants.

Maria Letícia S. Cruz; D. Robert Harris; Jennifer S. Read; Marisa M. Mussi-Pinhata; Regina C. M. Succi

2007-01-01

63

Impact of specialization in gynecology and obstetrics departments on pregnant women's choice of maternity institutions  

PubMed Central

In April 2008, specialization in gynecology and obstetrics departments was introduced in the Sennan area of Osaka prefecture in Japan that aimed at solving the problems of regional provisions of obstetrics services (e.g., shortage of obstetricians, overworking of obstetricians, and provision of specialist maternity services for high-risk pregnancies). Under this specialization, the gynecology and obstetrics departments in two city hospitals were combined and reconstructed into two centers, i.e., the gynecological care center in Kaizuka City Hospital and the prenatal care center in Izumisano City Hospital. This paper investigates to what extent and how this specialization affected pregnant women’s choices of the prenatal care center and other maternity institutions. We used birth certificate data of 15,927 newborns from the Sennan area between April 1, 2007 and March 30, 2010, for Before and After Analysis to examine changes in pregnant women’s choices of maternity institutions before and after the specialization was instituted. Our results indicated that this specialization scheme was, to some extent, successful on the basis of providing maternity services for high-risk pregnancies at the prenatal care center (i.e., Izumisano City Hospital) and having created a positive effect by pregnant women to other facilities in the nearby area.

2013-01-01

64

Reduction in the perinatal HIV transmission: the experience at the Maternal Infant Studies Center and Gamma Projects at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine.  

PubMed

The AIDS pandemic had a significant impact in Puerto Rico, especially among the heterosexual populations, in particular women. Women are one of the fastest growing risk groups with HIV/AIDS in the USA and constitute about half of the AIDS cases in the world. During the past 10 years Puerto Rico has ranked among the top 5 jurisdictions in the United States in AIDS cases rates, among men, women and children. In 1987 a universal prenatal HIV screening program was implemented in the University Hospital catchment area consisting of approximately 5,000 deliveries per year. Because of the early identification of pregnant women living with HIV, access to lifesaving clinical research and the implementation of multiple strategies and comprehensive care, the perinatal HIV transmission has been reduced to zero since 1997, with a blip of one case in 2002, and none since then. The availability and access to clinical and behavioral research has been one of the key elements for this success story. The programs involved and responsible for this spectacular outcome, namely the Maternal Infant Studies Center (CEMI-Spanish Acronym) and Gamma Projects at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine are described. The cost savings impact of stopping mother-infant perinatal HIV-1 transmission has been calculated to be approximately $34 to $58 million dollars in 10 years. The impact of the effectiveness of these programs in having healthy uninfected infants, prolonging and improving the quality of life of those living with HIV, and providing hope to families affected by this epidemic is incalculable. PMID:18246960

Zorrilla, Carmen D; Tamayo Agrait, Vivian; Febo, Irma; Santiago, Lydia E; Díaz, Clemente; Salabarría, Iraida; Pérez, Eileen; Hillyer, George V

2007-12-01

65

Perinatal\\/Neonatal Case Presentation: Neonatal Acute Renal Failure Secondary to Maternal Exposure to Telmisartan, Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonist  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fetal and neonatal toxic effects of angiotensin II receptor antagonists have been described in animals and humans. Five cases of fetal or neonatal deaths have been reported following maternal use of sartans for hypertension. We report a case of neonatal transient renal failure following telmisartan therapy during pregnancy. This class of antihypertensive drugs should be avoided during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Christine Pietrement; Lilia Malot; Brigitte Santerne; Bernard Roussel; Jacques Motte; Patrice Morville

2003-01-01

66

Maternal hyperuricemia in normotensive singleton pregnancy, a prenatal finding with continuous perinatal and postnatal effects, a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background To assess the association of maternal hyperuricemia with adverse pregnancy outcome and neonatal metabolic, neurologic and respiratory disturbances in normotensive singleton pregnant women. Method This prospective multicentric cohort study was conducted on 404 normotensive singleton pregnant women who were admitted for delivery in Vali-Asr and Akbar-Abadi teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Upon enrollment maternal and umbilical sera were obtained for determining uric acid levels. 1 and 5 minutes Apgar scores, the need for neonatal resuscitation and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission were recorded. In case of NICU admission a neonatal blood sample was drawn for determining uric acid, blood sugar and bilirubin levels. An intracranial ultrasound imaging was also carried out for the admittd neonates for detecting intraventricular hemorrhage. Results Maternal hyperuricemia (uric acid one standard deviation greater than the appropriate gestational age) was independently associated with preterm birth (odds ratio (OR), 3.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.1 – 4.79), small for gestational age delivery (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.04 – 2.57), NICU admission (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.12 – 2.94) and neonatal IVH (OR, 8.14; 95% CI, 1.11 – 87.1). Conclusions Maternal hyperuricemia in normotensive singleton pregnant women is significantly associated with preterm and SGA delivery and the development of neonatal IVH.

2014-01-01

67

Maternal glucose level and body mass index measured at gestational diabetes mellitus screening and the risk of macrosomia: results from a perinatal cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the impact of maternal blood glucose (BG) level and body mass index (BMI) measured at gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening on the risk of macrosomia. Design A perinatal cohort of women were followed up from receiving perinatal healthcare to giving birth. Setting Beichen District, Tianjin, China between June 2011 and October 2012. Participants 1951 women aged 19–42?years with valid values of BMI and BG level at GDM screening (24–28?weeks gestation), singleton birth and birth weight (BW)>2500?g. Main outcomes and measures Primary outcome was macrosomia (BW>4000?g). BG level and BMI were measured at GDM screening. Results 191 (9.7%) newborns were macrosomia. The ORs (95% CIs) of macrosomia from multiple logistic regression were 1.14 (1.10 to 1.19, p<0.0001) for BMI and 1.11 (1.01 to 1.23, p=0.03) for BG. When BMI and BG levels (continuous) were modelled simultaneously, the OR for BMI was similar, but significantly attenuated for BG. Areas of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were 0.6530 (0.6258 to 0.6803) for BMI and 0.5548 (0.5248 to 0.5848) for BG (?2=26.17, p<0.0001). BG (mmol/L, <6.7, 6.7–7.8 or ?7.8) and BMI in quintiles (Q1–Q5) were evaluated with BG <6.7 and Q2 BMI as the reference group. The ORs of macrosomia were not statistically different for mothers in Q1 or Q2 of BMI regardless of the BG levels; the ORs for ?Q3 of BMI were elevated significantly with the highest OR observed in Q5 of BMI and BG levels ?7.8 (6.93 (2.61 to 18.43), p<0.0001). Conclusions High BMI measured at GDM screening was the most important determinant for risk of macrosomia. These findings suggest that GDM screening may be a critical gestational time point to initiate maternal weight control oriented intervention strategy to lower the risk.

Liu, Jian; Leng, Junhong; Tang, Chen; Liu, Gongshu; Hay, John; Wang, Jing; Wen, Shiwu; Li, Zhenling; She, Ye

2014-01-01

68

The association between maternal hepatitis B e antigen status, as a proxy for perinatal transmission, and the risk of hepatitis B e antigenaemia in Gambian children  

PubMed Central

Background Early age at infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) increases the risk of chronic HBV infection. In addition early age at infection may further increase the risk of persistent viral replication beyond its effect on chronicity. The effects of perinatal and early postnatal transmission on the risk of prolonged hepatitis B e antigenaemia in children with chronic HBV infection are not well documented in Africa. We examine these associations using maternal HBV sero-status and the number of HBV-positive older siblings as proxy measures for perinatal and early postnatal transmission, respectively. Methods Hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive mothers were identified in six population-based HBV sero-surveys conducted in The Gambia between 1986 and 1990. For every HBeAg-positive mother, a hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive HBeAg-negative mother and HBsAg-negative mother were randomly selected from the population surveyed. These mothers and their family members were tested for HBV sero-markers in a subsequent survey conducted between 1991 and 1993. Results Thirty-eight HBeAg positive mothers and the same number of HBsAg-positive HBeAg-negative mothers and HBsAg-negative mothers participated in the study. Sixty-nine percent of their children also participated. There was a non-significant positive association between HBeAg prevalence in children and the number of HBeAg-positive older siblings (64.1%, 69.2% and 83.3% in children with 0, 1 and ?2 HBeAg-positive older siblings, respectively). After adjusting for confounders, having an HBeAg-positive mother was a risk factor for HBeAg positivity in children carrying HBsAg (adjusted OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.0-19.5, p?=?0.04), whilst the number of HBeAg-positive older siblings was not. Conclusions Maternal HBeAg was associated with positive HBeAg in children with chronic HBV infection. This suggests that interrupting mother-to-infant transmission in sub-Saharan Africa might help reduce the burden of liver disease. A timely dose of HBV vaccine within 24 hours of birth, as recommended by WHO, should be implemented in sub-Saharan Africa.

2014-01-01

69

Maternal and fetal outcomes in placenta accreta after institution of team-managed care.  

PubMed

Introduction: Placenta accreta significantly contributes to maternal morbidity and mortality. We evaluated whether planned delivery and experienced, team-managed surgical intervention results in improved outcomes. We also examined whether risk factors differed for accreta, increta, and percreta and evaluated whether excess lower segment uterine vascularity correlates with disease severity. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients before versus after institution of a management protocol. Of the 58 044 deliveries over 10 years, there were 67 women whose pregnancies were histopathologically confirmed as placenta accreta, increta, or percreta (1/866). Clinical outcome measures were estimated blood loss (EBL), packed red blood cells (pRBCs) transfused, maternal and fetal complications, intensive care unit admission, and length of stay. Results: There were no maternal or infant deaths. In the managed cohort, EBL was reduced by 48% (P < .001), intraoperative pRBCs transfused by 40% (P < .01), total transfused pRBCs per case by 50% (P < .01), and surgical intensive care unit admissions by >50% (P < .01). Assessment of maternal risk factors by diagnosis revealed marked differences between accreta versus increta and percreta. Clinically assessed excess vascularity of the lower uterine segment correlated with disease severity. The incidence of neonatal complications was similar in both cohorts. Conclusions: Targeted delivery at 34 weeks and team-managed diagnosis, treatment, and care of patients with placenta accreta were associated with improved maternal, but not neonatal outcomes. PMID:24336676

Al-Khan, Abdulla; Gupta, Vivek; Illsley, Nicholas P; Mannion, Ciaran; Koenig, Christopher; Bogomol, Adam; Alvarez, Manuel; Zamudio, Stacy

2014-06-01

70

Maternity waiting homes and institutional birth in Nicaragua: policy options and strategic implications.  

PubMed

With the aim of promoting institutional births and reducing the high maternal and child mortality rates in rural and poor zones, the government of Nicaragua is supporting the creation of maternity waiting homes. This study analyzes that strategy and examines the factors associated with the use of maternity waiting homes and institutional birth. To that end, we apply a quantitative approach, by means of an econometric analysis of the data extracted from surveys conducted in 2006 on a sample of women and parteras or traditional birth attendants, as well as a qualitative approach based on interviews with key informants. Results indicate that although the operation of the maternity waiting homes is usually satisfactory, there is still room for improvement along the following lines: (i) disseminating information about the homes to both women and men, as the latter frequently decide the course of women's healthcare, and to parteras, who can play an important role in referring women; (ii) strengthening the postpartum care; (iii) ensuring financial sustainability by obtaining regular financial support from the government to complement contributions from the community; and (iv) strengthening the local management and involvement of the regional government. These measures might be useful for health policy makers in Nicaragua and in other developing countries that are considering this strategy. PMID:22052420

García Prado, Ariadna; Cortez, Rafael

2012-01-01

71

A Population-Based Study of Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Assisted Reproductive Technology in Massachusetts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess associations between assisted reproductive technology (ART) and adverse maternal and infant outcomes, with an\\u000a emphasis on singletons. Methods: We linked data from the US ART surveillance system with Massachusetts live birth-infant death records data for resident births\\u000a in 1997–1998 and compared births conceived with ART (N = 3316) with births not conceived with ART or infertility medications (N = 157,066) on:

Laura A. Schieve; Bruce Cohen; Angela Nannini; Cynthia Ferre; Meredith A. Reynolds; Zi Zhang; Gary Jeng; Maurizio Macaluso; Victoria C. Wright

2007-01-01

72

Effects of Prenatal and Perinatal Exposure to Fine Air Pollutants and Maternal Fish Consumption on the Occurrence of Infantile Eczema  

PubMed Central

Background As there is a scarcity of evidence on potential hazards and preventive factors for infantile eczema operating in the prenatal period, the main goal of this study was to assess the role of prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the occurrence of infant eczema jointly with the possible modulating effect of maternal fish consumption. Methods The study sample consisted of 469 women enrolled during pregnancy, who gave birth to term babies (>36 weeks of gestation). Among all pregnant women recruited, personal measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were performed over 48 h in the second trimester of pregnancy. After delivery, every 3 months in the first year of the newborn's life, a detailed, standardized, face-to-face interview was administered to each mother, in the process of which a trained interviewer recorded any history of infantile eczema and data on potential environmental hazards. The estimated risk of eczema related to higher prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5 >53.0 ?g/m3) and postnatal ETS as well as the protective effect of maternal fish intake were adjusted for potential confounders in a multivariable logistic regression model. Results While the separate effects of higher prenatal PM2.5 and postnatal ETS exposure were not statistically significant, their joint effect appeared to have a significant influence on the occurrence of infantile eczema [odds ratio 2.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–5.18]. With maternal fish intake of more than 205 g/week, the risk of eczema decreased by 43% (odds ratio 0.57, 95% CI 0.35–0.93). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for eczema symptoms, estimated from the Poisson regression model, was increased with both higher exposure to prenatal PM2.5 and postnatal ETS (IRR 1.55, 95% CI 0.99–2.44) and in children of atopic mothers (IRR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04–1.75) but was lower in girls (IRR 0.78, 95% CI 0.61–1.00). The observed preventive effect of fish consumption on the frequency of eczema symptoms was consistent with the results of the logistic analysis (IRR 0.72, 95% CI 0.52–0.99). Conclusions The findings indicate that higher prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter combined with postnatal exposure to ETS may increase the risk of infant eczema, while maternal fish intake during pregnancy may reduce the risk of infantile eczema.

Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Perera, Frederica; Maugeri, Umberto; Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Miller, Rachel L.; Flak, Elzbieta; Mroz, Elzbieta; Jacek, Ryszard; Spengler, John D.

2011-01-01

73

The validity of verbal autopsies for assessing the causes of institutional maternal death.  

PubMed

This report presents data from a study carried out in three African countries to assess the validity of verbal autopsies--based on information about symptoms and signs observed antemortem by relatives or associates of deceased individuals--for determining the causes of institutional maternal death. The validity of the verbal autopsy was assessed for each cause of death; and for groups of "direct" and "indirect" maternal causes, by comparing the verbal autopsy diagnoses with the reference diagnoses and calculating their sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value. Verbal autopsies were found to be highly specific (98 percent specificity for all causes of maternal death) but not very sensitive (< or = 60 percent sensitivity for all causes except ante/postpartum hemorrhage). Verbal autopsy estimates of cause-specific mortality were comparable to expected values for most of the causes. The study shows that certain direct causes of hospital-based maternal mortality can be determined by means of verbal autopsies with a reasonable level of confidence. PMID:9919634

Chandramohan, D; Rodrigues, L C; Maude, G H; Hayes, R J

1998-12-01

74

An in vivo animal study assessing long-term changes in hypothalamic cytokines following perinatal exposure to a chemical mixture based on Arctic maternal body burden  

PubMed Central

Background The geographic distribution of environmental toxins is generally not uniform, with certain northern regions showing a particularly high concentration of pesticides, heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants. For instance, Northern Canadians are exposed to high levels of persistent organic pollutants like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), organochlorine pesticides (OCs) and methylmercury (MeHg), primarily through country foods. Previous studies have reported associations between neuronal pathology and exposure to such toxins. The present investigation assessed whether perinatal exposure (gestation and lactation) of rats to a chemical mixture (27 constituents comprised of PCBs, OCs and MeHg) based on Arctic maternal exposure profiles at concentrations near human exposure levels, would affect brain levels of several inflammatory cytokines Methods Rats were dosed during gestation and lactation and cytokine levels were measured in the brains of offspring at five months of age. Hypothalamic cytokine protein levels were measured with a suspension-based array system and differences were determined using ANOVA and post hoc statistical tests. Results The early life PCB treatment alone significantly elevated hypothalamic interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in rats at five months of age to a degree comparable to that of the entire chemical mixture. Similarly, the full mixture (and to a lesser degree PCBs alone) elevated levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1b, as well as the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. The full mixture of chemicals also moderately increased (in an additive fashion) hypothalamic levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-?). Challenge with bacterial endotoxin at adulthood generally increased hypothalamic levels to such a degree that differences between the perinatally treated chemical groups were no longer detectable. Conclusions These data suggest that exposure at critical neurodevelopmental times to environmental chemicals at concentrations and combinations reflective of those observed in vulnerable population can have enduring consequences upon cytokines that are thought to contribute to a range of pathological states. In particular, such protracted alterations in the cytokine balance within the hypothalamus would be expected to favor marked changes in neuro-immune and hormonal communication that could have profound behavioral consequences.

2011-01-01

75

Maternal body mass index and gestational weight gain and their association with perinatal outcomes in Viet Nam  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To examine the association between gestational weight gain and maternal body mass index (BMI) among Vietnamese women and the risk of delivering an infant too small or too large for gestational age. Methods A prospective health-facility-based study of 2989 pregnant Vietnamese women was conducted in the city of Nha Trang in 2007–2008. Cubic logistic regression was used to investigate the association of interest. Infants were classified into weight-for-gestational-age categories according to weight centiles for the Asian population. Gestational age was based on the date of last menstrual period and adjusted by the results of first-trimester ultrasound. Findings BMI was low (maternal gestational weight gain is

Ota, Erika; Haruna, Megumi; Suzuki, Motoi; Anh, Dang Duc; Tho, Le Huu; Tam, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Anh, Nguyen Thi Hien; Isozaki, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Kenji; Ariyoshi, Koya; Murashima, Sachiyo; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki

2011-01-01

76

Unmet need for induction of labor in Africa: secondary analysis from the 2004 - 2005 WHO Global Maternal and Perinatal Health Survey (A cross-sectional survey)  

PubMed Central

Background Induction of labor is being increasingly used to prevent adverse outcomes in the mother and the newborn.This study assessed the prevalence of induction of labor and determinants of its use in Africa. Methods We performed secondary analysis of the WHO Global Survey of Maternal and Newborn Health of 2004 and 2005. The African database was analyzed to determine the use of induction of labor at the country level and indications for induction of labor. The un-met needs for specific obstetric indications and at country level were assessed. Determinants of use of induction of labor were explored with multivariate regression analysis. Results A total of 83,437 deliveries were recorded in the 7 participating countries. Average rate of induction was 4.4% with a range of 1.4 – 6.8%. Pre-labor rupture of membranes was the commonest indication for induction of labor. Two groups of women were identified: 2,776 women with indications had induction of labor while 7,996 women although had indications but labor was not induced. Induction of labor was associated with reduction of stillbirths and perinatal deaths [OR – 0.34; 95% CI (0.27 – 0.43)]. Unmet need for induction of labor ranged between 66.0% and 80.2% across countries. Determinants of having an induction of labor were place of residence, duration of schooling, type of health facility and level of antenatal care. Conclusion Utilization of induction of labor in health facilities in Africa is very low. Improvements in social and health infrastructure are required to reverse the high unmet need for induction of labor.

2012-01-01

77

[Institutional violence, medical authority, and power relations in maternity hospitals from the perspective of health workers].  

PubMed

The current article discusses institutional violence in maternity hospitals from the health workers' perspective, based on data from a study in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Eighteen health workers from the public and private sectors were interviewed, including obstetricians, nurses, and nurse technicians. A semi-structured interview was used with questions on professional experience and the definition of violence. The analysis revealed that these health workers acknowledged the existence of discriminatory and disrespectful practices against women during prenatal care, childbirth, and the postpartum. Examples of such practices cited by interviewees included the use of pejorative slang as a form of "humor", threats, reprimands, and negligence in the management of pain. Such practices are not generally viewed by health workers as violent, but rather as the exercise of professional authority in what is considered a "difficult" context. The institutional violence is thus trivialized, disguised as purportedly good practice (i.e., "for the patient's own good"), and rendered invisible in the daily routine of care provided by maternity services. PMID:24233043

Aguiar, Janaina Marques de; d'Oliveira, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas; Schraiber, Lilia Blima

2013-11-01

78

PeriStats: Perinatal Statistics  

MedlinePLUS

... is developed by the March of Dimes Perinatal Data Center and provides access to maternal and infant health ... on PeriStats sometimes different from my health department's data? What should I do if pop-up blocker ... We acknowledge the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for its support ...

79

Mechanisms of perinatal brain injury.  

PubMed

Perinatal brain injury is associated with pathological conditions caused by pathogenetic mechanisms that remain unclear. Brain lesions can result not only from brain injury but may also originate during fetal growth. Fetal encephalopathy includes 4 groups of causes: maternal, fetal, placental and idiopathic. Hypoxic-ischemic lesions (periventricular leucomalacia and subcortical leucomalacia) and hemorrhage lesions (germinal hemorrhage) are discussed. PMID:12855936

Sabatino, G M D; Domizio, S; Cicioni, P; Sabatino, G

2003-06-01

80

India's Conditional Cash Transfer Programme (the JSY) to Promote Institutional Birth: Is There an Association between Institutional Birth Proportion and Maternal Mortality?  

PubMed Central

Background India accounts for 19% of global maternal deaths, three-quarters of which come from nine states. In 2005, India launched a conditional cash transfer (CCT) programme, Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY), to reduce maternal mortality ratio (MMR) through promotion of institutional births. JSY is the largest CCT in the world. In the nine states with relatively lower socioeconomic levels, JSY provides a cash incentive to all women on birthing in health institution. The cash incentive is intended to reduce financial barriers to accessing institutional care for delivery. Increased institutional births are expected to reduce MMR. Thus, JSY is expected to (a) increase institutional births and (b) reduce MMR in states with high proportions of institutional births. We examine the association between (a) service uptake, i.e., institutional birth proportions and (b) health outcome, i.e., MMR. Method Data from Sample Registration Survey of India were analysed to describe trends in proportion of institutional births before (2005) and during (2006–2010) the implementation of the JSY. Data from Annual Health Survey (2010–2011) for all 284 districts in above- mentioned nine states were analysed to assess relationship between MMR and institutional births. Results Proportion of institutional births increased from a pre-programme average of 20% to 49% in 5 years (p<0.05). In bivariate analysis, proportion of institutional births had a small negative correlation with district MMR (r?=??0.11).The multivariate regression model did not establish significant association between institutional birth proportions and MMR [CI: ?0.10, 0.68]. Conclusions Our analysis confirmed that JSY succeeded in raising institutional births significantly. However, we were unable to detect a significant association between institutional birth proportion and MMR. This indicates that high institutional birth proportions that JSY has achieved are of themselves inadequate to reduce MMR. Other factors including improved quality of care at institutions are required for intended effect.

Randive, Bharat; Diwan, Vishal; De Costa, Ayesha

2013-01-01

81

Perinatal neuroprotection  

PubMed Central

Fetal or neonatal brain injury can result in lifelong neurologic disability. The most significant risk factor for perinatal brain injury is prematurity; however, in absolute numbers, full-term infants represent the majority of affected children. Research on strategies to prevent or mitigate the impact of perinatal brain injury (“perinatal neuroprotection”) has established the mitigating roles of magnesium sulfate administration for preterm infants and therapeutic hypothermia for term infants with suspected perinatal brain injury. Banked umbilical cord blood, erythropoietin, and a number of other agents that may improve neuronal repair show promise for improving outcomes following perinatal brain injury in animal models. Other preventative strategies include delayed umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants and progesterone in women with prior preterm birth or short cervix and avoidance of infections. Despite these advances, we have not successfully decreased the rate of preterm birth, nor are we able to predict term infants at risk of hypoxic brain injury in order to intervene prior to the hypoxic event. Further, we lack the ability to modulate the sequelae of neuronal cell insults or the ability to repair brain injury after it has been sustained. As a consequence, despite exciting advances in the field of perinatal neuroprotection, perinatal brain injury still impacts thousands of newborns each year with significant long-term morbidity and mortality.

Jelin, Angie C.; Thiet, Mari-Paule

2014-01-01

82

Impact of Janani Suraksha Yojana on Institutional Delivery Rate and Maternal Morbidity and Mortality: An Observational Study in India  

PubMed Central

The Government of India initiated a cash incentive scheme—Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY)—to promote institutional deliveries with an aim to reduce maternal mortality ratio (MMR). An observational study was conducted in a tertiary-care hospital of Madhya Pradesh, India, before and after implementation of JSY, with a sample of women presenting for institutional delivery. The objectives of this study were to: (i) determine the total number of institutional deliveries before and after implementation of JSY, (ii) determine the MMR, and (iii) compare factors associated with maternal mortality and morbidity. The data were analyzed for two years before implementation of JSY (2003-2005) and compared with two years following implementation of JSY (2005-2007). Overall, institutional deliveries increased by 42.6% after implementation, including those among rural, illiterate and primary-literate persons of lower socioeconomic strata. The main causes of maternal mortality were eclampsia, pre-eclampsia and severe anaemia both before and after implementation of JSY. Anaemia was the most common morbidity factor observed in this study. Among those who had institutional deliveries, there were significant increases in cases of eclampsia, pre-eclampsia, polyhydramnios, oligohydramnios, antepartum haemorrhage (APH), postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), and malaria after implementation of JSY. The scheme appeared to increase institutional delivery by at-risk mothers, which has the potential to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality, improve child survival, and ensure equity in maternal healthcare in India. The lessons from this study and other available sources should be utilized to improve the performance and implementation of JSY scheme in India.

Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Pal, Dinesh K.; Tiwari, Rajesh; Garg, Rajesh; Shrivastava, Ashish K.; Sarawagi, Radha; Patil, Rajkumar; Agarwal, Lokesh; Gupta, Prashant

2012-01-01

83

Perinatal Pharmacology  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Perinatal pharmacology involves the three most important participants in pregnancy: the mother, the placenta, and the fetus\\u000a (Fig. 3-1). Virtually all drugs administered to the mother can traverse the placenta and appear in the fetal circulation to\\u000a some extent. Hence an appreciation of perinatal pharmacology is important for the safe conduct of obstetric anesthesia.

Sanjay Datta; Bhavani Shankar Kodali; Scott Segal

84

Maternal supplementation with n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids during perinatal period alleviates the metabolic syndrome disturbances in adult hamster pups fed a high-fat diet after weaning.  

PubMed

Perinatal nutrition is thought to affect the long-term risk of the adult to develop metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that maternal supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid during pregnancy and lactation would protect offspring fed a high-fat diet from developing metabolic disturbances. Thus, two groups of female hamsters were fed a low-fat control diet, either alone (LC) or enriched with n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) (LO), through the gestational and lactation periods. After weaning, male pups were randomized to separate groups that received either a control low-fat diet (LC) or a high-fat diet (HC) for 16 weeks. Four groups of pups were defined (LC-LC, LC-HC, LO-LC and LO-HC), based on the combinations of maternal and weaned diets. Maternal n-3 LC-PUFA supplementation was associated with reduced levels of basal plasma glucose, hepatic triglycerides secretion and postprandial lipemia in the LO-HC group compared to the LC-HC group. Respiratory parameters were not affected by maternal supplementation. In contrast, n-3 LC-PUFA supplementation significantly enhanced the activities of citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and ?-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase compared to the offspring of unsupplemented mothers. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2, fatty acid synthase, stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 and tumor necrosis factor ? expression levels were not affected by n-3 LC-PUFA supplementation. These results provide evidence for a beneficial effect of n-3 LC-PUFA maternal supplementation in hamsters on the subsequent risk of metabolic syndrome. Underlying mechanisms may include improved lipid metabolism and activation of the mitochondrial oxidative pathway. PMID:24767307

Kasbi-Chadli, Fatima; Boquien, Clair-Yves; Simard, Gilles; Ulmann, Lionel; Mimouni, Virginie; Leray, Véronique; Meynier, Anne; Ferchaud-Roucher, Véronique; Champ, Martine; Nguyen, Patrick; Ouguerram, Khadija

2014-07-01

85

Maternal-child blood group incompatibility and other perinatal events increase the risk for early-onset type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The nationwide Swedish Childhood Diabetes Registry, which ascertains 99% of recent-onset Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic children (0–14 years) in Sweden, was linked with the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. A matched case-control study was carried out analysing about 20 perinatal variables concerning mother and child. A total of 2757 infants who became diabetic during the period 1978–1988 were analysed. For each

G. Dahlquist; B. Källén

1992-01-01

86

[Obstetrics and perinatal medicine].  

PubMed

Perinatal medicine concerns the period from delivery to the 1st 28 days of life; it includes maternal-fetal and neonatal medicine and the intervention of the specialist in internal medicine, obstetrics, and pediatrics. Currently, factors related to increased obstetrical, fetal or neonatal risk have been used to establish indices to aid the identification of the population more at risk of perinatal morbidity/mortality. A high risk newborn has been defined as presenting possible physical, intellecteual, or social problems which can negatively influence his or her normal development and/or learning abilities. Retrospective analyses conducted in Great Britain and in the U.S. showed that about 19% of the population falls into this category; the percentage is much higher in less industrialized countries. Modern technology can detect 70-80% of cases at risk of perintatal morbidity and mortality, and can intervene, even before delivery, with fetal intrauterine transfusion, fetal monitoring of the heart, and amniocentesis. Perinatology cannot exist without proper equipment and highly specialized personnel, which have been the major cause for the spectacular decrease in neonatal mortality experienced in many countries; still, neonatal mortality is about 4 times higher than general mortality. Many physicians consider family planning an integral part of any neonatal medical program. Several statistics show that 75% of anatomical or functional alterations are due to factors present before birth; such alterations can be epilepsy, mental retardation, deafness, blindness, or cerebral paralysis. Statistics for Mexico show the presence of about 600,000 individuals with serious and permanent problems due to sequelae of perinatal morbidity. Cause-effect relationships are extremely difficult to establish; the influence of socioeconomic factors, low birth weight, or reduced gestational age can be of paramount importance in influencing perinatal morbidity/mortality. PMID:7250715

Karchner, S; Shor Pinsker, V; López García, R

1980-11-01

87

Maternal-Fetal Pharmacokinetics of Methanol. (Includes the Commentary of the Institute's Health Review Committee).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study defines the physiological factors that govern methanol delivery to the developing fetus after maternal methanol exposure. The disposition of methanol after oral or intravenous administration was similar in pregnant and nonpregnant rats, regardl...

G. M. Pollack K. L. R. Brouwer

1996-01-01

88

Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes of Exercise in Pregnant Women with Chronic Hypertension and/or Previous Preeclampsia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.  

PubMed

Objectives. To evaluate the association between physical exercise supervised in pregnant women with chronic hypertension and/or previous preeclampsia and maternal and neonatal outcomes. Method. Randomized controlled trial, which included 116 pregnant women with chronic hypertension and/or previous preeclampsia, considered risk of preeclampsia development. They were divided into two groups: study group that performed physical exercise with a stationary bicycle once a week, for 30 minutes; the intensity was controlled (heart rate 20% above resting values), under professional supervision and a control group that was not engaged in any physical exercise. The data was retrieved from medical charts. Significance level assumed was 5%. Results. Women from study group performed 9.24 ± 7.03 of physical exercise sessions. There were no differences between groups comparing type of delivery and maternal outcomes, including maternal morbidity and hospitalization in intensive unit care, and neonatal outcomes, including birth weight, adequacy of weight to gestational age, prematurity, Apgar scale at first and fifth minutes, hospitalization in intensive unit care, and neonatal morbidity. Conclusions. Physical exercise using a stationary bicycle in pregnant women with chronic hypertension and/or previous preeclampsia, once a week, under professional supervision, did not interfere in the delivery method and did not produce maternal and neonatal risks of the occurrence of morbidity. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01395342. PMID:23997960

Kasawara, Karina Tamy; Burgos, Camila Schneider Gannuny; do Nascimento, Simony Lira; Ferreira, Néville Oliveira; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Pinto E Silva, João Luiz

2013-01-01

89

Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes of Exercise in Pregnant Women with Chronic Hypertension and/or Previous Preeclampsia: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To evaluate the association between physical exercise supervised in pregnant women with chronic hypertension and/or previous preeclampsia and maternal and neonatal outcomes. Method. Randomized controlled trial, which included 116 pregnant women with chronic hypertension and/or previous preeclampsia, considered risk of preeclampsia development. They were divided into two groups: study group that performed physical exercise with a stationary bicycle once a week, for 30 minutes; the intensity was controlled (heart rate 20% above resting values), under professional supervision and a control group that was not engaged in any physical exercise. The data was retrieved from medical charts. Significance level assumed was 5%. Results. Women from study group performed 9.24 ± 7.03 of physical exercise sessions. There were no differences between groups comparing type of delivery and maternal outcomes, including maternal morbidity and hospitalization in intensive unit care, and neonatal outcomes, including birth weight, adequacy of weight to gestational age, prematurity, Apgar scale at first and fifth minutes, hospitalization in intensive unit care, and neonatal morbidity. Conclusions. Physical exercise using a stationary bicycle in pregnant women with chronic hypertension and/or previous preeclampsia, once a week, under professional supervision, did not interfere in the delivery method and did not produce maternal and neonatal risks of the occurrence of morbidity. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01395342.

Kasawara, Karina Tamy; Burgos, Camila Schneider Gannuny; do Nascimento, Simony Lira; Ferreira, Neville Oliveira; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Pinto e Silva, Joao Luiz

2013-01-01

90

Perinatal characteristics and retinoblastoma  

PubMed Central

Purpose The etiology of retinoblastoma remains poorly understood. In the present study, we examined associations between perinatal factors and retinoblastoma risk in California children. Methods We identified 609 retinoblastoma cases (420 unilateral, 187 bilateral, and 2 with laterality unknown) from California Cancer Registry records of diagnoses 1988–2007 among children <6 years of age. We randomly selected 209,051 controls from California birthrolls. The source of most study data was birth certificates. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations between retinoblastoma and perinatal characteristics. Results Bilateral retinoblastoma was associated with greater paternal age [for fathers over 35, crude Odds Ratio (OR)=1.73, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.20, 2.47] and with twin births (OR=1.93, 95% CI 0.99, 3.79). Among unilateral cases, we observed an increased risk among children of US-born Hispanic mothers (OR=1.34, 95% CI 1.01, 1.77) while a decreased risk was observed for infants born to mothers with less than 9 years of education (OR=0.70, 95% CI 0.49–1.00), a group that consisted primarily of mothers born in Mexico. We observed that maternal infection in pregnancy with any STD (OR=3.59, 95% CI 1.58, 8.15) was associated with bilateral retinoblastoma. Conclusions This study supports the findings of previous investigations reporting associations between parental age, HPV infection and retinoblastoma.

Heck, Julia E; Lombardi, Christina A; Meyers, Travis J; Cockburn, Myles; Wilhelm, Michelle; Ritz, Beate

2012-01-01

91

Community Mobilization in Mumbai Slums to Improve Perinatal Care and Outcomes: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Introduction Improving maternal and newborn health in low-income settings requires both health service and community action. Previous community initiatives have been predominantly rural, but India is urbanizing. While working to improve health service quality, we tested an intervention in which urban slum-dweller women's groups worked to improve local perinatal health. Methods and Findings A cluster randomized controlled trial in 24 intervention and 24 control settlements covered a population of 283,000. In each intervention cluster, a facilitator supported women's groups through an action learning cycle in which they discussed perinatal experiences, improved their knowledge, and took local action. We monitored births, stillbirths, and neonatal deaths, and interviewed mothers at 6 weeks postpartum. The primary outcomes described perinatal care, maternal morbidity, and extended perinatal mortality. The analysis included 18,197 births over 3 years from 2006 to 2009. We found no differences between trial arms in uptake of antenatal care, reported work, rest, and diet in later pregnancy, institutional delivery, early and exclusive breastfeeding, or care-seeking. The stillbirth rate was non-significantly lower in the intervention arm (odds ratio 0.86, 95% CI 0.60–1.22), and the neonatal mortality rate higher (1.48, 1.06–2.08). The extended perinatal mortality rate did not differ between arms (1.19, 0.90–1.57). We have no evidence that these differences could be explained by the intervention. Conclusions Facilitating urban community groups was feasible, and there was evidence of behaviour change, but we did not see population-level effects on health care or mortality. In cities with multiple sources of health care, but inequitable access to services, community mobilization should be integrated with attempts to deliver services for the poorest and most vulnerable, and with initiatives to improve quality of care in both public and private sectors. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN96256793 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

More, Neena Shah; Bapat, Ujwala; Das, Sushmita; Alcock, Glyn; Patil, Sarita; Porel, Maya; Vaidya, Leena; Fernandez, Armida; Joshi, Wasundhara; Osrin, David

2012-01-01

92

CCR5 promoter polymorphisms in a Kenyan perinatal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 cohort: association with increased 2-year maternal mortality.  

PubMed

The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a coreceptor with CD4 to permit infection by primary macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains. The CCR5Delta32 mutation, which is associated with resistance to infection in homozygous individuals and delayed disease progression in heterozygous individuals, is rare in Africa, where the HIV-1 epidemic is growing rapidly. Several polymorphisms in the promoter region of CCR5 have been identified, the clinical and functional relevance of which remain poorly defined. We evaluated the effect of 4 CCR5 promoter mutations on systemic and mucosal HIV-1 replication, disease progression, and perinatal transmission in a cohort of 276 HIV-1-seropositive women in Nairobi, Kenya. Mutations at positions 59353, 59402, and 59029 were not associated with effects on mortality, virus load, genital shedding, or transmission in this cohort. However, women with the 59356 C/T genotype had a 3.1-fold increased risk of death during the 2-year follow-up period (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-9.5) and a significant increase in vaginal shedding of HIV-1-infected cells (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.0-4.3), compared with women with the 59356 C/C genotype. PMID:11398114

John, G C; Bird, T; Overbaugh, J; Nduati, R; Mbori-Ngacha, D; Rostron, T; Dong, T; Kostrikis, L; Richardson, B; Rowland-Jones, S L

2001-07-01

93

Impact of Increasing Capacity for Generating and Using Research on Maternal and Perinatal Health Practices in South East Asia (SEA-ORCHID Project)  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity remain unacceptably high in many low and middle income countries. SEA-ORCHID was a five year international collaborative project in South East Asia which aimed to determine whether health care and health outcomes for mothers and babies could be improved by developing capacity for research generation, synthesis and use. Methods Nine hospitals in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand participated in SEA-ORCHID. These hospitals were supported by researchers from three Australian centres. Health care practices and outcomes were assessed for 1000 women at each hospital both before and after the intervention. The capacity development intervention was tailored to the needs and context of each hospital and delivered over an 18 month period. Main outcomes included adherence to forms of care likely to be beneficial and avoidance of forms of care likely to be ineffective or harmful. Results We observed substantial variation in clinical practice change between sites. The capacity development intervention had a positive impact on some care practices across all countries, including increased family support during labour and decreased perineal shaving before birth, but in some areas there was no significant change in practice and a few beneficial practices were followed less often. Conclusion The results of SEA-ORCHID demonstrate that investing in developing capacity for research use, synthesis and generation can lead to improvements in maternal and neonatal health practice and highlight the difficulty of implementing evidence-based practice change.

2011-01-01

94

Perinatal nephropathies.  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this paper is to review the development of the mammalian kidney and to assess the influence that various perinatal manipulations may have on the developmental process either morphologically or functionally. Immature kidneys in general have less functional capacity than adult kidneys and a low rate of glomerular filtration, perhaps related to renal blood flow, which appears to limit the disposition of a fluid or solute load. Tubular reabsorption is also limited leading to the urinary loss of glucose, amino acids, bicarbonate and phosphate. Although the relatively low function of the immature kidney is a normal part of development, its capacity to respond under conditions of stress may be less adequate than in adults. An additional concern is that a variety of perinatal manipulations, such as the incidental or accidental ingestion of a chemical, may lead to varying degrees of altered morphogenesis or functional development of the kidney. Chemical induced renal anomalies may be of several types, but in typical teratology experiments hydronephrosis may be the most frequent observation. The functional consequences of these renal malformations may be lethal or inconsequential or while an animal may be able to survive and develop normally in the presence of a renal malformation, it is possible that a stressful situation would unmask a functional malformation which could compromise survival. Thus, some renal abnormalities may be subtle enough to go unnoticed without experimental tests. Without such tests it is impossible to evaluate the effect of functional alterations on successful adaptation. Images FIGURE 2. A FIGURE 2. B FIGURE 2. C FIGURE 2. D

Gibson, J E

1976-01-01

95

Short term outcome in babies refused perinatal intensive care  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To compare the mortality in babies refused admission to a regional perinatal centre with that in babies accepted for intensive care in the centre. DESIGN--Retrospective study with group comparison. SETTING--Based at the Royal Maternity Hospital, Belfast, with follow up of patients in all obstetric units in Northern Ireland. PATIENTS--Requests for transfer of 675 babies to the regional perinatal centre (prenatally

H. Sidhu; R. N. Heasley; C. C. Patterson; H. L. Halliday; W. Thompson

1989-01-01

96

Perinatal Problems and Psychiatric Comorbidity Among Children with ADHD  

PubMed Central

Objective Among two large, independent samples of girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), we examined associations between specific (maternal gestational smoking and drug use, early labor, low birth weight, and infant breathing problems at birth) and cumulative prenatal and perinatal risk factors and psychiatric comorbidity during childhood. Method Data from the (a) Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD, a randomized clinical trial with 579 children aged 7 to 9.9 years with combined-type ADHD, and the (b) Berkeley Girls ADHD Longitudinal Sample, a naturalistic study of 140 girls with ADHD (93 combined-type and 47 inattentive-type) who were first seen when they were 6 to 12 years old, were analyzed separately. In each sample, perinatal risk factors were assessed retrospectively by maternal report, and current childhood psychiatric comorbidity was assessed using maternal report on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Results Consistent findings across these two studies show that infant breathing problems, early labor, and total perinatal problems predicted childhood comorbid depression but not comorbid anxiety or externalizing disorders. These associations remained significant, in both samples, with control of family SES and maternal symptoms of ADHD and depression. Results attenuated slightly with control of the number of child comorbidities plus SES and maternal symptoms. Conclusion Accumulating evidence suggests that perinatal risk factors are important precursors of childhood psychiatric comorbidity and that the association between these risk factors and detrimental psychiatric outcomes cannot be explained by maternal psychiatric symptoms or SES during childhood.

Owens, Elizabeth B.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.

2013-01-01

97

Perinatal problems and psychiatric comorbidity among children with ADHD.  

PubMed

Among two large, independent samples of girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), we examined associations between specific (maternal gestational smoking and drug use, early labor, low birth weight, and infant breathing problems at birth) and cumulative prenatal and perinatal risk factors and psychiatric comorbidity during childhood. Data from the (a) Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD, a randomized clinical trial with 579 children aged 7 to 9.9 years with combined-type ADHD, and the (b) Berkeley Girls ADHD Longitudinal Sample, a naturalistic study of 140 girls with ADHD (93 combined-type and 47 inattentive-type) who were first seen when they were 6 to 12 years old, were analyzed separately. In each sample, perinatal risk factors were assessed retrospectively by maternal report, and current childhood psychiatric comorbidity was assessed using maternal report on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Consistent findings across these two studies show that infant breathing problems, early labor, and total perinatal problems predicted childhood comorbid depression but not comorbid anxiety or externalizing disorders. These associations remained significant, in both samples, with control of family socioeconomic status (SES) and maternal symptoms of ADHD and depression. Results attenuated slightly with control of the number of child comorbidities plus SES and maternal symptoms. Accumulating evidence suggests that perinatal risk factors are important precursors of childhood psychiatric comorbidity and that the association between these risk factors and detrimental psychiatric outcomes cannot be explained by maternal psychiatric symptoms or SES during childhood. PMID:23581554

Owens, Elizabeth B; Hinshaw, Stephen P

2013-01-01

98

Use of previous maternal health services has a limited role in reattendance for skilled institutional delivery: cross-sectional survey in Northwest Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal mortality rates are unacceptably high in Ethiopia. Institutional delivery with skilled care of the mother is one of the interventions proven to reduce the risk of complications that can cause maternal and neonatal mortality. Quality of service given during antenatal visits and childbirth are important measures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of skilled institutional delivery and its repeat use during a subsequent pregnancy and to identify any reasons why women avoid institutional delivery. Methods A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to June 2012 in Chilga Woreda, Northwest Ethiopia. Data were collected from women who gave birth during the year preceding the survey. Information was entered and cleaned using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Multivariate and binary logistic regression was used to identify the relative effect of each explanatory variable on the outcome. Results A total of 402 (84.2%) women gave birth at home. Previous experience of skilled institutional delivery had a limited role in subsequent acceptance or use of institutional delivery. Most mothers who had previously had institutional delivery gave birth at home. Although 111 (40.8%) women visited the health facility during their pregnancy only because of illness, 184 (38.8%) did not know when to visit for antenatal care. In multivariate analysis, lower maternal education, being a rural resident, previous use of institutional delivery, remoteness of the health facility, and multiparity were factors significantly associated with less likelihood of institutional delivery. Number of months pregnant at the time of the first antenatal visit had no role in increasing the likelihood of institutional delivery. Conclusion The quality of the obstetric services presently available for women living in Ethiopia needs review.

Kebede, Bekana; Gebeyehu, Abebaw; Andargie, Gashaw

2013-01-01

99

Fourth goal of perinatal medicine.  

PubMed Central

Reduction in maternal mortality, infant mortality, and infant morbidity have been successively the goals of perinatal medicine. The fourth is to reduce bonding failure. In July 1978 a preventive service was started in the John Radcliffe Maternity Hospital. A twice-weekly round is made. Midwives refer families who cause them concern. In the first year the referral rate ws 20.5 per 1000 liveborn babies. The referred sample differed from the hospital population in terms of maternal psychiatric history, marital state and babies' admission to special care. The main reasons for referral were: doubt about parenting ability (27%), psychiatric history (15%), disturbed behaviour in hospital (14%), and diffuse social and medical problems (17%). Long-term care was needed for only 14% of families. At their first birthdays, six babies were placed away from their natural parents; the sample had had a slightly higher than expected admission rate to hospital; the distribution of weights did not differ from the expected; doctors and health visitors were still concerned about one-quarter of the families. Seven cases of screening failure were found among those not referred to our service, but only one was seriously abused. No child referred in the first year has been seriously neglected or abused.

Ounsted, C; Roberts, J C; Gordon, M; Milligan, B

1982-01-01

100

Perinatal pathology: practice suggestions for limited-resource settings.  

PubMed

The practice of perinatal pathology in much of the world suffers, as do all subspecialties of anatomic pathology, from inadequate resources (equipment, consumables, and both professional and technical personnel), from lack of education (not only of the pathologist but also of the clinicians responsible for sending the specimens, and the technicians processing the specimens), and from lack of appropriate government sector support. Perinatal pathology has significant public health-related utility and should be championing its service by providing maternal and fetal/infant mortality and morbidity data to governmental health ministries. It is with this pathologic data that informed decisions can be made on health-related courses of action and allocation of resources. These perinatal pathology data are needed to develop appropriate public health initiatives, specifically toward achieving the Millennium Developmental Goals as the best way to effectively decrease infant and maternal deaths and to determine causes of perinatal mortality and morbidity. The following overview will focus on the utility of perinatal pathology specifically as related to its public health function and will suggest methods to improve its service in resource-poor settings. This article is offered not as a critique of the current practice that most pathologists find themselves working in globally, but to provide suggestions for improving perinatal pathology services, which could be implemented with the limited available resources and manpower most pathology departments currently have. In addition, we offer suggestions for graded improvements ("ramping up") over time. PMID:23721272

Roberts, Drucilla J

2013-06-01

101

Imaging of perinatal stroke.  

PubMed

The main neonatal stroke syndromes discussed in this article are: arterial ischemic stroke (AIS), including perinatal AIS, and "presumed" perinatal AIS; cerebral venous thrombosis, including cortical vein and venous sinus thrombosis and germinal matrix hemorrhage/periventricular hemorrhagic infarction; and intraparenchymal hemorrhage. This review discusses general pathophysiological mechanisms and the role of imaging in these conditions. PMID:22118590

Gunny, Roxana S; Lin, Doris

2012-02-01

102

Perinatal Pitocin as an Early ADHD Biomarker: Neurodevelopmental Risk?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate a potential relationship between coincidental increases in perinatal Pitocin usage and subsequent childhood ADHD onset in an attempt to isolate a specific risk factor as an early biomarker of this neurodevelopmental disorder. Method: Maternal labor/delivery and corresponding childbirth records of 172 regionally diverse,…

Kurth, Lisa; Haussmann, Robert

2011-01-01

103

PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL HEALTH, BAMEN, INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA  

EPA Science Inventory

For developing countries, especially in remote rural areas, measures of maternal and perinatal health may be difficult to obtain because it is not systematically collected and/or electronic data is not available. We assisted the public health officials of Bayingnormen (BaMen), In...

104

Ethical Issues in Perinatal Mental Health Research  

PubMed Central

Purpose of Review To review the background of current ethical standards for the conduct of perinatal mental health research and describe the ethical challenges in this research domain. Recent Findings Current literature reflects a growing sentiment in the scientific community that having no information regarding the impact of psychiatric treatment on the mother and developing fetus/infant poses dangers that may exceed the risks involved in research. However, without sufficient consensus across the scientific community, both regulatory bodies and perinatal researchers find themselves without a framework for decision making that satisfactorily limits the risks and facilitates the benefits of participation of pregnant and lactating women in clinical research. Summary Psychiatric research in perinatal mental health is critically important as it enables clinicians and patients to participate in informed decision-making concerning treatment for psychiatric disorders. Specific areas of concern include fetal safety, maternal risk, the therapeutic misconception, commercial interests, forensic/legal issues, the informed consent process, and study design. Developing guidelines that address ethical challenges and include the views and concerns of multiple stakeholders could improve the access of perinatal women to the benefits of participation in mental health research in addition to providing evidence-based mental health care for this subpopulation.

Brandon, Anna R.; Shivakumar, Geetha; Lee, Simon Craddock; Inrig, Stephen J.; Sadler, John Z.

2010-01-01

105

Estimates of illicit drug use during pregnancy by maternal interview, hair analysis, and meconium analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To compare the sensitivity and specificity of maternal interview, maternal hair analysis, and meconium analysis in detecting perinatal exposure to cocaine, opiate, and cannabinoid. Design\\/methods: The use of cocaine, opiate, and cannabinoid during pregnancy was determined prospectively in 58 women by 3 methods: structured maternal interview, maternal hair analysis, and meconium analyses. The results of the 3 methods were

Enrique M. Ostrea; D. Kirk Knapp; Libby Tannenbaum; Anthony R. Ostrea; Al Romero; Valiollah Salari; Joel Ager

2001-01-01

106

Perinatal brachial plexus palsy  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is a flaccid paralysis of the arm at birth that affects different nerves of the brachial plexus supplied by C5 to T1 in 0.42 to 5.1 infants per 1000 live births. OBJECTIVES To identify antenatal factors associated with PBPP and possible preventive measures, and to review the natural history as compared with the outcome after primary or secondary surgical interventions. METHODS A literature search on randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses on the prevention and treatment of PBPP was performed. EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched until June 2005. Key words for searches included ‘brachial plexus’, ‘brachial plexus neuropathy’, ‘brachial plexus injury’, ‘birth injury’ and ‘paralysis, obstetric’. RESULTS There were no prospective studies on the cause or prevention of PBPP. Whereas birth trauma is said to be the most common cause, there is some evidence that PBPP may occur before delivery. Shoulder dystocia and PBPP are largely unpredictable, although associations of PBPP with shoulder dystocia, infants who are large for gestational age, maternal diabetes and instrumental delivery have been reported. The various forms of PBPP, clinical findings and diagnostic measures are described. Recent evidence suggests that the natural history of PBPP is not all favourable, and residual deficits are estimated at 20% to 30%, in contrast with the previous optimistic view of full recovery in greater than 90% of affected children. There were no randomized controlled trials on nonoperative management. There was no conclusive evidence that primary surgical exploration of the brachial plexus supercedes conservative management for improved outcome. However, results from nonrandomized studies indicated that children with severe injuries do better with surgical repair. Secondary surgical reconstructions were inferior to primary intervention, but could still improve arm function in children with serious impairments. CONCLUSIONS It is not possible to predict which infants are at risk for PBPP, and therefore amenable to preventive measures. Twenty-five per cent of affected infants will experience permanent impairment and injury. If recovery is incomplete by the end of the first month, referral to a multidisciplinary team is necessary. Further research into prediction, prevention and best mode of treatment needs to be done.

Andersen, John; Watt, Joe; Olson, Jaret; Van Aerde, John

2006-01-01

107

Prenatal and perinatal risk factors for autism in China.  

PubMed

We conducted a case-control study using 190 Han children with and without autism to investigate prenatal and perinatal risk factors for autism in China. Cases were recruited through public special education schools and controls from regular public schools in the same region (Tianjin), with frequency matching on sex and birth year. Unadjusted analyses identified seven prenatal and seven perinatal risk factors significantly associated with autism. In the adjusted analysis, nine risk factors showed significant association with autism: maternal second-hand smoke exposure, maternal chronic or acute medical conditions unrelated to pregnancy, maternal unhappy emotional state, gestational complications, edema, abnormal gestational age (<35 or >42 weeks), nuchal cord, gravidity >1, and advanced paternal age at delivery (>30 year-old). PMID:20358271

Zhang, Xin; Lv, Cong-Chao; Tian, Jiang; Miao, Ru-Juan; Xi, Wei; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Qi, Lihong

2010-11-01

108

Ethnic differences in perinatal mortality--a challenge.  

PubMed Central

The perinatal mortality rates of mothers who delivered at St. Thomas's Hospital from 1969 to 1976 have been examined. The rate in the West Indian population was significant higher than in the United Kingdom white population. The increased West Indian mortality was confined to infants with a birth weight of more than 2.0 kg and a gestational age of more than 37 weeks. The relative risk of perinatal death for West Indian mothers compared with UK white mothers was 1.4 at birth weights of 2.5 kg to 2.9 kg, rising to 4.3 at 4.0 + kg. West Indian perinatal mortality in term babies of normal birth weight was higher in all maternal age and parity groups except parity 3, but the difference was greatest in women aged 30 or over. The African perinatal mortality rate was not significantly greater than the UK white rate although it followed the West Indian trends. Pre-eclampsia and forceps delivery were associated with a greatly increased perinatal mortality in West Indian babies. The excess West Indian mortality could not be explained completely by differences in the proportions of stillbirths and early neonatal deaths nor by the distribution of births by parity, maternal age, or social class. Possible explanations for the differences in mortality are discussed.

Robinson, M J; Palmer, S R; Avery, A; James, C E; Beynon, J L; Taylor, R W

1982-01-01

109

Current Evidence on Perinatal Home Visiting and Intimate Partner Violence  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe current evidence on home visiting (HV) interventions for pregnant or postpartum women with specific intimate partner violence (IPV) assessment and content. Data Sources Online bibliographic databases including PubMed, CINAHL Plus, and Web of Science and a hand search of bibliographies of relevant articles. Study Selection Original research and intervention studies were included that contained 1) a well-described prenatal and/or postpartum home visitation; 2) an assessment of perinatal IPV; and 3) quantitative data describing health outcomes for the women and their infants. Data Extraction The search yielded 128 articles, and eight relevant articles met all of the inclusion criteria. Non-research, non -intervention and international articles were excluded. Data Synthesis No perinatal home visiting interventions were designed to address IPV. Programs that screened for IPV found high rates, and the presence of IPV limited the ability of the intervention to improve maternal and child outcomes. Conclusions Perinatal home visitation programs likely improve pregnancy and infant outcomes. Home visiting interventions addressing IPV in non-perinatal population groups have been effective in minimizing IPV and improving outcomes. This suggests that perinatal HV programs adding a specific IPV interventions may reduce IPV and improve maternal and infant health. Continued rigorous research is needed.

Campbell, Jacquelyn; Baty, Marguerite L.; Walker, Keisha S.; Bair-Merritt, Megan H.

2008-01-01

110

Polyhydramnios and adverse perinatal outcome - what is the actual cutoff?  

PubMed

Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between amniotic fluid index (AFI) and adverse perinatal outcome, and whether a critical cutoff can be defined. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted. Included were patients who were admitted to the ultrasound unit of the tertiary medical center between the years 1988 and 2010. Parturients were classified into five groups according to their AFI: <20 (n?=?9974; comparison group), 20-23 (n?=?2771), 24-27 (n?=?1315), 28-31 (n?=?494) and 32?+?(n?=?260). Pregnancy and the perinatal outcomes were compared between the groups. Statistical analysis included the chi-square tests for trends, and multivariable models to control for confounders (with AFI as a dummy variable). Results: A significant linear association was found between AFI and adverse perinatal outcomes including hypertensive disorders, diabetes mellitus, preterm labor, macrosomia, placental abruption and low birth weight. Furthermore, using multivariable logistic regression models, controlling for confounders such as maternal and gestational age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, etc., the significant association between all four subgroups of AFI?>?20 and adverse perinatal outcomes remained. Conclusion: A significant linear association exists between AFI?>?20 and perinatal complications such as perinatal mortality, low Apgar scores and preterm labor. Hence, the critical cutoff for polyhydramnios should be re-evaluated. PMID:24111654

Harlev, A; Sheiner, E; Friger, M; Hershkovitz, R

2014-08-01

111

Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy: biochemical predictors of adverse perinatal outcomes.  

PubMed

This study aimed to identify biochemical predictors of adverse perinatal outcomes in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). A total of 106 ICP cases were analyzed retrospectively by the combination of receiver operating characteristic curve and binary logistic regression analysis. "Adverse perinatal outcomes" included spontaneous preterm labor, meconium-staining of amniotic fluid, stillbirth and Apgar score ?7 at 1 or 5 min. Total bile acid (TBA) [AUC=0.658, 95%CI (0.536, 0.781), P=0.031] was a valuable predictor for adverse perinatal outcomes. The critical value of TBA above which adverse perinatal outcomes were observed was 40.15 ?mol/L (Youden's index=0.3). Binary multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes increased when TBA ?40.15 ?mol/L [OR=3.792, 95%CI (1.226, 11.727), P=0.021]. It is concluded that the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes in ICP increases when maternal TBA ?40.15 ?mol/L. PMID:23771669

Chen, Hui; Zhou, Yuan; Deng, Dong-rui; Hao, Hai-yan; Dang, Jing; Li, Jing

2013-06-01

112

An integrated village maternity service to improve referral patterns in a rural area in West-Java  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Regionalization of Perinatal Care, an intervention study carried out in Tanjungsari, a subdistrict in rural West Java, aimed to develop a comprehensive maternal health program to improve maternal and perinatal health outcomes. The main inputs included training at all levels of the health care system (informal and formal) and the establishment of birthing homes in villages to make services

A. Alisjahbana; C. Williams; R. Dharmayanti; D. Hermawan; B. E. Kwast; M. Koblinsky

1995-01-01

113

Perinatal stroke--risk factors and management.  

PubMed

Stroke is an uncommon but increasingly recognised cause of mortality and long-term neurological morbidity in children. A significant number of these events appear to be caused by thromboembolic disease and, as with other childhood thrombotic problems, the incidence of central nervous system events appears highest during the neonatal period. In contrast to peripheral arterial and venous thrombotic problems, it is likely that a proportion of cerebral thromboembolic events occur either in utero or perinatally and reflect different risk factors from those occurring in older infants and children. The pathophysiology of perinatal stroke is complex and in many cases is likely to be multifactorial. It is now recognised that risk factors may relate to both maternal and placental problems as well as fetal and neonatal disorders. Large prospective studies of perinatal stroke are currently lacking and efforts to define the relative contribution from each of these areas are at an early stage. The complex nature of these disorders requires collaboration between a number of different disciplines including obstetrics, fetal medicine, pathology, neonatology and neurology. Of particular interest to haematologists is the possible impact of prothrombotic abnormalities in the pathophysiology of these events and also the potential for the use of antithrombotic agents in both management and prevention. PMID:16042683

Chalmers, Elizabeth A

2005-08-01

114

The black box of perinatal ischemic stroke pathogenesis.  

PubMed

An improved understanding of perinatal stroke epidemiology, classification, neuroimaging, and outcomes has emerged in recent years. Despite this, little is known regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for most cases. A multitude of possible associations and putative risk factors have been reported, but most lack definitive empirical evidence supporting primary causation. These include obstetrical and maternal factors, perinatal conditions, infectious diseases, prothrombotic abnormalities, cardiac disorders, medications, and many others. The bulk of evidence is weak, dominated by case reports and retrospective case series. Findings from the small number of case-control and cohort studies that exist are limited by heterogeneous populations and methodologies. The single largest barrier to ultimately understanding and potentially improving outcomes from this common and disabling condition is the lack of comprehensive, fully powered risk factor studies required to definitively describe perinatal stroke pathogenesis. This review summarizes current evidence and suggests future directions for research. PMID:21670391

Mineyko, Aleksandra; Kirton, Adam

2011-09-01

115

The Black Box of Perinatal Ischemic Stroke Pathogenesis  

PubMed Central

An improved understanding of perinatal stroke epidemiology, classification, neuroimaging, and outcomes has emerged in recent years. Despite this, little is known regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for most cases. A multitude of possible associations and putative risk factors have been reported, but most lack definitive empirical evidence supporting primary causation. These include obstetrical and maternal factors, perinatal conditions, infectious diseases, prothrombotic abnormalities, cardiac disorders, medications, and many others. The bulk of evidence is weak, dominated by case reports and retrospective case series. Findings from the small number of case-control and cohort studies that exist are limited by heterogeneous populations and methodologies. The single largest barrier to ultimately understanding and potentially improving outcomes from this common and disabling condition is the lack of comprehensive, fully-powered risk factor studies required to definitively describe perinatal stroke pathogenesis. This review summarizes current evidence and suggests future directions for research.

Mineyko, Aleksandra; Kirton, Adam

2013-01-01

116

A parsimonious explanation for intersecting perinatal mortality curves: understanding the effect of plurality and of parity.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Birth weight- and gestational age-specific perinatal mortality curves intersect when compared across categories of maternal smoking, plurality, race and other factors. No simple explanation exists for this paradoxical observation. METHODS: We used data on all live births, stillbirths and infant deaths in Canada (1991-1997) to compare perinatal mortality rates among singleton and twin births, and among singleton births to nulliparous and parous women. Birth weight- and gestational age-specific perinatal mortality rates were first calculated by dividing the number of perinatal deaths at any given birth weight or gestational age by the number of total births at that birth weight or gestational age (conventional calculation). Gestational age-specific perinatal mortality rates were also calculated using the number of fetuses at risk of perinatal death at any given gestational age. RESULTS: Conventional perinatal mortality rates among twin births were lower than those among singletons at lower birth weights and earlier gestation ages, while the reverse was true at higher birth weights and later gestational ages. When perinatal mortality rates were based on fetuses at risk, however, twin births had consistently higher mortality rates than singletons at all gestational ages. A similar pattern emerged in contrasts of gestational age-specific perinatal mortality among singleton births to nulliparous and parous women. Increases in gestational age-specific rates of growth-restriction with advancing gestational age presaged rising rates of gestational age-specific perinatal mortality in both contrasts. CONCLUSIONS: The proper conceptualization of perinatal risk eliminates the mortality crossover paradox and provides new insights into perinatal health issues. PMID:12780942

Joseph, KS; Liu, Shiliang; Demissie, Kitaw; Wen, Shi Wu; Platt, Robert W; Ananth, Cande V; Dzakpasu, Susie; Sauve, Reg; Allen, Alexander C; Kramer, Michael S

2003-06-01

117

Perinatal outcome in an obstetric cohort of Mozambican women.  

PubMed

A prospective cohort of 908 consecutively enrolled pregnant women with biparietal diameter (DBP) compatible with gestational age equal to or below 21 weeks were followed up regularly at 2-4 weeks intervals. Normal antenatal care routine was applied. The newborns were followed until 7 days postpartum. The setting was two suburban antenatal clinics in Maputo and the delivery ward at the Maputo Central Hospital. The main outcome variables were low birth weight (LBW), preterm delivery, intrauterine fetal death, perinatal death and small for gestational age (SGA). For each of these variables the odds ratio for maternal risk factors was estimated with 95 per cent confidence interval and multiple logistic regression analysis was used. LBW occurred in 16.2 per cent and low maternal weight, low weight gain during pregnancy and not having a living child were risk factors. Prevalence of preterm birth was 15.4 per cent and low weight gain during pregnancy and malaria in the perinatal period were risk factors. Four per cent of mothers delivered stillborns and syphilis serology (positive VDRL test) was a risk factor. Perinatal death occurred in 4.7 per cent. These deaths were associated with being SGA, LBW or preterm at birth. Of the cohort women, 9.7 per cent delivered SGA newborns. It was concluded that maternal constitutional factors, particularly maternal weight gain, maternal height and maternal weight as well as syphilis and malaria during pregnancy, need to be given attention concerning the adverse outcomes addressed. The establishment of an obstetric cohort, followed prospectively, was possible in a low-income setting with limited numbers lost to follow-up at delivery. PMID:11245348

Osman, N B; Challis, K; Cotiro, M; Nordahl, G; Bergström, S

2001-02-01

118

The influence of socio-biological factors on perinatal mortality in a rural area of Bangladesh.  

PubMed

"The present study considers data on all pregnancies that ended in a stillbirth or live birth in a rural area of Bangladesh during the years 1982 to 1984. It considers the relationships of both biological and socio-economic factors to perinatal mortality....[Results show a] lack of association with any measure of socio-economic status.... Our study has confirmed that survival of the perinatal period is separately related to both maternal age and primiparity. Once maternal age is taken into account, high parity shows no evidence of decreasing survival chances." PMID:12319485

Mostafa, G; Foster, A; Fauveau, V

1995-03-01

119

Perinatal data collection: current practice in the Australian nursing and midwifery healthcare context.  

PubMed

The collection of perinatal data within Queensland, Australia, has traditionally been achieved via a paper form completed by midwives after each birth. Recently, with an increase in the use of e-health systems in healthcare, perinatal data collection has migrated to an online system. It is suggested that this move from paper to an ehealth platform has resulted in improvement to error rates, completion levels, timeliness of data transfer from healthcare institutions to the perinatal data collection and subsequent publication of data items. Worldwide, perinatal data are collected utilising a variety of methods, but essentially data are used for similar purposes: to monitor outcome patterns within obstetrics and midwifery. This paper discusses current practice in relation to perinatal data collection worldwide and within Australia, with a specific focus on Queensland, highlights relevant issues for midwives, and points to the need for further research into the efficient use of an e-health platform for perinatal data collection. PMID:23640918

Craswell, Alison; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

2013-01-01

120

Comments on: "Perinatal toxicity of cyfluthrin in Mice: developmental and behavioral effects" by Soni et al, which is accepted in Human & Experimental Toxicology (DOl: 10.1177/0960327110391386)  

EPA Science Inventory

Soni and colleagues recently reported that perinatal maternal exposure to cyfluthrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, caused fetal malformations and behavioral changes in offspring, including skeletal malformations and alterations in righting reflexes and locomotion (Soni et al., 2011)...

121

Toward Improving the Outcome of Pregnancy in Wisconsin: Report of the Statewide Perinatal Task Force Meeting, October 30-31, 1980, Madison, Wisconsin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The perinatal care system consists of maternity services (prenatal, ante-intra-postpartum, and interconceptional care) and newborn services (neonatal intensive, normal nursery, and infant follow-up care). The goal of the task force was to develop a genera...

1981-01-01

122

Classification of perinatal death.  

PubMed Central

Three paediatric pathologists, one perinatal paediatrician, one obstetrician, and one epidemiologist separately used information collected on 239 babies in an attempt to validate the Wigglesworth classification of perinatal deaths. This was first done using clinical data only, then using the combination of clinical and gross necropsy findings and finally using clinical, gross necropsy, histological and any other information (for example, chromosome analyses, microbiological investigations). Only 14 (6%) of deaths changed groups within the Wigglesworth classification when gross necropsy findings were considered as well as clinical findings, and altogether only 21 (9%) changed classification when complete investigations were available. There was an unacceptable amount (15%) of disagreement between the classifiers, largely the result of failure to comply with the rules laid down for classification. We set out amendments to Wigglesworth's original definitions to clarify certain ambiguities.

Keeling, J W; MacGillivray, I; Golding, J; Wigglesworth, J; Berry, J; Dunn, P M

1989-01-01

123

[Congenital and perinatal infections  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE: To review current information about congenital and perinatal infections, mainly related to their epidemiology in Brazil, mother-to-infant transmission, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Particular aspects related to the agents T. pallidum, hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus, cytomegalovirus and T. gondii were considered. METHODS: The main published papers from the last 10 years were selected from a Medline database electronic search. RESULTS: Congenital or perinatal infections can occur in up to 10% of newborns. Although there are few Brazilian studies, available data suggest their relevance, mainly related to the occurrence of infection due to T. pallidum, HIV and CMV. At least 50% of the infected newborns are asymptomatic. However, because these infections may lead to long term sequelae, it is necessary to early identify infected pregnant women in order to implement specific preventive measures. Presently, laboratory methods for early diagnosis of fetal or neonatal infections are available. They are predominantly based on assays for detection of IgA or IgM specific antibodies and fragments of the microorganism nucleic acids by polymerase chain reaction. The available treatments had only limited success, because they often have failed to substantially modify the prognosis for infected infants. New treatments and outcome studies are needed. CONCLUSIONS: Congenital and perinatal infections are a relevant problem whose main current advances are related to prevention and laboratory diagnostic methods applicable to pregnant women, fetus or infants. PMID:14685480

Mussi-Pinhata, M M; Yamamoto, A Y

1999-07-01

124

Predictors of perinatal mortality in rural population of Northwest Ethiopia: a prospective longitudinal study  

PubMed Central

Background Perinatal mortality is one of the serious challenges in meeting maternal and child Millennium Development Goals in developing countries. Identifying its predictors is an important step to develop focused and appropriate health interventions for reducing perinatal deaths. This study therefore aims at identifying predictors of perinatal mortality in a rural setting in northwest Ethiopia. Methods A prospective longitudinal study was conducted at Dabat Health and Demographic Surveillance site, northwest Ethiopia, from November 2009 to August 2011. Data were collected by interviewing the mothers or guardians of eligible children. Multiple logistic regressions were employed to identify potential predictors. Results A total of 1752 eligible children were included in the study. Perinatal mortality rate in the study population was 50.22 per 1000 (95% CI: 39.99, 60.46) total births. In multiple logistic analysis, previous still birth [(AOR?=?8.38, 95% CI: 3.94, 17.83)], twin birth [(AOR?=?7.09, 95% CI: (3.22, 15.61)], not receiving tetanus toxoid vaccine during the index pregnancy [(AOR?=?3.62, 95% CI: 1.57, 8.34)], short birth interval of less than 24 months [(AOR?=?2.58, 95% CI: (1.61, 4.13)], maternal illiteracy [(AOR?=?4.83, 95% CI: (1.45, 16.05)] and mothers’ running own business [(AOR?=?5.40, 95% CI: 1.40, 27.96)] were the main predictors associated with increased risk of perinatal death. Conclusions Predictors of perinatal death in the study area are easily recognizable and potentially preventable with the existing maternal health programs. Efforts need to be intensified in expanding maternal and newborn health services to significantly reduce perinatal mortality in rural settings.

2013-01-01

125

Congenital Malformations in Perinatal Autopsies - A Study of 100 Cases  

PubMed Central

Background Congenital malformations remain a common cause of perinatal deaths and even though ultrasonogram can give fairly accurate diagnosis, perinatal autopsy is essential to confirm the diagnosis and look for associated malformations. Objectives To emphasize the importance of perinatal autopsy in diagnosing congenital malformations and to compare the same with the prenatal ultrasound findings. Methods The present study comprises 100 consecutive perinatal autopsies conducted after obtaining the approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee. In cases where prenatal ultrasound findings were available they were compared with the autopsy findings. Results Out of 100 perinatal autopsies, 44 cases were congenital anomalies with M:F = 1:1.5. Majority of the fetuses with congenital malformations (36.36%) were therapeutically terminated, Cental nervous system malformations being the commonest indication. The most common timing of therapeutic termination being 20 -24weeks. Congenital malformations were common between 35-39 weeks gestational age and birth weight range 350- 1000g. The malformations involving the central nervous system were commonest, seen in 15 cases (34.09%) followed by renal anomalies in 9 cases (20.45%) and multiple malformations in 7cases ( 15.91%). Autopsy confirmed the prenatal ultrasound findings in 50% of the cases, added to diagnosis in 29.54%, while it completely changed the primary diagnosis in 9.09% of the cases. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of perinatal autopsy in confirming the diagnosis of congenital anomalies by prenatal ultrasound findings.

Andola, Uma S; AM, Anita; Ahuja, Mukta; Andola, Sainath K

2012-01-01

126

Disasters and Perinatal Health: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background The empirical literature on the effects of disaster on pregnancy and the postpartum period is limited. The objective of this review was to examine the existing evidence on the effect of disasters on perinatal health. Methods A systematic review was conducted by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl, PsycInfo), including literature on disasters and pregnancy outcomes (e.g., preterm birth, low birthweight, congenital anomalies), mental health, and child development. 110 articles were identified, but many published reports were anecdotes or recommendations rather than systematic studies. The final review included 49 peer-reviewed studies that met inclusion criteria. Results Studies addressing the World Trade Center disaster of September 11th and other terrorist attacks, environmental/chemical disasters, and natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes were identified. Disasters of various types may reduce fetal growth in some women, though there does not appear to be an effect on gestational age at birth. Severity of exposure is the major predictor of mental health issues among pregnant and postpartum women. The mother's mental health after a disaster may more strongly influence on child development than any direct effect of disaster-related prenatal stress. Conclusions There is evidence that disaster impacts maternal mental health and some perinatal health outcomes, particular among highly-exposed women. Future research should focus on under-studied outcomes such as spontaneous abortion. Relief workers and clinicians should concentrate on the most exposed women, particularly with respect to mental health.

Harville, EW; Xiong, X; Buekens, P

2012-01-01

127

Is Gestational Hypertension Protective against Perinatal Mortality in Twin Pregnancies?  

PubMed Central

Background Pregnancy-induced or gestational hypertension is a common pregnancy complication. Paradoxically, gestational hypertension has been associated with a protective effect against perinatal mortality in twin pregnancies in analytic models (logistic regression) without accounting for survival time. Whether this effect is real remains uncertain. This study aimed to validate the impact of gestational hypertension on perinatal mortality in twin pregnancies using a survival analysis approach. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of 278,821 twin pregnancies, using the U.S. 1995–2000 matched multiple birth dataset (the largest dataset available for multiple births). Cox proportional hazard models were applied to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) of perinatal death (stillbirth and neonatal death) comparing gestational hypertensive vs. non-hypertensive pregnancies controlling for maternal characteristics and twin cluster-level dependence. Results Comparing births in gestational hypertensive vs. non-hypertensive twin pregnancies, perinatal mortality rates were significantly lower (1.20% vs. 3.38%), so were neonatal mortality (0.72% vs. 2.30%) and stillbirth (0.48% vs. 1.10%) rates. The aHRs (95% confidence intervals) were 0.34 (0.31–0.38) for perinatal death, 0.31 (0.27–0.34) for neonatal death, and 0.45 (0.38–0.53) for stillbirth, respectively. The protective effect of gestational hypertension against perinatal death became weaker over advancing gestational age; the aHRs in very preterm (<32 weeks), mild preterm (32–36 weeks) and term (37+ weeks) births were 0.29, 0.48 and 0.76, respectively. The largest risk reductions in neonatal mortality were observed for infections and immaturity-related conditions. Conclusions Gestational hypertension appears to be beneficial for fetal survival in twin pregnancies, especially in those ending more prematurely or for deaths due to infections and immaturity-related conditions. Prospective studies are required to rule out the possibility of unmeasured confounders.

Luo, Qi-Guang; Zhang, Ji-Yan; Cheng, Wei-Wei; Audibert, Francois; Luo, Zhong-Cheng

2014-01-01

128

Excitotoxicity in Perinatal Brain Injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Excitotoxicity is an important mechanism involved in perinatal brain injuries. Gluta- mate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and most neurons as well as many oligo- dendrocytes and astrocytes possess receptors for glutamate. Perinatal insults such as hypoxia-ischemia, stroke, hypoglycemia, kernicterus, and trauma can disrupt synaptic function leading to accumulation of extracellular glutamate and excessive stimulation of these receptors. The activities

Michael V. Johnston

2006-01-01

129

Perinatal exposure to high-fat diet programs energy balance, metabolism and behavior in adulthood.  

PubMed

The perinatal environment plays an important role in programming many aspects of physiology and behavior including metabolism, body weight set point, energy balance regulation and predisposition to mental health-related disorders such as anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Maternal health and nutritional status heavily influence the early environment and have a long-term impact on critical central pathways, including the melanocortinergic, serotonergic system and dopaminergic systems. Evidence from a variety of animal models including rodents and nonhuman primates indicates that exposure to maternal high-fat diet (HFD) consumption programs offspring for increased risk of adult obesity. Hyperphagia and increased preference for fatty and sugary foods are implicated as mechanisms for the increased obesity risk. The effects of maternal HFD consumption on energy expenditure are unclear, and future studies need to address the impact of perinatal HFD exposure on this important component of energy balance regulation. Recent evidence from animal models also indicates that maternal HFD consumption increases the risk of offspring developing mental health-related disorders such as anxiety. Potential mechanisms for perinatal HFD programming of neural pathways include circulating factors, such as hormones (leptin, insulin), nutrients (fatty acids, triglycerides and glucose) and inflammatory cytokines. As maternal HFD consumption and obesity are common and rapidly increasing, we speculate that future generations will be at increased risk for both metabolic and mental health disorders. Thus, it is critical that future studies identify therapeutic strategies that are effective at preventing maternal HFD-induced malprogramming. PMID:21079387

Sullivan, Elinor L; Smith, M Susan; Grove, Kevin L

2011-01-01

130

Impacto das malformações congênitas na mortalidade perinatal e neonatal em uma maternidade-escola do Recife  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: to determine the incidence of conge- nital malformations in newborns in a university maternity hospital in Recife and assess the impact of malformation in perinatal and neonatal mortality. Methods: a longitudinal study was performed from September 2004 to May 2005 with all deliveries at the Instituto Materno Infantil Prof. Fernando Figueira, IMIP analyzed. The type and incidence of congenital

Melania Maria; Ramos de Amorim; Paulo Carvalho Vilela; Regina Viana; Dutra Santos; Luiza Medeiros; Vasconcelos Lima; Eduardo França; Pessoa de Melo; Paulo Fernando; Bezerra de Menezes

131

Standards and General Criteria for the Planning and Certification of Need of Perinatal Services.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Standards and criteria are defined for three levels of perinatal care established by the Maternal and Infant Care Services Committee appointed by the New Jersey State Health Planning Council. Based on the type of services provided, these levels are as fol...

1977-01-01

132

Impact of community organization of women on perinatal outcomes in rural Bolivia  

Microsoft Academic Search

An intervention to improve maternal and child health was conducted in a remote Bolivian province with limited access to modern medical facilities. The intervention focused on initiat- ing and strengthening women's organizations, developing women's skills in problem identifi- cation and prioritization, and training community members in safe birthing techniques. Its impact was evaluated by comparing perinatal mortality rates and obstetric

Kathleen O'Rourke; Lisa Howard-Grabman; Guillermo Seoane

1998-01-01

133

Early Intervention and Perinatal Depression: Is There a Need for Provider Training?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An estimated 5-25% of women suffer from perinatal depression (PD). If left untreated, PD can have negative consequences for maternal and child mental health. During pregnancy and the postpartum period, women are in contact with a variety of professionals and paraprofessionals such as public health nurses, early childhood providers and home…

Thomason, Elizabeth; Stacks, Ann M.; McComish, Judith Fry

2010-01-01

134

Perinatal Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Implications for Occupational Therapy in Early Intervention Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to present literature regarding perinatal posttraumatic stress disorder and to describe the implications of research findings for occupational therapy screening and treatment in early intervention practice. Changes in legislation regarding early intervention practice and family centered care are presented as a rationale for including maternal mental health screening as a standard practice in the

Kris Pizur-Barnekow; Stephanie Erickson

2011-01-01

135

Antenatal and perinatal predictors of infant mortality in rural Malawi  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND—The slow pace in the reduction of infant mortality in sub-Saharan Africa has partially been attributed to the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. To facilitate early interventions, antenatal and perinatal predictors of 1st year mortality were identified in a rural community in southern Malawi.?METHODS—A cohort of 733 live born infants was studied prospectively from approximately 24 gestation weeks onwards. Univariate analysis was used to determine relative risks for infant mortality after selected antenatal and perinatal exposures. Multivariate modelling was used to control for potential confounders.?FINDINGS—The infant mortality rate was 136 deaths/1000 live births. Among singleton newborns, the strongest antenatal and perinatal predictors of mortality were birth between May and July, maternal primiparity, birth before 38th gestation week, and maternal HIV infection. Theoretically, exposure to these variables accounted for 22%, 22%, 17%, and 15% of the population attributable risk for infant mortality, respectively.?INTERPRETATION—The HIV epidemic was an important but not the main determinant of infant mortality. Interventions targetting the offspring of primiparous women or infants born between May and July or prevention of prematurity would all have considerable impact on infant survival.??

Vaahtera, M.; Kulmala, T.; Ndekha, M.; Koivisto, A.; Cullinan, T.; Salin, M.; Ashorn, P.

2000-01-01

136

Perinatal mortality and morbidity in developing countries. A global view.  

PubMed

Global perinatal mortality figures show that of the 132 million births per year, there are between 6 and 7 million perinatal deaths. While 90% of these births are in less developed countries, perinatal deaths take 98% of the global share. These statistics show on average the rates as they were in England during the 1930s. The most common recorded medical causes of perinatal deaths are also similar in the less developed countries, and the common denominators are early childbearing, poor maternal health and above all, the lack of appropriate and quality services. Although life-saving practices for most infants have been known for decades, currently a third of mothers still have no access to services during pregnancy, and almost half do not have access to services for childbirth. There are enormous variations both among and within countries. It takes innovation to find the best fit between the needs of women and infants and resources. A health worker with excellent knowledge and skills is the key resource and the best investment. The cost is moderate, and the investment pays a high dividend in improved health of both the mother and her baby, and better health for the next generation at lower cost. PMID:14763290

Zupan, J

2003-01-01

137

Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Acinetobacter baumannii Infection  

PubMed Central

Objective?To determine perinatal and pregnancy outcomes of Acinetobacter baumannii infection using clinicopathologic material from pregnant women, neonates, and perinatal postmortem examinations with positive cultures. Study Design?This is a retrospective record review with placental and postmortem examination. Results?During a 5-year period, 40 positive cultures were found. Three pregnancies with positive cultures close in the peripartum period were all associated with adverse outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, and one full-term birth with histological chorioamnionitis. Two positive cultures were found in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Two of three cases of perinatal death grew pure cultures from blood and/or fetal tissue with placental or fetal examination demonstrating evidence of infection/inflammation with fetal inflammatory response. Conclusion?This is the first case series report of A. baumannii-positive cultures in maternal, fetal, and neonatal specimen, with histopathologic evidence of infection. The results suggest a significant role of A. baumannii infection in adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes.

He, Mai; Kostadinov, Stefan; Gundogan, Fusun; Struminsky, Judith; Pinar, Halit; Sung, C. James

2013-01-01

138

Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Acinetobacter baumannii Infection.  

PubMed

Objective?To determine perinatal and pregnancy outcomes of Acinetobacter baumannii infection using clinicopathologic material from pregnant women, neonates, and perinatal postmortem examinations with positive cultures. Study Design?This is a retrospective record review with placental and postmortem examination. Results?During a 5-year period, 40 positive cultures were found. Three pregnancies with positive cultures close in the peripartum period were all associated with adverse outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, and one full-term birth with histological chorioamnionitis. Two positive cultures were found in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Two of three cases of perinatal death grew pure cultures from blood and/or fetal tissue with placental or fetal examination demonstrating evidence of infection/inflammation with fetal inflammatory response. Conclusion?This is the first case series report of A. baumannii-positive cultures in maternal, fetal, and neonatal specimen, with histopathologic evidence of infection. The results suggest a significant role of A. baumannii infection in adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes. PMID:23943711

He, Mai; Kostadinov, Stefan; Gundogan, Fusun; Struminsky, Judith; Pinar, Halit; Sung, C James

2013-05-01

139

Perinatal quality collaboratives: improving care for mothers and infants.  

PubMed

Abstract Perinatal morbidity and mortality are key indicators of a nation's health status. These measures of our nation's health are influenced by decisions made in health care facilities and by health care providers. As our health systems and health care for women and infants can be improved, there is an expectation that these measures of health will also improve. State-based perinatal quality collaboratives (PQCs) are networks of perinatal care providers including hospitals, clinicians, and public health professionals working to improve pregnancy outcomes for women and newborns through continuous quality improvement. Members of the collaborative are healthcare facilities, primarily hospitals, which identify processes of care that require improvement and then use the best available methods to effect change and improve outcomes as quickly as possible. The Division of Reproductive Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is collaborating with state-based PQCs to enhance their ability to improve perinatal care by expanding the range of neonatal and maternal health issues addressed and including higher proportions of participating hospitals in their state PQC. The work of PQCs is cross-cutting and demonstrates how partnerships can act to translate evidence-based science to clinical care. PMID:24655150

Henderson, Zsakeba T; Suchdev, Danielle B; Abe, Karon; Johnston, Emily Osteen; Callaghan, William M

2014-05-01

140

The regionalization of perinatal care in Wales and Washington State.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to compare perinatal regionalization and neonatal mortality in Wales and Washington State. METHODS. The 28 hospitals in Wales and the 80 hospitals in Washington State that offered maternity services and the 218,326 births that occurred in these hospitals in 1989 and 1990 were studied. Surveys were used to identify the neonatal technology and the referral policies of each hospital, and linked data from birth and death certificates were used to examine birthweight-specific neonatal mortality rates for all babies born in these hospitals. RESULTS. Welsh district general hospitals (broadly equivalent to Level II perinatal centers in the United States) have more sophisticated neonatal technology than their Washington State counterparts and appear less likely to refer small or preterm babies to regional or subregional centers. Neonatal mortality rates were quite similar in the two settings. CONCLUSIONS. Perinatal care in Wales appears to be less regionalized than in a similar region in the United States. The relative lack of perinatal regionalization in Wales may contribute to duplication and underutilization of expensive neonatal technologies. National health care systems do not, in and of themselves, lead to optimal regionalization of services. Images FIGURE 1

Rosenblatt, R A; Macfarlane, A; Dawson, A J; Cartlidge, P H; Larson, E H; Hart, L G

1996-01-01

141

Perinatal transmission of human papilomavirus DNA  

PubMed Central

The purpose was to study the perinatal transmission of human papillomavirus DNA (HPV-DNA) in 63 mother-newborn pairs, besides looking at the epidemiological factors involved in the viral DNA transmission. The following sampling methods were used: (1) in the pregnant woman, when was recruited, in cervix and clinical lesions of the vagina, vulva and perineal region; (2) in the newborn, (a) buccal, axillary and inguinal regions; (b) nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c) cord blood; (3) in the children, buccal was repeated in the 4th week and 6th and 12th month of life. HPV-DNA was identified using two methodologies: multiplex PCR (PGMY09 and MY11 primers) and nested-PCR (genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58). Perinatal transmission was considered when concordance was found in type-specific HPV between mother/newborn or mother/child. HPV-DNA genital was detected in 49 pregnant women submitted to delivery. Eleven newborns (22.4%, n = 11/49) were HPV-DNA positive. In 8 cases (16.3%, n = 8/49) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. At the end of the first month of life three children (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA positive, while two remained positive from birth. In 3 cases (100%, n = 3/3) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. In the 6th month, a child (2%, n = 1/49) had become HPV-DNA positive between the 1st and 6th month of life, and there was type specific HPV concordance of mother/newborn samples. All the HPV-DNA positive children (22.4%, n = 11/49) at birth and at the end first month of life (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA negative at the age of 6 months. The HPV-DNA positive child (2%, n = 1/49) from 1st to the 6th month of life became HPV-DNA negative between the 6th and 12th month of life and one child had anogenital warts. In the twelfth month all (100%, n = 49/49) the children studied were HPV-DNA negative. A positive and significant correlation was observed between perinatal transmission of HPV-DNA and the immunodepression of maternal variables (HIV, p = 0.007). Finally, the study suggests that perinatal transmission of HPV-DNA occurred in 24.5% (n = 12/49) of the cases studied.

Rombaldi, Renato L; Serafini, Eduardo P; Mandelli, Jovana; Zimmermann, Edineia; Losquiavo, Kamille P

2009-01-01

142

Ethics and maternity care: from principles to practice.  

PubMed

In this column, the associate editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education (JPE) discusses the decision to devote an issue of JPE to the ethics of childbirth and maternity care. The current crisis in maternity care mandates a careful look at the ethical principles that provide the foundation for practice. The contents of this special issue include: a broad overview of ethics of childbearing, historical perspectives and contemporary understanding of informed decision making, the ethical issues faced by childbirth educators, and the challenges and moral distress experienced by childbirth educators and other maternity care providers when their values, beliefs, and ethical standards are in conflict with standard maternity care practices. PMID:19415107

Lothian, Judith A

2009-01-01

143

Periviable birth: executive summary of a joint workshop by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, American Academy of Pediatrics, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.  

PubMed

This is an executive summary of a workshop on the management and counseling issues of women anticipated to deliver at a periviable gestation (broadly defined as 20 0/7 through 25 6/7 weeks of gestation) and the treatment options for the newborn infant. Upon review of the available literature, the workshop panel noted that the rates of neonatal survival and neurodevelopmental disabilities among the survivors vary greatly across the periviable gestations and are significantly influenced by the obstetric and neonatal management practices (eg, antenatal steroid, tocolytic agents, and antibiotic administration; cesarean birth; and local protocols for perinatal care, neonatal resuscitation, and intensive care support). These are, in turn, influenced by the variations in local and regional definitions of limits of viability. Because of the complexities in making difficult management decisions, obstetric and neonatal teams should confer prior to meeting with the family, when feasible. Family counseling should be coordinated with the goal of creating mutual trust, respect, and understanding and should incorporate evidence-based counseling methods. Since clinical circumstances can change rapidly with increasing gestational age, counseling should include discussion of the benefits and risks of various maternal and neonatal interventions at the time of counseling. There should be a plan for follow-up counseling as clinical circumstances evolve. The panel proposed a research agenda and recommended developing educational curricula on the care and counseling of families facing the birth of a periviable infant. PMID:24725732

Raju, Tonse N K; Mercer, Brian M; Burchfield, David J; Joseph, Gerald F

2014-05-01

144

Periviable birth: executive summary of a Joint Workshop by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, American Academy of Pediatrics, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.  

PubMed

This is an executive summary of a workshop on the management and counseling issues of women anticipated to deliver at a periviable gestation (broadly defined as 20 0/7 through 25 6/7 weeks of gestation), and the treatment options for the newborn. Upon review of the available literature, the workshop panel noted that the rates of neonatal survival and neurodevelopmental disabilities among the survivors vary greatly across the periviable gestations and are significantly influenced by the obstetric and neonatal management practices (for example, antenatal steroid, tocolytic agents and antibiotic administration; cesarean birth; and local protocols for perinatal care, neonatal resuscitation and intensive care support). These are, in turn, influenced by the variations in local and regional definitions of limits of viability. Because of the complexities in making difficult management decisions, obstetric and neonatal teams should confer prior to meeting with the family, when feasible. Family counseling should be coordinated with the goal of creating mutual trust, respect and understanding, and should incorporate evidence-based counseling methods. Since clinical circumstances can change rapidly with increasing gestational age, counseling should include discussion of the benefits and risks of various maternal and neonatal interventions at the time of counseling. There should be a plan for follow-up counseling as clinical circumstances evolve. The panel proposed a research agenda and recommended developing educational curricula on the care and counseling of families facing the birth of a periviable infant. PMID:24722647

Raju, T N K; Mercer, B M; Burchfield, D J; Joseph, G F

2014-05-01

145

Periviable birth: executive summary of a joint workshop by the eunice kennedy shriver national institute of child health and human development, society for maternal-fetal medicine, american academy of pediatrics, and american college of obstetricians and gynecologists.  

PubMed

This is an executive summary of a workshop on the management and counseling issues of women anticipated to deliver at a periviable gestation (broadly defined as 20 0/7 through 25 6/7 weeks of gestation), and the treatment options for the newborn. Upon review of the available literature, the workshop panel noted that the rates of neonatal survival and neurodevelopmental disabilities among the survivors vary greatly across the periviable gestations and are significantly influenced by the obstetric and neonatal management practices (eg, antenatal steroid, tocolytic agents, and antibiotic administration; cesarean birth; and local protocols for perinatal care, neonatal resuscitation, and intensive care support). These are, in turn, influenced by the variations in local and regional definitions of limits of viability. Because of the complexities in making difficult management decisions, obstetric and neonatal teams should confer prior to meeting with the family, when feasible. Family counseling should be coordinated with the goal of creating mutual trust, respect, and understanding and should incorporate evidence-based counseling methods. Since clinical circumstances can change rapidly with increasing gestational age, counseling should include discussion of the benefits and risks of various maternal and neonatal interventions at the time of counseling. There should be a plan for follow-up counseling as clinical circumstances evolve. The panel proposed a research agenda and recommended developing educational curricula on the care and counseling of families facing the birth of a periviable infant. PMID:24785861

Raju, Tonse N K; Mercer, Brian M; Burchfield, David J; Joseph, Gerald F

2014-05-01

146

Regional perinatal mortality differences in the Netherlands; care is the question  

PubMed Central

Background Perinatal mortality is an important indicator of health. European comparisons of perinatal mortality show an unfavourable position for the Netherlands. Our objective was to study regional variation in perinatal mortality within the Netherlands and to identify possible explanatory factors for the found differences. Methods Our study population comprised of all singleton births (904,003) derived from the Netherlands Perinatal Registry for the period 2000–2004. Perinatal mortality including stillbirth from 22+0 weeks gestation and early neonatal death (0–6 days) was our main outcome measure. Differences in perinatal mortality were calculated between 4 distinct geographical regions North-East-South-West. We tried to explain regional differences by adjustment for the demographic factors maternal age, parity and ethnicity and by socio-economic status and urbanisation degree using logistic modelling. In addition, regional differences in mode of delivery and risk selection were analysed as health care factors. Finally, perinatal mortality was analysed among five distinct clinical risk groups based on the mediating risk factors gestational age and congenital anomalies. Results Overall perinatal mortality was 10.1 per 1,000 total births over the period 2000–2004. Perinatal mortality was elevated in the northern region (11.2 per 1,000 total births). Perinatal mortality in the eastern, western and southern region was 10.2, 10.1 and 9.6 per 1,000 total births respectively. Adjustment for demographic factors increased the perinatal mortality risk in the northern region (odds ratio 1.20, 95% CI 1.12–1.28, compared to reference western region), subsequent adjustment for socio-economic status and urbanisation explained a small part of the elevated risk (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.03–1.20). Risk group analysis showed that regional differences were absent among very preterm births (22+0 – 25+6 weeks gestation) and most prominent among births from 32+0 gestation weeks onwards and among children with severe congenital anomalies. Among term births (? 37+0 weeks) regional mortality differences were largest for births in women transferred from low to high risk during delivery. Conclusion Regional differences in perinatal mortality exist in the Netherlands. These differences could not be explained by demographic or socio-economic factors, however clinical risk group analysis showed indications for a role of health care factors.

Tromp, Miranda; Eskes, Martine; Reitsma, Johannes B; Erwich, Jan Jaap HM; Brouwers, Hens AA; Rijninks-van Driel, Greta C; Bonsel, Gouke J; Ravelli, Anita CJ

2009-01-01

147

Maternal and fetal well-being.  

PubMed

Pregnancy outcomes can be improved by following modern recommendations for personal health maintenance. Adequate caloric intake, reflected by a weight gain of about 10 to 12.3 kg (22 to 27 lb) for women of average build, is associated with the lowest rate of perinatal mortality. Maternal dietary protein supplementation should generally be avoided because it may be associated with low-birth-weight pregnancies. Abstinence from social drugs offers the greatest positive opportunity to modify the health of a fetus. Serious perinatal infection can be prevented by preconception immunization (rubella), food hygiene (toxoplasmosis) and attention to the expression of virus in the mother (herpes simplex). Available data do not correlate exercise programs begun before pregnancy and continued during pregnancy with adverse fetal effects. Athletic capacity need not diminish postpartum. Most employment may safely continue until delivery. Routine recommendations for prolonged maternal disability leaves are not medically warranted. PMID:6395495

Shy, K K; Brown, Z A

1984-12-01

148

[Perinatal obsessive-compulsive disorder].  

PubMed

A perinatal obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is defined as an illness exhibiting first symptoms in the context of pregnancy and the postpartal period. There are no valid data up to date concerning the incidence of OCD, which might be of multifactorial origin, in this period in which females are highly vulnerable for psychiatric diseases. From a clinical point of view, obsessions and compulsions are mainly related to the well-being of the foetus or newborn baby. Differential diagnosis of perinatal OCD including pregnancy psychosis and post-partum depression is often difficult. Concerning treatment, non-pharmacological approaches should be preferred. Administration of SSRIs should be strongly restricted. However, there are no controlled therapy studies in patients with perinatal OCD. Furthermore, current knowledge about these patients is still limited. The aim of this review article is the presentation of phenomenology, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and treatment of perinatal OCD. The mental situation of the female patients can be improved and stabilised if early diagnosis of a perinatal OCD leads to early initiation of an adequate therapy. This will then enable a good and stable mother-child relationship to develop. PMID:21830184

Mavrogiorgou, P; Illes, F; Juckel, G

2011-09-01

149

Maternal anxiety and infants' hippocampal development: timing matters.  

PubMed

Exposure to maternal anxiety predicts offspring brain development. However, because children's brains are commonly assessed years after birth, the timing of such maternal influences in humans is unclear. This study aimed to examine the consequences of antenatal and postnatal exposure to maternal anxiety upon early infant development of the hippocampus, a key structure for stress regulation. A total of 175 neonates underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at birth and among them 35 had repeated scans at 6 months of age. Maternal anxiety was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at week 26 of pregnancy and 3 months after delivery. Regression analyses showed that antenatal maternal anxiety did not influence bilateral hippocampal volume at birth. However, children of mothers reporting increased anxiety during pregnancy showed slower growth of both the left and right hippocampus over the first 6 months of life. This effect of antenatal maternal anxiety upon right hippocampal growth became statistically stronger when controlling for postnatal maternal anxiety. Furthermore, a strong positive association between postnatal maternal anxiety and right hippocampal growth was detected, whereas a strong negative association between postnatal maternal anxiety and the left hippocampal volume at 6 months of life was found. Hence, the postnatal growth of bilateral hippocampi shows distinct responses to postnatal maternal anxiety. The size of the left hippocampus during early development is likely to reflect the influence of the exposure to perinatal maternal anxiety, whereas right hippocampal growth is constrained by antenatal maternal anxiety, but enhanced in response to increased postnatal maternal anxiety. PMID:24064710

Qiu, A; Rifkin-Graboi, A; Chen, H; Chong, Y-S; Kwek, K; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Meaney, M J

2013-01-01

150

Maternal anxiety and infants' hippocampal development: timing matters  

PubMed Central

Exposure to maternal anxiety predicts offspring brain development. However, because children's brains are commonly assessed years after birth, the timing of such maternal influences in humans is unclear. This study aimed to examine the consequences of antenatal and postnatal exposure to maternal anxiety upon early infant development of the hippocampus, a key structure for stress regulation. A total of 175 neonates underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at birth and among them 35 had repeated scans at 6 months of age. Maternal anxiety was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at week 26 of pregnancy and 3 months after delivery. Regression analyses showed that antenatal maternal anxiety did not influence bilateral hippocampal volume at birth. However, children of mothers reporting increased anxiety during pregnancy showed slower growth of both the left and right hippocampus over the first 6 months of life. This effect of antenatal maternal anxiety upon right hippocampal growth became statistically stronger when controlling for postnatal maternal anxiety. Furthermore, a strong positive association between postnatal maternal anxiety and right hippocampal growth was detected, whereas a strong negative association between postnatal maternal anxiety and the left hippocampal volume at 6 months of life was found. Hence, the postnatal growth of bilateral hippocampi shows distinct responses to postnatal maternal anxiety. The size of the left hippocampus during early development is likely to reflect the influence of the exposure to perinatal maternal anxiety, whereas right hippocampal growth is constrained by antenatal maternal anxiety, but enhanced in response to increased postnatal maternal anxiety.

Qiu, A; Rifkin-Graboi, A; Chen, H; Chong, Y-S; Kwek, K; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Meaney, M J

2013-01-01

151

Screening in high-risk group of gestational diabetes mellitus with its maternal and fetal outcomes  

PubMed Central

Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a metabolic disorder defined as glucose intolerance with the onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Women with GDM are at increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The complications associated with GDM can be prevented by early recognition, intense monitoring and proper treatment. Aims: The present study was done to screen the high-risk pregnancy group for GDM, to find the incidence of abnormal results on screening and to correlate the abnormal results with the maternal and fetal outcomes. The study was done in a tertiary care hospital and teaching institute. It was a prospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: Selective screening for GDM was done in 150 pregnant women with high-risk factors. Screening was done with 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) after 18 weeks, and if GCT was negative then the test was repeated after 28 weeks of pregnancy. The patients who were having an abnormal GCT were subjected to 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). All GDM patients were followed up and treated with diet and/or insulin therapy till delivery to know maternal and fetal outcomes. The period of study was from April 2008 to March 2009. Results: 7.3% of study population was OGCT positive. 6% of the study population was OGTT positive. Age >25 years, obesity, family history of DM, and past history of GDM were the risk factors significantly associated with GDM. One newborn had hypoglycemia and one had hyperbilirubinemia. The fetal and maternal outcome in GDM patients was good in our study due to early diagnosis and intervention. Conclusion: Women with GDM are at an increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The increased morbidity in GDM is preventable by meticulous antenatal care.

Nilofer, Angadi Rajasab; Raju, V. S.; Dakshayini, B. R.; Zaki, Syed Ahmed

2012-01-01

152

Perinatal risk factors for asthma in Finnish adolescent twins  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND—Previous studies have suggested that, in addition to genetic liability and environment in early childhood, intrauterine life also influences the risk for asthma beyond childhood. Low birth weight, prematurity, young maternal age, and maternal smoking have all shown an association with asthma. The effect of perinatal factors on the risk for asthma in relation to familial and social risk factors was studied in a nationwide population-based sample of adolescent twins. In addition to a distribution of birth characteristics among twins which differs from that of singletons, data on twins enable a distinction to be made between genetic and environmental sources of variation.?METHODS—Questionnaires were sent to five consecutive birth cohorts of Finnish 16 year old twins born in 1975-9 and to their parents (3065 families). The outcome measure was life time prevalence of doctor-diagnosed asthma in these adolescents. The association between asthma and potential risk factors was assessed by multiple logistic regression and discordant twin pair analysis.?RESULTS—Risk for asthma increased with increasing ponderal index (p for trend <0.01) and decreasing maternal age (p for trend <0.05). Among the 25% of twins with the highest ponderal index, the odds ratio for asthma was 1.82 (95% confidence interval 1.18 to 2.79) compared with those in the lowest 25%. Neither birth weight, gestational age, nor Apgar score was associated with asthma. When perinatal risk factors were combined with familial and social risk factors, ponderal index, maternal smoking, parental asthma, and sibship size were all significant independent determinants of asthma in these adolescents.?CONCLUSIONS—The risk for asthma in adolescent twins increases with increasing ponderal index when adjusted for familial and social factors.??

Rasanen, M.; Kaprio, J.; Laitinen, T.; Winter, T.; Koskenvuo, M.; Laitinen, L.

2000-01-01

153

Comparison of perinatal outcome between adolescent and adult pregnancies.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to compare perinatal outcomes between adolescent and adult pregnancies. Material and methods: In 527 adolescent and 1334 adult pregnant women who delivered at Ondokuz Mayis University Obstetrics and Gynecology Department between 2006 and 2013, perinatal outcomes were retrospectively compared in terms of including spontaneous abortion, induced abortion rate, dilatation and curettage (D&C), pregnancy-induced hypertension, premature prelabor and prelabor rupture of membranes, polihydramnios, oligohydramnios, maternal anemia, delivery modes and also neonatal outcomes including 5th minute Apgar score and fetal birth weight. Results: The ratio of pregnancy induced hypertension and postpartum hemorrhage was higher in adults, but, anemia was more common in adolescents. There was statistically significant difference in the mode of delivery; the ratio of cesarean section was higher in adults whereas the rate of induced abortions and D&C significantly increased in adolescents. Low birth weight (LBW) and extremely LBW rates were significantly higher in adolescents, however, 5th minute Apgar scores were found to be higher than adult group. Conclusion: These results show that the perinatal care is fairly improved in Turkey. PMID:23899128

Bildircin, Fatma Devran; Kurtoglu, Emel; Kokcu, Arif; I?ik, Yuksel; Ozkarci, Murat; Kuruoglu, Serkan

2014-05-01

154

Sleep disorders in perinatal women.  

PubMed

Insufficient sleep is common in the general population, and can result from environmental and psychosocial factors, medical and psychiatric disorders, and sleep disorders, such as insomnia, circadian rhythm disorders, sleep apnoea and restless legs. Women are particularly at risk for sleep disorders, and complaints of sleep disturbance are more prevalent among women than men across the life span. During the perinatal period, many common sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnoea or restless legs may be exacerbated, or in the case of insomnia or narcolepsy, treatment options may change. In addition, the role of circadian rhythms in fertility and perinatal health is just beginning to be appreciated. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the unique aspects of diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders during the perinatal period. PMID:24144530

Abbott, Sabra M; Attarian, Hrayr; Zee, Phyllis C

2014-01-01

155

Collecting population-based perinatal data efficiently: the example of the Lebanese National Perinatal Survey  

PubMed Central

Summary We describe the methodology and the main results of the Lebanese perinatal health survey; the aim of the survey was to obtain a minimum data set on all births occurring during a short period of time. The survey was carried out during two consecutive weeks in fall 1999 and in spring 2000. All live births and stillbirths occurring during these periods in medical settings were recorded. The sample included 5231 women and 5333 newborns. Data were obtained from medical records and by interviewing the women in hospital after delivery. All maternity units and birth centers agreed to participate. Maternal characteristics, medical care during pregnancy and delivery, and pregnancy outcome were similar for the two study periods. However gestational age distribution differed between the two periods. In total, 9.0% of infants were born before 37 weeks of gestation and 7.0% weighed less than 2500 grams at birth. Wide regional variations were observed for many indicators of health, care and risk factors. For instance, the cesarean section rate varied from 16.2% in the North Region to 28.0% in Beirut. The survey protocol was successfully applied in Lebanon and may be useful in other countries that have a relatively well-developed health care system, but few sources of reliable population-based statistics on health and medical care. This type of survey may also be an appropriate instrument for collecting additional data for health policy evaluations.

Blondel, Beatrice; Zein, Ali; Ghosn, Nada; Du Mazaubrun, Christiane; Breart, Gerard

2006-01-01

156

Women's health groups to improve perinatal care in rural Nepal  

PubMed Central

Background Neonatal mortality rates are high in rural Nepal where more than 90% of deliveries are in the home. Evidence suggests that death rates can be reduced by interventions at community level. We describe an intervention which aimed to harness the power of community planning and decision making to improve maternal and newborn care in rural Nepal. Methods The development of 111 women's groups in a population of 86 704 in Makwanpur district, Nepal is described. The groups, facilitated by local women, were the intervention component of a randomized controlled trial to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality rates. Through participant observation and analysis of reports, we describe the implementation of this intervention: the community entry process, the facilitation of monthly meetings through a participatory action cycle of problem identification, community planning, and implementation and evaluation of strategies to tackle the identified problems. Results In response to the needs of the group, participatory health education was added to the intervention and the women's groups developed varied strategies to tackle problems of maternal and newborn care: establishing mother and child health funds, producing clean home delivery kits and operating stretcher schemes. Close linkages with community leaders and community health workers improved strategy implementation. There were also indications of positive effects on group members and health services, and most groups remained active after 30 months. Conclusion A large scale and potentially sustainable participatory intervention with women's groups, which focused on pregnancy, childbirth and the newborn period, resulted in innovative strategies identified by local communities to tackle perinatal care problems.

Morrison, Joanna; Tamang, Suresh; Mesko, Natasha; Osrin, David; Shrestha, Bhim; Manandhar, Madan; Manandhar, Dharma; Standing, Hilary; Costello, Anthony

2005-01-01

157

Clinical and scientific results in perinatal care of pregnancy complicated by insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in Croatia.  

PubMed

At the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Perinatal Unit for Diabetes and Fetal Growth, School of Medicine, Zagreb, perinatal care of pregnancies complicated with insulin dependent diabetes melitus (IDDM), has been performed for more than 36 years. The intention of this review is to show our own results in the management of IDDM pregnancies and the latest clinical advances in perinatal care of such pregnancies. Pregnancy complicated with IDDM is at risk because of numerous maternal, fetal and neonatal complications. Recent advances in medicine, especially in diabetology and perinatology, helps clinician avoid or lessen antenatal or perinatal complications in IDDM pregnancies. The main result of improved perinatal care is that today fetal and neonatal mortality in IDDM pregnancy is almost equal to that of healthy pregnant population. Intensive preconceptual care and optimal regulation of IDDM have resulted not only in decreased perinatal mortality but also in a decreased rate of congenital malformation. Tight glycemia control during pregnancy has a beneficial effect on fetal growth. Intensive control of fetal growth, verification of lung maturation at term by amniocenthesis, and control of fetal oxygenation will result in delivery of a mature eutrophic newborn with the lowest rate of neonatal complications possible. Perinatal mortality of less than 2% in IDDM pregnancy can be obtained by planned delivery between 38 and 39 weeks of gestation by either vaginal route or cesarean section, depending on indications. After delivery, intensive care of the newborn is necessary. PMID:9818436

Djelmis, J

1998-01-01

158

Behavioral effects of perinatal opioid exposure.  

PubMed

Opioids are among the world's oldest known drugs used mostly for pain relief, but recreational use is also widespread. A particularly important problem is opioid exposure in females, as their offspring can also be affected. Adverse intrauterine and postnatal environments can affect offspring development and may lead to various disabilities later in life. It is clear that repetitive painful experiences, such as randomly occurring invasive procedures during neonatal intensive care, can permanently alter neuronal and synaptic organization and therefore later behavior. At the same time, analgesic drugs can also be harmful, inducing neuronal apoptosis or withdrawal symptoms in the neonate and behavioral alterations in adulthood. Hence, risk-benefit ratios should be taken into consideration when pain relief is required during pregnancy or in neonates. Recreational use of opioids can also alter many aspects of life. Intrauterine opioid exposure has many toxic effects, inducing poor pregnancy outcomes due to underdevelopment, but it is believed that later negative consequences are more related to environmental factors such as a chaotic lifestyle and inadequate prenatal care. One of the crucial components is maternal care, which changes profoundly in addicted mothers. In substance-dependent mothers, pre- and postnatal care has special importance, and controlled treatment with a synthetic opioid (e.g., methadone) could be beneficial. We aimed to summarize and compare human and rodent data, as it is important to close the gap between scientific knowledge and societal policies. Special emphasis is given to gender differences in the sensitivity of offspring to perinatal opioid exposure. PMID:24746901

Fodor, Anna; Tímár, Júlia; Zelena, Dóra

2014-05-28

159

Maternal Factors Influencing Perinatal Transmission of HIV Infection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This annual report covers progress from the first year of a five year project evaluating the natural hisoory of HIV infection in pregnancy. This study will establish a cohort of 240 women who are classified as follows: (1) HIV infected pregnant women who ...

E. M. Connor

1990-01-01

160

A rare cause of perinatal asphyxia: maternal carbon monoxide poisoning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication has serious adverse effects to the mother and fetus and a result of intrauterine hypoxia,\\u000a it leads to fetal death or severe neurological sequelae. In this article, a preterm infant who was acutely exposed to CO at\\u000a the 33rd weeks of gestation before delivery was presented. The baby was delivered by emergent cesarean section at the

Hayrettin Yildiz; Esin Aldemir; Emel Altuncu; Muhittin Celik; Sultan Kavuncuoglu

2010-01-01

161

Maternal and perinatal health in Mali, Togo and Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The health care system in many developing countries is less efficient compared with that in the industrialized world. The aim of the present study was to investigate the differences of the efficiency of the health care in obstetrics in Nigeria, Mali and Togo. Study design: The data were collected in African district hospitals from Lomé\\/Togo (n = 1002), Bamako\\/Mali

W. Künzel; J. Herrero; P. Onwuhafua; T. Staub; C. Hornung

1996-01-01

162

Maternal Factors Influencing Perinatal Transmission of HIV Infection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This annual report covers progress for FY2 of a five year project evaluating the natural history of HIV infection in pregnancy. This study is establishing a cohort of 240 women, stratified as follows: GROUP 1, pregnant HIV-positive patients who are substa...

E. M. Connor

1990-01-01

163

Prenatal and perinatal influences on long-term psychomotor development in offspring of diabetic mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to assess to what extent disturbances in antepartum maternal metabolism and perinatal complications and morbidities contribute to poorer psychomotor development in offspring of diabetic mothers.STUDY DESIGN: One hundred ninety-six pregnant women and their singleton offspring participated in this prospective cohort-analytic study. Ninety-five women had pregestational diabetes mellitus, and 101 women had gestational diabetes mellitus. Serial estimates

Thomas A Rizzo; Sharon L Dooley; Boyd E Metzger; Nam H Cho; Edward S Ogata; Bernard L Silverman

1995-01-01

164

Maternal mortality, near misses, and severe morbidity: lowering rates through designated levels of maternity care.  

PubMed

An increase in the prevalence of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and abnormal placentation, among others, has fueled the recent rise in maternal mortality, "near misses" and severe morbidity. In 1976, the March of Dimes published a report, "Toward Improving the Outcome of Pregnancy," which included recommendations for levels of perinatal care. Although the original intent was to address the needs of both mother and neonate, implementation in the ensuing years focused mostly on the latter. Currently, there are no well-defined nationally accepted levels of maternal care similar to those adopted by the American Academy of Pediatrics for neonatal intensive care units. When discussing regionalization of perinatal care, the needs of the mother are frequently overlooked. We propose that it is time to address this deficiency and develop levels of care that are specific to the mother. We expect that improving maternal care will also improve neonatal outcome. We call on various organizations and agencies to establish national standards and levels of maternity care much as our colleagues in neonatology have already successfully done. We canvassed the available publications by states and other countries and found a number of noteworthy examples. We propose that the goal would be an integrated maternal-fetal-neonatal care network, a model similar to what is done in stroke or emergency care. In addition to accepting transfers, the central facility functioning at the highest level would also be responsible for education, evidence-based best practices, policy development, and quality review and improvement within the network. PMID:22996111

Hankins, Gary D V; Clark, Steven L; Pacheco, Luis D; O?Keeffe, Dan; D?Alton, Mary; Saade, George R

2012-10-01

165

Fetal Thrombotic Vasculopathy and Perinatal Thrombosis: Should all Placentas be Examined?  

PubMed

Objective?Numerous fetal placenta vascular lesions seem to be a predisposing condition for some types of perinatal disease. Placental disease and newborn thromboses might be both manifestations of the same underlying disorder. Objective of this study is to describe pathological lesions of the placenta in newborns with perinatal thrombosis. Study Design?We present retrospective data review and analysis regarding neonates admitted at our neonatal intensive care unit and diagnosed with an episode of thromboembolic events (TE) in the period from 2009 to 2013; among them we report three cases of perinatal thrombosis in newborns whose placentas demonstrated fetal thrombotic vasculopathy (FTV). Results?In all the three cases a prothrombotic maternal condition was found, and in one patient a maternal infection with chorioamnionitis; the histological examination of placenta, required soon after birth for maternal pathological conditions, was important in confirming and explaining the clinical diagnosis of neonatal thrombosis and for the management of future pregnancies. Conclusion?It is proposed that placenta of newborns with TE in first days of life should always be examined, for its association with FTV and thus the storage of placentas for a week after birth should be routinely implemented. PMID:24108664

Magnetti, Federica; Bagna, Rossana; Botta, Giovanni; Viano, Alice; Dorati, Gabriela; Raia, Melissa; Bertino, Enrico; Saracco, Paola

2014-09-01

166

A district-based audit of the causes and circumstances of maternal deaths in South Kalimantan, Indonesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A district-based audit of maternal and perinatal mortality began during 1994 in three provinces of South Kalimantan, Indonesia. Both medical and non-medical factors were documented and an effort was made to progress from merely assessing substandard care to recommending improvements in access to care and the quality of care. Extensive discussions of cases of maternal death were held during regular

Gunawan Supratikto; Meg E. Wirth; Endang Achadi; Surekha Cohen; Carine Ronsmans

2002-01-01

167

INTERSEASONAL AND INTERANNUAL MEASURES OF MATERNAL CARE AMONG INDIVIDUAL STELLER SEA LIONS (EUMETOPIAS JUBATUS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied maternal care in Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) at a small rookery in the northern Gulf of Alaska over the course of 4 summers, 2001-2004 and 3 autumn seasons, 2002-2004, using remotely operated video cameras. Perinatal periods were long (? 10.0 days); although varied between years. Timing of parturition was earlier and perinatal periods longer for multiparous females

John M. Maniscalco; Pamela Parker; Shannon Atkinson

2006-01-01

168

Maternal immunization.  

PubMed

Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

Chu, Helen Y; Englund, Janet A

2014-08-15

169

[Intensive care admissions due to severe maternal morbidity].  

PubMed

Background: Maternal morbidity is a quality of care indicator. The frequency of severe maternal morbidity that requires an intensive care management has increased, due to an increase in maternal age. Aim: To describe the severe and acute maternal morbidity spectrum that requires an intensive care management in a University Hospital. Material and Methods: Review of medical records of 89 pregnant women with a mean age of 29 years, admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (UCI) between 2006 and 2010. Results: Mean gestational age on admission was 32 weeks. The main comorbidities identified were chronic hypertension (13.5%), hypothyroidism (4.5%) and coagulopathies (6.7%). Severe preeclampsia, sepsis and obstetric hemorrhage were the main causes of admission. Length of stay ranged from 1 to 28 days. Seventy eight percent of patients were admitted in the immediate postnatal period. Mechanical ventilation was required in 24% of patients for a median of three days. The longer unit lengths of stay were observed in patients with preeclampsia and non-obstetric severe sepsis (pyelonephritis and pneumonia). Seven abortions and seven perinatal deaths were recorded. The latter were mainly secondary to severe preeclampsia/ HELLP syndrome. Neonatal morbidity was related to prematurity (19% hyaline membrane, 18% persistent ductus and 4% cerebral hemorrhage). There were no maternal deaths. Conclusions: Preeclampsia and its complications were the main causes of maternal ICU admission. In this series, there were no maternal deaths and the perinatal survival rate was 92%. PMID:24728427

Hasbún H, Jorge; Sepúlveda-Martínez, Alvaro; Cornejo R, Rodrigo; Romero P, Carlos

2013-12-01

170

Perinatal characteristics among early (10-14 years old) and late (15-19 years old) pregnant adolescents  

PubMed Central

Background Pregnancy in adolescents is a worldwide health problem and has been mostly common in poor populations. It is not clear if socioeconomic or biological factors are the main determinants of perinatal adverse outcomes in pregnant adolescents. Adolescents under 15 years old may present a high growth rate which may contribute to impair fetal growth. Our aim is to compare perinatal characteristics among early (aged 10 to 14 years) and late (aged 15 to 19 years) pregnant adolescents. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed using data from Pernambuco State 2009, obtained from DATASUS/SISNAC, a Brazilian Government, open-access public health database. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared between early (aged 10–14 years) and late (aged 15–19 years) pregnant adolescents. Family income was compared between early and late pregnant adolescents using a sample of 412 subjects evaluated at Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP) during 2011. Statistical comparisons were made using the chi-square test was used with a significant level of 0.05; bivariate and multivariate analysis were performed. This project was approved by the Institutional Ethics Review Board. Results Data from 31,209 pregnant adolescents were analyzed. 29,733 (95.2%) were aged 15 to 19 years and 1,476 (4.7%) were aged 10 to 14 years. There were significant differences with respect to marital status, education level and number of prenatal visits of mothers aged 10 to 14 years compared to 15 to 19 years. Of importance, early adolescents had a greater rate of neonates born premature and with low birth weight. Prematurity and low birth weight remained statistically significant after multivariate analysis. Conclusions Early aged adolescents may have an increased risk of prematurity and low birth weight. These findings highlight the potential role of biological factors in newborn outcomes in pregnant adolescents.

2012-01-01

171

Umbilical Cord Coiling Index and Perinatal Outcome  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To evaluate the perinatal outcome with the abnormal umbilical cord coiling index. Study Design: This prospective study was carried out in the department of OBG at Adichunchangiri Institute of Medical Sciences, B.G.Nagara, Mandya, Karnataka, India from January 2008 to August 2010. 200 patients who were in active labour with term gestations, irrespective of their parities, who had singleton pregnancies with live babies who were either delivered by vaginal or LSCS were included in the study. Umbilical cord coiling index was calculated and it was correlated with various perinatal parameters like birth weight, meconium stained liquor, Apgar score, ponderal index and foetal growth restriction. Chi square and Fisher exact tests were used to find the significance of study parameters. Results: There was a significant correlation between the hypercoiled cords (UCI >90th percentile) and IUGR of the babies (p value of < 0.001) and low ponderal indices (a p value of 0.022) Hypocoiled cords ( UCI which was < 10th percentile) were significantly associated with meconium staining (p < 0.001), Apgar score at 1 min of <4 and at 5 min of <7 (p value 0.065), LSCS rates (p value of 0.008) and NICU admissions (p <0.001). Conclusion: Hypercoiled cords or UCI which was > 90th percentile was associated with IUGR and low ponderal indices. Hypocoiled cords or UCI which was <10th percentile was associated with meconium staining, Apgar score at 1 min of <4 and at 5 min of <7, more LSCS rates and more NICU admissions.

Patil, Nivedita S.; Kulkarni, Sunanda R.; Lohitashwa, Renu

2013-01-01

172

Umbilical cord coiling index and perinatal outcome.  

PubMed

Objectives: To evaluate the perinatal outcome with the abnormal umbilical cord coiling index. Study Design: This prospective study was carried out in the department of OBG at Adichunchangiri Institute of Medical Sciences, B.G.Nagara, Mandya, Karnataka, India from January 2008 to August 2010. 200 patients who were in active labour with term gestations, irrespective of their parities, who had singleton pregnancies with live babies who were either delivered by vaginal or LSCS were included in the study. Umbilical cord coiling index was calculated and it was correlated with various perinatal parameters like birth weight, meconium stained liquor, Apgar score, ponderal index and foetal growth restriction. Chi square and Fisher exact tests were used to find the significance of study parameters. Results: There was a significant correlation between the hypercoiled cords (UCI >90(th) percentile) and IUGR of the babies (p value of < 0.001) and low ponderal indices (a p value of 0.022) Hypocoiled cords ( UCI which was < 10(th) percentile) were significantly associated with meconium staining (p < 0.001), Apgar score at 1 min of <4 and at 5 min of <7 (p value 0.065), LSCS rates (p value of 0.008) and NICU admissions (p <0.001). Conclusion: Hypercoiled cords or UCI which was > 90(th) percentile was associated with IUGR and low ponderal indices. Hypocoiled cords or UCI which was <10th percentile was associated with meconium staining, Apgar score at 1 min of <4 and at 5 min of <7, more LSCS rates and more NICU admissions. PMID:24086872

Patil, Nivedita S; Kulkarni, Sunanda R; Lohitashwa, Renu

2013-08-01

173

Effects of perinatal daidzein exposure on subsequent behavior and central estrogen receptor ? expression in the adult male mouse.  

PubMed

Daidzein is one of the most important isoflavones present in soy and it is unique as it can be further metabolized to equol, a compound with greater estrogenic activity than other isoflavones. The potential role of daidzein in the prevention of some chronic diseases has drawn public attention and increased its consumption in human, including in pregnant women and adolescent. It is unclear whether perinatal exposure to daidzein through maternal diets affects subsequent behavior and central estrogen receptor ? (ER?) expression in male adults. Following developmental exposure to daidzein through maternal diets during perinatal period, subsequent anxiety-like behavior, social behavior, spatial learning and memory of male mice at adulthood were assessed using a series of tests. The levels of central ER ? expression were also examined using immunocytochemistry. Compared with the controls, adult male mice exposed to daidzein during the perinatal period showed significantly less exploration, higher levels of anxiety and aggression. They also displayed more social investigation for females and a tendency to improve spatial learning and memory. The mice with this early daidzein treatment demonstrated significantly higher levels of ER? expression in several brain regions such as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, medial preoptic, arcuate hypothalamic nucleus and central amygdaloid mucleus, but decreased it in the lateral septum. Our results indicated that perinatal exposure to daidzein enhanced masculinization on male behaviors which is assocciated with alterations in ER? expression levels led by perinatal daidzein exposure. PMID:23268192

Yu, Chengjun; Tai, Fadao; Zeng, Shuangyan; Zhang, Xia

2013-06-01

174

Perinatal depression: an update and overview.  

PubMed

Over the last 3 years there have been notable developments in the screening and treatment of perinatal depression. Most importantly, the DSM-V has made only minor changes in the diagnostic criteria for perinatal depression as compared to the DSM-IV; "perinatal," as opposed to "postpartum," is a specifier for depression with a requirement that the depression onset occurs during pregnancy or the first 4 weeks postpartum. Advances in the treatment of perinatal depression have been made over the last 3 years, including both prevention and acute interventions. Additional support has emerged confirming the primary risk factors for perinatal depression: a personal or family history, low SES and poor interpersonal support. There is general agreement that universal screening be conducted for all perinatal women, by both the woman's obstetrician and the baby's pediatrician. PMID:25034859

Stuart-Parrigon, Kaela; Stuart, Scott

2014-09-01

175

Support for parents experiencing perinatal loss.  

PubMed Central

Grief following perinatal loss is just as debilitating as that following the death of an older person and may not be completely resolved for years. The physician's role in assisting parents following perinatal loss is one of a sympathetic listener and compassionate informant, but each category of perinatal loss--miscarriage, stillbirth, neonatal death and sudden infant death syndrome--requires a somewhat different approach. To be of assistance, physicians must understand the normal process of grief and the differences between the reactions of mothers, fathers and siblings. The advent of liberal attitudes to family visiting in perinatal units has helped parents better understand perinatal illness, and appropriate management in the event of perinatal death can greatly benefit the family.

1983-01-01

176

Beyond screening: assessment of perinatal depression in a perinatal care setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although screening for perinatal depression substantially improves detection, screening alone does not improve treatment entry\\u000a or outcome. This paper summarizes a pilot evaluation of the feasibility and patient acceptance of on-site diagnostic assessment\\u000a in perinatal care settings for women who screen positive for perinatal depressive symptoms. The model included screening,\\u000a assessment by the perinatal care provider, an algorithm to guide

Laura Miller; Michele Shade; Vamsi Vasireddy

2009-01-01

177

Pregnancy, prison and perinatal outcomes in New South Wales, Australia: a retrospective cohort study using linked health data  

PubMed Central

Background Studies from the United States and the United Kingdom have found that imprisoned women are less likely to experience poorer maternal and perinatal outcomes than other disadvantaged women. This population-based study used both community controls and women with a history of incarceration as a control group, to investigate whether imprisoned pregnant women in New South Wales, Australia, have improved maternal and perinatal outcomes. Methods Retrospective cohort study using probabilistic record linkage of routinely collected data from health and corrective services in New South Wales, Australia. Comparison of the maternal and perinatal outcomes of imprisoned pregnant women aged 18–44 years who gave birth between 2000–2006 with women who were (i) imprisoned at a time other than pregnancy, and (ii) community controls. Outcomes of interest: onset of labour, method of birth, pre-term birth, low birthweight, Apgar score, resuscitation, neonatal hospital admission, perinatal death. Results Babies born to women who were imprisoned during pregnancy were significantly more likely to be born pre-term, have low birthweight, and be admitted to hospital, compared with community controls. Pregnant prisoners did not have significantly better outcomes than other similarly disadvantaged women (those with a history of imprisonment who were not imprisoned during pregnancy). Conclusions In contrast to the published literature, we found no evidence that contact with prison health services during pregnancy was a “therapunitive” intervention. We found no association between imprisonment during pregnancy and improved perinatal outcomes for imprisoned women or their neonates. A history of imprisonment remained the strongest predictor of poor perinatal outcomes, reflecting the relative health disadvantage experienced by this population of women.

2014-01-01

178

Preventing the First Cesarean Delivery: Summary of a Joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Workshop  

PubMed Central

With over one-third of pregnancies in the United States being delivered by cesarean and the growing knowledge of morbidities associated with repeat cesarean deliveries, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists convened a workshop to address the concept of preventing the first cesarean. The available information on maternal and fetal factors, labor management and induction, and non-medical factors leading to the first cesarean were reviewed as well as the implications of the first cesarean on future reproductive health. Key points were identified to assist with reduction in cesarean rates including that labor induction should be performed primarily for medical indication; if done for non-medical indications, the gestational age should be at least 39 weeks or more and the cervix should be favorable, especially in the nulliparous patient. Review of the current literature demonstrates the importance of adhering to appropriate definitions for failed induction and arrest of labor progress. The diagnosis of “failed induction” should only be made after an adequate attempt. Adequate time for normal latent and active phases of the first stage, and for the second stage, should be allowed, as long as the maternal and fetal conditions permit. The adequate time for each of these stages appears to be longer than traditionally estimated. Operative vaginal delivery is an acceptable birth method when indicated, and can safely prevent cesarean delivery. Given the progressively declining use, it is critical that training and experience in operative vaginal delivery is facilitated and encouraged. When discussing the first cesarean with a patient, counseling should include its effect on future reproductive health.

Spong, Catherine Y.; Berghella, Vincenzo; Wenstrom, Katharine D.; Mercer, Brian M.; Saade, George R.

2012-01-01

179

Early Postpartum Maternal Morbidity among Rural Women of Rajasthan, India: A Community-based Study  

PubMed Central

The first postpartum week is a high-risk period for mothers and newborns. Very few community-based studies have been conducted on patterns of maternal morbidity in resource-poor countries in that first week. An intervention on postpartum care for women within the first week after delivery was initiated in a rural area of Rajasthan, India. The intervention included a rigorous system of receiving reports of all deliveries in a defined population and providing home-level postpartum care to all women, irrespective of the place of delivery. Trained nurse-midwives used a structured checklist for detecting and managing maternal and neonatal conditions during postpartum-care visits. A total of 4,975 women, representing 87.1% of all expected deliveries in a population of 58,000, were examined in their first postpartum week during January 2007–December 2010. Haemoglobin was tested for 77.1% of women (n=3,836) who had a postnatal visit. The most common morbidity was postpartum anaemia—7.4% of women suffered from severe anaemia and 46% from moderate anaemia. Other common morbidities were fever (4%), breast conditions (4.9%), and perineal conditions (4.5%). Life-threatening postpartum morbidities were detected in 7.6% of women—9.7% among those who had deliveries at home and 6.6% among those who had institutional deliveries. None had a fistula. Severe anaemia had a strong correlation with perinatal death [p<0.000, adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32-2.99], delivery at home [p<0.000, AOR=1.64 (95% CI 1.27-2.15)], socioeconomically-underprivileged scheduled caste or tribe [p<0.000, AOR=2.47 (95% CI 1.83-3.33)], and parity of three or more [p<0.000, AOR=1.52 (95% CI 1.18-1.97)]. The correlation with antenatal care was not significant. Perineal conditions were more frequent among women who had institutional deliveries while breast conditions were more common among those who had a perinatal death. This study adds valuable knowledge on postpartum morbidity affecting women in the first few days after delivery in a low-resource setting. Health programmes should invest to ensure that all women receive early postpartum visits after delivery at home and after discharge from institution to detect and manage maternal morbidity. Further, health programmes should also ensure that women are properly screened for complications before their discharge from hospitals after delivery.

2012-01-01

180

Context Modulates Outcome of Perinatal Glucocorticoid Action in the Brain  

PubMed Central

Prematurely born infants may be at risk, because of inadequate maturation of tissues. If there are signs of preterm birth, it has become common practice therefore to treat either antenatally the mother or postnatally the infant with glucocorticoids to accelerate tissue development, particularly of the lung. However, this life-saving early glucocorticoid treatment was found to increase the risk of adverse outcome in later life. In one animal study, the authors reported a 25% shorter lifespan of rats treated as newborns with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, but so far this finding has not been replicated. After a brief clinical introduction, we discuss studies in rodents designed to examine how perinatal glucocorticoid action affects the developing brain. It appears that the perinatal action of the glucocorticoid depends on the context and the timing as well as the type of administered steroid. The type of steroid is important because the endogenous glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone bind to two distinct receptor populations, i.e., mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors (GR), while synthetic glucocorticoids predominantly bind to the GR. In addition, if given antenatally hydrocortisone is inactivated in the placenta by 11?-HSD type 2, and dexamethasone is not. With respect to timing, the outcome of glucocorticoid effects is different in early vs. late phases of brain development. The context refers to the environmental input that can affect the susceptibility to glucocorticoid action in the newborn rodent brain; early handling of pups and maternal care obliterate effects of post-natal dexamethasone treatment. Context also refers to coping with environmental conditions in later life, for which the individual may have been programed epigenetically by early-life experience. This knowledge of determinants affecting the outcome of perinatal glucocorticoid exposure may have clinical implications for the treatment of prematurely born infants.

de Kloet, E. Ronald; Claessens, Sanne E. F.; Kentrop, Jiska

2014-01-01

181

Perinatal renal venous thrombosis: presenting renal length predicts outcome  

PubMed Central

Background Renal venous thrombosis (RVT) is the most common form of venous thrombosis in neonates, causing both acute and long term kidney dysfunction. Historical predisposing factors include dehydration, maternal diabetes, and umbilical catheters, but recent reports highlight associations with prothrombotic abnormalities. Study Twenty three patients with neonatal RVT were analysed over 15 years. Predisposing factors, presentation, and procoagulant status were compared with renal outcome using multilevel modelling. Results Median presentation was on day 1: 19/23 (83%) had pre/perinatal problems, including fetal distress (14), intrauterine growth retardation (five), and pre?identified renal abnormalities (two); 8/18 (44%) had procoagulant abnormalities, particularly factor V Leiden mutations (4/18). Long term abnormalities were detected in 28/34 (82%) affected kidneys; mean glomerular filtration rate was 93.6 versus 70.2?ml/min/1.73?m2 in unilateral versus bilateral cases (difference 23.4; 95% confidence interval 6.4 to 40.4; p ?=? 0.01). No correlation was observed between procoagulant tendencies and outcome, but presenting renal length had a significant negative correlation: mean fall in estimated single kidney glomerular filtration rate was 3?ml/min/1.73?m2 (95% confidence interval 3.7 to ?2.2; p ?=? 0.001) per 1?mm increase, and kidneys larger than 6?cm at presentation never had a normal outcome. Conclusions This subgroup of neonatal RVT would be better termed perinatal RVT to reflect antenatal and birth related antecedents. Prothrombotic defects should be considered in all patients with perinatal RVT. Kidney length at presentation correlated negatively with renal outcome. The latter, novel observation raises the question of whether larger organs should be treated more aggressively in future.

Winyard, P J D; Bharucha, T; De Bruyn, R; Dillon, M J; Hoff, W van't; Trompeter, R S; Liesner, R; Wade, A; Rees, L

2006-01-01

182

Obstetric and Perinatal Outcomes in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancies  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To perform comparative analyses of obstetric and perinatal outcomes between type 1 diabetic pregnancies and the general obstetric population in Sweden between 1991 and 2003. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a population-based study. Data were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry, covering >98% of all pregnancies in Sweden. A total of 5,089 type 1 diabetic pregnancies and 1,260,207 control pregnancies were included. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for group differences in maternal age, parity, BMI, chronic hypertensive disease, smoking habits, and ethnicity. RESULTS In type 1 diabetes, preeclampsia was significantly more frequent (OR 4.47 [3.77–5.31]) as was delivery by cesarean section (5.31 [4.97–5.69]) compared with results for the general population. Stillbirth (3.34 [2.46–4.55]), perinatal mortality (3.29 [2.50–4.33]), and major malformations (2.50 [2.13–2.94]) were more common in type 1 diabetic than in control pregnancies. The risk of very preterm birth (<32 gestational weeks) was also higher among type 1 diabetic women (3.08 [2.45–3.87]). The incidence of fetal macrosomia (birth weight ?2 SD above the mean) was increased in the diabetic group (11.45 [10.61–12.36]). CONCLUSIONS Type 1 diabetes in pregnancy is still associated with considerably increased rates of adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes. The eightfold increased risk for fetal macrosomia in type 1 diabetic pregnancies is unexpected and warrants further investigation.

Persson, Martina; Norman, Mikael; Hanson, Ulf

2009-01-01

183

Adverse perinatal environment contributes to altered cardiac development and function.  

PubMed

Epidemiological observations report an association between intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and cardiovascular diseases. Systemic maternal inflammation is the most common stress during pregnancy, leading to IUGR. We hypothesized that perinatal inflammation and hyperoxygenation induce discernible alterations in cardiomyocyte contractility and calcium signaling, causing early cardiac dysfunction. Pregnant C3H/HeN mice were injected with LPS or saline on embryonic day 16. Newborn mice were placed in 85% O2 or room air (RA) for 14 days. Pups born to LPS-injected dams had reduced birth weight. Echocardiographic measurements revealed that in vivo LV function was compromised in LPS/O2 mice as early as 3 days of life. Isolated cardiomyocytes from LPS/O2 mice at day 14 exhibited decreased sarcomere fractional shortening, along with decreased time-to-90% peak shortening. Calcium transient amplitude was greatest in LPS/O2 mice. SERCA2a mRNA and protein levels were increased and phospholamban mRNA levels were decreased in LPS/O2 mice. Phosphorylation of phospholamban was increased, along with Sorcin mRNA levels in LPS/O2 mice. Combined exposure to perinatal inflammation and hyperoxia resulted in growth restriction, in vivo and in vitro cardiac dysfunction, coinciding with humans and animal models of cardiac dysfunction. Expression of calcium handling proteins during the neonatal period was similar to that observed during fetal stages of development. Our data suggest that perinatal inflammation and hyperoxia exposure alter fetal development, resulting in early cardiac dysfunction. PMID:24610916

Velten, Markus; Gorr, Matthew W; Youtz, Dane J; Velten, Christina; Rogers, Lynette K; Wold, Loren E

2014-05-01

184

Fetal growth restriction and the risk of perinatal mortality-case studies from the multicentre PORTO study  

PubMed Central

Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is the single largest contributing factor to perinatal mortality in non-anomalous fetuses. Advances in antenatal and neonatal critical care have resulted in a reduction in neonatal deaths over the past decades, while stillbirth rates have remained unchanged. Antenatal detection rates of fetal growth failure are low, and these pregnancies carry a high risk of perinatal death. Methods The Prospective Observational Trial to Optimize Paediatric Health in IUGR (PORTO) Study recruited 1,200 ultrasound-dated singleton IUGR pregnancies, defined as EFW <10th centile, between 24+0 and 36+6 weeks gestation. All recruited fetuses underwent serial sonographic assessment of fetal weight and multi-vessel Doppler studies until birth. Perinatal outcomes were recorded for all pregnancies. Case records of the perinatal deaths from this prospectively recruited IUGR cohort were reviewed, their pregnancy details and outcome were analysed descriptively and compared to the entire cohort. Results Of 1,116 non-anomalous singleton infants with EFW <10th centile, 6 resulted in perinatal deaths including 3 stillbirths and 3 early neonatal deaths. Perinatal deaths occurred between 24+6 and 35+0 weeks gestation corresponding to birthweights ranging from 460 to 2260 grams. Perinatal deaths occurred more commonly in pregnancies with severe growth restriction (EFW <3rd centile) and associated abnormal Doppler findings resulting in earlier gestational ages at delivery and lower birthweights. All of the described pregnancies were complicated by either significant maternal comorbidities, e.g. hypertension, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or diabetes, or poor obstetric histories, e.g. prior perinatal death, mid-trimester or recurrent pregnancy loss. Five of the 6 mortalities occurred in women of non-Irish ethnic backgrounds. All perinatal deaths showed abnormalities on placental histopathological evaluation. Conclusions The PNMR in this cohort of prenatally identified IUGR cases was 5.4/1,000 and compares favourably to the overall national rate of 4.1/1,000 births, which can be attributed to increased surveillance and timely delivery. Despite antenatal recognition of IUGR and associated maternal risk factors, not all perinatal deaths can be prevented.

2014-01-01

185

Perinatal mortality and morbidity among babies delivered in water: surveillance study and postal survey  

PubMed Central

Aim To compare perinatal morbidity and mortality for babies delivered in water with rates for babies delivered conventionally (not in water). Design Surveillance study (of all consultant paediatricians) and postal survey (of all NHS maternity units). Setting British Isles (surveillance study); England and Wales (postal survey). Subjects Babies born in the British Isles between April 1994 and March 1996 who died perinatally or were admitted for special care within 48 hours of birth after delivery in water or after labour in water followed by conventional delivery (surveillance study); babies delivered in water in England and Wales in the same period (postal survey). Main outcome measures Number of deliveries in water in the British Isles that resulted in perinatal death or in admission to special care within 48 hours of birth; and proportions (of such deliveries) of all water births in England and Wales. Results 4032 deliveries (0.6% of all deliveries) in England and Wales occurred in water. Perinatal mortality was 1.2/1000 (95% confidence interval 0.4 to 2.9) live births; 8.4/1000 (5.8 to 11.8) live births were admitted for special care. No deaths were directly attributable to delivery in water, but 2 admissions were for water aspiration. UK reports of mortality and special care admission rates for babies of women considered to be at low risk of complications during delivery who delivered conventionally ranged from 0.8/1000 (0.2 to 4.2) to 4.6/1000 (0.1 to 25) live births and from 9.2 (1.1 to 33) to 64/1000 (58 to 70) live births respectively. Compared with regional data for low risk, spontaneous, normal vaginal deliveries at term, the relative risk for perinatal mortality associated with delivery in water was 0.9 (99% confidence interval 0.2 to 3.6). Conclusions Perinatal mortality is not substantially higher among babies delivered in water than among those born to low risk women who delivered conventionally. The data are compatible with a small increase or decrease in perinatal mortality for babies delivered in water. Key messagesData on adverse effects of delivery in water have been limited Perinatal mortality and risk of admission for special care is similar for babies delivered in water and for low risk deliveries that do not take place in waterThe risk of perinatal mortality for babies delivered in water is similar to the risk for babies born by normal vaginal delivery to women at low risk of adverse outcomeDelivery in water may have caused water aspiration in two babies and contributed to snapped umbilical cord in five

Gilbert, Ruth E; Tookey, Pat A

1999-01-01

186

Perinatal audit in low- and high-income countries.  

PubMed

Audit is a term used to include case reviews, criterion-based clinical audit, enquiries into maternal mortality and perinatal deaths, and near-miss reviews. The audit cycle consists of identifying cases, collecting information, analysing the results, formulating recommendations, implementing change and re-evaluating practice, and this cycle must be repeated regularly. Implicit in the process are standards against which practice is measured. These standards are becoming increasingly explicit and may be based on hospital protocols or regional or national guidelines. When protocols or guidelines are drawn up, this must be on the basis of multidisciplinary discussion and they need to be regularly updated as new evidence emerges. Audit does not need to be expensive, but it does need the support of all staff, including managers and clinicians. Staff must understand that its purpose is not to identify errors and punish mistakes but to improve clinical care. PMID:16364705

Drife, James Owen

2006-02-01

187

Advances and Failures in Preventing Perinatal Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection  

PubMed Central

Summary: An estimated 2.5 million children are currently living with HIV, the vast majority as a result of mother-to-child transmission. Prevention of perinatal HIV infection has been immensely successful in developed countries. A comprehensive package of services, including maternal and infant antiretroviral therapy, elective cesarean section, and avoidance of breast-feeding, has resulted in transmission rates of less than 2%. However, in developing countries, access to such services is often not available, as demonstrated by the fact that the vast majority of children with HIV live in Africa. Over the past few years, many developing nations have made great strides in improving access to much-needed services. Notably, in eastern and southern Africa, the regions most affected by HIV, mother-to-child-transmission coverage rates for HIV-positive women increased from 11% in 2004 to 31% in 2006. These successes are deserving of recognition, while not losing sight of the fact that much remains to be done; currently, an estimated 75% of pregnant women worldwide have an unmet need for antiretroviral therapy. Further work is needed to determine the optimal strategy for reducing perinatal transmission among women in resource-poor settings, with a particular need for reduction of transmission via breast-feeding.

Buchanan, Ann M.; Cunningham, Coleen K.

2009-01-01

188

Perinatal Lamb Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection  

PubMed Central

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of bronchiolitis in infants and children worldwide. Many animal models are used to study RSV, but most studies investigate disease in adult animals which does not address the unique physiology and immunology that makes infants more susceptible. The perinatal (preterm and term) lamb is a useful model of infant RSV disease as lambs have similar pulmonary structure including airway branching, Clara and type II cells, submucosal glands and Duox/lactoperoxidase (LPO) oxidative system, and prenatal alveologenesis. Lambs can be born preterm (90% gestation) and survive for experimentation although both preterm and term lambs are susceptible to ovine, bovine and human strains of RSV and develop clinical symptoms including fever, tachypnea, and malaise as well as mild to moderate gross and histologic lesions including bronchiolitis with epithelial injury, neutrophil infiltration and syncytial cell formation. RSV disease in preterm lambs is more severe than in term lambs; disease is progressively less in adults and age-dependent susceptibility is a feature similar to humans. Innate and adaptive immune responses by perinatal lambs closely parallel those of infants. The model is used to test therapeutic regimens, risk factors such as maternal ethanol consumption, and formalin inactivated RSV vaccines.

Derscheid, Rachel J.; Ackermann, Mark R.

2012-01-01

189

Causes of death and associated conditions (Codac) - a utilitarian approach to the classification of perinatal deaths  

PubMed Central

A carefully classified dataset of perinatal mortality will retain the most significant information on the causes of death. Such information is needed for health care policy development, surveillance and international comparisons, clinical services and research. For comparability purposes, we propose a classification system that could serve all these needs, and be applicable in both developing and developed countries. It is developed to adhere to basic concepts of underlying cause in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), although gaps in ICD prevent classification of perinatal deaths solely on existing ICD codes. We tested the Causes of Death and Associated Conditions (Codac) classification for perinatal deaths in seven populations, including two developing country settings. We identified areas of potential improvements in the ability to retain existing information, ease of use and inter-rater agreement. After revisions to address these issues we propose Version II of Codac with detailed coding instructions. The ten main categories of Codac consist of three key contributors to global perinatal mortality (intrapartum events, infections and congenital anomalies), two crucial aspects of perinatal mortality (unknown causes of death and termination of pregnancy), a clear distinction of conditions relevant only to the neonatal period and the remaining conditions are arranged in the four anatomical compartments (fetal, cord, placental and maternal). For more detail there are 94 subcategories, further specified in 577 categories in the full version. Codac is designed to accommodate both the main cause of death as well as two associated conditions. We suggest reporting not only the main cause of death, but also the associated relevant conditions so that scenarios of combined conditions and events are captured. The appropriately applied Codac system promises to better manage information on causes of perinatal deaths, the conditions associated with them, and the most common clinical scenarios for future study and comparisons.

Fr?en, J Frederik; Pinar, Halit; Flenady, Vicki; Bahrin, Safiah; Charles, Adrian; Chauke, Lawrence; Day, Katie; Duke, Charles W; Facchinetti, Fabio; Fretts, Ruth C; Gardener, Glenn; Gilshenan, Kristen; Gordijn, Sanne J; Gordon, Adrienne; Guyon, Grace; Harrison, Catherine; Koshy, Rachel; Pattinson, Robert C; Petersson, Karin; Russell, Laurie; Saastad, Eli; Smith, Gordon CS; Torabi, Rozbeh

2009-01-01

190

Guidelines for Perinatal Care. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The basic concept emphasized in this book is that a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach within a regionalized system of perinatal care is a constant factor improving the quality of pregancy outcomes. This coordinated multidisciplinary approach has had an impact on perinatal care in three important areas: (1) improved and expanded understanding…

American Coll. of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.

191

Inflammation processes in perinatal brain damage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Once viewed as an isolated, immune-privileged organ, the central nervous system has undergone a conceptual change. Neuroinflammation\\u000a has moved into the focus of research work regarding pathomechanisms underlying perinatal brain damage. In this review, we\\u000a provide an overview of current concepts regarding perinatal brain damage and the role of inflammation in the disease pathomechanism.

Vincent Degos; Géraldine Favrais; Angela M. Kaindl; Stéphane Peineau; Anne Marie Guerrot; Catherine Verney; Pierre Gressens

2010-01-01

192

Perinatal risk factors for childhood obesity and metabolic dysregulation123  

PubMed Central

Background: Childhood obesity has increased significantly in recent decades. Objective: The objective was to examine the perinatal risk factors related to childhood obesity. Design: In a prospective study, 89 women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and their offspring were evaluated at birth and at 8.8 ± 1.8 y. At birth, obstetrical data, parental anthropometric measures, and neonatal body composition were assessed; at follow-up, diet and activity were assessed and laboratory studies were conducted. Weight was classified by using weight for age and sex, and body composition was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. In childhood, data were analyzed as tertiles and prediction models were developed by using logistic and stepwise regression. Results: No significant differences in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention weight percentiles, body composition, and most metabolic measures were observed between children of mothers with NGT and GDM at follow-up. Children in the upper tertile for weight had greater energy intake (P = 0.02), skinfold thickness (P = 0.0001), and leptin concentrations (P < 0.0001) than did those in tertiles 1 and 2. Children in the upper tertile for percentage body fat had greater waist circumference (P = 0.0001), insulin resistance (P = 0.002), and triglyceride (P = 0.009) and leptin (P = 0.0001) concentrations than did children in tertiles 1 and 2. The correlation between body fat at birth and follow-up was r = 0.29 (P = 0.02). The strongest perinatal predictor for a child in the upper tertile for weight was maternal pregravid body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) >30 (odds ratio: 3.75; 95% CI: 1.39, 10.10; P = 0.009) and for percentage body fat was maternal pregravid BMI >30 (odds ratio: 5.45; 95% CI: 1.62, 18.41; P = 0.006). Conclusion: Maternal pregravid BMI, independent of maternal glucose status or birth weight, was the strongest predictor of childhood obesity.

Farrell, Kristen; Thomas, Alicia; Huston-Presley, Larraine; Mencin, Patricia; de Mouzon, Sylvie Hauguel; Amini, Saeid B

2009-01-01

193

Preventing perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prenatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and treatment instituted in the 1990s is responsible for a substantial reduction in the number of children diagnosed with AIDS, yet the number of children born with HIV infection remains unacceptably high. To prevent perinatal transmission of HIV, the United States must adopt a goal to test all pregnant women for HIV and to

Marie C McCormick; Ezra C Davidson; Michael A Stoto

1999-01-01

194

A Model for Maternal Depression  

PubMed Central

Abstract With the awareness of maternal depression as a prevalent public health issue and its important link to child physical and mental health, attention has turned to how healthcare providers can respond effectively. Intimate partner violence (IPV) and the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs are strongly related to depression, particularly for low-income women. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends psychosocial screening of pregnant women at least once per trimester, yet screening is uncommonly done. Research suggests that a collaborative care approach improves identification, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness of care. This article presents The Perinatal Mental Health Model, a community-based model that developed screening and referral partnerships for use in community obstetric settings in order to specifically address the psychosocial needs of culturally diverse, low-income mothers.

Connelly, Cynthia D.; Baker-Ericzen, Mary J.; Hazen, Andrea L.; Landsverk, John

2010-01-01

195

Reshaping maternal services in Nigeria: any need for spiritual care?  

PubMed Central

Background High maternal and perinatal mortalities occur from deliveries conducted in prayer houses in Nigeria. Although some regulatory efforts have been deployed to tackle this problem, less attention has been placed on the possible motivation for seeking prayer house intervention which could be hinged on the spiritual belief of patients about pregnancy and childbirth. This study therefore seeks to determine the perception of booked antenatal patients on spiritual care during pregnancy and their desire for such within hospital setting. Method A total of 397 antenatal attendees from two tertiary health institutions in southwest Nigeria were sampled. A pretested questionnaire was used to obtain information on socio-demographic features of respondents, perception of spiritual care during pregnancy and childbirth; and how they desire that their spiritual needs are addressed. Responses were subsequently collated and analyzed. Results Most of the women, 301 (75.8%), believe there is a need for spiritual help during pregnancy and childbirth. About half (48.5%) were currently seeking for help in prayer/mission houses while another 8.6% still intended to. Overwhelmingly, 281 (70.8%) felt it was needful for health professionals to consider their spiritual needs. Most respondents, 257 (64.7%), desired that their clergy is allowed to pray with them while in labour and sees such collaboration as incentive that will improve hospital patronage. There was association between high family income and desire for collaboration of healthcare providers with one’s clergy (OR 1.82; CI 1.03-3.21; p?=?0.04). Conclusion Our women desire spiritual care during pregnancy and childbirth. Its incorporation into maternal health services will improve hospital delivery rates.

2014-01-01

196

Effectiveness of an integrated approach to reduce perinatal mortality: recent experiences from Matlab, Bangladesh  

PubMed Central

Background Improving perinatal health is the key to achieving the Millennium Development Goal for child survival. Recently, several reviews suggest that scaling up available effective perinatal interventions in an integrated approach can substantially reduce the stillbirth and neonatal death rates worldwide. We evaluated the effect of packaged interventions given in pregnancy, delivery and post-partum periods through integration of community- and facility-based services on perinatal mortality. Methods This study took advantage of an ongoing health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) and a new Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health (MNCH) Project initiated in 2007 in Matlab, Bangladesh in half (intervention area) of the HDSS area. In the other half, women received usual care through the government health system (comparison area). The MNCH Project strengthened ongoing maternal and child health services as well as added new services. The intervention followed a continuum of care model for pregnancy, intrapartum, and post-natal periods by improving established links between community- and facility-based services. With a separate pre-post samples design, we compared the perinatal mortality rates between two periods--before (2005-2006) and after (2008-2009) implementation of MNCH interventions. We also evaluated the difference-of-differences in perinatal mortality between intervention and comparison areas. Results Antenatal coverage, facility delivery and cesarean section rates were significantly higher in the post- intervention period in comparison with the period before intervention. In the intervention area, the odds of perinatal mortality decreased by 36% between the pre-intervention and post-intervention periods (odds ratio: 0.64; 95% confidence intervals: 0.52-0.78). The reduction in the intervention area was also significant relative to the reduction in the comparison area (OR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.56-0.95; P = 0.018). Conclusion The continuum of care approach provided through the integration of service delivery modes decreased the perinatal mortality rate within a short period of time. Further testing of this model is warranted within the government health system in Bangladesh and other low-income countries.

2011-01-01

197

Current issues in perinatal epidemiology.  

PubMed Central

The main national data sources for perinatal epidemiology are birth and death certificates, yet routinely linked birth and death certificate data are still not available in the U.S. Completeness and quality of the reporting of perinatal events should be considered in examining trends over time and between jurisdictions. The U.S. has experienced a marked decline in its infant mortality rate, but only a very modest decline in the rate of low birth weight. Research must focus more on studies of pre-term labor, rather than low birth weight, which include children who are underground or who are born too early and who, therefore, may represent different etiologies. Sensitive hormonal tests may provide more precise estimates of the rate of very early fetal loss. Management of labor and delivery and of the high-risk newborn have undergone marked changes during the last 15 years, and yet clinical trials have not played a major role in the evaluation of these changes. The difference in reproductive outcomes between whites and blacks, especially in the rate of low birth weight, have persisted and are not understood. Data bases are becoming available for intergenerational studies to determine whether nature or nurture accounts for this difference.

Berendes, H. W.

1987-01-01

198

[Maternal mortality].  

PubMed

Every year, more than 585,000 women die throughout the world from pregnancy-related causes. Pregnancy complications occur in all countries, but nearly all the resulting deaths occur in developing countries. The maternal mortality rate in Ecuador, estimated by applying the sister survival method to survey data for 1988-94, was 160/100,000 live births. Approximately 460 women thus die each year from maternal causes. The Program of Action of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development established that countries with intermediate levels of maternal mortality should strive to reduce rates to below 100/100,000 by the year 2005 and to below 60/100,000 by the year 2015. Ecuador's Plan for Reduction of Maternal Mortality will involve the cooperation of national and international organizations, aided by the president of Ecuador and under the leadership of the first lady. The initiative will require commitment from all sectors and individuals directly or indirectly influencing women's health. PMID:12178219

1997-09-01

199

Maternal Employment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The overwhelming evidence from years of research is that maternal employment, by itself, has little influence on the behaviors of children. More relevant issues are: mother's reasons for working, family's acceptance of mother's employment, quality of substitute child care, family's social and emotional health, and economic conditions. (Author/AJ)

Clark, Sam

1975-01-01

200

Effect of Social Service Prenatal Care Utilization on Perinatal Outcomes among Women with Socioeconomic Problems in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area  

PubMed Central

Background. To investigate the effect of social service prenatal care (PNC) utilization on perinatal outcomes among women with socioeconomic problems in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Methods. Retrospective study. The study enrolled all women at our hospital who either attended PNC utilizing social services (attenders) or who did not attend PNC (nonattenders) between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010. We compared the maternal characteristics and perinatal outcome of attenders with those of nonattenders. Results. A total of 83 attenders and 45 nonattenders were enrolled. The mean gestational age at the first PNC visit was 31.1 weeks in the attenders. Attenders were found to have a lower incidence of preterm delivery, pregnancy-induced hypertension, emergency cesarean section, low birth weight, and the NICU admission than nonattenders (P < 0.05). Conclusions. The utilization of social service PNC greatly improved perinatal outcomes among women with socioeconomic problems problems in the Tokyo metropolitan area.

Kakogawa, Jun; Sadatsuki, Miyuki; Ogaki, Yoko; Nakanishi, Misao; Minoura, Shigeki

2011-01-01

201

Maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcome in low-resource countries  

PubMed Central

Background A maternity waiting home (MWH) is a facility within easy reach of a hospital or health centre which provides emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Women may stay in the MWH at the end of their pregnancy and await labour. Once labour starts, women move to the health facility so that labour and giving birth can be assisted by a skilled birth attendant. The aim of the MWH is to improve accessibility to skilled care and thus reduce morbidity and mortality for mother and neonate should complications arise. Some studies report a favourable effect on the outcomes for women and their newborns. Others show that utilisation is low and barriers exist. However, these data are limited in their reliability. Objectives To assess the effects of a maternity waiting facility on maternal and perinatal health. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (27 January 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4 of 4), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2012), EMBASE (1980 to January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to January 2012), African Journals Online (AJOL) (January 2012), POPLINE (January 2012), Dissertation Abstracts (January 2012) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials including quasi-randomised and cluster-randomised trials that compared perinatal and maternal outcome in women using a MWH and women who did not. Data collection and analysis There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Main results There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Authors’ conclusions There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcomes.

van Lonkhuijzen, Luc; Stekelenburg, Jelle; van Roosmalen, Jos

2014-01-01

202

Social exclusion, infant behavior, social isolation, and maternal expectations independently predict maternal depressive symptoms  

PubMed Central

The objective of the study was to identify latent variables that can be used to inform theoretical models of perinatal influences on postnatal depressed mood and maternal–infant attachment. A routine survey of mothers with newborn infants was commenced in South Western Sydney in 2000. The survey included the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and 46 psychosocial and health-related variables. Mothers (n = 15,389) delivering in 2002 and 2003 were surveyed at 2–3 weeks for depressive symptoms. Nonlinear principal components analysis was undertaken to identify dimensions that might represent latent variables. Correlations between latent variables and EPDS >12 were assessed by logistic regression. A five-dimension solution was identified, which accounted for 51% of the variance among the items studied. The five dimensions identified were maternal responsiveness, social exclusion, infant behavior, migrant social isolation, and family size. In addition, the variable maternal expectation contributed significantly to total variance and was included in the regression analysis. Regression on EPDS >12 was predictive for all variables except for maternal responsiveness, which was considered an outcome variable. The findings are consistent with the proposition that social exclusion, infant behavior, social isolation among migrant mothers, and maternal expectations are determinants of maternal mood.

Eastwood, John; Jalaludin, Bin; Kemp, Lynn; Phung, Hai; Barnett, Bryanne; Tobin, Jacinta

2013-01-01

203

Current problems of perinatal Chlamydia trachomatis infections.  

PubMed

Chlamydia trachomatis has been recognized as a pathogen of trachoma, nongonococcal urethritis, salpingitis, endocervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, inclusion conjunctivitis of neonates, follicular conjunctivitis of adults, infantile pneumonia and associated conditions. Chlamydial infections during pregnancy may also cause a variety of perinatal complications. Different antigenic strains of C. trachomatis from endocervical, nasopharyngeal and conjunctival origins have been associated with different clinical conditions. Control programs emphasizing early diagnosis, targeted screening, and effective treatment will lead to an eventual decline in the incidence of perinatal chlamydial infection. This review focuses on current problems of perinatal C. trachomatis infections in the aspects of microbiological and immunological pathogenesis. PMID:14962349

Numazaki, Kei

2004-02-13

204

[Perinatal audit: the most important legal aspects].  

PubMed

In The Netherlands a perinatal audit system is being prepared. Perinatal audit is seen as a powerful means of identifying substandard factors in perinatal care and of increasing the quality of care with better grounding. The proposed system does not raise insurmountable legal problems. However, certain legal aspects should be given specific attention. These aspects include the rights of patients with respect to privacy and information and the protection of health professionals against use of information from the audit system for reasons other than quality purposes. Legislation from other countries may inspire legislative developments in The Netherlands in this area. PMID:19192588

de Roode, R P; Legemaate, J

2008-12-13

205

Maternal nutrition in pregnancy. Part I: a review.  

PubMed Central

Maternal undernutrition may result in a greater deprivation of the fetus than has previously been believed. The infant not only may be "light for dates" but also has an increased risk of perinatal disability or death secondary to gross neurologic and developmental abnormalities. This article reviews current knowledge of the energy, protein, iron, vitamin, sodium and calcium requirements in pregnancy, with special reference to the management of the underweight and overweight pregnant women.

Leader, A.; Wong, K. H.; Deitel, M.

1981-01-01

206

Maternal and neonatal morbidity associated with in vitro fertilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this case-control study was to examine the maternal and neonatal morbidities associated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) in a single large teaching hospital. It was hypothesized that IVF mothers would have more perinatal complications and IVF infants would have higher mortality and morbidity rates than non-IVF control subjects. Methods: One hundred forty-three gestations resulting from 101

Christopher P. Tallo; Betty Vohr; William Oh; Lewis P. Rubin; David B. Seifer; Ray V. Haning

1995-01-01

207

The community as a strategic site for refining high perinatal risk assessments and interventions.  

PubMed

This paper describes a community-based agency's approach to reducing perinatal risk among populations at high medical, familial and environmental risk. Following a descriptive analysis of 96 families enrolled in a maternal outreach program, a case study illustrates how client-sensitive strategies are applied to successfully engage a traumatized population. The intensity and duration of the interventions, the extensive outreach efforts to the family and the dedication and commitment of the staff are not easily replicated but invaluable in helping providers and researchers understand to what extent the impact of severe deprivations and risk can be mediated and potential damage to the newborn prevented. The paper concludes that community-based agencies in partnership with social and clinical researchers from a tertiary care setting provide the key for developing more effective, integrated perinatal care by virtue of the critical density of hard-to-reach patients who can be followed by providers and clinical researchers. PMID:1796341

Belville, R; Indyk, D; Shapiro, V; Dewart, T; Moss, J Z; Gordon, G; Lachapelle, S

1991-01-01

208

[Role of the perinatal sexologist in the interdisciplinary perinatal health care team in Canada].  

PubMed

Interdisciplinary health care teams are models of health care that are the way of the future. In this model, the sexologist has a unique and important role, particularly in perinatal health care where sexuality is a central component of health. Perinatal sexuality is a newly emerging discipline in which the perinatal sexologist has a double role to play: 1) to train other perinatal health professionals in sexuality; and 2) to educate and to intervene with future and new parenting couples by answering their multiple intimate and sexual questions and concerns during the transition to parenthood. PMID:24961170

de Pierrepont, C; Polomeno, V

2014-01-01

209

Project Pró-Natal: Population-based Study of Perinatal and Infant Mortality in Natal, Northeast Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pró-Natal project is a collaborative initiative that aims to improve maternal and infant health in a deprived community\\u000a in Natal, Northeast Brazil. To assess the perinatal and infant mortality in this population of 40,000, we have collected over\\u000a a 2-year period a consecutive series of 39 autopsy examinations on deaths under 1 year of age. During this period there

Ana Maria O. Ramos; Técia D. O. Maranhão; Albanita S. Macedo; Jon I. Pollock; Alan M. Emond

2000-01-01

210

Long-term behavioral effects of perinatal exposure to ? 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in rats: Possible role of pituitaryadrenal axis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work evaluated motor behaviors in adult male and female rats exposed to ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 5 mg\\/kg) during gestation and lactation. The possibility that perinatal THC exposure induces sensitization to other drugs of abuse has also been addressed by evaluating morphine place preference conditioning (MPP) in the adult offspring. Maternal exposure to THC resulted in long-term effects on motor behaviors

P. Rubio; F. Rodríguez de Fonseca; R. M. Muñoz; C. Ariznavarreta; J. L. Martin-Calderón; M. Navarro

1995-01-01

211

Trajectories of Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Maternal Sensitivity, and Children's Functioning at School Entry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, the authors modeled trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms from infant age 1 month to 7 years. The authors identified 6 trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms: high-chronic, moderate-increasing, high-decreasing,…

Campbell, Susan B.; Matestic, Patricia; von Stauffenberg, Camilla; Mohan, Roli; Kirchner, Thomas

2007-01-01

212

Maternal Intensive Care': a systematic literature review  

PubMed Central

Objective: The objective of this systematic literature review is to review current scientific knowledge on the definition of and the indications for maternal/obstetric intensive care (MIC). Methods: We conducted a extensive search in OVID MEDLINE, EMBASE, COCHRANE, CINHAL and CEBAM using the keywords: maternal/obstetric intensive care, subacute care, intermediate care, postacute care, critical care, sub intensive care, progressive patient care, postnatal care, perinatal care, obstetrical nursing, neonatology, pregnancy, maternal mortality/morbidity and pregnancy complication. A total of 180 articles and one guideline were identified and supplemented by a hand search. After title, abstract and full text evaluation, the articles and guideline were subjected to critical appraisal. Results: Out of 180 potentially relevant articles, we identified 44 eligible articles of which 14 relevant MIC-articles of relatively good quality were selected. The concept ‘maternal intensive care’ was not found elsewhere, “high-dependency care” and “obstetrical intermediate care” appeared to be best comparable to what is understood as a MIC-service in Belgium. This thorough literature search resulted in a limited amount of scientific literature, with most studies retrospective observational tertiary centre based. No clear definition and admission criteria for maternal intensive care were found. Conclusion: This systematic literature review revealed that 1) there is no standard definition of maternal intensive care and 2) that admission criteria to a MIC unit differ widely. Further research is needed to create an evidence-based triage system to help clinicians attribute women to the appropriate level of care and thus stimulate an efficient utilization of maternal/obstetric intensive care services.

Van Parys, A. S.; Verstraelen, H.; Roelens, K.; Temmerman, M.

2010-01-01

213

Perinatal mental illness: definition, description and aetiology.  

PubMed

Perinatal mental illness is a significant complication of pregnancy and the postpartum period. These disorders include depression, anxiety disorders, and postpartum psychosis, which usually manifests as bipolar disorder. Perinatal depression and anxiety are common, with prevalence rates for major and minor depression up to almost 20% during pregnancy and the first 3 months postpartum. Postpartum blues are a common but lesser manifestation of postpartum affective disturbance. Perinatal psychiatric disorders impair a woman's function and are associated with suboptimal development of her offspring. Risk factors include past history of depression, anxiety, or bipolar disorder, as well psychosocial factors, such as ongoing conflict with the partner, poor social support, and ongoing stressful life events. Early symptoms of depression, anxiety, and mania can be detected through screening in pregnancy and the postpartum period. Early detection and effective management of perinatal psychiatric disorders are critical for the welfare of women and their offspring. PMID:24140480

O'Hara, Michael W; Wisner, Katherine L

2014-01-01

214

HETEROSIS AND BREED MATERNAL AND TRANSMITTED EFFECTS IN BEEF CATTLE I. PREWEANING TRAITS ''2\\  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY This study included data on 1,207 calves born and l, 151 calves weaned in 1973 and 1974 in a four- breed diallel crossing design including Red Poll, Brown Swiss (European and domestic), Hereford and Angus breeds to estimate heterosis and breed maternal and transmitted effects on economic traits of beef cattle. Birth weight, gestation length, calving difficulty, perinatal mortality,

K. E. Gregory; L. V. Cundiff; R. M. Koch; D. B. Laster; G. M. Smith

215

Genetic and perinatal effects of abused substances  

SciTech Connect

This book provides an overview of the effects of several abused drugs, including opiates, cannabinoids, alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, with special emphasis on the actions of these substances at the molecular and cellular levels. The first half deals with genetic effects, including molecular genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, cytogenetics, and genetic toxicity. The second half focuses on perinatal effects and covers: drug abuse during pregnancy; biochemical aspects of marihuana on male reproduction; and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of perinatal alcohol exposure.

Brande, M.C.; Zimmerman, A.M.

1987-01-01

216

Perinatal mortality in different ethnic groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have analysed the cause of perinatal deaths in four hospitals in the North West Thames region over a six year period commencing January 1980. The Pakistani population had a significantly greater perinatal mortality rate (15.7\\/1000 births) than the Europeans (11.3\\/1000 births). This was due to an increased incidence of macerated stillbirths and lethal malformations, the latter resulting from a

L S Chitty; R M Winter

1989-01-01

217

Perinatal inflammation and lung injury  

PubMed Central

Summary Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) remains the major morbidity of extreme preterm birth. The incidence of BPD has remained stable despite recent efforts to reduce postnatal exposures to volutrauma and hyperoxia. This review will focus on recent clinical and experimental insights that provide support for the concept that the ‘new BPD’ is the result of inflammation-mediated injury and altered lung development during a window of vulnerability in genetically susceptible infants that is modified by maternal and postnatal exposures.

Viscardi, Rose Marie

2011-01-01

218

Syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors associated with neural tube defects (III).  

PubMed

Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs) may be associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, such as omphalocele, OEIS (omphalocele-exstrophy-imperforate anus-spinal defects) complex, pentalogy of Cantrell, amniotic band sequence, limb-body wall complex, Meckel syndrome, Joubert syndrome, skeletal dysplasia, diabetic embryopathy, and single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes of glucose metabolism. NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors are a rare but important cause of NTDs. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors may be different from those of nonsyndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert the clinician to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt a thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling. PMID:18603496

Chen, Chih-Ping

2008-06-01

219

[The art of being when there is nothing you can do: caring for perinatal bereavement].  

PubMed

The period of mourning after perinatal loss is not synonym for depression. The article illustrates a way of caring for bereaved parents, which takes into account the temporality and individual nature of the bereavement process. The use of rituals and symbolic gestures allows for calling into existence the loss of a human being, who is gone without leaving many reminders. Psychotherapeutic care by the liaison-psychiatric service is part of the multidisciplinary care program proposed by the maternity of the University Hospitals of Geneva. These encounters offer parents the possibility to continue to include the dead in the membership of our lives. PMID:24620464

Weber, Kerstin; Canuto, Alessandra; Toma, Simona; Bonnet, Jocelyne; Epiney, Manuella; Girard, Elodie

2014-02-12

220

Maternal and child health. Maternal mortality in the Americas.  

PubMed

Maternal health in Latin America and the Caribbean continues to be an important issue, which is significantly affected by access to appropriate health technology and quality care, which in turn may be dependent upon economic conditions. Although contraceptive knowledge was high, only 53% of couples used some method of contraception. About 32% and 37% of maternal mortality in Mexico and Colombia could have been averted if contraception had been used. One study of 240 maternal deaths in Mexico indicated that 85% were potentially preventable, and 70% could have been potentially avoided with better medical and institutional care. The table gave the number and rate of maternal mortality and risk by country. In 23 countries, maternal mortality was one of the ten leading causes of death among women. The five prominent causes tended to be abortion, hemorrhage, toxemia, complications of the puerperium, and indirect causes among women aged 15-49 years. Countries can be grouped by level of maternal mortality: 227/100,000 live births, 133/100,000, and 50/100,000. About 280,000 to 420,000 episodes of severe intercurrent obstetric problems potentially occurred annually among the 12 million women of reproductive age in the region. In the United States about 1 out of every 5 pregnancies involved pregnancy related hospitalization in 1987. In Mexico in 1989, of the 740,000 obstetric related discharges for obstetric reasons, 80.5% were related to delivery and 19.5%, to morbidity during pregnancy. During the prenatal period, the five leading causes of morbidity have been identified as premature rupture of membranes, urinary tract infection, potential premature delivery, pre-eclampsia, and pregnancy induced hypertension. Latin American is also a region with increasing numbers of cesarean section deliveries. Maternal deaths in Latin America and the Caribbean would be reduced 47 times and 85% of deaths could be avoided if the health systems paralleled those in Canada. PMID:8240944

1993-10-15

221

Neonatal-perinatal medicine: Diseases of the fetus and infant  

SciTech Connect

This book consists of 40 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Perinatal services and resources; Diabetes in pregnancy; Erythroblastosis fetalis; Placental pathology; Genetic disease and chromosomal abnormalities; Perinatal ultrasound; and Diagnostic imaging.

Fanaroff, A.A.; Martin, R.J.

1987-01-01

222

What Does It Mean When We Screen? A Closer Examination of Perinatal Depression and Psychosocial Risk Screening Within One MCH Home Visiting Program.  

PubMed

Perinatal depression screening has become an imperative for maternal and child health (MCH) home visitation programs. However, contextual life experiences and situational life stress may be equally important in determining program response. As one component of a larger research study with an urban MCH home visitation program, we examined the results from multiple measures of depression and anxiety symptoms, social support and stressful life events in a sample of 30 newly enrolled program participants. We compared commonly used tools in identifying women who were "at risk" for perinatal depression. The analysis used published and agency practice cut-off scores, examined correlations between measures, and reflected on the role of stressful life events in this assessment. In this low-income, predominantly African-American sample, the assessed tools were inconsistent in identifying "at risk" women for perinatal depression, ranging from 22 % (Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale) to 75 % (Center for Epidemiological Studies, Depression Scale) depending on the instrument. Depression and anxiety were correlated across most measures, although provider-collected data did not correlate as anticipated with other measures. The combination of screening for perinatal depression and stressful life events offered an additional perspective on possible symptom alleviation and psychosocial intervention that could occur within the home visiting program. Our experience suggests that introducing a brief inventory of stressful life events accompanying perinatal depression screening allowed for a more comprehensive understanding of women's experiences than perinatal depression screening alone. We encourage psychosocial risk screening which integrates assessment of social support, stressful life events and perinatal depression symptoms. PMID:23793488

Price, Sarah Kye; Masho, Saba W

2014-05-01

223

Perinatal mortality and severe morbidity of term infants  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis describes the various aspects of perinatal morbidity and mortality in term infants. Most children are born at a gestational age of more than 36 completed weeks. Their chances of survival are high (99.7%). However, more than a quarter of perinatal deaths occur among births from 37 weeks’ gestation onwards. The perinatal mortality of term infants in the Netherlands

A. C. C. Evers

2012-01-01

224

Maternal exposure to childhood abuse is associated with elevated risk of autism  

PubMed Central

Context Adverse perinatal circumstances have been associated with increased risk of autism. Women exposed to childhood abuse experience more adverse perinatal circumstances than women unexposed, but whether abuse is associated with autism in offspring is unknown. Objective To determine whether maternal exposure to childhood abuse is associated with risk of autism, and whether possible increased risk is accounted for by higher prevalence of adverse perinatal circumstances among abused women, including gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use, intimate partner abuse, prior abortion, pregnancy less than 37 weeks, low birth weight, alcohol use, and smoking during pregnancy. Design and Setting Nurses’ Health Study II, a population-based longitudinal cohort of 116,430 women. Patients or Other Participants Participants with data on childhood abuse and child’s autism status (97% White). Controls were randomly selected from among children of women who did not report autism in offspring (N mothers of children with autism = 451; N mothers of children without autism=52,498). Main Outcome Measure Autism spectrum disorder, assessed by maternal report, validated with the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised in a subsample. Results Exposure to abuse was associated with increased risk of autism in children in a monotonically increasing fashion. The highest level of abuse was associated with the greatest prevalence of autism (1.8% versus 0.7% in women not abused, P = 0.005) and the greatest risk for autism adjusted for demographic factors (risk ratio=3.7, 95% confidence interval=2.3, 5.8). All adverse perinatal circumstances were more prevalent in women abused except low birth weight. Adjusted for perinatal factors, the association of maternal abuse with autism was slightly attenuated (highest level of abuse, risk ratio = 3.0, 95% confidence interval=1.9, 4.9). Conclusions We identify an intergenerational association between childhood exposure to abuse and risk for autism in the subsequent generation. Adverse perinatal circumstances accounted for only a small portion of this increased risk.

Roberts, Andrea L.; Lyall, Kristen; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Ascherio, Alberto; Weisskopf, Marc G.

2014-01-01

225

Association between pre- and perinatal exposures and Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorder in the ALSPAC cohort†  

PubMed Central

Background Tourette syndrome and chronic tic disorder are heritable but aetiologically complex. Although environment plays a role in their development, existing studies of non-genetic risk factors are inconsistent. Aims To examine the association between pre- and perinatal exposures and Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) prospective longitudinal pre-birth cohort. Method Relationships between exposures and Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder were examined in 6090 children using logistic regression. Results Maternal alcohol and cannabis use, inadequate maternal weight gain and parity were associated with Tourette syndrome or Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder. Other previously reported exposures, including birth weight and prenatal maternal smoking, were not associated with Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder. Conclusions This study supports previously reported relationships between Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder and prenatal alcohol exposure, and identifies additional previously unexplored potential prenatal risk factors.

Mathews, Carol A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Miller, Laura L.; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

2014-01-01

226

Perinatal factors and the risk of asthma in childhood--a population-based register study in Finland.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to assess whether perinatal factors are associated with the risk of asthma in childhood in a register-based, nested case-control study in Finland. All children born between January 1, 1996, and April 30, 2004, who were entitled to a special reimbursement for antiasthmatic drugs (i.e., had diagnosed asthma by 2006 and had purchased inhaled corticosteroids or montelukast at least once), were identified (n = 21,038). For each case, one matched control child was selected. The associations between perinatal factors, derived from the Finnish Medical Birth Register, and the risk of asthma were analyzed by conditional logistic regression. In the final multivariate model, maternal asthma, young age, smoking, previous miscarriages, and a high number of previous deliveries, as well as cesarean section, low gestational age, and low ponderal index, were associated with an increased risk of asthma in children diagnosed before the age of 3 years. Among children diagnosed at the age of 3 years or later, maternal asthma, low gestational age, and low ponderal index were associated with an increased risk, and a high number of previous deliveries was associated with a decreased risk of asthma. In conclusion, perinatal factors play a role in the development of asthma in childhood, but the etiology may differ in early and late-onset asthma. PMID:18511427

Metsälä, Johanna; Kilkkinen, Annamari; Kaila, Minna; Tapanainen, Heli; Klaukka, Timo; Gissler, Mika; Virtanen, Suvi M

2008-07-15

227

Birthplace in New South Wales, Australia: an analysis of perinatal outcomes using routinely collected data  

PubMed Central

Background The outcomes for women who give birth in hospital compared with at home are the subject of ongoing debate. We aimed to determine whether a retrospective linked data study using routinely collected data was a viable means to compare perinatal and maternal outcomes and interventions in labour by planned place of birth at the onset of labour in one Australian state. Methods A population-based cohort study was undertaken using routinely collected linked data from the New South Wales Perinatal Data Collection, Admitted Patient Data Collection, Register of Congenital Conditions, Registry of Birth Deaths and Marriages and the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Eight years of data provided a sample size of 258,161 full-term women and their infants. The primary outcome was a composite outcome of neonatal mortality and morbidity as used in the Birthplace in England study. Results Women who planned to give birth in a birth centre or at home were significantly more likely to have a normal labour and birth compared with women in the labour ward group. There were no statistically significant differences in stillbirth and early neonatal deaths between the three groups, although we had insufficient statistical power to test reliably for these differences. Conclusion This study provides information to assist the development and evaluation of different places of birth across Australia. It is feasible to examine perinatal and maternal outcomes by planned place of birth using routinely collected linked data, although very large data sets will be required to measure rare outcomes associated with place of birth in a low risk population, especially in countries like Australia where homebirth rates are low.

2014-01-01

228

Safety of Perinatal Exposure to Antiretroviral Medications: Developmental Outcomes in Infants  

PubMed Central

Background This study evaluated effects of perinatal exposure to antiretroviral (ARV) medications on neurodevelopment of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Methods HIV-exposed, uninfected infants (age 9-15 months) enrolled in SMARTT, a multisite prospective surveillance study, completed the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development—Third Edition (Bayley-III), assessing cognition, language, motor skills, social-emotional development, and adaptive behavior. Linear regression models were used to evaluate associations between Bayley-III outcomes in infants with and without perinatal and neonatal ARV exposure, by regimen (combination ARV [cARV] versus non-cARV), type of regimen (defined by drug class), and individual ARVs (for infants with cARV exposure), adjusting for maternal and infant health and demographic covariates. Results As of May 2010, 374 infants had valid Bayley-III evaluations. Median age at testing was 12.7 months; 49% male, 79% black, 16% Hispanic. Seventy-nine percent were exposed to regimens containing protease inhibitors (PIs; 9% of PI-containing regimens also included non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [NNRTIs]), 5% to regimens containing NNRTIs (without PI), and 14% to regimens containing only nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Overall, 83% were exposed to cARV. No Bayley-III outcome was significantly associated with overall exposure to cARV, ARV regimen, or neonatal prophylaxis. For individual ARVs, following sensitivity analyses, the adjusted group mean on the Language domain was within age expectations but significantly lower for infants with perinatal exposure to atazanavir (p=0.01). Conclusions These results support the safety of perinatal ARV use. Continued monitoring for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in older children is warranted, and the safety of atazanavir merits further study.

Sirois, Patricia A.; Huo, Yanling; Williams, Paige L.; Malee, Kathleen; Garvie, Patricia A.; Kammerer, Betsy; Rich, Kenneth; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Nozyce, Molly L.

2013-01-01

229

'My special time': Australian women's experiences of accessing a specialist perinatal and infant mental health service.  

PubMed

Women who have few social supports, poor health and a history of stressful life events are at risk of poor mental health during the perinatal period. Infants of parents whose parenting capacity is compromised are also at risk of adverse outcomes. Specifically, poor perinatal mental health can impact maternal-infant attachment. To identify women at risk of poor perinatal mental health, psychosocial assessment and depression screening in the antenatal and early postnatal periods are recommended. This qualitative study is part of a larger mixed methods study, which explored two specialist perinatal and infant mental health (PIMH) services in New South Wales (Australia). Eleven women who had accessed and been discharged from a PIMH service participated in either face-to-face or telephone interviews. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. One overarching theme, 'my special time' and three sub-themes, 'there is someone out there for me', 'it wasn't just a job' and 'swimming or stranded: feelings about leaving the service', were identified. The themes describe the women's experiences of being a client of a PIMH service. Overall, women reported a positive experience of the service, their relationship with the clinician being a key component. Findings from this study highlight the importance of the relational aspect of care and support; however, women need self-determination in all therapeutic processes, including discharge, if recovery and self-efficacy as a mother are to be gained. Importantly, further research is needed about how clinicians model a secure base and how mothers emulate this for their infants. PMID:24224792

Myors, Karen A; Schmied, Virginia; Johnson, Maree; Cleary, Michelle

2014-05-01

230

Preconception care for diabetic women for improving maternal and fetal outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Preexisting diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk for maternal and fetal adverse outcomes. Despite improvement in the access and quality of antenatal care recent population based studies demonstrating increased congenital abnormalities and perinatal mortality in diabetic mothers as compared to the background population. This systematic review was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of preconception care

Hayfaa A Wahabi; Rasmeia A Alzeidan; Ghada A Bawazeer; Lubna A Alansari; Samia A Esmaeil

2010-01-01

231

Maternal hypertension during pregnancy modifies the response of the immature brain to hypoxia–ischemia: Sequential MRI and behavioral investigations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypoxic–ischemic (HI) brain injury occurring during the perinatal period is still a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We assessed the impact of maternal hypertension, the most common medical disorder of pregnancy, on the anatomical and functional consequences of HI insult in the immature brain. Rat pups from spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive (Wistar Kyoto — WKY) dams were subjected

Annelise Letourneur; Thomas Freret; Simon Roussel; Michel Boulouard; Didier Divoux; Jérôme Toutain; Myriam Bernaudin; Pascale Schumann-Bard; Valentine Bouet; Omar Touzani

232

Change in paternity and select perinatal outcomes: causal or confounded?  

PubMed

Select social, behavioural and maternal characteristics were evaluated to determine if they were confounding factors in the association between paternity change and pre-eclampsia, small for gestational age (SGA) and pre-term delivery, in a sample of 1,409 women. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine if any of these risk factors modified the association between changing paternity and the selected perinatal outcomes. Results of the analysis showed that women who changed partners were more likely to possess potentially confounding risk factors compared with those who had not. Paternity change was 2.75 times more likely to be associated with the development of pre-eclampsia (95% CI 1.33; 5.68) and 2.25 times more likely to be associated with an SGA infant on weight (95% CI 1.13; 4.47), after adjusting for selected risk factors. Paternity change remains a significant risk factor for pre-eclampsia and SGA in the presence of select risk factors. PMID:22943712

Bandoli, G; Lindsay, S; Johnson, D L; Kao, K; Luo, Y; Chambers, C D

2012-10-01

233

Efficacy of light therapy for perinatal depression: a review  

PubMed Central

Perinatal depression is an important public health problem affecting 10% to 20% of childbearing women. Perinatal depression is associated with significant morbidity, and has enormous consequences for the wellbeing of the mother and child. During the perinatal period, treatment of depression, which could affect the mother and child during pregnancy and lactation, poses a complex problem for both mother and clinician. Bright light therapy may be an attractive treatment for perinatal depression because it is low cost, home-based, and has a much lower side effect profile than pharmacotherapy. The antidepressant effects of bright light are well established, and there are several rationales for expecting that bright light might also be efficacious for perinatal depression. This review describes these rationales, summarizes the available evidence on the efficacy of bright light therapy for perinatal depression, and discusses future directions for investigation of bright light therapy as a treatment for perinatal depression.

2012-01-01

234

Is there an association between female circumcision and perinatal death?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: In Sweden, a country with high standards of obstetric care, the high rate of perinatal mortality among children of immigrant women from the Horn of Africa raises the question of whether there is an association between female circumcision and perinatal death. METHOD: To investigate this, we examined a cohort of 63 perinatal deaths of infants born in Sweden over the period 1990-96 to circumcised women. FINDINGS: We found no evidence that female circumcision was related to perinatal death. Obstructed or prolonged labour, caused by scar tissue from circumcision, was not found to have any impact on the number of perinatal deaths. CONCLUSION: The results do not support previous conclusions that genital circumcision is related to perinatal death, regardless of other circumstances, and suggest that other, suboptimal factors contribute to perinatal death among circumcised migrant women.

Essen, Birgitta; Bodker, Birgit; Sjoberg, N-O; Gudmundsson, Saemundur; Ostergren, P-O; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

2002-01-01

235

Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

2009-01-01

236

Assessment of the Comprehensive Perinatal Care Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study evaluated the progress of grantees of the Comprehensive Perinatal Care Program (CPCP) in providing pregnant women and their families with comprehensive, case-managed care at community and migrant health centers (C/MHCs). Site visits to nine C/MH...

1990-01-01

237

Current problems of perinatal Chlamydia trachomatis infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chlamydia trachomatis has been recognized as a pathogen of trachoma, nongonococcal urethritis, salpingitis, endocervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, inclusion conjunctivitis of neonates, follicular conjunctivitis of adults, infantile pneumonia and associated conditions. Chlamydial infections during pregnancy may also cause a variety of perinatal complications. Different antigenic strains of C. trachomatis from endocervical, nasopharyngeal and conjunctival origins have been associated with different clinical

Kei Numazaki

2004-01-01

238

Respiratory plasticity after perinatal hypercapnia in rats.  

PubMed

Environmental conditions during early life may have profound effects on respiratory control development. We hypothesized that perinatal hypercapnia would exert lasting effects on the mammalian hypercapnic ventilatory response, but that these effects would differ between males and females. Rats were exposed to 5% CO2 from 1 to 3 days before birth through postnatal week 2 and ventilation was subsequently measured by whole-body plethysmography. In both male and female rats exposed to perinatal hypercapnia, a rapid, shallow breathing pattern was observed for the first 2 weeks after return to normocapnia, but ventilation was unchanged. Acute hypercapnic ventilatory responses (3% and 5% CO2) were reduced 27% immediately following perinatal hypercapnia, but these responses were normal after 2 weeks of recovery in both sexes and remained normal as adults. Collectively, these data suggest that perinatal hypercapnia elicits only transient respiratory plasticity in both male and female rats. This plasticity appears similar to that observed after chronic hypercapnia in adult animals and, therefore, is not unique to development. PMID:16338177

Bavis, Ryan W; Johnson, Rebecca A; Ording, Kari M; Otis, Jessica P; Mitchell, Gordon S

2006-08-01

239

Dynamic influence of maternal and pup traits on maternal care during lactation in an income breeder, the antarctic fur seal.  

PubMed

Life-history theory predicts that selection will favor optimal levels of parental effort that balance benefits of current reproduction with costs to survival and future reproduction. The optimal level of effort depends on parental traits, offspring traits, and provisioning strategy. Additionally, how these factors influence effort may differ depending on the stage of reproduction. The relative importance of maternal and offspring traits on energy allocation to offspring was investigated in known-age Antarctic fur seals Arctocephalus gazella across four stages of reproduction, using birth mass and milk-consumption measurements. Maternal traits were important during three of the four stages investigated, with larger females giving birth to larger pups and investing more in pups during perinatal and molt stages. Pup mass influenced maternal effort during the premolt stage, and provisioning strategy influenced postnatal maternal effort at all stages. Energy provided to the offspring during an attendance visit was positively related to the duration of the foraging-trip/visit cycle; however, when investment was controlled for trip/visit cycle duration, the overall rate of energy transfer was similar across trip durations. In addition to strong effects of maternal mass, pup traits affected energy allocation, suggesting that pup demand is important in determining maternal care. These findings emphasize the importance of considering state variables in life-history studies and suggest that timing of measurements of effort in species with long provisioning periods may influence conclusions and our ability to make comparisons of reproductive effort among species. PMID:22494980

McDonald, Birgitte I; Goebel, Michael E; Crocker, Daniel E; Costa, Daniel P

2012-01-01

240

Activation of paternally expressed genes and perinatal death caused by deletion of the Gtl2 gene  

PubMed Central

The Dlk1-Gtl2 imprinting locus is located on mouse distal chromosome 12 and consists of multiple maternally expressed non-coding RNAs and several paternally expressed protein-coding genes. The imprinting of this locus plays a crucial role in embryonic development and postnatal growth. At least one cis-element, the intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR) is required for expression of maternally expressed genes and repression of silenced paternally expressed genes. The mechanism by which the IG-DMR functions is largely unknown. However, it has been suggested that the unmethylated IG-DMR acts as a positive regulator activating expression of non-coding RNAs. Gtl2 is the first non-coding RNA gene downstream of the IG-DMR. Although its in vivo function in the mouse is largely unknown, its human ortholog MEG3 has been linked to tumor suppression in human tumor-derived cell lines. We generated a knockout mouse model, in which the first five exons and adjacent promoter region of the Gtl2 gene were deleted. Maternal deletion of Gtl2 resulted in perinatal death and skeletal muscle defects, indicating that Gtl2 plays an important role in embryonic development. The maternal deletion also completely abolished expression of downstream maternally expressed genes, activated expression of silenced paternally expressed genes and resulted in methylation of the IG-DMR. By contrast, the paternal inherited deletion did not have this effect. These data strongly indicate that activation of Gtl2 and its downstream maternal genes play an essential role in regulating Dlk1-Gtl2 imprinting, possibly by maintaining active status of the IG-DMR.

Zhou, Yunli; Cheunsuchon, Pornsuk; Nakayama, Yuki; Lawlor, Michael W.; Zhong, Ying; Rice, Kimberley A.; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Xun; Gordon, Francesca E.; Lidov, Hart G. W.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Klibanski, Anne

2010-01-01

241

Omentin-1 and vaspin are present in the fetus and neonate, and perinatal concentrations are similar in normal and growth-restricted pregnancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate circulating concentrations of omentin-1 and vaspin (adipocytokines predominantly secreted by visceral adipose tissue and not yet investigated in perinatal life) in maternal, fetal, and neonatal samples from intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR; associated with altered development of adipose tissue) and appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA) pregnancies and to correlate them with the respective insulin concentrations. Serum omentin-1

Despina D. Briana; Maria Boutsikou; Stavroula Baka; Dimitrios Gourgiotis; Antonios Marmarinos; Sofia Liosi; Dimitrios Hassiakos; Ariadne Malamitsi-Puchner

2011-01-01

242

[Chronological observation of the epidemiological characteristics of perinatal indicators in the Monastir health region (Tunisia) between 1994 and 2008].  

PubMed

In the Tunisian healthcare system, the mother-child pair is a key target of the national perinatal program established in 1990. The purpose of this study is to define the epidemiological profile and to study the chronological tendencies of the main perinatal care indicators in the region of Monastir. The paper is based on a population study involving all parturients who gave birth in Monastir public maternities over a period of 15 years (1 January 1994 to 31 December 2008). Data were drawn from the register of births of all public maternities located in the region. The study examined 121,046 parturients. The mean age of parturients was 28.8 ± 5.5 years. 17.2% of parturients were aged 35 and over. Two thirds of deliveries were performed in the 2nd and 3rd level care maternities. Over the course of the fifteen years, absent prenatal care decreased significantly, from 11% in 1994 to 1% in 2008 (p<0.001). The percentage of parturients aged 35 and over increased significantly, from 14% in 1994 to 18% in 2008 (p< 0.001). Prematurity also increased significantly, from 4.2% in 1994 to 7% in 2008. These results are a reflection of the demographic and social transition of the country. The Tunisian healthcare system will need to show greater vigilance and to promote a greater focus on prenatal care quality. PMID:22177606

El Mhamdi, Sana; Ben Salem, Kamel; Bouanene, Inès; Soussi Soltani, Mohamed

2011-01-01

243

Near miss maternal morbidity.  

PubMed

Audit of severe maternal morbidity is a potent tool in determining standards of maternity care. This study determines the incidence of severe acute maternal morbidity in our population, identifies the underlying organ dysfunction and associated obstetric risk factors, and compares them to published international reports. Over a 5 year period, 1999-2003, data were collected prospectively from patients with severe acute maternal morbidity. There were 36,802 women who delivered infants weighing more than 500 g over the 5 years with 53 cases of severe maternal morbidity. There were two indirect maternal deaths yielding an incidence of 1.4/1000 for severe maternal morbidity and 5.4/100,000 for maternal mortality. The severe maternal morbidity to mortality ratio was 26.5:1. Massive obstetric haemorrhage requiring acute blood transfusion of > or = 5 units of packed red cells occurred in 77% of cases. This study identifies the feasibility of audit of severe maternal morbidity using simple defined clinical criteria. The incidence and underlying aetiology of severe maternal morbidity in our unit is comparable to other developed countries. It is essential that data on severe maternal morbidity are reviewed and analysed continuously at local hospital and national level to assess, maintain and improve clinical standards. PMID:18624257

Lynch, C M; Sheridan, C; Breathnach, F M; Said, S; Daly, S; Byrne, B

2008-05-01

244

Perinatal features and umbilical cord blood gases in newborns complicated with nuchal cord.  

PubMed

Presence of nuchal cord (NC) is associated with transient decrease of umbilical cord blood flow. However, the exact perinatal effect of presence of NC in a newborn is still under debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perinatal complications and umbilical cord blood gases of deliveries complicated with NC and summarize the associated literature. Gestational age-matched term singleton pregnancies complicated with NC (n=160) were compared with neonates without NC (n=160). Patients' files and Labor and Delivery Unit database were used to extract maternal age, gestational age, presence of NC, number of nuchal loops around fetal neck, intrapartum complications and umbilical cord blood gases. pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3-, O2 saturation, and base excess were determined in all patients. Mean maternal age, mean gestational age, and birth weight were not significantly different between the two groups (p > 0.05). Occurrence of oligohydramnios, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), intrapartum abnormalities and Apgar scores < 7 at 1 minute were not significantly different between the groups (p>0.05). However, umbilical cord blood pH (7.32 vs. 7.30, p = 0.048), pO2 (37.4 +/- 18.1 vs. 31.7 +/- 14.4, p = 0.01) and O2 saturation (57.4 +/- 21.8 vs. 48.3 +/- 20.4, p = 0.005) were significantly lower in the NC group compared with the controls. Furthermore, the number of Apgar scores < 7 at 1 minute was significantly higher in neonates with multiple NC (28.1% vs. 9.2%, p = 0.007), and intrapartum abnormalities were more frequently seen in newborns with multiple NC (31.3% vs.15.6%, p = 0.04). The results of this study suggest that presence of single NC may negatively affect the umbilical cord blood gases without significant perinatal complications. However, multiple NC may also increase the development of intrapartum complications and lower Apgar scores. Perinatal effects of NC should be investigated with a large prospective study. PMID:19102052

Ondero?lu, Lütfü S; Dursun, Polat; Durukan, Tekin

2008-01-01

245

Maternal near miss and death among women with severe hypertensive disorders: a Brazilian multicenter surveillance study  

PubMed Central

Background Hypertensive disorders represent the major cause of maternal morbidity in middle income countries. The main objective of this study was to identify the prevalence and factors associated with severe maternal outcomes in women with severe hypertensive disorders. Methods This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study, including 6706 women with severe hypertensive disorder from 27 maternity hospitals in Brazil. A prospective surveillance of severe maternal morbidity with data collected from medical charts and entered into OpenClinica®, an online system, over a one-year period (2009 to 2010). Women with severe preeclampsia, severe hypertension, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome were included in the study. They were grouped according to outcome in near miss, maternal death and potentially life-threatening condition. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for cluster effect for maternal and perinatal variables and delays in receiving obstetric care were calculated as risk estimates of maternal complications having a severe maternal outcome (near miss or death). Poisson multiple regression analysis was also performed. Results Severe hypertensive disorders were the main cause of severe maternal morbidity (6706/9555); the prevalence of near miss was 4.2 cases per 1000 live births, there were 8.3 cases of Near Miss to 1 Maternal Death and the mortality index was 10.7% (case fatality). Early onset of the disease and postpartum hemorrhage were independent variables associated with severe maternal outcomes, in addition to acute pulmonary edema, previous heart disease and delays in receiving secondary and tertiary care. Conclusions In women with severe hypertensive disorders, the current study identified situations independently associated with a severe maternal outcome, which could be modified by interventions in obstetric care and in the healthcare system. Furthermore, the study showed the feasibility of a hospital system for surveillance of severe maternal morbidity.

2014-01-01

246

Nutritional interventions in depression and perinatal depression.  

PubMed

Depression is the leading cause of mental disability worldwide. Women who are depressed during pregnancy are at a higher risk for preterm delivery, preeclampsia, birth difficulties, and postpartum depression. The treatment of depression in conventional medicine has focused on physiological factors that lead to impaired neurotransmitter function and treatments to improve neurotransmitter function. Pharmaceutical substances pose risks for pregnant and lactating women, and lower risk options are preferred. Micronutrients, including certain B vitamins, folate, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), play a role in the synthesis and absorption of neurotransmitters. Experimental studies suggest that supplementation with specific micronutrients may alleviate depressive symptoms and improve birth outcomes in patients with perinatal depression. Alternative treatments for depression, including nutritional supplements, are an important treatment option for depressive symptoms while limiting potential side effects and treatment costs. This article explores the biological basis of perinatal depression and reviews the potential benefits of non-pharmacological interventions. PMID:23766734

Rechenberg, Kaitlyn; Humphries, Debbie

2013-06-01

247

Comparison of Perinatal Data of Immigrant Women of Turkish Origin and German Women - Results of a Prospective Study in Berlin  

PubMed Central

Aims: The aim of the study was to compare obstetrical process indicators and outcomes for German women with women of Turkish origin residing in Germany. Do women of Turkish origin attend antenatal examinations as frequently as non-immigrant women? Are high-risk pregnancies and anemia more common among immigrant women? Are the rates for epidural analgesia (PDA) and combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSE) during delivery the same for immigrant women compared to German women? Are there identifiable differences in the mode of delivery and in perinatal outcomes? Patient Population/Methods: Data were obtained from 3 maternity clinics in Berlin for the period 2011 to 2012. The questionnaires covered socio-demographic factors and information on prenatal care as well as immigration/acculturation. The data obtained from these questionnaires was supplemented by information obtained from the official maternal record of prenatal and natal care (Mutterpass) and perinatal data recorded by the clinic. Results: The response rate was 89.6?%; the data of 1277 women of Turkish origin who had immigrated to Germany or whose family had immigrated and of 2991 non-immigrant women in Germany were included in the study. Regression analysis showed no statistically significant difference in the number of antenatal examinations between immigrant and non-immigrant women. Women of Turkish origin born in Germany had a significantly higher risk of postpartum anemia. PDA/CSE rate, arterial umbilical cord pH and 5-minute Apgar scores did not differ. The incidence of cesarean sections (elective and secondary) was significantly lower in the population of immigrant women of Turkish origin. Conclusion: Outcomes for most perinatal parameters were comparable for immigrant and non-immigrant women. These results indicate that the achieved standards of antenatal care and medical care during pregnancy are similar for Turkish immigrant women compared to non-immigrant women in maternity clinics in Berlin. The higher rates of anemia among immigrant women should be targeted by preventive measures.

David, M.; Borde, T.; Brenne, S.; Ramsauer, B.; Henrich, W.; Breckenkamp, J.; Razum, O.

2014-01-01

248

Effects of a westernized diet on the reflexes and physical maturation of male rat offspring during the perinatal period.  

PubMed

This study evaluates the effects of a westernized diet during the perinatal period on the maternal performance and growth and development of rat offspring. Female Wistar rats were fed with either a control (C) diet, with casein as the protein source or a westernized (W) diet, during pregnancy and lactation. The pups were divided, eight per group, into the same diet groups as their dams. During lactation, the body weight (day 1, W = 6.85 ± 0.62 g, C = 5.81 ± 0.49, p < 0.05; day 21, W = 55.42 ± 3.78, C = 47.75 ± 3.45, p < 0.001) and somatic growth (body length day 1, W = 53.24 ± 2.16, C = 50.641 ± 1.79, p < 0.05; day 21, W = 124.8, C = 119.903 ± 3.71, p < 0.001) in the male offspring showed significant differences among the groups. The physical appearance and reflex maturation showed differences between day 1 and day 3. With the westernized diet, during the perinatal period, no alterations in maternal weight gain, gestation or performance were observed; however, changes in the coefficients of feed efficiency and energy during lactation were noted. Besides, blood glucose was found to be elevated at the end of lactation (C = 3.67 ± 0.35 mmol/l, W = 5.2 0 ± 0.49 mmol/l). At 21 days, the male pups from the dams on the westernized diet were 15 % heavier, and the maturation of the neural reflexes and physical characteristics were found to occur earlier. Therefore, the consumption of a westernized diet during the perinatal period was independent of maternal energy intake, and influenced the growth and development of offspring. PMID:24045974

Ferro Cavalcante, Taisy Cinthia; Lima da Silva, Jennyffer Mayara; da Marcelino da Silva, Amanda Alves; Muniz, Gisélia Santana; da Luz Neto, Laércio Marques; Lopes de Souza, Sandra; Manhães de Castro, Raul; Ferraz, Karla Mônica; do Nascimento, Elizabeth

2013-11-01

249

Perinatal mortality attributable to complications of childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh.  

PubMed Central

Very few population-based studies of perinatal mortality in developing countries have examined the role of intrapartum risk factors. In the present study, the proportion of perinatal deaths that are attributable to complications during childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh, was assessed using community-based data from a home-based programme led by professional midwives between 1987 and 1993. Complications during labour and delivery--such as prolonged or obstructed labour, abnormal fetal position, and hypertensive diseases of pregnancy--increased the risk of perinatal mortality fivefold and accounted for 30% of perinatal deaths. Premature labour, which occurred in 20% of pregnancies, accounted for 27% of perinatal mortality. Better care by qualified staff during delivery and improved care of newborns should substantially reduce perinatal mortality in this study population.

Kusiako, T.; Ronsmans, C.; Van der Paal, L.

2000-01-01

250

Sleep and perinatal mood disorders: a critical review  

PubMed Central

Pregnancy and the postpartum period are recognized as times of vulnerability to mood disorders, including postpartum depression and psychosis. Recently, changes in sleep physiology and sleep deprivation have been proposed as having roles in perinatal psychiatric disorders. In this article we review what is known about changes in sleep physiology and behaviour during the perinatal period, with a focus on the relations between sleep and postpartum “blues,” depression and psychosis and on sleep-based interventions for the treatment and prevention of perinatal mood disorders. The interaction between sleep and perinatal mood disorders is significant, but evidence-based research in this field is limited. Studies that measure both sleep and mood during the perinatal period, particularly those that employ objective measurement tools such as polysomnography and actigraphy, will provide important information about the causes, prevention and treatment of perinatal mood disorders.

Ross, Lori E.; Murray, Brian J.; Steiner, Meir

2005-01-01

251

[Reproductive and developmental toxicity studies of tazobactam/piperacillin or tazobactam (3)--Perinatal and postnatal study in rats with intraperitoneal administration].  

PubMed

Tazobactam (TAZ) is a newly developed beta-lactamase inhibitor and piperacillin (PIPC) is an antibiotics which is used in clinical field widely. The combination of TAZ and PIPC (TAZ/PIPC), which is combined with TAZ and PIPC at rate of 1:4, has been developed because of PIPC is unstable to various beta-lactamases. Perinatal and postnatal toxicity were studied in rats given daily intraperitoneal doses of TAZ/PIPC (200, 800 or 1600 mg/kg/day) or TAZ (40, 320 or 1280 mg/kg/day). TAZ/PIPC or TAZ were given from day 17 of pregnancy through day 21 of lactation. Total daily doses were administered in two equally divided doses. In this study, evaluation of the late stage of gestation, parturition, lactation and maternal behavior in adult rats and postnatal evaluation of the growth and development, and reproductive performance of the F1 generation occurred. In the TAZ/PIPC, maternal toxicity (decreased food consumption) was observed at 800 and 1600 mg/kg groups during perinatal period. A slight decrease in body weight gain during perinatal period and increased pup mortality and decreased pup weight in lactation period were observed at 1600 mg/kg group. An increase in stillbirths also was observed at 1600 mg/kg group. In the TAZ, maternal toxicity (decreased food consumption) was observed at all dosage groups during perinatal period. A decrease in body weight gain also were observed during perinatal period at 1280 mg/kg group. At maternotoxic doses of 320 and 1280 mg/kg groups, decreased pup weight were observed during lactation period. An increase in stillbirths also was observed at 1280 mg/kg group. Transient, significant decrease in pup body weights at 1280 mg/kg group in early postweaning period. No other effects occurred for the F1 generation rats. In conclusion, perinatal development and postnatal growth and development of offspring were affected only at the intermediate and high doses that caused maternal toxicity in this study. Therefore it is seemed that non-observed effect dose levels (NOELs) of TAZ/PIPC for dams is less than 200 mg/kg/day and that of TAZ is less than 40 mg/mg/day, and NOELs of TAZ/PIPC is 200 mg/kg/day and that of TAZ is 40 mg/kg/day for offspring under the condition of this study. PMID:7830289

Sato, T; Hoberman, A M; Christian, M S

1994-10-01

252

Mechanisms of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke.  

PubMed

The incidence of perinatal stroke is high, similar to that in the elderly, and produces a significant morbidity and severe long-term neurologic and cognitive deficits, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, neuropsychological impairments, and behavioral disorders. Emerging clinical data and data from experimental models of cerebral ischemia in neonatal rodents have shown that the pathophysiology of perinatal brain damage is multifactorial. These studies have revealed that, far from just being a smaller version of the adult brain, the neonatal brain is unique with a very particular and age-dependent responsiveness to hypoxia-ischemia and focal arterial stroke. In this review, we discuss fundamental clinical aspects of perinatal stroke as well as some of the most recent and relevant findings regarding the susceptibility of specific brain cell populations to injury, the dynamics and the mechanisms of neuronal cell death in injured neonates, the responses of neonatal blood-brain barrier to stroke in relation to systemic and local inflammation, and the long-term effects of stroke on angiogenesis and neurogenesis. Finally, we address translational strategies currently being considered for neonatal stroke as well as treatments that might effectively enhance repair later after injury. PMID:24667913

Fernández-López, David; Natarajan, Niranjana; Ashwal, Stephen; Vexler, Zinaida S

2014-06-01

253

Neoplasms in young dogs after perinatal irradiation  

SciTech Connect

For a study of the life-time effects of irradiation during development, 1,680 beagles were given single, whole-body exposures to /sup 60/Co gamma-radiation at one of three prenatal (preimplantation, embryonic, and fetal) or at one of three postnatal (neonatal, juvenile, and young adult) ages. Mean doses were 0, 0.16, or 0.83 Gy. For comparison with data on childhood cancer after prenatal irradiation, examination was made of tumors occurring in young dogs in this life-span experiment. Up to 4 years of age, 18 dogs had neoplasms diagnosed, 2 of these being in controls. Four dogs that were irradiated in the perinatal (late fetal or neonatal) period died of cancers prior to 2 years of age. This risk was of significant increase compared to the risks for other experimental groups and for the canine population in general. Overall, 71% (5 of 7) of all cancers and 56% (10 of 18) of all benign and malignant neoplasms seen in the first 4 years of life occurred in 29% (480 of 1680) of the dogs irradiated in the perinatal period. These data suggest an increased risk for neoplasia after perinatal irradiation in dogs.

Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.; Angleton, G.M.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Williams, J.S.; Brewster, R.D.; Long, R.I.

1986-08-01

254

Perinatal Asphyxia in a Nonhuman Primate Model  

PubMed Central

Perinatal asphyxia is a leading cause of brain injury in neonates, occurring in 2–4 per 1,000 live births, and there are limited treatment options. Because of their similarity to humans, nonhuman primates are ideal for performing preclinical tests of safety and efficacy for neurotherapeutic interventions. We previously developed a primate model of acute perinatal asphyxia using 12–15 min of umbilical cord occlusion. Continuing this research, we have increased cord occlusion time from 15 to 18 min and extended neurodevelopmental follow-up to 9 months. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the increase in morbidity associated with 18 min of asphyxia by comparing indices obtained from colony controls, nonasphyxiated controls and asphyxiated animals. Pigtail macaques were delivered by hysterotomy after 0, 15 or 18 min of cord occlusion, then resuscitated. Over the ensuing 9 months, for each biochemical and physiologic parameters, behavioral and developmental evaluations, and structural and spectroscopic MRI were recorded. At birth, all asphyxiated animals required resuscitation with positive pressure ventilation and exhibited biochemical and clinical characteristics diagnostic of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, including metabolic acidosis and attenuated brain activity. Compared with controls, asphyxiated animals developed long-term physical and cognitive deficits. This preliminary report characterizes the acute and chronic consequences of perinatal asphyxia in a nonhuman primate model, and describes diagnostic imaging tools for quantifying correlates of neonatal brain injury as well as neurodevelopmental tests for evaluating early motor and cognitive outcomes.

Misbe, Elizabeth N. Jacobson; Richards, Todd L.; McPherson, Ronald J.; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Juul, Sandra E.

2011-01-01

255

Domestic Violence and Perinatal Mental Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Domestic violence in the perinatal period is associated with adverse obstetric outcomes, but evidence is limited on its association with perinatal mental disorders. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and odds of having experienced domestic violence among women with antenatal and postnatal mental disorders (depression and anxiety disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], eating disorders, and psychoses). Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis (PROSPERO reference CRD42012002048). Data sources included searches of electronic databases (to 15 February 2013), hand searches, citation tracking, update of a review on victimisation and mental disorder, and expert recommendations. Included studies were peer-reviewed experimental or observational studies that reported on women aged 16 y or older, that assessed the prevalence and/or odds of having experienced domestic violence, and that assessed symptoms of perinatal mental disorder using a validated instrument. Two reviewers screened 1,125 full-text papers, extracted data, and independently appraised study quality. Odds ratios were pooled using meta-analysis. Sixty-seven papers were included. Pooled estimates from longitudinal studies suggest a 3-fold increase in the odds of high levels of depressive symptoms in the postnatal period after having experienced partner violence during pregnancy (odds ratio 3.1, 95% CI 2.7–3.6). Increased odds of having experienced domestic violence among women with high levels of depressive, anxiety, and PTSD symptoms in the antenatal and postnatal periods were consistently reported in cross-sectional studies. No studies were identified on eating disorders or puerperal psychosis. Analyses were limited because of study heterogeneity and lack of data on baseline symptoms, preventing clear findings on causal directionality. Conclusions High levels of symptoms of perinatal depression, anxiety, and PTSD are significantly associated with having experienced domestic violence. High-quality evidence is now needed on how maternity and mental health services should address domestic violence and improve health outcomes for women and their infants in the perinatal period. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

Howard, Louise M.; Oram, Sian; Galley, Helen; Trevillion, Kylee; Feder, Gene

2013-01-01

256

Gestational weight gain in twin pregnancies and maternal and child health: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Our objective was to systematically review the data interrogating the association between gestational weight gain (GWG) and maternal and child health among women with twin gestations. We identified 15 articles of twin gestations that studied GWG in relation to a maternal, perinatal, or child health outcome and controlled for gestational age at delivery and prepregnancy body mass index. A positive association between GWG and fetal size was consistently found. Evidence on preterm birth and pregnancy complications was inconsistent. The existing studies suffer from serious methodological weaknesses, including not properly accounting for the strong correlation between gestational duration and GWG and not controlling for chorionicity. In addition, serious perinatal outcomes were not studied, and no research is available on the association between GWG and outcomes beyond birth. Our systematic review underscores that GWG in twin gestations is a neglected area of research. Rigorous studies are needed to inform future evidence-based guidelines.

Bodnar, Lisa M.; Pugh, Sarah J.; Abrams, Barbara; Himes, Katherine P.; Hutcheon, Jennifer A.

2014-01-01

257

Comparing hospital perinatal mortality rates: a quality improvement instrument.  

PubMed

This article describes the development of a reliable measurement instrument for the quality of perinatal care. The Hospital Perinatal Mortality Comparison (HPMC) predicts the expected perinatal mortality for individual hospitals, based on the perinatal mortality experienced in a group of similar newborns in a large reference population. Out of the 76 hospitals analyzed in 1990, 2 performed significantly better and 5 performed significantly worse than expected according to the logistic regression model. These results may lead to the identification of opportunities for improving the process of medical care in these hospitals. PMID:8366682

Holthof, B; Prins, P

1993-09-01

258

Dual role of astrocytes in perinatal asphyxia injury and neuroprotection.  

PubMed

Perinatal asphyxia represents an important cause of severe neurological deficits including delayed mental and motor development, epilepsy, major cognitive deficits and blindness. However, at the moment, most of the therapeutic strategies were not well targeted toward the processes that induced the brain injury during perinatal asphyxia. Traditionally, experimental research focused on neurons, whereas astrocytes have been more related with the damage mechanisms of perinatal asphyxia. In this work, we propose to review possible protective as well as deleterious roles of astrocytes in the asphyctic brain with the aim to stimulate further research in this area of perinatal asphyxia still not well studied. PMID:24172702

Romero, J; Muñiz, J; Tornatore, T Logica; Holubiec, M; González, J; Barreto, G E; Guelman, L; Lillig, C H; Blanco, E; Capani, F

2014-04-17

259

Daily Maternal Counting of Fetal Movement as an Antenatal Screening Test. Part I. A Review  

PubMed Central

The author reviews use of maternal counting of fetal movements as an antenatal screening test. This test appears to be a sensitive indicator of fetal well-being and a useful method for preventing inexplicable stillbirths. Evidence suggests that it should be considered a routine antenatal screening test for all pregnant women, and not just for those at high risk for perinatal morbidity and mortality. Screening should begin at 28 weeks gestation.

Swanson, Richard W.

1988-01-01

260

Risk factors for maternal mortality in five Kampala hospitals, 1980-1986.  

PubMed

A case-control study assessing risk factors for maternal mortality was carried out in five Kampala hospitals covering a period of seven years (1 January 1980 to 31 December 1986). The major predictors of maternal mortality were the general condition on admission, the mode of delivery and the Apgar score of the newborn. These predictors indicate that women at high risk were those admitted to hospital for delivery in a poor state of health. We believe that the risk of maternal mortality can be reduced through appropriate action by health workers and that there is a need for a more complete view of risk factors for both maternal and perinatal mortality to be obtained through population-based studies rather than only those women who deliver in hospital. PMID:2083999

Kampikaho, A; Irwig, L M

1990-12-01

261

Pharmacologic prevention of perinatal HIV infection.  

PubMed

The goal of antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV is to achieve maximal suppression of maternal viral load with minimal maternal, fetal and infant toxicity during pregnancy, delivery and postpartum. In addition to the efficacy and toxicity of antiretroviral therapy, the consideration of HIV resistance in mothers and infected newborns further complicates therapeutic choices for PMTCT. This manuscript summarizes current approaches to PMTC in diverse international settings. PMID:24709447

Rakhmanina, Natella Y; van den Anker, Johannes N

2014-03-01

262

Role of Maternal Reflective Ability for Substance Abusing Mothers  

PubMed Central

This paper reports on a study designed to explore factors contributing to better outcomes for substance abusing pregnant and parenting women in residential treatment, and, as a result, contribute to better outcomes for their children. The setting was three live-in units focusing in supporting both abstinence from substances and mother-child relationship. Participants were 18 mother-baby pairs in treatment from perinatal phase to 4 months of child’s age. Pilot results demonstrated more sensitive maternal interaction tended to be associated with higher pre-and postnatal reflective functioning and better child developmental scores at 4 months of child’s age. Reflective functioning (RF) refers to the essential human capacity to understand behavior in light of underlying mental states and intentions. An indicated conclusion is that enhancement of maternal reflective ability seems an important focus in developing the content and effectiveness of interventions for substance abusing mothers.

Pajulo, Marjukka; Suchman, Nancy; Kalland, Mirjam; Sinkkonen, Jari; Helenius, Hans; Mayes, Linda

2009-01-01

263

Evidence for perinatal and child health care guidelines in crisis settings: can Cochrane help?  

PubMed Central

Background It is important that healthcare provided in crisis settings is based on the best available research evidence. We reviewed guidelines for child and perinatal health care in crisis situations to determine whether they were based on research evidence, whether Cochrane systematic reviews were available in the clinical areas addressed by these guidelines and whether summaries of these reviews were provided in Evidence Aid. Methods Broad internet searches were undertaken to identify relevant guidelines. Guidelines were appraised using AGREE and the clinical areas that were relevant to perinatal or child health were extracted. We searched The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify potentially relevant reviews. For each review we determined how many trials were included, and how many were conducted in resource-limited settings. Results Six guidelines met selection criteria. None of the included guidelines were clearly based on research evidence. 198 Cochrane reviews were potentially relevant to the guidelines. These reviews predominantly addressed nutrient supplementation, breastfeeding, malaria, maternal hypertension, premature labour and prevention of HIV transmission. Most reviews included studies from developing settings. However for large portions of the guidelines, particularly health services delivery, there were no relevant reviews. Only 18 (9.1%) reviews have summaries in Evidence Aid. Conclusions We did not identify any evidence-based guidelines for perinatal and child health care in disaster settings. We found many Cochrane reviews that could contribute to the evidence-base supporting future guidelines. However there are important issues to be addressed in terms of the relevance of the available reviews and increasing the number of reviews addressing health care delivery.

2010-01-01

264

Perinatal nicotine exposure eliminates peak in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor response in adolescent rats.  

PubMed

Maternal smoking is a risk factor associated with nicotine abuse, so the effect of perinatal nicotine exposure was studied on the responsiveness to nicotine across adolescence in the rat. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with s.c. Alzet osmotic minipumps delivering nicotine (L-nicotine hydrogen tartrate, 2 mg/kg/day free base) or vehicle (0.9% saline) on gestational day 7. There was no effect of nicotine on dam weight gain, food consumption, or water consumption or on the number of live pups or weights at the time of birth. Pups were cross-fostered to obtain the following prenatal/postnatal exposure groups: control/control, nicotine/nicotine, nicotine/control, and control/nicotine. On postnatal days 28, 35, 49, and 63, nicotine-stimulated (86)Rb(+) efflux was measured in synaptosomes prepared from the frontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum (STR), and thalamus (THL), using a previously developed method. Significant effects of treatment and concentration were detected in all four brain regions, and significant effects of age were observed in the STR and THL. Significant interactions of age and treatment were observed in each of the four brain regions. Nicotine-stimulated (86)Rb(+) efflux peaked during adolescence in control rats. However, perinatal exposure to nicotine eliminated this peak during adolescence. These results are consistent with recent behavioral and receptor binding results from other laboratories and are the first direct evidence at the cellular level that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor response varies during adolescence and is affected by perinatal nicotine exposure. PMID:17105825

Britton, Angela F; Vann, Robert E; Robinson, Susan E

2007-02-01

265

Changes in adaptability following perinatal morphine exposure in juvenile and adult rats.  

PubMed

The problem of drug abuse among pregnant women causes a major concern. The aim of the present study was to examine the adaptive consequences of long term maternal morphine exposure in offspring at different postnatal ages, and to see the possibility of compensation, as well. Pregnant rats were treated daily with morphine from the day of mating (on the first two days 5mg/kgs.c. than 10mg/kg) until weaning. Male offspring of dams treated with physiological saline served as control. Behavior in the elevated plus maze (EPM; anxiety) and forced swimming test (FST; depression) as well as adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone hormone levels were measured at postpartum days 23-25 and at adult age. There was only a tendency of spending less time in the open arms of the EPM in morphine treated rats at both ages, thus, the supposed anxiogenic impact of perinatal exposure with morphine needs more focused examination. In response to 5min FST morphine exposed animals spent considerable longer time with floating and shorter time with climbing at both ages which is an expressing sign of depression-like behavior. Perinatal morphine exposure induced a hypoactivity of the stress axis (adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone elevations) to strong stimulus (FST). Our results show that perinatal morphine exposure induces long term depression-like changes. At the same time the reactivity to the stress is failed. These findings on rodents presume that the progenies of morphine users could have lifelong problems in adaptive capability and might be prone to develop psychiatric disorders. PMID:21147096

Klausz, Barbara; Pintér, Ottó; Sobor, Melinda; Gyarmati, Zsuzsa; Fürst, Zsuzsanna; Tímár, Júlia; Zelena, Dóra

2011-03-01

266

Effect of khat on maternal food intake, maternal weight gain and fetal growth in the late-pregnant guinea pig.  

PubMed

Khat chewing is a widespread male social habit in countries around the southern shore of the Red Sea and in eastern Africa and is also practiced by women, even during pregnancy and lactation. In order to study the potentially adverse effects of khat chewing during pregnancy, guinea pigs were fed 2.2 g/kg of khat leaves daily throughout the third trimester. Control animals were given aspen leaves. Maternal daily food intake was significantly reduced during the first 10 days of feeding and maternal weight gain was slightly lower in the khat group. Khat feeding of the mother significantly reduced the mean birth weight of the offspring by 7% without any effect on litter size or length of gestational period. Since low birth weight is a well-established risk factor for both perinatal and young infant death, khat chewing during pregnancy may be one of the factors contributing to infant mortality. PMID:3419198

Jansson, T; Kristiansson, B; Qirbi, A

1988-01-01

267

Psychological stressors as a model of maternal adversity: diurnal modulation of corticosterone responses and changes in maternal behavior.  

PubMed

Maternal adversity is associated with long-lasting consequences on cognitive development, behavior and physiological responses in rat offspring. Few studies have examined whether repeated maternal stress produces repeated activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in mothers and whether it modifies maternal behavior. Here, we tested a novel model of perinatal stress using repeated exposure to "purely" psychological stressors throughout the gestation and lactation periods in rats. We first tested the diurnal influences of repeated 1-h strobe light exposure on maternal corticosterone secretion. Despite the hyporesponsiveness to stress documented in late pregnant and lactating mothers, we observed an enhanced response to strobe light in the afternoon compared to the morning in stressed mothers during lactation. Next, dams were exposed to 24-h forced foraging followed by 10-h wet bedding during the diurnal peak of corticosterone secretion. Although no corticosterone responses to forced foraging and wet bedding were observed, the combination of both stressors had a significant effect on maternal behavior. Mother-pup interactions were significantly altered during the first 8 days of lactation. Taken together, these findings suggest that lactating mothers maintain responsiveness to specific and repeated psychological stressors, in particular at the time of the diurnal peak in corticosterone secretion. Depending on the stressor applied, either neuroendocrine activation or changes in maternal behavior might be important determinants of the long-term consequences in the offspring. The combination of forced foraging, wet bedding and strobe light might represent a novel model of mild maternal adversity using "purely" psychological stressors. PMID:17034794

Léonhardt, Marion; Matthews, Stephen G; Meaney, Michael J; Walker, Claire-Dominique

2007-01-01

268

Some Animal Models for the Study of Perinatal Asphyxia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of our current understanding concerning the pathophysiology of perinatal brain disorders has evolved from animal studies over the past three decades. Fetal and neonatal nonhuman primate, pregnant sheep, lamb, puppy, piglet and immature rodents, all have been important animal models for perinatal brain research. Although no model can be considered Ê?perfect’ in reflecting the variety and complexity of human

Tonse N. K Raju

1992-01-01

269

Mozambican Midwives' Views on Barriers to Quality Perinatal Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our purpose in this study was to explore the midwives' perception of factors obstructing or facilitating their ability to provide quality perinatal care at a central labor ward in Maputo. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 16 midwives and were analyzed according to grounded theory technique. Barriers to provision of quality perinatal care were identified as follows: (i) the unsupportive environment,

Karen Odberg Pettersson; Eva Johansson; Maria de Fatima M. Pelembe; Clemencia Dgedge; Kyllike Christensson

2006-01-01

270

Perinatal Mental Health: Opportunities and Challenges for Psychiatry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Developments in public mental health policy in Australia and a renewed focus on the preventative importance of the early postnatal years have recently brought perinatal mental health to the fore. The present paper aims to explore the meaning of ‘perinatal mental health’ and its relevance to psychiatry, and to examine the opportunities and challenges currently facing Australian psychiatrists in

Marie-Paule Austin

2003-01-01

271

Modifying CBT for Perinatal Depression: What Do Women Want?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The evidence for the efficacy of CBT for depression during the perinatal period is mixed. This was a qualitative study that aimed to understand the perinatal-specific needs of depressed women in an effort to inform treatment modifications that may increase the relevance and acceptability of CBT during this period. Stratified purposeful sampling…

O'Mahen, Heather; Fedock, Gina; Henshaw, Erin; Himle, Joseph A.; Forman, Jane; Flynn, Heather A.

2012-01-01

272

Asperger Syndrome: Familial and Pre- and Perinatal Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Study familial and pre- and perinatal factors in Asperger Syndrome (AS). Methods: Hundred boys with AS had their records reviewed. "Pathogenetic subgroups" were defined according to presence of medical syndromes/chromosomal abnormalities, indices of familiarity, and pre- and perinatal risk factors predisposing to brain damage. Results:…

Gillberg, Christopher; Cederlund, Mats

2005-01-01

273

Prenatal and perinatal risk factors of schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Schizophrenia could be considered the most severe of all psychiatric disorders. It shows a heterogeneous clinical picture and presents an etiopathogenesis that is not cleared sufficiently. Even if the etiopathogenesis remains a puzzle, there is a scientific consensus that it is an expression of interaction between genotype and environmental factors. In the present article, following a study of literature and the accumulated evidence, the role of prenatal and perinatal factors in the development of schizophrenia will be revised and synthesized. We think that better knowledge of the risk factors could be helpful not only for better comprehension of the pathogenesis but especially to optimize interventions for prevention of the disorder. PMID:22646662

Meli, Giampiero; Ottl, Birgit; Paladini, Angela; Cataldi, Luigi

2012-12-01

274

Perinatal management of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.  

PubMed

Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) retains high mortality due to lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. Efforts to improve survival and outcome have included fetal intervention, delivery at specialist centres, elective operation after stabilisation of labile physiology and minimising barotrauma. Permissive hypercapnea ('gentle ventilation') represents a significant advance in therapy gaining wider acceptance in centres worldwide. Human genetic studies are underway to identify candidate genes for the birth defect. Progress in the basic sciences may uncover critical aspects of developmental biology fundamental to CDH. Clinical trends in perinatal management of CDH are highlighted, which underpin the challenges of this lethal human anomaly. PMID:16616439

Conforti, Andrea F; Losty, Paul D

2006-05-01

275

Nutritional manipulations in the perinatal period program adipose tissue in offspring.  

PubMed

Epidemiological studies demonstrated initially that maternal undernutrition results in low birth weight with increased risk for long-lasting energy balance disorders. Maternal obesity and diabetes associated with high birth weight, excessive nutrition in neonates, and rapid catchup growth also increase the risk of adult-onset obesity. As stated by the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease concept, nutrient supply perturbations in the fetus or neonate result in long-term programming of individual body weight set point. Adipose tissue is a key fuel storage unit involved mainly in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Studies in numerous animal models have demonstrated that the adipose tissue is the focus of developmental programming events in a sex- and depot-specific manner. In rodents, adipose tissue development is particularly active during the perinatal period, especially during the last week of gestation and during early postnatal life. In contrast to rodents, this process essentially takes place before birth in bigger mammals. Despite these different developmental time windows, altricial and precocial species share several mechanisms of adipose tissue programming. Offspring from malnourished dams present adipose tissue with a series of alterations: impaired glucose uptake, insulin and leptin resistance, low-grade inflammation, modified sympathetic activity with reduced noradrenergic innervations, and thermogenesis. These modifications reprogram adipose tissue metabolism by changing fat distribution and composition and by enhancing adipogenesis, predisposing the offspring to fat accumulation. Subtle adipose tissue circadian rhythm changes are also observed. Inappropriate hormone levels, modified tissue sensitivity (especially glucocorticoid system), and epigenetic mechanisms are key factors for adipose tissue programming during the perinatal period. PMID:24045869

Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Eberlé, Delphine; Vieau, Didier; Breton, Christophe

2013-11-15

276

Prenatal Exposure to Persistent Organochlorines and Childhood Obesity in the U.S. Collaborative Perinatal Project  

PubMed Central

Background: In some previous studies, prenatal exposure to persistent organochlorines such as 1,1,-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p´-DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) has been associated with higher body mass index (BMI) in children. Objective: Our goal was to evaluate the association of maternal serum levels of ?-hexachlorocyclohexane (?-HCH), p,p´-DDE, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p´-DDT), dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, HCB, trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, and PCBs with offspring obesity during childhood. Methods: The analysis was based on a subsample of 1,915 children followed until 7 years of age as part of the U.S. Collaborative Perinatal Project (CPP). The CPP enrolled pregnant women in 1959–1965; exposure levels were measured in third-trimester maternal serum that was collected before these organochlorines were banned in the United States. Childhood overweight and obesity were defined using age- and sex-specific cut points for BMI as recommended by the International Obesity Task Force. Results: Adjusted results did not show clear evidence for an association between organochlorine exposure and obesity; however, a suggestive finding emerged for dieldrin. Compared with those in the lowest quintile (dieldrin, < 0.57 ?g/L), odds of obesity were 3.6 (95% CI: 1.3, 10.5) for the fourth and 2.3 (95% CI: 0.8, 7.1) for the highest quintile. Overweight and BMI were unrelated to organochlorine exposure. Conclusions: In this population with relatively high levels of exposure to organochlorines, no clear associations with obesity or BMI emerged. Citation: Cupul-Uicab LA, Klebanoff MA, Brock JW, Longnecker MP. 2013. Prenatal exposure to persistent organochlorines and childhood obesity in the U.S. Collaborative Perinatal Project. Environ Health Perspect 121:1103–1109;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1205901

Klebanoff, Mark A.; Brock, John W.; Longnecker, Matthew P.

2013-01-01

277

Use of Wigglesworth pathophysiological classification for perinatal mortality in Malaysia.  

PubMed Central

A one year prospective study of perinatal deaths was conducted to test the feasibility of using the Wigglesworth pathophysiological classification in the Malaysian health service. Four regions with high perinatal mortality rates were selected. Deaths were actively identified. Nursing staff were trained to use the classification and every death was reviewed by a clinician. A total of 26,198 births and 482 perinatal deaths were reported. The perinatal mortality rate was 18.4. Only 14 (2.9%) deaths had their Wigglesworth category reclassified. Most deaths were in the normally formed macerated stillbirths (34.4%), asphyxial conditions (26.8%), and immaturity (20.1%) subgroups. The results were compared with data from other countries that used this classification. This study has shown that the Wigglesworth pathophysiological classification can be applied to perinatal deaths in the existing Malaysian health service.

Amar, H. S.; Maimunah, A. H.; Wong, S. L.

1996-01-01

278

Use of Wigglesworth pathophysiological classification for perinatal mortality in Malaysia.  

PubMed

A one year prospective study of perinatal deaths was conducted to test the feasibility of using the Wigglesworth pathophysiological classification in the Malaysian health service. Four regions with high perinatal mortality rates were selected. Deaths were actively identified. Nursing staff were trained to use the classification and every death was reviewed by a clinician. A total of 26,198 births and 482 perinatal deaths were reported. The perinatal mortality rate was 18.4. Only 14 (2.9%) deaths had their Wigglesworth category reclassified. Most deaths were in the normally formed macerated stillbirths (34.4%), asphyxial conditions (26.8%), and immaturity (20.1%) subgroups. The results were compared with data from other countries that used this classification. This study has shown that the Wigglesworth pathophysiological classification can be applied to perinatal deaths in the existing Malaysian health service. PMID:8653438

Amar, H S; Maimunah, A H; Wong, S L

1996-01-01

279

Antenatal care packages with reduced visits and perinatal mortality: a secondary analysis of the WHO Antenatal Care Trial  

PubMed Central

Background In 2001, the WHO Antenatal Care Trial (WHOACT) concluded that an antenatal care package of evidence-based screening, therapeutic interventions and education across four antenatal visits for low-risk women was not inferior to standard antenatal care and may reduce cost. However, an updated Cochrane review in 2010 identified an increased risk of perinatal mortality of borderline statistical significance in three cluster-randomized trials (including the WHOACT) in developing countries. We conducted a secondary analysis of the WHOACT data to determine the relationship between the reduced visits, goal-oriented antenatal care package and perinatal mortality. Methods Exploratory analyses were conducted to assess the effect of baseline risk and timing of perinatal death. Women were stratified by baseline risk to assess differences between intervention and control groups. We used linear modeling and Poisson regression to determine the relative risk of fetal death, neonatal death and perinatal mortality by gestational age. Results 12,568 women attended the 27 intervention clinics and 11,958 women attended the 26 control clinics. 6,160 women were high risk and 18,365 women were low risk. There were 161 fetal deaths (1.4%) in the intervention group compared to 119 fetal deaths in the control group (1.1%) with an increased overall adjusted relative risk of fetal death (Adjusted RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.03, 1.58). This was attributable to an increased relative risk of fetal death between 32 and 36 weeks of gestation (Adjusted RR 2.24; 95% CI 1.42, 3.53) which was statistically significant for high and low risk groups. Conclusion It is plausible the increased risk of fetal death between 32 and 36 weeks gestation could be due to reduced number of visits, however heterogeneity in study populations or differences in quality of care and timing of visits could also be playing a role. Monitoring maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes when implementing antenatal care protocols is essential. Implementing reduced visit antenatal care packages demands careful monitoring of maternal and perinatal outcomes, especially fetal death.

2013-01-01

280

Human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus co-infection in pregnant women and perinatal transmission to infants in Thailand  

PubMed Central

Summary Objectives The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence and factors associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and -uninfected Thai pregnant women and the rate of HCV transmission to their infants. Patients and methods Study subjects included 1435 HIV-infected pregnant women and their infants, enrolled in a perinatal HIV prevention trial, and a control group of 448 HIV-uninfected pregnant women. Women were screened for HCV antibodies with an enzyme immunoassay. Positive results were confirmed by recombinant immunoblot and HCV RNA quantification. Infants were tested for HCV antibodies at 18 months or for HCV RNA at between 6 weeks and 6 months. Results Of the HIV-infected women, 2.9% were HCV-infected compared to 0.5% of HIV-uninfected women (p = 0.001). Only history of intravenous drug use was associated with HCV infection in HIV-infected women. Ten percent of infants born to co-infected mothers acquired HCV. The risk of transmission was associated with a high maternal HCV RNA (p = 0.012), but not with HIV-1 load or CD4 count. Conclusions Acquisition of HCV through intravenous drug use partially explains the higher rate of HCV infection in HIV-infected Thai women than in HIV-uninfected controls. Perinatal transmission occurred in 10% of infants of HIV–HCV-co-infected mothers and was associated with high maternal HCV RNA.

Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Jourdain, Gonzague; Siriungsi, Wasna; Decker, Luc; Khamduang, Woottichai; Le Coeur, Sophie; Sirinontakan, Surat; Somsamai, Rosalin; Pagdi, Karin; Hemvuttiphan, Jittapol; McIntosh, Kenneth; Barin, Francis; Lallemant, Marc

2010-01-01

281

Perinatal cardiac arrest. Quality of the survivors.  

PubMed Central

Steiner, H., and Neligan, G. (1975). Archives of Disease in Childhood, 50, 696. Perinatal cardiac arrest: quality of the survivors. Twenty-two consecutive survivors of perinatal cardiac arrest have been followed to a mean age of 4 1/4 years, using methods of neurological and developmental assessment appropriate to their ages. 4 showed evidence of gross, diffuse brain-damage (2 of these died before the age of 3 years). These were the only 4 survivors of the first month of life who took more than 30 minutes to establish regular, active respiration after their heartbeat had been restored. The arrest in these cases had occurred during or within 15 minutes of delivery, and followed antepartum haemorrhage, breech delivery, or prolapsed cord. The remaining 18 were free of any evidence of brain damage. In the majority of these the arrest had occurred during shoulder dystocia or exchange transfusion, or was unexplained; the heartbeat had been restored within 5 minutes in most cases, and regular, active respiration had been established within 30 minutes thereafter in all cases.

Steiner, H; Neligan, G

1975-01-01

282

Perinatal mortality in pregnancies with omphalocele: data from the Chinese national birth defects monitoring network, 1996-2006  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies on the mortality rate of omphalocele are limited. The risk of death of non-isolated omphalocele and that of cases of omphalocele that are diagnosed prenatally by ultrasound are unclear. This study aimed to estimate the perinatal mortality of pregnancies with omphalocele. This study also examined the potential risk of death of non-isolated omphalocele and that of cases that are prenatally diagnosed by ultrasound. Methods Data were retrieved from the national birth defects registry in China, for 1996–2006. Multinomial logistic regression was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between perinatal mortality and selected maternal and fetal characteristics. Results Among 827 cases of omphalocele, 309 (37.4%) cases resulted in termination of pregnancy and stillbirth, and 124 (15.0%) cases resulted in death in the first 7 days after delivery, yielding a perinatal mortality rate of 52.4% (95% CI: 49.0–55.8%). The late fetal death rate (LFDR) of omphalocele that was diagnosed prenatally by ultrasound was 15.91-fold (AOR: 15.91, 95% CI: 10.18–24.87) higher than that of postnatally diagnosed cases. The LFDR of non-isolated omphalocele was 2.64-fold (AOR: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.62–4.29) higher than that of isolated cases. For the early neonatal death rate, neonates with non-isolated omphalocele had a 2.96-fold (AOR: 2.96, 95% CI: 1.82–4.81) higher risk than isolated cases, but the difference between prenatal ultrasound diagnosis and postnatal diagnosis was not significant. Conclusions Selected fetal characteristics are significantly associated with the perinatal risk of death from omphalocele. Our findings suggest that improving pregnancy and delivery care, as well as management for omphalocele are important.

2014-01-01

283

Systematic review of effect of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality  

PubMed Central

Background The objective was to provide a systematic review of the effectiveness of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality. Methods We searched published papers using Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, CINAHL, BNI, CAB ABSTRACTS, IBSS, Web of Science, LILACS and African Index Medicus from inception or at least 1982 to June 2006; searched unpublished works using National Research Register website, metaRegister and the WHO International Trial Registry portal. We hand searched major references. Selection criteria were maternity or childbearing age women, comparative study designs with concurrent controls, community-level interventions and maternal death as an outcome. We carried out study selection, data abstraction and quality assessment independently in duplicate. Results We found five cluster randomised controlled trials (RCT) and eight cohort studies of community-level interventions. We summarised results as odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI), combined using the Peto method for meta-analysis. Two high quality cluster RCTs, aimed at improving perinatal care practices, showed a reduction in maternal mortality reaching statistical significance (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.98). Three equivalence RCTs of minimal goal-oriented versus usual antenatal care showed no difference in maternal mortality (1.09, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.25). The cohort studies were of low quality and did not contribute further evidence. Conclusion Community-level interventions of improved perinatal care practices can bring about a reduction in maternal mortality. This challenges the view that investment in such interventions is not worthwhile. Programmes to improve maternal mortality should be evaluated using randomised controlled techniques to generate further evidence.

Kidney, Elaine; Winter, Heather R; Khan, Khalid S; Gulmezoglu, A Metin; Meads, Catherine A; Deeks, Jonathan J; MacArthur, Christine

2009-01-01

284

Perinatal bisphenol A exposure promotes dose-dependent alterations of the mouse methylome  

PubMed Central

Background Environmental factors during perinatal development may influence developmental plasticity and disease susceptibility via alterations to the epigenome. Developmental exposure to the endocrine active compound, bisphenol A (BPA), has previously been associated with altered methylation at candidate gene loci. Here, we undertake the first genome-wide characterization of DNA methylation profiles in the liver of murine offspring exposed perinatally to multiple doses of BPA through the maternal diet. Results Using a tiered focusing approach, our strategy proceeds from unbiased broad DNA methylation analysis using methylation-based next generation sequencing technology to in-depth quantitative site-specific CpG methylation determination using the Sequenom EpiTYPER MassARRAY platform to profile liver DNA methylation patterns in offspring maternally exposed to BPA during gestation and lactation to doses ranging from 0 BPA/kg (Ctr), 50 ?g BPA/kg (UG), or 50 mg BPA/kg (MG) diet (N?=?4 per group). Genome-wide analyses indicate non-monotonic effects of DNA methylation patterns following perinatal exposure to BPA, corroborating previous studies using multiple doses of BPA with non-monotonic outcomes. We observed enrichment of regions of altered methylation (RAMs) within CpG island (CGI) shores, but little evidence of RAM enrichment in CGIs. An analysis of promoter regions identified several hundred novel BPA-associated methylation events, and methylation alterations in the Myh7b and Slc22a12 gene promoters were validated. Using the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, a number of candidate genes that have previously been associated with BPA-related gene expression changes were identified, and gene set enrichment testing identified epigenetically dysregulated pathways involved in metabolism and stimulus response. Conclusions In this study, non-monotonic dose dependent alterations in DNA methylation among BPA-exposed mouse liver samples and their relevant pathways were identified and validated. The comprehensive methylome map presented here provides candidate loci underlying the role of early BPA exposure and later in life health and disease status.

2014-01-01

285

Parental and Perinatal Correlates of Neonatal Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the analyses of antecedent correlates of the behavior of 60 infants as measured by the Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Scale on the third day after birth. The data include two sets of antecedent variables: maternal adaptation to pregnancy as reported in prenatal interviews and measured describing the conditions of labor and…

Standley, Kay

286

Maternal health outcomes in Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To use PERISTAT data on indicators of maternal mortality and morbidity to explore maternal health outcomes in Europe, and to discuss the implications of variations in the data sources for these indicators. Study design: The PERISTAT feasibility study provides the source for this descriptive study, covering 15 European countries. Maternal mortality ratios are calculated, and data to describe maternal

Sophie Alexander; Katherine Wildman; Weihong Zhang; Martin Langer; Christian Vutuc; Gunilla Lindmarke

287

Incidence of nuchal cord, mode of delivery and perinatal outcome: a notable experience in Dhulikhel Hospital - Kathmandu University Hospital.  

PubMed

With the advent of ultrasound as a means of providing quality antenatal care, there is an increase in the diagnosis of nuchal cord in fetuses. The major cause of foetal or neonatal death during labor and in postpartum period is birth asphyxia and tight nuchal cord is a cause of birth asphyxia. Whilst there are instances in which fetuses with 3 to 4 loops of cord around the neck have been delivered by normal vaginal delivery, some cases have to be delivered by caesarean section due to foetal distress caused by a single loop of cord around the neck. The reason for conducting this study was also to analyze the incidence and other aspects of nuchal cord. Dhulikhel Hospital labour registry was reviewed between Jan 2010 and Dec 2011. A total of 289 cases with at least one loop of nuchal cord were recorded as study case. For comparison, 965 controls were randomly selected from the 4219 unaffected singleton births delivered during the same time period. Of 1254 neonates, nuchal cord was present at 6.85% of deliveries (n = 289). Of these the incidence was 6.57% at preterm, 49.13% at term, 39.79% at postdated and 4.50% at postterm. A total of 151 had one loop and 138 had two or more loops. There was significant difference in the maternal age and birth weight of among three groups (control, with one loop and with two or more loops) in this study (p = 0.002) and (p = 0.000) respectively. However, the incidence was not affected by caste, parity, gestational age, antenatal site, neonatal intensive care unit admission and other perinatal complications. Most were primigravida (62.98%) and about 85.12% were delivered vaginally but caesarean section had to be done in 30 cases. And 2.8% cases required neonatal intensive care unit admission for prematurity. Obstetrician working in the periphery should refer the clients to a tertiary care center to confirm a suspicion of nuchal cord (non-engaged foetal head, decreased foetal movements, meconium stained liquor, foetal distress or malpresentation etc.) and also as a routine basis for ultrasound. Clients with confirmed complication should be managed in tertiary hospitals or institutions with the facility of ultrasound, cardiotocography and emergency surgery. This would improve the health of both the mother and fetus. PMID:24592793

Tamrakar, S R

2013-03-01

288

Perinatal Exposure to Low-Dose Methoxychlor Impairs Testicular Development in C57BL/6 Mice  

PubMed Central

Methoxychlor (MXC), an organochlorine pesticide, has adverse effects on male reproduction at toxicological doses. Humans and wild animals are exposed to MXC mostly through contaminated dietary intake. Higher concentrations of MXC have been found in human milk, raising the demand for the risk assessment of offspring after maternal exposure to low doses of MXC. In this study, pregnant mice (F0) were given intraperitoneal daily evening injections of 1 mg/kg/d MXC during their gestational (embryonic day 0.5, E0.5) and lactational periods (postnatal day 21.5, P21.5), and the F1 males were assessed. F1 testes were collected at P0.5, P21.5 and P45.5. Maternal exposure to MXC disturbed the testicular development. Serum testosterone levels decreased, whereas estradiol levels increased. To understand the molecular mechanisms of exposure to MXC in male reproduction, the F1 testes were examined for changes in the expression of steroidogenesis- and spermatogenesis- related genes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that MXC significantly decreased Cyp11a1 and increased Cyp19a1; furthermore, it downregulated certain spermatogenic genes (Dazl, Boll, Rarg, Stra8 and Cyclin-a1). In summary, perinatal exposure to low-dose MXC disturbs the testicular development in mice. This animal study of exposure to low-dose MXC in F1 males suggests similar dysfunctional effects on male reproduction in humans.

Du, Xiaohong; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Yuanwu; Yu, Wanpeng; Huang, Chaobin; Li, Xiangdong

2014-01-01

289

Perinatal characteristics and bone cancer risk in offspring - a Scandinavian population-based study.  

PubMed

Abstract Background. We investigated perinatal factors in relation to bone cancer subtypes, osteosarcoma (OS), Ewing Sarcoma (ES) and chondrosarcoma (CS). Materials and methods. All cases in Norway (1970-2009), Sweden (1974-2009) and Denmark (1980-2010) < 43 years were included (n = 914); 10 controls per case were selected from birth registries (which provided information on pregnancies) matched on birth country, sex and birth year (n = 9140). Unconditional logistic regression models including sex and birth year were used to compute relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results. Higher maternal education was associated with a 40% increase in OS risk (95% CI 1-93%). The RR for OS was 3.22 (95% CI 1.37-7.59) comparing offspring of hypertensive mothers with those of mothers with a normotensive pregnancy, and Cesarean section was associated with a 29% risk reduction (95% CI 0-50%). When gestational age, birth weight and birth length were assessed simultaneously, there were no associations with any of the bone tumor subtypes. Conclusion. These results provided little evidence of an important role of pregnancy factors in the etiology of bone cancers. Higher maternal education may be associated with factors, possibly early nutrition or other correlates of socioeconomic status, that increase OS risk in offspring. The elevated OS risk associated with gestational hypertension and reduced risk associated with Cesarean section warrant replication. PMID:24313390

Troisi, Rebecca; Stephansson, Olof; Jacobsen, Jacob; Tretli, Steinar; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Gissler, Mika; Kaaja, Risto; Ekbom, Anders; Hoover, Robert N; Grotmol, Tom

2014-06-01

290

The effect of perinatal exposures on the infant: antidepressants and depression.  

PubMed

Depression, anxiety, or both, during pregnancy are common complications during the perinatal period, with 15-20% of women experiencing depression at some point during their pregnancy. Considerable evidence suggests that untreated or undertreated maternal Axis I mood disorders can increase the risk for preterm birth, low birth weight, and alter neurobehavioral development in utero. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants are often considered for antenatal therapy, with the goal of improving maternal mental health during pregnancy. Treatment with a serotonin-reuptake inhibitor, however, does not guarantee remission of depression, and in-utero serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure has also been linked to increased risks for adverse infant outcomes. In this chapter, evidence linking serotonin reuptake inhibitor use with an increased risk for postnatal adaptation syndrome, congenital heart defects, and neonatal persistent pulmonary hypertension is reviewed. Management decisions should include attention to the continuum of depression symptoms, from subclinical to severe major depressive disorder and the long-term developmental risks that might also be associated with pre- and postnatal exposure. PMID:24100223

Hanley, Gillian E; Oberlander, Tim F

2014-01-01

291

Brain pertechnetate SPECT in perinatal asphyxia  

SciTech Connect

Single photon emission computed tomography of the brain was performed in 6 patients with perinatal asphyxis aged 8-26 days. A single-head (LFOV) commercial SPECT system (Picker) was used and data were acquired 2-3 hr after an IV injection of 1-2 mCi Tc-99m-pertechnetate (360/sup 0/ rotation, 60 views, 64 x 64 matrix, 50K cts/view). Reconstruction in three planes was performed using MDS software (Hanning medium resolution filter, with or without attenuation correction using Sorenson's technique). For each clinical study, a ring type phantom source was used to identify the level of reconstruction noise in the tomographic planes. Abnormalities were found in all patients studied, 3 central (moderate intensity), 2 peripheral (1 severe, 1 moderate) and 1 diffuse (mild intensity). Despite use of oral perchlorate (50 mg) in one patient the choroid plexus was visible. Since attenuation correction tended to amplify noise, the clinical studies were interpreted both with and without this correction. All 3 patients with central lesions were found abnormal on early (1-4 mo) neurologic follow-up examination, whereas the others were normal. No correlation was found between SPECT and 24 hr blood levels of CPK, ammonia, base excess, or the Apgar scores. Ct scans were reported abnormal (3 diffuse, 1 peripheral, 1 central and 1 questionable). Planar scintigrams obtained immediately after SPECT were normal (2), questionable (2) and abnormal (2). Follow-up SPECT brain scintigrams in two of the patients showed partial resolution. SPECT of the brain appears promising in perinatal asphyxia but long-term correlation with patient development is necessary.

Sfakianakis, G.; Curless, R.; Goldberg, R.; Clarke, L.; Saw, C.; Sfakianakis, E.; Bloom, F.; Bauer, C.; Serafini, A.

1984-01-01

292

Women's Education Level, Maternal Health Facilities, Abortion Legislation and Maternal Deaths: A Natural Experiment in Chile from 1957 to 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe aim of this study was to assess the main factors related to maternal mortality reduction in large time series available in Chile in context of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).MethodsTime series of maternal mortality ratio (MMR) from official data (National Institute of Statistics, 1957–2007) along with parallel time series of education years, income per capita, fertility rate

Elard Koch; John Thorp; Miguel Bravo; Sebastián Gatica; Camila X. Romero; Hernán Aguilera; Ivonne Ahlers

2012-01-01

293

Effect of Sustained Maternal Hyperglycaemia on the Fetus in Normal and Diabetic Pregnancies  

PubMed Central

The effect of prolonged maternal hyperglycaemia on fetal plasma glucose and insulin concentrations was investigated in eight normal and nine diabetic patients. It was found that under fasting conditions the fetal glucose concentration in gestational diabetic pregnancies tended to be lower than in normal pregnancies. Insulin measurements suggested that this may be due to fetal hyperinsulinism in the diabetic group. During glucose infusion, regardless of the degree of maternal hyperglycaemia, the fetal glucose concentration was limited in 12 out of 13 cases to less than 200 mg/100 ml, with only small differences between normal and diabetic pregnancies. It is proposed that the placenta prevents unlimited transport of glucose to the fetus; yet in diabetic pregnancies a sequence of increased maternal-fetal glucose transport, fetal hyperinsulinism, and fetal hypoglycaemia may contribute to the observed perinatal mortality.

Oakley, N. W.; Beard, R. W.; Turner, R. C.

1972-01-01

294

Biological effects of a maternal ED on pregnancy and foetal development: a review.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper was to review the literature on the biological effects of a maternal eating disorder (ED) (and relevant comorbidities) in pregnancy on mothers and in particular on the foetus. We also aimed to highlight possible mechanisms of risk for long-term consequences in the offspring. Relevant literature was searched for using PubMed, PsychInfo and Google Scholar and manually through relevant research papers. The consequences of maternal EDs in pregnancy on EDs symptoms, psychopathology and perinatal outcomes are discussed. A developmental model of possible risk mechanisms for adverse long-term nutritional and psychopathological outcomes in the offspring is proposed. Maternal EDs during pregnancy are likely to have important long-term biological effects on the foetus. Further research needs to clarify potential biological risk mechanisms highlighted in this review. PMID:19851992

Micali, Nadia; Treasure, Janet

2009-11-01

295

Effect of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids during the perinatal period on later body composition.  

PubMed

A systematic review to identify studies reporting the effects of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) intake, during pregnancy and postnatally, on infants and young children's body composition was performed. A structured search strategy was performed in the MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and LILACS databases. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined according to the research question. Only those studies addressing the relationship between n-3 LCPUFA exposure during the perinatal period and later adiposity measured in terms of weight, height, body mass index (BMI), skinfold thickness and/or circumferences were included regardless of the study design. Studies quality was scored and were thereafter categorised into those reporting on maternal intake of n-3 LCPUFA during pregnancy or lactation (6 publications) or on infant's n-3 LCPUFA intake (7 publications). Two studies showed inverse associations between maternal n-3 LCPUFA intake and children's later body composition (lower adiposity, BMI or body weight), two showed direct associations and no effects were observed in the remaining two studies. Among those studies focusing on n-3 LCPUFA intake through enriched infant formulas; three observed no effect on later body composition and two showed higher weight and adiposity with increased amounts of n-3 LCPUFA. Reversely, in two studies weight and fat mass decreased. In conclusion, reported body composition differences in infants and young children were not clearly explained by perinatal n-3 LCPUFA intake via supplemented formulas, breastfeeding or maternal intakes of n-3 LCPUFA during pregnancy and lactation. Associated operational mechanisms including n-3 LCPUFA doses and sources applied are not sufficiently explained and therefore no conclusions could be made. PMID:22591886

Rodríguez, G; Iglesia, I; Bel-Serrat, S; Moreno, L A

2012-06-01

296

[Maternal death: unequal risks].  

PubMed

Nearly 99% of maternal deaths in the world each year occur in developing countries. New efforts have recently been undertaken to combat maternal mortality through research and action. The medical causes of such deaths are coming to be better understood, but the social mechanisms remain poorly grasped. Maternal mortality rates in developing countries are difficult to interpret because they tend to exclude all deaths not occurring in health care facilities. The countries of Europe and North America have an average maternal mortality rate of 30/100,000 live births, representing about 6000 deaths each year. The developing countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America have rates of 270-640/100,000, representing some 492,000 deaths annually. For a true comparison of the risks of maternal mortality in different countries, the risk itself and the average number of children per woman must both be considered. A Nigerian woman has 375 times greater risk of maternal death than a Swedish woman, but since she has about 4 times more children, her lifetime risk of maternal death is over 1500 times greater than that of the Swedish woman. The principal medical causes of maternal death are known: hemorrhages due to placenta previa or retroplacental hematoma, mechanical dystocias responsible for uterine rupture, toxemia with eclampsia, septicemia, and malaria. The exact weight of abortion in maternal mortality is not known but is probably large. The possible measures for improving such rates are of 3 types: control of fertility to avoid early, late, or closely spaced pregnancies; effective medical surveillance of the pregnancy to reduce the risk of malaria, toxemia, and hemorrhage, and delivery in an obstetrical facility, especially for high-risk pregnancies. Differential access to high quality health care explains much of the difference between mortality rates in urban and rural, wealthy and impoverished areas of the same country. The social determinants of high maternal mortality rates include political, geographic, and economic mechanisms of exclusion which affect the vast majority of the population in developing countries. Political power is concentrated in the hands of relatively small groups whose decisions about such expenditures as health care are usually more favorable to the privileged. A consequence of the very unequal regional development in most Third World countries is that health, educational, and most other resources are concentrated in large cities and perhaps 1 or 2 strategic regions, leaving most of the population underserved. The low social position of women leaves them doubly vulnerable. The social factors adding to risks of maternal mortality should be considered in programs of prevention if the causes and not just the consequences are to be addressed. PMID:12281979

Defossez, A C; Fassin, D

1989-01-01

297

Prenatal and Perinatal Risk Factors for Autism in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a case–control study using 190 Han children with and without autism to investigate prenatal and perinatal risk\\u000a factors for autism in China. Cases were recruited through public special education schools and controls from regular public\\u000a schools in the same region (Tianjin), with frequency matching on sex and birth year. Unadjusted analyses identified seven\\u000a prenatal and seven perinatal risk

Xin Zhang; Cong-Chao Lv; Jiang Tian; Ru-Juan Miao; Wei Xi; Irva Hertz-Picciotto; Lihong Qi

2010-01-01

298

Endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation, and perinatal brain damage  

PubMed Central

Inflammation appears to play a role in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain damage in fetuses/infants born much before term. We raise the possibility that non-inflammatory phenomena induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which, in turn, leads to the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is followed by apoptosis-promoting processes and inflammation. Perhaps by these events, non-inflammatory stimuli lead to perinatal brain damage.

Bueter, Wolfgang; Dammann, Olaf; Leviton, Alan

2009-01-01

299

Nitrotyrosine in Human Neonatal Spinal Cord after Perinatal Asphyxia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Spinal cord injury has been reported after perinatal asphyxia in full-term neonates. Objectives: To examine the role of excessive nitric oxide production in perinatal spinal cord injury. Subjects and Methods: Tissue samples of 18 full-term neonates who died of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were analyzed for the presence of nitrotyrosine (NT). Results: NT was demonstrated in 5 of these 18 neonates.

Floris Groenendaal; Johannes Vles; Harry Lammers; Jan De Vente; Diane Smit; Peter G. J. Nikkels

2008-01-01

300

The Association Between Depression and Diabetes in the Perinatal Period  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both depression and diabetes are common in the perinatal period and result in serious consequences for mother and fetus. Although\\u000a the association between depression and diabetes is well established, few studies have examined the association between these\\u000a disorders during the perinatal period, when the etiology of depression and diabetes may differ from other periods over the\\u000a life course. This article

Laura J. Rasmussen-Torvik; Bernard L. Harlow

2010-01-01

301

Perinatal HIV transmission: developing country considerations.  

PubMed

In many developing countries, because the prevalence of maternal HIV infection is high (more than 30% in some sub-Saharan African countries) and the resources commonly used to prevent transmission in developed countries are generally not available, transmission of HIV from mother to infant is a devastating problem. Countries already experiencing infant mortality rates 10- to 20-fold greater than those in developed countries can expect a doubling of infant and childhood mortality due to HIV. Those infants who escape infection themselves can expect to be orphaned in early childhood. Low-cost antiviral therapy can reduce transmission substantially, but many countries do not have the infrastructure to screen pregnant women for HIV and appropriately treat the mothers and infants. In developing countries, reduction in maternal-child transmission is feasible, but will require substantial additional resources and a well-functioning obstetric care system. PMID:12530611

Goldenberg, R L; Stringer, J S A; Sinkala, M; Vermund, S H

2002-09-01

302

Obstetric Factors Related to Perinatal Brain Injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Labor and delivery are the culminating events of the maternal–fetal relationship. Although the outcome for mother and child\\u000a is favorable in the majority of cases, events may occur during parturition that affect the future neurological status of the\\u000a fetus. In this chapter, we will review the definitions, incidence, and pathophysiology of neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral\\u000a palsy, examine the impact that

Christopher S. Ennen; Ernest M. Graham

303

Magnitude of income-related disparities in adverse perinatal outcomes  

PubMed Central

Background To assess and compare multiple measurements of socioeconomic position (SEP) in order to determine the relationship with adverse perinatal outcomes across various contexts. Methods A birth registry, the Nova Scotia Atlee Perinatal Database, was confidentially linked to income tax and related information for the year in which delivery occurred. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine odds ratios between multiple indicators of SEP and multiple adverse perinatal outcomes in 117734 singleton births between 1988 and 2003. Models for after tax family income were also adjusted for neighborhood deprivation to gauge the relative magnitude of effects related to SEP at both levels. Effects of SEP were stratified by single- versus multiple-parent family composition, and by urban versus rural location of residence. Results The risk of small for gestational age and spontaneous preterm birth was higher across all the indicators of lower SEP, while risk for large for gestational age was lower across indicators of lower SEP. Higher risk of postneonatal death was demonstrated for several measures of lower SEP. Higher material deprivation in the neighborhood of residence was associated with increased risk for perinatal death, small for gestational age birth, and iatrogenic and spontaneous preterm birth. Family composition and urbanicity were shown to modify the association between income and some perinatal outcomes. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of understanding the definitions of SEP and the mechanisms that lead to the association between income and poor perinatal outcomes, and broadening the types of SEP measures used in some cases.

2014-01-01

304

Maternal Ultrasonography for the Antenatal Diagnosis of Surgically Significant Neonatal Anomalies  

PubMed Central

The increased use of ultrasonography in the management and evaluation of pregnancy has provided a unique opportunity to observe the anatomy of the developing fetus from 12 weeks gestation until term. Twenty-eight surgically important anatomic abnormalities have been diagnosed in utero by sonographic examinations at our affiliated institutions over the past three and a half years. These include ascites (five cases), gastroschisis (four cases), omphalocele (three cases), sacrococcygeal teratoma, cystic hygroma, hydrocele, duodenal atresia, multicystic kidney (two cases each), and one each of jejunal atresia, conjoined twins, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, urethral valves, urethral agenesis, and hydronephrosis secondary to reflux. Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonographic examination has signifcantly improved perinatal management. Elective caesarean section has benefited infants with lesions causing dystocia, such as sacrococcygeal teratoma, omphalocele, and conjoined twins. Advance notification of surgeons and neonatalogists has reduced the delays of postnatal evaluation and treatment that contribute, significantly, to complications and death. In addition, transfer of the pregnant mother carrying an infant with a significant surgical anomaly to a center with facilities for neonatal surgery and specialized postoperative care can be properly planned for in advance. In the near future, intrauterine fetal surgery or palliative intervention may provide increased salvage of patients with obstructive uropathy and diaphragmatic hernia, both of which carry high mortality rates secondary to in utero damage. Sonography has proven useful in following the dilatation of either intestinal or urinary tract structures in utero. In our hands, maternal sonography has improved the surgical care of the newborn and may open a new frontier of intrauterine fetal surgery in the future. ImagesFig. 1a.Fig. 1b.Fig. 2a.Fig. 2b.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6a.Fig. 6b.Fig. 6c.Fig. 7a.Fig. 7b.Fig. 8.

Canty, Timothy G.; Leopold, George R.; Wolf, Deborah A.

1981-01-01

305

The relationship between maternal attitudes and symptoms of depression and anxiety among pregnant and postpartum first-time mothers  

PubMed Central

Two studies examined the relationship between maternal attitudes and symptoms of depression and anxiety during pregnancy and the early postpartum period. In the first study, a measure of maternal attitudes, the Attitudes Toward Motherhood Scale (AToM), was developed and validated in a sample of first-time mothers. The AToM was found to have good internal reliability and convergent validity with cognitive biases and an existing measure of maternal attitudes. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses determined that the measure comprises three correlated factors: beliefs about others’ judgments, beliefs about maternal responsibility, and maternal role idealization. In the second study, we used the AToM to assess the relationship between maternal attitudes and other psychological variables. The factor structure of the measure was confirmed. Maternal attitudes predicted symptoms of depression and anxiety, and these attitudes had incremental predictive validity over general cognitive biases and interpersonal risk factors. Overall, the results of these studies suggest that maternal attitudes are related to psychological distress among first-time mothers during the transition to parenthood and may provide a useful means of identifying women who may benefit from intervention during the perinatal period.

Epperson, C. Neill; Barber, Jacques P.

2014-01-01

306

The relationship between maternal attitudes and symptoms of depression and anxiety among pregnant and postpartum first-time mothers.  

PubMed

Two studies examined the relationship between maternal attitudes and symptoms of depression and anxiety during pregnancy and the early postpartum period. In the first study, a measure of maternal attitudes, the Attitudes Toward Motherhood Scale (AToM), was developed and validated in a sample of first-time mothers. The AToM was found to have good internal reliability and convergent validity with cognitive biases and an existing measure of maternal attitudes. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses determined that the measure comprises three correlated factors: beliefs about others' judgments, beliefs about maternal responsibility, and maternal role idealization. In the second study, we used the AToM to assess the relationship between maternal attitudes and other psychological variables. The factor structure of the measure was confirmed. Maternal attitudes predicted symptoms of depression and anxiety, and these attitudes had incremental predictive validity over general cognitive biases and interpersonal risk factors. Overall, the results of these studies suggest that maternal attitudes are related to psychological distress among first-time mothers during the transition to parenthood and may provide a useful means of identifying women who may benefit from intervention during the perinatal period. PMID:24643422

Sockol, Laura E; Epperson, C Neill; Barber, Jacques P

2014-06-01

307

The implementation of unit-based perinatal mortality audit in perinatal cooperation units in the northern region of the Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Background Perinatal (mortality) audit can be considered to be a way to improve the careprocess for all pregnant women and their newborns by creating an opportunity to learn from unwanted events in the care process. In unit-based perinatal audit, the caregivers involved in cases that result in mortality are usually part of the audit group. This makes such an audit a delicate matter. Methods The purpose of this study was to implement unit-based perinatal mortality audit in all 15 perinatal cooperation units in the northern region of the Netherlands between September 2007 and March 2010. These units consist of hospital-based and independent community-based perinatal caregivers. The implementation strategy encompassed an information plan, an organization plan, and a training plan. The main outcomes are the number of participating perinatal cooperation units at the end of the project, the identified substandard factors (SSF), the actions to improve care, and the opinions of the participants. Results The perinatal mortality audit was implemented in all 15 perinatal cooperation units. 677 different caregivers analyzed 112 cases of perinatal mortality and identified 163 substandard factors. In 31% of cases the guidelines were not followed and in 23% care was not according to normal practice. In 28% of cases, the documentation was not in order, while in 13% of cases the communication between caregivers was insufficient. 442 actions to improve care were reported for ‘external cooperation’ (15%), ‘internal cooperation’ (17%), ‘practice organization’ (26%), ‘training and education’ (10%), and ‘medical performance’ (27%). Valued aspects of the audit meetings were: the multidisciplinary character (13%), the collective and non-judgmental search for substandard factors (21%), the perception of safety (13%), the motivation to reflect on one’s own professional performance (5%), and the inherent postgraduate education (10%). Conclusion Following our implementation strategy, the perinatal mortality audit has been successfully implemented in all 15 perinatal cooperation units. An important feature was our emphasis on the delicate character of the caregivers evaluating the care they provided. However, the actual implementation of the proposed actions for improving care is still a point of concern.

2012-01-01

308

Maternal smoking during pregnancy and anger temperament among adult offspring.  

PubMed

Maternal smoking during pregnancy has been consistently associated with aggressive behaviors among offspring across the life course. We posit that anger, as a precedent of aggression, may have mediated the association. The current study examines the relation between maternal smoking during pregnancy and anger proneness among the adult offspring. Participants were 611 adult offspring (ages 38-48 years) of mothers enrolled in the Collaborative Perinatal Project between 1959 and 1966 in Boston and Providence. Information on maternal smoking during pregnancy was collected during prenatal visits. Spielberger's trait anger scale was used to measure anger proneness which has two components: anger temperament and angry reaction. Results from the full sample analyses showed that offspring whose mother smoked one pack or more per day on average scored 1.7 higher in anger temperament T scores in comparison to offspring whose mother never smoked during pregnancy (?=1.7, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.1, 3.2). The fixed effects analyses among siblings that accounted for more confounding found a greater effect of around one standard deviation increase in anger temperament T scores corresponding to maternal smoking of one pack or more (?=7.4, 95% CI: 0.5, 14.4). We did not observe an association of maternal smoking during pregnancy with offspring angry reaction or other negative emotions including anxiety and depression. We concluded that prenatal exposure to heavy cigarette smoke was associated with an increased level of anger temperament, a stable personality trait that may carry the influence of prenatal smoking through the life course. PMID:21890149

Liu, Tianli; Gatsonis, Constantine A; Baylin, Ana; Kubzansky, Laura D; Loucks, Eric B; Buka, Stephen L

2011-12-01

309

Mental Health in Low-to-Moderate Risk Preterm, Low Birth Weight, and Small for Gestational Age Children at 4 to 5 Years: The Role of Early Maternal Parenting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The majority of children born preterm, with low birth weight, or small for gestational age are born with low-to-moderate risk (LTM), yet most research focuses on the high-risk group. Little is known about whether children with LTM perinatal risk are at greater risk for mental health problems, or what the role of early maternal

Westrupp, Elizabeth M.; Mensah, Fiona K.; Giallo, Rebecca; Cooklin, Amanda; Nicholson, Jan M.

2012-01-01

310

Vitamin D, vitamin A, maternal-perinatal considerations: old concepts, new insights, new questions.  

PubMed

Vitamins A and D are essential nutrients that play important roles in growth and development. Preterm and low birth weight infants have low levels of these nutrients and are at risk for developing detrimental health consequences associated with vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies. Preliminary data suggest that vitamin A and D supplementation is needed to prevent deficiency. More work is needed to define optimal doses, timing, and modes of administration to ensure that an adequate supply of these vitamins is available to meet the critical needs during pregnancy and in high-risk neonates. PMID:23445845

Murguía-Peniche, Teresa

2013-03-01

311

A thematic analysis of factors influencing recruitment to maternal and perinatal trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

This literature review examines factors that affect recruitment success, including characteristics of participants, clinicians, and organizations. Strategies often cited in the literature for improving recruitment include avoiding blinding and placebos, providing telephone reminders and financial incentives, and tailoring interventions to meet the needs of underserved populations and minority groups. The authors also identified a number of strategies that were not shown to be effective.

312

Perinatal choline effects on neonatal pathophysiology related to later schizophrenia risk  

PubMed Central

Background Deficient cerebral inhibition is a pathophysiological brain deficit related to poor sensory gating and attention in schizophrenia and other disorders. Cerebral inhibition develops perinatally, influenced by genetic and in utero factors. Amniotic choline activates fetal ?7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and facilitates development of cerebral inhibition. Increasing this activation may protect infants from future illness by promoting normal brain development. Methods A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of dietary phosphatidylcholine supplementation was conducted with 100 healthy pregnant women, who consented to the study at second trimester. Supplementation to twice normal dietary levels for mother or newborn continued through the third postnatal month. All women received dietary advice regardless of treatment. Infants’ electroencephalographic recordings of inhibition of the P50 component of the cerebral evoked response to paired sounds were analyzed. Criterion for inhibition was suppression of the amplitude of the second P50 response by at least half, compared to the first response. Results No adverse effects of choline were observed in maternal health and delivery, birth, or infant development. More choline-treated infants (76%) suppressed the P50 response, compared to placebo-treated infants (43%) at the fifth postnatal week (effect size 0.7). There was no difference at the 13th week. A CHRNA7 genotype associated with schizophrenia diminished P50 inhibition in the placebo-treated infants, but not in the choline-treated infants. Conclusion Neonatal developmental delay in inhibition is associated with attentional problems as the child matures. Perinatal choline activates timely development of cerebral inhibition, even in the presence of gene mutations that otherwise delay it.

Ross, Randal G.; Hunter, Sharon K.; McCarthy, Lizbeth; Beuler, Julie; Hutchison, Amanda K.; Wagner, Brandie D.; Leonard, Sherry; Stevens, Karen E.; Freedman, Robert

2013-01-01

313

Mental Health Treatment Patterns in Perinatally HIV-Infected Youth and Controls  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Youths perinatally infected with HIV often receive psychotropic medication and behavioral treatment for emotional and behavioral symptoms. We describe patterns of intervention for HIV-positive youth and youth in a control group in the United States. METHODS Three hundred nineteen HIV-positive youth and 256 controls, aged 6 to 17 years, enrolled in the International Maternal Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials 1055, a prospective, 2-year observational study of psychiatric symptoms. One hundred seventy-four youth in the control group were perinatally exposed to HIV, and 82 youth were uninfected children living in households with HIV-positive members. Youth and their primary caregivers completed Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition-referenced symptom-rating scales. Children's medication and behavioral psychiatric intervention histories were collected at entry. We evaluated the association of past or current psychiatric treatment with HIV status, baseline symptoms, and impairment by using multiple logistic regression, controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS HIV-positive youth and youth in the control group had a similar prevalence of psychiatric symptoms (61%) and impairment (14% to 15%). One hundred four (18%) participants received psychotropic medications (stimulants [14%], antidepressants [6%], and neuroleptic agents [4%]), and 127 (22%) received behavioral treatment. More HIV-positive youth than youth in the control group received psychotropic medication (23% vs 12%) and behavioral treatment (27% vs 17%). After adjusting for symptom class and confounders, HIV-positive children had twice the odds of children in the control group of having received stimulants and >4 times the odds of having received antidepressants. Caregiver-reported symptoms or impairment were associated with higher odds of intervention than reports by children alone. CONCLUSIONS HIV-positive children are more likely to receive mental health interventions than control-group children. Pediatricians and caregivers should consider available mental health treatment options for all children living in families affected by HIV.

Chernoff, Miriam; Nachman, Sharon; Williams, Paige; Brouwers, Pim; Heston, Jerry; Hodge, Janice; Di Poalo, Vinnie; Deygoo, Nagamah Sandra; Gadow, Kenneth D.

2009-01-01

314

The perinatal presentation of cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome.  

PubMed

There is limited information available related to the perinatal course of cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC) compared to other syndromes within the Ras-MAP kinase pathway (rasopathies) such as Noonan and Costello syndrome. Retrospective chart review revealed four cases of CFC with molecular confirmation between 2005 and 2012 at Hawaii's largest obstetric and pediatric referral center. We report on details of the prenatal, neonatal, and infancy course and long-term follow-up beyond infancy in two patients. This report includes novel features including systemic hypertension, hyponatremia, and chronic respiratory insufficiency, not previously reported in CFC. We provide pathologic diagnosis of loose anagen hair in one patient. Some of these findings have been reported in the other rasopathies, documenting further clinical overlap among these conditions. Molecular testing can be useful to differentiate CFC from other rasopathies and in counseling families about potential complications and prognosis. We recommend a full phenotypic evaluation including echocardiogram, renal ultrasound, brain imaging, and ophthalmology examination. We additionally recommend close follow-up of blood pressure, pulmonary function, and monitoring for electrolyte disturbance and extra-vascular fluid shifts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24719372

Wong Ramsey, Kara N; Loichinger, Matthew H; Slavin, Thomas P; Kuo, Sheree; Seaver, Laurie H

2014-08-01

315

[Effect of birth timing on perinatal mortality].  

PubMed

Several reports show increased risk of perinatal/neonatal mortality for night time, weekend and holiday births. Intrapartum-related deaths were attributed to physical and mental fatigue, reduced availability of skilled and experienced staff and inadequate supervision by senior staff. The incidence of intrapartum and neonatal deaths related to intrapartum asphyxia is regarded to be a sensitive indicator of the quality of care during labor. Continuity of care is regarded as a major element in providing quality medical care. Several reports indicate the occurrences of potentially preventable adverse events which are associated with cross coverage by physicians who are less familiar with the patients than their usual providers. There is no conclusive evidence regarding clustering of high risk cases during night, weekend and holiday births. Clinical studies data suggests that resident work-hour restrictions have minimal impact on improving quality medical care. Carefully designed shift work, greater supervision by experienced staff and routine attendance of neonatologist should be considered in order to reduce early neonatal mortality during night times, weekends and holidays. More studies evaluating factors affecting birth outcome are needed. PMID:18300625

Zilberman, Beniamin

2008-01-01

316

Maternal Inheritance of a Promoter Variant in the Imprinted PHLDA2 Gene Significantly Increases Birth Weight  

PubMed Central

Birth weight is an important indicator of both perinatal and adult health, but little is known about the genetic factors contributing to its variability. Intrauterine growth restriction is a leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality and is also associated with adult disease. A significant correlation has been reported between lower birth weight and increased expression of the maternal PHLDA2 allele in term placenta (the normal imprinting pattern was maintained). However, a mechanism that explains the transcriptional regulation of PHLDA2 on in utero growth has yet to be described. In this study, we sequenced the PHLDA2 promoter region in 263 fetal DNA samples to identify polymorphic variants. We used a luciferase reporter assay to identify in the PHLDA2 promoter a 15 bp repeat sequence (RS1) variant that significantly reduces PHLDA2-promoter efficiency. RS1 genotyping was then performed in three independent white European normal birth cohorts. Meta-analysis of all three (total n = 9,433) showed that maternal inheritance of RS1 resulted in a significant 93 g increase in birth weight (p = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 22–163). Moreover, when the mother was homozygous for RS1, the influence on birth weight was 155 g (p = 0.04; 95% CI = 9–300), which is a similar magnitude to the reduction in birth weight caused by maternal smoking.

Ishida, Miho; Monk, David; Duncan, Andrew J.; Abu-Amero, Sayeda; Chong, Jiehan; Ring, Susan M.; Pembrey, Marcus E.; Hindmarsh, Peter C.; Whittaker, John C.; Stanier, Philip; Moore, Gudrun E.

2012-01-01

317

Hospital-based incidence of maternal heart failure during pregnancy in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Purpose To determine the incidence of heart failure during pregnancy and incriminated cardiac lesions, as well as maternal and fetal outcomes in Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital (LTH), Osogbo, Southwest Nigeria. Methods This study was a retrospective, descriptive review of all cases of heart failure during pregnancy based on data retrieved from the medical records of LTH over a 7-year period from January 2004 to December 2010. Analysis of these data was carried out using SPSS 17. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ethical Committee of LTH. Results A total of 4523 patients delivered babies over the 7-year period, ten (2.2/1000) of which had cardiac decompensation. All patients were not registered at LTH for antenatal care (unbooked), with 70% of them aged 18–24 years. Fifty percent were primigravidae and the majority of them presented with symptoms in the second and third trimester. There were two cases of maternal deaths recorded and three cases of fetal/perinatal mortality. Only one case of congenital heart disease (pulmonary stenosis) and no cases of rheumatic heart disease were found. Conclusion The data suggests that heart failure during pregnancy is uncommon in Southwest Nigeria. However, it occurs more often in young, unbooked primigravid women. Efforts should be aimed at encouraging early booking for antenatal care and a full cardiovascular evaluation to prevent associated maternal and fetal/perinatal morbidity and mortality.

Akinwusi, Patience Olayinka; Adeniji, Adetunji Oladeni; Atanda, Oluseyi Olaboyede; Adekunle, Adebayo Duyile

2013-01-01

318

Fetal and maternal outcomes in Indo-Asian compared to caucasian women with diabetes in pregnancy.  

PubMed

Maternal and fetal complications are increased when pregnancy is complicated by diabetes, and this may be further influenced by racial and cultural differences. We examined fetal and maternal outcomes in Indo-Asian and Caucasian women attending the same antenatal diabetes service to see if there were any differences. Women with diabetes mellitus (type 1, type 2 and gestationally-acquired disease) complicating pregnancy, registered at the combined diabetes/antenatal clinic of this University teaching hospital over the period 1990-1998 were included. Fetal outcomes examined were miscarriage <24 weeks, stillbirths, neonatal deaths up to 28 days of life, perinatal mortality, congenital malformations and size for gestational age. Maternal outcomes examined were rates of caesarean section and vaginal deliveries, and number of pre-term deliveries <37 completed weeks of gestation. Outcomes for Indo-Asian and Caucasian women were similar, with a take-home baby rate of 96% and 92%, respectively. There was no perinatal mortality in Indo-Asian women, who were more likely to have a vaginal delivery and less likely to have a baby large for gestational age. Pregnancies complicated by type 2 diabetes in both groups pose the greatest threat to a successful pregnancy outcome. Indo-Asian and Caucasian women attending the same antenatal diabetes service have comparable outcomes. Attendance for pre-pregnancy care needs to be encouraged to combat the high early pregnancy loss and congenital malformation rate identified, particularly in those with type 2 disease, irrespective of ethnicity. PMID:11110588

Dunne, F P; Brydon, P A; Proffitt, M; Smith, T; Gee, H; Holder, R L

2000-12-01

319

Consultation needs in perinatal HIV care: experience of the National Perinatal HIV Consultation Service.  

PubMed

This study evaluates the consultation needs of clinicians who provide perinatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care in the United States. The Perinatal Hotline (1-888-448-8765) is a telephone consultation service for providers who treat HIV-infected pregnant women and their infants. Hotline calls were analyzed for demographics about callers and their patients and information about consultation topics. There were 430 calls to the hotline from January 1, 2005, through June 30, 2006. Most calls (59.5%) were related to pregnant patients; 5.1% of the calls pertained to women currently in labor. The most common topic was HIV care in pregnancy (49.1%), particularly antiretroviral drug use (42.1%). HIV testing was discussed in 21.9%, and intrapartum treatment was discussed in 24.0%. Callers most often requested help choosing antiretroviral drug regimens; many of the discussions were about drug toxicities and viral resistance. Although the hotline received few calls about women in labor, the need for these consultations is expected to increase with the expanding use of rapid HIV testing. Access to 24-hour consultation can help ensure that state-of-the-art care is provided. PMID:17825645

Fogler, Jessica A; Weber, Shannon; Goldschmidt, Ronald H; Mahoney, Megan R; Cohan, Deborah

2007-09-01

320

Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development  

PubMed Central

Iron deficiency is the most common form of nutrient deficiency worldwide. It is highly prevalent due to the limited availability of high quality food in developing countries and poor dietary habits in industrialized countries. According to the World Health Organization, it affects nearly 2 billion people and up to 50% of women who are pregnant. Maternal anemia during pregnancy is especially burdensome to healthy neurodevelopment in the fetus because iron is needed for proper neurogenesis, development, and myelination. Maternal anemia also increases the risk of low birth weight, either due to premature birth or fetal growth restriction, which is associated with delayed neurocognitive development and even psychiatric illness. As rapid neurodevelopment continues after birth infants that received sufficient iron in utero, but that receive a low iron diet after 6 months of age, also show deficits in neurocognitive development, including impairments in learning and memory. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive complications of iron deficiency during critical pre- and postnatal periods of brain development are difficult to remedy, persisting into adulthood. Thus, preventing iron deficiency in the pre- and postnatal periods is critical as is devising new means to recapture cognitive function in individuals who experienced early iron deficiency. This review will discuss the prevalence of pre- and postnatal iron deficiency, the mechanism, and effects of iron deficiency on brain and cognitive development.

Radlowski, Emily C.; Johnson, Rodney W.

2013-01-01

321

Maternal amino acid supplementation for intrauterine growth restriction  

PubMed Central

Maternal dietary protein supplementation to improve fetal growth has been considered as an option to prevent or treat intrauterine growth restriction. However, in contrast to balanced dietary supplementation, adverse perinatal outcomes in pregnant women who received high amounts of dietary protein supplementation have been observed. The responsible mechanisms for these adverse outcomes are unknown. This review will discuss relevant human and animal data to provide the background necessary for the development of explanatory hypotheses and ultimately for the development therapeutic interventions during pregnancy to improve fetal growth. Relevant aspects of fetal amino acid metabolism during normal pregnancy and those pregnancies affected by IUGR will be discussed. In addition, data from animal experiments which have attempted to determine mechanisms to explain the adverse responses identified in the human trials will be presented. Finally, we will suggest new avenues for investigation into how amino acid supplementation might be used safely to treat and/or prevent IUGR.

Brown, Laura D; Green, Alice S; Limesand, Sean W; Rozance, Paul J

2011-01-01

322

[The application of music therapy in maternity nursing].  

PubMed

Music therapy has been used in the care of patients in a variety of fields, to decrease anxiety and enhance health, and has shown promising results. It is reported that pregnancy and childbirth may result in stressful consequences for some women. This article describes the systematic applications of music therapy to perinatal women and their families. The use of music for the childbearing family is appropriate because it enhances learning, improves the birth experience, and promotes closer relationships. The labor nurses are charged with the tasks of assuring the positive aspects of pregnancy and childbirth and meeting the demands of the women in these stressful situations. In order to create a caring environment, we suggest that music therapy be incorporated into standard maternity care. PMID:15614664

Chang, Shu-Chen; Chen, Chung-Hey

2004-10-01

323

Guidelines for the Planning and Development of Perinatal Health Services in North Central Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A framework for the planning and development of an integrated perinatal health system throughout the north central Texas region is presented. The concept of perinatology is defined and discussed. Components of a regional perinatal health system including ...

1974-01-01

324

Perinatal bisphenol A exposure promotes hyperactivity, lean body composition, and hormonal responses across the murine life course  

PubMed Central

The development of adult-onset diseases is influenced by perinatal exposure to altered environmental conditions. One such exposure, bisphenol A (BPA), has been associated with obesity and diabetes, and consequently labeled an obesogen. Using an isogenic murine model, we examined the effects of perinatal exposure through maternal diet to 50 ng (n=20), 50 ?g (n=21), or 50 mg (n=18) BPA/kg diet, as well as controls (n=20) on offspring energy expenditure, spontaneous activity, and body composition at 3, 6, and 9 mo of age, and hormone levels at 9 and 10 mo of age. Overall, exposed females and males exhibited increased energy expenditure (P<0.001 and 0.001, respectively) throughout the life course. In females, horizontal and vertical activity increased (P=0.07 and 0.06, respectively) throughout the life course. Generally, body composition measures were not different throughout the life course in exposed females or males (all P>0.44), although body fat and weight decreased in exposed females at particular ages (all P<0.08). Milligram-exposed females had improved glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and leptin profiles (all P<0.10). Thus, life-course analysis illustrates that BPA is associated with hyperactive and lean phenotypes. Variability across studies may be attributable to differential exposure duration and timing, dietary fat and phytoestrogen content, or lack of sophisticated phenotyping across the life course.—Anderson, O.S., Peterson, K.E., Sanchez, B.N., Zhang, Z., Mancuso, P., Dolinoy, D.C. Perinatal bisphenol A exposure promotes hyperactivity, lean body composition, and hormonal responses across the murine life course.

Anderson, Olivia S.; Peterson, Karen E.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Mancuso, Peter; Dolinoy, Dana C.

2013-01-01

325

Perinatal Nicotine Exposure Increases Vulnerability of Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury in Neonatal Rats: Role of Angiotensin II Receptors  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose Maternal cigarette smoking increases the risk of neonatal morbidity. We tested the hypothesis that perinatal nicotine exposure causes heightened brain vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury in neonatal rats via aberrant expression patterns of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1R) and type 2 (AT2R) receptors in the developing brain. Methods Nicotine was administered to pregnant rats via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps. HI brain injury was determined in 10-day-old pups. AT1R and AT2R expression patterns were assessed via Western blotting, q-PCR, immunofluorescence and confocal imaging. Results Perinatal nicotine exposure significantly increased HI brain infarct size in male, but not female, pups. In fetal brains, nicotine caused a decrease in mRNA and protein abundance of AT2R, but not AT1R. The downregulation of AT2R persisted in brains of male pups, and nicotine treatment resulted in a significant increase in methylation of CpG locus three bases upstream of TATA-box at AT2R gene promoter. In female brains, there was an increase in AT2R, but a decrease in AT1R expression. Both AT1R and AT2R expressed in neurons but not in astrocytes in the cortex and hippocampus. Central application of AT1R antagonist losartan or AT2R antagonist PD123319 increased HI brain infarct size in both male and female pups. In male pups, AT2R agonist CGP42112 abrogated nicotine-induced increase in HI brain infarction. In females, PD123319 uncovered the nicotine’s effect on HI brain infarction. Conclusion Perinatal nicotine exposure causes epigenetic repression of AT2R gene in the developing brain resulting in heightened brain vulnerability to HI injury in neonatal male rats in a sex-dependent manner.

Li, Yong; Xiao, Daliao; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Xiong, Fuxia; Tong, Wenni; Yang, Shumei; Zhang, Lubo

2012-01-01

326

Thyroid hormone concentrations in relation to age, sex, pregnancy, and perinatal loss in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).  

PubMed

This study evaluated circulating concentrations of thyroid hormones in relation to age, sex, pregnancy status, and perinatal loss in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) under human care. A total of 373 blood samples were collected from 60 individual dolphins housed at nine aquariums/oceanariums. Serum concentrations of total and free thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) were analyzed with commercial RIA kits validated for use with dolphins. While the effect of age was indicated by higher (P<0.0001) concentrations of total and free T4 and T3 in juveniles than adults, the effect of sex on thyroid hormones was inconclusive. The effect of pregnancy was indicated by higher (P<0.035) total and free T4 and T3 during early pregnancy compared to non-pregnancy. For both successful and unsuccessful pregnancy outcomes, maternal concentrations of thyroid hormones were highest during early, intermediate during mid, and lowest during late pregnancy (P<0.07 to P<0.0001). Compared to live and thriving births, concentrations of total and free T4 and total T3 were lower (P<0.08 to P<0.001) in dolphins with perinatal loss. Lower concentrations ranged from 10% to 14% during early, 11% to 18% during mid, and 23% to 37% during late pregnancy. In conclusion, the effects of age, reproductive status and stage of pregnancy on thyroid hormone concentrations are necessary factors to take into account when assessing thyroid gland function. Since perinatal loss may be associated with hypothyroidism in dolphins, analysis of serum T4 and T3 should be considered for those dolphins that have a history of pregnancy loss. PMID:24321177

West, Kristi L; Ramer, Jan; Brown, Janine L; Sweeney, Jay; Hanahoe, Erin M; Reidarson, Tom; Proudfoot, Jeffry; Bergfelt, Don R

2014-02-01

327

Maternal behavior and developmental psychopathology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews recent developments in the phenomenology, neurobiology, and genetics of maternal behavior in animal model systems from an evolutionary perspective on psychopathology. Following a review of the phenomenology and neurobiology of maternal behavior, recent studies addressing the role of genetic factors in the maternal behavior of rodents were identified in a search of literature in peer-reviewed journals. Gene

James F. Leckman; Amy E. Herman

2002-01-01

328

Impact of the Jamaican birth cohort study on maternal, child and adolescent health policy and practice.  

PubMed

The Jamaica Perinatal Morbidity and Mortality Survey (JPMMS) was a national study designed to identify modifiable risk factors associated with poor maternal and perinatal outcome. Needing to better understand factors that promote or retard child development, behaviour and academic achievement, we conducted follow-up studies of the birth cohort. The paper describes the policy developments from the JPMMS and two follow-up rounds. The initial study (1986-87) documented 94% of all births and their outcomes on the island over 2 months (n = 10 508), and perinatal (n = 2175) and maternal deaths (n = 62) for a further 10 months. A subset of the birth cohort, identified by their date of birth through school records, was seen at ages 11-12 (n = 1715) and 15-16 years (n = 1563). Findings from the initial survey led to, inter alia, clinic-based screening for syphilis, referral high-risk clinics run by visiting obstetricians, and the redesign and construction of new labour wards at referral hospitals. The follow-up studies documented inadequate academic achievement among boys and children attending public schools, and associations between under- and over-nutrition, excessive television viewing (>20 h/week), inadequate parental supervision and behavioural problems. These contributed to the development of a television programming code for children, a National Parenting Policy, policies aimed at improving inter-sectoral services to children from birth to 5 years (Early Childhood Commission) and behavioural interventions of the Violence Prevention Alliance (an inter-sectoral NGO) and the Healthy Lifestyles project (Ministry of Health). Indigenous maternal and child health research provided a local evidence base that informed public policy. Collaboration, good communication, being vigilant to opportunities to influence policy, and patience has contributed to our success. PMID:20078824

McCaw-Binns, A; Ashley, D; Samms-Vaughan, M

2010-01-01

329

Severe maternal morbidity and maternal near miss in the extremes of reproductive age: results from a national cross- sectional multicenter study  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to assess severe maternal morbidity (SMM) and near miss (NM) cases among adolescent girls and women over 35 years of age in the Brazilian Network for Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity, using a set of standard criteria, compared to pregnant women aged 20 to 34 years. Methods A cross-sectional multicenter study conducted in 27 referral obstetric units in Brazil. All pregnant women admitted to these centers during a one-year period of prospective surveillance were screened to identify cases of maternal death (MD), NM and other SMM. Indicators of maternal morbidity and mortality were evaluated for the three age groups. Sociodemographic, clinical and obstetric characteristics, gestational and perinatal outcomes, main causes of morbidity and delays in care were also compared. Two multiple analysis models were performed, to estimate the adjusted prevalence ratio for identified factors that were independently associated with the occurrence of severe maternal outcome (SMO?=?MNM?+?MD). Results Among SMM and MD cases identified, the proportion of adolescent girls and older women were 17% each. The risk of MNM or death was 25% higher among older women. Maternal near miss ratio and maternal mortality ratios increased with age, but these ratios were also higher among adolescents aged 10 to 14, although the absolute numbers were low. On multivariate analysis, younger age was not identified as an independent risk factor for SMO, while this was true for older age (PR 1.25; 1.07-1.45). Conclusions SMO was high among women below 14 years of age and increased with age in Brazilian pregnant women.

2014-01-01

330

Perinatal outcome and congenital malformations in in-vitro fertilization babies from the Bourn-Hallam group.  

PubMed

The perinatal outcome and congenital malformations in children born between 1978 and 1987 in Great Britain after in-vitro fertilization (IVF) at Bourn Hall Clinic and the Hallam Medical Centre are presented. The average maternal age was 34.2 years. Multiple births were frequent, constituting 23% of all deliveries; 19% were twins and 4% triplets. There were no quadruplet or higher order multiple births during that period. Twenty-five per cent of all deliveries were preterm. The mean birth weight was 2793 g and was strongly related to multiplicity of pregnancy and gestational age. Overall, 32% of babies had a low birthweight (less than 2500 g) with 6% having a very low birthweight (less than 1500 g). The overall stillbirth and infant mortality rates were two to three times higher than those of infants born after natural conception in England and Wales; this is attributed to the high incidence of multiple births. The stillbirth rates were 5.07, 20.8 and 24.7 per thousand total births in singletons, twins and triplets respectively. The corresponding figures for perinatal mortality were 13.5, 38.2 and 37 per thousand. Overall, 2.5% of the babies had one or more major congenital malformations diagnosed within one week of life. This was within the range of expected values in the United Kingdom and there was no significant increase in any specific malformation. PMID:1752928

Rizk, B; Doyle, P; Tan, S L; Rainsbury, P; Betts, J; Brinsden, P; Edwards, R

1991-10-01

331

Maternal correlates of maternal child feeding practices: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Establishing healthy eating habits early in life is one important strategy to combat childhood obesity. Given that early maternal child feeding practices have been linked to child food intake and weight, identifying the maternal correlates of maternal child feeding practices is important in order to understand the determinants of childhood obesity; this was the overall aim of the current review. Academic databases were searched for studies examining the relationship between maternal child feeding practices and parenting, personal characteristics and psychopathology of mothers with preschoolers. Papers were limited to those published in English, between January 2000 and June 2012. Only studies with mothers of normally developing children between the ages of 2 and 6 years were included. There were no restrictions regarding the inclusion of maternal nationality or socioeconomic status (SES). Seventeen eligible studies were sourced. Information on the aim, sample, measures and findings of these was summarised into tables. The findings of this review support a relationship between maternal controlling parenting, general and eating psychopathology, and SES and maternal child feeding practices. The main methodological issues of the studies reviewed included inconsistency in measures of maternal variables across studies and cross-sectional designs. We conclude that the maternal correlates associated with maternal child feeding practices are complex, and the pathways by which maternal correlates impact these feeding practices require further investigation. PMID:22973806

McPhie, Skye; Skouteris, Helen; Daniels, Lynne; Jansen, Elena

2014-01-01

332

Maternal sexuality and breastfeeding  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper I consider the ways in which lactation has been discussed as a form of maternal sexuality, and the implications this carries for our understanding of breastfeeding practices and sexuality. Drawing on knowledge constructed in the western world during the last half of the twentieth century, the paper identifies a shift between the radical ideologies of the 1960s

Alison Bartlett

2005-01-01

333

Maternal serum screening.  

PubMed Central

Maternal serum screening (MSS) measures three serum markers: alpha-fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and unconjugated estriol, from which the risk of fetal Down syndrome or open neural tube defect is calculated. Initially, 8% of women will have positive results. I present a protocol for investigating these women. Family physicians should be informed about MSS so they can give their patients information and guidance.

Carroll, J. C.

1994-01-01

334

Temperament and Maternal Employment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a model of the bi-directional relations between children and the context of their living situations and explains how the usefulness of this model may be evaluated by assessing the relations between child temperament and maternal attitudes and behaviors. Also indicates how the child's temperament may influence the mother's decision to…

Lerner, Jacqueline V.; Galambos, Nancy L.

1986-01-01

335

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Perinatal Depression  

PubMed Central

Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies are increasingly sought out by patients with psychiatric disorders. This article provides a review of the evidence for several commonly utilized CAM therapies (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids, folate, S-adenosyl-methionine (SAMe), St. John’s Wort, bright light therapy, exercise, massage, and acupuncture) in the treatment of perinatal depression. A number of these treatments may be reasonable to consider for women during pregnancy or the postpartum, but the safety and efficacy of these relative to standard treatments must still be systematically determined. Evidence based use of CAM treatments for perinatal depression is discussed. Adequately powered systematic studies are necessary to determine the role of CAM in the treatment of perinatal depression.

Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Freeman, Marlene P.

2014-01-01

336

Long term neurological and behavioral effects of graded perinatal asphyxia in the rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic states can cause irreversible damage to the brain, ranging from minimal brain dysfunction to death. Only few studies have been reported describing neurological, cognitive and behavioral deficits following perinatal asphyxia. We therefore decided to study long term effects of perinatal asphyxia in a well-documented animal model resembling the clinical situation. Caeserean section in rats was performed and the

Harald Hoeger; Mario Engelmann; Guenther Bernert; Rainer Seidl; Hermann Bubna-Littitz; Wilhelm Mosgoeller; Barbara Lubec; Gert Lubec

2000-01-01

337

Perinatal exposure to environmental contaminants detected in Canadian Arctic human populations changes bone geometry and biomechanical properties in rat offspring.  

PubMed

Arctic inhabitants consume large proportions of fish and marine mammals, and are therefore continuously exposed to levels of environmental toxicants, which may produce adverse health effects. Fetuses and newborns are the most vulnerable groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in bone geometry, mineral density, and biomechanical properties during development following perinatal exposure to a mixture of environmental contaminants corresponding to maternal blood levels in Canadian Arctic human populations. Sprague-Dawley rat dams were dosed with a Northern Contaminant Mixture (NCM) from gestational day 1 to postnatal day (PND) 23. NCM contains 27 contaminants comprising polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and methylmercury. Femurs were collected on PND 35, 77 and 350, and diaphysis was analyzed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography and three-point bending test, while femoral neck was assessed in an axial loading experiment. Dose-response modeling was performed to establish the benchmark dose (BMD) for the analyzed bone parameters. Exposure to the high dose of NMC resulted in short and thin femur with reduced mechanical strength in offspring at PND35. BMD of femur length, cortical area, and stiffness were 3.2, 1.6, and 0.8 mg/kg bw/d, respectively. At PND77 femur was still thin, but at PND350 no treatment-related bone differences were detected. This study provides new insights on environmental contaminants present in the maternal blood of Canadian Arctic populations, showing that perinatal exposure induces bone alterations in the young offspring. These findings could be significant from a health risk assessment point of view. PMID:21830859

Elabbas, Lubna E; Finnilä, Mikko A; Herlin, Maria; Stern, Natalia; Trossvik, Christina; Bowers, Wayne J; Nakai, Jamie; Tuukkanen, Juha; Heimeier, Rachel A; Åkesson, Agneta; Håkansson, Helen

2011-01-01

338

77 FR 12860 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Maternal and Child Health in Poor Countries: Evidence...

2012-03-02

339

75 FR 8974 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of...Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Maternal and Child Health in Poor Countries: Evidence...

2010-02-26

340

Early intervention after perinatal stroke: opportunities and challenges.  

PubMed

Perinatal stroke is the most common cause of hemiplegic cerebral palsy. No standardized early intervention exists despite evidence for a critical time window for activity-dependent plasticity to mould corticospinal tract development in the first few years of life. Intervention during this unique period of plasticity could mitigate the consequences of perinatal stroke to an extent not possible with later intervention, by preserving the normal pattern of development of descending motor pathways. This article outlines the broad range of approaches currently under investigation. Despite significant progress in this area, improved early detection and outcome prediction remain important goals. PMID:24528276

Basu, Anna P

2014-06-01

341

A review of cognitive outcomes in children following perinatal stroke.  

PubMed

Perinatal stroke is a significant cause of congenital neurological disability. Although motor deficits and epilepsy are relatively easy to identify, developmental and behavioral co-morbidities are more complex and challenging to define. We provide an overview of perinatal stroke syndromes and theories relating injury in the developing brain to long-term outcomes. We present a comprehensive overview of the effects on intelligence and other specific cognitive domains, as well as investigations relating clinical features and neuroimaging to deficits. Better understanding of the impact of early stroke has potential to elucidate processes of brain development, in addition to providing guidance for prognosis and rehabilitation. PMID:24571931

Murias, Kara; Brooks, Brian; Kirton, Adam; Iaria, Giuseppe

2014-01-01

342

The Door's Perinatal Program for Pregnant and Parenting Teens.  

PubMed

The perinatal program for urban youth at The Door, located in New York City, provides accessible, comprehensive, high-quality prenatal services to pregnant teens. Through a holistic, family-centered, youth-development approach, the program seeks to counteract the adverse medical risks and psychosocial consequences of early childbirth and child rearing in order to improve the immediate and long-term futures of the mother and her new family. The Door's services are presented, along with a description of the agency's service model and an analysis of 100 pregnant teens enrolled in its perinatal program. PMID:17273204

Dewart, T; Zaengle, D

2000-01-01

343

The Door's Perinatal Program for Pregnant and Parenting Teens  

PubMed Central

The perinatal program for urban youth at The Door, located in New York City, provides accessible, comprehensive, high-quality prenatal services to pregnant teens. Through a holistic, family-centered, youth-development approach, the program seeks to counteract the adverse medical risks and psychosocial consequences of early childbirth and child rearing in order to improve the immediate and long-term futures of the mother and her new family. The Door's services are presented, along with a description of the agency's service model and an analysis of 100 pregnant teens enrolled in its perinatal program.

Dewart, Tracey; Zaengle, Donna

2000-01-01

344

Maternal and neonatal lipopolysaccharide and Fas responses are altered by antenatal risk factors for sepsis  

PubMed Central

The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is difficult, resulting in unnecessary treatment to minimize morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that exposure to antenatal risk factors for sepsis alters the perinatal neutrophil phenotype. The study setting was a tertiary referral university-affiliated maternity and neonatal hospital. Neutrophils from adults, normal neonates, neonates with antenatal sepsis risk factors and their respective maternal samples were incubated alone, with agonistic Fas antibody or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Surface receptor CD11b expression and the percentage apoptosis (persistent inflammatory response) were assessed using flow cytometry. Both mothers and asymptomatic neonates exposed to maternal sepsis risk factors had increased spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis compared to their respective controls. Infants with sepsis were LPS and Fas hyporesponsive. Maternal neutrophils had a delay in apoptosis in all groups with enhanced LPS and Fas responses associated with neonatal sepsis. CD11b expression was not altered significantly between groups. Maternal neutrophil function is altered in neonatal sepsis and may have a diagnostic role. Neonatal sepsis was associated with LPS hyporesponsiveness, potentially increasing susceptibility to infection.

Molloy, E J; O'Neill, A J; Grantham-Sloan, J J; Webb, D W; Watson, R W G

2008-01-01

345

Maternal Genetic Variation Accounts in Part for the Associations of Maternal Size during Pregnancy with Offspring Cardiometabolic Risk in Adulthood  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal pre-pregnancy body-mass index (ppBMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) are associated with cardiometabolic risk (CMR) traits in the offspring. The extent to which maternal genetic variation accounts for these associations is unknown. Methods/Results In 1249 mother-offspring pairs recruited from the Jerusalem Perinatal Study, we used archival data to characterize ppBMI and GWG and follow-up data from offspring to assess CMR, including body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, glucose, insulin, blood pressure, and lipid levels, at an average age of 32. Maternal genetic risk scores (GRS) were created using a subset of SNPs most predictive of ppBMI, GWG, and each CMR trait, selected among 1384 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) characterizing variation in 170 candidate genes potentially related to fetal development and/or metabolic risk. We fit linear regression models to examine the associations of ppBMI and GWG with CMR traits with and without adjustment for GRS. Compared to unadjusted models, the coefficient for the association of a one-standard-deviation (SD) difference in GWG and offspring BMI decreased by 41% (95%CI ?81%, ?11%) from 0.847 to 0.503 and the coefficient for a 1SD difference in GWG and WC decreased by 63% (95%CI ?318%, ?11%) from 1.196 to 0.443. For other traits, there were no statistically significant changes in the coefficients for GWG with adjustment for GRS. None of the associations of ppBMI with CMR traits were significantly altered by adjustment for GRS. Conclusions Maternal genetic variation may account in part for associations of GWG with offspring BMI and WC in young adults.

Wander, Pandora L.; Hochner, Hagit; Sitlani, Colleen M.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Lumley, Thomas; Lawrence, Gabriela M.; Burger, Ayala; Savitsky, Bella; Manor, Orly; Meiner, Vardiella; Hesselson, Stephanie; Kwok, Pui Y.; Siscovick, David S.; Friedlander, Yechiel

2014-01-01

346

The impact of maternal obesity on intrapartum outcomes in otherwise low risk women: secondary analysis of the Birthplace national prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objectives?To evaluate the impact of maternal BMI on intrapartum interventions and adverse outcomes that may influence choice of planned birth setting in healthy women without additional risk factors. Design?Prospective cohort study. Setting?Stratified random sample of English obstetric units. Sample?17 230 women without medical or obstetric risk factors other than obesity. Methods?Multivariable log Poisson regression was used to evaluate the effect of BMI on risk of intrapartum interventions and adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes adjusted for maternal characteristics. Main outcome measures?Maternal intervention or adverse outcomes requiring obstetric care (composite of: augmentation, instrumental delivery, intrapartum caesarean section, general anaesthesia, blood transfusion, 3rd/4th degree perineal tear); neonatal unit admission or perinatal death. Results?In otherwise healthy women, obesity was associated with an increased risk of augmentation, intrapartum caesarean section and some adverse maternal outcomes but when interventions and outcomes requiring obstetric care were considered together, the magnitude of the increased risk was modest (adjusted RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.02–1.23, for BMI > 35 kg/m2 relative to low risk women of normal weight). Nulliparous low risk women of normal weight had higher absolute risks and were more likely to require obstetric intervention or care than otherwise healthy multiparous women with BMI > 35 kg/m2 (maternal composite outcome: 53% versus 21%). The perinatal composite outcome exhibited a similar pattern. Conclusions?Otherwise healthy multiparous obese women may have lower intrapartum risks than previously appreciated. BMI should be considered in conjunction with parity when assessing the potential risks associated with birth in non-obstetric unit settings.

Hollowell, J; Pillas, D; Rowe, R; Linsell, L; Knight, M; Brocklehurst, P

2014-01-01

347

Identifying maternity services in public hospitals in rural and remote Australia.  

PubMed

Objective This paper articulates the importance of accurately identifying maternity services. It describes the process and challenges of identifying the number, level and networks of rural and remote maternity services in public hospitals serving communities of between 1000 and 25000 people across Australia, and presents the findings of this process. Methods Health departments and the national government's websites, along with lists of public hospitals, were used to identify all rural and remote Australian public hospitals offering maternity services in small towns. State perinatal reports were reviewed to establish numbers of births by hospital. The level of maternity services and networks of hospitals within which services functioned were determined via discussion with senior jurisdictional representatives. Results In all, 198 rural and remote public hospitals offering maternity services were identified. There were challenges in sourcing information on maternity services to generate an accurate national picture. The nature of information about maternity services held centrally by jurisdictions varied, and different frameworks were used to describe minimum requirements for service levels. Service networks appeared to be based on a combination of individual links, geography and transport infrastructure. Conclusions The lack of readily available centralised and comparable information on rural and remote maternity services has implications for policy review and development, equity, safety and quality, network development and planning. Accountability for services and capacity to identify problems is also compromised. What is known about the topic? Australian birthing services have previously been identified for hospitals with 50 or more births a year. Less is known about public hospitals with fewer than 50 births a year or those with only antenatal and postnatal services, particularly in rural and remote locations, or how maternity services information may be identified from publicly available sources. What does this paper add? This paper describes the process and challenges of identifying maternity services in rural and remote public hospitals serving towns of between 1000 and 25000, and presents the findings of this process. What are the implications for practitioners? Nationally accessible, reliable and comparable information is important for health planners, policy makers and health practitioners. This paper provides useful information on the variations in the capability and location of maternity services across Australia. Opportunities exist for consistent collection, collation and reporting of maternity services across rural and remote Australia. This will ensure quality and safety of services, contribute to policy review, support the development and maintenance of service networks, and assist in planning services and expenditure, as well as in the identification of problems. It is therefore key to providing equitable services across the country. PMID:24882523

Longman, Jo; Pilcher, Jennifer M; Donoghue, Deborah A; Rolfe, Margaret; Kildea, Sue V; Kruske, Sue; Oats, Jeremy J N; Morgan, Geoffrey G; Barclay, Lesley M

2014-06-01

348

Perinatal bisphenol A exposures increase production of pro-inflammatory mediators in bone marrow-derived mast cells of adult mice.  

PubMed

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used monomer of polycarbonate plastics and epoxide resin that has been implicated in asthma pathogenesis when exposure occurs to the developing fetus. However, few studies have examined the relationship between perinatal BPA exposure and asthma pathogenesis in adulthood. This study used an isogenic mouse model to examine the influence of perinatal BPA exposure via maternal diet on inflammatory mediators associated with asthma in 6-month-old adult offspring by measuring bone marrow-derived mast cell (BMMC) production of lipid mediators (cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2), cytokines (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-?), and histamine. Global DNA methylation levels in BMMCs from adult offspring were determined to elucidate a potential regulatory mechanism linking perinatal exposure to mast cell phenotype later in life. Four BPA exposure doses were tested: low (50?ng BPA/kg diet, n?=?5), medium (50??g BPA/kg diet, n?=?4), high (50?mg BPA/kg diet, n?=?4), and control (n?=?3). Following BMMC activation, increases in cysteinyl leukotriene (p?perinatal BPA exposure displayed a long-term influence on mast cell-mediated production of pro-inflammatory mediators associated with asthma and global DNA methylation levels, suggesting a potential for mast cell dysregulation, which could affect pulmonary inflammation associated with allergic airway disease into adulthood. PMID:23914806

O'Brien, Edmund; Dolinoy, Dana C; Mancuso, Peter

2014-01-01

349

Standardized severe maternal morbidity review: rationale and process.  

PubMed

Severe maternal morbidity and mortality have been rising in the United States. To begin a national effort to reduce morbidity, a specific call to identify all pregnant and postpartum women experiencing admission to an intensive care unit or receipt of 4 or more units of blood for routine review has been made. While advocating for review of these cases, no specific guidance for the review process was provided. Therefore, the aim of this expert opinion is to present guidelines for a standardized severe maternal morbidity interdisciplinary review process to identify systems, professional, and facility factors that can be ameliorated, with the overall goal of improving institutional obstetric safety and reducing severe morbidity and mortality among pregnant and recently pregnant women. This opinion was developed by a multidisciplinary working group that included general obstetrician-gynecologists, maternal-fetal medicine subspecialists, certified nurse-midwives, and registered nurses all with experience in maternal mortality reviews. A process for standardized review of severe maternal morbidity addressing committee organization, review process, medical record abstraction and assessment, review culture, data management, review timing, and review confidentiality is presented. Reference is made to a sample severe maternal morbidity abstraction and assessment form. PMID:25004341

Kilpatrick, Sarah J; Berg, Cynthia; Bernstein, Peter; Bingham, Debra; Delgado, Ana; Callaghan, William M; Harris, Karen; Lanni, Susan; Mahoney, Jeanne; Main, Elliot; Nacht, Amy; Schellpfeffer, Michael; Westover, Thomas; Harper, Margaret

2014-08-01

350

Gestational Weight Gain in Adolescents: A Comparison to the New Institute of Medicine Recommendations  

PubMed Central

Study Objective To examine the gestational weight gain distributions of healthy adolescents with optimal birth outcomes and compare them to the current 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations. Design Secondary data analysis to conduct a population-based, cross-sectional study. Setting The Central and Finger Lakes regions of New York state (Perinatal Database System). Participants 6995 adolescents with healthy singleton pregnancies (1996 to 2002). Main Outcome Measures Percentiles of the gestational weight gain distributions were compared within body mass index (BMI) groups categorized using 2 different classification schemes: adolescent BMI percentiles and adult BMI cut-points. We compared these distributions overall and within racial and age groups. Results The gestational weight gain distribution does not differ considerably when BMI is classified using adolescent or adult cutoffs. Adolescents have good birth outcomes across a wider gestational weight gain range than recommended by the Institute of Medicine regardless of how pre-pregnancy weight status is categorized. For example, overweight adolescents by adult cutoffs have a range of gestational weight gain from 5.0 kg to 30.0 kg, and overweight adolescents by percentile cutoffs have a range from 5.4 kg to 29.5 kg, whereas the IOM range is 7.5-11.5 kg. Black and young adolescents have a similar distribution to their white and older counterparts. Conclusion Practitioners can safely use the new IOM gestational weight gain ranges to monitor weight gain in pregnant adolescent patients using adult BMI classifications. Future research should examine the range of gestational weight gain in adolescents considering a broader scope of birth and maternal outcomes.

Fernandez, I.D.; Hoffmire, C.A.; Olson, C.M.

2011-01-01

351

Very Low Birth Weight and Perinatal Periods of Risk: Disparities in St. Louis  

PubMed Central

Objective. Very low birth weight (VLBW) is a significant issue in St. Louis, Missouri. Our study evaluated risk factors associated with VLBW in this predominantly urban community. Methods. From 2000 to 2009, birth and fetal death certificates were evaluated (n = 160, 189), and mortality rates were calculated for perinatal periods of risk. The Kitagawa method was used to explore fetoinfant mortality rates (FIMR) in terms of birth weight distribution and birthweight specific mortality. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the magnitude of association of selected risk factors with VLBW. Results. VLBW contributes to 50% of the excess FIMR in St. Louis City and County. The highest proportion of VLBW can be attributed to black maternal race (40.6%) in St. Louis City, inadequate prenatal care (19.8%), and gestational hypertension (12.0%) among black women. Medicaid was found to have a protective effect for VLBW among black women (population attributable risk (PAR)?=??14.5). Discussion. Interventions targeting the health of women before and during conception may be most successful at reducing the disparities in VLBW in this population. Interventions geared towards smoking cessation and improvements in Medicaid and prenatal care access for black mothers and St. Louis City residents can greatly reduce VLBW rates.

Xaverius, Pamela; Salas, Joanne; Kiel, Deborah; Woolfolk, Candice

2014-01-01

352

The costs and financing of perinatal care in the United States.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to estimate the aggregate annual costs of maternal and infant health care and to describe the flow of funds that finance that care. METHODS. Estimates of costs and financing based on household and provider surveys, third-party claims data, and hospital discharge data were combined into a single, best estimate. RESULTS. The total cost of perinatal care in 1989 was $27.8 billion, or $6850 per mother-infant pair. Payments made directly by patients or third parties for this care totaled $25.4 billion, or about 7% of personal health care spending by the nonaged population. Payments were less than costs because they did not include a value for direct delivery care or for bad debt and charity care, which accounted for $2.4 billion. Private insurance accounted for about 63% of total payments, and Medicaid accounted for 17% of the total. CONCLUSIONS. National health reform would provide windfall receipts to hospitals, which would receive payment for the considerable bad debt and charity care they provide. Reform might also provide short-term gains to providers as private payment rates are substituted for those of Medicaid.

Long, S H; Marquis, M S; Harrison, E R

1994-01-01

353

Prenatal and perinatal determinants of neonatal seizures occurring in the first week of life.  

PubMed

To evaluate prenatal and perinatal risk factors for early neonatal seizures, we conducted a case-control study including 100 newborns with neonatal seizures in the first week of life and 204 controls randomly selected from a list of healthy newborns born in the same hospital during the study period. Generalized tonic seizures were the most common seizures observed (29%), although the majority of newborns (71%) experienced more than one type of seizure. The most frequent presumed etiology of neonatal seizures was hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (30%). A history of epilepsy in first-degree relatives was found only for cases. Neonatal seizures were found to be associated with maternal disease in the 2 years before pregnancy, mother's weight gain > 14 kg during pregnancy, placental pathology, preeclampsia, low birthweight, low gestational age, and jaundice in the first 3 days of life. The need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation was found only for cases (37%). The causal pathways for neonatal seizures often begin before birth, and some of the factors identified may be preventable. PMID:11575604

Arpino, C; Domizio, S; Carrieri, M P; Brescianini, D S; Sabatino, M G; Curatolo, P

2001-09-01

354

Perinatal periods of risk analysis of infant mortality in Jackson County, Missouri.  

PubMed

The perinatal periods of risk (PPOR) methodology provides an easy-to-use analytical approach to infant mortality that helps focus community initiatives for improving maternal and infant health. Because few analyses have been published, many public health practitioners may be unfamiliar with PPOR. This article demonstrates the application of PPOR analysis using infant mortality in Jackson County, Missouri. While the PPOR consists of two phases, this analysis was restricted to the initial phase of the overall process. The second phase builds on the initial findings and prioritizes the contributing factors of fetal/infant mortality so that targeted interventions can be developed. For Jackson County, the PPOR analysis found that racial and geographic disparities existed and, for very low-birth-weight infants, different interventions strategies may be needed on the basis of race. In addition, a mother who experienced a fetal or infant death was more likely to have had a medical risk factor, to have smoked cigarettes, to have started prenatal care after the first trimester or received no prenatal care, and to have been nulliparous. PMID:17435494

Cai, Jinwen; Hoff, Gerald L; Archer, Rex; Jones, Larry D; Livingston, Paula S; Guillory, V James

2007-01-01

355

Maternal Health and HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The HIV\\/AIDS epidemic is one of the major factors affecting women's health, with 20 million women living with HIV and more than two million pregnancies in HIV-positive women each year. Most HIV infections in women are in resource-constrained settings where the risk of maternal morbidity and mortality is also unacceptably high, and where most of the 529,000 deaths from complications

James McIntyre

2005-01-01

356

Myelination deficits in brain of rats following perinatal asphyxia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perinatal asphyxia remains a major cause of acute mortality and of permanent neurodevelopmental disability in infants and children. However, the pathophysiologic features of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are still incompletely understood. Animal studies have been focussing on grey matter pathology but information on white matter lesions is limited. The aim of the study was to investigate white matter lesions after three months

Christina Kohlhauser; Wilhelm Mosgöller; Harald Höger; Barbara Lubec

2000-01-01

357

Evaluation of a multisystems model for treating perinatal cocaine addiction.  

PubMed

Two stages of a gender-specific treatment program for perinatal cocaine-addicted women were introduced into a coed peer-led day treatment program and evaluated for outcomes. Stage I (N = 21) targeted gender-specific needs, but did not expressly promote family reintegration. Stage II (N = 27) augmented the gender-specific program with a multisystems model for family reintegration. As a control for historical effects, nonperinatal clients whose treatment remained the same during the periods corresponding to the two stages, were evaluated for outcomes (N = 66 for Stage I, N = 75 for Stage II). As hypothesized, urine toxicology and retention data were significantly improved for perinatal clients treated in Stage II, as compared with those treated in Stage I; no such improvements were noted for non-perinatal clients. The data support a conclusion that introducing a multisystems framework into a gender-specific program selectively improves clinical outcomes for inner-city perinatal cocaine-addicted women. PMID:9633037

Egelko, S; Galanter, M; Dermatis, H; DeMaio, C

1998-01-01

358

Perinatal outcome in relation to second-stage duration  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: The second stage of labor has been thought of as a time of particular asphyxial risk for the fetus. This perceived risk has been invoked to justify arbitrary time limits and high rates of operative vaginal delivery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether perinatal outcome worsened as the second stage lengthened.STUDY DESIGN: Over a 5-year period

Savas M. Menticoglou; Frank Manning; Christopher Harman; Ian Morrison

1995-01-01

359

Classifying Perinatal Advanced Practice Data With the Omaha System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pilot study analyzed perinatal advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) diagnoses\\/client problems and interventions across sites using standardized terminology. APRN verbatim encounter logs from 8 patients in a previous study were coded by both the Omaha System and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. Previous outcomes were reduced preterm births, hospitalizations, and costs (Brooten et al., 2001). In 597 encounters (63%

Karen Dorman Marek; Melinda L. Jenkins; Marilyn Stringer; Dorothy Brooten; Gregory L. Alexander

2004-01-01

360

Retinal Hemorrhage Associated with Perinatal Distress in Newborns  

PubMed Central

Purpose To describe the ophthalmoscopic features and natural history in a case series of eyes that developed intraocular hemorrhages associated with perinatal distress and to evaluate their clinical courses. Methods A retrospective chart review of 289 neonates with a medical history of perinatal distress was conducted. Among these 289 patients (578 eyes), 29 eyes of 17 neonates were found to have had retinal hemorrhages or vitreous hemorrhages (VH). A comprehensive chart review, including details of fundoscopic findings and perinatal history, was conducted. Results Intraocular hemorrhage was present in 5.5% of the patients. Most hemorrhages (82.7%) were intraretinal. In our population, 17% (n = 5) of hemorrhages resolved within two weeks, but 31% (n = 9) did not resolve even after four weeks. Most hemorrhages spontaneously resolved without any specific sequelae; however, one infant's dense unilateral VH persisted up to three months after birth. When the patient was seen again at 3.5 years of age, she had developed axial myopia and severe amblyopia of the involved eye. Conclusions In asphyxiated newborns, the possibility of intraocular hemorrhages should be considered. Long-standing, dense hemorrhages obscuring the macula may lead to severe vision deprivation amblyopia. Therefore, ophthalmic examination should be considered in neonates with perinatal distress, and close observation is necessary for hemorrhages that do not resolve in this amblyogenic age group.

Choi, Youn Joo; Jung, Moon Sun

2011-01-01

361

Perinatal Status and Help-Seeking for Intimate Partner Violence  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Although there has been much research examining the relationship between pregnancy and abuse, this study is one of the few to investigate whether perinatal status (defined as pregnancy or early postpartum) impacts the help seeking of abused women. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 3 years of prosecutor administrative records, police incident reports, and hospital medical records for a countywide population of adult females (n?=?964) assaulted by an intimate partner in 2000. Perinatal and nonperinatal victims were compared using chi-square and a series of logistic regression models, controlling for all demographic and incident-related factors. Results Compared with women across the county, abused women were twice as likely to become pregnant (p?Perinatal status did not change the rate of help seeking from police (OR 1.1, p?=?0.67) or emergency departments (ED) (OR 1.1, p?=?0.94), but it did change the pattern of help seeking with higher ED use in the 6 months prior to the assault (p?Perinatal status impacts how victims seek help from criminal justice agencies and EDs.

Cerulli, Catherine; Marcus, Steven; Rhodes, Karin V.

2009-01-01

362

[Paternal grief and nursing care in perinatal deaths].  

PubMed

Perinatal death distresses all family members. Paternal perceptions of perinatal death should be better understood in order to help the expectant father maintain long-term health and quality of life and minimize the potential negative effects of paternal grieving and stress on family and marital relations. Male and female grieving behaviors have been shown to differ significantly. Taiwan society typically expects males to be strong and support the family while avoiding the overt expression or revelation of personal feelings such as grief, regret, and anger. Although fathers may be reluctant to express a need for care, care personnel may facilitate care through such activities as understanding of a perinatal-death father's feelings, providing related messages about the event to facilitate good decisions, helping him support his spouse, helping him adopt appropriate behaviors and attitudes toward the fetus, and treating him as a grieving father rather than a medical event. This article reviews the literature to explore paternal perceptions and reactions toward perinatal death in order to recognize nursing needs and principles of grieving fathers within the Taiwan cultural context. Further study in this area is recommended. PMID:24310558

Su, Yu-Ting; Chen, Fu-Hsuan

2013-12-01

363

Perinatal antidepressant use: understanding women's preferences and concerns.  

PubMed

Perinatal depression is prevalent and linked with a host of adverse consequences for women and newborns. Rates of engagement in depression treatment are, however, strikingly low among pregnant and postpartum women, with the majority of affected women receiving no mental health treatment. Research indicates that perinatal women are extremely reluctant to take antidepressant medications, yet the nature of women's concerns and treatment decision- making patterns have not been well documented. Developing a clearer understanding of women's treatment preferences and behaviors may help identify solutions to the under-treatment of perinatal depression. In this mixed methods study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 61 pregnant women, approximately half of whom were experiencing clinical levels of depression. In addition to assessing psychiatric diagnoses, symptoms, and functional impairment, we conducted qualitative interviews addressing women's preferences for depression treatment, concerns, and decision-making patterns. Consistent with prior reports, women were significantly more likely to voice a preference for non-pharmacologic depression treatments, as opposed to antidepressant medications. Many depressed women reported a great degree of uncertainty regarding how to treat their depression, and those with more severe depression symptoms were more likely to endorse decisional conflict. Analysis of qualitative comments yielded detailed information about the nature of women's concerns and preferences related to use of antidepressant medications and other aspects of treatment engagement. We discuss findings in the context of improving patient-centered care for perinatal depression. PMID:24241498

Battle, Cynthia L; Salisbury, Amy L; Schofield, Casey A; Ortiz-Hernandez, Samia

2013-11-01

364

Perinatal Substance Abuse: What's Best for the Children?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, which is based on the work of the Perinatal Substance Exposure Think Tanks, establishes priorities for statewide services in California to young children who are prenatally exposed to alcohol and drugs. Although the report focuses on the developmental needs of children, it also examines efforts to provide prevention and treatment…

Poulsen, Marie Kanne

365

Relative Risk of Perinatal Complications in Common Childhood Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Perinatal complications have been associated with a myriad of later-developing behavioral, neurological, and psychological disorders. These have included school-related disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, mood and anxiety disorders, and learning disabilities. This article reviews the research that considers the…

Dean, Raymond S.; Davis, Andrew S.

2007-01-01

366

Model of Cerebral Palsy in the Perinatal Rabbit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perinatal brain injury results in one of the highest burdens of disease in view of the lifelong consequences and is of enormous cost to society. This makes it imperative to develop better animal models that mimic the human condition. Many neurodevelopmental deficits, such as cerebral palsy, are believed to be a result of prenatal hypoxia-ischemia in humans. Fetal global hypoxia-ischemia

Sidhartha Tan; Alexander Drobyshevsky; Tamas Jilling; Xinhai Ji; Lauren M. Ullman; Ila Englof; Matthew Derrick

2005-01-01

367

Perinatal Cyanosis: Long-Term Cognitive Sequelae and Behavioral Consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research suggests that serious perinatal asphyxia leading to long-term neurological consequences occurs in 1 to 6 out of every 1,000 newborns (Barkovich et al., 1998; Mcguire, 2007). In serious cases, encephalopathy follows the asphyxia and resultant hypoxia, leading to additional insult to the brain. The effects of brief or transient hypoxia and cyanosis have not been well researched. This study

Robert Perna; David Cooper

2012-01-01

368

Perinatal cyanosis: long-term cognitive sequelae and behavioral consequences.  

PubMed

Research suggests that serious perinatal asphyxia leading to long-term neurological consequences occurs in 1 to 6 out of every 1,000 newborns (Barkovich et al., 1998 ; Mcguire, 2007 ). In serious cases, encephalopathy follows the asphyxia and resultant hypoxia, leading to additional insult to the brain. The effects of brief or transient hypoxia and cyanosis have not been well researched. This study involved comparing children who had a brief perinatal episode to those who have not. The research hypothesis is that those children who have experienced a brief perinatal cyanotic episode will subsequently have cognitive and behavioral issues during childhood that will be measurable on neuropsychological testing or result in increased clinical diagnoses. A sample (N = 52) of school-aged children (M(age) = 10.5 years) was divided into those who had had a brief perinatal cyanotic episode (n = 14) and those who had not (n = 38). On neuropsychological testing, data from the tests administered did not suggest any negative effects of a brief cyanotic episode. The cyanotic group was significantly more likely to have a developmental disorder (speech or motor delay) and subsequently be diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Given the high incidence of ADHD in the cyanotic group, it may be reasonable to construe cyanosis as a risk factor. PMID:23428277

Perna, Robert; Cooper, David

2012-01-01

369

Perinatal Mental Health: Supporting New Families through Vulnerability and Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Zero to Three is a single focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that because the perinatal periodfrom the later stages of pregnancy through the first 6 months of the infants lifeis a period of…

Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

2002-01-01

370

Association of Intrauterine Exposure to Maternal Diabetes and Obesity With Type 2 Diabetes in Youth  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—Limited data exist on the association between in utero exposure to maternal diabetes and obesity and type 2 diabetes in diverse youth. These associations were explored in African-American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white youth participating in the SEARCH Case-Control Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 79 youth with type 2 diabetes and 190 nondiabetic control youth aged 10–22 years attended a research visit. In utero exposures to maternal diabetes and obesity were recalled by biological mothers. RESULTS—Youth with type 2 diabetes were more likely to have been exposed to maternal diabetes or obesity in utero than were nondiabetic control youth (P < 0.0001 for each). After adjusting for offspring age, sex, and race/ethnicity, exposure to maternal diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 5.7 [95% CI 2.4–13.4]) and exposure to maternal obesity (2.8 [1.5–5.2]) were independently associated with type 2 diabetes. Adjustment for other perinatal and socioeconomic factors did not alter these associations. When offspring BMI was added, the OR for the association between in utero exposure to obesity and type 2 diabetes was attenuated toward the null (OR 1.1 [0.5–2.4]). Overall, 47.2% (95% CI 30.9–63.5) of type 2 diabetes in youth could be attributed to intrauterine exposure to maternal diabetes and obesity. CONCLUSIONS—Intrauterine exposures to maternal diabetes and obesity are strongly associated with type 2 diabetes in youth. Prevention efforts may need to target, in addition to childhood obesity, the increasing number of pregnancies complicated by obesity and diabetes.

Dabelea, Dana; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Liese, Angela D.; Vehik, Kendra S.; Narayan, K.M. Venkat; Zeitler, Phillip; Hamman, Richard F.

2008-01-01

371

Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy and Neonatal Behavior: A Large-Scale Community Study  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the influence of prospectively-measured smoking during pregnancy on aspects of neonatal behavior in a large, community sample. Patients and Methods Participants were mothers and infants from the Providence Cohort of the National Collaborative Perinatal Project enrolled between 1960 and 1966. Mothers with pregnancy/medical complications and infants with medical complications and/or born premature or low birthweight were excluded. The final sample included 962 mother-infant pairs, of whom 23% were African-American. Maternal smoking was measured prospectively at each prenatal visit. Neonatal behavior was assessed using the Graham-Rosenblith Behavioral Examination of the Neonate. Items from the examination were reduced to three subscales: irritability, muscle tone, response to respiratory challenge. Results Sixty-two percent of the sample reported smoking during pregnancy with 24% of smokers reporting smoking a pack per day or more. We found a significant influence of maternal smoking exposure (none, moderate/less than a pack per day, heavy/pack a day or more) on irritability and muscle tone in the neonate (p's<.005), with exposed infants showing greater irritability and hypertonicity. Effects remained significant after controlling for significant covariates: maternal socioeconomic status, age and race, and infant birthweight and age (p's<.001). Post hoc tests suggested particular effects of heavy smoking on increased infant irritability, but both moderate and heavy smoking exposure on increased muscle tone. Conclusions In a large, community sample, exposure to maternal smoking was associated with increased irritability and hypertonicity in neonates. Exposure to maternal smoking did not influence neonatal response to respiratory challenge. This study is the largest-scale investigation to date of effects of maternal smoking (heavy and moderate) on examiner-assessed neonatal behavior. Given associations between both maternal smoking and infant irritability and later behavioral dysregulation, results have important implications for early identification and intervention with at-risk offspring.

Stroud, Laura R.; Paster, Rachel L.; Goodwin, Matthew S.; Shenassa, Edmond; Buka, Stephen; Niaura, Raymond; Rosenblith, Judy F.; Lipsitt, Lewis P.

2009-01-01

372

Psychosocial impact of perinatal loss among Muslim women  

PubMed Central

Background Women of reproductive age are vulnerable to psychosocial problems, but these have remained largely unexplored in Muslim women in developing countries. The aim of this study was to explore and describe psychosocial impact and social support following perinatal loss among Muslim women. Methods A qualitative study was conducted in a specialist centre among Muslim mothers who had experienced perinatal loss. Purposive sampling to achieve maximum variation among Muslims in relation to age, parity and previous perinatal death was used. Data was collected by focus group discussion and in-depth unstructured interview until the saturation point met. Sixteen mothers who had recent perinatal loss of wanted pregnancy, had received antenatal follow up from public or private health clinics, and had delivery in our centre participated for the study. All of them had experienced psychological difficulties including feelings of confusion, emptiness and anxiety over facing another pregnancy. Results Two out of sixteen showed anger and one felt guilt. They reported experiencing a lack of communication and privacy in the hospital during the period of grief. Family members and friends play an important role in providing support. The majority agreed that the decision makers were husbands and families instead of themselves. The respondents felt that repetitive reminder of whatever happened was a test from God improved their sense of self-worth. They appreciated this reminder especially when it came from husband, family or friends closed to them. Conclusion Muslim mothers who had experienced perinatal loss showed some level of adverse psychosocial impact which affected their feelings. Husbands and family members were the main decision makers for Muslim women. Health care providers should provide psychosocial support during antenatal, delivery and postnatal care. On-going support involving husband should be available where needed.

2012-01-01

373

Cortical Reorganization of Language Functioning Following Perinatal Left MCA Stroke  

PubMed Central

Objective Functional MRI was used to determine differences in patterns of cortical activation between children who suffered perinatal left middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and healthy children performing a silent verb generation task. Methods Ten children with prior perinatal left MCA stroke (age 6–16 years) and ten healthy age matched controls completed an executive language activation task. FMRI scans were acquired on a 3T scanner using T2* weighted gradient echo, echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence. Random Effects Analysis and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) were used to compute activation maps. Results Both analysis methods demonstrated alternative activation of cortical areas in children with perinatal stroke. Following perinatal stroke, typical left dominant productive language areas in the inferior frontal gyrus were displaced to anatomical identical areas in the right hemisphere (p=0.001). In addition, stroke patients showed more bilateral activation in superior temporal and anterior cingulate gyri and increased activation in primary visual cortex when compared to healthy controls. There was no relation between lesion size and the degree of right hemisphere activation. ICA analysis showed that the healthy controls had a negative correlation with the time course in the right inferior frontal gyrus in the same region that was activated in stroke subjects. Interpretation This functional MRI study in children revealed novel patterns of cortical language reorganization following perinatal stroke. The addition of ICA is complementary to Random Effects analysis, allowing for the exploration of potential subtle differences in pathways in functional MRI data obtained from both healthy and pathological groups.

Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Byars, Anna W.; Jacola, Lisa M.; Schapiro, Mark B.; Schmithorst, Vince J.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.

2009-01-01

374

Maternal diabetes programs hypertension and kidney injury in offspring.  

PubMed

We investigated whether maternal diabetes programs the offspring to develop hypertension and kidney injury in adulthood and examined potential underlying mechanisms. In a murine model we studied the offspring of three groups of dams (non-diabetic, diabetic, and diabetic treated with insulin). Mean systolic blood pressure in the offspring was monitored from 8 to 20 weeks. Body and kidney weights in the offspring of diabetic mothers were significantly lower than in offspring of non-diabetic mothers. Offspring of diabetic mothers developed hypertension, microalbuminuria, and glucose intolerance. Increased accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the glomeruli and marked upregulation of angiotensinogen, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme, transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta1), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression were evident in the renal cortex of hypertensive offspring of diabetic mothers. By contrast, angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) gene expression was lower in the hypertensive offspring of diabetic mothers than in that of non-diabetic mothers. These changes were prevented in the offspring of insulin-treated diabetic mothers. These data indicate that maternal diabetes induces perinatal programming of hypertension, renal injury, and glucose intolerance in the offspring and suggest a central role for the activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and TGF-beta1 gene expression in this process. PMID:20422227

Chen, Yun-Wen; Chenier, Isabelle; Tran, Stella; Scotcher, Michael; Chang, Shiao-Ying; Zhang, Shao-Ling

2010-07-01

375

Maternal or neonatal infection: association with neonatal encephalopathy outcomes.  

PubMed

Background:Perinatal infection may potentiate brain injury among children born preterm. The objective of this study was to examine whether maternal and/or neonatal infection are associated with adverse outcomes among term neonates with encephalopathy.Methods:This study is a cohort study of 258 term newborns with encephalopathy whose clinical records were examined for signs of maternal infection (chorioamnionitis) and infant infection (sepsis). Multivariate regression was used to assess associations between infection, pattern, and severity of injury on neonatal magnetic resonance imaging, as well as neurodevelopment at 30 mo (neuromotor examination, or Bayley Scales of Infant Development, second edition mental development index <70 or Bayley Scales of Infant Development, third edition cognitive score <85).Results:Chorioamnionitis was associated with lower risk of moderate-severe brain injury (adjusted odds ratio: 0.3; 95% confidence interval: 0.1-0.7; P = 0.004) and adverse cognitive outcome in children when compared with no chorioamnionitis. Children with signs of neonatal sepsis were more likely to exhibit watershed predominant injury than those without (P = 0.007).Conclusion:Among neonates with encephalopathy, chorioamnionitis was associated with a lower risk of brain injury and adverse outcomes, whereas signs of neonatal sepsis carried an elevated risk. The etiology of encephalopathy and timing of infection and its associated inflammatory response may influence whether infection potentiates or mitigates injury in term newborns. PMID:24713817

Jenster, Meike; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Ruel, Theodore; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Tam, Emily W; Partridge, John Colin; Barkovich, Anthony James; Ferriero, Donna M; Glass, Hannah C

2014-07-01

376

Defining a conceptual framework for near-miss maternal morbidity.  

PubMed

Maternal mortality is the major indicator used to monitor maternal health in the United States. For every woman who dies, however, many suffer serious life-threatening complications of pregnancy. Yet relatively little attention has been given to identifying a general category of morbidities that could be called near misses. Characterizing near-miss morbidity is valuable for monitoring the quality of hospital-based obstetric care and for assessing the incidence of life-threatening complications. Cases of near-miss morbidity also provide an appropriate comparison group both for dinical case review and for epidemiologic analysis. This paper presents an initial framework and a process for the definition and identification of near-miss morbidity that minimizes loss of information yet has practical utility. A clinical review team classified 22 of 186 women as near misses and 164 as other severe morbidity. A quantitative score classified 28 women as near misses and 156 as other severe morbidity. Precise classification of near-miss morbidity is the first step in analyzing factors that may differentiate survival from death on the continuum from morbidity to mortality. Ultimately, a methodology for the identification and analysis of near-miss morbidity will allow for integrated morbidity and mortality reviews that can then be institutionalized. The results will serve as important models for other researchers, state health agencies, and regionalized perinatal systems that are engaged in morbidity and mortality surveillance. PMID:12146602

Geller, Stacie E; Rosenberg, Deborah; Cox, Suzanne M; Kilpatrick, Sarah

2002-01-01

377

Institutional productivities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We considered the 5707 research papers published in the ApJ, AJ, and PASP in 1952, 1962, 1972, 1982, and 1992. For each paper we noted the affiliations and, assuming that each of n authors should get credit for one/n paper for his/her institution, we determined the numbers of papers published by 38 preselected institutions, the remaining other U.S. institutions, and non-U.S. institutions. The ten or 20 most- productive institutions are listed for each year. In many cases the institutions with the largest staffs are at the top of the lists. Then we determined the numbers of AAS members at each institution and computed the mean number of papers per AAS member. We found that pure research organizations have the highest productivity per AAS member and the averages decrease as we progress to institutions whose staff members have many other commitments in addition to research.

Abt, Helmut A.

1993-07-01

378

Maternal nodal and zebrafish embryogenesis.  

PubMed

In fish and amphibians, the dorsal axis is specified by the asymmetric localization of maternally provided components of the Wnt signalling pathway. Gore et al. suggest that the Nodal signal Squint (Sqt) is required as a maternally provided dorsal determinant in zebrafish. Here we test their proposal and show that the maternal activities of sqt and the related Nodal gene cyclops (cyc) are not required for dorsoventral patterning. PMID:17994032

Bennett, James T; Stickney, Heather L; Choi, Wen-Yee; Ciruna, Brian; Talbot, William S; Schier, Alexander F

2007-11-01

379

Translational control of maternal RNAs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early development of many species depends on the temporal and spatial control of maternal gene products. This review discusses the control of maternal mRNAs that encode regulators of C. elegans embryogenesis. In the C. elegans embryo, maternal mRNA regulation is crucial to the patterning of early cell fates. Translational control of key mRNAs spatially organizes cell signaling pathways, localizes transcription

Thomas C. Evans; Craig P. Hunter

2005-01-01

380

Adolescent maternal mortality in mozambique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To describe adolescent maternal mortality and analyze its avoidability.Methods: An audit approach was used to clarify the presence of avoidable factors in 239 maternal deaths, of which 22% were among adolescents.Results: The main causes of adolescent death were malaria, pregnancy-induced hypertension, puerperal sepsis, and septic abortion. The audit classified as avoidable 75% of all maternal deaths.Conclusion: Adequate strategies addressing

Ana Carla L Granja; Fernanda Machungo; Aurelio Gomes; Staffan Bergström

2001-01-01

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