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Sample records for perinephric tissues ct

  1. Factors Predicting Adhesion between Renal Capsule and Perinephric Adipose Tissue in Partial Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kurahashi, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Yuko; Wada, Koichiro; Sasaki, Katsumi; Araki, Motoo; Ebara, Shin; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-04-01

    In minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN), it is important to preoperatively predict the degree of difficulty of tumor resection. When severe adhesions occur between the renal capsule and perinephric adipose tissue, detachment can be difficult. Preoperative prediction of adhesion is thought to be useful in the selection of surgical procedure. Subjects were 63 patients of a single surgeon who had received MIPN between April 2008 and August 2013 at Okayama University Hospital. Of these patients, this study followed 47 in whom the presence or absence of adhesions between the renal capsule and perinephric adipose tissue was confirmed using intraoperative videos. Data collected included: sex, BMI, CT finding (presence of fi broids in perinephric adipose tissue), comorbidities and lifestyle. Adhesion was observed in 7 patients (14.9%). The mean operative time was 291.6 min in the adhesion group, and 226.3 min in the group without. The increased time in the adhesions group was significant (p<0.05). Predictive factors were a positive CT finding for fibroid structure and comorbidity of hypertension (p<0.05). In MIPN, difficulty of surgery can be affected by the presence of adhesion of the perinephric adipose tissue. Predicting such adhesion from preoperative CT is thus important. PMID:27094831

  2. Computed tomography findings in bilateral perinephric lymphangiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, Aijaz; Gojwari, Tariq A; Reyaz, Sheikh; Rasool, Shubana; Shafi, Hakim; Mufti, Shahida

    2010-01-01

    Perinephric lymphangioma is rare disorder that may be confused with various forms of renal cystic diseases and urinomas. In this disorder a developmental malformation results in failure of developing lymphatic tissue to establish normal communication with the rest of lymphatic system. Once there is restricted drainage of lymphatic fluid the lymphatic channels dilate to form cystic masses that may be unilocular or multilocular and may be seen unilaterally or bilaterally .This condition presents with various signs and symptoms or can be just an incidental finding which in presence of misleading clinical history may be confused with other diseases. CT scan with delayed cuts and USG guided aspiration with biochemical analysis of fluid will help us in arriving to final diagnosis. PMID:20842254

  3. Imaging Manifestations of Hematologic Diseases with Renal and Perinephric Involvement.

    PubMed

    Purysko, Andrei S; Westphalen, Antonio C; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Leão Filho, Hilton M; Herts, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys and perinephric tissues can be affected by a variety of hematologic disorders, which usually occur in the setting of multisystem involvement. In many of these disorders, imaging is used to evaluate the extent of disease, guide biopsy, and/or monitor disease activity and patient response to therapy. Lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma commonly manifest as multiple parenchymal or perinephric lesions. Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease, rare forms of multisystemic histiocytosis, are often identified as perinephric and periureteral masses. Renal abnormalities depicted at imaging in patients with sickle cell disease include renal enlargement, papillary necrosis, and renal medullary carcinoma. Sickle cell disease, along with other causes of intravascular hemolysis, can also lead to hemosiderosis of the renal cortex. Thrombosis of renal veins is sometimes seen in patients with coagulation disorders but more often occurs in association with certain malignancies and nephrotic syndrome. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease is another multisystem process that often produces focal renal lesions, seen along with involvement of more characteristic organs such as the pancreas. Perinephric lesions with calcifications should raise the possibility of secondary amyloidosis, especially in patients with a history of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the imaging patterns of renal and perinephric involvement are usually not specific for a single entity, and the same entity can manifest with different or overlapping patterns, familiarity with these patterns and key clinical and histopathologic features may help to narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the next step of care. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27257766

  4. Perinephric abscess caused by ruptured retrocecal appendix: MDCT demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Nisar Ahmad; Farooq, Mir; Gojwari, Tariq; Kosar, Tasleem

    2010-01-01

    Acute appendicitis may occasionally become extraordinarily complicated and life threatening yet difficult to diagnose. One such presentation is described in a 60-year-old man who was brought to the hospital due to right lumbar pain and fever for the last 15 days. Ultrasonography showed a right perinephric gas and fluid collection. Abdominal computed tomography with multidetector-row CT (MDCT) revealed gas-containing abscess in the right retroperitoneal region involving the perinephric space, extending from the lower pole of the right kidney up to the bare area of the liver. Inflamed retrocecal appendix was seen on thick multiplanar reformat images with its tip at the lower extent of the abscess. Laparotomy and retroperitoneal exploration were performed immediately and a large volume of foul smelling pus was drained. A ruptured retrocecal appendix was confirmed as the cause of the abscess. PMID:20842255

  5. CT of soft-tissue neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Weekes, R.G.; McLeod, R.A.; Reiman, H.M.; Pritchard, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    The computed tomographic scans (CT) of 84 patients with untreated soft-tissue neoplasms were studied, 75 with primary and nine with secondary lesions. Each scan was evaluated using several criteria: homogeneity and density, presence and type of calcification, presence of bony destruction, involvement of multiple muscle groups, definition of adjacent fat, border definition, and vessel or nerve involvement. CT demonstrated the lesion in all 84 patients and showed excellent anatomic detail in 64 of the 75 patients with primary neoplasms. The CT findings were characteristic enough to suggest the histology of the neoplasm in only 13 lesions (nine lipomas, three hemangiomas, one neurofibroma). No malignant neoplasm had CT characteristics specific enough to differentiate it from any other malignant tumor. However, malignant neoplasms could be differentiated from benign neoplasms in 88% of the cases.

  6. CT volumetry of the skeletal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Brindle, James M.; Alexandre Trindade, A.; Pichardo, Jose C.; Myers, Scott L.; Shah, Amish P.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is an important and widely used modality in the diagnosis and treatment of various cancers. In the field of molecular radiotherapy, the use of spongiosa volume (combined tissues of the bone marrow and bone trabeculae) has been suggested as a means to improve the patient-specificity of bone marrow dose estimates. The noninvasive estimation of an organ volume comes with some degree of error or variation from the true organ volume. The present study explores the ability to obtain estimates of spongiosa volume or its surrogate via manual image segmentation. The variation among different segmentation raters was explored and found not to be statistically significant (p value >0.05). Accuracy was assessed by having several raters manually segment a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe with known volumes. Segmentation of the outer region of the PVC pipe resulted in mean percent errors as great as 15% while segmentation of the pipe's inner region resulted in mean percent errors within {approx}5%. Differences between volumes estimated with the high-resolution CT data set (typical of ex vivo skeletal scans) and the low-resolution CT data set (typical of in vivo skeletal scans) were also explored using both patient CT images and a PVC pipe phantom. While a statistically significant difference (p value <0.002) between the high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was observed with excised femoral heads obtained following total hip arthroplasty, the mean difference between high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was found to be only 1.24 and 2.18 cm{sup 3} for spongiosa and cortical bone, respectively. With respect to differences observed with the PVC pipe, the variation between the high-resolution and low-resolution mean percent errors was a high as {approx}20% for the outer region volume estimates and only as high as {approx}6% for the inner region volume estimates. The findings from this study suggest that manual segmentation is a reasonably accurate

  7. Splenectomy and risk of renal and perinephric abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Little epidemiological research is available on the relationship between splenectomy and renal and perinephric abscesses. The purpose of the study was to examine this issue in Taiwan. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using the hospitalization dataset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. A total of 16,426 participants aged 20 and older who were newly diagnosed with splenectomy from 1998 to 2010 were assigned to the splenectomy group, whereas 65,653 sex-matched, age-matched, and comorbidity-matched, randomly selected participants without splenectomy were assigned to the nonsplenectomy group. The incidence of renal and perinephric abscesses at the end of 2011 was measured in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of renal and perinephric abscesses associated with splenectomy and other comorbidities including cystic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis. The overall incidence rate of renal and perinephric abscesses was 2.14-fold greater in the splenectomy group than that in the nonsplenectomy group (2.24 per 10,000 person-years vs 1.05 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 2.02, 2.28). After controlling for sex, age, cystic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis, the multivariable regression analysis demonstrated that the adjusted HR of renal and perinephric abscesses was 2.24 for the splenectomy group (95 % CI 1.30, 3.88), when compared with the nonsplenectomy group. In further analysis, the adjusted HR markedly increased to 7.69 for those comorbid with splenectomy and diabetes mellitus (95% CI 3.31, 17.9). Splenectomy is associated with renal and perinephric abscesses, particularly comorbid with diabetes mellitus. In view of its potential morbidity and mortality, clinicians should consider the possibility of renal and perinephric

  8. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm2 pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  9. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-03-21

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  10. An increasing proportion of perinephric to subcutaneous fat is associated with adverse perioperative outcomes of robotic partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Reynolds, Christopher; Hannon, Michael

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the association of perinephric fat (PF) thickness and the ratio of perinephric to subcutaneous fat (PF:SF) thickness on perioperative outcomes following robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN), 240 patients undergoing RPN with preoperative computed tomography (CT) axial imaging were included. Perinephric and subcutaneous fat thickness was measured at the level of the renal vein and umbilicus, respectively. The association between PF thickness and PF:SF ratio and perioperative outcomes was determined by Spearman correlation and logistic regression. 121 men and 119 women with a median age of 55 years, BMI of 32, tumor size of 2.6 cm, and RENAL nephrometry score of 6 were included. On preoperative imaging, median PF thickness was 2.2 cm, SF thickness was 3.1 cm, and PF:SF ratio was 0.63. There were statistically significant positive correlations between PF thickness (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.26, p = 0.001) and PF:SF ratio (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.33, p < 0.0001) with longer operative duration of RPN. In addition, an increasing PF:SF ratio was associated with a greater risk of perioperative complications (OR = 1.82, 95 % CI 1.1-3.0, p = 0.02). No association was observed with respect to ischemia time, blood loss, length of stay, or margin status. PF thickness is associated with longer OR duration, and a greater PF:SF ratio correlated with increased OR duration and complications following RPN. These easily measured indices of fat distribution are likely more accurate in predicting perioperative outcomes after RPN than BMI alone. PMID:27160676

  11. Fully automated adipose tissue measurement on abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Sussman, Daniel L.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-03-01

    Obesity has become widespread in America and has been associated as a risk factor for many illnesses. Adipose tissue (AT) content, especially visceral AT (VAT), is an important indicator for risks of many disorders, including heart disease and diabetes. Measuring adipose tissue (AT) with traditional means is often unreliable and inaccurate. CT provides a means to measure AT accurately and consistently. We present a fully automated method to segment and measure abdominal AT in CT. Our method integrates image preprocessing which attempts to correct for image artifacts and inhomogeneities. We use fuzzy cmeans to cluster AT regions and active contour models to separate subcutaneous and visceral AT. We tested our method on 50 abdominal CT scans and evaluated the correlations between several measurements.

  12. Noncontrast helical CT for ureteral stones.

    PubMed

    Boridy, I C; Nikolaidis, P; Kawashima, A; Sandler, C M; Goldman, S M

    1998-01-01

    Noncontrast helical computed tomography (CT) has recently been found to be superior to excretory urography (IVU) in the evaluation of patients with suspected ureterolithiasis. Noncontrast helical CT does not require the use of intravenous contrast material with its associated cost and risk of adverse reactions and can be completed within 5 min, in most cases. Noncontrast CT often detects extraurinary pathology responsible for the patient's symptoms. CT is also more sensitive than IVU in detecting the calculus, regardless of its size, location, and chemical composition. However, confidently differentiating ureteral calculi from phleboliths along the course of the ureter may, at times, be difficult. The "tissue-rim" sign, a rim of soft tissue attenuation around the suspicious calcification, is helpful in making this distinction. Noncontrast CT does not provide physiological information about renal function and the degree of obstruction. A pilot study has suggested a proportional relationship between the extent of perinephric edema and the degree of obstruction. The cost of the examination and the radiation dose delivered to the patient may be higher with CT. Despite these limitations, noncontrast helical CT has quickly become the imaging study of choice in evaluating patients with acute flank pain. PMID:9542010

  13. Perinephric and epididymal fat affect hepatic metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shlomo, Shani; Einstein, Francine H; Zvibel, Isabel; Atias, Dikla; Shlomai, Amir; Halpern, Zamir; Barzilai, Nir; Fishman, Sigal

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined whether the perinephric and epididymal visceral fat (PEVF) depot under short-term excess nutrient protected the liver by trapping nutrient-derived nonesterified free fatty acids (NEFAs) or had deleterious effects on hepatic triglycerides (TGs) accumulation and insulin resistance due to adipokine secretion. Young rats pre-emptively underwent surgical PEVF removal or sham operations and were fed with either high-fat diet (HFD) (PEVF-HFD) or regular chow (RC) (PEVF-RC) for 3 days. Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Liver TG, serum NEFA, and fat-derived adipokines were assessed. Insulin and lipogenesis signaling were assessed by western blots. Pre-emptive PEVF removal significantly decreases insulin-induced suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) both in RC and in HFD-fed rats. In accordance with the clamp results, hepatic TG accumulation is also significantly reduced by PEVF excision both in RC and HFD-fed rats. These results are further validated by insulin signaling results, which show that pre-emptive PEVF removal increases phosphorylation of hepatic Akt, irrespective of diet. Notably, high levels of serum leptin induced by HFD are significantly reduced by pre-emptive PEVF excision. Additionally, expression of lipogenic enzyme p-acetyl-CoA-carboxylase, denoting reduced lipogenesis, is increased in the PEVF-HFD rats. In conclusion, PEVF has a deleterious effect on the liver as a source of insulin resistance-inducing adipokines irrespective of diet, and does not serve as a buffer for excess nutrients. PMID:21818154

  14. Splenectomy and risk of renal and perinephric abscesses: A population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-08-01

    Little epidemiological research is available on the relationship between splenectomy and renal and perinephric abscesses. The purpose of the study was to examine this issue in Taiwan.We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using the hospitalization dataset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. A total of 16,426 participants aged 20 and older who were newly diagnosed with splenectomy from 1998 to 2010 were assigned to the splenectomy group, whereas 65,653 sex-matched, age-matched, and comorbidity-matched, randomly selected participants without splenectomy were assigned to the nonsplenectomy group. The incidence of renal and perinephric abscesses at the end of 2011 was measured in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of renal and perinephric abscesses associated with splenectomy and other comorbidities including cystic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis.The overall incidence rate of renal and perinephric abscesses was 2.14-fold greater in the splenectomy group than that in the nonsplenectomy group (2.24 per 10,000 person-years vs 1.05 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 2.02, 2.28). After controlling for sex, age, cystic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, urinary tract infection, and urolithiasis, the multivariable regression analysis demonstrated that the adjusted HR of renal and perinephric abscesses was 2.24 for the splenectomy group (95 % CI 1.30, 3.88), when compared with the nonsplenectomy group. In further analysis, the adjusted HR markedly increased to 7.69 for those comorbid with splenectomy and diabetes mellitus (95% CI 3.31, 17.9).Splenectomy is associated with renal and perinephric abscesses, particularly comorbid with diabetes mellitus. In view of its potential morbidity and mortality, clinicians should consider the possibility of renal and perinephric abscesses when

  15. 18F-FDG PET-CT in soft tissue sarcomas: staging, restaging, and prognostic value?

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Michael; Rubello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the current role of PET/computed tomography (CT) in soft tissue sarcomas with respect to staging, restaging, and prognostic value. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET, for instance, can be very useful in differentiating recurrent disease from scar tissue during follow-up. Other indications of PET-CT are still evolving, especially in the light of new molecular drugs. Different aspects of PET/CT imaging in soft tissue sarcomas are overviewed including organ-specific merits, limitations, and potential pitfalls. Finally, methodological considerations on PET/MRI are also briefly discussed. PMID:26457597

  16. Bilateral perinephric fluid accumulation: an unusual manifestation of pulmonary hypertension--a case report.

    PubMed

    Pentimone, F; Meola, M; Del Corso, L

    1993-06-01

    This is the case report of a forty-seven-year-old man with an ostium secundum atrial septal defect and a very high grade of pulmonary hypertension, associated with a large bilateral perinephric fluid accumulation. The fluid accumulation was remarkably reduced after eleven phlebotomies over a twelve-month period. A pathogenetic relation with the Eisenmenger's syndrome is discussed. No previous report of this association has been found in a survey of the literature. PMID:8503517

  17. Brain tissue segmentation in 4D CT using voxel classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boom, R.; Oei, M. T. H.; Lafebre, S.; Oostveen, L. J.; Meijer, F. J. A.; Steens, S. C. A.; Prokop, M.; van Ginneken, B.; Manniesing, R.

    2012-02-01

    A method is proposed to segment anatomical regions of the brain from 4D computer tomography (CT) patient data. The method consists of a three step voxel classification scheme, each step focusing on structures that are increasingly difficult to segment. The first step classifies air and bone, the second step classifies vessels and the third step classifies white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. As features the time averaged intensity value and the temporal intensity change value were used. In each step, a k-Nearest-Neighbor classifier was used to classify the voxels. Training data was obtained by placing regions of interest in reconstructed 3D image data. The method has been applied to ten 4D CT cerebral patient data. A leave-one-out experiment showed consistent and accurate segmentation results.

  18. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  19. 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in rat adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zyirek, M.; Flood, C.; Longcope, C.

    1987-11-01

    We measured the 5 ..cap alpha..-reductase activity in isolated cell preparations of rat adipose tissue using the formation of (/sup 3/H) dihydrotestosterone from (/sup 3/H) testosterone as an endpoint. Stromal cells were prepared from the epididymal fat pad, perinephric fat, and subcutaneous fat of male rats and from perinephric fat of female rats. Adipocytes were prepared from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat of male rats. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat contained greater 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity than did the adipocytes from these depots. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad contained greater activity than those from perinephric and subcutaneous depots. Perinephric stromal cells from female rats were slightly more active than those from male rats. Estradiol (10/sup -8/ M), when added to the medium, caused a 90% decrease in 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity. Aromatase activity was minimal, several orders of magnitude less than 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity in each tissue studied.

  20. CT Hounsfield Numbers of Soft Tissues on Unenhanced Abdominal CT Scans: Variability Between Two Different Manufacturers’ MDCT Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P.; Corwin, Michael T.; Li, Chin-Shang; Tran, Tien; Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT of the same patient vary on repeat scans done on two different manufacturers’ MDCT scanners. MATERIALS AND METHODS A database search was performed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent unenhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed both on a Volume CT (GE Healthcare) and a Definition AS Plus (Siemens Healthcare) 64-MDCT scanner within 12 months of each other. After excluding those patients for whom Hounsfield unit measurements would be affected by mitigating factors, 48 patients (mean age, 58.8 years) were identified. Hounsfield unit measurements were obtained in nine different soft-tissue anatomic locations on each scan, and the location of these sites was kept identical on each scan pair. Data were analyzed to evaluate Hounsfield unit differences between these scanners. RESULTS In general, there was a low consistency in the Hounsfield unit measurements for each of these sites on scans obtained by the two scanners, with the subcutaneous fat in the left posterolateral flank showing the lowest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.198). There were differences in the Hounsfield unit measurements obtained in all anatomic sites on scans obtained by both scanners. Mean Hounsfield unit measurements obtained on the Definition AS Plus scanner were lower than those obtained on the Volume CT scanner, with the intriguing exception of the anterior midline subcutaneous fat Hounsfield unit measurements, which were higher on the Definition AS Plus scanner. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION Hounsfield unit measurements for unenhanced abdominal soft tissues of the same patient vary between scanners of two common MDCT manufacturers. PMID:25341139

  1. Spontaneous peri-nephric hematoma in a patient with acute kidney injury following Russell's viper envenomation.

    PubMed

    Golay, Vishal; Roychowdhary, Arpita; Pandey, Rajendra

    2015-03-01

    Snake bite envenomation is a common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the tropics and severe coagulopathy with bleeding manifestations is usually seen, especially with viperine bites. We present a case of a 34-year-old male who had developed AKI following Russell's viper envenomation along with disseminated intravascular coagulation. The patient was seemingly improving during the course of his treatment but subsequently developed a spontaneous unilateral peri-nephric hematoma and finally succumbed to this complication. This is a rare presentation that can be clinically innoccuous in a disease where there are multiple bleeding manifestations and, carries a very poor outcome. PMID:25758885

  2. A method for estimating radiation interaction coefficients for tissues from single energy CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    A parametric model for the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient is used to describe the compositional dependence of Hounsfield numbers measured by medical CT scanners. Measurements with materials of known density and composition, that span and evenly sample the compositional range of tissues, are written as linear simultaneous equations and solved for model coefficients. An algorithm is identified for this purpose. Results are expressed as atomic cross-sections in units of barn per electron divided by the attenuation coefficient for water. With the CT scanner characterised, a virtual CT scan can be simulated to predict HN for tissues based upon their known density and composition. Similar calculations using the tabulations and mixture rule deliver attenuation coefficients and mass energy absorption coefficients for mono-energetic radiation 10 keV to 20 MeV. Results are presented for measurements with a radiotherapy CT simulator, the RMI-467 phantom with tissue substitute materials, plus common polymer materials and silicon. Published measurements with earlier generations of the phantom and tissue substitutes using different CT scanners are also considered. Measured atomic cross-sections differ from expectations for mono-energetic radiation due to the use of a filtered spectrum and energy integrating detection system. The cross-sections for different CT scanners are similar, without large variations with kVp. Results are presented showing the relationship between predicted HN for tissues, electron density and photon interaction coefficients for healthy tissues and mono-energetic radiation. A strategy is suggested for accommodating strongly attenuating materials such as calculi and metallic implants.

  3. A method for estimating radiation interaction coefficients for tissues from single energy CT.

    PubMed

    Midgley, S M

    2014-12-01

    A parametric model for the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient is used to describe the compositional dependence of Hounsfield numbers measured by medical CT scanners. Measurements with materials of known density and composition, that span and evenly sample the compositional range of tissues, are written as linear simultaneous equations and solved for model coefficients. An algorithm is identified for this purpose. Results are expressed as atomic cross-sections in units of barn per electron divided by the attenuation coefficient for water. With the CT scanner characterised, a virtual CT scan can be simulated to predict HN for tissues based upon their known density and composition. Similar calculations using the tabulations and mixture rule deliver attenuation coefficients and mass energy absorption coefficients for mono-energetic radiation 10 keV to 20 MeV. Results are presented for measurements with a radiotherapy CT simulator, the RMI-467 phantom with tissue substitute materials, plus common polymer materials and silicon. Published measurements with earlier generations of the phantom and tissue substitutes using different CT scanners are also considered. Measured atomic cross-sections differ from expectations for mono-energetic radiation due to the use of a filtered spectrum and energy integrating detection system. The cross-sections for different CT scanners are similar, without large variations with kVp. Results are presented showing the relationship between predicted HN for tissues, electron density and photon interaction coefficients for healthy tissues and mono-energetic radiation. A strategy is suggested for accommodating strongly attenuating materials such as calculi and metallic implants. PMID:25393760

  4. An Open Environment CT-US Fusion for Tissue Segmentation during Interventional Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Caskey, Charles F.; Hlawitschka, Mario; Qin, Shengping; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Cardiff, Robert D.; Boone, John M.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound (US) can be noninvasively focused to activate drugs, ablate tumors and deliver drugs beyond the blood brain barrier. However, well-controlled guidance of US therapy requires fusion with a navigational modality, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or X-ray computed tomography (CT). Here, we developed and validated tissue characterization using a fusion between US and CT. The performance of the CT/US fusion was quantified by the calibration error, target registration error and fiducial registration error. Met-1 tumors in the fat pads of 12 female FVB mice provided a model of developing breast cancer with which to evaluate CT-based tissue segmentation. Hounsfield units (HU) within the tumor and surrounding fat pad were quantified, validated with histology and segmented for parametric analysis (fat: −300 to 0 HU, protein-rich: 1 to 300 HU, and bone: HU>300). Our open source CT/US fusion system differentiated soft tissue, bone and fat with a spatial accuracy of ∼1 mm. Region of interest (ROI) analysis of the tumor and surrounding fat pad using a 1 mm2 ROI resulted in mean HU of 68±44 within the tumor and −97±52 within the fat pad adjacent to the tumor (p<0.005). The tumor area measured by CT and histology was correlated (r2 = 0.92), while the area designated as fat decreased with increasing tumor size (r2 = 0.51). Analysis of CT and histology images of the tumor and surrounding fat pad revealed an average percentage of fat of 65.3% vs. 75.2%, 36.5% vs. 48.4%, and 31.6% vs. 38.5% for tumors <75 mm3, 75–150 mm3 and >150 mm3, respectively. Further, CT mapped bone-soft tissue interfaces near the acoustic beam during real-time imaging. Combined CT/US is a feasible method for guiding interventions by tracking the acoustic focus within a pre-acquired CT image volume and characterizing tissues proximal to and surrounding the acoustic focus. PMID:22132098

  5. An open environment CT-US fusion for tissue segmentation during interventional guidance.

    PubMed

    Caskey, Charles F; Hlawitschka, Mario; Qin, Shengping; Mahakian, Lisa M; Cardiff, Robert D; Boone, John M; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound (US) can be noninvasively focused to activate drugs, ablate tumors and deliver drugs beyond the blood brain barrier. However, well-controlled guidance of US therapy requires fusion with a navigational modality, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or X-ray computed tomography (CT). Here, we developed and validated tissue characterization using a fusion between US and CT. The performance of the CT/US fusion was quantified by the calibration error, target registration error and fiducial registration error. Met-1 tumors in the fat pads of 12 female FVB mice provided a model of developing breast cancer with which to evaluate CT-based tissue segmentation. Hounsfield units (HU) within the tumor and surrounding fat pad were quantified, validated with histology and segmented for parametric analysis (fat: -300 to 0 HU, protein-rich: 1 to 300 HU, and bone: HU>300). Our open source CT/US fusion system differentiated soft tissue, bone and fat with a spatial accuracy of ∼1 mm. Region of interest (ROI) analysis of the tumor and surrounding fat pad using a 1 mm(2) ROI resulted in mean HU of 68±44 within the tumor and -97±52 within the fat pad adjacent to the tumor (p<0.005). The tumor area measured by CT and histology was correlated (r(2) = 0.92), while the area designated as fat decreased with increasing tumor size (r(2) = 0.51). Analysis of CT and histology images of the tumor and surrounding fat pad revealed an average percentage of fat of 65.3% vs. 75.2%, 36.5% vs. 48.4%, and 31.6% vs. 38.5% for tumors <75 mm(3), 75-150 mm(3) and >150 mm(3), respectively. Further, CT mapped bone-soft tissue interfaces near the acoustic beam during real-time imaging. Combined CT/US is a feasible method for guiding interventions by tracking the acoustic focus within a pre-acquired CT image volume and characterizing tissues proximal to and surrounding the acoustic focus. PMID:22132098

  6. CT-Based Assessment of Relative Soft-Tissue Alteration in Different Types of Ancient Mummies.

    PubMed

    Sydler, Christina; Öhrström, Lena; Rosendahl, Wilfried; Woitek, Ulrich; Rühli, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Mummification leads to alteration of soft-tissue morphology. No research has focused specifically on differences in soft-tissue shrinkage depending on mummification type. This study evaluated whether soft-tissue alteration is dependent on type of mummification. A total of 17 human mummies have been investigated by computed tomography (CT). Samples included artificially embalmed ancient Egyptian mummies, naturally mummified South American corpses, ice mummies (including the Iceman, South Tyrol Museum of Archeology, Bolzano, Italy, ca. 3,300 BC), bog bodies and a desiccated mummy of possibly Asian provenance. The acquired data were compared to four contemporary bodies. The extent of soft-tissue shrinkage was evaluated using CT data. Shrinkage was defined as soft-tissue relative to area of bone (in number of voxels). Measurements were taken at 13 anatomically defined locations. Ice mummies show the highest degree of preservation. This finding is most likely explained due to frozen water within tissues. All other types of mummies show significantly (at P < 0.05) smaller relative area of preserved soft-tissue. Variation between different anatomical structures (e.g., upper lip vs. mid-femur) is significant, unlike variation within one compartment (e.g., proximal vs. distal humerus). Mummification type strongly affects the degree of soft-tissue alteration, surprisingly mostly independent of overall historical age. These results highlight the unique morphological impact of taphonomy on soft-tissue preservation and are of particular interest in tissue research as well as in forensics. PMID:25998649

  7. Experimental verification of ion stopping power prediction from dual energy CT data in tissue surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farace, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    A two-steps procedure is presented to convert dual-energy CT data to stopping power ratio (SPR), relative to water. In the first step the relative electron density (RED) is calculated from dual-energy CT-numbers by means of a bi-linear relationship: RED = a HUscH + b HUscL + c, where HUscH and HUscL are scaled units (HUsc = HU + 1000) acquired at high and low energy respectively, and the three parameters a, b and c has to be determined for each CT scanner. In the second step the RED values were converted into SPR by means of published poly-line functions, which are invariant as they do not depend on a specific CT scanner. The comparison with other methods provides encouraging results, with residual SPR error on human tissue within 1%. The distinctive features of the proposed method are its simplicity and the generality of the conversion functions.

  8. Evolving Bioprosthetic Tissue Calcification Can Be Quantified Using Serial Multislice CT Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Meuris, B.; De Praetere, H.; Coudyzer, W.; Flameng, W.

    2013-01-01

    Background. We investigated the value of serial multislice CT scanning for in vivo determination of evolving tissue calcification in three separate experimental settings. Materials and Methods. Bioprosthetic valve tissue was implanted in three different conditions: (1) glutaraldehyde-fixed porcine stentless conduits in pulmonary position (n = 6); (2) glutaraldehyde-fixed stented pericardial valves in mitral position (n = 3); and (3) glutaraldehyde-fixed pericardial tissue as patch in the jugular vein and carotid artery (n = 16). Multislice CT scanning was performed at various time intervals. Results. In stentless conduits, the distribution of wall calcification can be reliably quantified with CT. After 20 weeks, the CT-determined mean calcium volume was 1831 ± 581 mm³, with a mean wall calcium content of 89.8 ± 44.4 μg/mg (r2 = 0.68). In stented pericardial valves implanted in mitral position, reliable determination of tissue mineralization is disturbed by scattering caused by the (continuously moving) alloy of the stent material. Pericardial patches in the neck vessels revealed progressive mineralization, with a significant increase in mean HU and calcium volume at 8 weeks after implantation, rising up to a level of 131.1 ± 39.6 mm³ (mean calcium volume score) and a mean calcium content of 19.1 ± 12.3 μg/mg. Conclusion. The process of bioprosthetic tissue mineralization can be visualized and quantified in vivo using multislice CT scanning. This allows determination of the kinetics of tissue mineralization with intermediate in vivo evaluations. PMID:24089616

  9. Optimization of CT image reconstruction algorithms for the lung tissue research consortium (LTRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollough, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Bruesewitz, Michael; Bartholmai, Brian

    2006-03-01

    To create a repository of clinical data, CT images and tissue samples and to more clearly understand the pathogenetic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) launched a cooperative effort known as the Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC). The CT images for the LTRC effort must contain accurate CT numbers in order to characterize tissues, and must have high-spatial resolution to show fine anatomic structures. This study was performed to optimize the CT image reconstruction algorithms to achieve these criteria. Quantitative analyses of phantom and clinical images were conducted. The ACR CT accreditation phantom containing five regions of distinct CT attenuations (CT numbers of approximately -1000 HU, -80 HU, 0 HU, 130 HU and 900 HU), and a high-contrast spatial resolution test pattern, was scanned using CT systems from two manufacturers (General Electric (GE) Healthcare and Siemens Medical Solutions). Phantom images were reconstructed using all relevant reconstruction algorithms. Mean CT numbers and image noise (standard deviation) were measured and compared for the five materials. Clinical high-resolution chest CT images acquired on a GE CT system for a patient with diffuse lung disease were reconstructed using BONE and STANDARD algorithms and evaluated by a thoracic radiologist in terms of image quality and disease extent. The clinical BONE images were processed with a 3 x 3 x 3 median filter to simulate a thicker slice reconstructed in smoother algorithms, which have traditionally been proven to provide an accurate estimation of emphysema extent in the lungs. Using a threshold technique, the volume of emphysema (defined as the percentage of lung voxels having a CT number lower than -950 HU) was computed for the STANDARD, BONE, and BONE filtered. The CT numbers measured in the ACR CT Phantom images were accurate for all reconstruction kernels for both manufacturers. As expected, visual evaluation of the

  10. Automatic tissue classification for high-resolution breast CT images based on bilateral filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Fei, Baowei

    2011-03-01

    Breast tissue classification can provide quantitative measurements of breast composition, density and tissue distribution for diagnosis and identification of high-risk patients. In this study, we present an automatic classification method to classify high-resolution dedicated breast CT images. The breast is classified into skin, fat and glandular tissue. First, we use a multiscale bilateral filter to reduce noise and at the same time keep edges on the images. As skin and glandular tissue have similar CT values in breast CT images, we use morphologic operations to get the mask of the skin based on information of its position. Second, we use a modified fuzzy C-mean classification method twice, one for the skin and the other for the fatty and glandular tissue. We compared our classified results with manually segmentation results and used Dice overlap ratios to evaluate our classification method. We also tested our method using added noise in the images. The overlap ratios for glandular tissue were above 94.7% for data from five patients. Evaluation results showed that our method is robust and accurate.

  11. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaart, René F. Paulides, Margarethus M.; Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Lugt, Aad van der

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, head and neck (H and N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors’ study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H and N HTP. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H and N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRI{sub db}). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H and N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (T{sub max}) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRI{sub db}. Results: In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm

  12. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Aootaphao, Sorapong; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak S.; Rajruangrabin, Jartuwat; Thanasupsombat, Chalinee; Srivongsa, Tanapon; Thajchayapong, Pairash

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter correction scheme to estimate X-ray scatter signals is based on the deconvolution technique using the maximum likelihood estimation maximization (MLEM) method. The scatter kernels are obtained by simulating the PMMA sheet on the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) software. In the experiment, we used the QRM phantom to quantitatively compare with fan-beam CT (FBCT) data in terms of CT number values, contrast to noise ratio, cupping artifacts, and low contrast detectability. Moreover, the PH3 angiography phantom was also used to mimic human soft tissues in the brain. The reconstructed images with our proposed scatter correction show significant improvement on image quality. Thus the proposed scatter correction technique has high potential to detect soft tissues in the brain. PMID:27022608

  13. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT.

    PubMed

    Aootaphao, Sorapong; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak S; Rajruangrabin, Jartuwat; Thanasupsombat, Chalinee; Srivongsa, Tanapon; Thajchayapong, Pairash

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter correction scheme to estimate X-ray scatter signals is based on the deconvolution technique using the maximum likelihood estimation maximization (MLEM) method. The scatter kernels are obtained by simulating the PMMA sheet on the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) software. In the experiment, we used the QRM phantom to quantitatively compare with fan-beam CT (FBCT) data in terms of CT number values, contrast to noise ratio, cupping artifacts, and low contrast detectability. Moreover, the PH3 angiography phantom was also used to mimic human soft tissues in the brain. The reconstructed images with our proposed scatter correction show significant improvement on image quality. Thus the proposed scatter correction technique has high potential to detect soft tissues in the brain. PMID:27022608

  14. TU-F-18C-01: Breast Tissue Decomposition Using Spectral CT After Distortion Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, H; Zhao, B; Klopfer, M; Masaki, F; Baturin, P; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of accurate breast tissue compositional characterization by using spectral-distortion-corrected dual energy images from a photon-counting spectral CT. Methods: Thirty eight postmortem breasts were imaged with a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT)-based photon-counting spectral CT system at beam energy of 100 kVp. The energy-resolved detector sorted photons into low and high energy bins with a splitting energy of 42 keV. The estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) for each breast was approximately 2.0 mGy. Dual energy technique was used to decompose breast tissue into water, lipid, and protein contents. Two image-based methods were investigated to improve the accuracy of tissue compositional characterization. The first method simply limited the recorded spectra up to 90 keV. This reduced the pulse pile-up artifacts but it has some dose penalty. The second method corrected the spectral information of all measured photons by using a spectral distortion correction technique. Breasts were then chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein contents, which was used as the reference standard. The accuracy of the tissue compositional measurement with spectral CT was evaluated by the root-mean-square (RMS) errors in percentage composition. Results: The errors in quantitative material decomposition were significantly reduced after the appropriate image processing methods. As compared to the chemical analysis as the reference standard, the averages of the RMS errors were estimated to be 15.5%, 3.3%, and 2.8% for the raw, energy-limited, and spectral-corrected images, respectively. Conclusion: Spectral CT can be used to accurately quantify the water, lipid, and protein contents in breast tissues by implementing a spectral distortion correction algorithm. The tissue compositional information can potentially improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis.

  15. Dual-energy CT-based material extraction for tissue segmentation in Monte Carlo dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Carrier, Jean-François; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2008-05-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations are performed on patient geometries derived from computed tomography (CT) images. For most available MC codes, the Hounsfield units (HU) in each voxel of a CT image have to be converted into mass density (ρ) and material type. This is typically done with a (HU; ρ) calibration curve which may lead to mis-assignment of media. In this work, an improved material segmentation using dual-energy CT-based material extraction is presented. For this purpose, the differences in extracted effective atomic numbers Z and the relative electron densities ρe of each voxel are used. Dual-energy CT material extraction based on parametrization of the linear attenuation coefficient for 17 tissue-equivalent inserts inside a solid water phantom was done. Scans of the phantom were acquired at 100 kVp and 140 kVp from which Z and ρe values of each insert were derived. The mean errors on Z and ρe extraction were 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. Phantom dose calculations were performed for 250 kVp and 18 MV photon beams and an 18 MeV electron beam in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code. Two material assignments were used: the conventional (HU; ρ) and the novel (HU; ρ, Z) dual-energy CT tissue segmentation. The dose calculation errors using the conventional tissue segmentation were as high as 17% in a mis-assigned soft bone tissue-equivalent material for the 250 kVp photon beam. Similarly, the errors for the 18 MeV electron beam and the 18 MV photon beam were up to 6% and 3% in some mis-assigned media. The assignment of all tissue-equivalent inserts was accurate using the novel dual-energy CT material assignment. As a result, the dose calculation errors were below 1% in all beam arrangements. Comparable improvement in dose calculation accuracy is expected for human tissues. The dual-energy tissue segmentation offers a significantly higher accuracy compared to the conventional single-energy segmentation.

  16. Synchrotron radiation CT from the micro to nanoscale for the investigation of bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrin, Francoise; Dong, Pei; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Zuluaga, Maria; Olivier, Cécile; Langer, Max; Cloetens, Peter

    2012-10-01

    During the last decade, X-ray micro Computerized Tomography (CT) has become a conventional technique for the three-dimensional (3D) investigation of trabecular bone micro-architecture. Coupling micro-CT to synchrotron sources possesses significant advantages in terms of image quality and gives access to information on bone mineralization which is an important factor of bone quality. We present an overview of the investigation of bone using Synchrotron Radiation (SR) CT from the micro to the nano scale. We introduce two synchrotron CT systems developed at the ESRF based on SR parallel-beam micro-CT and magnified phase CT respectively, achieving down to submicrometric and nanometric spatial resolution. In the latter, by using phase retrieval prior to tomographic reconstruction, the system provides maps of the 3D refractive index distribution. Parallel-beam SR micro-CT has extensively been used for the analysis of trabecular or cortical bone in human or small animals with spatial resolution in the range [3-10] μm. However, the characterization of the bone properties at the cellular scale is also of major interest. At the micrometric scale, the shape, density and morphology of osteocyte lacunae can be studied on statistically representative volumes. At the nanometric scale, unprecedented 3D displays of the canaliculi network have been obtained on fields of views including a large number of interconnected osteocyte lacunae. Finally SR magnified phase CT provides a detailed analysis of the lacuno-canalicular network and in addition information on the organization of the collagen fibers. These findings open new perspectives for three-dimensional quantitative assessment of bone tissue at the cellular scale.

  17. Automated segmentations of skin, soft-tissue, and skeleton, from torso CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kiryu, Takuji; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2004-05-01

    We have been developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for automatically recognizing human tissue and organ regions from high-resolution torso CT images. We show some initial results for extracting skin, soft-tissue and skeleton regions. 139 patient cases of torso CT images (male 92, female 47; age: 12-88) were used in this study. Each case was imaged with a common protocol (120kV/320mA) and covered the whole torso with isotopic spatial resolution of about 0.63 mm and density resolution of 12 bits. A gray-level thresholding based procedure was applied to separate the human body from background. The density and distance features to body surface were used to determine the skin, and separate soft-tissue from the others. A 3-D region growing based method was used to extract the skeleton. We applied this system to the 139 cases and found that the skin, soft-tissue and skeleton regions were recognized correctly for 93% of the patient cases. The accuracy of segmentation results was acceptable by evaluating the results slice by slice. This scheme will be included in CAD systems for detecting and diagnosing the abnormal lesions in multi-slice torso CT images.

  18. Angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves evaluated objectively using MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-kui; Wang, Ya-xian; Xue, Cheng-bin; Li, Zhen-mei-yu; Huang, Jing; Zhao, Ya-hong; Yang, Yu-min; Gu, Xiao-song

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in regenerative medicine generally, as well as in the specific field of nerve regeneration. However, no convenient and objective method for evaluating the angiogenesis of tissue-engineered nerves has been reported. In this study, tissue-engineered nerves were constructed in vitro using Schwann cells differentiated from rat skin-derived precursors as supporting cells and chitosan nerve conduits combined with silk fibroin fibers as scaffolds to bridge 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Four weeks after surgery, three-dimensional blood vessel reconstructions were made through MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning, and parameter analysis of the tissue-engineered nerves was performed. New blood vessels grew into the tissue-engineered nerves from three main directions: the proximal end, the distal end, and the middle. The parameter analysis of the three-dimensional blood vessel images yielded several parameters, including the number, diameter, connection, and spatial distribution of blood vessels. The new blood vessels were mainly capillaries and microvessels, with diameters ranging from 9 to 301 μm. The blood vessels with diameters from 27 to 155 μm accounted for 82.84% of the new vessels. The microvessels in the tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo were relatively well-identified using the MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning method, which allows the evaluation and comparison of differences and changes of angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo. PMID:26981108

  19. Development of automated quantification of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes from abdominal CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensink, Sanne D.; Spliethoff, Jarich W.; Belder, Ruben; Klaase, Joost M.; Bezooijen, Roland; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-03-01

    This contribution describes a novel algorithm for the automated quantification of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes from abdominal CT scans of patients referred for colorectal resection. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes can accurately be measured with errors of 1.2 and 0.5%, respectively. Also the reproducibility of CT measurements is good; a disadvantage is the amount of radiation. In this study the diagnostic CT scans in the work - up of (colorectal) cancer were used. This implied no extra radiation. For the purpose of segmentation alone, a low dose protocol can be applied. Obesity is a well known risk factor for complications in and after surgery. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a widely accepted indicator of obesity, but it is not specific for risk assessment of colorectal surgery. We report on an automated method to quantify visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes as a basic step in a clinical research project concerning preoperative risk assessment. The outcomes are to be correlated with the surgery results. The hypothesis is that the balance between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue together with the presence of calcifications in the major bloodvessels, is a predictive indicator for post - operatieve complications such as anastomotic leak. We start with four different computer simulated humanoid abdominal volumes with tissue values in the appropriate Hounsfield range at different dose levels. With satisfactory numerical results for this test, we have applied the algorithm on over a 100 patient scans and have compared results with manual segmentations by an expert for a smaller pilot group. The results are within a 5% difference. Compared to other studies reported in the literature, reliable values are obtained for visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue areas.

  20. Automated characterization of normal and pathologic lung tissue by topological texture analysis of multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Fink, C.; Becker, C.; Reiser, M.

    2007-03-01

    Reliable and accurate methods for objective quantitative assessment of parenchymal alterations in the lung are necessary for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. Two major types of alterations are pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis, emphysema being characterized by abnormal enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal, nonrespiratory bronchiole, accompanied by destructive changes of the alveolar walls. The main characteristic of fibrosis is coursening of the interstitial fibers and compaction of the pulmonary tissue. With the ability to display anatomy free from superimposing structures and greater visual clarity, Multi-Detector-CT has shown to be more sensitive than the chest radiograph in identifying alterations of lung parenchyma. In automated evaluation of pulmonary CT-scans, quantitative image processing techniques are applied for objective evaluation of the data. A number of methods have been proposed in the past, most of which utilize simple densitometric tissue features based on the mean X-ray attenuation coefficients expressed in terms of Hounsfield Units [HU]. Due to partial volume effects, most of the density-based methodologies tend to fail, namely in cases, where emphysema and fibrosis occur within narrow spatial limits. In this study, we propose a methodology based upon the topological assessment of graylevel distribution in the 3D image data of lung tissue which provides a way of improving quantitative CT evaluation. Results are compared to the more established density-based methods.

  1. Dosimetry concepts for scanner quality assurance and tissue dose assessment in micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hupfer, Martin; Kolditz, Daniel; Nowak, Tristan; Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: At present, no established methods exist for dosimetry in micro computed tomography (micro-CT). The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate practical concepts for both dosimetric scanner quality assurance and tissue dose assessment for micro-CT. Methods: The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was adapted to micro-CT and measurements of the CTDI both free in air and in the center of cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 20 and 32 mm diameter were performed in a 6 month interval with a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber calibrated for low tube voltages. For tissue dose assessment, z-profile measurements using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) were performed and both profile and CTDI measurements were compared to Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to validate an existing MC tool for use in micro-CT. The consistency of MC calculations and TLD measurements was further investigated in two mice cadavers. Results: CTDI was found to be a reproducible quantity for constancy tests on the micro-CT system under study, showing a linear dependence on tube voltage and being by definition proportional to mAs setting and z-collimation. The CTDI measured free in air showed larger systematic deviations after the 6 month interval compared to the CTDI measured in PMMA phantoms. MC calculations were found to match CTDI measurements within 3% when using x-ray spectra measured at our micro-CT installation and better than 10% when using x-ray spectra calculated from semi-empirical models. Visual inspection revealed good agreement for all z-profiles. The consistency of MC calculations and TLD measurements in mice was found to be better than 10% with a mean deviation of 4.5%. Conclusions: Our results show the CTDI implemented for micro-CT to be a promising candidate for dosimetric quality assurance measurements as it linearly reflects changes in tube voltage, mAs setting, and collimation used during the scan, encouraging further studies on a variety of

  2. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... or other growth (mass) Cerebral atrophy (loss of brain tissue) ... with the hearing nerve Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)

  3. Quantification of Regional Interstitial Lung Disease from CT-derived Fractional Tissue Volume: A Lung Tissue Research Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Watharkar, Snehal S.; de Leon, Alberto Diaz; Garcia, Christine K.; Patel, Nova C.; Jordan, Kirk G.; Hsia, Connie C.W.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Evaluation of chest CT is usually qualitative or semi-quantitative, resulting in subjective descriptions often by different observers over time and imprecise determinations of disease severity within distorted lobes. There is a need for standardized imaging biomarkers to quantify regional disease, maximize diagnostic yield, and facilitate multi-center comparisons. We applied lobe-based voxelwise image analysis to derive regional air (Vair) and tissue (Vtissue) volumes and fractional tissue volume (FTV=tissue/[tissue+air] volume) as internally standardized parameter for assessing interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and Methods High-resolution CT was obtained at supine and prone end-inspiration and supine end-expiration in 29 patients with ILD and 20 normal subjects. Lobar Vair, Vtissue, and FTV were expressed along standard coordinate axes. Results In normal subjects from end-inspiration to end-expiration, total Vair declined 43%, FTV increased ~80% while Vtissue remained unchanged. With increasing ILD, Vair declined and Vtissue rose in all lobes; FTV increased with a peripheral-to-central progression inversely correlated to spirometry and lung diffusing capacity (R2=0.57–0.75, prone end-inspiration). Inter- and intra-lobar coefficients of variation (CVs) of FTV increased 84–148% in mild-to-moderate ILD, indicating greater spatial heterogeneity, then normalized in severe ILD. Analysis of discontinuous images incurs <3% error compared to consecutive images. Conclusions These regional attenuation-based biomarkers could quantify heterogeneous parenchymal disease in distorted lobes, detect mild ILD involvement in all lobes and describe the pattern of disease progression. The next step would be to study a larger series, examine reproducibility and follow longitudinal changes in correlation with clinical and functional indices. PMID:21596593

  4. Interaction of expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm with surrounding tissue: Retrospective CT image studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sebastian T.; Burek, William; Dupay, Alexander C.; Farsad, Mehdi; Baek, Seungik; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) that rupture have a high mortality rate. Rupture occurs when local mechanical stress exceeds the local mechanical strength of an AAA, so stress profiles such as those from finite element analysis (FEA) are useful. The role and effect of surrounding tissues, like the vertebral column, which have not been extensively studied, are examined in this paper. Methods Longitudinal CT scans from ten patients with AAAs were studied to see the effect of surrounding tissues on AAAs. Segmentation was performed to distinguish the AAA from other tissues and we studied how these surrounding tissues affected the shape and curvature of the AAA. Previously established methods by Veldenz et al. were used to split the AAA into 8 sections and examine the specific effects of surrounding tissues on these sections [1]. Three-dimensional models were created to better examine these effects over time. Registration was done in order to compare AAAs longitudinally. Results The vertebral column and osteophytes were observed to have been affecting the shape and the curvature of the AAA. Interaction with the spine caused focal flattening in certain areas of the AAA. In 16 of the 41 CT scans, the right posterior dorsal section (section 5), had the highest radius of curvature, which was by far the section that had the maximum radius for a specified CT scan. Evolution of the growing AAA showed increased flattening in this section when comparing the last CT scan to the first scan. Conclusion Surrounding tissues have a clear influence on the geometry of an AAA, which may in turn affect the stress profile of AAA. Incorporating these structures in FEA and G&R models will provide a better estimate of stress. Clinical Relevance Currently, size is the only variable considered when deciding whether to undergo elective surgery to repair AAA since it is an easy enough measure for clinicians to utilize. However, this may not be the best indicator of rupture risk

  5. Processing of CT images for analysis of diffuse lung disease in the lung tissue research consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Holmes, David; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-03-01

    The goal of Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC) is to improve the management of diffuse lung diseases through a better understanding of the biology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD) including Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). Participants are subjected to a battery of tests including tissue biopsies, physiologic testing, clinical history reporting, and CT scanning of the chest. The LTRC is a repository from which investigators can request tissue specimens and test results as well as semi-quantitative radiology reports, pathology reports, and automated quantitative image analysis results from the CT scan data performed by the LTRC core laboratories. The LTRC Radiology Core Laboratory (RCL), in conjunction with the Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR), has developed novel processing methods for comprehensive characterization of pulmonary processes on volumetric high-resolution CT scans to quantify how these diseases manifest in radiographic images. Specifically, the RCL has implemented a semi-automated method for segmenting the anatomical regions of the lungs and airways. In these anatomic regions, automated quantification of pathologic features of disease including emphysema volumes and tissue classification are performed using both threshold techniques and advanced texture measures to determine the extent and location of emphysema, ground glass opacities, "honeycombing" (HC) and "irregular linear" or "reticular" pulmonary infiltrates and normal lung. Wall thickness measurements of the trachea, and its branches to the 3 rd and limited 4 th order are also computed. The methods for processing, segmentation and quantification are described. The results are reviewed and verified by an expert radiologist following processing and stored in the public LTRC database for use by pulmonary researchers. To date, over 1200 CT scans have been processed by the RCL and the LTRC project is on target for recruitment of the

  6. Value and limits of μ-CT for nondemineralized bone tissue processing.

    PubMed

    Draenert, Miriam Esther; Draenert, Alice Irène; Forriol, Francisco; Cerler, Michael; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz; Hickel, Reinhard; Draenert, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    An experimental approach was performed on 20 giant rabbits to establish the possibilities and limitations of μ-CT for routine processing of nondemineralized bone tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HA) or β-tricalciumphosphate (β-TCP) bead implants or a melange of both, microchambered and solid, were implanted into a standardized and precise defect in the patellar groove. The bone-healing phase was chosen for the histology considering 1 or 2 days, and 2, 3, and 6 weeks. Normal X-ray and μ-CT were applied on all specimens; five specimens in the 6-week stage were additionally processed according to the full range of conventional nondemineralized bone processing methods. μ-CT increased the possibilities of nondemineralized histology with respect to bone morphometry and a complete sequence of sections, thus providing a complete analysis of the bone response. μ-CT was limited in differentiating bone quality, cell analyses, and mineralization stages. The investigation based on normal X-rays is limited to defining integration and excluding the fibrous and bony encapsulation of loose implants. μ-CT allows a 3D evaluation of newly formed bone which is clearly marked against the ceramic implant. It does not allow, however, for the differentiation between woven and lamellar bone, the presentation of the canalicular lacunar system, or on the cell level, revealing canaliculi or details of the mineralization process which can be documented by high-resolution microradiography. Titer dynamics of bone formation remains the domain of polychromatic sequential labeling. The complete sequence of μ-CT slices enhances the possibilities for routine histology, tremendously allowing to the focus on detail histology to topographically well-defined cuts, thus providing more precise conclusions which take into consideration the whole implant. PMID:22553825

  7. CT imaging during microwave ablation: Analysis of spatial and temporal tissue contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dong; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze the spatial distribution and temporal development of liver tissue contraction during high-temperature ablation by using intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: A total of 46 aluminum fiducial markers were positioned in a 60 × 45 mm grid, in a single plane, around a microwave ablation antenna in each of six ex vivo bovine liver samples. Ablations were performed for 10 min at 100 W. CT data of the liver sample were acquired every 30 s during ablation. Fiducial motion between acquisitions was tracked in postprocessing and used to calculate measures of tissue contraction and contraction rates. The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of contraction were analyzed. Results: Fiducial displacement indicated that the zone measured postablation was 8.2 ± 1.8 mm (∼20%) smaller in the radial direction and 7.1 ± 1.0 mm (∼10%) shorter in the longitudinal direction than the preablation tissue dimension. Therefore, the total ablation volume was reduced from its preablation value by approximately 45%. Very little longitudinal contraction was noted in the distal portion of the ablation zone. Central tissues contracted more than 60%, which was near an estimated limit of ∼70% based on initial water content. More peripheral tissues contracted only 15% in any direction. Contraction rates peaked during the first 60 s of heating with a roughly exponential decay over time. Conclusions: Ablation zones measured posttreatment are significantly smaller than the pretreatment tissue dimensions. Tissue contraction is spatially dependent, with the greatest effect occurring in the central ablation zone. Contraction rate peaks early and decays over time.

  8. Experimental verification of ion stopping power prediction from dual energy CT data in tissue surrogates.

    PubMed

    Farace, Paolo

    2014-11-21

    A two-steps procedure is presented to convert dual-energy CT data to stopping power ratio (SPR), relative to water. In the first step the relative electron density (RED) is calculated from dual-energy CT-numbers by means of a bi-linear relationship: RED=a HUscH+b HUscL+c, where HUscH and HUscL are scaled units (HUsc=HU+1000) acquired at high and low energy respectively, and the three parameters a, b and c has to be determined for each CT scanner. In the second step the RED values were converted into SPR by means of published poly-line functions, which are invariant as they do not depend on a specific CT scanner. The comparison with other methods provides encouraging results, with residual SPR error on human tissue within 1%. The distinctive features of the proposed method are its simplicity and the generality of the conversion functions. PMID:25360874

  9. Investigation on Tissue Equivalent Normoxic Polymer Gel Dosimeter using In-house Laser CT scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Kumar, D.; Jebaseelan Samuel, E. James

    2010-11-01

    Optical Computed Tomography has wide applications in the treatment of cancer. In continuation of this, an in-house Laser CT scanner has been built for "3D gel dosimetry". The Laser CT (LCT) scanner plays a major for Gel dosimeter or phantom readout and in clinical radiation therapy as a 3-Dimensional Radiation Dosimetry. A gel dosimeter which absorbs dose in a tissue-equivalent manner and allows the measurement of spatial distribution of the deposited dose is required. The normoxic PAGAT (Polyacrylamide Gelatin and Tetrakis) gel is used as a dosimeter for this analysis. When laser passes through this gel phantom, absorption and scattering takes place and combined to attenuation. The optical attenuation coefficient of the laser can be obtained by measuring its intensity after passing through the gel by means of a sensor. Reconstruction using Mat Lab algorithm provides 3D dose distribution.

  10. Renal and perinephric abscesses in West China Hospital: 10-year retrospective-descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, Yan-Bin; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the clinical, radiological and laboratory profiles of renal abscess (RA) and perinephric abscess (PNA), along with related treatment and outcome. METHODS: Ninety-eight patients diagnosed with RA or PNA using the primary discharge diagnoses identified from the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems Tenth Edition (ICD-10) codes (RA: N15.101, PNA: N15.102) between September 2004 and December 2014 in West China Hospital were selected. Medical records including patients’ characteristics, symptoms and signs, high-risk factors, radiological features, causative microorganisms and antibiotic-resistance profiles, treatment approaches, and clinical outcomes were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 46.49 years with a male to female ratio of 41:57. Lumbar pain (76.5%) and fever (53.1%) were the most common symptoms. Other symptoms and signs included chills (28.6%), anorexia and vomiting (25.5%), lethargy (10.2%), abdominal pain (11.2%), flank mass (12.2%), flank fistula (2.0%), gross hematuria (7.1%), frequency (14.3%), dysuria (9.2%), pyuria (5.1%) and weight loss (1.0%). Painful percussion of the costovertebral angle (87.8%) was the most common physical finding. The main predisposing factors were lithiasis (48.0%), diabetes mellitus (33.7%) followed by history of urological surgery (16.3%), urinary tract infections (14.3%), renal function impairment (13.3%), liver cirrhosis (2.0%), neurogenic bladder (1.0%), renal cyst (1.0%), hydronephrosis (1.0%), chronic hepatitis B (1.0%), post-discectomy (1.0%) and post-colectomy (1.0%). Ultrasound (US) and computed tomography were the most valuable diagnostic tools and US was recommended as the initial diagnostic imaging choice. Escherichia coli (51.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (10.0%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.6%) were the main causative microorganisms. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was necessary while intervention including surgical and

  11. Range prediction for tissue mixtures based on dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Möhler, Christian; Wohlfahrt, Patrick; Richter, Christian; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    The use of dual-energy CT (DECT) potentially decreases range uncertainties in proton and ion therapy treatment planning via determination of the involved physical target quantities. For eventual clinical application, the correct treatment of tissue mixtures and heterogeneities is an essential feature, as they naturally occur within a patient's CT. Here, we present how existing methods for DECT-based ion-range prediction can be modified in order to incorporate proper mixing behavior on several structural levels. Our approach is based on the factorization of the stopping-power ratio into the relative electron density and the relative stopping number. The latter is confined for tissue between about 0.95 and 1.02 at a therapeutic beam energy of 200 MeV u(-1) and depends on the I-value. We show that convenient mixing and averaging properties arise by relating the relative stopping number to the relative cross section obtained by DECT. From this, a maximum uncertainty of the stopping-power ratio prediction below [Formula: see text] is suggested for arbitrary mixtures of human body tissues. PMID:27182757

  12. Range prediction for tissue mixtures based on dual-energy CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhler, Christian; Wohlfahrt, Patrick; Richter, Christian; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    The use of dual-energy CT (DECT) potentially decreases range uncertainties in proton and ion therapy treatment planning via determination of the involved physical target quantities. For eventual clinical application, the correct treatment of tissue mixtures and heterogeneities is an essential feature, as they naturally occur within a patient’s CT. Here, we present how existing methods for DECT-based ion-range prediction can be modified in order to incorporate proper mixing behavior on several structural levels. Our approach is based on the factorization of the stopping-power ratio into the relative electron density and the relative stopping number. The latter is confined for tissue between about 0.95 and 1.02 at a therapeutic beam energy of 200 MeV u‑1 and depends on the I-value. We show that convenient mixing and averaging properties arise by relating the relative stopping number to the relative cross section obtained by DECT. From this, a maximum uncertainty of the stopping-power ratio prediction below 1% is suggested for arbitrary mixtures of human body tissues.

  13. High-resolution CT analysis of facial struts in trauma: 1. Osseous and soft-tissue complications

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, L.R.; Manor, W.F.; Turski, P.A.; Strother, C.M.

    1983-03-01

    In six cadavers, high-resolution thin-section computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate the sequelae of experimentally produced facial trauma. As confirmed by pluridirectional tomography, CT was an effective imaging method for the detection and classification of facial fractures. The ability of CT to simultaneously depict both osseous and soft-tissue structures expands the role that diagnostic radiology can play in the evaluation of the traumatized face. A method of evaluation is presented in which the face is geometrically conceptualized as a series of triplanar (horizontal, sagittal, and coronal) osseous struts. Sequential, systematic assessment of each strut for fracture and its adjacent soft tissue for injury can facilitate evaluation of the traumatized face. Using this approach the osseous and soft-tissue complications arising from experimentally produced trauma are reviewed and illustrated with CT.

  14. PET/CT for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, Irene; Devic, Slobodan; Hickeson, Marc; Roberge, David; Turcotte, Robert E.; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To study the possibility of incorporating positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) information into radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We studied 17 patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy at our institution from 2005 to 2007. All patients had a high-grade STS and had had a staging PET/CT scan. For each patient, an MRI-based gross tumor volume (GTV), considered to be the contemporary standard for radiotherapy treatment planning, was outlined on a T1-gadolinium enhanced axial MRI (GTV{sub MRI}), and a second set of GTVs were outlined using different threshold values on PET images (GTV{sub PET}). PET-based target volumes were compared with the MRI-based GTV. Threshold values for target contouring were determined as a multiple (from 2 to 10 times) of the background soft tissue uptake values (B) sampled over healthy tissue. Results: PET-based GTVs contoured using a threshold value of 2 or 2.5 most closely resembled the GTV{sub MRI} volumes. Higher threshold values lead to PET volumes much smaller than the GTV{sub MRI}. The standard deviations between the average volumes of GTV{sub PET} and GTV{sub MRI} ratios for all thresholds were large, ranging from 36% for 2 xB up to 93% for 10 xB. Maximum uptake-to-background ratio correlated poorly with the maximum standardized uptake values. Conclusions: It is unlikely that PET/CT will make a significant contribution in GTV definition for radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with STS using threshold methods on PET images. Future studies will focus on molecular imaging and tumor physiology.

  15. Soft-tissue imaging with C-arm cone-beam CT using statistical reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Adam S; Stayman, J Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Gallia, Gary L; Khanna, A Jay; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2014-02-21

    The potential for statistical image reconstruction methods such as penalized-likelihood (PL) to improve C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue visualization for intraoperative imaging over conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) is assessed in this work by making a fair comparison in relation to soft-tissue performance. A prototype mobile C-arm was used to scan anthropomorphic head and abdomen phantoms as well as a cadaveric torso at doses substantially lower than typical values in diagnostic CT, and the effects of dose reduction via tube current reduction and sparse sampling were also compared. Matched spatial resolution between PL and FBP was determined by the edge spread function of low-contrast (∼ 40-80 HU) spheres in the phantoms, which were representative of soft-tissue imaging tasks. PL using the non-quadratic Huber penalty was found to substantially reduce noise relative to FBP, especially at lower spatial resolution where PL provides a contrast-to-noise ratio increase up to 1.4-2.2 × over FBP at 50% dose reduction across all objects. Comparison of sampling strategies indicates that soft-tissue imaging benefits from fully sampled acquisitions at dose above ∼ 1.7 mGy and benefits from 50% sparsity at dose below ∼ 1.0 mGy. Therefore, an appropriate sampling strategy along with the improved low-contrast visualization offered by statistical reconstruction demonstrates the potential for extending intraoperative C-arm CBCT to applications in soft-tissue interventions in neurosurgery as well as thoracic and abdominal surgeries by overcoming conventional tradeoffs in noise, spatial resolution, and dose. PMID:24504126

  16. Soft-tissue imaging with C-arm cone-beam CT using statistical reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Adam S.; Webster Stayman, J.; Otake, Yoshito; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Gallia, Gary L.; Khanna, A. Jay; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-02-01

    The potential for statistical image reconstruction methods such as penalized-likelihood (PL) to improve C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue visualization for intraoperative imaging over conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) is assessed in this work by making a fair comparison in relation to soft-tissue performance. A prototype mobile C-arm was used to scan anthropomorphic head and abdomen phantoms as well as a cadaveric torso at doses substantially lower than typical values in diagnostic CT, and the effects of dose reduction via tube current reduction and sparse sampling were also compared. Matched spatial resolution between PL and FBP was determined by the edge spread function of low-contrast (˜40-80 HU) spheres in the phantoms, which were representative of soft-tissue imaging tasks. PL using the non-quadratic Huber penalty was found to substantially reduce noise relative to FBP, especially at lower spatial resolution where PL provides a contrast-to-noise ratio increase up to 1.4-2.2× over FBP at 50% dose reduction across all objects. Comparison of sampling strategies indicates that soft-tissue imaging benefits from fully sampled acquisitions at dose above ˜1.7 mGy and benefits from 50% sparsity at dose below ˜1.0 mGy. Therefore, an appropriate sampling strategy along with the improved low-contrast visualization offered by statistical reconstruction demonstrates the potential for extending intraoperative C-arm CBCT to applications in soft-tissue interventions in neurosurgery as well as thoracic and abdominal surgeries by overcoming conventional tradeoffs in noise, spatial resolution, and dose.

  17. Automated segmentation of muscle and adipose tissue on CT images for human body composition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Howard; Cobzas, Dana; Birdsell, Laura; Lieffers, Jessica; Baracos, Vickie

    2009-02-01

    The ability to compute body composition in cancer patients lends itself to determining the specific clinical outcomes associated with fat and lean tissue stores. For example, a wasting syndrome of advanced disease associates with shortened survival. Moreover, certain tissue compartments represent sites for drug distribution and are likely determinants of chemotherapy efficacy and toxicity. CT images are abundant, but these cannot be fully exploited unless there exist practical and fast approaches for tissue quantification. Here we propose a fully automated method for segmenting muscle, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues, taking the approach of shape modeling for the analysis of skeletal muscle. Muscle shape is represented using PCA encoded Free Form Deformations with respect to a mean shape. The shape model is learned from manually segmented images and used in conjunction with a tissue appearance prior. VAT and SAT are segmented based on the final deformed muscle shape. In comparing the automatic and manual methods, coefficients of variation (COV) (1 - 2%), were similar to or smaller than inter- and intra-observer COVs reported for manual segmentation.

  18. Imaging Invasion: Micro-CT imaging of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma highlights cell type specific spatial relationships of tissue invasion.

    PubMed

    Apps, John R; Hutchinson, J Ciaran; Arthurs, Owen J; Virasami, Alex; Joshi, Abhijit; Zeller-Plumhoff, Berit; Moulding, Dale; Jacques, Thomas S; Sebire, Neil J; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Tissue invasion and infiltration by brain tumours poses a clinical challenge, with destruction of structures leading to morbidity. We assessed whether micro-CT could be used to map tumour invasion in adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP), and whether it could delineate ACPs and their intrinsic components from surrounding tissue.Three anonymised archival frozen ACP samples were fixed, iodinated and imaged using a micro-CT scanner prior to the use of standard histological processing and immunohistochemical techniques.We demonstrate that micro-CT imaging can non-destructively give detailed 3D structural information of tumours in volumes with isotropic voxel sizes of 4-6 microns, which can be correlated with traditional histology and immunohistochemistry.Such information complements classical histology by facilitating virtual slicing of the tissue in any plane and providing unique detail of the three dimensional relationships of tissue compartments. PMID:27260197

  19. PET/CT Imaging Reveals Unrivaled Placental Avidity for Glucose Compared to Other Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sawatzke, Alexander B.; Norris, Andrew W.; Spyropoulos, Fotios; Walsh, Susan A.; Acevedo, Michael R.; Hu, Shanming; Yao, Jianrong; Wang, Chunlin; Sunderland, John J.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The goal of this study was to define the kinetics of glucose transport from maternal blood to placenta to fetus using real time imaging. Methods Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the glucose tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to temporally and spatially define, in vivo, the kinetics of glucose transport from maternal blood into placentae and fetuses, in the late gestational gravid rat. Computed tomography (CT), with intravenous contrast, co-registered to the PET images allowed anatomic differentiation of placentae from fetal and maternal tissues. Results FDG was rapidly taken up by placentae and subsequently appeared in fetuses with minimal temporal lag. FDG standardized uptake values in placentae and fetuses approached that of maternal brain. In both anesthetized and awake dams, one quarter of the administered FDG ultimately was accrued in the collective fetuses and placentae. Accordingly, kinetic modeling demonstrated that the placentae had very high avidity for FDG, 2-fold greater than that of the fetus and maternal brain, when accounting for the fact that fetal FDG necessarily must first be taken up by placentae. Consistent with this, placental expression of glucose transporter 1 exceeded that of all other tissues. Discussion Fetal and placental tissues place a substantial glucose metabolic burden on the mother, owing to very high avidity of placentae for glucose coupled with the large relative mass of fetal and placental tissues. Conclusions The placenta has a tremendous capacity to uptake and transport glucose. PET/CT imaging is an ideal means to study metabolite transport kinetics in the fetoplacental unit. PMID:25555498

  20. Micro-CT scouting for transmission electron microscopy of human tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Morales, A G; Stempinski, E S; Xiao, X; Patel, A; Panna, A; Olivier, K N; McShane, P J; Robinson, C; George, A J; Donahue, D R; Chen, P; Wen, H

    2016-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides sub-nanometre-scale details in volumetric samples. Samples such as pathology tissue specimens are often stained with a metal element to enhance contrast, which makes them opaque to optical microscopes. As a result, it can be a lengthy procedure to find the region of interest inside a sample through sectioning. We describe micro-CT scouting for TEM that allows noninvasive identification of regions of interest within a block sample to guide the sectioning step. In a tissue pathology study, a bench-top micro-CT scanner with 10 μm resolution was used to determine the location of patches of the mucous membrane in osmium-stained human nasal scraping samples. Once the regions of interest were located, the sample block was sectioned to expose that location, followed by ultra-thin sectioning and TEM to inspect the internal structure of the cilia of the membrane epithelial cells with nanometre resolution. This method substantially reduced the time and labour of the search process from typically 20 sections for light microscopy to three sections with no added sample preparation. PMID:26854176

  1. Improved correction for the tissue fraction effect in lung PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Beverley F.; Cuplov, Vesna; Millner, Lynn; Hutton, Brian F.; Maher, Toby M.; Groves, Ashley M.; Thielemans, Kris

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in imaging different pulmonary disorders using PET techniques. Previous work has shown, for static PET/CT, that air content in the lung influences reconstructed image values and that it is vital to correct for this ‘tissue fraction effect’ (TFE). In this paper, we extend this work to include the blood component and also investigate the TFE in dynamic imaging. CT imaging and PET kinetic modelling are used to determine fractional air and blood voxel volumes in six patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. These values are used to illustrate best and worst case scenarios when interpreting images without correcting for the TFE. In addition, the fractional volumes were used to determine correction factors for the SUV and the kinetic parameters. These were then applied to the patient images. The kinetic parameters K1 and Ki along with the static parameter SUV were all found to be affected by the TFE with both air and blood providing a significant contribution to the errors. Without corrections, errors range from 34-80% in the best case and 29-96% in the worst case. In the patient data, without correcting for the TFE, regions of high density (fibrosis) appeared to have a higher uptake than lower density (normal appearing tissue), however this was reversed after air and blood correction. The proposed correction methods are vital for quantitative and relative accuracy. Without these corrections, images may be misinterpreted.

  2. Soft-tissue changes after head and neck radiation: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Bronstein, A.D.; Nyberg, D.A.; Schwartz, A.N.; Shuman, W.P.; Griffin, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    To identify possible soft-tissue changes of the head and neck after radiation therapy, 102 CT scans from 78 patients with head and neck tumors were reviewed to assess (1) skin thickening, (2) epiglottic thickening, (3) stranding of subcutaneous fat, and (4) stranding of deep cervical fat. Scans were obtained after radiation therapy alone (10 cases), after radiation and surgery (27 cases), after surgery alone (24 cases), or before either surgery or radiation (41 cases). Skin thickening, epiglottic thickening, and stranding of subcutaneous fat were seen more frequently after radiation therapy than before such treatment. However, skin thickening and stranding of subcutaneous fat were sometimes also associated with tumor involvement and/or previous surgery, while epiglottic thickening was only occasionally associated with tumor involvement. Stranding of deep cervical fat was noted with increased frequency after radiation or surgery, but postradiation effects could not be reliably distinguished from postsurgical or tumor effects. We conclude that soft-tissue changes of the head and neck on CT may commonly be associated with previous radiation therapy, but these postradiation effects are not always distinguishable from postsurgical effects or tumor.

  3. Experimental verification of ion stopping power prediction from dual energy CT data in tissue surrogates.

    PubMed

    Hünemohr, Nora; Krauss, Bernhard; Tremmel, Christoph; Ackermann, Benjamin; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    We present an experimental verification of stopping-power-ratio (SPR) prediction from dual energy CT (DECT) with potential use for dose planning in proton and ion therapy. The approach is based on DECT images converted to electron density relative to water ϱe/ϱe, w and effective atomic number Zeff. To establish a parameterization of the I-value by Zeff, 71 tabulated tissue compositions were used. For the experimental assessment of the method we scanned 20 materials (tissue surrogates, polymers, aluminum, titanium) at 80/140Sn kVp and 100/140Sn kVp (Sn: additional tin filtration) and computed the ϱe/ϱe, w and Zeff with a purely image based algorithm. Thereby, we found that ϱe/ϱe, w (Zeff) could be determined with an accuracy of 0.4% (1.7%) for the tissue surrogates with known elemental compositions. SPRs were predicted from DECT images for all 20 materials using the presented approach and were compared to measured water-equivalent path lengths (closely related to SPR). For the tissue surrogates the presented DECT approach was found to predict the experimental values within 0.6%, for aluminum and titanium within an accuracy of 1.7% and 9.4% (from 16-bit reconstructed DECT images). PMID:24334601

  4. Modeling of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy treatments planned with conventional x-ray CT systems.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-07-01

    In the conventional procedure for accurate Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, a CT number given to each pixel of a patient image is directly converted to mass density and elemental composition using their respective functions that have been calibrated specifically for the relevant x-ray CT system. We propose an alternative approach that is a conversion in two steps: the first from CT number to density and the second from density to composition. Based on the latest compilation of standard tissues for reference adult male and female phantoms, we sorted the standard tissues into groups by mass density and defined the representative tissues by averaging the material properties per group. With these representative tissues, we formulated polyline relations between mass density and each of the following; electron density, stopping-power ratio and elemental densities. We also revised a procedure of stoichiometric calibration for CT-number conversion and demonstrated the two-step conversion method for a theoretically emulated CT system with hypothetical 80 keV photons. For the standard tissues, high correlation was generally observed between mass density and the other densities excluding those of C and O for the light spongiosa tissues between 1.0 g cm(-3) and 1.1 g cm(-3) occupying 1% of the human body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues were generally consistent with similar formulations in the literature. The two-step conversion procedure was demonstrated to be practical and will potentially facilitate Monte Carlo simulation for treatment planning and for retrospective analysis of treatment plans with little impact on the management of planning CT systems. PMID:27300449

  5. Modeling of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy treatments planned with conventional x-ray CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-07-01

    In the conventional procedure for accurate Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, a CT number given to each pixel of a patient image is directly converted to mass density and elemental composition using their respective functions that have been calibrated specifically for the relevant x-ray CT system. We propose an alternative approach that is a conversion in two steps: the first from CT number to density and the second from density to composition. Based on the latest compilation of standard tissues for reference adult male and female phantoms, we sorted the standard tissues into groups by mass density and defined the representative tissues by averaging the material properties per group. With these representative tissues, we formulated polyline relations between mass density and each of the following; electron density, stopping-power ratio and elemental densities. We also revised a procedure of stoichiometric calibration for CT-number conversion and demonstrated the two-step conversion method for a theoretically emulated CT system with hypothetical 80 keV photons. For the standard tissues, high correlation was generally observed between mass density and the other densities excluding those of C and O for the light spongiosa tissues between 1.0 g cm‑3 and 1.1 g cm‑3 occupying 1% of the human body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues were generally consistent with similar formulations in the literature. The two-step conversion procedure was demonstrated to be practical and will potentially facilitate Monte Carlo simulation for treatment planning and for retrospective analysis of treatment plans with little impact on the management of planning CT systems.

  6. Tissue decomposition from dual energy CT data for MC based dose calculation in particle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hünemohr, Nora; Paganetti, Harald; Greilich, Steffen; Jäkel, Oliver; Seco, Joao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors describe a novel method of predicting mass density and elemental mass fractions of tissues from dual energy CT (DECT) data for Monte Carlo (MC) based dose planning. Methods: The relative electron density ϱe and effective atomic number Zeff are calculated for 71 tabulated tissue compositions. For MC simulations, the mass density is derived via one linear fit in the ϱe that covers the entire range of tissue compositions (except lung tissue). Elemental mass fractions are predicted from the ϱe and the Zeff in combination. Since particle therapy dose planning and verification is especially sensitive to accurate material assignment, differences to the ground truth are further analyzed for mass density, I-value predictions, and stopping power ratios (SPR) for ions. Dose studies with monoenergetic proton and carbon ions in 12 tissues which showed the largest differences of single energy CT (SECT) to DECT are presented with respect to range uncertainties. The standard approach (SECT) and the new DECT approach are compared to reference Bragg peak positions. Results: Mean deviations to ground truth in mass density predictions could be reduced for soft tissue from (0.5±0.6)% (SECT) to (0.2±0.2)% with the DECT method. Maximum SPR deviations could be reduced significantly for soft tissue from 3.1% (SECT) to 0.7% (DECT) and for bone tissue from 0.8% to 0.1%. Mean I-value deviations could be reduced for soft tissue from (1.1±1.4%, SECT) to (0.4±0.3%) with the presented method. Predictions of elemental composition were improved for every element. Mean and maximum deviations from ground truth of all elemental mass fractions could be reduced by at least a half with DECT compared to SECT (except soft tissue hydrogen and nitrogen where the reduction was slightly smaller). The carbon and oxygen mass fraction predictions profit especially from the DECT information. Dose studies showed that most of the 12 selected tissues would profit significantly (up to 2

  7. Tissue decomposition from dual energy CT data for MC based dose calculation in particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hünemohr, Nora Greilich, Steffen; Paganetti, Harald; Seco, Joao; Jäkel, Oliver

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a novel method of predicting mass density and elemental mass fractions of tissues from dual energy CT (DECT) data for Monte Carlo (MC) based dose planning. Methods: The relative electron density ϱ{sub e} and effective atomic number Z{sub eff} are calculated for 71 tabulated tissue compositions. For MC simulations, the mass density is derived via one linear fit in the ϱ{sub e} that covers the entire range of tissue compositions (except lung tissue). Elemental mass fractions are predicted from the ϱ{sub e} and the Z{sub eff} in combination. Since particle therapy dose planning and verification is especially sensitive to accurate material assignment, differences to the ground truth are further analyzed for mass density, I-value predictions, and stopping power ratios (SPR) for ions. Dose studies with monoenergetic proton and carbon ions in 12 tissues which showed the largest differences of single energy CT (SECT) to DECT are presented with respect to range uncertainties. The standard approach (SECT) and the new DECT approach are compared to reference Bragg peak positions. Results: Mean deviations to ground truth in mass density predictions could be reduced for soft tissue from (0.5±0.6)% (SECT) to (0.2±0.2)% with the DECT method. Maximum SPR deviations could be reduced significantly for soft tissue from 3.1% (SECT) to 0.7% (DECT) and for bone tissue from 0.8% to 0.1%. MeanI-value deviations could be reduced for soft tissue from (1.1±1.4%, SECT) to (0.4±0.3%) with the presented method. Predictions of elemental composition were improved for every element. Mean and maximum deviations from ground truth of all elemental mass fractions could be reduced by at least a half with DECT compared to SECT (except soft tissue hydrogen and nitrogen where the reduction was slightly smaller). The carbon and oxygen mass fraction predictions profit especially from the DECT information. Dose studies showed that most of the 12 selected tissues would

  8. Individualised, micro CT-based finite element modelling as a tool for biomechanical analysis related to tissue engineering of bone.

    PubMed

    Jaecques, S V N; Van Oosterwyck, H; Muraru, L; Van Cleynenbreugel, T; De Smet, E; Wevers, M; Naert, I; Vander Sloten, J

    2004-04-01

    Load-bearing tissues, like bone, can be replaced by engineered tissues or tissue constructs. For the success of this treatment, a profound understanding is needed of the mechanical properties of both the native bone tissue and the construct. Also, the interaction between mechanical loading and bone regeneration and adaptation should be well understood. This paper demonstrates that microfocus computer tomography (microCT) based finite element modelling (FEM) can have an important contribution to the field of functional bone engineering as a biomechanical analysis tool to quantify the stress and strain state in native bone tissue and in tissue constructs. Its value is illustrated by two cases: (1) in vivo microCT-based FEM for the analysis of peri-implant bone adaptation and (2) design of biomechanically optimised bone scaffolds. The first case involves a combined animal experimental and numerical study, in which the peri-implant bone adaptive response is monitored by means of in vivo microCT scanning. In the second case microCT-based finite element models were created of native trabecular bone and bone scaffolds and a mechanical analysis of both structures was performed. Procedures to optimise the mechanical properties of bone scaffolds, in relation to those of native trabecular bone are discussed. PMID:14697870

  9. High-Performance Soft-Tissue Imaging in Extremity Cone-Beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Muhit, A.; Thawait, G.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Clinical performance studies of an extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT) system indicate excellent bone visualization, but point to the need for improvement of soft-tissue image quality. To this end, a rapid Monte Carlo (MC) scatter correction is proposed, and Penalized Likelihood (PL) reconstruction is evaluated for noise management. Methods The accelerated MC scatter correction involved fast MC simulation with low number of photons implemented on a GPU (107 photons/sec), followed by Gaussian kernel smoothing in the detector plane and across projection angles. PL reconstructions were investigated for reduction of imaging dose for projections acquired at ~2 mGy. Results The rapid scatter estimation yielded root-mean-squared-errors of scatter projections of ~15% of peak scatter intensity for 5·106 photons/projection (runtime ~0.5 sec/projection) and 25% improvement in fat-muscle contrast in reconstructions of a cadaveric knee. PL reconstruction largely restored soft-tissue visualization at 2 mGy dose to that of 10 mGy FBP image. Conclusion The combination of rapid (5–10 minutes/scan) MC-based, patient-specific scatter correction and PL reconstruction offers an important means to overcome the current limitations of extremity CBCT in soft-tissue imaging. PMID:25076825

  10. High-performance soft-tissue imaging in extremity cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Muhit, A.; Thawait, G.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Clinical performance studies of an extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT) system indicate excellent bone visualization, but point to the need for improvement of soft-tissue image quality. To this end, a rapid Monte Carlo (MC) scatter correction is proposed, and Penalized Likelihood (PL) reconstruction is evaluated for noise management. Methods: The accelerated MC scatter correction involved fast MC simulation with low number of photons implemented on a GPU (107 photons/sec), followed by Gaussian kernel smoothing in the detector plane and across projection angles. PL reconstructions were investigated for reduction of imaging dose for projections acquired at ~2 mGy. Results: The rapid scatter estimation yielded root-mean-squared-errors of scatter projections of ~15% of peak scatter intensity for 5ṡ106 photons/projection (runtime ~0.5 sec/projection) and 25% improvement in fat-muscle contrast in reconstructions of a cadaveric knee. PL reconstruction largely restored soft-tissue visualization at 2 mGy dose to that of 10 mGy FBP image. Conclusion: The combination of rapid (5-10 minutes/scan) MC-based, patient-specific scatter correction and PL reconstruction offers an important means to overcome the current limitations of extremity CBCT in soft-tissue imaging.

  11. Nonlinear histogram binning for quantitative analysis of lung tissue fibrosis in high-resolution CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2007-03-01

    Diffuse lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), can be characterized and quantified by analysis of volumetric high resolution CT scans of the lungs. These data sets typically have dimensions of 512 x 512 x 400. It is too subjective and labor intensive for a radiologist to analyze each slice and quantify regional abnormalities manually. Thus, computer aided techniques are necessary, particularly texture analysis techniques which classify various lung tissue types. Second and higher order statistics which relate the spatial variation of the intensity values are good discriminatory features for various textures. The intensity values in lung CT scans range between [-1024, 1024]. Calculation of second order statistics on this range is too computationally intensive so the data is typically binned between 16 or 32 gray levels. There are more effective ways of binning the gray level range to improve classification. An optimal and very efficient way to nonlinearly bin the histogram is to use a dynamic programming algorithm. The objective of this paper is to show that nonlinear binning using dynamic programming is computationally efficient and improves the discriminatory power of the second and higher order statistics for more accurate quantification of diffuse lung disease.

  12. Pulmonary CT image registration and warping for tracking tissue deformation during the respiratory cycle through 3D consistent image registration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baojun; Christensen, Gary E.; Hoffman, Eric A.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    Tracking lung tissues during the respiratory cycle has been a challenging task for diagnostic CT and CT-guided radiotherapy. We propose an intensity- and landmark-based image registration algorithm to perform image registration and warping of 3D pulmonary CT image data sets, based on consistency constraints and matching corresponding airway branchpoints. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectivenss and accuracy of this algorithm in tracking lung tissues by both animal and human data sets. In the animal study, the result showed a tracking accuracy of 1.9 mm between 50% functional residual capacity (FRC) and 85% total lung capacity (TLC) for 12 metal seeds implanted in the lungs of a breathing sheep under precise volume control using a pulmonary ventilator. Visual inspection of the human subject results revealed the algorithm’s potential not only in matching the global shapes, but also in registering the internal structures (e.g., oblique lobe fissures, pulmonary artery branches, etc.). These results suggest that our algorithm has significant potential for warping and tracking lung tissue deformation with applications in diagnostic CT, CT-guided radiotherapy treatment planning, and therapeutic effect evaluation. PMID:19175115

  13. Soft tissue visualization using a highly efficient megavoltage cone beam CT imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghelmansarai, Farhad A.; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Pouliot, Jean; Calderon, Ed; Hernandez, Paco; Mitschke, Matthias; Aubin, Michelle; Bucci, Kara

    2005-04-01

    Recent developments in two-dimensional x-ray detector technology have made volumetric Cone Beam CT (CBCT) a feasible approach for integration with conventional medical linear accelerators. The requirements of a robust image guidance system for radiation therapy include the challenging combination of soft tissue sensitivity with clinically reasonable doses. The low contrast objects may not be perceptible with MV energies due to the relatively poor signal to noise ratio (SNR) performance. We have developed an imaging system that is optimized for MV and can acquire Megavoltage CBCT images containing soft tissue contrast using a 6MV x-ray beam. This system is capable of resolving relative electron density as low as 1% with clinically acceptable radiation doses. There are many factors such as image noise, x-ray scatter, improper calibration and acquisitions that have a profound effect on the imaging performance of CBCT and in this study attempts were made to optimize these factors in order to maximize the SNR. A QC-3V phantom was used to determine the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and f50 of a single 2-D projection. The computed f50 was 0.43 lp/mm and the CNR for a radiation dose of 0.02cGy was 43. Clinical Megavoltage CBCT images acquired with this system demonstrate that anatomical structures such as the prostate in a relatively large size patient are visible using radiation doses in range of 6 to 8cGy.

  14. Extracting tissue and cell outlines of Arabidopsis seeds using refraction contrast X-ray CT at the SPring-8 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Hayami, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio; Karahara, Ichirou; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2012-07-01

    How biological form is determined is one of the important questions in developmental biology. Physical forces are thought to be the primary determinants of the biological forms, and several theories for this were proposed nearly a century ago. To evaluate how physical forces can influence biological forms, precise determination of cell and tissue shapes and their geometries is necessary. Computed tomography (CT) is useful for visualizing three-dimensional structures without destroying a sample. Because recent progress in micro-CT has enabled visualizing cells and tissues at the sub-micron level, we investigated if we could extract cell and tissue outlines of seeds using refraction contrast X-ray CT available at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. We used Arabidopsis seeds because Arabidopsis is a well-known model plant and its seed size is small enough to obtain whole images using the X-ray CT experimental system. We could trace the outlines of tissues in dry seeds using beamline BL20B2 (10 keV, 2.4µm.pixel-1). Although we could also detect the outlines of some cell types, the image resolution was not adequate to extract whole cell edges. To detect the edges of cells in the epidermis and cortex, we obtained CT images using beamline BL20XU (8 keV, 0.5 µm.pixel-1). With these CT images, we could extract the facets and edges of each cell and determine cell vertices. This method enabled us to compare the numbers of cell facets among various cell types. We could also describe cell geometry as a set of points that showed these cell vertices.

  15. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  16. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  17. Does the Oropharyngeal Fat Tissue Influence the Oropharyngeal Airway in Snorers? Dynamic CT Study

    PubMed Central

    Akan, Huseyin; Celebi, Mehmet; Sakan, Banu Baglan

    2004-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine if snorers have a narrower oropharyngeal airway area because of fat infiltration, and an elevated body mass index. Materials and Methods Ten control subjects and 19 patients that snored were evaluated. We obtained 2-mm-thick axial CT scan images every 0.6 seconds during expiration and inspiration at the same level of the oropharynx. We selected the largest and the smallest oropharyngeal airway areas and found the differences. From the slice that had the smallest oropharyngeal airway area, the thickness of the parapharyngeal and subcutaneous fat was measured. The measurements from the left and right side were added together and single values for parapharyngeal and subcutaneous fat tissue thickness were then found. Results The conventional measure of body mass index was significantly higher in the snorers (p < 0.05). The difference in the smallest oropharyngeal airway area between snorers and the controls was statistically significant (p < 0.01). The average difference between the largest and the smallest oropharyngeal area in the control group and the snorer group was statistically significant (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the largest oropharyngeal airway area, the total subcutaneous fat width and the total parapharyngeal fat width between snorers and control subjects (p > 0.05). Conclusion We concluded that the oropharyngeal fat deposition in snorers is not an important factor, and it does not predispose a person to the upper airway narrowing. PMID:15235234

  18. Severe Hydronephrosis and Perinephric Urinoma with Rupture of Renal Fornix Secondary to Postoperative Urinary Retention following Laparoscopic Umbilical Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wysock, James; Satterfield, James

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) is a known complication following a variety of procedures, with a reported incidence of 2.1–3.8% in general surgery and up to 52% in anorectal surgery. We report a case of POUR in a female resulting in severe unilateral hydronephrosis with a perinephric urinoma due to a ruptured fornix. The extent of hydroureter caused an axial rotation upon itself producing further outflow obstruction. This phenomenon of an anatomical ureter deformity secondary to urinary retention resulting in a ruptured fornix is an unusual occurrence. The patient underwent a percutaneous nephrogram where a stiff guidewire was successfully passed into the bladder by interventional radiology (IR) and allowed for placement of an indwelling ureteral stent. The case presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and therapeutic intervention are discussed. PMID:27555977

  19. Severe Hydronephrosis and Perinephric Urinoma with Rupture of Renal Fornix Secondary to Postoperative Urinary Retention following Laparoscopic Umbilical Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Dakwar, Anthony; Wysock, James; Satterfield, James

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) is a known complication following a variety of procedures, with a reported incidence of 2.1-3.8% in general surgery and up to 52% in anorectal surgery. We report a case of POUR in a female resulting in severe unilateral hydronephrosis with a perinephric urinoma due to a ruptured fornix. The extent of hydroureter caused an axial rotation upon itself producing further outflow obstruction. This phenomenon of an anatomical ureter deformity secondary to urinary retention resulting in a ruptured fornix is an unusual occurrence. The patient underwent a percutaneous nephrogram where a stiff guidewire was successfully passed into the bladder by interventional radiology (IR) and allowed for placement of an indwelling ureteral stent. The case presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and therapeutic intervention are discussed. PMID:27555977

  20. The correlation of epicardial adipose tissue on postmortem CT with coronary artery stenosis as determined by autopsy.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Damien I; Ebert, Lars C; Flach, Patricia M; Ruder, Thomas D; Thali, Michael J; Ampanozi, Garyfalia

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this study was to assess whether epicardial and paracardial adipose tissue volumes, as determined by computed tomography (CT), correlate with coronary artery stenosis as determined by autopsy. The postmortem CT data and autopsy findings of 116 adult human decedents were retrospectively compared. Subjects were classified into three groups according to their degree of coronary artery stenosis: ≥50, <50%, and no stenosis. Epicardial and paracardial adipose tissue volumes were calculated based on manual segmentation after threshold based masking. In addition, epicardial adipose tissue thickness was measured using a caliper. All three parameters (thickness of epicardial fat and volumes of both epicardial and paracardial fat) were compared among the three groups and correlated with the degree of coronary artery stenosis. The group with no coronary artery stenosis showed the lowest mean values of epicardial adipose tissue volume, while the coronary artery stenosis ≥50 % group showed the highest volume. All measured variables (thickness of epicardial fat and volumes of both epicardial and paracardial fat) correlated significantly with the grade of coronary artery stenosis, even after controlling for BMI, however, epicardial adipose tissue volume exhibited the strongest correlation. This study reveals that there is an association between the degree of coronary artery stenosis and the amount of epicardial fat tissue: The larger the volume of epicardial fat, the higher the degree of coronary artery stenosis. PMID:25711291

  1. The use of CT density changes at internal tissue interfaces to correlate internal organ motion with an external surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaede, Stewart; Carnes, Gregory; Yu, Edward; Van Dyk, Jake; Battista, Jerry; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a non-invasive method to monitor the motion of internal organs affected by respiration without using external markers or spirometry, to test the correlation with external markers, and to calculate any time shift between the datasets. Ten lung cancer patients were CT scanned with a GE LightSpeed Plus 4-Slice CT scanner operating in a ciné mode. We retrospectively reconstructed the raw CT data to obtain consecutive 0.5 s reconstructions at 0.1 s intervals to increase image sampling. We defined regions of interest containing tissue interfaces, including tumour/lung interfaces that move due to breathing on multiple axial slices and measured the mean CT number versus respiratory phase. Tumour motion was directly correlated with external marker motion, acquired simultaneously, using the sample coefficient of determination, r2. Only three of the ten patients showed correlation higher than r2 = 0.80 between tumour motion and external marker position. However, after taking into account time shifts (ranging between 0 s and 0.4 s) between the two data sets, all ten patients showed correlation better than r2 = 0.8. This non-invasive method for monitoring the motion of internal organs is an effective tool that can assess the use of external markers for 4D-CT imaging and respiratory-gated radiotherapy on a patient-specific basis.

  2. 3D Riesz-wavelet based Covariance descriptors for texture classification of lung nodule tissue in CT.

    PubMed

    Cirujeda, Pol; Muller, Henning; Rubin, Daniel; Aguilera, Todd A; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian; Binefa, Xavier; Depeursinge, Adrien

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present a novel technique for characterizing and classifying 3D textured volumes belonging to different lung tissue types in 3D CT images. We build a volume-based 3D descriptor, robust to changes of size, rigid spatial transformations and texture variability, thanks to the integration of Riesz-wavelet features within a Covariance-based descriptor formulation. 3D Riesz features characterize the morphology of tissue density due to their response to changes in intensity in CT images. These features are encoded in a Covariance-based descriptor formulation: this provides a compact and flexible representation thanks to the use of feature variations rather than dense features themselves and adds robustness to spatial changes. Furthermore, the particular symmetric definite positive matrix form of these descriptors causes them to lay in a Riemannian manifold. Thus, descriptors can be compared with analytical measures, and accurate techniques from machine learning and clustering can be adapted to their spatial domain. Additionally we present a classification model following a "Bag of Covariance Descriptors" paradigm in order to distinguish three different nodule tissue types in CT: solid, ground-glass opacity, and healthy lung. The method is evaluated on top of an acquired dataset of 95 patients with manually delineated ground truth by radiation oncology specialists in 3D, and quantitative sensitivity and specificity values are presented. PMID:26738126

  3. Characterizing active and inactive brown adipose tissue in adult humans using PET-CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Aliya; Towse, Theodore F; Walker, Ronald C; Avison, Malcolm J; Welch, E Brian

    2016-07-01

    Activated brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermogenesis and whole body metabolism in mammals. Positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) imaging has identified depots of BAT in adult humans, igniting scientific interest. The purpose of this study is to characterize both active and inactive supraclavicular BAT in adults and compare the values to those of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT). We obtained [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) PET-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 25 healthy adults. Unlike [(18)F]FDG PET, which can detect only active BAT, MRI is capable of detecting both active and inactive BAT. The MRI-derived fat signal fraction (FSF) of active BAT was significantly lower than that of inactive BAT (means ± SD; 60.2 ± 7.6 vs. 62.4 ± 6.8%, respectively). This change in tissue morphology was also reflected as a significant increase in Hounsfield units (HU; -69.4 ± 11.5 vs. -74.5 ± 9.7 HU, respectively). Additionally, the CT HU, MRI FSF, and MRI R2* values are significantly different between BAT and WAT, regardless of the activation status of BAT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify PET-CT and MRI FSF measurements and utilize a semiautomated algorithm to identify inactive and active BAT in the same adult subjects. Our findings support the use of these metrics to characterize and distinguish between BAT and WAT and lay the foundation for future MRI analysis with the hope that some day MRI-based delineation of BAT can stand on its own. PMID:27166284

  4. Targeted in-vivo computed tomography (CT) imaging of tissue ACE using concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticle solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Marie-Christine; Aras, Omer; Smith, Mark F.; Nan, Anjan; Fleiter, Thorsten

    2010-04-01

    The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis have been associated with overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Moreover, ACE inhibitors, such as lisinopril, have shown a benificial effect for patients diagnosed with heart failure or systemic hypertension. Thus targeted imaging of the ACE is of crucial importance for monitoring of the tissue ACE activity as well as the treatment efficacy in heart failure. In this respect, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles were prepared to provide a new type of probe for targeted molecular imaging of ACE by tuned K-edge computed tomography (CT) imaging. Concentrated solutions of these modified gold nanoparticles, with a diameter around 16 nm, showed high contrast in CT imaging. These new targeted imaging agents were thus used for in vivo imaging on rat models.

  5. Tumor and normal tissue motion in the thorax during respiration: Analysis of volumetric and positional variations using 4D CT

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Elisabeth . E-mail: eweiss@mcvh-vcu.edu; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Dill, S. Vaughn; Keall, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate temporospatial variations of tumor and normal tissue during respiration in lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients, gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures were manually contoured on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Structures were evaluated for volume changes, centroid (center of mass) motion, and phase dependence of variations relative to inspiration. Only volumetrically complete structures were used for analysis (lung in 2, heart in 8, all other structures in >10 patients). Results: During respiration, the magnitude of contoured volumes varied up to 62.5% for GTVs, 25.5% for lungs, and 12.6% for hearts. The range of maximum three-dimensional centroid movement for individual patients was 1.3-24.0 mm for GTV, 2.4-7.9 mm for heart, 5.2-12.0 mm for lungs, 0.3-5.5 mm for skin markers, 2.9-10.0 mm for trachea, and 6.6-21.7 mm for diaphragm. During respiration, the centroid positions of normal structures varied relative to the centroid position of the respective GTV by 1.5-8.1 mm for heart, 2.9-9.3 mm for lungs, 1.2-9.2 mm for skin markers, 0.9-7.1 mm for trachea, and 2.7-16.4 mm for diaphragm. Conclusion: Using 4D-CT, volumetric changes, positional alterations as well as changes in the position of contoured structures relative to the GTV were observed with large variations between individual patients. Although the interpretation of 4D-CT data has considerable uncertainty because of 4D-CT artifacts, observer variations, and the limited acquisition time, the findings might have a significant impact on treatment planning.

  6. Unenhanced CT for the evaluation of acute ureteric colic: the essential pictorial guide.

    PubMed

    Kennish, Steven J; Wah, Tze M; Irving, Henry C

    2010-07-01

    Acute ureteric colic is a common emergency, often dealt with by the emergency physician or general practitioner and referred on to the urologist. Unenhanced CT of the kidneys, ureters and bladder (CTKUB) is the 'gold standard' imaging investigation for establishing a diagnosis and guiding management. An appreciation of the CTKUB signs, which support or refute a diagnosis of ureteric colic, is highly valuable to the clinician when making a urological referral, and to the urologist, who must make appropriate management plans. All salient diagnostic and supportive features of ureteric colic are carefully illustrated, as are important radiological mimics, with the objectives of educating and informing the non-radiologist. Ready access to the picture archive and communication system (PACS) allows all specialists involved to interpret the radiological report with the benefit of images. A stone within the ureter may not always be readily apparent. Soft tissue rim sign around a calcific focus is an important indicator of a ureteric stone, whereas a comet tail sign suggests a phlebolith (a calcified venous thrombosis), a radiological mimic of a ureteric stone. Numerous secondary signs of ureteric obstruction may be present including hydronephrosis and perinephric stranding, and can help to confirm the diagnosis. The relative diagnostic weighting of signs is discussed, and a checklist is provided to assist with interpretation. Unexpected alternative radiological diagnoses are also illustrated, which may have significant management consequences necessitating specialist referral. PMID:20634253

  7. Iodine-enhanced micro-CT imaging: methodological refinements for the study of the soft-tissue anatomy of post-embryonic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Gignac, Paul M; Kley, Nathan J

    2014-05-01

    The now widespread use of non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and micro-CTCT) has greatly augmented our ability to comprehensively detail and quantify the internal hard-tissue anatomy of vertebrates. However, the utility of X-ray imaging for gaining similar insights into vertebrate soft-tissue anatomy has yet to be fully realized due to the naturally low X-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissues. In this study, we show how a wide diversity of soft-tissue structures within the vertebrate head-including muscles, glands, fat deposits, perichondria, dural venous sinuses, white and gray matter of the brain, as well as cranial nerves and associated ganglia-can be rapidly visualized in their natural relationships with extraordinary levels of detail using iodine-enhanced (i-e) µCT imaging. To date, Lugol's iodine solution (I2 KI) has been used as a contrast agent for µCT imaging of small invertebrates, vertebrate embryos, and certain isolated parts of larger, post-embryonic vertebrates. These previous studies have all yielded promising results, but visualization of soft tissues in smaller invertebrate and embryonic vertebrate specimens has generally been more complete than that for larger, post-embryonic vertebrates. Our research builds on these previous studies by using high-energy µCT together with more highly concentrated I2 KI solutions and longer staining times to optimize the imaging and differentiation of soft tissues within the heads of post-embryonic archosaurs (Alligator mississippiensis and Dromaius novaehollandiae). We systematically quantify the intensities of tissue staining, demonstrate the range of anatomical structures that can be visualized, and generate a partial three-dimensional reconstruction of alligator cephalic soft-tissue anatomy. PMID:24482316

  8. High resolution multidetector CT aided tissue analysis and quantification of lung fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, also known as Idiopathic Usual Interstitial Pneumontis, pathologically) is a progressive diffuse lung disease which has a median survival rate of less than four years with a prevalence of 15-20/100,000 in the United States. Global function changes are measured by pulmonary function tests and the diagnosis and extent of pulmonary structural changes are typically assessed by acquiring two-dimensional high resolution CT (HRCT) images. The acquisition and analysis of volumetric high resolution Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) images with nearly isotropic pixels offers the potential to measure both lung function and structure. This paper presents a new approach to three dimensional lung image analysis and classification of normal and abnormal structures in lungs with IPF.

  9. A topology-oriented and tissue-specific approach to detect pleural thickenings from 3D CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerger, C.; Chaisaowong, K.; Knepper, A.; Kraus, T.; Aach, T.

    2009-02-01

    Pleural thickenings are caused by asbestos exposure and may evolve into malignant pleural mesothelioma. The detection of pleural thickenings is today mostly done by a visual inspection of CT data, which is time-consuming and underlies the physician's subjective judgment. We propose a new detection algorithm within our computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system to automatically detect pleural thickenings within CT data. First, pleura contours are identified by thresholding and contour relaxation with a probabilistic model. Subsequently, the approach to automatically detect pleural thickenings is proposed as a two-step procedure. Step one; since pleural thickenings appear as fine-scale occurrences on the rather large-scale pleura contour, a surface-based smoothing algorithm is developed. Pleural thickenings are initially detected as the difference between the original contours and the resulting "healthy" model of the pleura. Step two; as pleural thickenings can expand into the surrounding thoracic tissue, a subsequent tissue-specific segmentation for the initially detected pleural thickenings is performed in order to separate pleural thickenings from the surrounding thoracic tissue. For this purpose, a probabilistic Hounsfield model for pleural thickenings as a mixture of Gaussian distributions has been constructed. The parameters were estimated by applying the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. A model fitting technique in combination with the application of a Gibbs-Markov random field (GMRF) model then allows the tissuespecific segmentation of pleural thickenings with high precision. With these methods, a new approach is presented in order to assure a precise and reproducible detection of pleural mesothelioma in its early stage.

  10. Evaluating the dose effects of a longitudinal micro-CT study on pulmonary tissue in C57BL/6 mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detombe, Sarah A.; Dunmore-Buyze, Joy; Petrov, Ivailo E.; Drangova, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Background: Micro-computed tomography offers numerous advantages for small animal imaging, including the ability to monitor the same animals throughout a longitudinal study. However, concerns are often raised regarding the effects of x-ray dose accumulated over the course of the experiment. In this study, we scan C57BL/6 mice multiple times per week for six weeks, to determine the effect of the cumulative dose on pulmonary tissue at the end of the study. Methods/Results: C57BL/6 male mice were split into two groups (irradiated group=10, control group=10). The irradiated group was scanned (80kVp/50mA) each week for 6 weeks; the weekly scan session had three scans. This resulted in a weekly dose of 0.84 Gy, and a total study dose of 5.04 Gy. The control group was scanned on the final week. Scans from weeks 1 and 6 were reconstructed and analyzed: overall, there was no significant difference in lung volume or lung density between the control group and the irradiated group. Similarly, there were no significant differences between the week 1 and week 6 scans in the irradiated group. Histological samples taken from excised lung tissue also showed no evidence of inflammation or fibrosis in the irradiated group. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that a 5 Gy x-ray dose accumulated over six weeks during a longitudinal micro-CT study has no significant effects on the pulmonary tissue of C57BL/6 mice. As a result, the many advantages of micro- CT imaging, including rapid acquisition of high-resolution, isotropic images in free-breathing mice, can be taken advantage of in longitudinal studies without concern for negative dose-related effects.

  11. High-resolution CT by diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging: mapping of breast tissue samples and comparison with their histo-pathology.

    PubMed

    Bravin, Alberto; Keyriläinen, Jani; Fernández, Manuel; Fiedler, Stefan; Nemoz, Christian; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Leidenius, Marjut; von Smitten, Karl; Sipilä, Petri; Suortti, Pekka

    2007-04-21

    The aim of this study was to introduce high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of breast tumours using the diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging (DEI) technique and to compare results with radiological and histo-pathological examinations. X-ray CT images of tumour-bearing breast tissue samples were acquired by monochromatic synchrotron radiation (SR). Due to the narrow beam and a large sample-to-detector distance scattering is rejected in the absorption contrast images (SR-CT). Large contrast enhancement is achieved by the use of the DEI-CT method, where the effects of refraction and scatter rejection are analysed by crystal optics. Clinical mammograms and CT images were recorded as reference material for a radiological examination. Three malignant and benign samples were studied in detail. Their radiographs were compared with optical images of stained histological sections. The DEI-CT images map accurately the morphology of the samples, including collagen strands and micro-calcifications of dimensions less than 0.1 mm. Histo-pathological examination and reading of the radiographs were done independently, and the conclusions were in general agreement. High-resolution DEI-CT images show strong contrast and permit visualization of details invisible in clinical radiographs. The radiation dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude without compromising image quality, which would make possible clinical in vivo DEI-CT with future compact SR sources. PMID:17404464

  12. Computer-aided analysis of airway trees in micro-CT scans of ex vivo porcine lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christian; Adam, Ryan; Stoltz, David A; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2012-12-01

    We present a highly automated approach to obtain detailed structural models of airway trees from ex vivo porcine lung tissue imaged with a high resolution micro-CT scanner. Such information is an important prerequisite to systematically study models of lung disease that affect airway morphology. The method initially identifies all tubular airway-like structures in the lung. In a second processing step, these structures are grouped into a connected airway tree by utilizing prior knowledge about the airway trees branching pattern. The method was evaluated on 12 micro-CT scans from four tracheal lobes of piglets imaged at three different inflation levels. For this study, two control piglets and two cystic fibrosis piglets were used. For systematic validation of our approach, an airway nomenclature was developed for the pig airway tree. Out of more than 3500 airway tree segments assessed during evaluation, 88.45% were correctly identified by the method. No false positive airway branches were found. A detailed performance analysis for different airway tree hierarchy levels, lung inflation levels and piglets with/without cystic fibrosis is presented in the paper. PMID:22959430

  13. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment.

    PubMed

    Miksys, N; Xu, C; Beaulieu, L; Thomson, R M

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  14. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksys, N.; Xu, C.; Beaulieu, L.; Thomson, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  15. MicroCT for comparative morphology: simple staining methods allow high-contrast 3D imaging of diverse non-mineralized animal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Metscher, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Background Comparative, functional, and developmental studies of animal morphology require accurate visualization of three-dimensional structures, but few widely applicable methods exist for non-destructive whole-volume imaging of animal tissues. Quantitative studies in particular require accurately aligned and calibrated volume images of animal structures. X-ray microtomography (microCT) has the potential to produce quantitative 3D images of small biological samples, but its widespread use for non-mineralized tissues has been limited by the low x-ray contrast of soft tissues. Although osmium staining and a few other techniques have been used for contrast enhancement, generally useful methods for microCT imaging for comparative morphology are still lacking. Results Several very simple and versatile staining methods are presented for microCT imaging of animal soft tissues, along with advice on tissue fixation and sample preparation. The stains, based on inorganic iodine and phosphotungstic acid, are easier to handle and much less toxic than osmium, and they produce high-contrast x-ray images of a wide variety of soft tissues. The breadth of possible applications is illustrated with a few microCT images of model and non-model animals, including volume and section images of vertebrates, embryos, insects, and other invertebrates. Each image dataset contains x-ray absorbance values for every point in the imaged volume, and objects as small as individual muscle fibers and single blood cells can be resolved in their original locations and orientations within the sample. Conclusion With very simple contrast staining, microCT imaging can produce quantitative, high-resolution, high-contrast volume images of animal soft tissues, without destroying the specimens and with possibilities of combining with other preparation and imaging methods. Such images are expected to be useful in comparative, developmental, functional, and quantitative studies of morphology. PMID:19545439

  16. SU-D-12A-02: DeTECT, a Method to Enhance Soft Tissue Contrast From Mega Voltage CT

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, K; Gou, S; Qi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: MVCT images have been used on TomoTherapy system to align patients based on bony anatomies but its usefulness for soft tissue registration, delineation and adaptive radiation therapy is severely limited due to minimal photoelectric interaction and prominent presence of noise resulting from low detector quantum efficiency of megavoltage x-rays. We aim to utilize a non-local means denoising method and texture analysis to recover the soft tissue information for MVCT. Methods: A block matching 3D (BM3D) algorithm was adapted to reduce the noise while keeping the texture information of the MVCT images. BM3D is an imaging denoising algorithm developed from non-local means methods. BM3D additionally creates 3D groups by stacking 2D patches by the order of similarity. 3D denoising operation is then performed. The resultant 3D group is inversely transformed back to 2D images. In this study, BM3D was applied to MVCT images of a CT quality phantom, a head and neck and a prostate patient. Following denoising, imaging texture was enhanced to create the denoised and texture enhanced CT (DeTECT). Results: The original MVCT images show prevalent noise and poor soft tissue contrast. By applying BM3D denoising and texture enhancement, all MVCT images show remarkable improvements. For the phantom, the contrast to noise ratio for the low contrast plug was improved from 2.2 to 13.1 without compromising line pair conspicuity. For the head and neck patient, the lymph nodes and vein in the carotid space inconspicuous in the original MVCT image becomes highly visible in DeTECT. For the prostate patient, the boundary between the bladder and the prostate in the original MVCT is successfully recovered. Both results are visually validated by kVCT images of the corresponding patients. Conclusion: DeTECT showed the promise to drastically improve the soft tissue contrast of MVCT for image guided radiotherapy and adaptive radiotherapy.

  17. Metal artifact reduction in CT using tissue-class modeling and adaptive prefiltering

    SciTech Connect

    Bal, Matthieu; Spies, Lothar

    2006-08-15

    High-density objects such as metal prostheses, surgical clips, or dental fillings generate streak-like artifacts in computed tomography images. We present a novel method for metal artifact reduction by in-painting missing information into the corrupted sinogram. The information is provided by a tissue-class model extracted from the distorted image. To this end the image is first adaptively filtered to reduce the noise content and to smooth out streak artifacts. Consecutively, the image is segmented into different material classes using a clustering algorithm. The corrupted and missing information in the original sinogram is completed using the forward projected information from the tissue-class model. The performance of the correction method is assessed on phantom images. Clinical images featuring a broad spectrum of metal artifacts are studied. Phantom and clinical studies show that metal artifacts, such as streaks, are significantly reduced and shadows in the image are eliminated. Furthermore, the novel approach improves detectability of organ contours. This can be of great relevance, for instance, in radiation therapy planning, where images affected by metal artifacts may lead to suboptimal treatment plans.

  18. Deriving concentrations of oxygen and carbon in human tissues using single- and dual-energy CT for ion therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Parodi, Katia; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-08-01

    Dedicated methods of in-vivo verification of ion treatment based on the detection of secondary emitted radiation, such as positron-emission-tomography and prompt gamma detection require high accuracy in the assignment of the elemental composition. This especially concerns the content in carbon and oxygen, which are the most abundant elements of human tissue. The standard single-energy computed tomography (SECT) approach to carbon and oxygen concentration determination has been shown to introduce significant discrepancies in the carbon and oxygen content of tissues. We propose a dual-energy CT (DECT)-based approach for carbon and oxygen content assignment and investigate the accuracy gains of the method. SECT and DECT Hounsfield units (HU) were calculated using the stoichiometric calibration procedure for a comprehensive set of human tissues. Fit parameters for the stoichiometric calibration were obtained from phantom scans. Gaussian distributions with standard deviations equal to those derived from phantom scans were subsequently generated for each tissue for several values of the computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol). The assignment of %weight carbon and oxygen (%wC,%wO) was performed based on SECT and DECT. The SECT scheme employed a HU versus %wC,O approach while for DECT we explored a Zeff versus %wC,O approach and a (Zeff, ρe) space approach. The accuracy of each scheme was estimated by calculating the root mean square (RMS) error on %wC,O derived from the input Gaussian distribution of HU for each tissue and also for the noiseless case as a limiting case. The (Zeff, ρe) space approach was also compared to SECT by comparing RMS error for hydrogen and nitrogen (%wH,%wN). Systematic shifts were applied to the tissue HU distributions to assess the robustness of the method against systematic uncertainties in the stoichiometric calibration procedure. In the absence of noise the (Zeff, ρe) space approach showed more accurate %wC,O assignment (largest error of

  19. Volume shrinkage of bone, brain and muscle tissue in sample preparation for micro-CT and light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM).

    PubMed

    Buytaert, Jan; Goyens, Jana; De Greef, Daniel; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-08-01

    Two methods are especially suited for tomographic imaging with histological detail of macroscopic samples that consist of multiple tissue types (bone, muscle, nerve or fat): Light sheet (based) fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Micro-CT requires staining with heavy chemical elements (and thus fixation and sometimes dehydration) in order to make soft tissue imageable when measured alongside denser structures. LSMF requires fixation, decalcification, dehydration, clearing and staining with a fluorescent dye. The specimen preparation of both imaging methods is prone to shrinkage, which is often not mentioned, let alone quantified. In this paper the presence and degree of shrinkage are quantitatively identified for the selected preparation methods/stains. LSFM delivers a volume shrinkage of 17% for bone, 56% for muscle and 62% for brain tissue. The three most popular micro-CT stains (phosphotungstic acid, iodine with potassium iodide, and iodine in absolute ethanol) deliver a volume shrinkage ranging from 10 to 56% for muscle and 27-66% for brain, while bone does not shrink in micro-CT preparation. PMID:24963987

  20. Heidelberg-mCT-Analyzer: a novel method for standardized microcomputed-tomography-guided evaluation of scaffold properties in bone and tissue research.

    PubMed

    Westhauser, Fabian; Weis, Christian; Hoellig, Melanie; Swing, Tyler; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Weber, Marc-André; Stiller, Wolfram; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Moghaddam, Arash

    2015-11-01

    Bone tissue engineering and bone scaffold development represent two challenging fields in orthopaedic research. Micro-computed tomography (mCT) allows non-invasive measurement of these scaffolds' properties in vivo. However, the lack of standardized mCT analysis protocols and, therefore, the protocols' user-dependency make interpretation of the reported results difficult. To overcome these issues in scaffold research, we introduce the Heidelberg-mCT-Analyzer. For evaluation of our technique, we built 10 bone-inducing scaffolds, which underwent mCT acquisition before ectopic implantation (T0) in mice, and at explantation eight weeks thereafter (T1). The scaffolds' three-dimensional reconstructions were automatically segmented using fuzzy clustering with fully automatic level-setting. The scaffold itself and its pores were then evaluated for T0 and T1. Analysing the scaffolds' characteristic parameter set with our quantification method showed bone formation over time. We were able to demonstrate that our algorithm obtained the same results for basic scaffold parameters (e.g. scaffold volume, pore number and pore volume) as other established analysis methods. Furthermore, our algorithm was able to analyse more complex parameters, such as pore size range, tissue mineral density and scaffold surface. Our imaging and post-processing strategy enables standardized and user-independent analysis of scaffold properties, and therefore is able to improve the quantitative evaluations of scaffold-associated bone tissue-engineering projects. PMID:26716008

  1. Heidelberg-mCT-Analyzer: a novel method for standardized microcomputed-tomography-guided evaluation of scaffold properties in bone and tissue research

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Christian; Hoellig, Melanie; Swing, Tyler; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Weber, Marc-André; Stiller, Wolfram; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Moghaddam, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering and bone scaffold development represent two challenging fields in orthopaedic research. Micro-computed tomography (mCT) allows non-invasive measurement of these scaffolds’ properties in vivo. However, the lack of standardized mCT analysis protocols and, therefore, the protocols’ user-dependency make interpretation of the reported results difficult. To overcome these issues in scaffold research, we introduce the Heidelberg-mCT-Analyzer. For evaluation of our technique, we built 10 bone-inducing scaffolds, which underwent mCT acquisition before ectopic implantation (T0) in mice, and at explantation eight weeks thereafter (T1). The scaffolds’ three-dimensional reconstructions were automatically segmented using fuzzy clustering with fully automatic level-setting. The scaffold itself and its pores were then evaluated for T0 and T1. Analysing the scaffolds’ characteristic parameter set with our quantification method showed bone formation over time. We were able to demonstrate that our algorithm obtained the same results for basic scaffold parameters (e.g. scaffold volume, pore number and pore volume) as other established analysis methods. Furthermore, our algorithm was able to analyse more complex parameters, such as pore size range, tissue mineral density and scaffold surface. Our imaging and post-processing strategy enables standardized and user-independent analysis of scaffold properties, and therefore is able to improve the quantitative evaluations of scaffold-associated bone tissue-engineering projects. PMID:26716008

  2. 68Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET/CT imaging of peri-implant tissue responses and staphylococcal infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    significant. The difference between the S. aureus group and group 3 was neither statistically significant. Conclusion PET/CT imaging with novel 68Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 tracer was able to detect inflammatory tissue response induced by catheter implantation and staphylococcal infections. PMID:25520903

  3. Diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT): an emerging tool for rapid, high-resolution, 3-D imaging of metazoan soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Gignac, Paul M; Kley, Nathan J; Clarke, Julia A; Colbert, Matthew W; Morhardt, Ashley C; Cerio, Donald; Cost, Ian N; Cox, Philip G; Daza, Juan D; Early, Catherine M; Echols, M Scott; Henkelman, R Mark; Herdina, A Nele; Holliday, Casey M; Li, Zhiheng; Mahlow, Kristin; Merchant, Samer; Müller, Johannes; Orsbon, Courtney P; Paluh, Daniel J; Thies, Monte L; Tsai, Henry P; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-06-01

    Morphologists have historically had to rely on destructive procedures to visualize the three-dimensional (3-D) anatomy of animals. More recently, however, non-destructive techniques have come to the forefront. These include X-ray computed tomography (CT), which has been used most commonly to examine the mineralized, hard-tissue anatomy of living and fossil metazoans. One relatively new and potentially transformative aspect of current CT-based research is the use of chemical agents to render visible, and differentiate between, soft-tissue structures in X-ray images. Specifically, iodine has emerged as one of the most widely used of these contrast agents among animal morphologists due to its ease of handling, cost effectiveness, and differential affinities for major types of soft tissues. The rapid adoption of iodine-based contrast agents has resulted in a proliferation of distinct specimen preparations and scanning parameter choices, as well as an increasing variety of imaging hardware and software preferences. Here we provide a critical review of the recent contributions to iodine-based, contrast-enhanced CT research to enable researchers just beginning to employ contrast enhancement to make sense of this complex new landscape of methodologies. We provide a detailed summary of recent case studies, assess factors that govern success at each step of the specimen storage, preparation, and imaging processes, and make recommendations for standardizing both techniques and reporting practices. Finally, we discuss potential cutting-edge applications of diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT) and the issues that must still be overcome to facilitate the broader adoption of diceCT going forward. PMID:26970556

  4. Initial In Vivo Quantification of Tc-99m Sestamibi Uptake as a Function of Tissue Type in Healthy Breasts Using Dedicated Breast SPECT-CT

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Steve D.; Perez, Kristy L.; McCracken, Emily K. E.; Shah, Jainil P.; Wong, Terence Z.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2012-01-01

    A pilot study is underway to quantify in vivo the uptake and distribution of Tc-99m Sestamibi in subjects without previous history of breast cancer using a dedicated SPECT-CT breast imaging system. Subjects undergoing diagnostic parathyroid imaging studies were consented and imaged as part of this IRB-approved breast imaging study. For each of the seven subjects, one randomly selected breast was imaged prone-pendant using the dedicated, compact breast SPECT-CT system underneath the shielded patient support. Iteratively reconstructed and attenuation and/or scatter corrected images were coregistered; CT images were segmented into glandular and fatty tissue by three different methods; the average concentration of Sestamibi was determined from the SPECT data using the CT-based segmentation and previously established quantification techniques. Very minor differences between the segmentation methods were observed, and the results indicate an average image-based in vivo Sestamibi concentration of 0.10 ± 0.16 μCi/mL with no preferential uptake by glandular or fatty tissues. PMID:22956950

  5. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  6. Mapping transitions between healthy and pathological lesions in human breast tissues by diffraction enhanced imaging computed tomography (DEI-CT) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, A. L. C.; Antoniassi, M.; Geraldelli, W.; Poletti, M. E.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we have combined the DEI-CT and SAXS technique to study the transition between healthy and pathological breast tissues, which include benign and malignant lesions. The ability of DEI-CT to enhance the contrast between soft tissues was used to localize the tumor region in the sample. Then, the tumor region and its surroundings were scanned by SAXS in order to map the changes promoted by the neoplasias at nano-level.It was clearly observed that pathological tissues present distinguishable SAXS scattering profiles from those of normal tissue. These differences are mainly related to changes in arrangement and diameter of collagen fibrils, evaluated by the higher order of reflection peaks of these fibrils. Differences related to the peak intensities and the total scattered intensity were found by comparing the healthy and pathological regions. The 2nd order of collagen reflection arises only in the healthy region neighboring the benign lesion. A broader peak at q=0.16 nm-1 seems to characterize the malignant lesions. Finally, based on this information, the transition between healthy and pathological human breast tissues was mapped which allowed to get insights into the changes promoted by tumors during growth and progression.

  7. Assessing the three-dimensional collagen network in soft tissues using contrast agents and high resolution micro-CT: Application to porcine iliac veins.

    PubMed

    Nierenberger, Mathieu; Rémond, Yves; Ahzi, Saïd; Choquet, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The assessment of the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibers inside vessel walls constitutes one of the bases for building structural models for the description of the mechanical behavior of these tissues. Multiphoton microscopy allows for such observations, but is limited to volumes of around a thousand of microns. In the present work, we propose to observe the collagenous network of vascular tissues using micro-CT. To get a contrast, three staining solutions (phosphotungstic acid, phosphomolybdic acid and iodine potassium iodide) were tested. Two of these stains were showed to lead to similar results and to a satisfactory contrast within the tissue. A detailed observation of a small porcine iliac vein sample allowed assessing the collagen fibers orientations within the medial and adventitial layers of the vein. The vasa vasorum network, which is present inside the adventitia of the vein, was also observed. Finally, the demonstrated micro-CT staining technique for the three-dimensional observation of thin soft tissues samples, like vein walls, contributes to the assessment of their structure at different scales while keeping a global overview of the tissue. PMID:26033495

  8. Monte Carlo investigations of megavoltage cone-beam CT using thick, segmented scintillating detectors for soft tissue visualization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Sawant, Amit; Du, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MY CBCT) is a highly promising technique for providing volumetric patient position information in the radiation treatment room. Such information has the potential to greatly assist in registering the patient to the planned treatment position, helping to ensure accurate delivery of the high energy therapy beam to the tumor volume while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Presently, CBCT systems using conventional MV active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are commonly used in portal imaging, require a relatively large amount of dose to create images that are clinically useful. This is due to the fact that the phosphor screen detector employed in conventional MV AMFPIs utilizes only ~2% of the incident radiation (for a 6 MV x-ray spectrum). Fortunately, thick, segmented scintillating detectors can overcome this limitation, and the first prototype imager has demonstrated highly promising performance for projection imaging at low doses. It is therefore of definite interest to examine the potential performance of such thick, segmented scintillating detectors for MV CBCT. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation energy deposition were used to examine reconstructed images of cylindrical CT contrast phantoms, embedded with tissue-equivalent objects. The phantoms were scanned at 6 MV using segmented detectors having various design parameters (i.e., detector thickness, as well as scintillator and septal wall materials). Due to constraints imposed by the nature of this study, the size of the phantoms was limited to ~6 cm. For such phantoms, the simulation results suggest that a 40 mm thick, segmented CsI detector with low density septal walls can delineate electron density differences of ~2.3% and 1.3% at doses of 1.54 and 3.08 cGy, respectively. In addition, it was found that segmented detectors with greater thickness, higher density scintillator material, or lower density septal walls exhibit higher contrast

  9. Pilot Study to Confirm that Fat and Liver can be Distinguished by Spectroscopic Tissue Response on a Medipix-All-Resolution System-CT (MARS-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Kyra B.; Carr, James M.; Clark, Michael J.; Cook, Nick J.; Anderson, Nigel G.; Scott, Nicola J.; Butler, Alexandra P.; Butler, Philip H.; Butler, Anthony P.

    2009-07-01

    NAFLD, liver component of the "metabolic" syndrome, has become the most common liver disease in western nations. Non-invasive imaging techniques exist, but have limitations, especially in detection and quantification of mild to moderate fatty liver. In this pilot study, we produced attenuation curves from biomedical-quality projection images of liver and fat using the MARS spectroscopic-CT scanner. Difficulties obtaining attenuation spectra after reconstruction demonstrated that standard reconstruction programs do not preserve spectral information.

  10. Pilot Study to Confirm that Fat and Liver can be Distinguished by Spectroscopic Tissue Response on a Medipix-All-Resolution System-CT (MARS-CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Kyra B.; Anderson, Nigel G.; Butler, Alexandra P.; Carr, James M.; Clark, Michael J.; Cook, Nick J.; Scott, Nicola J.; Butler, Philip H.; Butler, Anthony P.

    2009-07-23

    NAFLD, liver component of the 'metabolic' syndrome, has become the most common liver disease in western nations. Non-invasive imaging techniques exist, but have limitations, especially in detection and quantification of mild to moderate fatty liver. In this pilot study, we produced attenuation curves from biomedical-quality projection images of liver and fat using the MARS spectroscopic-CT scanner. Difficulties obtaining attenuation spectra after reconstruction demonstrated that standard reconstruction programs do not preserve spectral information.

  11. The Value of SPECT/CT in Monitoring Prefabricated Tissue-Engineered Bone and Orthotopic rhBMP-2 Implants for Mandibular Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miao; Peng, Xin; Mao, Chi; Tian, Jia-he; Zhang, Shu-wen; Xu, Fang; Tu, Jing-jing; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Min; Yu, Guang-yan

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering shows good prospects for mandibular reconstruction. In recent studies, prefabricated tissue-engineered bone (PTEB) by recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) applied in vivo has found to be an effective alternative for autologous bone grafts. However, the optimal time to transfer PTEB for mandibular reconstruction is still not elucidated. Thus, here in an animal experiment of rhesus monkey, the suitable transferring time for PTEB to reconstruct mandibular defects was evaluated by 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT, and its value in monitoring orthotopic rhBMP-2 implants for mandibular reconstruction was also evaluated. The result of SPECT/CT showed higher 99mTc-MDP uptake, indicating osteoinductivity, in rhBMP-2 incorporated demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) and coralline hydroxyapatite (CHA) implants than those without BMP stimulation. 99mTc-MDP uptake of rhBMP-2 implant peaked at 8 weeks following implantation while CT showed the density of these implants increased after 13 weeks' prefabrication. Histology confirmed that mandibular defects were repaired successfully with PTEB or orthotopically rhBMP-2 incorporated CHA implants, in accordance with SPECT/CT findings. Collectively, data shows 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT is a sensitive and noninvasive tool to monitor osteoinductivity and bone regeneration of PTEB and orthotopic implants. The PTEB achieved peak osteoinductivity and bone density at 8 to 13 weeks following ectopic implantation, which would serve as a recommendable time frame for its transfer to mandibular reconstruction. PMID:26340447

  12. The Value of SPECT/CT in Monitoring Prefabricated Tissue-Engineered Bone and Orthotopic rhBMP-2 Implants for Mandibular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Miao; Peng, Xin; Mao, Chi; Tian, Jia-he; Zhang, Shu-wen; Xu, Fang; Tu, Jing-jing; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Min; Yu, Guang-yan

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering shows good prospects for mandibular reconstruction. In recent studies, prefabricated tissue-engineered bone (PTEB) by recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) applied in vivo has found to be an effective alternative for autologous bone grafts. However, the optimal time to transfer PTEB for mandibular reconstruction is still not elucidated. Thus, here in an animal experiment of rhesus monkey, the suitable transferring time for PTEB to reconstruct mandibular defects was evaluated by 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT, and its value in monitoring orthotopic rhBMP-2 implants for mandibular reconstruction was also evaluated. The result of SPECT/CT showed higher 99mTc-MDP uptake, indicating osteoinductivity, in rhBMP-2 incorporated demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) and coralline hydroxyapatite (CHA) implants than those without BMP stimulation. 99mTc-MDP uptake of rhBMP-2 implant peaked at 8 weeks following implantation while CT showed the density of these implants increased after 13 weeks’ prefabrication. Histology confirmed that mandibular defects were repaired successfully with PTEB or orthotopically rhBMP-2 incorporated CHA implants, in accordance with SPECT/CT findings. Collectively, data shows 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT is a sensitive and noninvasive tool to monitor osteoinductivity and bone regeneration of PTEB and orthotopic implants. The PTEB achieved peak osteoinductivity and bone density at 8 to 13 weeks following ectopic implantation, which would serve as a recommendable time frame for its transfer to mandibular reconstruction. PMID:26340447

  13. Correlation of visceral adipose tissue measured by Lunar Prodigy dual X-ray absorptiometry with MRI and CT in older men.

    PubMed

    Cheung, A S; de Rooy, C; Hoermann, R; Gianatti, E J; Hamilton, E J; Roff, G; Zajac, J D; Grossmann, M

    2016-08-01

    Quantification of abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is important to understand obesity-related comorbidities. We hypothesized that dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements of VAT would correlate with traditional gold standards of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in older men. Deming regression and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the agreement between VAT measured simultaneously by DXA and MRI (n=95) in a cohort of older males participating in a randomized trial of testosterone replacement for diabetes. We also correlated DXA with single-slice CT (n=102) in a cohort of older males undergoing testosterone deprivation for prostate cancer. Lunar Prodigy DXA scanners using enCORE software was used to measure VAT. DXA VAT volume strongly correlated with MRI VAT volume (r=0.90, P<0.0001) and CT VAT area (r=0.83, P<0.0001). As DXA assesses VAT volume in a smaller compartment than MRI, Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated DXA systematically underestimated VAT by an approximately 30% proportional bias. DXA VAT volume measured by Lunar Prodigy DXA scanners correlate well with gold standard MRI and CT quantification methods, and provides a low radiation, efficient, cost-effective option. Future clinical studies examining the effects of interventions on body composition and regional fat distribution may find DXA an appropriate volumetric method to quantify VAT. PMID:27003112

  14. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienemann, Philipp S.; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R.; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E.; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (<1 mm). Herein, we employ modular designed poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels that release bone morphogenetic protein to guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials.

  15. Extracting alveolar structure of human lung tissue specimens based on surface skeleton representation from 3D micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimori, Hiroyuki; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakaya, Yoshihiro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Matsui, Eisuke; Fujii, Masashi; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a Micro CT system for understanding lung function at a high resolution of the micrometer order (up to 5µm in spatial resolution). Micro CT system enables the removal specimen of lungs to be observed at micro level, has expected a big contribution for micro internal organs morphology and the image diagnosis study. In this research, we develop system to visualize lung microstructures in three dimensions from micro CT images and analyze them. They characterize in that high CT value of the noise area is, and the difficulty of only using threshold processing to extract the alveolar wall of micro CT images. Thus, we are developing a method of extracting the alveolar wall with surface thinning algorithm. In this report, we propose the method which reduces the excessive degeneracy of figure which caused by surface thinning process. And, we apply this algorithm to the micro CT image of the actual pulmonary specimen. It is shown that the extraction of the alveolus wall becomes possible in the high precision.

  16. Diagnosing Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis in Patients Without Signs of Soft Tissue Infection by Coupling Hybrid 67Ga SPECT/CT With Bedside Percutaneous Bone Puncture

    PubMed Central

    Aslangul, Elisabeth; M’Bemba, Jocelyne; Caillat-Vigneron, Nadine; Coignard, Sophie; Larger, Etienne; Boitard, Christian; Lipsky, Benjamin A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Successful treatment of osteomyelitis is more likely with accurate diagnosis and identification of the causative pathogens. This typically requires obtaining a specimen of bone, usually by image-guided biopsy. We sought to develop a simpler bedside method for definitively diagnosing osteomyelitis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Over 2 years, we enrolled consecutive patients presenting to our diabetic foot clinic with a foot ulcer and clinically suspected osteomyelitis but without soft tissue infection. Each underwent hybrid 67Ga single-photon emission computed tomography and X-ray computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging; those with a positive scan underwent bedside percutaneous bone puncture. Patients with a positive bone culture received culture-guided antibiotic therapy. Patients with negative 67Ga SPECT/CT imaging or with positive imaging but negative bone culture were not treated with antibiotics. All patients were followed up for ≥1 year. RESULTS Among 55 patients who underwent 67Ga SPECT/CT imaging, 13 had negative results and all of their foot ulcers resolved without antibiotic therapy. Among 42 with positive imaging, 2 were excluded (for recent antibiotic therapy) and 40 had bone punctures (3 punctured twice): 19 had negative results, 3 of which were likely false negatives, and 24 had positive results (all gram-positive cocci). At follow-up, 3 patients had died, 3 had undergone amputation, and 47 had no evidence of foot infection. The sensitivity and specificity of this combined method were 88.0 and 93.6%, respectively, and the positive and negative predictive values were 91.7 and 90.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Coupling of 67Ga SPECT/CT imaging and bedside percutaneous bone puncture appears to be accurate and safe for diagnosing diabetic foot osteomyelitis in patients without signs of soft tissue infection, obviating the need for antibiotic treatment in 55% of suspected cases. PMID:23514729

  17. Influence of radiation therapy on the lung-tissue in breast cancer patients: CT-assessed density changes and associated symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rotstein, S.; Lax, I.; Svane, G. )

    1990-01-01

    The relative electron density of lung tissue was measured from computer tomography (CT) slices in 33 breast cancer patients treated by various techniques of adjuvant radiotherapy. The measurements were made before radiotherapy, 3 months and 9 months after completion of radiation therapy. The changes in lung densities at 3 months and 9 months were compared to radiation induced radiological (CT) findings. In addition, subjective symptoms such as cough and dyspnoea were assessed before and after radiotherapy. It was observed that the mean of the relative electron density of lung tissue varied from 0.25 when the whole lung was considered to 0.17 when only the anterior lateral quarter of the lung was taken into account. In patients with positive radiological (CT) findings the mean lung density of the anterior lateral quarter increased 2.1 times 3 months after radiotherapy and was still increased 1.6 times 6 months later. For those patients without findings, in the CT pictures the corresponding values were 1.2 and 1.1, respectively. The standard deviation of the pixel values within the anterior lateral quarter of the lung increased 3.8 times and 3.2 times at 3 months and 9 months, respectively, in the former group, as opposed to 1.2 and 1.1 in the latter group. Thirteen patients had an increase in either cough or dyspnoea as observed 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. In eleven patients these symptoms persisted 6 months later. No significant correlation was found between radiological findings and subjective symptoms. However, when three different treatment techniques were compared among 29 patients the highest rate of radiological findings was observed in patients in which the largest lung volumes received the target dose. A tendency towards an increased rate of subjective symptoms was also found in this group.

  18. Simulation study on potential accuracy gains from dual energy CT tissue segmentation for low-energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Granton, Patrick V.; Reniers, Brigitte; Öllers, Michel C.; Beaulieu, Luc; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-10-01

    This work compares Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for 125I and 103Pd low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources performed in virtual phantoms containing a series of human soft tissues of interest for brachytherapy. The geometries are segmented (tissue type and density assignment) based on simulated single energy computed tomography (SECT) and dual energy (DECT) images, as well as the all-water TG-43 approach. Accuracy is evaluated by comparison to a reference MC dose calculation performed in the same phantoms, where each voxel's material properties are assigned with exactly known values. The objective is to assess potential dose calculation accuracy gains from DECT. A CT imaging simulation package, ImaSim, is used to generate CT images of calibration and dose calculation phantoms at 80, 120, and 140 kVp. From the high and low energy images electron density ρe and atomic number Z are obtained using a DECT algorithm. Following a correction derived from scans of the calibration phantom, accuracy on Z and ρe of ±1% is obtained for all soft tissues with atomic number Z in [6,8] except lung. GEANT4 MC dose calculations based on DECT segmentation agreed with the reference within ±4% for 103Pd, the most sensitive source to tissue misassignments. SECT segmentation with three tissue bins as well as the TG-43 approach showed inferior accuracy with errors of up to 20%. Using seven tissue bins in our SECT segmentation brought errors within ±10% for 103Pd. In general 125I dose calculations showed higher accuracy than 103Pd. Simulated image noise was found to decrease DECT accuracy by 3-4%. Our findings suggest that DECT-based segmentation yields improved accuracy when compared to SECT segmentation with seven tissue bins in LDR brachytherapy dose calculation for the specific case of our non-anthropomorphic phantom. The validity of our conclusions for clinical geometry as well as the importance of image noise in the tissue segmentation procedure deserves further

  19. Simulation study on potential accuracy gains from dual energy CT tissue segmentation for low-energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Granton, Patrick V; Reniers, Brigitte; Ollers, Michel C; Beaulieu, Luc; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-10-01

    This work compares Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for (125)I and (103)Pd low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources performed in virtual phantoms containing a series of human soft tissues of interest for brachytherapy. The geometries are segmented (tissue type and density assignment) based on simulated single energy computed tomography (SECT) and dual energy (DECT) images, as well as the all-water TG-43 approach. Accuracy is evaluated by comparison to a reference MC dose calculation performed in the same phantoms, where each voxel's material properties are assigned with exactly known values. The objective is to assess potential dose calculation accuracy gains from DECT. A CT imaging simulation package, ImaSim, is used to generate CT images of calibration and dose calculation phantoms at 80, 120, and 140 kVp. From the high and low energy images electron density ρ(e) and atomic number Z are obtained using a DECT algorithm. Following a correction derived from scans of the calibration phantom, accuracy on Z and ρ(e) of ±1% is obtained for all soft tissues with atomic number Z ∊ [6,8] except lung. GEANT4 MC dose calculations based on DECT segmentation agreed with the reference within ±4% for (103)Pd, the most sensitive source to tissue misassignments. SECT segmentation with three tissue bins as well as the TG-43 approach showed inferior accuracy with errors of up to 20%. Using seven tissue bins in our SECT segmentation brought errors within ±10% for (103)Pd. In general (125)I dose calculations showed higher accuracy than (103)Pd. Simulated image noise was found to decrease DECT accuracy by 3-4%. Our findings suggest that DECT-based segmentation yields improved accuracy when compared to SECT segmentation with seven tissue bins in LDR brachytherapy dose calculation for the specific case of our non-anthropomorphic phantom. The validity of our conclusions for clinical geometry as well as the importance of image noise in the tissue segmentation procedure deserves

  20. Perinephric Hematoma and Hemorrhagic Shock as a Rare Presentation for an Acutely Obstructive Ureteral Stone with Forniceal Rupture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zynger, Debra L.; Box, Geoffrey N.; Shah, Ketul K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Spontaneous perinephric hematoma (SPH) secondary to a forniceal rupture as the first presenting sign for an obstructive ureteral stone in a patient without history of urolithiasis has not been described previously. Case presentation: We report a 70-year-old Caucasian male patient who presented to our emergency room with fever, altered mental status, and left flank pain. He had a temperature of 103.3°F, tachycardia, but stable blood pressure. He had left flank tenderness. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen/pelvis with intravenous contrast revealed an intracapsular hematoma (13.3 × 10.0 × 6.4 cm) with an active bleeding and a 1.1 cm left proximal ureteral stone. The patient became quickly hemodynamically unstable and was taken for emergent exploratory laparotomy and left nephrectomy. An active bleeding was encountered secondary to a (2.4 × 2.0 cm) lateral capsular defect in the kidney. Conclusion: Hemorrhagic/septic shock as a presenting sign for an obstructive ureteral stone may require an emergent nephrectomy in a hemodynamically unstable patient.

  1. Modeling mechanical signals on the surface of µCT and CAD based rapid prototype scaffold models to predict (early stage) tissue development.

    PubMed

    Hendrikson, W J; van Blitterswijk, C A; Verdonschot, N; Moroni, L; Rouwkema, J

    2014-09-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, mechano-regulation theories have been applied to help predict tissue development in tissue engineering scaffolds in the past. For this, finite element models (FEMs) were used to predict the distribution of strains within a scaffold. However, the strains reported in these studies are volumetric strains of the material or strains developed in the extracellular matrix occupying the pore space. The initial phase of cell attachment and growth on the biomaterial surface has thus far been neglected. In this study, we present a model that determines the magnitude of biomechanical signals on the biomaterial surface, enabling us to predict cell differentiation stimulus values at this initial stage. Results showed that magnitudes of the 2D strain--termed surface strain--were lower when compared to the 3D volumetric strain or the conventional octahedral shear strain as used in current mechano-regulation theories. Results of both µCT and CAD derived FEMs from the same scaffold were compared. Strain and fluid shear stress distributions, and subsequently the cell differentiation stimulus, were highly dependent on the pore shape. CAD models were not able to capture the distributions seen in the µCT FEM. The calculated mechanical stimuli could be combined with current mechanobiological models resulting in a tool to predict cell differentiation in the initial phase of tissue engineering. Although experimental data is still necessary to properly link mechanical signals to cell behavior in this specific setting, this model is an important step towards optimizing scaffold architecture and/or stimulation regimes. PMID:24824318

  2. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  3. 3D strain measurement in soft tissue: demonstration of a novel inverse finite element model algorithm on MicroCT images of a tissue phantom exposed to negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, R; Zhao, Y; Cunningham, K; Kieswetter, K; Haridas, B

    2009-07-01

    This study describes a novel system for acquiring the 3D strain field in soft tissue at sub-millimeter spatial resolution during negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Recent research in advanced wound treatment modalities theorizes that microdeformations induced by the application of sub-atmospheric (negative) pressure through V.A.C. GranuFoam Dressing, a reticulated open-cell polyurethane foam (ROCF), is instrumental in regulating the mechanobiology of granulation tissue formation [Saxena, V., Hwang, C.W., Huang, S., Eichbaum, Q., Ingber, D., Orgill, D.P., 2004. Vacuum-assisted closure: Microdeformations of wounds and cell proliferation. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 114, 1086-1096]. While the clinical response is unequivocal, measurement of deformations at the wound-dressing interface has not been possible due to the inaccessibility of the wound tissue beneath the sealed dressing. Here we describe the development of a bench-test wound model for microcomputed tomography (microCT) imaging of deformation induced by NPWT and an algorithm set for quantifying the 3D strain field at sub-millimeter resolution. Microdeformations induced in the tissue phantom revealed average tensile strains of 18%-23% at sub-atmospheric pressures of -50 to -200 mmHg (-6.7 to -26.7 kPa). The compressive strains (22%-24%) and shear strains (20%-23%) correlate with 2D FEM studies of microdeformational wound therapy in the reference cited above. We anticipate that strain signals quantified using this system can then be used in future research aimed at correlating the effects of mechanical loading on the phenotypic expression of dermal fibroblasts in acute and chronic ulcer models. Furthermore, the method developed here can be applied to continuum deformation analysis in other contexts, such as 3D cell culture via confocal microscopy, full scale CT and MRI imaging, and in machine vision. PMID:19627832

  4. Automatic identification of organ/tissue regions in CT image data for the implementation of patient specific phantoms for treatment planning in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Richard Blaine

    In vivo targeted radiotherapy has the potential to be an effective treatment for many types of cancer. Agents which show preferred uptake by cancerous tissue are labeled with radio-nuclides and administered to the patient. The preferred uptake by the cancerous tissue allows for the delivery of therapeutically effective radiation absorbed doses to tumors, while sparing normal tissue. Accurate absorbed dose estimation for targeted radiotherapy would be of great clinical value in a patient's treatment planning. One of the problems with calculating absorbed dose involves the use of geometric mathematical models of the human body for the simulation of the radiation transport. Since many patients differ markedly from these models, errors in the absorbed dose estimation procedure result from using these models. Patient specific models developed using individual patient's anatomical structure would greatly enhance the accuracy of dosimetry calculations. Patient specific anatomy data is available from CT or MRI images, but the very time consuming process of manual organ and tissue identification limits its practicality for routine clinical use. This study uses a statistical classifier to automatically identify organs and tissues from CT image data. In this study, image ``slices'' from thirty- five different subjects at approximately the same anatomical position are used to ``train'' the statistical classifier. Multi-dimensional probability distributions of image characteristics, such as location and intensity, are generated from the training images. Statistical classification rules are then used to identify organs and tissues in five previously unseen images. A variety of pre-processing and post-processing techniques are then employed to enhance the classification procedure. This study demonstrated the promise of statistical classifiers for solving segmentation problems involving human anatomy where there is an underlying pattern of structure. Despite the poor quality of

  5. [CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Rogalla, P; Juran, R

    2004-07-01

    Percutaneous biopsy of pulmonary nodules requires precise needle placement, with the goal of attaining a secure position of the needle for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes as quickly as possible and with minimal tissue damage along the access route. The requirements from the image guidance system during the intervention are, in addition to universal applicability, a quick reaction time and a user-friendly interface. CT fluoroscopy fulfils these requirements, although radiation protection for the patient and radiologist becomes an important issue. PMID:15232690

  6. 18F Sodium Fluoride PET/CT in Patients with Prostate Cancer: Quantification of Normal Tissues, Benign Degenerative Lesions, and Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Oldan, Jorge D.; Hawkins, A. Stewart; Chin, Bennett B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the range and variability of normal, benign degenerative, and malignant 18F sodium fluoride (18F NaF) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) uptake is important in influencing clinical interpretation. Further, it is essential for the development of realistic semiautomated quantification techniques and simulation models. The purpose of this study is to determine the range of these values in a clinically relevant patient population with prostate cancer. 18F NaF PET/CT scans were analyzed in patients with prostate cancer (n = 47) referred for evaluation of bone metastases. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values [SUVs (SUVmean and SUVmax)] were made in normal background regions (n = 470) including soft tissues (liver, aorta, bladder, adipose, brain, and paraspinal muscle) and osseous structures (T12 vertebral body, femoral diaphyseal cortex, femoral head medullary space, and ribs). Degenerative joint disease (DJD; n = 281) and bone metastases (n = 159) were identified and quantified by an experienced reader using all scan information including coregistered CT. For normal bone regions, the highest 18F NaF PET SUVmean occurred in T12 (6.8 ± 1.4) and it also showed the lowest coefficient of variation (cv = 21%). For normal soft tissues, paraspinal muscles showed very low SUVmean (0.70 ± 0.11) and also showed the lowest variability (cv = 16%). Average SUVmean in metastatic lesions is higher than uptake in benign degenerative lesions but values showed a wide variance and overlapping values (16.3 ± 13 vs 11.1 ± 3.8; P < 0.00001). The normal 18F NaF PET uptake values for prostate cancer patients in normal background, benign degenerative disease, and osseous metastases are comparable to those reported for a general population with a wide variety of diagnoses. These normal ranges, specifically for prostate cancer patients, will aid in clinical interpretation and also help to establish the basis of normal limits in a semiautomated data

  7. (18)F Sodium Fluoride PET/CT in Patients with Prostate Cancer: Quantification of Normal Tissues, Benign Degenerative Lesions, and Malignant Lesions.

    PubMed

    Oldan, Jorge D; Hawkins, A Stewart; Chin, Bennett B

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the range and variability of normal, benign degenerative, and malignant (18)F sodium fluoride ((18)F NaF) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) uptake is important in influencing clinical interpretation. Further, it is essential for the development of realistic semiautomated quantification techniques and simulation models. The purpose of this study is to determine the range of these values in a clinically relevant patient population with prostate cancer. (18)F NaF PET/CT scans were analyzed in patients with prostate cancer (n = 47) referred for evaluation of bone metastases. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values [SUVs (SUVmean and SUVmax)] were made in normal background regions (n = 470) including soft tissues (liver, aorta, bladder, adipose, brain, and paraspinal muscle) and osseous structures (T12 vertebral body, femoral diaphyseal cortex, femoral head medullary space, and ribs). Degenerative joint disease (DJD; n = 281) and bone metastases (n = 159) were identified and quantified by an experienced reader using all scan information including coregistered CT. For normal bone regions, the highest (18)F NaF PET SUVmean occurred in T12 (6.8 ± 1.4) and it also showed the lowest coefficient of variation (cv = 21%). For normal soft tissues, paraspinal muscles showed very low SUVmean (0.70 ± 0.11) and also showed the lowest variability (cv = 16%). Average SUVmean in metastatic lesions is higher than uptake in benign degenerative lesions but values showed a wide variance and overlapping values (16.3 ± 13 vs 11.1 ± 3.8; P < 0.00001). The normal (18)F NaF PET uptake values for prostate cancer patients in normal background, benign degenerative disease, and osseous metastases are comparable to those reported for a general population with a wide variety of diagnoses. These normal ranges, specifically for prostate cancer patients, will aid in clinical interpretation and also help to establish the basis of normal limits in a

  8. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  9. Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in CT Examinations of Human Mummies

    PubMed Central

    Panzer, Stephanie; Mc Coy, Mark R.; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Piombino-Mascali, Dario; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Zink, Albert R.; Augat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a checklist for standardized assessment of soft tissue preservation in human mummies based on whole-body computed tomography examinations, and to add a scoring system to facilitate quantitative comparison of mummies. Computed tomography examinations of 23 mummies from the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Sicily (17 adults, 6 children; 17 anthropogenically and 6 naturally mummified) and 7 mummies from the crypt of the Dominican Church of the Holy Spirit of Vilnius, Lithuania (5 adults, 2 children; all naturally mummified) were used to develop the checklist following previously published guidelines. The scoring system was developed by assigning equal scores for checkpoints with equivalent quality. The checklist was evaluated by intra- and inter-observer reliability. The finalized checklist was applied to compare the groups of anthropogenically and naturally mummified bodies. The finalized checklist contains 97 checkpoints and was divided into two main categories, “A. Soft Tissues of Head and Musculoskeletal System” and “B. Organs and Organ Systems”, each including various subcategories. The complete checklist had an intra-observer reliability of 98% and an inter-observer reliability of 93%. Statistical comparison revealed significantly higher values in anthropogenically compared to naturally mummified bodies for the total score and for three subcategories. In conclusion, the developed checklist allows for a standardized assessment and documentation of soft tissue preservation in whole-body computed tomography examinations of human mummies. The scoring system facilitates a quantitative comparison of the soft tissue preservation status between single mummies or mummy collections. PMID:26244862

  10. Implications of Pericardial, Visceral and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue on Vascular Inflammation Measured Using 18FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ho Cheol; Hwang, Soon Young; Park, Soyeon; Ryu, Ja Young; Choi, Hae Yoon; Yoo, Hye Jin; Seo, Ji-A; Kim, Sin Gon; Kim, Nan Hee; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) is associated with adverse cardiometabolic risk factors and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the relative implications of PAT, abdominal visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue on vascular inflammation have not been explored. Method and Results We compared the association of PAT, abdominal visceral fat area (VFA), and subcutaneous fat area (SFA) with vascular inflammation, represented as the target-to-background ratio (TBR), the blood-normalized standardized uptake value measured using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18FDG-PET) in 93 men and women without diabetes or CVD. Age- and sex-adjusted correlation analysis showed that PAT, VFA, and SFA were positively associated with most cardiometabolic risk factors, including systolic blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin resistance and high sensitive C-reactive proteins (hsCRP), whereas they were negatively associated with HDL-cholesterol. In particular, the maximum TBR (maxTBR) values were positively correlated with PAT and VFA (r = 0.48 and r = 0.45, respectively; both P <0.001), whereas SFA showed a relatively weak positive relationship with maxTBR level (r = 0.31, P = 0.003). Conclusion This study demonstrated that both PAT and VFA are significantly and similarly associated with vascular inflammation and various cardiometabolic risk profiles. PMID:26270050

  11. Estimation of CT-Derived Abdominal Visceral and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Depots from Anthropometry in Europeans, South Asians and African Caribbeans

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Sophie V.; Tillin, Therese; Wright, Andrew; Heasman, John; Willis, Joseph; Godsland, Ian F.; Forouhi, Nita; Whincup, Peter; Hughes, Alun D.; Chaturvedi, Nishi

    2013-01-01

    Background South Asians and African Caribbeans experience more cardiometabolic disease than Europeans. Risk factors include visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal (SAT) adipose tissue, which vary with ethnicity and are difficult to quantify using anthropometry. Objective We developed and cross-validated ethnicity and gender-specific equations using anthropometrics to predict VAT and SAT. Design 669 Europeans, 514 South Asians and 227 African Caribbeans (70±7 years) underwent anthropometric measurement and abdominal CT scanning. South Asian and African Caribbean participants were first-generation migrants living in London. Prediction equations were derived for CT-measured VAT and SAT using stepwise regression, then cross-validated by comparing actual and predicted means. Results South Asians had more and African Caribbeans less VAT than Europeans. For basic VAT prediction equations (age and waist circumference), model fit was better in men (R2 range 0.59-0.71) than women (range 0.35-0.59). Expanded equations (+ weight, height, hip and thigh circumference) improved fit for South Asian and African Caribbean women (R2 0.35 to 0.55, and 0.43 to 0.56 respectively). For basic SAT equations, R2 was 0.69-0.77, and for expanded equations it was 0.72-0.86. Cross-validation showed differences between actual and estimated VAT of <7%, and SAT of <8% in all groups, apart from VAT in South Asian women which disagreed by 16%. Conclusion We provide ethnicity- and gender-specific VAT and SAT prediction equations, derived from a large tri-ethnic sample. Model fit was reasonable for SAT and VAT in men, while basic VAT models should be used cautiously in South Asian and African Caribbean women. These equations will aid studies of mechanisms of cardiometabolic disease in later life, where imaging data are not available. PMID:24069381

  12. 3D Assessment of Cortical Bone Porosity and Tissue Mineral Density Using High-Resolution Micro-CT: Effects of Resolution and Threshold Method

    PubMed Central

    Palacio-Mancheno, Paolo E.; Larriera, Adriana I.; Doty, Stephen B.; Cardoso, Luis; Fritton, Susannah P.

    2013-01-01

    Current micro-CT systems allow scanning bone at resolutions capable of three-dimensional characterization of intracortical vascular porosity and osteocyte lacunae. However, the scanning and reconstruction parameters along with the image segmentation method affect the accuracy of the measurements. In this study, the effects of scanning resolution and image threshold method in quantifying small features of cortical bone (vascular porosity, vascular canal diameter and separation, lacunar porosity and density, and tissue mineral density) were analyzed. Cortical bone from the tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats was scanned at 1-µm and 4-µm resolutions, reconstructions were density-calibrated, and volumes of interest were segmented using approaches based on edge-detection or histogram analysis. With 1-µm resolution scans, the osteocyte lacunar spaces could be visualized, and it was possible to separate the lacunar porosity from the vascular porosity. At 4-µm resolution, the vascular porosity and vascular canal diameter were underestimated, and osteocyte lacunae were not effectively detected, whereas the vascular canal separation and tissue mineral density were overestimated compared to 1-µm resolution. Resolution had a much greater effect on the measurements than did threshold method, with partial volume effects at resolutions coarser than 2 µm demonstrated in two separate analyses, one of which assessed the effect of resolution on an object of known size with similar architecture to a vascular pore. Although there was little difference when using the edge-detection versus histogram-based threshold approaches, edge-detection was somewhat more effective in delineating canal architecture at finer resolutions (1 – 2 µm). In addition, use of a high-resolution (1-µm) density-based threshold on lower resolution (4-µm) density-calibrated images was not effective in improving the lower-resolution measurements. In conclusion, if measuring cortical vascular microarchitecture

  13. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  14. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of

  15. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  16. CT-guided Irreversible Electroporation in an Acute Porcine Liver Model: Effect of Previous Transarterial Iodized Oil Tissue Marking on Technical Parameters, 3D Computed Tomographic Rendering of the Electroporation Zone, and Histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Fritz, S.; Vollherbst, D.; Zelzer, S.; Wachter, M. F. Bellemann, N. Gockner, T. Mokry, T. Schmitz, A.; Aulmann, S.; Stampfl, U.; Pereira, P.; Kauczor, H. U.; Werner, J.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of previous transarterial iodized oil tissue marking (ITM) on technical parameters, three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided irreversible electroporation (IRE) in an acute porcine liver model as a potential strategy to improve IRE performance.MethodsAfter Ethics Committee approval was obtained, in five landrace pigs, two IREs of the right and left liver (RL and LL) were performed under CT guidance with identical electroporation parameters. Before IRE, transarterial marking of the LL was performed with iodized oil. Nonenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations followed. One hour after IRE, animals were killed and livers collected. Mean resulting voltage and amperage during IRE were assessed. For 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, parameters for size and shape were analyzed. Quantitative data were compared by the Mann–Whitney test. Histopathological differences were assessed.ResultsMean resulting voltage and amperage were 2,545.3 ± 66.0 V and 26.1 ± 1.8 A for RL, and 2,537.3 ± 69.0 V and 27.7 ± 1.8 A for LL without significant differences. Short axis, volume, and sphericity index were 16.5 ± 4.4 mm, 8.6 ± 3.2 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for RL, and 18.2 ± 3.4 mm, 9.8 ± 3.8 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for LL without significant differences. For RL and LL, the electroporation zone consisted of severely widened hepatic sinusoids containing erythrocytes and showed homogeneous apoptosis. For LL, iodized oil could be detected in the center and at the rim of the electroporation zone.ConclusionThere is no adverse effect of previous ITM on technical parameters, 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided IRE of the liver.

  17. Imaging strategies in the evaluation of soft-tissue hemangiomas of the extremities: correlation of the findings of plain radiography, angiography, CT, MRI, and ultrasonography in 12 histologically proven cases.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, A; McGahan, J P; Vogelsang, P; Szabo, R M

    1992-01-01

    Twelve patients with the histologic diagnosis of soft-tissue hemangioma of the extremities (nine intramuscular, two subcutaneous, and one synovial) were evaluated in a retrospective study using plain film radiography (n = 12), angiography (n = 8), computed tomography (CT; n = 4), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; n = 3), and ultrasonography (US; n = 2). In eight of nine intramuscular lesions, the plain film demonstration of phleboliths suggested the diagnosis, while the plain radiographs were normal in three. Angiograms showed the pathognomonic features of soft-tissue hemangioma in six patients. MRI was characteristic in all three patients: The lesion demonstrated intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted spin echo images and extremely bright signal on T2-weighting. US showed a hypoechoic soft-tissue mass in one case and a mixed echo pattern in the other. In one case, a central echogenic focus with acoustic shadowing consistent with a calcified phlebolith was identified, and one lesion exhibited increased color flow and low resistance arterial Doppler signal. CT showed a nonspecific mass in one of four cases and a mass with phleboliths in three. If a deep hemangioma is suspected, we recommend initial imaging with plain radiography followed by MRI. US may be useful in confirming the presence of a mass in doubtful cases or if MRI is unavailable. CT offers no distinct advantage over the combined use of plain radiography and MRI. Although angiography demonstrated the pathognomonic features in all six deeply situated lesions, because of its invasiveness it should be reserved chiefly for those patients undergoing surgical resection. PMID:1546331

  18. Coupling multiscale X-ray physics and micromechanics for bone tissue composition and elasticity determination from micro-CT data, by example of femora from OVX and sham rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasslinger, Patricia; Vass, Viktoria; Dejaco, Alexander; Blanchard, Romane; Örlygsson, Gissur; Gargiulo, Paolo; Hellmich, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Due to its high resolution, micro-CT (Computed Tomograph) scanning is the key to assess bone quality of sham and OVX (ovariectomized) rats. Combination of basic X-ray physics, such as the energy- and chemistry-dependence of attenuation coefficients, with results from ashing tests on rat bones, delivers mineral, organic, and water volume fractions within the voxels. Additional use of a microelastic model for bone provides voxel-specific elastic properties. The new method delivers realistic bone mass densities, and reveals that OVX protocols may indeed induce some bone mass loss, while the average composition of the bone tissue remains largely unaltered.

  19. CT number variations in micro CT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Hsieh, Hui-Ling; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2008-03-01

    CT numbers can be directly computed from the linear attenuation coefficients in the reconstructed CT images and are correlated to the electron densities of the chemical elements with specific atomic numbers. However, the computed CT numbers can be varied when different imaging parameters are used. Phantoms composed of clinically relevant and tissue-equivalent materials (lung, bone, muscle, and adipose) were scanned with a commercial circular-scanning micro CT imager. This imaging system is composed with a micro-focused x-ray tube and charged-coupled device (CCD) camera as the detector. The mean CT numbers and the corresponding standard deviations in terms of Hounsfield units were then computed from a pre-defined region of interest located within the reconstructed volumetric images. The variations of CT number were then identified from a series of imaging parameters. Those parameters include imaging acquisition modes (e.g., the metal filter used in the x-ray tube), reconstruction methods (e.g., Feldkamp and iterative algorithm), and post-image processing techniques (e.g., ring artifact, beam-hardening artifact, and smoothing processing). These variations of CT numbers are useful and important in tissue characterization, quantitative bone structure analysis, bone marrow density evaluation, and Monte Carlo dose calculations for the pilot small animal study when micro CT imaging systems are employed. Also these variations can be used as the quantification for the performance of the micro CT imaging systems.

  20. Chronic osteomyelitis examined by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Helms, C.A.; Trafton, P.

    1985-01-01

    CT examination of 25 patients who had acute exacerbations of chronic osteomyelitis allowed for the correct identification of single or multiple sequestra in 14 surgical patients. Plain radiographs were equivocal for sequestra in seven of these patients, because the sequestra were too small or because diffuse bony sclerosis was present. CT also demonstrated a foreign body and five soft tissue abscesses not suspected on the basis of plain radiographs. CT studies, which helped guide the operative approach, were also useful in treating those patients whose plain radiographs were positive for sequestra. The authors review the potential role of CT in evaluating patients with chronic osteomyelitis.

  1. High-contrast X-ray micro-radiography and micro-CT of ex-vivo soft tissue murine organs utilizing ethanol fixation and large area photon-counting detector

    PubMed Central

    Dudak, Jan; Zemlicka, Jan; Karch, Jakub; Patzelt, Matej; Mrzilkova, Jana; Zach, Petr; Hermanova, Zuzana; Kvacek, Jiri; Krejci, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Using dedicated contrast agents high-quality X-ray imaging of soft tissue structures with isotropic micrometre resolution has become feasible. This technique is frequently titled as virtual histology as it allows production of slices of tissue without destroying the sample. The use of contrast agents is, however, often an irreversible time-consuming procedure and despite the non-destructive principle of X-ray imaging, the sample is usually no longer usable for other research methods. In this work we present the application of recently developed large-area photon counting detector for high resolution X-ray micro-radiography and micro-tomography of whole ex-vivo ethanol-preserved mouse organs. The photon counting detectors provide dark-current-free quantum-counting operation enabling acquisition of data with virtually unlimited contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thanks to the very high CNR even ethanol-only preserved soft-tissue samples without addition of any contrast agent can be visualized in great detail. As ethanol preservation is one of the standard steps of tissue fixation for histology, the presented method can open a way for widespread use of micro-CT with all its advantages for routine 3D non-destructive soft-tissue visualisation. PMID:27461900

  2. High-contrast X-ray micro-radiography and micro-CT of ex-vivo soft tissue murine organs utilizing ethanol fixation and large area photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Dudak, Jan; Zemlicka, Jan; Karch, Jakub; Patzelt, Matej; Mrzilkova, Jana; Zach, Petr; Hermanova, Zuzana; Kvacek, Jiri; Krejci, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Using dedicated contrast agents high-quality X-ray imaging of soft tissue structures with isotropic micrometre resolution has become feasible. This technique is frequently titled as virtual histology as it allows production of slices of tissue without destroying the sample. The use of contrast agents is, however, often an irreversible time-consuming procedure and despite the non-destructive principle of X-ray imaging, the sample is usually no longer usable for other research methods. In this work we present the application of recently developed large-area photon counting detector for high resolution X-ray micro-radiography and micro-tomography of whole ex-vivo ethanol-preserved mouse organs. The photon counting detectors provide dark-current-free quantum-counting operation enabling acquisition of data with virtually unlimited contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thanks to the very high CNR even ethanol-only preserved soft-tissue samples without addition of any contrast agent can be visualized in great detail. As ethanol preservation is one of the standard steps of tissue fixation for histology, the presented method can open a way for widespread use of micro-CT with all its advantages for routine 3D non-destructive soft-tissue visualisation. PMID:27461900

  3. CT in pyogenic osteomyelitis of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Kattapuram, S.V.; Phillips, W.C.; Boyd, R.

    1983-06-01

    Six patients with bacteriologically proven pyogenic osteomyelitis of the spine were followed serially with computed tomography (CT). Initial evaluation of the involved vertebral bodies and adjacent soft tissues showed a drop in CT numbers when compared to normal cancellous bone and soft tissues. A soft-tissue mass was seen in all cases. After appropriate antibiotic therapy, all six patients showed an increase in bone density and a diminution of the soft-tissue mass (p < 0.05). Five of the six patients showed a further decrease in soft-tissue CT numbers.

  4. Canalicular network morphology is the major determinant of the spatial distribution of mass density in human bone tissue: evidence by means of synchrotron radiation phase-contrast nano-CT.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Bernhard; Varga, Peter; Langer, Max; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Schrof, Susanne; Männicke, Nils; Suhonen, Heikki; Maurer, Peter; Cloetens, Peter; Peyrin, Francoise; Raum, Kay

    2015-02-01

    In bone remodeling, maturation of the newly formed osteonal tissue is associated with a rapid primary increase followed by a slower secondary increase of mineralization. This requires supply and precipitation of mineral into the bone matrix. Mineral delivery can occur only from the extracellular fluid via interfaces such as the Haversian system and the osteocyte pore network. We hypothesized that in mineralization, mineral exchange is achieved by the diffusion of mineral from the lacunar-canalicular network (LCN) to the bone matrix, resulting in a gradual change in tissue mineralization with respect to the distance from the pore-matrix interface. We expected to observe alterations in the mass density distribution with tissue age. We further hypothesized that mineral exchange occurs not only at the lacunar but also at the canalicular boundaries. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate the spatial distribution of mass density in the perilacunar and pericanalicular bone matrix and to explore how these densities are influenced by tissue aging. This is achieved by analyzing human jawbone specimens originating from four healthy donors and four treated with high-dosage bisphosphonate using synchrotron radiation phase-contrast nano-CT with a 50-nm voxel size. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that mass density in the direct vicinity of both lacunae (p < 0.001) and canaliculi (p < 0.001) is different from the mean matrix mass density, resulting in gradients with respect to the distance from both pore-matrix interfaces, which diminish with increasing tissue age. Though limited by the sample size, these findings support our hypotheses. Moreover, the density gradients are more pronounced around the lacunae than around the canaliculi, which are explained by geometrical considerations in the LCN morphology. In addition, we speculate that mineral exchange occurs at all interfaces of the LCN, not only in mineralization but also in mineral

  5. Detection of Preoperative Wilms Tumor Rupture with CT: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, Arlene; Hoffer, Fredric; Mullen, Elizabeth; Geller, James; Gratias, Eric J.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Rosen, Nancy; Grundy, Paul; Dome, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the diagnostic performance of computed tomography (CT) in identifying the presence or absence of preoperative Wilms tumor rupture. Materials and Methods: The cohort was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children’s Oncology Group. The study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. Written informed consent was obtained before enrollment. The diagnosis of Wilms tumor rupture was established by central review of notes from surgery and/or pathologic examination. Seventy Wilms tumor cases with rupture were matched to 70 Wilms tumor controls without rupture according to age and tumor weight (within 6 months and 50 g, respectively). CT scans were independently reviewed by two radiologists, and the following CT findings were assessed: poorly circumscribed mass, perinephric fat stranding, peritumoral fat planes obscured, retroperitoneal fluid (subcapsular vs extracapsular), ascites beyond the cul-de-sac, peritoneal implants, ipsilateral pleural effusion, and intratumoral hemorrhage. All fluids were classified as hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic by using a cutoff of 30 HU. The relationship between CT findings and rupture was assessed with logistic regression models. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for detecting Wilms tumor rupture were 54% (36 of 67 cases) and 88% (61 of 69 cases), respectively, for reviewer 1 and 70% (47 of 67 cases) and 88% (61 of 69 cases), respectively, for reviewer 2. Interobserver agreement was substantial (ĸ = 0.76). All imaging signs tested, except peritoneal implants, intratumoral hemorrhage, and subcapsular fluid, showed a significant association with rupture (P ≤ .02). The attenuation of ascitic fluid did not have a significant correlation with rupture (P = .9990). Ascites beyond the cul-de-sac was the single best indicator of rupture for both reviewers, followed by perinephric fat stranding and retroperitoneal fluid for reviewers 1 and 2, respectively (P

  6. A comparison of 3D poly(ε-caprolactone) tissue engineering scaffolds produced with conventional and additive manufacturing techniques by means of quantitative analysis of SR μ-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, F.; Intranuovo, F.; Mohammadi, S.; Domingos, M.; Favia, P.; Tromba, G.

    2013-07-01

    The technique used to produce a 3D tissue engineering (TE) scaffold is of fundamental importance in order to guarantee its proper morphological characteristics. An accurate assessment of the resulting structural properties is therefore crucial in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the produced scaffold. Synchrotron radiation (SR) computed microtomography (μ-CT) combined with further image analysis seems to be one of the most effective techniques to this aim. However, a quantitative assessment of the morphological parameters directly from the reconstructed images is a non trivial task. This study considers two different poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds fabricated with a conventional technique (Solvent Casting Particulate Leaching, SCPL) and an additive manufacturing (AM) technique (BioCell Printing), respectively. With the first technique it is possible to produce scaffolds with random, non-regular, rounded pore geometry. The AM technique instead is able to produce scaffolds with square-shaped interconnected pores of regular dimension. Therefore, the final morphology of the AM scaffolds can be predicted and the resulting model can be used for the validation of the applied imaging and image analysis protocols. It is here reported a SR μ-CT image analysis approach that is able to effectively and accurately reveal the differences in the pore- and throat-size distributions as well as connectivity of both AM and SCPL scaffolds.

  7. TU-A-12A-04: Quantitative Texture Features Calculated in Lung Tissue From CT Scans Demonstrate Consistency Between Two Databases From Different Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cunliffe, A; Armato, S; Castillo, R; Pham, N; Guerrero, T; Al-Hallaq, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the consistency of computed tomography (CT) scan texture features, previously identified as stable in a healthy patient cohort, in esophageal cancer patient CT scans. Methods: 116 patients receiving radiation therapy (median dose: 50.4Gy) for esophageal cancer were retrospectively identified. For each patient, diagnostic-quality pre-therapy (0-183 days) and post-therapy (5-120 days) scans (mean voxel size: 0.8mm×0.8mm×2.5mm) and a treatment planning scan and associated dose map were collected. An average of 501 32x32-pixel ROIs were placed randomly in the lungs of each pre-therapy scan. ROI centers were mapped to corresponding locations in post-therapy and planning scans using the displacement vector field output by demons deformable registration. Only ROIs with mean dose <5Gy were analyzed, as these were expected to contain minimal post-treatment damage. 140 texture features were calculated in pre-therapy and post-therapy scan ROIs and compared using Bland-Altman analysis. For each feature, the mean feature value change and the distance spanned by the 95% limits of agreement were normalized to the mean feature value, yielding normalized range of agreement (nRoA) and normalized bias (nBias). Using Wilcoxon signed rank tests, nRoA and nBias were compared with values computed previously in 27 healthy patient scans (mean voxel size: 0.67mm×0.67mm×1mm) acquired at a different institution. Results: nRoA was significantly (p<0.001) larger in cancer patients than healthy patients. Differences in nBias were not significant (p=0.23). The 20 features identified previously as having nRoA<20% for healthy patients had the lowest nRoA values in the current database, with an average increase of 5.6%. Conclusion: Despite differences in CT scanner type, scan resolution, and patient health status, the same 20 features remained stable (i.e., low variability and bias) in the absence of disease changes for databases from two institutions. Identification of

  8. Application of SPECT/CT imaging system and radiochemical analysis for investigation of blood kinetics and tissue distribution of radiolabeled plumbagin in healthy and Plasmodium berghei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Sumsakul, W; Karbwang, J; Na-Bangchang, K

    2016-02-01

    Plumbagin is a derivative of napthoquinone which is isolated from the roots of plants in several families. These compound exhibits a wide range of biological and pharmacological activities including antimalarial, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities. The aim of the study was to investigate blood kinetics and tissue distribution of plumbagin in healthy and Plasmodium berghei-infected mice using Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) and radiochemical analysis by gamma counter. Plumbagin was labeled with (99m)technetium and the reducing agent stannous chloride dihydrate (50 μg/ml) at pH 6.5. Blood kinetics and tissue distribution of the radiolabeled plumbagin were investigated in healthy and P. berghei-infected mice (2 males and 2 females for each experimental group). In vitro and in vivo stability of plumbagin complex suggested satisfactory stability profiles of (99m)Tc-plumbagin complex in plasma and normal saline (92.21-95.47%) within 24 h. Significant difference in blood kinetics parameters (Cmax, AUC, t1/2, MRT, Vd, and CL) were observed between P. berghei-infected and healthy mice. The labeled complex distributed to all organs of both healthy and infected mice but with high intensity in liver, followed by lung, stomach, large intestine and kidney. Accumulation in spleen was markedly noticeable in the infected mice. Plumbagin-labeled complex was rapidly cleared from blood and major routes of excretion were hepatobiliary and pulmonary routes. In P. berghei-infected mice, t1/2 was significantly decreased, while Vd and CL were increased compared with healthy mice. Result suggests that malaria disease state influenced the pharmacokinetics and disposition of plumbagin. SPECT/CT imaging with radiolabeled (99m)Tc is a viable non-invasive technique that can be applied for investigation of kinetics and biodistribution of plumbagin in animal models. PMID:26713669

  9. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. Modern spiral scanners can perform the exam without stopping. A computer ...

  10. Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Angiographic CT for Intra-abdominal Tumor Embolization: A New Tool for Vessel and Soft Tissue Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Bernhard Christian Frericks, Bernd Benedikt; Albrecht, Thomas; Wolf, Karl-Juergen; Wacker, Frank Klaus

    2007-07-15

    C-Arm cone-beam computed tomography (CACT), is a relatively new technique that uses data acquired with a flat-panel detector C-arm angiography system during an interventional procedure to reconstruct CT-like images. The purpose of this Technical Note is to present the technique, feasibility, and added value of CACT in five patients who underwent abdominal transarterial chemoembolization procedures. Target organs for the chemoembolizations were kidney, liver, and pancreas and a liposarcoma infiltrating the duodenum. The time for patient positioning, C-arm and system preparation, CACT raw data acquisition, and data reconstruction for a single CACT study ranged from 6 to 12 min. The volume data set produced by the workstation was interactively reformatted using maximum intensity projections and multiplanar reconstructions. As part of an angiography system CACT provided essential information on vascular anatomy, therapy endpoints, and immediate follow-up during and immediately after the abdominal interventions without patient transfer. The quality of CACT images was sufficient to influence the course of treatment. This technology has the potential to expedite any interventional procedure that requires three-dimensional information and navigation.

  11. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  12. Targeted SPECT/CT Imaging of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in the Evaluation of Remodeling Tissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts Implanted in a Growing Lamb Model

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Mitchel R.; Naito, Yuji; Maxfield, Mark W.; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Tara, Shuhei; Chan, Chung; Rocco, Kevin A.; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Sinusas, Albert J.; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) The clinical translation of tissue-engineered vascular grafts has been demonstrated in children. The remodeling of biodegradable, cell-seeded scaffolds to functional neovessels is partially attributed to matrix metalloproteinases. Noninvasive assessment of matrix metalloproteinase activity may indicate graft remodeling and elucidate the progression of neovessel formation. Therefore, matrix metalloproteinase activity was evaluated in grafts implanted in lambs using in vivo and ex vivo hybrid imaging. Graft growth and remodeling was quantified using in vivo X-ray computed tomography angiography. Methods Cell-seeded and unseeded scaffolds were implanted in lambs (n=5) as inferior vena cava interposition grafts. At 2 and 6 months post-implantation, in vivo angiography assessed graft morphology. In vivo and ex vivo single photon emission tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging was performed with a radiolabeled compound targeting matrix metalloproteinase activity at 6 months. Neotissue was examined at 6 months using qualitative histologic and immunohistochemical staining and quantitative biochemical analysis. Results Seeded grafts demonstrated significant luminal and longitudinal growth from 2 to 6 months. In vivo imaging revealed subjectively higher matrix metalloproteinase activity in grafts vs. native tissue. Ex vivo imaging confirmed a quantitative increase in matrix metalloproteinase activity and demonstrated higher activity in unseeded vs. seeded grafts. Glycosaminoglycan content was increased in seeded grafts vs. unseeded grafts, without significant differences in collagen content. Conclusions Matrix metalloproteinase activity remains elevated in tissue-engineered grafts 6 months post-implantation and may indicate remodeling. Optimization of in vivo imaging to noninvasively evaluate matrix metalloproteinase activity may assist in serial assessment of vascular graft remodeling. PMID:24952823

  13. A μCT-based investigation of the influence of tissue modulus variation, anisotropy and inhomogeneity on ultrasound propagation in trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenlei; Shen, Yi; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound propagation is widely used in the diagnosis of osteoporosis by providing information on bone mechanical quality. When it loses calcium, the tissue properties will first decrease. However, limited research about the influence of tissue properties on ultrasound propagation have been done due to the cumbersome experiment. The goal of this study was to explore the relationships between tissue modulus (Es) and speed of sound (SOS) through numerical simulations, and to study the influence of Es on the acoustical behavior in characterizing the local structural anisotropy and inhomogeneity. In this work, three-dimensional finite element (FE) simulations were performed on a cubic high-resolution (15μm) bovine trabecular bone sample (4×4×4mm(3), BV/TV=0.18) mapped from micro-computed tomography. Ultrasound excitations of 50kHz, 500kHz and 2MHz were applied in three orthogonal axes and the first arriving signal (FAS) was collected to quantify wave velocity. In this study, a strong power law relationship between Es and SOS was measured with estimated exponential index β=2.08-3.44 for proximal-distal (PD), anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML), respectively (all R(2)>0.95). For various Es, a positive dispersion of sound speed with respect to sound frequency was observed and the velocity dispersion magnitude (VDM) was measured. Also, with Es=15GPa in three orientations, the SOS in PD axis is 2009±120m/s, faster than that of AP (1762±106m/s) and ML (1798±132m/s) (f=2MHz) directions. Besides, the standard deviation of SOS increases with the sound frequency and the Es in all directions except for that at 50kHz. For the mechanical properties, the apparent modulus with certain Es was highest in the longitudinal direction compared with the transverse directions. It indicates that the tissue modulus combining with anisotropy and inhomogeneity has great influence on ultrasound propagation. Simulation results agree well with theoretical and experimental

  14. Volume-Based F-18 FDG PET/CT Imaging Markers Provide Supplemental Prognostic Information to Histologic Grading in Patients With High-Grade Bone or Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Fuglo, Hanna Maria; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid; Petersen, Michael Mork; Loft, Annika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to assess the prognostic value of different volume-based calculations of tumor metabolic activity in the initial assessment of patients with high-grade bone sarcomas (BS) and soft tissue sarcomas (STS) using F-18 FDG PET/CT. A single-site, retrospective study from 2002 to 2012 including 92 patients with histologically verified high-grade BS (N = 37) or STS (N = 55). All patients underwent a pretreatment F-18 FDG PET/CT scan. Clinical data were registered. Measurements of the accuracy of metabolic tumor volume with a preset threshold of 40% of the maximum standardized uptake value of primary tumor (MTV40%) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) as prognostic variables and identification of optimal discriminating cut-off values were performed through ROC curve analysis. Patients were grouped according to the cut-off values. All deaths were considered an event in survival analysis. Kaplan–Meier survival estimates and log-rank test were used to compare the degree of equality of survival distributions. Prognostic variables with related hazard ratios (HR) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Forty-one of 92 patients died during follow-up (45%; 12 BS and 29 STS). Average survival for included patients was 6.5 years (95% CI 5.8–7.3 years) and probability of 5-year survival was 52%. There was a high-significant accuracy of TLG and MTV40% as prognostic variables when looking on all patients and during subgroup analysis. AUCs were higher for TLG than for MTV40%. TLG above optimal cut-off value was the only variable which was independently prognostic for survival throughout multivariate regression analysis of all included patients (P = 0.01, HR 4.78 [95% CI 1.45–15.87]) and subgroup analysis (BS: P = 0.04, HR 11.11 [95% CI 1.09–111.11]; STS: P < 0.05, HR 3.37 [95% CI 1.02–11.11]). No significant results were demonstrated for MTV40%. Volume-based F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging markers in terms of

  15. Volume-Based F-18 FDG PET/CT Imaging Markers Provide Supplemental Prognostic Information to Histologic Grading in Patients With High-Grade Bone or Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Fuglo, Hanna Maria; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid; Petersen, Michael Mork; Loft, Annika

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the prognostic value of different volume-based calculations of tumor metabolic activity in the initial assessment of patients with high-grade bone sarcomas (BS) and soft tissue sarcomas (STS) using F-18 FDG PET/CT.A single-site, retrospective study from 2002 to 2012 including 92 patients with histologically verified high-grade BS (N = 37) or STS (N = 55). All patients underwent a pretreatment F-18 FDG PET/CT scan. Clinical data were registered. Measurements of the accuracy of metabolic tumor volume with a preset threshold of 40% of the maximum standardized uptake value of primary tumor (MTV40%) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) as prognostic variables and identification of optimal discriminating cut-off values were performed through ROC curve analysis. Patients were grouped according to the cut-off values. All deaths were considered an event in survival analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank test were used to compare the degree of equality of survival distributions. Prognostic variables with related hazard ratios (HR) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis.Forty-one of 92 patients died during follow-up (45%; 12 BS and 29 STS). Average survival for included patients was 6.5 years (95% CI 5.8-7.3 years) and probability of 5-year survival was 52%. There was a high-significant accuracy of TLG and MTV40% as prognostic variables when looking on all patients and during subgroup analysis. AUCs were higher for TLG than for MTV40%. TLG above optimal cut-off value was the only variable which was independently prognostic for survival throughout multivariate regression analysis of all included patients (P = 0.01, HR 4.78 [95% CI 1.45-15.87]) and subgroup analysis (BS: P = 0.04, HR 11.11 [95% CI 1.09-111.11]; STS: P < 0.05, HR 3.37 [95% CI 1.02-11.11]). No significant results were demonstrated for MTV40%.Volume-based F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging markers in terms of pretreatment estimation

  16. Principles of CT and CT technology.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lee W

    2007-09-01

    This article provides a review of the basic principles of CT within the context of the evolution of CT. Modern CT technology can be understood as a natural progression of improvements and innovations in response to both engineering problems and clinical requirements. Detailed discussions of multislice CT, CT image quality evaluation, and radiation doses in CT will be presented in upcoming articles in this series. PMID:17823453

  17. CT of the pulmonary ligament

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, J.D.; Vock, P.; Osborne, D.R.

    1983-08-01

    Most computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest show the inferior pulmonary ligament and an associated septum in the lower lobe, although CT descriptions of these structures have not been reported. Conventional radiography of the ligament has relied on indirect signs: the position of the lower lobe in the presence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion, soft-tissue peaks along the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the rare traumatic paramediastinal pneumatocele (attributed to air in the ligament). CT clarifies the anatomic relations of the ligament and alterations caused by pleural effusion and pneumothorax. The ligament is probably responsible for some long linear shadows at the lung bases, and CT helps to distinguish these from scars, walls of bullae, and normal structures such as the phrenic nerve and the interlobar fissures.

  18. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal CT; CT - lumbosacral spine ... In other cases, a CT of the lumbosacral spine may be done after injecting contrast dye into ... of the body. A CT of the lumbosacral spine can evaluate fractures and changes of the spine, ...

  19. Thoracic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... table that slides into the center of the scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... than 300 pounds, have your doctor contact the scanner operator before the exam. CT scanners have a ...

  20. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  1. Quantitative micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevrhal, Sven

    2005-09-01

    Micro-CT for bone structural analysis has progressed from an in-vitro laboratory technique to devices for in-vivo assessment of small animals and the peripheral human skeleton. Currently, topological parameters of bone architecture are the primary goals of analysis. Additional measurement of the density or degree of mineralization (DMB) of trabecular and cortical bone at the microscopic level is desirable to study effects of disease and treatment progress. This information is not commonly extracted because of the challenges of accurate measurement and calibration at the tissue level. To assess the accuracy of micro-CT DMB measurements in a realistic but controlled situation, we prepared bone-mimicking watery solutions at concentrations of 100 to 600 mg/cm3 K2PO4H and scanned them with micro-CT, both in glass vials and microcapillary tubes with inner diameters of 50, 100 and 150 μm to simulate trabecular thickness. Values of the linear attenuation coefficients μ in the reconstructed image are commonly affected by beam hardening effects for larger samples and by partial volume effects for small volumes. We implemented an iterative reconstruction technique to reduce beam hardening. Partial voluming was sought to be reduced by excluding voxels near the tube wall. With these two measures, improvement on the constancy of the reconstructed voxel values and linearity with solution concentration could be observed to over 90% accuracy. However, since the expected change in real bone is small more measurements are needed to confirm that micro-CT can indeed be adapted to assess bone mineralization at the tissue level.

  2. CT & CBCT imaging: assessment of the orbits.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, David C

    2012-11-01

    The orbits can be visualized easily on routine or customized protocols for computed tomography (CT) or cone beam CT (CBCT) scans. Detailed orbital investigations are best performed with 3-dimensional imaging methods. CT scans are preferred for visualizing the osseous orbital anatomy and fissures while magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for evaluating tumors and inflammation. CBCT provides high-resolution anatomic data of the sinonasal spaces, airway, soft tissue surfaces, and bones but does not provide much detail within the soft tissues. This article discusses CBCT imaging of the orbits, osseous anatomy of the orbits, and CBCT investigation of selected orbital pathosis. PMID:22981080

  3. CT of osteomyelitis of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Golimbu, C.; Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed in 17 adults with osteomyelitis of the spine. The dominant features were paravertebral soft-tissue swelling, abscess formation, and bone erosion. In two patients there were no findings indicative of osteomyelitis on conventional radiographs, but CT revealed paravertebral abscesses and bone lysis, helping to establish the diagnosis of osteomyelitis, chiefly because of its ability to detect early erosion of spongy vertabral bone, disk involvement, paravertebral soft-tissue swelling or abscess, and extension of the pathology into the spinal canal. Furthermore, CT facilitated closed-needle biopsy, helping to establish the pathologic diagnosis.

  4. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  5. Virtual hybrid bronchoscopy using PET/CT data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Seemann, Marcus D.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the possibilities, advantages and limitations of virtual bronchoscopy using data sets from positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). Eight consecutive patients with lung cancer underwent PET/CT. PET was performed with F-18-labelled 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D: -glucose ((18)F-FDG). The tracheobronchial system was segmented with a volume-growing algorithm, using the CT data sets, and visualized with a shaded-surface rendering method. The primary tumours and the lymph node metastases were segmented for virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the CT data set and for virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy using the PET/CT data set. Virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the low-dose or diagnostic CT facilitates the detection of anatomical/morphological structure changes of the tracheobronchial system. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy was superior to virtual CT-bronchoscopy in the detection of lymph node metastases (P=0.001), because it uses the CT information and the molecular/metabolic information from PET. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy with a transparent colour-coded shaded-surface rendering model is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy of identification and characterization of malignancies, assessment of tumour staging, differentiation of viable tumour tissue from atelectases and scars, verification of infections, evaluation of therapeutic response and detection of an early stage of recurrence that is not detectable or is misjudged in comparison with virtual CT-bronchoscopy.

  6. Micro-CT as a guide for clinical CT development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritman, Erik L.; Eaker, Diane R.; Jorgensen, Steven M.

    2006-08-01

    Micro-CT, with voxel size ~10 -5 mm 3, has a great advantage over traditional microscopic methods in its ability to generate detailed 3D images in relatively large, opaque, volumes such as an intact mouse femur, heart or kidney. In addition to providing new insights into tissue structure-to-function interrelationships, micro-CT can contribute to suggesting new applications of clinical CT imaging such as: A. The spatio-density-temporal resolution that is needed to: 1) Quantitate an organ's Basic Functional Unit (smallest collection of diverse cells that behaves like the organ), which requires voxels less than 10 -4 mm 3 in volume; 2) Quantitate new vessel growth which manifests as increased x-ray contrast enhancement in tissues during passage of a bolus of intravascular contrast agent; 3) Quantitate endothelial integrity by the movement of x-ray contrast agents across the endothelial inner lining of vessel walls. B. The use of x-ray scatter for providing the contrast amongst soft tissue components and/or their interfaces for enhanced discrimination of nerve and muscular/tendon fiber directions.

  7. Small-animal CT: Its difference from, and impact on, clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritman, Erik L.

    2007-10-01

    For whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of small rodents, a voxel resolution of at least 10 -3 mm 3 is needed for scale-equivalence to that currently achieved in clinical CT scanners (˜1 mm 3) in adult humans. These "mini-CT" images generally require minutes rather than seconds to complete a scan. The radiation exposure resulting from these mini-CT scans, while higher than clinical CT scans, is below the level resulting in acute tissue damage. Hence, these scans are useful for performing clinical-type diagnostic and monitoring scans for animal models of disease and their response to treatment. "Micro-CT", with voxel size <10 -5 mm 3, has been useful for imaging isolated, intact organs at an almost cellular level of resolution. Micro-CT has the great advantage over traditional microscopic methods in that it generates detailed three-dimensional images in relatively large, opaque volumes such as an intact rodent heart or kidney. The radiation exposure needed in these scans results in acute tissue damage if used in living animals. Experience with micro-CT is contributing to exploration of new applications for clinical CT imaging by providing insights into different modes of X-ray image formation as follows: Spatial resolution should be sufficient to detect an individual Basic Functional Unit (BFU, the smallest collection of diverse cells, such as hepatic lobule, that behaves like the organ), which requires voxels ˜10 -3 mm 3 in volume, so that the BFUs can be counted. Contrast resolution sufficient to allow quantitation of: New microvascular growth, which manifests as increased tissue contrast due to X-ray contrast agent in those vessels' lumens during passage of injected contrast agent in blood. Impaired endothelial integrity which manifests as increased opacification and delayed washout of contrast from tissues. Discrimination of pathological accumulations of metals such as Fe and Ca, which occur in the arterial wall following hemorrhage or tissue damage

  8. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  9. SU-E-J-24: Can Fiducial Marker-Based Setup Using ExacTrac Be An Alternative to Soft Tissue-Based Setup Using Cone-Beam CT for Prostate IMRT?

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, S; Utsunomiya, S; Abe, E; Aoyama, H; Satou, H; Sakai, H; Yamada, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess an accuracy of fiducial maker-based setup using ExacTrac (ExT-based setup) as compared with soft tissue-based setup using Cone-beam CT (CBCT-based setup) for patients with prostate cancer receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the purpose of investigating whether ExT-based setup can be an alternative to CBCT-based setup. Methods: The setup accuracy was analyzed prospectively for 7 prostate cancer patients with implanted three fiducial markers received IMRT. All patients were treated after CBCT-based setup was performed and corresponding shifts were recorded. ExacTrac images were obtained before and after CBCT-based setup. The fiducial marker-based shifts were calculated based on those two images and recorded on the assumption that the setup correction was carried out by fiducial marker-based auto correction. Mean and standard deviation of absolute differences and the correlation between CBCT and ExT shifts were estimated. Results: A total of 178 image dataset were analyzed. On the differences between CBCT and ExT shifts, 133 (75%) of 178 image dataset resulted in smaller differences than 3 mm in all dimensions. Mean differences in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) dimensions were 1.8 ± 1.9 mm, 0.7 ± 1.9 mm, and 0.6 ± 0.8 mm, respectively. The percentages of shift agreements within ±3 mm were 76% for AP, 90% for SI, and 100% for LR. The Pearson coefficient of correlation for CBCT and ExT shifts were 0.80 for AP, 0.80 for SI, and 0.65 for LR. Conclusion: This work showed that the accuracy of ExT-based setup was correlated with that of CBCT-based setup, implying that ExT-based setup has a potential ability to be an alternative to CBCT-based setup. The further work is to specify the conditions that ExT-based setup can provide the accuracy comparable to CBCT-based setup.

  10. Acute orbital pseudotumors: classification and CT features

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, R.A.; Rootman, J.; Robertson, W.D.; Lapointe, J.S.; Harrison, P.B.

    1981-11-01

    Acute orbital pseudotumors are inflammatory lesions of unknown etiology that may affect part or, less often, all of the tissue within the orbit. A retrospective computed tomographic (CT) study of 16 patients demonstrated that these lesions occur in one of five specific anatomic patterns: anterior, posterior, diffuse, lacrimal, or myositic. The most common location was lacrimal followed by anterior psuedotumors. Posterior, diffuse, and myositic pseudotumors were equally frequent. Localization on the basis of clinical features correlated with the CT localization. Illustrative cases of each of the five types are included. The role of CT in evaluating the therapeutic response is discussed.

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  12. Ion Stopping Powers and CT Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, Michael F.; Sardesai, Milind; Sun, Sean; Miller, Daniel W.

    2010-10-01

    One of the advantages of ion beam therapy is the steep dose gradient produced near the ion's range. Use of this advantage makes knowledge of the stopping powers for all materials through which the beam passes critical. Most treatment planning systems calculate dose distributions using depth dose data measured in water and an algorithm that converts the kilovoltage X-ray computed tomography (CT) number of a given material to its linear stopping power relative to water. Some materials present in kilovoltage scans of patients and simulation phantoms do not lie on the standard tissue conversion curve. The relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs) of 21 different tissue substitutes and positioning, registration, immobilization, and beamline materials were measured in beams of protons accelerated to energies of 155, 200, and 250 MeV; carbon ions accelerated to 290 MeV/n; and iron ions accelerated to 970 MeV/n. These same materials were scanned with both kilovoltage and megavoltage CT scanners to obtain their CT numbers. Measured RLSPs and CT numbers were compared with calculated and/or literature values. Relationships of RLSPs to physical densities, electronic densities, kilovoltage CT numbers, megavoltage CT numbers, and water equivalence values converted by a treatment planning system are given. Usage of CT numbers and substitution of measured values into treatment plans to provide accurate patient and phantom simulations are discussed.

  13. MR to CT registration of brains using image synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the preferred imaging modality for patient dose calculation for radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) is used along with CT to identify brain structures due to its superior soft tissue contrast. Registration of MR and CT is necessary for accurate delineation of the tumor and other structures, and is critical in radiotherapy planning. Mutual information (MI) or its variants are typically used as a similarity metric to register MRI to CT. However, unlike CT, MRI intensity does not have an accepted calibrated intensity scale. Therefore, MI-based MR-CT registration may vary from scan to scan as MI depends on the joint histogram of the images. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic framework for MR-CT registration by synthesizing a synthetic CT image from MRI using a co-registered pair of MR and CT images as an atlas. Patches of the subject MRI are matched to the atlas and the synthetic CT patches are estimated in a probabilistic framework. The synthetic CT is registered to the original CT using a deformable registration and the computed deformation is applied to the MRI. In contrast to most existing methods, we do not need any manual intervention such as picking landmarks or regions of interests. The proposed method was validated on ten brain cancer patient cases, showing 25% improvement in MI and correlation between MR and CT images after registration compared to state-of-the-art registration methods.

  14. 18F-FDG PET/CT oncologic imaging at extended injection-to-scan acquisition time intervals derived from a single-institution 18F-FDG-directed surgery experience: feasibility and quantification of 18F-FDG accumulation within 18F-FDG-avid lesions and background tissues

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a well-established imaging modality for a wide variety of solid malignancies. Currently, only limited data exists regarding the utility of PET/CT imaging at very extended injection-to-scan acquisition times. The current retrospective data analysis assessed the feasibility and quantification of diagnostic 18F-FDG PET/CT oncologic imaging at extended injection-to-scan acquisition time intervals. Methods 18F-FDG-avid lesions (not surgically manipulated or altered during 18F-FDG-directed surgery, and visualized both on preoperative and postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging) and corresponding background tissues were assessed for 18F-FDG accumulation on same-day preoperative and postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Multiple patient variables and 18F-FDG-avid lesion variables were examined. Results For the 32 18F-FDG-avid lesions making up the final 18F-FDG-avid lesion data set (from among 7 patients), the mean injection-to-scan times of the preoperative and postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT scans were 73 (±3, 70-78) and 530 (±79, 413-739) minutes, respectively (P < 0.001). The preoperative and postoperative mean 18F-FDG-avid lesion SUVmax values were 7.7 (±4.0, 3.6-19.5) and 11.3 (±6.0, 4.1-29.2), respectively (P < 0.001). The preoperative and postoperative mean background SUVmax values were 2.3 (±0.6, 1.0-3.2) and 2.1 (±0.6, 1.0-3.3), respectively (P = 0.017). The preoperative and postoperative mean lesion-to-background SUVmax ratios were 3.7 (±2.3, 1.5-9.8) and 5.8 (±3.6, 1.6-16.2), respectively, (P < 0.001). Conclusions 18F-FDG PET/CT oncologic imaging can be successfully performed at extended injection-to-scan acquisition time intervals of up to approximately 5 half-lives for 18F-FDG while maintaining good/adequate diagnostic image quality. The resultant increase in the 18F-FDG-avid lesion SUVmax values, decreased background SUVmax values, and

  15. Head CT (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  16. CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  17. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  18. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-21

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  19. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  20. Orbit CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may mean: Bleeding Broken eye socket bone Graves disease Infection Tumor Risks CT scans and other x- ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 66. Read More CT scan Graves disease Tumor Update Date 1/18/2015 Updated by: ...

  1. CT Image Presentations For Oral Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Rothman, Stephen L. G.; Schwarz, Melvyn S.; Tivattanasuk, Eva S.

    1988-06-01

    Reformatted CT images of the mandible and maxilla are described as a planning aid to the surgical implantation of dental fixtures. Precisely scaled and cross referenced axial, oblique, CT generated panorex, and 3-D images are generated to help indicate where and how critical anatomic structures are positioned. This information guides the oral surgeon to those sites where dental implants have optimal osteotic support and least risk to sensitive neural tissue. Oblique images are generated at 1-2 mm increments along the arch of the mandible (or maxilla). Each oblique is oriented perpendicular to the local arch curvature. The adjoining five CT generated panorex views match the patient's mandibular (or maxilla) arch, with each of the views separated by twice the distance between axial CT slices. All views are mutually cross-referenced to show fine detail of the underlying mandibular (or maxilla) structure. Several exams are illustrated and benefit to subsequent surgery is assessed.

  2. Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumors: CT and FDG-PET/CT findings with histopathological association

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JINGJING; WU, ZENGJIE; SUN, BINBIN; LI, DACHENG; WANG, ZHENGUANG; LIU, FANGJUN; HUA, HUI

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) are rare and aggressive malignant tumors. The aim of the present study was to analyze computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT imaging features of intra-abdominal desmoplastic DSRCT, and investigate the association of these features with histopathological results. The present study was a retrospective investigation of 4 patients with DSRCT. All patients underwent CT and dynamic CT, and 1 additionally underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning. Following a tumor resection, routine hematoxylin and eosin staining, and immunostaining, were performed and evaluated. Multiple large abdominopelvic masses were identified in all 4 patients; however, no indications of their site of origin were demonstrated. CT revealed soft-tissue masses with patchy foci of hypodense lesions. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed slightly or moderately heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions. Other observations from these patients included calcification (n=2), peritoneal seeding (n=3), hepatic metastasis (n=3), retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (n=3) and ascites (n=2). FDG-PET/CT revealed multiple nodular increased FDG uptake in the abdominopelvic masses, and in the liver and peritoneum in 1 case. Intra-abdominal DSRCT demonstrated significant diagnostic characteristics on plain and contrast-enhanced CT. Multiple, bulky soft-tissue masses inside the peritoneal cavity, particularly in male adolescents and young adults, should be considered as potential cases of DSRCT. FDG-PET/CT techniques may be utilized to aid the staging of tumors. PMID:27123106

  3. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing. PMID:22276376

  4. Connective tissue: Vascular and hematological (blood) support

    PubMed Central

    Calvino, Nick

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Connective Tissue (CT) is a ubiquitous component of all major tissues and structures of the body (50% of all body protein is CT), including that of the blood, vascular, muscle, tendon, ligament, fascia, bone, joint, IVD's (intervertebral discs) and skin. Because of its ubiquitous nature, CT is an often overlooked component of any essential nutritional program that may address the structure, and/or function of these tissues. The central role of CT in the health of a virtually all cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems, is discussed. General nutritional CT support strategies, as well as specific CT support strategies that focus on blood, vascular, structural system (eg, muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, bone, and joints), integument (skin) and inflammatory and immune mediation will be discussed here and will deal with connective tissue dynamics and dysfunction. An overview of the current scientific understanding and possible options for naturally enhancing the structure and function of CT through the application of these concepts will be discussed in this article, with specific attention on the vascular and hematological systems. PMID:19674592

  5. RONI Based Secured and Authenticated Indexing of Lung CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Jasmine Selvakumari Jeya, I.; Suganthi, J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical images need to be transmitted with the patient's information without altering the image data. The present paper discusses secured indexing of lung CT image (SILI) which is a secured way of indexing the lung CT images with the patient information. Authentication is provided using the sender's logo information and the secret key is used for embedding the watermark into the host image. Watermark is embedded into the region of Noninterest (RONI) of the lung CT image. RONI is identified by segmenting the lung tissue from the CT scan image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust against unauthorized access, noise, blurring, and intensity based attacks. PMID:26078782

  6. RONI Based Secured and Authenticated Indexing of Lung CT Images.

    PubMed

    Jasmine Selvakumari Jeya, I; Suganthi, J

    2015-01-01

    Medical images need to be transmitted with the patient's information without altering the image data. The present paper discusses secured indexing of lung CT image (SILI) which is a secured way of indexing the lung CT images with the patient information. Authentication is provided using the sender's logo information and the secret key is used for embedding the watermark into the host image. Watermark is embedded into the region of Noninterest (RONI) of the lung CT image. RONI is identified by segmenting the lung tissue from the CT scan image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust against unauthorized access, noise, blurring, and intensity based attacks. PMID:26078782

  7. Transsphenoidal hypophysectomy: postsurgical CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinskas, C.A.; Simeone, F.A.

    1985-03-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery produces changes in the paranasal sinuses and sella that should be familiar to radiologists in view of frequency of this type of surgery. Some of these changes, such as soft-tissue-density debris in the sinuses, are transient. Fat and other packing material identifiable in the sinuses and sella after surgery is permanent. The procedure is associated with a variety of complications that are readily detectable by computed tomography (CT). These include bleeding, compression of parasellar structures by packing material, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and pneumocephalus. After a transsphenoidal procedure, with or without follow-up radiation therapy, residual enhancing intrasellar and parasellar lesions may still be identified.

  8. CT Findings in Temporal Bone Osteoradionecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Salmaan; Gupta, Nakul; Hamilton, Jackson D.; Garden, Adam S.; Gidley, Paul W.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study is to describe CT findings in patients with clinically proven temporal bone osteoradionecrosis (TB-ORN). Methods and materials CT scans of twenty patients were retrospectively evaluated for bony and soft tissue abnormalities. Clinical severity was graded based on level of therapy administered: mild (observation), moderate (antibiotics/hyperbaric oxygen), or severe (surgery). Results Radiation dose to the primary tumor ranged from 30 to 75.6 Gy. Time to onset of ORN from completion of radiation therapy was 2 to 22 years (median=7yrs). Clinical findings: Exposed bone=20/20, otorrhea=17/20, hearing loss=11/20, otalgia=10/20, facial nerve paralysis=2/20, gait imbalance=2/20. CT findings: EAC erosions=18/20, mastoid effusion=18/20, mastoid bony coalescence=5/20, enhancing soft tissue=6/20, soft tissue gas=6/20, temporomandibular joint/condylar erosion=3/20. 3 patients developed an abscess. Conclusion Mastoid effusion and EAC erosions are commonly seen with TB-ORN. Clinically moderate or severe cases of TB-ORN are more likely to demonstrate enhancing soft tissue (p=0.002), soft tissue gas (p=0.002), and temporomandibular joint involvement (p=0.07). PMID:24834883

  9. IV Leiomyomatosis on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaona; Li, Fang; Lu, Zhaohui; Cheng, Wuying

    2016-07-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of right lower extremity edema. Clinical examination only showed right lower limb swelling. Routine laboratory examination revealed no abnormal results. Abdominal ultrasonography identified uterine leiomyoma and soft tissue masses. An abdominal CT demonstrated a continuous mass extending from the right internal and external iliac vein into the common iliac vein and inferior vena cava. To distinguish the mass from malignancy, the patient underwent PET/CT scan which showed increased FDG activity in the mass. However, histopathological examination proved the mass to be IV leiomyomatosis. PMID:26914578

  10. Practical CT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizumi, T.T.; Suneja, S.K.; Teal, J.S. )

    1989-07-01

    The dose from computed tomography (CT) examinations is not negligible from a radiation safety standpoint. Occasionally, one encounters a case in which an unsuspected pregnant woman undergoes a CT pelvic scan, and the radiologist is required to estimate the dose to the fetus. This article addresses practical methods of CT dosimetry with a specific discussion on fetal dose estimate. Three methods are described: (1) the use of a dose chart, (2) the pencil ionization chamber method, and (3) the thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) method.

  11. PET/CT Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M.; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2014-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT. PMID:21237418

  12. Computing effective dose in cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Tipnis, Sameer; Sterzik, Alexander; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-07-01

    We present a method of estimating effective doses in cardiac CT that accounts for selected techniques (kV mAs-1), anatomical location of the scan and patient size. A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator) was used to estimate effective doses (E) using ICRP 103 weighting factors for a 70 kg patient undergoing cardiac CT examinations. Using dose length product (DLP) for the same scans, we obtained values of E/DLP for three CT scanners used in cardiac imaging from two vendors. E/DLP ratios were obtained as a function of the anatomical location in the chest and for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. We also computed the ratio of the average absorbed dose in a water cylinder modeling a patient weighing W kg to the corresponding average absorbed dose in a water cylinder equivalent to a 70 kg patient. The average E/DLP for a 16 cm cardiac heart CT scan was 26 µSv (mGy cm)-1, which is about 70% higher than the current E/DLP values used for chest CT scans (i.e. 14-17 µSv (mGy cm)-1). Our cardiac E/DLP ratios are higher because the cardiac region is ~30% more radiosensitive than the chest, and use of the ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors increases cardiac CT effective doses by ~30%. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases the E/DLP conversion factor for cardiac CT by 17%. For the same incident radiation at 120 kV, doses in 45 kg adults were ~22% higher than those in 70 kg adults, whereas doses in 120 kg adults were ~28% lower. Accurate estimates of the patient effective dose in cardiac CT should use ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors, and account for a choice of scan techniques (kV mAs-1), exposed scan region, as well as patient size.

  13. Method for transforming CT images for attenuation correction in PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Jonathan P.J.; Townsend, David W.; Rappoport, Vitaliy; Bendriem, Bernard

    2006-04-15

    A tube-voltage-dependent scheme is presented for transforming Hounsfield units (HU) measured by different computed tomography (CT) scanners at different x-ray tube voltages (kVp) to 511 keV linear attenuation values for attenuation correction in positron emission tomography (PET) data reconstruction. A Gammex 467 electron density CT phantom was imaged using a Siemens Sensation 16-slice CT, a Siemens Emotion 6-slice CT, a GE Lightspeed 16-slice CT, a Hitachi CXR 4-slice CT, and a Toshiba Aquilion 16-slice CT at kVp ranging from 80 to 140 kVp. All of these CT scanners are also available in combination with a PET scanner as a PET/CT tomograph. HU obtained for various reference tissue substitutes in the phantom were compared with the known linear attenuation values at 511 keV. The transformation, appropriate for lung, soft tissue, and bone, yields the function 9.6x10{sup -5}{center_dot}(HU+1000) below a threshold of {approx}50 HU and a{center_dot}(HU+1000)+b above the threshold, where a and b are fixed parameters that depend on the kVp setting. The use of the kVp-dependent scaling procedure leads to a significant improvement in reconstructed PET activity levels in phantom measurements, resolving errors of almost 40% otherwise seen for the case of dense bone phantoms at 80 kVp. Results are also presented for patient studies involving multiple CT scans at different kVp settings, which should all lead to the same 511 keV linear attenuation values. A linear fit to values obtained from 140 kVp CT images using the kVp-dependent scaling plotted as a function of the corresponding values obtained from 80 kVp CT images yielded y=1.003x-0.001 with an R{sup 2} value of 0.999, indicating that the same values are obtained to a high degree of accuracy.

  14. Comparison of CT and MR-CT Fusion for Prostate Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Maletz, Kristina L.; Ennis, Ronald D.; Ostenson, Jason; Pevsner, Alexander; Kagen, Alexander; Wernick, Iddo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The use of T2 MR for postimplant dosimetry (PID) after prostate brachytherapy allows more anatomically accurate and precise contouring but does not readily permit seed identification. We developed a reproducible technique for performing MR-CT fusion and compared the resulting dosimetry to standard CT-based PID. Methods and Materials: CT and T1-weighted MR images for 45 patients were fused and aligned based on seed distribution. The T2-weighted MR image was then fused to the aligned T1. Reproducibility of the fusion technique was tested by inter- and intraobserver variability for 13 patients. Dosimetry was computed for the prostate as a whole and for the prostate divided into anterior and posterior sectors of the base, mid-prostate, and apex. Results: Inter- and intraobserver variability for the fusion technique showed less than 1% variation in D90. MR-CT fusion D90 and CT D90 were nearly equivalent for the whole prostate, but differed depending on the identification of superior extent of the base (p = 0.007) and on MR/CT prostate volume ratio (p = 0.03). Sector analysis showed a decrease in MR-CT fusion D90 in the anterior base (ratio 0.93 {+-}0.25, p < 0.05) and an increase in MR-CT fusion D90 in the apex (p < 0.05). The volume of extraprostatic tissue encompassed by the V100 is greater on MR than CT. Factors associated with this difference are the MR/CT volume ratio (p < 0.001) and the difference in identification of the inferior extent of the apex (p = 0.03). Conclusions: We developed a reproducible MR-CT fusion technique that allows MR-based dosimetry. Comparing the resulting postimplant dosimetry with standard CT dosimetry shows several differences, including adequacy of coverage of the base and conformity of the dosimetry around the apex. Given the advantage of MR-based tissue definition, further study of MR-based dosimetry is warranted.

  15. Development of contrast-enhanced rodent imaging using functional CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yun; Stantz, Keith M.; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Steinmetz, Rosemary; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2003-05-01

    Micro-computed tomography (microCT) is capable of obtaining high-resolution images of skeletal tissues. However its image contrast among soft tissues remains inadequate for tumor detection. High speed functional computed tomography will be needed to image tumors by employing x-ray contrast medium. The functional microCT development will not only facilitate the image contrast enhancement among different tissues but also provide information of tumor physiology. To demonstrate the feasibility of functional CT in mouse imaging, sequential computed tomography is performed in mice after contrast material administration using a high-speed clinical CT scanner. Although the resolution of the clinical scanner is not sufficient to dissolve the anatomic details of rodents, bulky physiological parameters in major organs such as liver, kidney, pancreas, and ovaries (testicular) can be examined. For data analysis, a two-compartmental model is employed and implemented to characterize the tissue physiological parameters (regional blood flow, capillary permeability, and relative compartment volumes.) The measured contrast dynamics in kidneys are fitted with the compartmental model to derive the kidney tissue physiology. The study result suggests that it is feasible to extract mouse tissue physiology using functional CT imaging technology.

  16. Tissue-like phantoms

    DOEpatents

    Frangioni, John V.; De Grand, Alec M.

    2007-10-30

    The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

  17. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls. PMID:26562229

  18. Evaluation of CT-based SUV normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patients’ lean body mass (LBM) and lean tissue (LT) mass using a computed tomography (CT)-based method, and to compare standardized uptake value (SUV) normalized by these parameters to conventionally normalized SUVs. Head-to-toe positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semi-automatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units (HU). The following HU ranges were used for determination of CT-estimated LBM and LT (LBMCT and LTCT):  ‑180 to  ‑7 for adipose tissue (AT), ‑6 to 142 for LT, and 143 to 3010 for bone tissue (BT). Formula-estimated LBMs were calculated using formulas of James (1976 Research on Obesity: a Report of the DHSS/MRC Group (London: HMSO)) and Janmahasatian et al (2005 Clin. Pharmacokinet. 44 1051–65), and body surface area (BSA) was calculated using the DuBois formula (Dubois and Dubois 1989 Nutrition 5 303–11). The CT segmentation method was validated by comparing total patient body weight (BW) to CT-estimated BW (BWCT). LBMCT was compared to formula-based estimates (LBMJames and LBMJanma). SUVs in two healthy reference tissues, liver and mediastinum, were normalized for the aforementioned parameters and compared to each other in terms of variability and dependence on normalization factors and BW. Comparison of actual BW to BWCT shows a non-significant difference of 0.8 kg. LBMJames estimates are significantly higher than LBMJanma with differences of 4.7 kg for female and 1.0 kg for male patients. Formula-based LBM estimates do not significantly differ from LBMCT, neither for men nor for women. The coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV normalized for LBMJames (SUVLBM-James) (12.3%) was significantly reduced in liver compared to SUVBW (15.4%). All SUV variances in mediastinum were significantly reduced (CVs were 11.1–12.2%) compared to SUVBW (15.5%), except SUVBSA (15.2%). Only SUVBW and SUVLBM

  19. Evaluation of CT-based SUV normalization.

    PubMed

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patients' lean body mass (LBM) and lean tissue (LT) mass using a computed tomography (CT)-based method, and to compare standardized uptake value (SUV) normalized by these parameters to conventionally normalized SUVs. Head-to-toe positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semi-automatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units (HU). The following HU ranges were used for determination of CT-estimated LBM and LT (LBMCT and LTCT):  -180 to  -7 for adipose tissue (AT), -6 to 142 for LT, and 143 to 3010 for bone tissue (BT). Formula-estimated LBMs were calculated using formulas of James (1976 Research on Obesity: a Report of the DHSS/MRC Group (London: HMSO)) and Janmahasatian et al (2005 Clin. Pharmacokinet. 44 1051-65), and body surface area (BSA) was calculated using the DuBois formula (Dubois and Dubois 1989 Nutrition 5 303-11). The CT segmentation method was validated by comparing total patient body weight (BW) to CT-estimated BW (BWCT). LBMCT was compared to formula-based estimates (LBMJames and LBMJanma). SUVs in two healthy reference tissues, liver and mediastinum, were normalized for the aforementioned parameters and compared to each other in terms of variability and dependence on normalization factors and BW. Comparison of actual BW to BWCT shows a non-significant difference of 0.8 kg. LBMJames estimates are significantly higher than LBMJanma with differences of 4.7 kg for female and 1.0 kg for male patients. Formula-based LBM estimates do not significantly differ from LBMCT, neither for men nor for women. The coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV normalized for LBMJames (SUVLBM-James) (12.3%) was significantly reduced in liver compared to SUVBW (15.4%). All SUV variances in mediastinum were significantly reduced (CVs were 11.1-12.2%) compared to SUVBW (15.5%), except SUVBSA (15.2%). Only SUVBW and SUVLBM-James show independence

  20. Medipix-based Spectral Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; He, Peng; Bennett, James; Amir, Raja; Dobbs, Bruce; Mou, Xuanqin; Wei, Biao; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Since Hounsfield's Nobel Prize winning breakthrough decades ago, X-ray CT has been widely applied in the clinical and preclinical applications - producing a huge number of tomographic gray-scale images. However, these images are often insufficient to distinguish crucial differences needed for diagnosis. They have poor soft tissue contrast due to inherent photon-count issues, involving high radiation dose. By physics, the X-ray spectrum is polychromatic, and it is now feasible to obtain multi-energy, spectral, or true-color, CT images. Such spectral images promise powerful new diagnostic information. The emerging Medipix technology promises energy-sensitive, high-resolution, accurate and rapid X-ray detection. In this paper, we will review the recent progress of Medipix-based spectral micro-CT with the emphasis on the results obtained by our team. It includes the state- of-the-art Medipix detector, the system and method of a commercial MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) spectral micro-CT, and the design and color diffusion of a hybrid spectral micro-CT. PMID:24194631

  1. Variation of patient dose in head CT.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Shah, G A; Kron, T

    1998-12-01

    CT dose varies with both equipment related and operator dependent factors. Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) was employed in two phantoms to investigate the variation in absorbed dose for head CT scans, using a cylindrical head CT dose phantom. Dose profiles were plotted and the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) calculated for a single 10 mm thick slice on 14 CT scanners. An anthropomorphic head phantom was also scanned from the base-of-skull to the vertex using 10/10 mm slices. The absorbed dose measured at the centre of the scan series is reported (Dmid). The mean CTDIw for the 14 scanners was 60.0 mGy, while the mean Dmid was 45.8 mGy. Dmid better represents the absorbed dose in human tissues. The CTDIw and Dmid normalized to mAs varied by up to a factor of 2.2 for the different scanners. Equipment related factors contribute to such variations. However, variations due to operator dependent factors such as the choice of exposure factors, scanning protocol and positioning technique must also be considered. When such factors are taken into account the absorbed dose received by the patient can vary considerably, by as much as 16.2 for lens dose. Increased awareness of the factors influencing CT dose and the standardization of scanning protocols is recommended. PMID:10319004

  2. Medipix-based Spectral Micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hengyong; Xu, Qiong; He, Peng; Bennett, James; Amir, Raja; Dobbs, Bruce; Mou, Xuanqin; Wei, Biao; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Wang, Ge

    2012-12-01

    Since Hounsfield's Nobel Prize winning breakthrough decades ago, X-ray CT has been widely applied in the clinical and preclinical applications - producing a huge number of tomographic gray-scale images. However, these images are often insufficient to distinguish crucial differences needed for diagnosis. They have poor soft tissue contrast due to inherent photon-count issues, involving high radiation dose. By physics, the X-ray spectrum is polychromatic, and it is now feasible to obtain multi-energy, spectral, or true-color, CT images. Such spectral images promise powerful new diagnostic information. The emerging Medipix technology promises energy-sensitive, high-resolution, accurate and rapid X-ray detection. In this paper, we will review the recent progress of Medipix-based spectral micro-CT with the emphasis on the results obtained by our team. It includes the state- of-the-art Medipix detector, the system and method of a commercial MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) spectral micro-CT, and the design and color diffusion of a hybrid spectral micro-CT. PMID:24194631

  3. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  4. Expression of MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 predicts lymph node metastasis in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Nuber, Natko; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Seifert, Burkhardt; Soldini, Davide; Dummer, Reinhard; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries; Moch, Holger

    2011-01-01

    MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 are members of the large MAGE family of cancer-testis (CT) antigens. CT antigens are promising targets for immunotherapy in cancer because their expression is restricted to cancer and germ line cells and a proportion of cancer patients presents with immune responses against CT antigens, which clearly demonstrates their immunogenicity. This study investigates the expression of MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 in primary and metastatic melanoma. Immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays that consisted of 59 primary malignant melanomas of the skin, 163 lymph node and distant melanoma metastases and 68 melanoma cell lines was performed. We found MAGE-C1/CT7 expression in 15 out of 50 (24%) primary melanomas and 15 out of 50 (24%) cell lines, whereas MAGE-C2/CT10 was detected in 17 out of 51 (33%) primary melanomas and 14 out of 68 (17%) cell lines. MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 were both detected in 40% of melanoma metastases. Patients with MAGE-C1/CT7 or MAGE-C2/CT10 positive primary melanoma had significantly more lymph node metastases (p = 0.005 and p<0.001, resp.). Prediction of lymph node metastasis by MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 was independent of tumor cell proliferation rate (Ki67 labeling index) in a multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). Our results suggest that the expression of MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 in primary melanoma is a potent predictor of sentinel lymph node metastasis. PMID:21738656

  5. Expression of MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 Predicts Lymph Node Metastasis in Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Seifert, Burkhardt; Soldini, Davide; Dummer, Reinhard; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries; Moch, Holger

    2011-01-01

    MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 are members of the large MAGE family of cancer-testis (CT) antigens. CT antigens are promising targets for immunotherapy in cancer because their expression is restricted to cancer and germ line cells and a proportion of cancer patients presents with immune responses against CT antigens, which clearly demonstrates their immunogenicity. This study investigates the expression of MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 in primary and metastatic melanoma. Immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays that consisted of 59 primary malignant melanomas of the skin, 163 lymph node and distant melanoma metastases and 68 melanoma cell lines was performed. We found MAGE-C1/CT7 expression in 15 out of 50 (24%) primary melanomas and 15 out of 50 (24%) cell lines, whereas MAGE-C2/CT10 was detected in 17 out of 51 (33%) primary melanomas and 14 out of 68 (17%) cell lines. MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 were both detected in 40% of melanoma metastases. Patients with MAGE-C1/CT7 or MAGE-C2/CT10 positive primary melanoma had significantly more lymph node metastases (p = 0.005 and p<0.001, resp.). Prediction of lymph node metastasis by MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 was independent of tumor cell proliferation rate (Ki67 labeling index) in a multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). Our results suggest that the expression of MAGE-C1/CT7 and MAGE-C2/CT10 in primary melanoma is a potent predictor of sentinel lymph node metastasis. PMID:21738656

  6. CT of the normal and abnormal parametria in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, C.W.; Walsh, J.W.; Wheelock, J.B.; Brewer, W.H.

    1984-09-01

    To evaluate CT criteria for differentiating a cervical cancer confined to the cervix from a lesion that invades the parametria, 16 patients with newly diagnosed, untreated cervical cancer were studied with CT. Twenty-five parameria were confined by radical hysterectomy, transvaginal parametrial fine-needle aspiration cytology, or excretory urography. In 17 tumor-positive parametria, CT findings associated with parametrial tumor invasion were: 1) irregularity or poor definition of the lateral cervical margins; 2) prominent parametrial soft-tissue strands; 3) obliteration of the periureteral fat plane; and 4) an eccentric parametrial soft-tissue mass. Irregularity of the cervical margins and prominent parametrial strands were seen most commonly with parametrial tumor invasion, but were also occasionally seen with parametrial inflammation. On the basis of the criteria developed in this report, CT may be used as an adjunct to the physical examination in differentiating stage I cervical cancer from more advanced disease in selected patients.

  7. CT and MR imaging after middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Kösling, S; Bootz, F

    2001-11-01

    This article describes the current value of imaging in patients after stapes surgery and surgery after chronic otitis media including cholesteatoma. Possibilities and limits of computed tomography (CT) and MRI are described and most important investigation parameters are mentioned. After otosclerosis surgery, CT is the method of first choice in detection of reasons for vertigo and/or recurrent hearing loss in the later postoperative phase. CT may show the position and condition of prosthesis, scarring around the prosthesis and otospongiotic foci. Sometimes, it gives indirect hints for perilymphatic fistulas and incus necrosis. MRI is able to document inner ear complications. CT has a high negative predictive value in cases with a free cavity after mastoidectomy. Localized opacities or total occlusion are difficult to distinguish by CT alone. MRI provides important additional information in the differentiation of cholesterol granuloma, cholesteatoma, effusion, granulation and scar tissue. PMID:11704358

  8. Thyroid CT number and its relationship to iodine concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Y.; Konishi, J.; Harioka, T.; Misaki, T.; Endo, K.; Torizuka, K.

    1983-06-01

    Sixty-seven patients with thyroid disease and 24 normal controls were examined with computed tomography (CT). The mean CT number (Hounsfield units +/- SD) in the normal controls (118.1 +/- 12.2) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than the mean CT number in patients with diseased thyroids, except for 2 cases of simple goiter (CT numbers 113, 132). The Graves disease (69.5 +/- 17.6) amd Hishimoto thyroiditis (61.4 +/- 9.1) were significaantly higher than those in patients with adenoma (41.7 +/- 10.6, p < 0.001), cyst (33.1 +/- 14.8, p < 0.001), or cancer (48.7 +/- 13, p < 0.01). In 14 patients studied, a significant correlation was observed between thyroid CT numbers and the iodine concentration of the tissue (r = 0.889; p < 0.001).

  9. Iterative CT shading correction with no prior information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pengwei; Sun, Xiaonan; Hu, Hongjie; Mao, Tingyu; Zhao, Wei; Sheng, Ke; Cheung, Alice A.; Niu, Tianye

    2015-11-01

    Shading artifacts in CT images are caused by scatter contamination, beam-hardening effect and other non-ideal imaging conditions. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel and general correction framework to eliminate low-frequency shading artifacts in CT images (e.g. cone-beam CT, low-kVp CT) without relying on prior information. The method is based on the general knowledge of the relatively uniform CT number distribution in one tissue component. The CT image is first segmented to construct a template image where each structure is filled with the same CT number of a specific tissue type. Then, by subtracting the ideal template from the CT image, the residual image from various error sources are generated. Since forward projection is an integration process, non-continuous shading artifacts in the image become continuous signals in a line integral. Thus, the residual image is forward projected and its line integral is low-pass filtered in order to estimate the error that causes shading artifacts. A compensation map is reconstructed from the filtered line integral error using a standard FDK algorithm and added back to the original image for shading correction. As the segmented image does not accurately depict a shaded CT image, the proposed scheme is iterated until the variation of the residual image is minimized. The proposed method is evaluated using cone-beam CT images of a Catphan©600 phantom and a pelvis patient, and low-kVp CT angiography images for carotid artery assessment. Compared with the CT image without correction, the proposed method reduces the overall CT number error from over 200 HU to be less than 30 HU and increases the spatial uniformity by a factor of 1.5. Low-contrast object is faithfully retained after the proposed correction. An effective iterative algorithm for shading correction in CT imaging is proposed that is only assisted by general anatomical information without relying on prior knowledge. The proposed method is thus practical

  10. State-of-the-Art CT Imaging Techniques for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    CT is increasingly being used for evaluating the cardiovascular structures and airways in the patients with congenital heart disease. Multi-slice CT has traditionally been used for the evaluation of the extracardiac vascular and airway abnormalities because of its inherent high spatial resolution and excellent air-tissue contrast. Recent developments in CT technology primarily by reducing the cardiac motion and the radiation dose usage in congenital heart disease evaluation have helped expand the indications for CT usage. Tracheobronchomalacia associated with congenital heart disease can be evaluated with cine CT. Intravenous contrast injection should be tailored to unequivocally demonstrate cardiovascular abnormalities. Knowledge of the state-of-the-art CT imaging techniques that are used for evaluating congenital heart disease is helpful not only for planning and performing CT examinations, but also for interpreting and presenting the CT image findings that consequently guide the proper medical and surgical management. PMID:20046490

  11. Dedicated phantom materials for spectral radiography and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2012-03-01

    As x-ray imaging technology moves from conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) to spectral radiography and CT, dedicated phantom materials are needed for spectral imaging. The spectral phantom materials should accurately represent the energy-dependent mass-attenuation coefficients of different types of tissues. Although tissue-equivalent phantom materials were previously developed for CT and radiation therapy applications, these materials are suboptimal for spectral radiography and CT; they are not compatible with contrast agents, do not represent many of the tissue types and do not provide accurate values of attenuation characteristics of tissue. This work provides theoretical framework and a practical method for developing tissue-equivalent spectral phantom materials with a required set of parameters. The samples of the tissue-equivalent spectral phantom materials were developed, tested and characterized. The spectral phantom materials were mixed with iodine, gold and calcium contrast agents and evaluated. The materials were characterized by CT imaging and x-ray transmission experiments. The fabricated materials had nearly identical densities, mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities as compared to corresponding tissue materials presented in the ICRU-44 report. The experimental results have shown good volume uniformity and inter-sample uniformity (repeatability of sample fabrication) of the fabricated materials. The spectral phantom materials were fabricated under laboratory conditions from readily available and inexpensive components. It was concluded that the presented theoretical framework and fabrication method of dedicated spectral phantom materials could be useful for researchers and developers working in the new area of spectral radiography and CT. Independently, the results could also be useful for other applications, such as radiation therapy.

  12. Energy Dependence of Measured CT Numbers on Substituted Materials Used for CT Number Calibration of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Reza; Jabbari, Nasrollah; aghdasi, Mehdi; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For accurate dose calculations, it is necessary to provide a correct relationship between the CT numbers and electron density in radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy dependence of measured CT numbers on substituted materials used for CT number calibration of radiotherapy TPSs and the resulting errors in the treatment planning calculation doses. Materials and Methods In this study, we designed a cylindrical water phantom with different materials used as tissue equivalent materials for the simulation of tissues and obtaining the related CT numbers. For evaluating the effect of CT number variations of substituted materials due to energy changing of scanner (kVp) on the dose calculation of TPS, the slices of the scanned phantom at three kVp's were imported into the desired TPSs (MIRS and CorePLAN). Dose calculations were performed on two TPSs. Results The mean absolute percentage differences between the CT numbers of CT scanner and two treatment planning systems for all the samples were 3.22%±2.57% for CorePLAN and 2.88%±2.11% for MIRS. It was also found that the maximum absolute percentage difference between all of the calculated doses from each photon beam of linac (6 and 15 MV) at three kVp's was less than 1.2%. Discussion The present study revealed that, for the materials with effective low atomic number, the mean CT number increased with increasing energy, which was opposite for the materials with an effective high atomic number. We concluded that the tissue substitute materials had a different behavior in the energy ranges from 80 to 130 kVp. So, it is necessary to consider the energy dependence of the substitute materials used for the measurement or calibration of CT number for radiotherapy treatment planning systems. PMID:27391672

  13. Spiral CT: vascular applications.

    PubMed

    Rankin, S C

    1998-08-01

    Recent technical advances in CT have renewed interest in the development of CT angiography (CTA). CT angiography is a minimally invasive method of visualising the vascular system and is becoming an alternative to conventional arteriography in some situations. Spiral technology allows a volume of data to be obtained on a single breath-hold with no respiratory misregistration. Fast machines with second or subsecond acquisition times mean the images are obtained while there are high circulating levels of contrast medium giving peak vascular opacification from a peripheral intravenous injection. Accurate timing will ensure either the arterial or venous phase is imaged. Multiple overlapping axial images can be obtained from the data set with no increase in radiation dose to the patient and from these scans computer generated multiplanar and 3D images are obtained which can be viewed from numerous angles. CT angiography can be performed more quickly, less invasively and at reduced cost compared to conventional angiography. PMID:9717621

  14. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  15. Thoracic spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. (Modern "spiral" scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer ...

  16. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. While inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... breathing during the test, you should notify the scanner operator immediately. Scanners come with an intercom and ...

  17. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... Mosby; 2013:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  18. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - heart; Computed axial tomography scan - heart; Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT scan - heart; Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agaston score; Coronary calcium scan

  19. Sinus CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - sinus; Computed axial tomography scan - sinus; Computed tomography scan - sinus; CT scan - sinus ... 2014:chap 67. Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's ...

  20. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  1. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... gov/pubmed/18381118 . Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, ...

  2. Shoulder CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - shoulder; Computed axial tomography scan - shoulder; Computed tomography scan - shoulder; CT scan - shoulder ... Mosby; 2012:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  3. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  4. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... pictures to create a very detailed, three-dimensional (3D) model of organs. Sometimes, a substance called contrast dye is injected into a vein in your arm for the CT scan. This substance highlights areas in your chest, which ...

  5. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the colon using a hand-held squeeze bulb. Sometimes an electronic pump is used to deliver ... When you enter the CT scanner room, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  6. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  7. A new CT prostate segmentation for CT-based HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has become a popular treatment modality for localized prostate cancer. Prostate HDR treatment involves placing 10 to 20 catheters (needles) into the prostate gland, and then delivering radiation dose to the cancerous regions through these catheters. These catheters are often inserted with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance and the HDR treatment plan is based on the CT images. The main challenge for CT-based HDR planning is to accurately segment prostate volume in CT images due to the poor soft tissue contrast and additional artifacts introduced by the catheters. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel approach to segment the prostate in CT images through TRUS-CT deformable registration based on the catheter locations. In this approach, the HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intra-operative TRUS and planning CT images, and then used as landmarks for the TRUS-CT image registration. The prostate contour generated from the TRUS images captured during the ultrasound-guided HDR procedure was used to segment the prostate on the CT images through deformable registration. We conducted two studies. A prostate-phantom study demonstrated a submillimeter accuracy of our method. A pilot study of 5 prostate-cancer patients was conducted to further test its clinical feasibility. All patients had 3 gold markers implanted in the prostate that were used to evaluate the registration accuracy, as well as previous diagnostic MR images that were used as the gold standard to assess the prostate segmentation. For the 5 patients, the mean gold-marker displacement was 1.2 mm; the prostate volume difference between our approach and the MRI was 7.2%, and the Dice volume overlap was over 91%. Our proposed method could improve prostate delineation, enable accurate dose planning and delivery, and potentially enhance prostate HDR treatment outcome.

  8. Fusion of PET and CT images using wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Shalchian, Bahareh; Rajabi, Hossein; Soltanian-zadeh, Hamid

    2009-01-01

    While information about anatomy is available in CT images, information about physiology and metabolism is available in PET images. To integrate both information, the two images are fused. Image fusion methods include simple methods like pixel averaging and sophisticated methods like wavelet transformation. An advantage of using wavelet transformation is that it preserves significant parts of each image. After creating lesions of 10, 8, 6 mm in a NURBS (non-uniform rational B-splines) based cardiac torso (NCAT) phantom, PET images were simulated using SimSET simulator. Attenuation maps of the activity phantom were used as CT images. Each of the PET and CT images was divided into an approximation image and three detailed images by the wavelet transform. The corresponding transformed images generated from the PET and CT images were fused in nine different ways to generate composite images, which were compared to the original images. The basis of comparison is the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image in comparison to the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the original PET and CT images. Our results showed that except for one method, the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image was higher than that of the CT images. In the first six methods, the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image was less than the contrast, in the PET image. In the other three methods, the contrast in the fused image was higher than in the PET image. This was true in cases of 10, 8, 6 mm lesions. In conclusion, we have show that the approximation image produced a better ultimate image and that the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image was also better than that of the original PET and CT images. This is because the approximation image is comprised of fundamental information of the signal (low frequency) that directly affects the image contrast. PMID:19936335

  9. Assessment of thermal sensitivity of CT during heating of liver: an ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Pandeya, G D; Greuter, M J W; Schmidt, B; Flohr, T; Oudkerk, M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the thermal sensitivity of CT during heating of ex-vivo animal liver. Methods Pig liver was indirectly heated from 20 to 90 °C by passage of hot air through a plastic tube. The temperature in the heated liver was measured using calibrated thermocouples. In addition, image acquisition was performed with a multislice CT scanner before and during heating of the liver sample. The reconstructed CT images were then analysed to assess the change of CT number as a function of temperature. Results During heating, a decrease in CT numbers was observed as a hypodense area on the CT images. In addition, the hypodense area extended outward from the heat source during heating. The analysis showed a linear decrease of CT number as a function of temperature. From this relationship, we derived a thermal sensitivity of CT for pig liver tissue of −0.54±0.03 HU °C−1 with an r2 value of 0.91. Conclusions The assessment of the thermal sensitivity of CT in ex-vivo pig liver tissue showed a linear dependency on temperature ≤90 °C. This result may be beneficial for the application of isotherms or thermal maps in CT images of liver tissue. PMID:22919016

  10. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  11. Imaging features of rhinosporidiosis on contrast CT

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Shailesh M; Irodi, Aparna; Khiangte, Hannah L; Rupa, V; Naina, P

    2013-01-01

    Context: Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic granulomatous disease endemic in certain regions of India. Computed tomography (CT) imaging appearances of rhinosporidiosis have not been previously described in the literature. Aims: To study imaging features in rhinosporidiosis with contrast-enhanced CT and elucidate its role in the evaluation of this disease. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with pathologically proven rhinosporidiosis were included in the study. Contrast-enhanced CT images were analyzed retrospectively and imaging findings were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: A total of 29 lesions were found and evaluated. On contrast-enhanced CT, rhinosporidiosis was seen as moderately enhancing lobulated or irregular soft tissue mass lesions in the nasal cavity (n = 13), lesions arising in nasal cavity and extending through choana into nasopharynx (n = 5), pedunculated polypoidal lesions arising from the nasopharyngeal wall (n = 5), oropharyngeal wall (n = 2), larynx (n = 1), bronchus (n = 1), skin and subcutaneous tissue (n = 2). The inferior nasal cavity comprising nasal floor, inferior turbinate, and inferior meatus was the most common site of involvement (n = 13). Surrounding bone involvement was seen in the form of rarefaction (n = 6), partial (n = 3) or complete erosion (n = 3) of inferior turbinate, thinning of medial maxillary wall (n = 2), and septal erosion (n = 2). Nasolacrimal duct involvement was seen in four cases. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced CT has an important role in delineating the site and extent of the disease, as well as the involvement of surrounding bone, nasolacrimal duct and tracheobronchial tree. This provides a useful roadmap prior to surgery. PMID:24347850

  12. Evaluation of a bilinear model for attenuation correction using CT numbers generated from a parametric method.

    PubMed

    Martinez, L C; Calzado, A

    2016-01-01

    A parametric model is used for the calculation of the CT number of some selected human tissues of known compositions (Hi) in two hybrid systems, one SPECT-CT and one PET-CT. Only one well characterized substance, not necessarily tissue-like, needs to be scanned with the protocol of interest. The linear attenuation coefficients of these tissues for some energies of interest (μ(i)) have been calculated from their tabulated compositions and the NIST databases. These coefficients have been compared with those calculated with the bilinear model from the CT number (μ(B)i). No relevant differences have been found for bones and lung. In the soft tissue region, the differences can be up to 5%. These discrepancies are attributed to the different chemical composition for the tissues assumed by both methods. PMID:26454019

  13. Calibration free beam hardening correction for cardiac CT perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Jacob; Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) and coronary CTA have the potential to make CT an ideal noninvasive gate-keeper for invasive coronary angiography. However, beam hardening artifacts (BHA) prevent accurate blood flow calculation in MPI-CT. BH Correction (BHC) methods require either energy-sensitive CT, not widely available, or typically a calibration-based method. We developed a calibration-free, automatic BHC (ABHC) method suitable for MPI-CT. The algorithm works with any BHC method and iteratively determines model parameters using proposed BHA-specific cost function. In this work, we use the polynomial BHC extended to three materials. The image is segmented into soft tissue, bone, and iodine images, based on mean HU and temporal enhancement. Forward projections of bone and iodine images are obtained, and in each iteration polynomial correction is applied. Corrections are then back projected and combined to obtain the current iteration's BHC image. This process is iterated until cost is minimized. We evaluate the algorithm on simulated and physical phantom images and on preclinical MPI-CT data. The scans were obtained on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare). Mono-energetic reconstructed images were used as the reference. In the simulated phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 12+/-2HU to 1+/-1HU and cupping was reduced by 81%. Similarly, in physical phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 48+/-6HU to 1+/-5HU and cupping was reduced by 86%. In preclinical MPI-CT images, BHA was reduced from 28+/-6 HU to less than 4+/-4HU at peak enhancement. Results suggest that the algorithm can be used to reduce BHA in conventional CT and improve MPI-CT accuracy.

  14. Analysis and validation of tissue biomarkers for renal cell carcinoma using automated high-throughput evaluation of protein expression☆

    PubMed Central

    Abel, E. Jason; Bauman, Tyler M.; Weiker, Madelyn; Shi, Fangfang; Downs, Tracy M.; Jarrard, David F.; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study was to compare the predictive ability of potential tissue biomarkers to known prognostic factors that predict renal cell carcinoma (RCC) recurrence using an automated system of immunohistochemical analysis. After institutional review board approval, a tissue microarray was constructed using tissue from patients who had partial or radical nephrectomy for RCC. Patients with metastatic disease were excluded. Immunohistochemical staining of the tissue microarray for Ki-67, C-reactive protein, carbonic anhydrase 9, and hypoxia-inducible factors 1α and 2α was analyzed using automated image analysis. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to evaluate the association of putative biomarkers and known prognostic factors. Of 216 patients who met the entrance criteria, 34 (16%) patients developed metastatic recurrence within a median follow-up interval of 60.9 (interquartile range, 13.9–87.1) months. RCC morphotypes analyzed in this study include clear cell (n = 156), papillary (n = 38), chromophobe (n = 16), and collecting duct/unclassified (n = 6). Univariate analysis identified that only increased Ki-67 was predictive of RCC recurrence among the proteins evaluated, in addition to other known clinicopathological prognostic factors. After multivariate analysis, Ki-67 was identified as an independently predictive risk factor for RCC recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 3.73 [confidence interval {CI}, 1.60–8.68]). Other independent predictors of RCC recurrence included tumor diameter (HR, 1.20 [CI, 1.02–1.41]) and perinephric fat invasion (HR, 4.49 [CI, 1.11–18.20]). We conclude that Ki-67 positivity is independently predictive of RCC recurrence after surgery in nonmetastatic patients. Automated analysis of tissue protein expression can facilitate a more objective and expedient investigation of tissue biomarkers for RCC. PMID:24746216

  15. Frontoethmoidal Mucoceles: CT and MRI Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, I; Michaelides, M; Bintoudi, A; Kyriakou, V

    2007-10-31

    Paranasal sinus mucocele is an expanded, airless, mucus-filled sinus caused by obstruction of the sinus ostium. It is a benign slow growing epithelial lined lesion, bulging against adjacent anatomical structures, without infiltrating them. The purpose of our study is to describe the CT and MR findings in 19 patients (ten women, nine men, 18-72 years, mean age: 48.1) with surgically confirmed frontoethmoidal mucoceles between 1999-2005. CT scans displayed mucoceles as non enhancing soft tissue density lesions, generally isodense to the brain parenchyma, expanding the sinuses in most cases, eroding adjacent bones and extending intraorbitally or intracranially. Signal intensity in T2WI and T1WI MR images varied, but generally lesions had high signal intensity in T2WI and low to intermediate signal intensity in T1WI. Some of the lesions demonstrated regular linear peripheral enhancement after administration of contrast medium. The causes of mucoceles included mucosal thickening from chronic sinusitis, adhesions from previous operation in the nasal cavity, previous trauma, small nasal polyps and a small osteoma, while in six patients (31.5%) the cause of the mucocele remained unrecognized even after surgery. No underlying malignant tumor was found in any of the cases as the cause of obstruction. CT and MRI established the correct diagnosis in all patients. CT was more sensitive in determining bone erosions, while MRI had the advantage of multiplanar imaging and was much more sensitive for differentiating mucocele from a tumor on the basis of MR signal intensity characteristics. In conclusion, CT and MRI are the methods of choice for diagnosing mucoceles of the paranasal sinuses and are of major importance for the treatment plan. Each method seems to have its own advantages and should be used as complementary investigations of sinonasal pathology. Enhanced CT scan should only be performed in the absence or contraindication for enhanced MR imaging. PMID:24299951

  16. Deformable planning CT to cone-beam CT image registration in head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Jidong; Guerrero, Mariana; Chen, Wenjuan; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to implement and validate a deformable CT to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image registration method in head-and-neck cancer to eventually facilitate automatic target delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients underwent a planning CT and weekly CBCT during the 5-7 week treatment period. The 12 planning CT images (moving images) of these patients were registered to their weekly CBCT images (fixed images) via the symmetric force Demons algorithm and using a multiresolution scheme. Histogram matching was used to compensate for the intensity difference between the two types of images. Using nine known anatomic points as registration targets, the accuracy of the registration was evaluated using the target registration error (TRE). In addition, region-of-interest (ROI) contours drawn on the planning CT were morphed to the CBCT images and the volume overlap index (VOI) between registered contours and manually delineated contours was evaluated. Results: The mean TRE value of the nine target points was less than 3.0 mm, the slice thickness of the planning CT. Of the 369 target points evaluated for registration accuracy, the average TRE value was 2.6{+-}0.6 mm. The mean TRE for bony tissue targets was 2.4{+-}0.2 mm, while the mean TRE for soft tissue targets was 2.8{+-}0.2 mm. The average VOI between the registered and manually delineated ROI contours was 76.2{+-}4.6%, which is consistent with that reported in previous studies. Conclusions: The authors have implemented and validated a deformable image registration method to register planning CT images to weekly CBCT images in head-and-neck cancer cases. The accuracy of the TRE values suggests that they can be used as a promising tool for automatic target delineation on CBCT.

  17. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Bradford J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.; Yanof, J.; Bauer, C.; Kruecker, J.; Seip, R.

    2006-05-08

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  18. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Yanof, J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kruecker, J.; Bauer, C.; Seip, R.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.

    2006-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  19. A realistic simulation framework for assessing deformable slice-to-volume (CT-fluoroscopy/CT) registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaniv, Ziv; Stenzel, Roland; Cleary, Kevin; Banovac, Filip

    2006-03-01

    Lung cancer screening for early diagnosis is a clinically important problem. One screening method is to test tissue samples obtained from CT-fluoroscopy (CTF) guided lung biopsy. CTF provides real-time imaging; however on most machines the view is limited to a single slice. Mentally reconstructing the direction of the needle when it is not in the imaging plane is a difficult task. We are currently developing 3D visualization software that will augment the physician's ability to perform this task. At the beginning of the procedure a CT scan is acquired at breath-hold. The physician then specifies an entry point and a target point on the CT. As the procedure advances the physician acquires a CTF image at breath-hold; the system then registers the current setup to the CT scan. To assess the performance of different registration algorithms for CTF/CT registration we propose to use simulated CTF images. These images are created by deforming the original CT volume and extracting a slice from it. Realistic deformation of the CT volume is achieved by using positional information from electromagnetically tracked fiducials, acquired throughout the respiratory cycle. To estimate the dense displacement field underlying the sparse displacement field provided by the fiducials we use radial basis function interpolation. Finally, we evaluated Thirion's "demons" algorithm, as implemented in ITK, for the task of slice-to-volume registration. We found it to be unsuitable for this task, as in most cases the recovered displacements were less than 50% of the original ones.

  20. Biological tissues analysis by XRF microtomography.

    PubMed

    Pereira, G R; Rocha, H S; Calza, C; Anjos, M J; Pérez, C A; Lopes, R T

    2010-01-01

    The main of this work is to determine the elemental distribution in breast and prostate tissue samples in order to verify the concentration of some elements correlated with characteristics and pathology of each tissue observed by the X-ray transmission microtomography (microCT). The experiments were performed at the X-ray fluorescence beamline of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory. The microCT images were reconstructed using a filtered-back-projection algorithm and the XRF microtomographies were reconstructed using a filtered-back-projection algorithm with absorption corrections. PMID:20122839

  1. Automated lung segmentation of low resolution CT scans of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Benjamin M.; Haworth, Steven T.; Clough, Anne V.

    2014-03-01

    Dual modality micro-CT and SPECT imaging can play an important role in preclinical studies designed to investigate mechanisms, progression, and therapies for acute lung injury in rats. SPECT imaging involves examining the uptake of radiopharmaceuticals within the lung, with the hypothesis that uptake is sensitive to the health or disease status of the lung tissue. Methods of quantifying lung uptake and comparison of right and left lung uptake generally begin with identifying and segmenting the lung region within the 3D reconstructed SPECT volume. However, identification of the lung boundaries and the fissure between the left and right lung is not always possible from the SPECT images directly since the radiopharmaceutical may be taken up by other surrounding tissues. Thus, our SPECT protocol begins with a fast CT scan, the lung boundaries are identified from the CT volume, and the CT region is coregistered with the SPECT volume to obtain the SPECT lung region. Segmenting rat lungs within the CT volume is particularly challenging due to the relatively low resolution of the images and the rat's unique anatomy. Thus, we have developed an automated segmentation algorithm for low resolution micro-CT scans that utilizes depth maps to detect fissures on the surface of the lung volume. The fissure's surface location is in turn used to interpolate the fissure throughout the lung volume. Results indicate that the segmentation method results in left and right lung regions consistent with rat lung anatomy.

  2. Toward high-contrast breast CT at low radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Keyriläinen, Jani; Fernández, Manuel; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Virkkunen, Pekka; Leidenius, Marjut; von Smitten, Karl; Sipilä, Petri; Fiedler, Stefan; Suhonen, Heikki; Suortti, Pekka; Bravin, Alberto

    2008-10-01

    This study was approved by the local research ethics committee, and patient informed consent was obtained. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that high-spatial-resolution low-dose analyzer-based x-ray computed tomography (CT) can substantially improve the radiographic contrast of breast tissue in vitro when compared with that attained by using diagnostic mammography and CT. An excised human breast tumor was examined by using analyzer-based x-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation. The correspondence between analyzer-based x-ray images and diagnostic mammograms, CT images, and histopathologic findings was determined. Calcifications and fine details of soft tissue, which are at the contrast detection limit on diagnostic mammograms, are clearly visible on planar analyzer-based x-ray images. Analyzer-based x-ray CT yields high contrast from smoothly varying internal structures, such as tumorous mass lesions, corresponding to information on actual structures seen at histopathologic analysis. The mean glandular dose of 1.9 mGy in analyzer-based x-ray CT is approximately equivalent to the dose administered during single-view screening mammography. The improved visibility of mammographically indistinguishable lesions in vitro suggests that analyzer-based x-ray CT may be a valuable method in radiographic evaluation of the breast, thereby justifying further investigations. PMID:18796684

  3. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual ... to allow for inflation with air while CT images are being taken. If you’re scheduled for ...

  5. Dose management in CT facility

    PubMed Central

    Tsapaki, V; Rehani, M

    2007-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) examinations have rapidly increased in number over the last few years due to recent advances such as the spiral, multidetector-row, CT fluoroscopy and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-CT technology. This has resulted in a large increase in collective radiation dose as reported by many international organisations. It is also stated that frequently, image quality in CT exceeds the level required for confident diagnosis. This inevitably results in patient radiation doses that are higher than actually required, as also stressed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding the CT exposure of paediatric and small adult patients. However, the wide range in exposure parameters reported, as well as the different CT applications reveal the difficulty in standardising CT procedures. The purpose of this paper is to review the basic CT principles, outline the recent technological advances and their impact in patient radiation dose and finally suggest methods of radiation dose optimisation. PMID:21614279

  6. Silencing of CtBP1 suppresses the migration in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengjin; Shen, Yifen; Tao, Xuelei; Xu, Jian; Lu, Junjie; Liu, Chao; Xu, Zhiwei; Tang, Qing; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Xiubing

    2016-06-01

    Carboxyl-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1), up-regulated in various types of human cancers, has been functionally associated with proliferation, anti-apoptosis, and EMT in vitro studies. However, the functional significance of CtBP1 in the pathophysiology of glioma remains unknown. In the present study, we showed the expression of CtBP1 was markedly higher in glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CtBP1 mainly localized in the nucleus of glioma cells. Statistical analysis suggested the upregulation of CtBP1 was considerably correlated with the WHO grade (P < 0.05) and those patients with high CtBP1 levels exhibited shorter survival time (P < 0.01). Silencing CtBP1 by short hairpin RNAi caused an inhibition of cell migration. Moreover, knockdown of CtBP1 increases E-cadherin expression and decreases vimentin expression. These data uncovered that CtBP1 protein is a valuable marker of glioma pathogenic process and that CtBP1 can serve as a novel prognostic marker for glioma therapy. PMID:27160109

  7. FDG PET-CT of gynecologic cancers: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Hima B; Kraeft, Jessica J; Schorge, John O; Scott, James A; Lee, Susanna I

    2015-10-01

    FDG PET-CT plays an important role in treatment planning and in prognosis assessment of gynecologic cancer patients. Detection of hypermetabolic tissue with FDG PET, when combined with the high spatial resolution of CT, results in improved cancer detection and localization not afforded by either modality independently. This article is a primer for a radiologist performing PET-CT on gynecologic cancer patients and includes the imaging protocol, normal pattern of FDG distribution in the female pelvis and the lymph node drainage pathways from the gynecologic organs. Clinically relevant imaging findings that should be included in the report are discussed. Case examples illustrate how potential errors in exam interpretation can be avoided by concurrently performing a high-quality diagnostic CT with the FDG PET scan and by analyzing both the stand-alone and the fusion images. PMID:25680500

  8. Utility of CT in detecting postpneumonectomy carcinoma recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, H.S.; Aronberg, D.J.; Sagel, S.S.; Emami, B.

    1984-03-01

    After pneumonectomy for bronchogenic carcinoma, detection of recurrent disease in the ipsilateral hemithorax or mediastinum is often difficult. The authors discuss the utility of CT in the evaluation of 18 postpneumonectomy patients who had developed new clinical symptoms. In six patients without documented tumor recurrence, CT demonstrated a normal postpneumonectomy appearance. In the other 12, CT confirmed the clinical impression of recurrent neoplasm (10 prospectively, two retrospectively), which appeared either as enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes or as a soft-tissue mass projecting into the normal near-water-density postpneumonectomy space. In only five of these patients were plain chest radiographs suggestive of recurrence (two prospectively, three retrospectively). The accurate assessment of the presence and extent of recurrent neoplasm by CT was important in planning radiotherapy in eight patients.

  9. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... weight limit. Too much weight can damage the scanner's working parts. You will be asked to remove ...

  10. The diagnostic dilemma of the posterior mediastinal thymus: CT manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.D.; Weber, T.R.; Sequeira, F.W.; Vane, D.W.; King, H.

    1983-03-01

    Extension of the normal thymus into the posterior mediastinum is rare. The CT appearance of this anomaly in an infant is presented. A mass of soft-tissue density extended from the anterior mediastinum to the posterior chest wall. The absence of any tissue-cleavage plane in the lesion and a smooth continuous lateral margin are signs of posterior extension of the thymus, and they help to distinguish this from a normal anterior thymus being present with a posterior tumor.

  11. PET/CT imaging artifacts.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Waheeda; Mawlawi, Osama

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the principles of PET/CT imaging and describe the artifacts associated with it. PET/CT is a new imaging modality that integrates functional (PET) and structural (CT) information into a single scanning session, allowing excellent fusion of the PET and CT images and thus improving lesion localization and interpretation accuracy. Moreover, the CT data can also be used for attenuation correction, ultimately leading to high patient throughput. These combined advantages have rendered PET/CT a preferred imaging modality over dedicated PET. Although PET/CT imaging offers many advantages, this dual-modality imaging also poses some challenges. CT-based attenuation correction can induce artifacts and quantitative errors that can affect the PET emission images. For instance, the use of contrast medium and the presence of metallic implants can be associated with focal radiotracer uptake. Furthermore, the patient's breathing can introduce mismatches between the CT attenuation map and the PET emission data, and the discrepancy between the CT and PET fields of view can lead to truncation artifacts. After reading this article, the technologist should be able to describe the principles of PET/CT imaging, identify at least 3 types of image artifacts, and describe the differences between PET/CT artifacts of different causes: metallic implants, respiratory motion, contrast medium, and truncation. PMID:16145223

  12. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  13. Tissue Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Rabien, Anja; Kristiansen, Glen

    2016-01-01

    The new opportunities of modern assays of molecular biology can only be exploited fully if the results can be accurately correlated to the tissue phenotype under investigation. This is a general problem of non-in situ techniques, whereas results from in situ techniques are often difficult to quantify. The use of bulk tissue, which is not precisely characterized in terms of histology, has long been the basis for molecular analysis. It has, however, become apparent, that this simple approach is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of molecular alterations, which might be restricted to a specific tissue phenotype (e.g., tumor or normal tissue, stromal or epithelial cells). Microdissection is a method to provide minute amounts of histologically characterized tissues for molecular analysis with non-in situ techniques and has become an indispensable research tool. If tissue diversity is moderate and negligible, manual microdissection can be an easy and cost-efficient method of choice. In contrast, the advantage of laser microdissection is a very exact selection down to the level of a single cell, but often with a considerable time exposure to get enough material for the following analyses. The latter issue and the method of tissue preparation needed for laser microdissection are the main problems to solve if RNA, highly sensitive to degradation, shall be analyzed. This chapter focuses on optimized procedures for manual microdissection and laser microdissection to analyze RNA of malignant and nonmalignant prostate tissue. PMID:26667453

  14. Tissue Tregs.

    PubMed

    Panduro, Marisella; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2016-05-20

    The immune system is responsible for defending an organism against the myriad of microbial invaders it constantly confronts. It has become increasingly clear that the immune system has a second major function: the maintenance of organismal homeostasis. Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important contributors to both of these critical activities, defense being the primary purview of Tregs circulating through lymphoid organs, and homeostasis ensured mainly by their counterparts residing in parenchymal tissues. This review focuses on so-called tissue Tregs. We first survey existing information on the phenotype, function, sustaining factors, and human equivalents of the three best-characterized tissue-Treg populations-those operating in visceral adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and the colonic lamina propria. We then attempt to distill general principles from this body of work-as concerns the provenance, local adaptation, molecular sustenance, and targets of action of tissue Tregs, in particular. PMID:27168246

  15. Dosimetric feasibility of cone-beam CT-based treatment planning compared to CT-based treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Sua . E-mail: sua.yoo@duke.edu; Yin, F.-F.

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images are currently used for positioning verification. However, it is yet unknown whether CBCT could be used in dose calculation for replanning in adaptive radiation therapy. This study investigates the dosimetric feasibility of CBCT-based treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Hounsfield unit (HU) values and profiles of Catphan, homogeneous/inhomogeneous phantoms, and various tissue regions of patients in CBCT images were compared to those in CT. The dosimetric consequence of the HU variation was investigated by comparing CBCT-based treatment plans to conventional CT-based plans for both phantoms and patients. Results: The maximum HU difference between CBCT and CT of Catphan was 34 HU in the Teflon. The differences in other materials were less than 10 HU. The profiles for the homogeneous phantoms in CBCT displayed reduced HU values up to 150 HU in the peripheral regions compared to those in CT. The scatter and artifacts in CBCT became severe surrounding inhomogeneous tissues with reduced HU values up to 200 HU. The MU/cGy differences were less than 1% for most phantom cases. The isodose distributions between CBCT-based and CT-based plans agreed very well. However, the discrepancy was larger when CBCT was scanned without a bowtie filter than with bowtie filter. Also, up to 3% dosimetric error was observed in the plans for the inhomogeneous phantom. In the patient studies, the discrepancies of isodose lines between CT-based and CBCT-based plans, both 3D and IMRT, were less than 2 mm. Again, larger discrepancy occurred for the lung cancer patients. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of CBCT-based treatment planning. CBCT-based treatment plans were dosimetrically comparable to CT-based treatment plans. Dosimetric data in the inhomogeneous tissue regions should be carefully validated.

  16. Gallbladder Tuberculosis: CT Findings with Histopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiu-Fang; Qiu, Ling-Ling; Shen, Jian; Dong, Fei; Chen, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Objective We wanted to describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of gallbladder tuberculosis (TB) and to correlate them with pathologic findings. Materials and Methods There were seven patients (M:F = 3:4; mean age, 46.3 years; age range, 32 to 78 years) in whom gallbladder TB was eventually diagnosed. All of them underwent cross-sectional imaging with CT, a pathologic examination and a retrospective review. CT imaging evaluation was done in each case, including the findings of a mass versus nodule, wall thickening (uniform or irregular) and the enhancement patterns (homogeneous or heterogeneous). Results All the cases of gallbladder TB revealed the following three different CT findings: micronodular lesion of the gallbladder wall (n = 1), a thickened wall (n = 4) and a gallbladder mass (n = 2). There were three cases of homogeneous enhancement of the lesions, including homogeneous enhancement with nodular lesion, homogeneous uniform thickness enhancement and homogeneous thickness enhancement in one case each, and these cases pathology showed tuberculous granuloma with a little caseating necrosis in one case and tuberculous granuloma with rich fibrous tissue, but little or no evident caseating necrosis in two cases. Four cases of heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions, including heterogeneous uniform-thickness enhancement in two cases, heterogeneous enhancement with a local mass lesion in one case and heterogeneous enhancement with a mass that replaced the gallbladder in one case; in these cases, pathology showed tuberculous granuloma with marked caseation or liquefaction necrosis in three cases and tuberculous granuloma by fibrous and calcifications accompanied by caseating necrosis in one case. Among the seven cases of gallbladder TB, six cases were accompanied by abdominal extra-gallbladder TB, including abdominal lymph node TB in five cases and hepatic TB in four cases. Conclusion Gallbladder TB has various CT manifestations, and the enhanced CT findings

  17. Early CT findings after interstitial radiation therapy for primary malignant brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tolly, T.L.; Bruckman, J.E.; Czarnecki, D.J.; Frazin, L.J.; Lewis, H.J.; Richards, M.J.; Adamkiewicz, J.J. Jr.

    1988-11-01

    The CT findings after interstitial radiation therapy for brain tumors have not been extensively described. We evaluated retrospectively the CT scans of 13 patients who were treated with brachytherapy for malignant glioma. We found no typical CT appearance that differentiates recurrent tumor from radiation effect. After undergoing brachytherapy, eight of the 13 patients scanned demonstrated enhancement of brain tissue beyond the margins of the original enhancing tumor mass. In most cases, the pattern of enhancement diminished and extended more peripherally from the central necrotic area with time. We also report a new CT finding of focal calcification developing at the site of the radioactive implant.

  18. SU-E-J-187: Individually Optimized Contrast-Enhancement 4D-CT for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in Radiotherapy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, M; Patel, K; Regine, W; Lane, B; D'Souza, W; Lu, W; Klahr, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of individually optimized contrastenhancement (CE) 4D-CT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDA) in radiotherapy simulation. To evaluate the image quality and contrast enhancement of tumor in the CE 4D-CT, compared to the clinical standard of CE 3D-CT and 4D-CT. Methods: In this IRB-approved study, each of the 7 PDA patients enrolled underwent 3 CT scans: a free-breathing 3D-CT with contrast (CE 3D-CT) followed by a 4D-CT without contrast (4D-CT) in the first study session, and a 4D-CT with individually synchronized contrast injection (CE 4D-CT) in the second study session. In CE 4D-CT, the time of full contrast injection was determined based on the time of peak enhancement for the test injection, injection rate, table speed, and longitudinal location and span of the pancreatic region. Physicians contoured both the tumor (T) and the normal pancreatic parenchyma (P) on the three CTs (end-of-exhalation for 4D-CT). The contrast between the tumor and normal pancreatic tissue was computed as the difference of the mean enhancement level of three 1 cm3 regions of interests in T and P, respectively. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to statistically compare the scores and contrasts. Results: In qualitative evaluations, both CE 3D-CT and CE 4D-CT scored significantly better than 4D-CT (4.0 and 3.6 vs. 2.6). There was no significant difference between CE 3D-CT and CE 4D-CT. In quantitative evaluations, the contrasts between the tumor and the normal pancreatic parenchyma were 0.6±23.4, −2.1±8.0, and −19.6±28.8 HU, in CE 3D-CT, 4D-CT, and CE 4D-CT, respectively. Although not statistically significant, CE 4D-CT achieved better contrast enhancement between the tumor and the normal pancreatic parenchyma than both CE 3D-CT and 4DCT. Conclusion: CE 4D-CT achieved equivalent image quality and better contrast enhancement between tumor and normal pancreatic parenchyma than the clinical standard of CE 3D-CT and 4D-CT. This study was supported in part

  19. Design of spectral filtering for tissue classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ajay; Shah, Pratik; Das, Bipul

    2012-02-01

    Tissue characterization from imaging studies is an integral part of clinical practice. We describe a spectral filter design for tissue separation in dual energy CT scans obtained from Gemstone Spectral Imaging scanner. It enables to have better 2D/3D visualization and tissue characterization in normal and pathological conditions. The major challenge to classify tissues in conventional computed tomography (CT) is the x-ray attenuation proximity of multiple tissues at any given energy. The proposed method analyzes the monochromatic images at different energy levels, which are derived from the two scans obtained at low and high KVp through fast switching. Although materials have a distinct attenuation profile across different energies, tissue separation is not trivial as tissues are a mixture of different materials with range of densities that vary across subjects. To address this problem, we define spectral filtering, that generates probability maps for each tissue in multi-energy space. The filter design incorporates variations in the tissue due to composition, density of individual constituents and their mixing proportions. In addition, it also provides a framework to incorporate zero mean Gaussian noise. We demonstrate the application of spectral filtering for bone-free vascular visualization and calcification characterization.

  20. Concha bullosa: CT evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zinreich, S J; Mattox, D E; Kennedy, D W; Chisholm, H L; Diffley, D M; Rosenbaum, A E

    1988-01-01

    Aeration of the middle turbinate, termed "concha bullosa," is a common anatomical variant of intranasal anatomy. Of 320 patients evaluated for sinus disease with coronal CT, 34% had concha bullosa on at least one side. The overall incidence of inflammatory disease in the ostiomeatal complex in these symptomatic patients was not different between those with and without concha bullosa. However, there were many cases in which an abnormally large middle turbinate appeared to obstruct the ostiomeatal complex causing secondary infection of the ethmoid, frontal, and maxillary sinuses. Obstruction of drainage of the concha bullosa itself can lead to mucocele formation. Furthermore, the presence of a concha bullosa has important implications for the technique of endoscopic surgery used in the management of the sinus disease. The anatomy, pathophysiology, and CT findings in patients with concha bullosa are reviewed. PMID:3170840

  1. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  2. An assessment of image distortion and CT number accuracy within a wide-bore CT extended field of view.

    PubMed

    Beeksma, B; Truant, D; Holloway, L; Arumugam, S

    2015-06-01

    Although wide bore computed tomography (CT) scanners provide increased space for patients, the scan field of view (sFOV) remains considerably smaller than the bore size. Consequently, patient anatomy which spans beyond the sFOV is truncated and the information is lost. As a solution, some manufacturers provide the capacity to reconstruct CT images from a partial dataset at an extended field of view (eFOV). To assess spatial distortion within this eFOV three phantoms were considered a 30 × 30 × 20 cm(3) slab of solid water, the Gammex electron density CT phantom and a female anthropomorphic phantom. For each phantom, scans were taken centrally within the sFOV as a reference image and with the phantom edge extended at 1 cm intervals from 0 to 5 cm beyond the sFOV into the eFOV. To assess CT number accuracy various tissue equivalent materials were scanned in the eFOV and resulting CT numbers were compared to inserts scanned within the sFOV. For all phantom geometries, objects within the eFOV were geometrically overestimated with elongation of phantom shapes into the eFOV. The percentage increase in size ranged from 0.22 to 15.94 % over all phantoms considered. The difference between eFOV and sFOV CT numbers was dependent upon insert density. The eFOV underestimated CT numbers in the range of -127 to -230 HU for soft tissue densities and -278 to -640 for bone densities. This trend reversed for low tissue densities with the CT numbers in the eFOV being overestimated by 100-130 HU for lung equivalent inserts. Initial correlation between eFOV and sFOV CT numbers was seen and a correction function was successfully applied to better estimate the CT number representative of that seen within the sFOV. PMID:26048719

  3. Dependence Of The Computerized Tomography (CT) Number - Electron Density Relationship On Patient Size And X-Ray Beam Filtration For Fan Beam CT Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, M. E.; Thomason, C. L.; McGary, R.; Hunt, M. A.; Simpson, L. D.; Miller, D. W.; Laughlin, J. S.

    1981-07-01

    The applicability of quantitative information contained in CT scans to diagnostic radiology and to radiation therapy treatment planning and the heterogeneity problem has been recognized by members of the radiological community and by manufacturers. Determination of the relationship between electron density and CT number is important for these applications. As CT technology has evolved, CT number generation has changed. CT number variation was limited in the early water bag systems. However, later generation "air" scanners may exhibit variation in CT numbers across a reconstructed image which are re-lated to positioning within the scan circle and scan field size. Results of experimental investigations using tissue-equivalent phantoms of different cross-sectional shapes and areas on the Technicare Delta 2020 are presented. Investigations also cover the effect of "shaped" and "flat" x-ray beam filters. A variation in CT number is demonstrated on this fan beam geometry scanner for phantoms of different sizes and for different scan circle diameters. An explanation of these effects is given. Differences of as much as 20% in determination of tissue electron density relative to water under different experimental conditions are obtained and reported. A family of curves (electron density vs. CT number) is presented for different patient cross-sectional areas and different scanner settings.

  4. Automated delineation of stroke lesions using brain CT images

    PubMed Central

    Gillebert, Céline R.; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Mantini, Dante

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) images are widely used for the identification of abnormal brain tissue following infarct and hemorrhage in stroke. Manual lesion delineation is currently the standard approach, but is both time-consuming and operator-dependent. To address these issues, we present a method that can automatically delineate infarct and hemorrhage in stroke CT images. The key elements of this method are the accurate normalization of CT images from stroke patients into template space and the subsequent voxelwise comparison with a group of control CT images for defining areas with hypo- or hyper-intense signals. Our validation, using simulated and actual lesions, shows that our approach is effective in reconstructing lesions resulting from both infarct and hemorrhage and yields lesion maps spatially consistent with those produced manually by expert operators. A limitation is that, relative to manual delineation, there is reduced sensitivity of the automated method in regions close to the ventricles and the brain contours. However, the automated method presents a number of benefits in terms of offering significant time savings and the elimination of the inter-operator differences inherent to manual tracing approaches. These factors are relevant for the creation of large-scale lesion databases for neuropsychological research. The automated delineation of stroke lesions from CT scans may also enable longitudinal studies to quantify changes in damaged tissue in an objective and reproducible manner. PMID:24818079

  5. CT features of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Eelkema, E.A.; Stephens, D.H.; Ward, E.M.; Sheedy, P.F. II

    1984-11-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas, the CT scans of 27 patients with that disease were reviewed. The pancreatic tumor was identified as a mass in 26 patients (96%) Of the 25 tumors evaluated with contrast enhancement, 20 became partially diffusely hyperdense relative to nearby normal pancreatic tissue. Hepatic metastases were identified in 15 patients (56%), regional lymphadenopathy in 10 (37%), atrophy of the gland proximal to the tumor in six (22%), dilatation of the biliary ducts in five (19%), and dilatation of the pancreatic duct in four (15%). The CT appearances of the nonfunctioning islet cell tumors were compared with those of 100 ordinary (ductal) pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Although the two types of tumors were sometimes indistinguishable, features found to be more characteristic of islet cell carcinoma included a pancreatic mass of unusually large size, calcification within the tumor, and contrast enhancement of either the primary tumor or hepatic metastases. Involvement of the celiac axis or proximal superior mesenteric artery was limited to ductal carcinoma.

  6. Demons deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT using an iterative intensity matching approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Schafer, Sebastian; Uneri, Ali; and others

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: A method of intensity-based deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) images is described, in which intensity correction occurs simultaneously within the iterative registration process. The method preserves the speed and simplicity of the popular Demons algorithm while providing robustness and accuracy in the presence of large mismatch between CT and CBCT voxel values (''intensity''). Methods: A variant of the Demons algorithm was developed in which an estimate of the relationship between CT and CBCT intensity values for specific materials in the image is computed at each iteration based on the set of currently overlapping voxels. This tissue-specific intensity correction is then used to estimate the registration output for that iteration and the process is repeated. The robustness of the method was tested in CBCT images of a cadaveric head exhibiting a broad range of simulated intensity variations associated with x-ray scatter, object truncation, and/or errors in the reconstruction algorithm. The accuracy of CT-CBCT registration was also measured in six real cases, exhibiting deformations ranging from simple to complex during surgery or radiotherapy guided by a CBCT-capable C-arm or linear accelerator, respectively. Results: The iterative intensity matching approach was robust against all levels of intensity variation examined, including spatially varying errors in voxel value of a factor of 2 or more, as can be encountered in cases of high x-ray scatter. Registration accuracy without intensity matching degraded severely with increasing magnitude of intensity error and introduced image distortion. A single histogram match performed prior to registration alleviated some of these effects but was also prone to image distortion and was quantifiably less robust and accurate than the iterative approach. Within the six case registration accuracy study, iterative intensity matching Demons reduced mean TRE to (2.5{+-}2.8) mm compared to (3.5{+-}3.0) mm

  7. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, Robert; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Fei, Baowei

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. Methods: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bilateral filter to reduce noise while keeping edge information and were corrected to overcome cupping artifacts. As skin and glandular tissue have similar CT values on breast CT images, morphologic processing is used to identify the skin based on its position information. A support vector machine (SVM) is trained and the resulting model used to create a pixelwise classification map of fat and glandular tissue. By combining the results of the skin mask with the SVM results, the breast tissue is classified as skin, fat, and glandular tissue. This map is then used to identify markers for a minimum spanning forest that is grown to segment the image using spatial and intensity information. To evaluate the authors’ classification method, they use DICE overlap ratios to compare the results of the automated classification to those obtained by manual segmentation on five patient images. Results: Comparison between the automatic and the manual segmentation shows that the minimum spanning forest based classification method was able to successfully classify dedicated breast CT image with average DICE ratios of 96.9%, 89.8%, and 89.5% for fat, glandular, and skin tissue, respectively. Conclusions: A 2D minimum spanning forest based classification method was proposed and evaluated for classifying the fat, skin, and glandular tissue in dedicated breast CT images. The classification method can be used for dense breast tissue quantification, radiation dose assessment, and other applications in breast imaging.

  8. Functional MRI and CT biomarkers in oncology.

    PubMed

    Winfield, J M; Payne, G S; deSouza, N M

    2015-04-01

    Imaging biomarkers derived from MRI or CT describe functional properties of tumours and normal tissues. They are finding increasing numbers of applications in diagnosis, monitoring of response to treatment and assessment of progression or recurrence. Imaging biomarkers also provide scope for assessment of heterogeneity within and between lesions. A wide variety of functional parameters have been investigated for use as biomarkers in oncology. Some imaging techniques are used routinely in clinical applications while others are currently restricted to clinical trials or preclinical studies. Apparent diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer ratio and native T1 relaxation time provide information about structure and organization of tissues. Vascular properties may be described using parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, transverse relaxation rate (R2*), vessel size index and relative blood volume, while magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be used to probe the metabolic profile of tumours. This review describes the mechanisms of contrast underpinning each technique and the technical requirements for robust and reproducible imaging. The current status of each biomarker is described in terms of its validation, qualification and clinical applications, followed by a discussion of the current limitations and future perspectives. PMID:25578953

  9. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  10. Nano-CT Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masschaele, B.

    Tomography is a non-destructive research technique which allows investigating the internal structure of objects in 3D . The "centre for X-ray tomography (UGCT)" of the Ghent University has developed a modular X-ray micro/nanoCT scanner which is used for multi-disciplinary research. In this paper we give an overview of the different components of the UGCT scanner with special attention to the X-ray imaging detectors. Also the software tools for data reconstruction and analysis and some obtained results are discussed.

  11. X-ray microscopy of soft and hard human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Stalder, Anja K.; Ilgenstein, Bernd; Holme, Margaret N.; Weitkamp, Timm; Beckmann, Felix; Hieber, Simone E.

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous post mortem visualization of soft and hard tissues using absorption-based CT remains a challenge. If the photon energy is optimized for the visualization of hard tissue, the surrounding soft tissue components are almost X-ray transparent. Therefore, the combination with other modalities such as phase-contrast CT, magnetic resonance microscopy, and histology is essential to detect the anatomical features. The combination of the 2D and 3D data sets using sophisticated segmentation and registration tools allows for conclusions about otherwise inaccessible anatomical features essential for improved patient treatments.

  12. WE-D-9A-02: Automated Landmark-Guided CT to Cone-Beam CT Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, V; Gu, X; Chen, S; Jiang, L; Liu, H; Chiu, T; Yordy, J; Nedzi, L; Mao, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The anatomical changes that occur between the simulation CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) are investigated using an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm with simultaneous intensity correction. LDIR was designed to be accurate in the presence of tissue intensity mismatch and heavy noise contamination. Method: An auto-landmark generation algorithm was used in conjunction with a local small volume (LSV) gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and planning CT. The LSVs offsets were used to perform an initial deformation, generate landmarks, and correct local intensity mismatch. The landmarks act as stabilizing controlpoints in the Demons objective function. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm was evaluated on one synthetic case with ground truth and data of ten head and neck cancer patients. The deformation vector field (DVF) accuracy was accessed using a synthetic case. The Root mean square error of the 3D canny edge (RMSECE), mutual information (MI), and feature similarity index metric (FSIM) were used to access the accuracy of LDIR on the patient data. The quality of the corresponding deformed contours was verified by an attending physician. Results: The resulting 90 percentile DVF error for the synthetic case was within 5.63mm for the original demons algorithm, 2.84mm for intensity correction alone, 2.45mm using controlpoints without intensity correction, and 1.48 mm for the LDIR algorithm. For the five patients the mean RMSECE of the original CT, Demons deformed CT, intensity corrected Demons CT, control-point stabilized deformed CT, and LDIR CT was 0.24, 0.26, 0.20, 0.20, and 0.16 respectively. Conclusion: LDIR is accurate in the presence of multimodal intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination. Since LDIR is GPU based it can be implemented with minimal additional strain on clinical resources. This project has been supported by a CPRIT individual investigator award RP11032.

  13. A preliminary study on a dual-modality OPT/micro-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yujie; Di, Dong; Shi, Liangliang; Wang, Jun; Hui, Hui; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a mesoscopic scale optical imaging technique for specimens between 1mm and 10mm. Although OPT is widely used for in vivo and ex vivo imaging, its applications in high intensity tissues such as bone and thick samples are limited due to the strong absorption of the light. In contrast, X-ray micro-CT is suitable for high intensity tissue imaging but its contrast of soft tissue is poor. Therefore, imaging tools with both strong penetration and high contrast are in great demand. To address this issue, we develop a dual-modality system integrating both OPT and micro-CT. In this paper, this dual-modality system is applied to dynamic imaging of a clearing process of a mouse paw. The clearing process is essential in OPT when imaging thick or intensity tissues since it can make high intensity tissues optically transparent. In our experiment, we scan the mouse paw with our system - before, during and after optical clearing. Each time we scan CT first and then the OPT. After acquisition, 3-dimentional volumes of OPT and CT are reconstructed separately. Then we use a rigid image registration algorithm to register these volumes. Finally, the volumes are merged together. The experimental results show our bimodal system performs better than single OPT or CT system when processing tissues with both high intensity and soft parts.

  14. Investigation of pathogen infiltration into produce using Xradia Bio MicroCT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The internalization of human pathogens into plant tissues has received significant attention. Human pathogens can infiltrate plant tissue through stomata, cut edges, wounds on produce, or the plant vascular system. The nondestructive X-ray computed microtomography (MicroCT) technique is an X-ra...

  15. Experimental assessment of CT-based thermometry during laser ablation of porcine pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schena, E.; Saccomandi, P.; Giurazza, F.; Caponero, M. A.; Mortato, L.; Di Matteo, F. M.; Panzera, F.; Del Vescovo, R.; Beomonte Zobel, B.; Silvestri, S.

    2013-08-01

    Laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is employed to destroy tumors in organs, and its outcome strongly depends on the temperature distribution inside the treated tissue. The recent introduction of computed tomography (CT) scan thermometry, based on the CT number dependence of the tissue with temperature, overcomes the invasiveness of other techniques used to monitor temperature during LITT. The averaged CT number (ROI = 0.02 cm2) of an ex vivo swine pancreas is monitored during LITT (Nd:YAG laser power of 3 W, treatment time: 120 s) at different distances from the applicator (from 4 to 30 mm). The averaged CT number shows a clear decrease during treatment: it is highest at 4 mm from the applicator (mean variation in the whole treatment of -0.256 HU s-1) and negligible at 30 mm, since the highest temperature increase is present close to the applicator (i.e., 45 °C at 4 mm and 25 °C at 6 mm). To obtain the relationship between CT numbers and pancreas temperature, the reference temperature was measured by 12 fiber Bragg grating sensors. The CT number decreases as a function of temperature, showing a nonlinear trend with a mean thermal sensitivity of -0.50 HU °C-1. Results here reported are the first assessment of pancreatic CT number dependence on temperature, at the best of our knowledge. Findings can be useful to further investigate CT scan thermometry during LITT on the pancreas.

  16. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  17. Automatic classification of lung tumour heterogeneity according to a visual-based score system in dynamic contrast enhanced CT sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Baiocco, Serena

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) technologies have been considered for a long time as one of the most effective medical imaging tools for morphological analysis of body parts. Contrast Enhanced CT (CE-CT) also allows emphasising details of tissue structures whose heterogeneity, inspected through visual analysis, conveys crucial information regarding diagnosis and prognosis in several clinical pathologies. Recently, Dynamic CE-CT (DCE-CT) has emerged as a promising technique to perform also functional hemodynamic studies, with wide applications in the oncologic field. DCE-CT is based on repeated scans over time performed after intravenous administration of contrast agent, in order to study the temporal evolution of the tracer in 3D tumour tissue. DCE-CT pushes towards an intensive use of computers to provide automatically quantitative information to be used directly in clinical practice. This requires that visual analysis, representing the gold-standard for CT image interpretation, gains objectivity. This work presents the first automatic approach to quantify and classify the lung tumour heterogeneities based on DCE-CT image sequences, so as it is performed through visual analysis by experts. The approach developed relies on the spatio-temporal indices we devised, which also allow exploiting temporal data that enrich the knowledge of the tissue heterogeneity by providing information regarding the lesion status.

  18. An automatic method for colon segmentation in CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Bert, Alberto; Dmitriev, Ivan; Agliozzo, Silvano; Pietrosemoli, Natalia; Mandelkern, Mark; Gallo, Teresa; Regge, Daniele

    2009-06-01

    An automatic method for the segmentation of the colonic wall is proposed for abdominal computed tomography (CT) of the cleansed and air-inflated colon. This multistage approach uses an adaptive 3D region-growing algorithm, with a self-adjusting growing condition depending on local variations of the intensity at the air-tissue boundary. The method was evaluated using retrospectively collected CT scans based on visual segmentation of the colon by expert radiologists. This evaluation showed that the procedure identifies 97% of the colon segments, representing 99.8% of the colon surface, and accurately replicates the anatomical profile of the colonic wall. The parameter settings and performance of the method are relatively independent of the scanner and acquisition conditions. The method is intended for application to the computer-aided detection of polyps in CT colonography. PMID:19304454

  19. Cadaver validation of intensity-based ultrasound to CT registration.

    PubMed

    Penney, G P; Barratt, D C; Chan, C S K; Slomczykowski, M; Carter, T J; Edwards, P J; Hawkes, D J

    2006-06-01

    A method is presented for the rigid registration of tracked B-mode ultrasound images to a CT volume of a femur and pelvis. This registration can allow tracked surgical instruments to be aligned with the CT image or an associated preoperative plan. Our method is fully automatic and requires no manual segmentation of either the ultrasound images or the CT volume. The parameter which is directly related to the speed of sound through tissue has also been included in the registration optimisation process. Experiments have been carried out on six cadaveric femurs and three cadaveric pelves. Registration results were compared with a "gold standard" registration acquired using bone implanted fiducial markers. Results show the registration method to be accurate, on average, to 1.6 mm root-mean-square target registration error. PMID:16520083

  20. PET/CT: fundamental principles.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Marcus D

    2004-05-28

    Positron emission tomography (PET) facilitates the evaluation of metabolic and molecular characteristics of a wide variety of cancers, but is limited in its ability to visualize anatomical structures. Computed tomography (CT) facilitates the evaluation of anatomical structures of cancers, but can not visualize their metabolic and molecular aspects. Therefore, the combination of PET and CT provides the ability to accurately register metabolic and molecular aspects of disease with anatomical findings, adding further information to the diagnosis and staging of tumors. The recent generation of high performance PET/CT scanners combines a state of the art full-ring 3D PET scanner and a high-end 16-slice CT scanner. In PET/CT scanners, a CT examination is used for attenuation correction of PET images rather than standard transmission scanning using superset 68 Ge sources. This reduces the examination time, but metallic objects and contrast agents that alter the CT image quality and quantitative measurements of standardized uptake values (SUV) may lead to artifacts in the PET images. Hybrid PET/CT imaging will be very important in oncological applications in the decades to come, and possibly for use in cancer screening and cardiac imaging. PMID:15257877

  1. Comparison of PET-CT and Conventional Imaging in Staging Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Sara M.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Billups, Catherine A.; Wu, Jianrong; Shulkin, Barry; Mandell, Gerald; McCarville, M. Beth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare PET-CT to conventional imaging (CI) in staging pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Subjects and Methods Thirty subjects with RMS, median age 7.3 years, underwent PET-CT before therapy. PET-CTs and CI were independently reviewed by two radiologists and two nuclear medicine physician to determine the presence of nodal, pulmonary, bone, bone marrow and other sites of metastasis. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT for detecting metastases was compared to CI using biopsy and clinical follow-up as reference standards. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of primary tumors, lymph nodes and pulmonary nodules were measured. Results Primary tumors had an average SUVmax of 7.2 (range, 2.5-19.2). Accuracy rates for 17 subjects with nodal disease were 95% for PET-CT and 49% for CI. PET-CT had 94% sensitivity and 100% specificity for nodal disease. Of 7 pulmonary nodules detected by CI, 3 were not identified by PET-CT, 2 were indeterminate by PET-CT, and 1 was malignant with a SUVmax (3.4) > twice that of benign nodules. Two subjects had bone disease; both were identified by PET-CT but only 1 by CI. Four subjects had bone marrow disease, 2 had positive PET-CTs but none had positive CI. Two subjects had soft tissue metastases detected by PET-CT but not CI. Conclusion PET-CT performed better than CI in identifying nodal, bone, bone marrow, and soft tissue disease in children with RMS. CI remains essential for detection of pulmonary nodules. We recommend PET-CT for routine staging of children with RMS. CI with Tc99m bone scan can be eliminated. PMID:23255260

  2. Quantifying tumour heterogeneity with CT

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heterogeneity is a key feature of malignancy associated with adverse tumour biology. Quantifying heterogeneity could provide a useful non-invasive imaging biomarker. Heterogeneity on computed tomography (CT) can be quantified using texture analysis which extracts spatial information from CT images (unenhanced, contrast-enhanced and derived images such as CT perfusion) that may not be perceptible to the naked eye. The main components of texture analysis can be categorized into image transformation and quantification. Image transformation filters the conventional image into its basic components (spatial, frequency, etc.) to produce derived subimages. Texture quantification techniques include structural-, model- (fractal dimensions), statistical- and frequency-based methods. The underlying tumour biology that CT texture analysis may reflect includes (but is not limited to) tumour hypoxia and angiogenesis. Emerging studies show that CT texture analysis has the potential to be a useful adjunct in clinical oncologic imaging, providing important information about tumour characterization, prognosis and treatment prediction and response. PMID:23545171

  3. Coronary vasospasm during CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Takehiro; Toyama, Takuji; Tsushima, Yoshito; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    A 71-year-old man, a heavy smoker, was admitted for evaluation of "chest oppression" after every dinner. Cardiac CT with a beta-blocker showed coronary stenosis in the left circumflex. Although adenosine triphosphate-stress perfusion single-photon emission CT revealed no ischemia, Holter electrocardiography belatedly indicated an ST elevation associated with his symptoms while smoking. He was diagnosed to have vasospastic angina. Cardiac CT without a beta-blocker showed thin diffuse plaque and negative remolding without any significant stenosis at the same site. Asian patients have a tendency to develop vasospastic angina. Although beta-blockers are recommended for cardiac CT, the routine administration of beta-blockers in cardiac CT may have some risk for such cases. PMID:25065860

  4. Scar Tissue.

    PubMed

    McLean, Haydn J

    2015-12-01

    Scar tissue is associated with physical wounds and their mending, but it is also descriptive in portraying the emotional scarring that occurs following adversity, resulting in potential psychological morbidity. Provided the adversity is not severe, such challenges to adaptability may provoke Andrew Solomon's process of forging meaning and building identity. Perceiving an emotional constitution as analogous to the immune system provides a metaphor for appreciating the benefits of emotional challenges, which may provoke greater emotional resilience or posttraumatic growth. PMID:26631526

  5. Adaptive Breast Radiation Therapy Using Modeling of Tissue Mechanics: A Breast Tissue Segmentation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Harris, Emma J.; Kirby, Anna M.; Evans, Philip M.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To validate and compare the accuracy of breast tissue segmentation methods applied to computed tomography (CT) scans used for radiation therapy planning and to study the effect of tissue distribution on the segmentation accuracy for the purpose of developing models for use in adaptive breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients receiving postlumpectomy radiation therapy for breast cancer underwent CT imaging in prone and supine positions. The whole-breast clinical target volume was outlined. Clinical target volumes were segmented into fibroglandular and fatty tissue using the following algorithms: physical density thresholding; interactive thresholding; fuzzy c-means with 3 classes (FCM3) and 4 classes (FCM4); and k-means. The segmentation algorithms were evaluated in 2 stages: first, an approach based on the assumption that the breast composition should be the same in both prone and supine position; and second, comparison of segmentation with tissue outlines from 3 experts using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Breast datasets were grouped into nonsparse and sparse fibroglandular tissue distributions according to expert assessment and used to assess the accuracy of the segmentation methods and the agreement between experts. Results: Prone and supine breast composition analysis showed differences between the methods. Validation against expert outlines found significant differences (P<.001) between FCM3 and FCM4. Fuzzy c-means with 3 classes generated segmentation results (mean DSC = 0.70) closest to the experts' outlines. There was good agreement (mean DSC = 0.85) among experts for breast tissue outlining. Segmentation accuracy and expert agreement was significantly higher (P<.005) in the nonsparse group than in the sparse group. Conclusions: The FCM3 gave the most accurate segmentation of breast tissues on CT data and could therefore be used in adaptive radiation therapy-based on tissue modeling. Breast tissue segmentation

  6. Analysis of patient CT dose data using virtualdose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Richard

    -Expo for organ dose difference versus age, male phantoms show percent difference of -19 % to 25 % for various organs minus bone surface and breast tissues results. Finally, for organ dose difference across all software for average adult phantom the results range from -45 % to 6 % in the comparison of ImPACT CT to VirtualDose and -27 % to 66 % for the comparison of CT-Expo to VirtualDose. In the comparison for increased BMI (done only in VirtualDose), results show that with all other parameters fixed, the organ dose goes down as BMI increases, which is due to the increase in adipose tissue and bulk of the patient model. The range of results when comparing all the three softwares have a wide range, in some cases greater than 150 %, it is evident that using a different anatomical basis for the human phantom and the theoretical basis for the dose estimation will cause fluctuation in the results. Therefore, choosing the software with the most accurate human phantom will provide a closer range to the true dose to the organ.

  7. The appearance and effects of metallic implants in CT images.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Crowe, S B; Fogg, P; Trapp, J V

    2013-06-01

    The computed tomography (CT) imaging artefacts that metallic medical implants produce in surrounding tissues are usually contoured and over-ridden during radiotherapy treatment planning. In cases where radiotherapy treatment beams unavoidably pass though implants, it is especially important to understand the imaging artefacts that may occur within the implants themselves. This study examines CT images of a set of simple metallic objects, immersed in water, in order to evaluate reliability and variability of CT numbers (Hounsfield units, HUs) within medical implants. Model implants with a range of sizes (heights from 2.2 to 49.6 mm), electron densities (from 2.3 to 7.7 times the electron density of water) and effective atomic numbers (from 3.9 to 9.0 times the effective atomic number of water in a CT X-ray beam) were created by stacking metal coins from several currencies. These 'implants' were CT scanned within a large (31.0 cm across) and a small (12.8 cm across) water phantom. Resulting HU values are as much as 50 % lower than the result of extrapolating standard electron density calibration data (obtained for tissue and bone densities) up to the metal densities and there is a 6 % difference between the results obtained by scanning with 120 and 140 kVp tube potentials. Profiles through the implants show localised cupping artefacts, within the implants, as well as a gradual decline in HU outside the implants that can cause the implants' sizes to be over estimated by 1.3-9.0 mm. These effects are exacerbated when the implants are scanned in the small phantom or at the side of the large phantom, due to reduced pre-hardening of the X-ray beam in these configurations. These results demonstrate the necessity of over-riding the densities of metallic implants, as well as their artefacts in tissue, in order to obtain accurate radiotherapy dose calculations. PMID:23760920

  8. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  9. Validation of CT doses of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid devices: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Sera, Terez; Porubszky, Tamas; Papos, Miklos; Elek, Richard; Besenyi, Zsuzsanna; Gion, Katalin; Bartha, Andras; Pellet, Sandor; Pavics, Laszlo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to check the validity of computed tomographic (CT) doses exhibited by SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid devices. Dose measurements were taken from four SPECT/CT and four PET/CT cameras commercially available from different manufacturers. A calibrated ionization chamber was placed in whole-body or head phantoms for the acquisition of CT images with clinically used parameters. Computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values were calculated according to the IEC 60601-2-44:1999 formula. The measured CTDIvol doses were compared with those preprogrammed by the manufacturer. In the case of the whole-body phantom, the differences between the measured and displayed values varied between -31 and +24% [European document RP162 (2012) sets up the limit for acceptance criterion as ±20%]. The head phantom data showed either an agreement between -10 and +24%, or an underestimation by two-fold. The latter seemed to be because, while preprogramming the doses, the manufacturer had used the whole-body phantom instead of a proper head phantom. The results of the work demonstrate the need for individual dosimetric calibration of every single X-ray tube. Dosimetric checks should be included in the regular quality control programmes of the SPECT/CT and PET/CT devices. Special attention should be paid to head-and-neck and paediatric protocols, in which the use of a head phantom is recommended for dose calibration. PMID:24499726

  10. Evaluation of organ doses in CT examinations with an infant anthropomorphic phantom.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K; Akahane, K; Miyazaki, O; Horiuchi, T; Shimada, A; Nagmatsu, H; Yamauchi, M; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Kawasaki, T

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate organ doses in infant CT examinations with multi-detector row CT scanners. Radiation doses were measured with radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters set in various organ positions within a 1-y-old child anthropomorphic phantom and organ doses were evaluated from the measurement values. Doses for tissues or organs within the scan range were 28-36 mGy in an infant head CT, 3-11 mGy in a chest CT, 5-11 mGy in an abdominal-pelvic CT and 2-14 mGy in a cardiac CT. The doses varied by the differences in the types of CT scanners and scan parameters used at each medical facility. Compared with those for children of various ages, the doses in an infant CT protocol were found to be similar to or slightly smaller than those in a paediatric CT for 5- or 6-y-old children. PMID:21743079

  11. In vivo small animal micro-CT using nanoparticle contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Jeffrey R.; West, Jennifer L.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most valuable modalities for in vivo imaging because it is fast, high-resolution, cost-effective, and non-invasive. Moreover, CT is heavily used not only in the clinic (for both diagnostics and treatment planning) but also in preclinical research as micro-CT. Although CT is inherently effective for lung and bone imaging, soft tissue imaging requires the use of contrast agents. For small animal micro-CT, nanoparticle contrast agents are used in order to avoid rapid renal clearance. A variety of nanoparticles have been used for micro-CT imaging, but the majority of research has focused on the use of iodine-containing nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles. Both nanoparticle types can act as highly effective blood pool contrast agents or can be targeted using a wide variety of targeting mechanisms. CT imaging can be further enhanced by adding spectral capabilities to separate multiple co-injected nanoparticles in vivo. Spectral CT, using both energy-integrating and energy-resolving detectors, has been used with multiple contrast agents to enable functional and molecular imaging. This review focuses on new developments for in vivo small animal micro-CT using novel nanoparticle probes applied in preclinical research. PMID:26581654

  12. CT guided diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as blood, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer detection. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at wavelengths of 650 and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements, the width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an EMCCD camera with air cooling is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we report our effort and progress on the integration of the multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  13. Dynamic CT head phantom for perfusion and angiography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, K.; Blazeski, A.; Dannecker, K.; Lee, Q. Y.; Holscher, C.; Donahue, C.; van Kampen, W.

    2010-03-01

    Contrast imaging is a compelling enhancement for the portable, flat panel-based brain CT scanner currently under development at Xoran. Due to the relative low temporal resolution of flat panel detectors, enabling tomographic imaging on such platform requires optimizing the imaging and injection protocols. A dynamic CT head phantom was designed to facilitate this task. The Dynamic Perfusion and Angiography Model (PAM), mimics tissue attenuation in CT images, provides physiological timing for angiography and perfusion studies, and moves fluid with properties similar to those of blood. The design consists of an arterial system, which contains bifurcating vessels that feed into perfusion chambers, mimicking blood flow through capillaries and smaller vessels, and a venous system, which is symmetrical to the arterial side and drains the perfusion chambers. The variation of geometry and flow rate in the phantom provides the physiological total time that fluid spends in the head, and the difference in material densities correlates to CT numbers for biological tissues. This paper discusses the design of Dynamic PAM and shows experimental results demonstrating its ability to realistically simulate blood flow. Results of dynamic imaging studies of the phantom are also presented.

  14. Dual-Energy Spectral CT: Various Clinical Vascular Applications.

    PubMed

    Machida, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Fukui, Rika; Shen, Yun; Ishikawa, Takuya; Tate, Etsuko; Ueno, Eiko

    2016-01-01

    Single-source dual-energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) with fast switching of tube voltage allows projection-based image reconstruction, substantial reduction of beam-hardening effects, reconstruction of accurate monochromatic images and material decomposition images (MDIs), and detailing of material composition by using x-ray spectral information. In vascular applications, DE CT is expected to overcome limitations of standard single-energy CT angiography, including patient exposure to nephrotoxic contrast medium and carcinogenic radiation, insufficient contrast vascular enhancement, interference from metallic and beam-hardening artifacts and severe vessel calcification, and limited tissue characterization and perfusion assessment. Acquisition of low-energy monochromatic images and iodine/water MDIs can reasonably reduce contrast agent dose and improve vessel enhancement. Acquisition of virtual noncontrast images, such as water/iodine MDIs, can reduce overall radiation exposure by replacing true noncontrast CT in each examination. Acquisition of monochromatic images by using metal artifact reduction software or acquisition of iodine/water MDIs can reduce metal artifacts with preserved or increased vessel contrast, and subtraction of monochromatic images between two energy levels can subtract coils composed of dense metallic materials. Acquisition of iodine/calcium (ie, hydroxyapatite) MDIs permits subtraction of vessel calcification and improves vessel lumen delineation. Sensitive detection of lipid-rich plaque can be achieved by using fat/water MDIs, the spectral Hounsfield unit curve (energy level vs CT attenuation), and a histogram of effective atomic numbers included in an image. Various MDIs are useful for accurate differentiation among materials with high attenuation values, including contrast medium, calcification, and fresh hematoma. Iodine/water MDIs are used to assess organ perfusion, such as in the lungs and myocardium. Understanding these DE CT

  15. CT observation of rib abnormalities: spectrum of findings.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, G; Levitt, R G; Slaker, D P; Murphy, W A

    1985-01-01

    The CT studies in 63 patients in which rib abnormality was identified or excluded were retrospectively analyzed. The CT features were detailed and correlated with other available radiographic findings as well as clinical data. Contiguous spread of tumor to rib or metastasis to rib characteristically showed subtle or complete segmental lytic rib destruction. An accompanying extrapleural soft tissue mass was frequently seen with metastatic disease and myeloma. In nine patients CT showed rib destruction that had been obscured on chest radiography by heart, diaphragm, mass, or pleural effusion. Other imaging studies prompted consideration of neoplasm in seven patients in whom CT clearly showed benign post-traumatic or developmental lesions. Six patients had a clinically suspected chest wall mass excluded, leading to the diagnosis of Tietze syndrome. The ribs should be carefully inspected on all CT studies of the thorax and upper abdomen. Computed tomography is helpful when other imaging techniques, such as rib films or isotopic bone scans, have not resolved the question of clinically or radiographically suspected rib abnormality. PMID:3968282

  16. Paleoradiology: advanced CT in the evaluation of nine Egyptian mummies.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Heidi; Torres, William E; Ernst, Randy D

    2002-01-01

    Axial thin-collimation state-of-the-art spiral computed tomography (CT) was combined with sagittal and coronal reformatting, three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, and virtual "fly-through" techniques to nondestructively study nine Egyptian mummies. These techniques provided important paleopathologic and historical information about mummification techniques, depicted anatomy in the most informative imaging plane, illustrated the soft-tissue preservation and physical appearance of mummies in superb detail, and generated an intriguing virtual tour through hollow mummified remains without harming the specimens themselves. Images generated with these methods can help archaeologists and Egyptologists understand these fascinating members of mankind and can serve as adjunct visual aids for laypersons who are interested in mummies. CT has emerged as the imaging modality of choice for the examination of Egyptian mummies due to its noninvasive cross-sectional nature and inherently superior contrast and spatial resolution. As multi-detector row CT and postprocessing tools evolve, the capabilities and applications of CT will continue to proliferate, attesting to the expanded versatility and utility of CT as a noninvasive research tool in the multidisciplinary study of Egyptian mummies. PMID:11896227

  17. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma under CT guidance

    PubMed Central

    Morassi, L G; Kokkinis, K; Karargyris, O; Vlachou, I; Kalokairinou, K; Pneumaticos, S G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Osteoid osteoma (OO) accounts for approximately 10–12% of all benign bone tumours and 3% of all bone tumours. Spinal involvement appears in 10–25% of all cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation in the treatment of spinal OOs and report our experience. Methods: 13 patients suffering from spinal OO and treated at the authors' institution using CT-guided RF ablation were retrospectively evaluated. The RF probe was introduced through a 11-G Jamshidi® needle, and the lesion was heated at 90 °C for 6 min. Results: All procedures were considered technically successful as the correct positioning of the probe was proven by CT. 11 of the 13 patients reported pain relief after RF ablation. In two cases, RF ablation was repeated 1 month after the first procedure. Pain relief was achieved in both cases after the second procedure. No recurrence was reported throughout the follow-up. No complications like skin burn, soft-tissue haematoma, infection, vessel damage or neurological deficit were reported. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation is a safe and effective method for the treatment of spinal OOs. Advances in knowledge: The data of this study support the efficacy and safety of the recently applied CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation technique for the treatment of spinal OOs. PMID:24712322

  18. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  19. Monte Carlo comparison of x-ray and proton CT for range calculations of proton therapy beams.

    PubMed

    Arbor, N; Dauvergne, D; Dedes, G; Létang, J M; Parodi, K; Quiñones, C T; Testa, E; Rit, S

    2015-10-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been described as a solution for imaging the proton stopping power of patient tissues, therefore reducing the uncertainty of the conversion of x-ray CT images to relative stopping power (RSP) maps and its associated margins. This study aimed to investigate this assertion under the assumption of ideal detection systems. We have developed a Monte Carlo framework to assess proton CT performances for the main steps of a proton therapy treatment planning, i.e. proton or x-ray CT imaging, conversion to RSP maps based on the calibration of a tissue phantom, and proton dose simulations. Irradiations of a computational phantom with pencil beams were simulated on various anatomical sites and the proton range was assessed on the reference, the proton CT-based and the x-ray CT-based material maps. Errors on the tissue's RSP reconstructed from proton CT were found to be significantly smaller and less dependent on the tissue distribution. The imaging dose was also found to be much more uniform and conformal to the primary beam. The mean absolute deviation for range calculations based on x-ray CT varies from 0.18 to 2.01 mm depending on the localization, while it is smaller than 0.1 mm for proton CT. Under the assumption of a perfect detection system, proton range predictions based on proton CT are therefore both more accurate and more uniform than those based on x-ray CT. PMID:26378805

  20. Multiscale registration of planning CT and daily cone beam CT images for adaptive radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paquin, Dana; Levy, Doron; Xing Lei

    2009-01-15

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the incorporation of daily images in the radiotherapy treatment process so that the treatment plan can be evaluated and modified to maximize the amount of radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to healthy tissue. Registration of planning images with daily images is thus an important component of ART. In this article, the authors report their research on multiscale registration of planning computed tomography (CT) images with daily cone beam CT (CBCT) images. The multiscale algorithm is based on the hierarchical multiscale image decomposition of E. Tadmor, S. Nezzar, and L. Vese [Multiscale Model. Simul. 2(4), pp. 554-579 (2004)]. Registration is achieved by decomposing the images to be registered into a series of scales using the (BV, L{sup 2}) decomposition and initially registering the coarsest scales of the image using a landmark-based registration algorithm. The resulting transformation is then used as a starting point to deformably register the next coarse scales with one another. This procedure is iterated at each stage using the transformation computed by the previous scale registration as the starting point for the current registration. The authors present the results of studies of rectum, head-neck, and prostate CT-CBCT registration, and validate their registration method quantitatively using synthetic results in which the exact transformations our known, and qualitatively using clinical deformations in which the exact results are not known.

  1. [CT colonography in daily practice].

    PubMed

    Stoker, Jaap; Dekker, Evelien

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) colonography for colorectal carcinoma and large polyps (≥ 10 mm) is comparable with that of colonoscopy. Acceptance in symptomatic patients is higher than for colonoscopy. The accuracy of CT colonography for polyps of 6-9 mm, for flat polyps and in particular for polyps < 6 mm is lower than for colonoscopy. Indication for CT colonography depends on the a prior chance of finding something relevant, as colonoscopy is necessary in the case of relevant findings. CT colonography can be an alternative to colonoscopy in patients with symptoms consistent with colorectal cancer when colonoscopy is not possible or appears incomplete. It can be used as primary technique in older patients with comorbidity and low a prior chance of relevant findings. CT colonography is less appropriate for surveillance as the accuracy for flat polyps is lower. CT colonography is not suitable in hereditary syndromes due to the lower accuracy for polyps < 10 mm. CT colonography can be a good alternative in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in the case of a low suspicion of colorectal cancer. PMID:24168847

  2. Segmenting the Brain Surface from CT Images with Artifacts Using Dictionary Learning for Non-rigid MR-CT Registration.

    PubMed

    Onofrey, John A; Staib, Lawrence H; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a dictionary learning-based method to segment the brain surface in post-surgical CT images of epilepsy patients following surgical implantation of electrodes. Using the electrodes identified in the post-implantation CT, surgeons require accurate registration with pre-implantation functional and structural MR imaging to guide surgical resection of epileptic tissue. In this work, we use a surface-based registration method to align the MR and CT brain surfaces. The key challenge here is not the registration, but rather the extraction of the cortical surface from the CT image, which includes missing parts of the skull and artifacts introduced by the electrodes. To segment the brain from these images, we propose learning a model of appearance that captures both the normal tissue and the artifacts found along this brain surface boundary. Using clinical data, we demonstrate that our method both accurately extracts the brain surface and better localizes electrodes than intensity-based rigid and non-rigid registration methods. PMID:26221711

  3. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (<7 mm wide) silicon photodiode dosemeters (34 in total), which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within adult and 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantoms. Output signals from photodiode dosemeters were read on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. For the adult phantom, organ doses (for organs within the scan range) and effective doses were 8–35 mGy and 7–18 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 12–33 mGy and 10–21 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. For the paediatric phantom, organ and effective doses were 4–17 mGy and 3–7 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 5–14 mGy and 3–9 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. Doses to organs at the boundaries of the scan length were higher for 64-slice CT scanners using large beam widths and/or a large pitch because of the larger extent of over-ranging. The CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose–length product (DLP) and the effective dose values using 64-slice CT for the adult and paediatric phantoms were the same as those obtained using 4-, 8- and 16-slice CT. Conversion factors of DLP to the effective dose by International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 were 0.024 mSv⋅mGy−1⋅cm−1 and 0.019 mSv⋅mGy−1⋅cm−1 for adult chest and abdominopelvic CT scans, respectively. PMID:19934069

  4. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (<7 mm wide) silicon photodiode dosemeters (34 in total), which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within adult and 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantoms. Output signals from photodiode dosemeters were read on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. For the adult phantom, organ doses (for organs within the scan range) and effective doses were 8-35 mGy and 7-18 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 12-33 mGy and 10-21 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. For the paediatric phantom, organ and effective doses were 4-17 mGy and 3-7 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 5-14 mGy and 3-9 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. Doses to organs at the boundaries of the scan length were higher for 64-slice CT scanners using large beam widths and/or a large pitch because of the larger extent of over-ranging. The CT dose index (CTDI(vol)), dose-length product (DLP) and the effective dose values using 64-slice CT for the adult and paediatric phantoms were the same as those obtained using 4-, 8- and 16-slice CT. Conversion factors of DLP to the effective dose by International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 were 0.024 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) and 0.019 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) for adult chest and abdominopelvic CT scans, respectively. PMID:19934069

  5. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  6. Limited Reliability of CT perfusion acute infarct volume measurements compared to DWI in anterior circulation stroke

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Pamela W.; Souza, Leticia; Kamalian, Shervin; Hirsch, Joshua A.; Yoo, Albert J.; Kamalian, Shahmir; Gonzalez, R. Gilberto; Lev, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose DWI can reliably identify critically ischemic tissue (CIT) shortly after stroke onset. We tested if thresholded CT-CBF and CT-CBV maps are sufficiently accurate to substitute for DWI for estimating CIT volume. Methods Ischemic volumes of 55 patients with acute anterior circulation stroke were assessed on DWI by visual segmentation, and CT-CBF and CT-CBV with segmentation using 15% and 30% thresholds, respectively. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of ischemic regions on the DWI and CTP images were measured. Correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were used to assess reliability of CTP. Results Mean CNRs for DWI, CT-CBF and CT-CBV were 4.3, 0.9 and 0.4, respectively. CTP and DWI lesion volumes were highly correlated (R2=0.87 for CT-CBF; R2=0.83 for CT-CBV; p<0.001). Bland-Altman analyses revealed little systemic bias (−2.6 ml) but high measurement variability (95% CI ±56.7 ml) between mean CT-CBF and DWI lesion volumes, and systemic bias (−26 ml) and high measurement variability (95% CI ±64.0 ml) between mean CT-CBV and DWI lesion volumes. A simulated treatment study demonstrated that using CTP-CBF instead of DWI for detecting a statistically significant effect would require at least twice as many patients. Conclusions The poor CNRs of CT-CBV and CT-CBF compared to DWI result in large measurement error making it problematic to substitute CTP for DWI in selecting individual acute stroke patients for treatment. CTP could be used for treatment studies of patient groups, but the number of patients needed to identify a significant effect is much higher than if DWI is used. PMID:25550366

  7. Radiation dose to patients from the Philips CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Badcock, P.C.

    1985-07-01

    While the anthropomorphic phantom is useful in radiotherapy dosimetry, corrections for diagnostic qualities of radiation are necessary for departures from tissue-equivalence. TLD measurements were performed for this reason in the rectum of patients undergoing CT scanning of the pelvis. At high slice densities the energy imparted becomes comparable with that associated with fluoroscopic examinations of the abdomen. At low slice densities the average dose is ca 12 mGy.

  8. PET/CT images of a patient with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Koç, Zehra Pınar; Akarsu, Saadet; Balci, Tansel; Unal, Kemal

    2012-01-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare immune disorder that predominantly affects macrophages and T lymphocytes and leads to multiple organ disease and death. The characteristic pathological finding in the bone marrow and the other affected tissues is haemophagocytosis of macrophages (macrophages digesting erythrocyte). Primary (hereditary) and secondary (acquired) forms of the disease are present. A patient with documented HLH disease revealed by positron emission tomography/CT is reported in this paper. PMID:22729341

  9. CT-Guided Percutaneous Biopsy of Intrathoracic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Hira; Nath, Alok; Borah, Samudra

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous CT-guided needle biopsy of mediastinal and pulmonary lesions is a minimally invasive approach for obtaining tissue for histopathological examination. Although it is a widely accepted procedure with relatively few complications, precise planning and detailed knowledge of various aspects of the biopsy procedure is mandatory to avert complications. In this pictorial review, we reviewed important anatomical approaches, technical aspects of the procedure, and its associated complications. PMID:22438689

  10. Physical model of facial tissue and muscle articulation derived from computer tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Keith

    1992-09-01

    A facial tissue model, articulated by synthetic muscles, provides a tool for observing, analyzing, and predicting soft tissue mobility on the face. A geometric model of facial tissue extracted from CT data improves the skin tissue simulation by using accurate skin tissue depths. This paper suggests that the ability to control the model resolution, muscle placement and activity requires an integrated modeling and animation system.

  11. Computer aided breast calcification auto-detection in cone beam breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2010-03-01

    In Cone Beam Breast CT (CBBCT), breast calcifications have higher intensities than the surrounding tissues. Without the superposition of breast structures, the three-dimensional distribution of the calcifications can be revealed. In this research, based on the fact that calcifications have higher contrast, a local thresholding and a histogram thresholding were used to select candidate calcification areas. Six features were extracted from each candidate calcification: average foreground CT number value, foreground CT number standard deviation, average background CT number value, background CT number standard deviation, foreground-background contrast, and average edge gradient. To reduce the false positive candidate calcifications, a feed-forward back propagation artificial neural network was designed. The artificial neural network was trained with the radiologists confirmed calcifications and used as classifier in the calcification auto-detection task. In the preliminary experiments, 90% of the calcifications in the testing data sets were detected correctly with an average of 10 false positives per data set.

  12. Algorithm of pulmonary emphysema extraction using thoracic 3-D CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saita, Shinsuke; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Tominaga, Keigo; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2008-03-01

    Emphysema patients have the tendency to increase due to aging and smoking. Emphysematous disease destroys alveolus and to repair is impossible, thus early detection is essential. CT value of lung tissue decreases due to the destruction of lung structure. This CT value becomes lower than the normal lung- low density absorption region or referred to as Low Attenuation Area (LAA). So far, the conventional way of extracting LAA by simple thresholding has been proposed. However, the CT value of CT image fluctuates due to the measurement conditions, with various bias components such as inspiration, expiration and congestion. It is therefore necessary to consider these bias components in the extraction of LAA. We removed these bias components and we proposed LAA extraction algorithm. This algorithm has been applied to the phantom image. Then, by using the low dose CT(normal: 30 cases, obstructive lung disease: 26 cases), we extracted early stage LAA and quantitatively analyzed lung lobes using lung structure.

  13. Micro- and nano-CT for the study of bone ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Peyrin, Françoise; Dong, Pei; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Langer, Max

    2014-12-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)-a version of X-ray CT operating at high spatial resolution-has had a considerable success for the investigation of trabecular bone micro-architecture. Currently, there is a lot of interest in exploiting CT techniques at even higher spatial resolutions to assess bone tissue at the cellular scale. After recalling the basic principles of micro-CT, we review the different existing system, based on either standard X-ray tubes or synchrotron sources. Then, we present recent applications of micro- and nano-CT for the analysis of osteocyte lacunae and the lacunar-canalicular network. We also address the question of the quantification of bone ultrastructure to go beyond the sole visualization. PMID:25292366

  14. Visualization and quantitative analysis of lung microstructure using micro CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Matsui, Eisuke; Ohamatsu, Hironobu; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2004-04-01

    Micro CT system is developed for lung function analysis at a high resolution of the micrometer order (up to 5 μm in spatial resolution). This system reveals the lung distal structures such as interlobular septa, terminal bronchiole, respiratory bronchiole, alveolar duct, and alveolus. In order to visualize lung 3-D microstructures using micro CT images and to analyze them, this research presents a computerized approach. In this approach, the following things are performed: (1) extracting lung distal structures from micro CT images, (2) visualizing extracted lung microstructure in three dimensions, and (3) visualizing inside of lung distal area in three dimensions with fly-through. This approach is applied for to micro CT images of human lung tissue specimens that were obtained by surgical excision and were kept in the state of the inflated fixed lung. And this research succeeded in visualization of lung microstructures using micro CT images to reveal the lung distal structures from bronchiole up to alveolus.

  15. Visualization and quantitative analysis of lung microstructure using micro CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Fujii, Masashi; Nakaya, Yoshihiro; Matsui, Eisuke; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2005-04-01

    Micro CT system is developed for lung function analysis at a high resolution of the micrometer order (up to 5μm in spatial resolution). This system reveals the lung distal structures such as interlobular septa, terminal bronchiole, respiratory bronchiole, alveolar duct, and alveolus. In order to visualize lung 3-D microstructures using micro CT images and to analyze them, this research presents a computerized approach. This approach is applied for to micro CT images of human lung tissue specimens that were obtained by surgical excision and were kept in the state of the inflated fixed lung. This report states a wall area such as bronchus wall and alveolus wall about the extraction technique by using the surface thinning process to analyze the lung microstructures from micro CT images measured by the new-model micro CT system.

  16. Microstructure analysis of the pulmonary acinus using a synchrotron radiation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumoto, Y.; Minami, K.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Umetani, K.; Nakano, Y.; Sakai, H.; Ohmatsu, H.; Itoh, H.

    2015-03-01

    Conversion of images at micro level of normal and with very early stage disease of the lung and quantitative analysis of morphology on CT image can contribute to the chest image diagnosis to the next generation. Previous, anatomy and pathology analysis of pulmonary lobule have been conducted to better understand the CT image of peripheral lung tissue disease. However, it is difficult to figure out three-dimensional (3D) conformation because of analyzing at the slice image. The purpose of this study is a 3D microstructual and quantitative analyses of pulmonary acinus with spatial resolution in the range of several micrometers by using a synchrotron radiation micro CT (SRμCT). In this paper, we present a semi-automatic method for segmenting the secondary pulmonary lobule into acinus or subacinus and extracting small vessel in human acinus imaged by the SRμCT.

  17. Unusual Presentation of Bladder Paraganglioma: Comparison of 131I MIBG SPECT/CT and 68Ga DOTANOC PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Shukla, Jaya; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Extraadrenal chromaffin cell-related tumors or paragangliomas are rare, especially in the bladder, accounting for less than 1% of cases. We report a 16-year-old boy who presented with hematuria and paroxysmal headache and was found to have a prostatic growth infiltrating the urinary bladder on anatomical imaging. Iodine-131 (131I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) whole-body scanning and subsequently gallium-68 (68Ga) DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The MIBG scan revealed a non-tracer-avid soft-tissue mass, while DOTANOC PET/CT revealed a tracer-avid primary soft-tissue mass involving the urinary bladder and prostate with metastasis to the iliac lymph nodes. He underwent surgical management; histopathology of the surgical specimen revealed a bladder paraganglioma, whereas the prostate was found to be free of tumor. PMID:26912984

  18. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  19. Accuracy of CT-based attenuation correction in PET/CT bone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abella, Monica; Alessio, Adam M.; Mankoff, David A.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-05-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of scaling CT images for attenuation correction of PET data measured for bone. While the standard tri-linear approach has been well tested for soft tissues, the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on the accuracy of tracer uptake in bone has not been reported in detail. We measured the accuracy of attenuation coefficients of bovine femur segments and patient data using a tri-linear method applied to CT images obtained at different kVp settings. Attenuation values at 511 keV obtained with a 68Ga/68Ge transmission scan were used as a reference standard. The impact of inaccurate attenuation images on PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) was then evaluated using simulated emission images and emission images from five patients with elevated levels of FDG uptake in bone at disease sites. The CT-based linear attenuation images of the bovine femur segments underestimated the true values by 2.9 ± 0.3% for cancellous bone regardless of kVp. For compact bone the underestimation ranged from 1.3% at 140 kVp to 14.1% at 80 kVp. In the patient scans at 140 kVp the underestimation was approximately 2% averaged over all bony regions. The sensitivity analysis indicated that errors in PET SUVs in bone are approximately proportional to errors in the estimated attenuation coefficients for the same regions. The variability in SUV bias also increased approximately linearly with the error in linear attenuation coefficients. These results suggest that bias in bone uptake SUVs of PET tracers ranges from 2.4% to 5.9% when using CT scans at 140 and 120 kVp for attenuation correction. Lower kVp scans have the potential for considerably more error in dense bone. This bias is present in any PET tracer with bone uptake but may be clinically insignificant for many imaging tasks. However, errors from CT-based attenuation correction methods should be carefully evaluated if quantitation of tracer uptake in bone is important.

  20. Reducing CT dose in myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Emma; Dixon, Kat L

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the radiation dose arising from computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction to single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging studies without adversely affecting its accuracy. Using the Perspex CTDI phantom with the Xi detector to measure dose, CT scans were acquired using the Siemens Symbia T over the full range of CT settings available. Using the default setting 'AECmean', the measured dose at the centre of the phantom was 1.68 mGy and the breast dose from the scout view was 0.30 mGy. The lowest dose was achieved using the dose modulation setting in which the doses were reduced to 1.21 mGy and undetectable (<0.01 mGy), respectively. To observe the effect of changing these settings, 30 patients received a stress scan with default CT settings and a rest scan utilizing single photon emission computed tomography-guided CT and the dose modulation CT settings. Results showed a mean effective dose reduction of 23.6%. The dose reduction was greatest for larger patients, with the largest dose reduction for one patient being 72%. There was no apparent difference in attenuation correction between the two sets of resultant images. These new lower-dose settings are now applied to all clinical myocardial perfusion imaging studies. PMID:26302461

  1. Kilovoltage CT using a linac-CT scanner combination.

    PubMed

    Thieke, C; Malsch, U; Schlegel, W; Debus, J; Huber, P; Bendl, R; Thilmann, C

    2006-09-01

    Modern radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulation are capable of generating complex dose distributions whose high dose areas tightly conform to the tumour target volume, sparing critical organs even when they are located in close proximity. This potential can only be exploited to its full extent when the accumulated dose actually delivered over the complete treatment course is sufficiently close to the dose computed on the initial CT scan used for treatment planning. Exact patient repositioning is mandatory, but also other sources of error, e.g. changes of the patient's anatomy under therapy, should be taken into account. At the German Cancer Research Center, we use a combination of a linear accelerator and a CT scanner installed in one room and sharing the same couch. It allows the quantification and correction of interfractional variations between planning and treatment delivery. In this paper, we describe treatments of prostate, paraspinal and head and neck tumours. All patients were immobilized by customized fixation devices and treated in a stereotactic setup. For each patient, frequent CT scans were taken during the treatment course. Each scan was compared with the original planning CT using manual checks and automatic rigid matching algorithms. Depending on the individual case, the adaptation to variations was carried out offline after several fractions or in real-time between the CT scan and linac irradiation. We discuss the techniques for detecting and correcting interfractional errors and outline the procedural steps of a linac-CT scanner-supported radiation treatment course. PMID:16980687

  2. Tissue Characterization Using Energy-Selective Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Robert E.; Marshall, William H.; Lewis, Roger

    1981-07-01

    Energy-selective computed tomography has several important properties useful for in-vivo tissue characterization. Most importantly, it produces more information than conventional computed tomography. This information can be considered to be an added dimension which can be used to eliminate the ambiguities in conventional CT data. The noise in energy-selective computed tomography is also two dimensional and an un-correlated coordinate system can be defined which is needed for studying the capabilities of the technique for characterizing tissues. By using the calibration material basis set, the information from energy-selective CT can be extracted with extreme accuracy. Our preliminary experiments indicate that the technique is accurate enough to characterize the difference between gray and white matter. Most conventional systems have difficulty in distinguishing these materials, much less characterizing the reason for their differing attenuation. Thus energy-selective CT has the promise of providing extremely accurate tissue characterization based on its physical properties.

  3. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Rie Ø; Strauch, Louise S; Sandgaard, Michael; Kristensen, Thomas S; Nielsen, Michael B; Lauridsen, Carsten A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the use of Dynamic Contrast-enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) in patients with pancreatic cancer. This study was composed according to the PRISMA guidelines 2009. The literature search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases to identify all relevant publications. The QUADAS-2 tool was implemented to assess the risk of bias and applicability concerns of each included study. The initial literature search yielded 483 publications. Thirteen articles were included. Articles were categorized into three groups: nine articles concerning primary diagnosis or staging, one article about tumor response to treatment, and three articles regarding scan techniques. In exocrine pancreatic tumors, measurements of blood flow in eight studies and blood volume in seven studies were significantly lower in tumor tissue, compared with measurements in pancreatic tissue outside of tumor, or normal pancreatic tissue in control groups of healthy volunteers. The studies were heterogeneous in the number of patients enrolled and scan protocols. Perfusion parameters measured and analyzed by DCE-CT might be useful in the investigation of characteristic vascular patterns of exocrine pancreatic tumors. Further clinical studies are desired for investigating the potential of DCE-CT in pancreatic tumors. PMID:27608045

  4. Accuracies of the synthesized monochromatic CT numbers and effective atomic numbers obtained with a rapid kVp switching dual energy CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Christodoulou, Emmanuel G.; Larson, Sandra C.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: This study was performed to investigate the accuracies of the synthesized monochromatic images and effective atomic number maps obtained with the new GE Discovery CT750 HD CT scanner. Methods: A Gammex-RMI model 467 tissue characterization phantom and the CT number linearity section of a Phantom Laboratory Catphan 600 phantom were scanned using the dual energy (DE) feature on the GE CT750 HD scanner. Synthesized monochromatic images at various energies between 40 and 120 keV and effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) maps were generated. Regions of interest were placed within these images/maps to measure the average monochromatic CT numbers and average Z{sub eff} of the materials within these phantoms. The true Z{sub eff} values were either supplied by the phantom manufacturer or computed using Mayneord's equation. The linear attenuation coefficients for the true CT numbers were computed using the NIST XCOM program with the input of manufacturer supplied elemental compositions and densities. The effects of small variations in the assumed true densities of the materials were also investigated. Finally, the effect of body size on the accuracies of the synthesized monochromatic CT numbers was investigated using a custom lumbar section phantom with and without an external fat-mimicking ring. Results: Other than the Z{sub eff} of the simulated lung inserts in the tissue characterization phantom, which could not be measured by DECT, the Z{sub eff} values of all of the other materials in the tissue characterization and Catphan phantoms were accurate to 15%. The accuracies of the synthesized monochromatic CT numbers of the materials in both phantoms varied with energy and material. For the 40-120 keV range, RMS errors between the measured and true CT numbers in the Catphan are 8-25 HU when the true CT numbers were computed using the nominal plastic densities. These RMS errors improve to 3-12 HU for assumed true densities within the nominal density {+-}0.02 g

  5. Mass preserving registration for lung CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lo, Pechin; Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm A.; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we evaluate a novel image registration method on a set of expiratory-inspiratory pairs of computed tomography (CT) lung scans. A free-form multi resolution image registration technique is used to match two scans of the same subject. To account for the differences in the lung intensities due to differences in inspiration level, we propose to adjust the intensity of lung tissue according to the local expansion or compression. An image registration method without intensity adjustment is compared to the proposed method. Both approaches are evaluated on a set of 10 pairs of expiration and inspiration CT scans of children with cystic fibrosis lung disease. The proposed method with mass preserving adjustment results in significantly better alignment of the vessel trees. Analysis of local volume change for regions with trapped air compared to normally ventilated regions revealed larger differences between these regions in the case of mass preserving image registration, indicating that mass preserving registration is better at capturing localized differences in lung deformation.

  6. Acute Coronary Artery Air Embolism Following CT-Guided Lung Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Asem AbdelRaouf, Salah; Qandeel, Monther; Swaidan, Maisa

    2005-01-15

    CT-guided needle biopsy is a common procedure for obtaining a tissue diagnosis and consequently correctly managing patients. This procedure has many potential complications, ranging from simple pneumothorax or self-limiting hemoptysis to life-threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and air embolism. Though the latter is a rare complication of CT-guided needle biopsy, it has attracted a lot of interest. We report a case of right coronary air embolism resulting in myocardial infarction after a CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the lung.

  7. [Pulmonary manifestations of connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Rehbock, B

    2015-03-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are responsible for about 25% of all deaths due to interstitial lung disease; therefore, an early identification of patients with pulmonary manifestation changes the management. Detection, differential diagnostic classification and staging of the pneumological pattern of findings are largely based on high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT). The main differential diagnostic challenges are interstitial manifestations which present with radiological-histopathological phenotypes of interstitial pneumonia. The most common form of interstitial pulmonary reaction form of connective tissue diseases is the nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) pattern. In rheumatoid arthritis, a usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern is dominant. Uncharacteristic reactions of airways and pleura can be the leading symptom or present as accompanying findings. A serious complication is pulmonary hypertension. Drug-induced lung lesions can present with similar HR-CT morphology as connective tissue diseases and can only be differentiated in the temporal and clinical context. PMID:25693496

  8. Children, CT Scan and Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bajoghli, Morteza; Bajoghli, Farshad; Tayari, Nazila; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Computerized tomography (CT) consists of 25 % of all medical imaging. It was estimated that more than 2% of all carcinomas in the USA are due to CT scans. There is an ongoing focus on the reduction of CT scan radiation dose. Awareness about risk-benefits of CT has increased. Reduction of radiological exam is an important issue because the accumulation effects of radiation can be hazardous. In addition, proper protocol should be followed for diagnostic procedures of ionization radiation and computerized tomography. Effective radiation dose should range from 0.8 to 10.5 millisievert. The same protocol should be followed in different hospitals as well. Basic principles of radiation protection should be monitored. As much as possible, both technician and radiologist must be present during computerized tomography for children, and MRI and ultrasound should be replaced if possible. PMID:21566776

  9. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  10. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  11. CT Perfusion of the Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... scanning combines special x-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images or pictures of the ... being studied can then be examined on a computer monitor, printed or transferred to a CD. CT ...

  12. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 16 chapters. Some of the topics are: CT of the Sacrum, The Postoperative Spine, Film Organizations and Case Reporting, Degeneration and Disc Disease of the Intervertebral Joint, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, and Cervical and Thoracic Spine.

  13. Multiple myeloma: evaluation by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiman, J.S.; McLeod, R.A.; Kyle, R.A.; Beabout, J.W.

    1985-02-01

    Although patients who have multiple myeloma usually have straightforward clinical symptoms and corroborative radiographs, in some instances, these patients will present atypically, with symptoms suggesting active disease but radiographs that are normal or nonspecific. The authors reviewed the records of 32 patients who had documented multiple myeloma and had undergone CT examinations, assessing the value of those examinations. Although CT is not indicated in all patients who have multiple myeloma, it is especially useful in patients who have bone pain and normal or nonspecific radiographs. CT provided confirmatory information in all cases in which lesions were seen on radiographs. CT also frequently demonstrated a greater extent of disease than could be appreciated on the radiographs.

  14. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  15. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    PubMed Central

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Finkenthal, M.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Pfeiffer, F.; Stutman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  16. Optimal scan time for evaluation of parathyroid adenoma with [18F]-fluorocholine PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Rep, Sebastijan; Lezaic, Luka; Kocjan, Tomaz; Pfeifer, Marija; Sever, Mojca Jensterle; Simoncic, Urban; Tomse, Petra; Hocevar, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Background Parathyroid adenomas, the most common cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, are benign tumours which autonomously produce and secrete parathyroid hormone. [18F]-fluorocholine (FCH), PET marker of cellular proliferation, was recently demonstrated to accumulate in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue; however, the optimal time to perform FCH PET/CT after FCH administration is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal scan time of FCH PET/CT in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Patients and methods. 43 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were enrolled in this study. A triple-phase PET/CT imaging was performed five minutes, one and two hours after the administration of FCH. Regions of interest (ROI) were placed in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue and thyroid tissue. Standardized uptake value (SUVmean), retention index and lesion contrast for parathyroid and thyroid tissue were calculated. Results Accumulation of FCH was higher in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue in comparison to the thyroid tissue with significantly higher SUVmean in the second and in the third phase (p < 0.0001). Average retention index decreased significantly between the first and the second phase and increased significantly between the second and the third phase in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue and decreased significantly over all three phases in thyroid tissue (p< 0.0001). The lesion contrast of lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue and thyroid tissue was significantly better in the second and the third phase compared to the first phase (p < 0.05). Conclusions According to the results the optimal scan time of FCH PET/CT for localization of lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue is one hour after administration of the FCH. PMID:26834518

  17. Semantic analysis of SNOMED CT for a post-coordinated database of histopathology findings

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Walter S; Campbell, James R; West, William W; McClay, James C; Hinrichs, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    Objective This research investigated the use of SNOMED CT to represent diagnostic tissue morphologies and notable tissue architectures typically found within a pathologist's microscopic examination report to identify gaps in expressivity of SNOMED CT for use in anatomic pathology. Methods 24 breast biopsy cases were reviewed by two board certified surgical pathologists who independently described the diagnostically important tissue architectures and diagnostic morphologies observed by microscopic examination. In addition, diagnostic comments and details were extracted from the original diagnostic pathology report. 95 unique clinical statements were extracted from 13 malignant and 11 benign breast needle biopsy cases. Results 75% of the inventoried diagnostic terms and statements could be represented by valid SNOMED CT expressions. The expressions included one pre-coordinated expression and 73 post-coordinated expressions. No valid SNOMED CT expressions could be identified or developed to unambiguously assert the meaning of 21 statements (ie, 25% of inventoried clinical statements). Evaluation of the findings indicated that SNOMED CT lacked sufficient definitional expressions or the SNOMED CT concept model prohibited use of certain defined concepts needed to describe the numerous, diagnostically important tissue architectures and morphologic changes found within a surgical pathology microscopic examination. Conclusions Because information gathered during microscopic histopathology examination provides the basis of pathology diagnoses, additional concept definitions for tissue morphometries and modifications to the SNOMED CT concept model are needed and suggested to represent detailed histopathologic findings in computable fashion for purposes of patient information exchange and research. Trial registration number UNMC Institutional Review Board ID# 342-11-EP. PMID:24833774

  18. Dedicated breast CT: geometric design considerations to maximize posterior breast coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Emmons, Margaret M.; Moss, Lawrence J.; Hussain, Sarwat; Baker, Stephen P.

    2013-06-01

    An Institutional Review Board-approved protocol was used to quantify breast tissue inclusion in 52 women, under conditions simulating both craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views in mammography, dedicated breast CT in the upright subject position, and dedicated breast CT in the prone subject position. Using skin as a surrogate for the underlying breast tissue, the posterior aspect of the breast that is aligned with the chest-wall edge of the breast support in a screen-film mammography system was marked with the study participants positioned for CC and MLO views. The union of skin marks with the study participants positioned for CC and MLO views was considered to represent chest-wall tissue available for imaging with mammography and served as the reference standard. For breast CT, a prone stereotactic breast biopsy unit and a custom-fabricated barrier were used to simulate conditions during prone and upright breast CT, respectively. For the same breast marked on the mammography system, skin marks were made along the breast periphery that was just anterior to the apertures of the prone biopsy unit and the upright barrier. The differences in skin marks between subject positioning simulating breast CT (prone, upright) and mammography were quantified at six anatomic locations. For each location, at least one study participant had a skin mark from breast CT (prone, upright) posterior to mammography. However for all study participants, there was at least one anatomic location where the skin mark from mammography was posterior to that from breast CT (prone, upright) positioning. The maximum amount by which the skin mark from mammography was posterior to breast CT (prone and upright) over all six locations was quantified for each study participant and pair-wise comparison did not exhibit statistically significant difference between prone and upright breast CT (paired t- test, p = 0.4). Quantitatively, for 95% of the study participants the skin mark from

  19. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  20. Construction of mouse phantoms from segmented CT scan data for radiation dosimetry studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, D.; Harken, A. D.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Brenner, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    We present the complete construction methodology for an anatomically accurate mouse phantom made using materials which mimic the characteristics of tissue, lung, and bone for radiation dosimetry studies. Phantoms were constructed using 2 mm thick slices of tissue equivalent material which was precision machined to clear regions for insertion of lung and bone equivalent material where appropriate. Images obtained using a 3D computed tomography (CT) scan clearly indicate regions of tissue, lung, and bone that match their position within the original mouse CT scan. Additionally, radiographic films are used with the phantom to demonstrate dose mapping capabilities. The construction methodology presented here can be quickly and easily adapted to create a phantom of any specific small animal given a segmented CT scan of the animal. These physical phantoms are a useful tool to examine individual organ dose and dosimetry within mouse systems that are complicated by density inhomogeneity due to bone and lung regions.

  1. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lol, Pechin; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; Nielsen, Mads; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan compared with intensities in the deformed baseline image indicate local loss of lung tissue that is associated with progression of emphysema. To account for differences in lung intensity owing to differences in the inspiration level in the two scans rather than disease progression, we propose to adjust the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans and may result in a more sensitive measure of disease progression than standard quantitative CT measures. PMID:18982686

  2. Construction of mouse phantoms from segmented CT scan data for radiation dosimetry studies

    PubMed Central

    Welch, D; Harken, A D; Randers-Pehrson, G; Brenner, D J

    2015-01-01

    We present the complete construction methodology for an anatomically accurate mouse phantom made using materials which mimic the characteristics of tissue, lung, and bone for radiation dosimetry studies. Phantoms were constructed using 2 mm thick slices of tissue equivalent material which was precision machined to clear regions for insertion of lung and bone equivalent material where appropriate. Images obtained using a 3D computed tomography (CT) scan clearly indicate regions of tissue, lung, and bone that match their position within the original mouse CT scan. Additionally, radiographic films are used with the phantom to demonstrate dose mapping capabilities. The construction methodology presented here can be quickly and easily adapted to create a phantom of any specific small animal given a segmented CT scan of the animal. These physical phantoms are a useful tool to examine individual organ dose and dosimetry within mouse systems that are complicated by density inhomogeneity due to bone and lung regions. PMID:25860401

  3. X-ray phase contrast imaging of calcified tissue and biomaterial structure in bioreactor engineered tissues.

    PubMed

    Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Garson, Alfred B; Guan, Huifeng; Zhong, Zhong; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Fisher, John P; Anastasio, Mark A; Brey, Eric M

    2015-03-01

    Tissues engineered in bioreactor systems have been used clinically to replace damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these systems are under continued development for many tissue engineering applications. The ability to quantitatively assess material structure and tissue formation is critical for evaluating bioreactor efficacy and for preimplantation assessment of tissue quality. Techniques that allow for the nondestructive and longitudinal monitoring of large engineered tissues within the bioreactor systems will be essential for the translation of these strategies to viable clinical therapies. X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) imaging techniques have shown tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties, including absorption, refraction, and scatter. In this research, mesenchymal stem cell-seeded alginate hydrogels were prepared and cultured under osteogenic conditions in a perfusion bioreactor. The constructs were imaged at various time points using XPC microcomputed tomography (µCT). Imaging was performed with systems using both synchrotron- and tube-based X-ray sources. XPC µCT allowed for simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) quantification of hydrogel size and mineralization, as well as spatial information on hydrogel structure and mineralization. Samples were processed for histological evaluation and XPC showed similar features to histology and quantitative analysis consistent with the histomorphometry. These results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for noninvasive 3D imaging engineered tissues grown in bioreactors. PMID:25257802

  4. X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging of Calcified Tissue and Biomaterial Structure in Bioreactor Engineered Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Alyssa A.; Larson, Jeffery C.; Garson, III, Alfred B.; Guan, Huifeng; Zhong, Zhong; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc; Fisher, John P.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Brey, Eric M.

    2014-11-04

    Tissues engineered in bioreactor systems have been used clinically to replace damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these systems are under continued development for many tissue engineering applications. The ability to quantitatively assess material structure and tissue formation is critical for evaluating bioreactor efficacy and for preimplantation assessment of tissue quality. These techniques allow for the nondestructive and longitudinal monitoring of large engineered tissues within the bioreactor systems and will be essential for the translation of these strategies to viable clinical therapies. X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) imaging techniques have shown tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties, including absorption, refraction, and scatter. In this research, mesenchymal stem cell-seeded alginate hydrogels were prepared and cultured under osteogenic conditions in a perfusion bioreactor. The constructs were imaged at various time points using XPC microcomputed tomography (µCT). Imaging was performed with systems using both synchrotron- and tube-based X-ray sources. XPC µCT allowed for simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) quantification of hydrogel size and mineralization, as well as spatial information on hydrogel structure and mineralization. Samples were processed for histological evaluation and XPC showed similar features to histology and quantitative analysis consistent with the histomorphometry. Furthermore, these results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for noninvasive 3D imaging engineered tissues grown in bioreactors.

  5. Enhanced transbuccal salmon calcitonin (sCT) delivery: effect of chemical enhancers and electrical assistance on in vitro sCT buccal permeation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong-Ho; Chun, Kyeung-Hwa; Jeon, Sang-Ok; Kang, Jeong-Won; Lee, Sangkil

    2011-10-01

    This study investigates the combined effect of absorption enhancers and electrical assistance on transbuccal salmon calcitonin (sCT) delivery, using fresh swine buccal tissue. We placed 200 IU (40 μg/mL) of each sCT formulation--containing various concentrations of ethanol, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), and sodium deoxyglycocholate (SDGC)--onto the donor part of a Franz diffusion cell. Then, 0.5 mA/cm(2) of fixed anodal current was applied alone or combined with chemical enhancers. The amount of permeated sCT was analyzed using an ELISA kit, and biophysical changes of the buccal mucosa were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy, and hematoxylin-eosin staining methods were used to evaluate histological alteration of the buccal tissues. The flux (J(s)) of sCT increased with the addition of absorption enhancer groups, but it was significantly enhanced by the application of anodal iontophoresis (ITP). FT-IR study revealed that all groups caused an increase in lipid fluidity but only the groups containing SDGC showed statistically significant difference. Although the histological data of SDGC groups showed a possibility for tissue damage, the present enhancing methods appear to be safe. In conclusion, the combination of absorption enhancers and electrical assistance is a potential strategy for the enhancement of transbuccal sCT delivery. PMID:21683790

  6. Tissue transition projection (TTP) of the intestines.

    PubMed

    Rogalla, P; Bender, A; Bick, U; Huitema, A; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, J; Hamm, B

    2000-01-01

    Tissue transition projection (TTP) represents a three-dimensional reconstruction technique for volumetric image data sets. To demonstrate the principle characteristics of TTP, a simple phantom consisting of two pipes with a simulated, wall-adherent polyp was scanned with spiral CT, and images were reconstructed by means of volume rendering for both opaque surface reconstructions and TTP. Tissue transition projection was used in 7 patients for reconstruction of the small intestine or the colon. Unlike three-dimensional reconstructions with opaque surfaces, TTP enhances surface transitions while suppressing homogeneous areas, allowing delineation of the bowel wall similar to conventional double-contrast studies. PMID:10823637

  7. Monte Carlo comparison of x-ray and proton CT for range calculations of proton therapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbor, N.; Dauvergne, D.; Dedes, G.; Létang, J. M.; Parodi, K.; Quiñones, C. T.; Testa, E.; Rit, S.

    2015-10-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been described as a solution for imaging the proton stopping power of patient tissues, therefore reducing the uncertainty of the conversion of x-ray CT images to relative stopping power (RSP) maps and its associated margins. This study aimed to investigate this assertion under the assumption of ideal detection systems. We have developed a Monte Carlo framework to assess proton CT performances for the main steps of a proton therapy treatment planning, i.e. proton or x-ray CT imaging, conversion to RSP maps based on the calibration of a tissue phantom, and proton dose simulations. Irradiations of a computational phantom with pencil beams were simulated on various anatomical sites and the proton range was assessed on the reference, the proton CT-based and the x-ray CT-based material maps. Errors on the tissue’s RSP reconstructed from proton CT were found to be significantly smaller and less dependent on the tissue distribution. The imaging dose was also found to be much more uniform and conformal to the primary beam. The mean absolute deviation for range calculations based on x-ray CT varies from 0.18 to 2.01 mm depending on the localization, while it is smaller than 0.1 mm for proton CT. Under the assumption of a perfect detection system, proton range predictions based on proton CT are therefore both more accurate and more uniform than those based on x-ray CT.

  8. Tissue Photolithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    Tissue lithography will enable physicians and researchers to obtain macromolecules with high purity (greater than 90 percent) from desired cells in conventionally processed, clinical tissues by simply annotating the desired cells on a computer screen. After identifying the desired cells, a suitable lithography mask will be generated to protect the contents of the desired cells while allowing destruction of all undesired cells by irradiation with ultraviolet light. The DNA from the protected cells can be used in a number of downstream applications including DNA sequencing. The purity (i.e., macromolecules isolated form specific cell types) of such specimens will greatly enhance the value and information of downstream applications. In this method, the specific cells are isolated on a microscope slide using photolithography, which will be faster, more specific, and less expensive than current methods. It relies on the fact that many biological molecules such as DNA are photosensitive and can be destroyed by ultraviolet irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to protect the contents of desired cells, yet destroy undesired cells. This approach leverages the technologies of the microelectronics industry, which can make features smaller than 1 micrometer with photolithography. A variety of ways has been created to achieve identification of the desired cell, and also to designate the other cells for destruction. This can be accomplished through chrome masks, direct laser writing, and also active masking using dynamic arrays. Image recognition is envisioned as one method for identifying cell nuclei and cell membranes. The pathologist can identify the cells of interest using a microscopic computerized image of the slide, and appropriate custom software. In one of the approaches described in this work, the software converts the selection into a digital mask that can be fed into a direct laser writer, e.g. the Heidelberg DWL66. Such a machine uses a metalized glass plate (with

  9. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach. PMID:27457483

  10. Creation and Characterization of an Ultrasound and CT Phantom for Non-invasive Ultrasound Thermometry Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chun-Yen; Kruse, Dustin E.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Caskey, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound thermometry provides noninvasive two-dimensional (2-D) temperature monitoring, and in this paper, we have investigated the use of computed tomography (CT) radiodensity to characterize tissues to improve the accuracy of ultrasound thermometry. Agarose-based tissue-mimicking phantoms were created with glyceryl trioleate (a fat-mimicking material) concentration of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50%. The speed of sound (SOS) of the phantoms was measured over a temperature range of 22.1–41.1°C. CT images of the phantoms were acquired by a clinical dedicated breast CT scanner, followed by calculation of the Hounsfield units (HU). The phantom was heated with a therapeutic acoustic pulse (1.54 MHz), while RF data were acquired with a 10-MHz linear-array transducer. 2-D speckle tracking was used to calculate the thermal strain offline. The tissue dependent thermal strain parameter required for ultrasound thermometry was analyzed and correlated with CT radiodensity, followed by validation of the temperature prediction. Results showed that the change in SOS with the temperature increase was opposite in sign between the 0–10% and 20–50% trioleate phantoms. The inverse of the tissue dependent thermal strain parameter of the phantoms was correlated with the CT radiodensity (R2 = 0.99). A blinded ultrasound thermometry study on phantoms with a trioleate range of 5–35% demonstrated the capability to estimate the tissue dependent thermal strain parameter and estimate temperature with error less than ~1°C. In conclusion, CT radiodensity may provide a method for improving ultrasound thermometry in heterogeneous tissues. PMID:24107918

  11. PET/MRI and PET/CT in Lung Lesions and Thoracic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Flechsig, Paul; Mehndiratta, Amit; Haberkorn, Uwe; Kratochwil, Clemens; Giesel, Frederik L

    2015-07-01

    More than one decade ago, introduction of integrated PET/CT scanners changed oncologic imaging and oncologic patient management profoundly. With these systems, the metabolic information acquired by PET can be anatomically localized even to small structures such as small primary tumors, lymph nodes, and soft tissue masses owing to the high-resolution multidetector CT scanners. This has made PET/CT a most reliable method for tumor detection, characterization, staging, and response monitoring. The importance of an integrated functional and morphologic approach to better understand the biology of oncologic disease and to improve therapy planning is underlined by the increasing number of PET/CT systems worldwide, leading to an increasing number of scientific publications in the field. The paradigmatic indication of integrated PET/CT is staging of patients with lung cancer, as PET/CT allows for precise pretherapeutic staging and also posttreatment restaging according to the TNM criteria. The growing numbers of targeted therapy strategies in the fields of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, which are adapted to dedicated tumor stages, require the exact classifications of each patient's tumor stage. In this context, whole-body examinations using integrated (18)F-FDG-PET/CT have been shown to reduce the side effects of futile invasive procedures and reduce additional costly staging procedures. In this review article, the diagnostic and therapeutic effects of PET/CT examinations are highlighted and compared with some competitive techniques such as scintigraphy, MRI, and, where possible, integrated PET/MRI. PMID:26050655

  12. Extracting information from previous full-dose CT scan for knowledge-based Bayesian reconstruction of current low-dose CT images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Liang, Zhengrong; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Moore, William; Ma, Jianhua; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely employed in edge-preserving regional noise smoothing penalty to reconstruct piece-wise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose computed tomography (LdCT). While it preserves edge sharpness, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it may compromise clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodules or colon polyps. This study aims to shift the edge-preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF’s neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of muscle, fat, bone, lung, etc. from previous full-dose CT (FdCT) scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of the proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed a dramatic gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction using the commonly-used Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that the texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over the edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications. PMID:26561284

  13. 3D Ultrasound Can Contribute to Planning CT to Define the Target for Partial Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berrang, Tanya S.; Truong, Pauline T. Popescu, Carmen; Drever, Laura; Kader, Hosam A.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Mitchell, Tracy; Soh, S.Y.; Sands, Letricia; Silver, Stuart; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The role of three-dimensional breast ultrasound (3D US) in planning partial breast radiotherapy (PBRT) is unknown. This study evaluated the accuracy of coregistration of 3D US to planning computerized tomography (CT) images, the seroma contouring consistency of radiation oncologists using the two imaging modalities and the clinical situations in which US was associated with improved contouring consistency compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Twenty consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled prospectively after breast-conserving surgery. Subjects underwent 3D US at CT simulation for adjuvant RT. Three radiation oncologists independently contoured the seroma on separate CT and 3D US image sets. Seroma clarity, seroma volumes, and interobserver contouring consistency were compared between the imaging modalities. Associations between clinical characteristics and seroma clarity were examined using Pearson correlation statistics. Results: 3D US and CT coregistration was accurate to within 2 mm or less in 19/20 (95%) cases. CT seroma clarity was reduced with dense breast parenchyma (p = 0.035), small seroma volume (p < 0.001), and small volume of excised breast tissue (p = 0.01). US seroma clarity was not affected by these factors (p = NS). US was associated with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in 8/20 (40%) cases. Of these 8 cases, 7 had low CT seroma clarity scores and 4 had heterogeneously to extremely dense breast parenchyma. Conclusion: 3D US can be a useful adjunct to CT in planning PBRT. Radiation oncologists were able to use US images to contour the seroma target, with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in cases with dense breast parenchyma and poor CT seroma clarity.

  14. Spectral optimization for micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Brauweiler, Robert; Eisa, Fabian; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize micro-CT protocols with respect to x-ray spectra and thereby reduce radiation dose at unimpaired image quality. Methods: Simulations were performed to assess image contrast, noise, and radiation dose for different imaging tasks. The figure of merit used to determine the optimal spectrum was the dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD). Both optimal photon energy and tube voltage were considered. Three different types of filtration were investigated for polychromatic x-ray spectra: 0.5 mm Al, 3.0 mm Al, and 0.2 mm Cu. Phantoms consisted of water cylinders of 20, 32, and 50 mm in diameter with a central insert of 9 mm which was filled with different contrast materials: an iodine-based contrast medium (CM) to mimic contrast-enhanced (CE) imaging, hydroxyapatite to mimic bone structures, and water with reduced density to mimic soft tissue contrast. Validation measurements were conducted on a commercially available micro-CT scanner using phantoms consisting of water-equivalent plastics. Measurements on a mouse cadaver were performed to assess potential artifacts like beam hardening and to further validate simulation results. Results: The optimal photon energy for CE imaging was found at 34 keV. For bone imaging, optimal energies were 17, 20, and 23 keV for the 20, 32, and 50 mm phantom, respectively. For density differences, optimal energies varied between 18 and 50 keV for the 20 and 50 mm phantom, respectively. For the 32 mm phantom and density differences, CNRD was found to be constant within 2.5% for the energy range of 21-60 keV. For polychromatic spectra and CMs, optimal settings were 50 kV with 0.2 mm Cu filtration, allowing for a dose reduction of 58% compared to the optimal setting for 0.5 mm Al filtration. For bone imaging, optimal tube voltages were below 35 kV. For soft tissue imaging, optimal tube settings strongly depended on phantom size. For 20 mm, low voltages were preferred. For 32 mm, CNRD was found to be almost independent of

  15. Filtered backprojection proton CT reconstruction along most likely paths

    SciTech Connect

    Rit, Simon; Dedes, George; Freud, Nicolas; Sarrut, David; Letang, Jean Michel

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) has the potential to accurately measure the electron density map of tissues at low doses but the spatial resolution is prohibitive if the curved paths of protons in matter is not accounted for. The authors propose to account for an estimate of the most likely path of protons in a filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Methods: The energy loss of protons is first binned in several proton radiographs at different distances to the proton source to exploit the depth-dependency of the estimate of the most likely path. This process is named the distance-driven binning. A voxel-specific backprojection is then used to select the adequate radiograph in the distance-driven binning in order to propagate in the pCT image the best achievable spatial resolution in proton radiographs. The improvement in spatial resolution is demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations of resolution phantoms. Results: The spatial resolution in the distance-driven binning depended on the distance of the objects from the source and was optimal in the binned radiograph corresponding to that distance. The spatial resolution in the reconstructed pCT images decreased with the depth in the scanned object but it was always better than previous FBP algorithms assuming straight line paths. In a water cylinder with 20 cm diameter, the observed range of spatial resolutions was 0.7 - 1.6 mm compared to 1.0 - 2.4 mm at best with a straight line path assumption. The improvement was strongly enhanced in shorter 200 Degree-Sign scans. Conclusions: Improved spatial resolution was obtained in pCT images with filtered backprojection reconstruction using most likely path estimates of protons. The improvement in spatial resolution combined with the practicality of FBP algorithms compared to iterative reconstruction algorithms makes this new algorithm a candidate of choice for clinical pCT.

  16. Predicting stroke outcome using DCE-CT measured blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterbroek, Jaap; Bennink, Edwin; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Horsch, Alexander D.; Viergever, Max A.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2015-03-01

    CT plays an important role in the diagnosis of acute stroke patients. Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) can estimate local tissue perfusion and extent of ischemia. However, hemodynamic information of the large intracranial vessels may also be obtained from DCE-CT data and may contain valuable diagnostic information. We describe a novel method to estimate intravascular blood velocity (IBV) in large cerebral vessels using DCE-CT data, which may be useful to help predict stroke outcome. DCE-CT scans from 34 patients with isolated M1 occlusions were included from a large prospective multi-center cohort study of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Gaussians fitted to the intravascular data yielded the time-to-peak (TTP) and cerebral-blood-volume (CBV). IBV was computed by taking the inverse of the TTP gradient magnitude. Voxels with a CBV of at least 10% of the CBV found in the arterial input function were considered part of a vessel. Mid-sagittal planes were drawn manually and averages of the IBV over all vessel-voxels (arterial and venous) were computed for each hemisphere. Mean-hemisphere IBV differences, mean-hemisphere TTP differences, and hemisphere vessel volume differences were used to differentiate between patients with good and bad outcome (modified Rankin Scale score <3 versus ≥3 at 90 days) using ROC analysis. AUCs from the ROC for IBV, TTP, and vessel volume were 0.80, 0.67 and 0.62 respectively. In conclusion, IBV was found to be a better predictor of patient outcome than the parameters used to compute it and may be a promising new parameter for stroke outcome prediction.

  17. Dosimetry in small-animal CT using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-L.; Park, S.-J.; Jeon, P.-H.; Jo, B.-D.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Small-animal computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging devices are increasingly being used in biological research. While investigators are mainly interested in high-contrast, low-noise, and high-resolution anatomical images, relatively large radiation doses are required, and there is also growing concern over the radiological risk from preclinical experiments. This study was conducted to determine the radiation dose in a mouse model for dosimetric estimates using the GEANT4 application for tomographic emission simulations (GATE) and to extend its techniques to various small-animal CT applications. Radiation dose simulations were performed with the same parameters as those for the measured micro-CT data, using the MOBY phantom, a pencil ion chamber and an electrometer with a CT detector. For physical validation of radiation dose, absorbed dose of brain and liver in mouse were evaluated to compare simulated results with physically measured data using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The mean difference between simulated and measured data was less than 2.9% at 50 kVp X-ray source. The absorbed doses of 37 brain tissues and major organs of the mouse were evaluated according to kVp changes. The absorbed dose over all of the measurements in the brain (37 types of tissues) consistently increased and ranged from 42.4 to 104.0 mGy. Among the brain tissues, the absorbed dose of the hypothalamus (157.8-414.30 mGy) was the highest for the beams at 50-80 kVp, and that of the corpus callosum (11.2-26.6 mGy) was the lowest. These results can be used as a dosimetric database to control mouse doses and preclinical targeted radiotherapy experiments. In addition, to accurately calculate the mouse-absorbed dose, the X-ray spectrum, detector alignment, and uncertainty in the elemental composition of the simulated materials must be accurately modeled.

  18. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  19. The effects of mapping CT images to Monte Carlo materials on GEANT4 proton simulation accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Samuel; McAuley, Grant; Slater, James; Wroe, Andrew

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations of radiation therapy require conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) in CT images to an exact tissue composition and density. The number of discrete densities (or density bins) used in this mapping affects the simulation accuracy, execution time, and memory usage in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo code. The relationship between the number of density bins and CT noise was examined in general for all simulations that use HU conversion to density. Additionally, the effect of this on simulation accuracy was examined for proton radiation. Methods: Relative uncertainty from CT noise was compared with uncertainty from density binning to determine an upper limit on the number of density bins required in the presence of CT noise. Error propagation analysis was also performed on continuously slowing down approximation range calculations to determine the proton range uncertainty caused by density binning. These results were verified with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: In the presence of even modest CT noise (5 HU or 0.5%) 450 density bins were found to only cause a 5% increase in the density uncertainty (i.e., 95% of density uncertainty from CT noise, 5% from binning). Larger numbers of density bins are not required as CT noise will prevent increased density accuracy; this applies across all types of Monte Carlo simulations. Examining uncertainty in proton range, only 127 density bins are required for a proton range error of <0.1 mm in most tissue and <0.5 mm in low density tissue (e.g., lung). Conclusions: By considering CT noise and actual range uncertainty, the number of required density bins can be restricted to a very modest 127 depending on the application. Reducing the number of density bins provides large memory and execution time savings in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo packages.

  20. CT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrin, Françoise; Engelke, Klaus

    This chapter presents the principle of X-ray CT and its evolution during the last 40 years. The first section describes the physical basis of X-ray CT, tomographic image reconstruction algorithms, and the source of artifacts in X-ray CT images. The second section is devoted to the evolution of CT technology from the first translation-rotation systems to multi-slice spiral CTs currently used today. The next section addresses specific developments of CT technology and applications, like perfusion CT, quantitative CT, and spectral CT. The fourth section introduces the problem of radiation exposure delivered to the patient and its evaluation. Finally the last section addresses the development in micro- and even nano-CT which is a rapidly evolving area in preclinical imaging and biology.

  1. CT effective dose per dose length product using ICRP 103 weighting factors

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; He Wenjun

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To generate effective dose per unit dose length product (E/DLP) conversion factors incorporating ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. Methods: Effective doses for CT examinations were obtained using the IMPACT Dosimetry Calculator using all 23 dose data sets that are offered by this spreadsheet. CT examinations were simulated for scans performed along the patient long axis for each dosimetry data set using a 4 cm beam width ranging from the upper thighs to top of the head. Five basic body regions (head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis), as well as combinations of the regions (head/neck, chest/abdomen, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis) and whole body CT scans were investigated. Correction factors were generated that can be applied to convert E/DLP conversion factors based on ICRP 60 data to conversion factors that are valid for ICRP 103 data (i.e., E{sub 103}/E{sub 60}). Results: Use of ICRP 103 weighting factors increase effective doses for head scans by {approx}11%, for chest scans by {approx}20%, and decrease effective doses for pelvis scans by {approx}25%. Current E/DLP conversion factors are estimated to be 2.4 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for head CT examinations and range between 14 and 20 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for body CT examinations. Conclusions: Factors that enable patient CT doses to be adjusted to account for ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors are provided, which result in E/DLP factors that were increased in head and chest CT, reduced in pelvis CT, and showed no marked change in neck and abdomen CT.

  2. New horizons in cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    den Harder, A M; Willemink, M J; de Jong, P A; Schilham, A M R; Rajiah, P; Takx, R A P; Leiner, T

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) was associated with considerable radiation doses. The introduction of tube current modulation and automatic tube potential selection as well as high-pitch prospective ECG-triggering and iterative reconstruction offer the ability to decrease dose with approximately one order of magnitude, often to sub-millisievert dose levels. In parallel, advancements in computational technology have enabled the measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) from CCTA data (FFRCT). This technique shows potential to replace invasively measured FFR to select patients in need of coronary intervention. Furthermore, developments in scanner hardware have led to the introduction of dual-energy and photon-counting CT, which offer the possibility of material decomposition imaging. Dual-energy CT reduces beam hardening, which enables CCTA in patients with a high calcium burden and more robust myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Future-generation CT systems will be capable of counting individual X-ray photons. Photon-counting CT is promising and may result in a substantial further radiation dose reduction, vastly increased spatial resolution, and the introduction of a whole new class of contrast agents. PMID:26932775

  3. Application of Polychromatic µCT for Mineral Density Determination

    PubMed Central

    Zou, W.; Hunter, N.; Swain, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate assessment of mineral density (MD) provides information critical to the understanding of mineralization processes of calcified tissues, including bones and teeth. High-resolution three-dimensional assessment of the MD of teeth has been demonstrated by relatively inaccessible synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography (SRµCT). While conventional desktop µCT (CµCT) technology is widely available, polychromatic source and cone-shaped beam geometry confound MD assessment. Recently, considerable attention has been given to optimizing quantitative data from CµCT systems with polychromatic x-ray sources. In this review, we focus on the approaches that minimize inaccuracies arising from beam hardening, in particular, beam filtration during the scan, beam-hardening correction during reconstruction, and mineral density calibration. Filtration along with lowest possible source voltage results in a narrow and near-single-peak spectrum, favoring high contrast and minimal beam-hardening artifacts. More effective beam monochromatization approaches are described. We also examine the significance of beam-hardening correction in determining the accuracy of mineral density estimation. In addition, standards for the calibration of reconstructed grey-scale attenuation values against MD, including K2PHO4 liquid phantom, and polymer-hydroxyapatite (HA) and solid hydroxyapatite (HA) phantoms, are discussed. PMID:20858779

  4. CT imaging with a mobile C-arm prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Tubbs, David; Langille, Vinton; Kalya, Prabhanjana; Smith, Brady; Cherone, Rocco

    2008-03-01

    Mobile X-ray imagery is an omnipresent tool in conventional musculoskeletal and soft tissue applications. The next generation of mobile C-arm systems can provide clinicians of minimally-invasive surgery and pain management procedures with both real-time high-resolution fluoroscopy and intra-operative CT imaging modalities. In this study, we research two C-arm CT experimental system configurations and evaluate their imaging capabilities. In a non-destructive evaluation configuration, the X-ray Tube - Detector assembly is stationary while an imaging object is placed on a rotating table. In a medical imaging configuration, the C-arm gantry moves around the patient and the table. In our research setting, we connect the participating devices through a Mobile X-Ray Imaging Environment known as MOXIE. MOXIE is a set of software applications for internal research at GE Healthcare - Surgery and used to examine imaging performance of experimental systems. Anthropomorphic phantom volume renderings and orthogonal slices of reconstructed images are obtained and displayed. The experimental C-arm CT results show CT-like image quality that may be suitable for interventional procedures, real-time data management, and, therefore, have great potential for effective use on the clinical floor.

  5. Renal applications of dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT is being increasingly used for abdominal imaging due to its incremental benefit of material characterization without significant increase in radiation dose. Knowledge of the different dual-energy CT acquisition techniques and image processing algorithms is essential to optimize imaging protocols and understand potential limitations while using dual-energy CT renal imaging such as urinary calculi characterization, assessment of renal masses and in CT urography. This review article provides an overview of the current dual-energy CT techniques and use of dual-energy CT in renal imaging. PMID:27010938

  6. Fast and Automatic Ultrasound Simulation from CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose. PMID:24348736

  7. Ovarian cancer: the clinical role of US, CT, and MRI.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Kaori

    2003-12-01

    This article presents an overview of ovarian cancer, which addresses the clinical roles of imaging studies, including US, CT, and MR imaging in the course of diagnosis and treatment of this important disease. US is the modality of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected adnexal masses. Although its accuracy is not sufficient to avert surgery, morphological analysis of adnexal masses with US helps narrow the differential diagnosis, determining the degree of suspicion for malignancy, usually in concert with a serum CA-125 level. Combined morphological and vascular imaging obtained by US appear to further improve the preoperative assessment of adnexal masses. For uncertain or problematic cases, MR imaging helps to distinguish benign from malignant, with an overall accuracy for the diagnosis of malignancy of 93%. The accuracy of MR imaging in the confident diagnosis of mature cystic teratoma, endometrial cysts, and leiomayomas is very high. CT is not indicated for differential diagnosis of adnexal masses because of poor soft tissue discrimination, except for fatty tissue and for calcification, and the disadvantages of irradiation. In the staging of ovarian cancer, CT, US, and MR imaging all have a similarly high accuracy. Although it is difficult to suggest a simple algorithm for evaluating the state of women with adnexal masses, the correct preoperative diagnosis and staging of ovarian cancer with the use of any of these imaging studies will lead to an appropriate referral to a specialist in gynecologic oncology and offer a significant survival advantage for patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:15018172

  8. A biological phantom for evaluation of CT image reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammin, J.; Fung, G. S. K.; Fishman, E. K.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, iterative algorithms have become popular in diagnostic CT imaging to reduce noise or radiation dose to the patient. The non-linear nature of these algorithms leads to non-linearities in the imaging chain. However, the methods to assess the performance of CT imaging systems were developed assuming the linear process of filtered backprojection (FBP). Those methods may not be suitable any longer when applied to non-linear systems. In order to evaluate the imaging performance, a phantom is typically scanned and the image quality is measured using various indices. For reasons of practicality, cost, and durability, those phantoms often consist of simple water containers with uniform cylinder inserts. However, these phantoms do not represent the rich structure and patterns of real tissue accurately. As a result, the measured image quality or detectability performance for lesions may not reflect the performance on clinical images. The discrepancy between estimated and real performance may be even larger for iterative methods which sometimes produce "plastic-like", patchy images with homogeneous patterns. Consequently, more realistic phantoms should be used to assess the performance of iterative algorithms. We designed and constructed a biological phantom consisting of porcine organs and tissue that models a human abdomen, including liver lesions. We scanned the phantom on a clinical CT scanner and compared basic image quality indices between filtered backprojection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm.

  9. An augmented reality framework for soft tissue surgery.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Peter; Fallert, Johannes; Nicolau, Stephane; Soler, Luc; Mewes, Philip W

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality for soft tissue laparoscopic surgery is a growing topic of interest in the medical community and has potential application in intra-operative planning and image guidance. Delivery of such systems to the operating room remains complex with theoretical challenges related to tissue deformation and the practical limitations of imaging equipment. Current research in this area generally only solves part of the registration pipeline or relies on fiducials, manual model alignment or assumes that tissue is static. This paper proposes a novel augmented reality framework for intra-operative planning: the approach co-registers pre-operative CT with stereo laparoscopic images using cone beam CT and fluoroscopy as bridging modalities. It does not require fiducials or manual alignment and compensates for tissue deformation from insufflation and respiration while allowing the laparoscope to be navigated. The paper's theoretical and practical contributions are validated using simulated, phantom, ex vivo, in vivo and non medical data. PMID:25333146

  10. Differentiating tissue by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, Stefan; Huen, Julien; Malthan, Dirk

    2004-03-01

    A common problem in several surgical applications is the lack of navigational information. Most often, the only source of information about the location of crucial structures, in relation to the surgical instrument, is the visible and tactile sensory input of the surgeon. In some cases, this leads to time-consuming procedures and a high risk for the patient. Therefore, we developed a spectroscopic sensor system for automatic differentiation between several tissue types. For example in milling processes, a sensor that is able to detect bone in contrast to nerve or vein tissue can be used to control the milling process. We showed exemplarily for the cochlea implant, a typical ENT-surgery, that with the help of our sensor system, the milling of bone can be accelerated without increasing the risk for the patient. It is also possible to use this type of sensor system in the area of medical robotics in soft-tissue applications. With real-time information, a continuous registration can take place, in contrast to a registration that is done using static preoperatively acquired images. We showed that our sensor system can be used to dynamically update the location of the patient in relation to CT or MR-images. In conclusion, we have been able to show that well-known spectroscopy sensors can be used to open new possibilities in medical treatment with and without the use of robotics.

  11. Splenic scintigraphy for further differentiation of unclear (68) Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT findings: Strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Werner, Christoph; Winkens, Thomas; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Splenic scintigraphy has been described to be a powerful tool in unclear (68 ) Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT findings, allowing differentiation between somatostatin receptor (Sst)-positive tissue deriving from neuroendocrine tumour (NET) and functioning splenic tissue. However, our own experiences sometimes show a lack of identification on splenic scintigraphy, especially in small lesions, leading to uncertainties regarding the safe identification of NET or splenic tissue. Here, we report on 10 cases with (68) Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT and (99m) Tc-heat-denaturated red blood cell (HDRBC) scintigraphy and we illustrate the strengths and limitations of (99m) Tc-HDRBC scintigraphy in this context. PMID:27188232

  12. CT of the gluteal region

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Schilling, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Although the buttock can be involved in many pathologic processes, most physicians pay little attention to this area of the body. Because pelvic computed tomography (CT) delineates gluteal anatomy exquisitely, pathologic processes in the buttock are now frequently seen. Inflammation, neoplasm, or trauma involving the buttock may be difficult to differentiate without clinical history. However, spread of these processes to or from the pelvis or retroperitoneum is easily documented by CT. A number of these pathologic processes and the pathways of spread of disease involving the pelvis or retroperitoneum are described in this review.

  13. In Defense of Body CT

    PubMed Central

    McCollough, Cynthia H.; Guimarães, Luís; Fletcher, Joel G.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid technical developments, and an expanding list of applications that have supplanted less accurate or more invasive diagnostic tests, have led to a dramatic increase in the use of body CT imaging in medical practice since its introduction in 1975. Our purpose here is to discuss medical justification of the small risk associated with the ionizing radiation used in CT and to provide perspectives on practice-specific decisions that can maximize overall patient benefit. In addition, we review available dose management and optimization technique. PMID:19542392

  14. Registration of 2D x-ray images to 3D MRI by generating pseudo-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Gounis, M. J.; van de Kraats, E. B.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Timmer, J.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial and soft tissue information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can be very valuable during image-guided procedures, where usually only real-time two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images are available. Registration of 2D x-ray images to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired prior to the procedure, can provide optimal information to guide the procedure. However, registering x-ray images to MRI data is not a trivial task because of their fundamental difference in tissue contrast. This paper presents a technique that generates pseudo-computed tomography (CT) data from multi-spectral MRI acquisitions which is sufficiently similar to real CT data to enable registration of x-ray to MRI with comparable accuracy as registration of x-ray to CT. The method is based on a k-nearest-neighbors (kNN)-regression strategy which labels voxels of MRI data with CT Hounsfield Units. The regression method uses multi-spectral MRI intensities and intensity gradients as features to discriminate between various tissue types. The efficacy of using pseudo-CT data for registration of x-ray to MRI was tested on ex vivo animal data. 2D-3D registration experiments using CT and pseudo-CT data of multiple subjects were performed with a commonly used 2D-3D registration algorithm. On average, the median target registration error for registration of two x-ray images to MRI data was approximately 1 mm larger than for x-ray to CT registration. The authors have shown that pseudo-CT data generated from multi-spectral MRI facilitate registration of MRI to x-ray images. From the experiments it could be concluded that the accuracy achieved was comparable to that of registering x-ray images to CT data.

  15. Comparison of CT numbers of organs before and after plastination using standard S-10 technique.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, Pauline; Singh, Rabi Raja; Gibikote, Sridhar; Rabi, Suganthy

    2015-05-01

    Plastination is the art of preserving biological tissues with curable polymers. Imaging with plastinates offers a unique opportunity for radiographic, anatomical, pathological correlation to elucidate complex anatomical relationships. The aim of this study was to make plastinates from cadavers using the standard S-10 plastination technique and to compare the radiological properties of the tissue before and afterwards to examine the suitability of plastinates as phantoms for planning radiotherapy treatment. An above-diaphragm and a below-diaphragm specimen were obtained from a male and a female cadaver, respectively, and subjected to the standard S-10 plastination technique. CT images were obtained before and after plastination and were compared using Treatment Planning System for anatomical accuracy, volume of organs, and CT numbers. The plastinated specimens obtained were dry, robust, and durable. CT imaging of the plastinated specimens showed better anatomical detail of the organs than the preplastinate. Organ volumes were estimated by contouring the organs' outline in the CT images of the preplastinated and postplastinated specimens, revealing an average shrinkage of 25%. CT numbers were higher in the plastinated specimens except in bones and air-filled cavities such as the maxillary air sinus. Although plastination by the standard S-10 technique preserves anatomical accuracy, it increases the CT numbers of the organs because of the density of silicone, making it unsuitable for radiation dosimetry. Further improvements of the technique could yield more suitable plastinated phantoms. PMID:25708008

  16. Micro-CT of rodents: state-of-the-art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2014-01-01

    Micron-scale computed tomography (micro-CT) is an essential tool for phenotyping and for elucidating diseases and their therapies. This work is focused on preclinical micro-CT imaging, reviewing relevant principles, technologies, and applications. Commonly, micro-CT provides high-resolution anatomic information, either on its own or in conjunction with lower-resolution functional imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). More recently, however, advanced applications of micro-CT produce functional information by translating clinical applications to model systems (e.g. measuring cardiac functional metrics) and by pioneering new ones (e.g. measuring tumor vascular permeability with nanoparticle contrast agents). The primary limitations of micro-CT imaging are the associated radiation dose and relatively poor soft tissue contrast. We review several image reconstruction strategies based on iterative, statistical, and gradient sparsity regularization, demonstrating that high image quality is achievable with low radiation dose given ever more powerful computational resources. We also review two contrast mechanisms under intense development. The first is spectral contrast for quantitative material discrimination in combination with passive or actively targeted nanoparticle contrast agents. The second is phase contrast which measures refraction in biological tissues for improved contrast and potentially reduced radiation dose relative to standard absorption imaging. These technological advancements promise to develop micro-CT into a commonplace, functional and even molecular imaging modality. PMID:24974176

  17. Dosimetric impact of a CT metal artefact suppression algorithm for proton, electron and photon therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jikun; Sandison, George A.; Hsi, Wen-Chien; Ringor, Michael; Lu, Xiaoyi

    2006-10-01

    Accurate dose calculation is essential to precision radiation treatment planning and this accuracy depends upon anatomic and tissue electron density information. Modern treatment planning inhomogeneity corrections use x-ray CT images and calibrated scales of tissue CT number to electron density to provide this information. The presence of metal in the volume scanned by an x-ray CT scanner causes metal induced image artefacts that influence CT numbers and thereby introduce errors in the radiation dose distribution calculated. This paper investigates the dosimetric improvement achieved by a previously proposed x-ray CT metal artefact suppression technique when the suppressed images of a patient with bilateral hip prostheses are used in commercial treatment planning systems for proton, electron or photon therapies. For all these beam types, this clinical image and treatment planning study reveals that the target may be severely underdosed if a metal artefact-contaminated image is used for dose calculations instead of the artefact suppressed one. Of the three beam types studied, the metal artefact suppression is most important for proton therapy dose calculations, intermediate for electron therapy and least important for x-ray therapy but still significant. The study of a water phantom having a metal rod simulating a hip prosthesis indicates that CT numbers generated after image processing for metal artefact suppression are accurate and thus dose calculations based on the metal artefact suppressed images will be of high fidelity.

  18. Vascular imaging with contrast agent in hard and soft tissues using microcomputed-tomography.

    PubMed

    Blery, P; Pilet, P; Bossche, A Vanden-; Thery, A; Guicheux, J; Amouriq, Y; Espitalier, F; Mathieu, N; Weiss, P

    2016-04-01

    Vascularization is essential for many tissues and is a main requisite for various tissue-engineering strategies. Different techniques are used for highlighting vasculature, in vivo and ex vivo, in 2-D or 3-D including histological staining, immunohistochemistry, radiography, angiography, microscopy, computed tomography (CT) or micro-CT, both stand-alone and synchrotron system. Vascularization can be studied with or without a contrast agent. This paper presents the results obtained with the latest Skyscan micro-CT (Skyscan 1272, Bruker, Belgium) following barium sulphate injection replacing the bloodstream in comparison with results obtained with a Skyscan In Vivo 1076. Different hard and soft tissues were perfused with contrast agent and were harvested. Samples were analysed using both forms of micro-CT, and improved results were shown using this new micro-CT. This study highlights the vasculature using micro-CT methods. The results obtained with the Skyscan 1272 are clearly defined compared to results obtained with Skyscan 1076. In particular, this instrument highlights the high number of small vessels, which were not seen before at lower resolution. This new micro-CT opens broader possibilities in detection and characterization of the 3-D vascular tree to assess vascular tissue engineering strategies. PMID:27002484

  19. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  20. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose.

  1. Texture-preserved penalized weighted least-squares reconstruction of low-dose CT image via image segmentation and high-order MRF modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hao; Zhang, Hao; Wei, Xinzhou; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we proposed a low-dose computed tomography (LdCT) image reconstruction method with the help of prior knowledge learning from previous high-quality or normal-dose CT (NdCT) scans. The well-established statistical penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) algorithm was adopted for image reconstruction, where the penalty term was formulated by a texture-based Gaussian Markov random field (gMRF) model. The NdCT scan was firstly segmented into different tissue types by a feature vector quantization (FVQ) approach. Then for each tissue type, a set of tissue-specific coefficients for the gMRF penalty was statistically learnt from the NdCT image via multiple-linear regression analysis. We also proposed a scheme to adaptively select the order of gMRF model for coefficients prediction. The tissue-specific gMRF patterns learnt from the NdCT image were finally used to form an adaptive MRF penalty for the PWLS reconstruction of LdCT image. The proposed texture-adaptive PWLS image reconstruction algorithm was shown to be more effective to preserve image textures than the conventional PWLS image reconstruction algorithm, and we further demonstrated the gain of high-order MRF modeling for texture-preserved LdCT PWLS image reconstruction.

  2. Patient-specific biomechanical model as whole-body CT image registration tool.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Miller, Karol; Joldes, Grand Roman; Doyle, Barry; Garlapati, Revanth Reddy; Kikinis, Ron; Wittek, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Whole-body computed tomography (CT) image registration is important for cancer diagnosis, therapy planning and treatment. Such registration requires accounting for large differences between source and target images caused by deformations of soft organs/tissues and articulated motion of skeletal structures. The registration algorithms relying solely on image processing methods exhibit deficiencies in accounting for such deformations and motion. We propose to predict the deformations and movements of body organs/tissues and skeletal structures for whole-body CT image registration using patient-specific non-linear biomechanical modelling. Unlike the conventional biomechanical modelling, our approach for building the biomechanical models does not require time-consuming segmentation of CT scans to divide the whole body into non-overlapping constituents with different material properties. Instead, a Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) algorithm is used for tissue classification to assign the constitutive properties automatically at integration points of the computation grid. We use only very simple segmentation of the spine when determining vertebrae displacements to define loading for biomechanical models. We demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of our approach on CT images of seven patients suffering from cancer and aortic disease. The results confirm that accurate whole-body CT image registration can be achieved using a patient-specific non-linear biomechanical model constructed without time-consuming segmentation of the whole-body images. PMID:25721296

  3. Patient-Specific Biomechanical Model as Whole-Body CT Image Registration Tool

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mao; Miller, Karol; Joldes, Grand Roman; Doyle, Barry; Garlapati, Revanth Reddy; Kikinis, Ron; Wittek, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body computed tomography (CT) image registration is important for cancer diagnosis, therapy planning and treatment. Such registration requires accounting for large differences between source and target images caused by deformations of soft organs/tissues and articulated motion of skeletal structures. The registration algorithms relying solely on image processing methods exhibit deficiencies in accounting for such deformations and motion. We propose to predict the deformations and movements of body organs/tissues and skeletal structures for whole-body CT image registration using patient-specific non-linear biomechanical modelling. Unlike the conventional biomechanical modelling, our approach for building the biomechanical models does not require time-consuming segmentation of CT scans to divide the whole body into non-overlapping constituents with different material properties. Instead, a Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) algorithm is used for tissue classification to assign the constitutive properties automatically at integration points of the computation grid. We use only very simple segmentation of the spine when determining vertebrae displacements to define loading for biomechanical models. We demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of our approach on CT images of seven patients suffering from cancer and aortic disease. The results confirm that accurate whole-body CT image registration can be achieved using a patient-specific non-linear biomechanical model constructed without time-consuming segmentation of the whole-body images. PMID:25721296

  4. CT scans and 3D reconstructions of Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) heads and ear bones.

    PubMed

    Chapla, Marie E; Nowacek, Douglas P; Rommel, Sentiel A; Sadler, Valerie M

    2007-06-01

    The auditory anatomy of the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) was investigated using computerized tomography (CT), three-dimensional reconstructions, and traditional dissection of heads removed during necropsy. The densities (kg/m3) of the soft tissues of the head were measured directly using the displacement method and those of the soft tissues and bone were calculated from CT measurements (Hounsfield units). The manatee's fatty tissue was significantly less dense than the other soft tissues within the head (p<0.05). The squamosal bone was significantly less dense than the other bones of the head (p<0.05). Measurements of the ear bones (tympanic, periotic, malleus, incus, and stapes) collected during dissection revealed that the ossicular chain was overly massive for the mass of the tympanoperiotic complex. PMID:17420106

  5. Upright 3D Treatment Planning Using a Vertical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Anand P. Strauss, Jonathan B.; Kirk, Michael C.; Chen, Sea S.; Kroc, Thomas K.; Zusag, Thomas W.

    2009-04-01

    In this report, we describe a novel technique used to plan and administer external beam radiation therapy to a patient in the upright position. A patient required reirradiation for thymic carcinoma but was unable to tolerate the supine position due to bilateral phrenic nerve injury and paralysis of the diaphragm. Computed tomography (CT) images in the upright position were acquired at the Northern Illinois University Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab. The CT data were imported into a standard 3-dimensional (3D) treatment planning system. Treatment was designed to deliver 24 Gy to the target volume while respecting normal tissue tolerances. A custom chair that locked into the treatment table indexing system was constructed for immobilization, and port films verified the reproducibility of setup. Radiation was administered using mixed photon and electron AP fields.

  6. Pocket atlas of normal CT anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.B.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a quick reference for interpreting CT scans of the extracranial organs. This collection of 41 CT scans covers all the major organs of the body: neck and larynx; chest; abdomen; male pelvis; and female pelvis.

  7. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 ... facts MDCT is a very fast type of computed tomography (CT) scan. MDCT creates pictures of the healthy ...

  8. [CT diagnosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis].

    PubMed

    Pan, J S

    1989-02-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of CT in CWP, 100 coal workers were examined with both chest radiograph and CT scan. Comparison was done, the result indicated that both modalities yielded similar sensitivity to simple CWP. The CT score of simple CWP correlated well with ILO classification and 1986 Chinese criteria for staging of pneumoconiosis, whereas in complicated CWP, the CT scan was significantly superior to chest radiograph. CT scan identified readily large opacities. It could detect large opacities in 40% of simple CWP diagnosed on the basis of chest radiograph. CT scan also identified more cavities and calcifications within large opacities. The CT attenuation values were less reliable. The authors were of the opinion that at present CT attenuation values is not recommended for routine evaluation of CWP. PMID:2758921

  9. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  10. ¹⁸F-fluoride PET and PET/CT in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Grant, Frederick D

    2014-07-01

    18F-fluoride PET/CT has been used for a wide variety of indications in children and young adults. Nearly all pediatric 18F-fluoride PET/CTs are performed to evaluate benign conditions. The most common indication is the evaluation of back pain in a wide variety of circumstances, including patients with sports injuries, scoliosis, trauma, and back pain after surgery. The high image quality of 18F-fluoride PET/CT can make it particularly useful for evaluating benign skeletal lesions such as osteoid osteoma and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Quantitative assessment of bone turnover with 18F-fluoride PET/CT may make it useful for assessing the skeleton in patients with metabolic bone diseases, eating disorders, and avascular necrosis. There is little pediatric experience using 18F-fluoride PET/CT for evaluation of skeletal or soft tissue disease in childhood cancers. PMID:25030392

  11. Comparison of stroke infarction between CT perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Arka, Israna Hossain; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Mukari, Shahizon Azura; Law, Zhe Kang; Sahathevan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results of comparison of automatic segmentations of the infarct core, between that obtained from CT perfusion (based on time to peak parameter) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). For each patient, the two imaging volumes were automatically co-registered to a common frame of reference based on an acquired CT angiography image. The accuracy of image registration is measured by the overlap of the segmented brain from both images (CT perfusion and DWI), measured within their common field of view. Due to the limitations of the study, DWI was acquired as a follow up scan up to a week after initial CT based imaging. However, we found significant overlap of the segmented brain (Jaccard indices of approximately 0.8) and the percentage of infarcted brain tissue from the two modalities were still fairly highly correlated (correlation coefficient of approximately 0.9). The results are promising with more data needed in future for clinical inference.

  12. Response of osteosarcoma to preoperative intravenous high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, J.T.; Cohen, M.D.; Mirkin, L.D.; Provisor, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The histologic response of an osteosarcoma to preamputation high-dose methotrexate therapy can be used to determine the optimum maintenance chemotherapy regimen to be administered after amputation. This study evaluates computed tomography (CT) as a method of assessing the response of the tumor to the methotrexate therapy. Nine patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of an extremity had a CT scan of the tumor at initial presentation. This was compared with a second CT scan after four courses of high-dose intravenous methotrexate. Each set of scans was evaluated for changes in bony destruction, soft-tissue mass, pattern of calcification, and extent of tumor involvement of the marrow cavity. These findings were correlated with the histologic response of the tumor as measured by the degree of tumor necrosis. The changes seen on CT correlated well with the degree of the histologic response in seven of the nine patients.

  13. Improving the spatial resolution characteristics of dedicated cone-beam breast CT technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazi, Peymon; Boone, John M.

    2014-03-01

    Prior studies have shown that breast CT (bCT) outperforms mammography in the visualization of mass lesions, yet underperforms in the detection of micro-calcifications. The Breast Tomography Project at UC Davis has successively developed and fabricated four dedicated breast CT scanners, the most recent code-named Doheny, that produce high resolution, fully tomographic images, and overcome the tissue superposition effects of mammography at equivalent radiation dose. Over 600 patients have been imaged thus far in an ongoing clinical trial. The Doheny prototype differs from prior bCT generations in its usage of a pulsed rather than continuous x-ray source and in its utilization of a CMOS flat-panel fluoroscopic detector rather than TFT. Spatial Resolution analysis performed on Doheny indicates that the MTF characteristics have been substantially improved.

  14. CT angiography after 20 years: a transformation in cardiovascular disease characterization continues to advance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Geoffrey D; Leipsic, Jonathon; Joseph Schoepf, U; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2014-06-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5-15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  15. Simulation of trabecular mineralization measurements in micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevrhal, Sven

    2006-08-01

    Micro-CT for bone structural analysis has progressed from an in-vitro laboratory technique to devices for in-vivo assessment of small animals and the peripheral human skeleton. Currently, topological parameters of bone architecture are the primary goals of analysis. Additional measurement of the density or degree of mineralization (DMB) of trabecular and cortical bone at the microscopic level is desirable to study effects of disease and treatment progress. This information is not commonly extracted because of the challenges of accurate measurement and calibration at the tissue level. To assess the accuracy of micro-CT DMB measurements in a realistic but controlled situation, we prepared bone-mimicking watery solutions at concentrations of 100 to 600 mg/cm3 K2PO4H and scanned them with micro-CT, both in glass vials and microcapillary tubes with inner diameters of 50, 100 and 150 mm to simulate trabecular thickness. Values of the linear attenuation coefficients m in the reconstructed image are commonly affected by beam hardening effects for larger samples and by partial volume effects for small volumes. We implemented an iterative reconstruction technique to reduce beam hardening. Partial voluming was sought to be reduced by excluding voxels near the tube wall. With these two measures, improvement on the constancy of the reconstructed voxel values and linearity with solution concentration could be observed to over 90% accuracy. However, since the expected change in real bone is small more measurements are needed to confirm that micro-CT can indeed be adapted to assess bone mineralization at the tissue level.

  16. Augmenting CT cardiac roadmaps with segmented streaming ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qi; Shechter, Guy; Gutiérrez, Luis F.; Stanton, Douglas; Zagorchev, Lyubomir; Laine, Andrew F.; Elgort, Daniel R.

    2007-03-01

    Static X-ray computed tomography (CT) volumes are often used as anatomic roadmaps during catheter-based cardiac interventions performed under X-ray fluoroscopy guidance. These CT volumes provide a high-resolution depiction of soft-tissue structures, but at only a single point within the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Augmenting these static CT roadmaps with segmented myocardial borders extracted from live ultrasound (US) provides intra-operative access to real-time dynamic information about the cardiac anatomy. In this work, using a customized segmentation method based on a 3D active mesh, endocardial borders of the left ventricle were extracted from US image streams (4D data sets) at a frame rate of approximately 5 frames per second. The coordinate systems for CT and US modalities were registered using rigid body registration based on manually selected landmarks, and the segmented endocardial surfaces were overlaid onto the CT volume. The root-mean squared fiducial registration error was 3.80 mm. The accuracy of the segmentation was quantitatively evaluated in phantom and human volunteer studies via comparison with manual tracings on 9 randomly selected frames using a finite-element model (the US image resolutions of the phantom and volunteer data were 1.3 x 1.1 x 1.3 mm and 0.70 x 0.82 x 0.77 mm, respectively). This comparison yielded 3.70+/-2.5 mm (approximately 3 pixels) root-mean squared error (RMSE) in a phantom study and 2.58+/-1.58 mm (approximately 3 pixels) RMSE in a clinical study. The combination of static anatomical roadmap volumes and dynamic intra-operative anatomic information will enable better guidance and feedback for image-guided minimally invasive cardiac interventions.

  17. Dedicated Cone-Beam CT System for Extremity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Al Muhit, Abdullah; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Stayman, J. Webster; Packard, Nathan; Senn, Robert; Yang, Dong; Foos, David H.; Yorkston, John; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide initial assessment of image quality and dose for a cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) scanner dedicated to extremity imaging. Materials and Methods A prototype cone-beam CT scanner has been developed for imaging the extremities, including the weight-bearing lower extremities. Initial technical assessment included evaluation of radiation dose measured as a function of kilovolt peak and tube output (in milliampere seconds), contrast resolution assessed in terms of the signal difference–to-noise ratio (SDNR), spatial resolution semiquantitatively assessed by using a line-pair module from a phantom, and qualitative evaluation of cadaver images for potential diagnostic value and image artifacts by an expert CT observer (musculoskeletal radiologist). Results The dose for a nominal scan protocol (80 kVp, 108 mAs) was 9 mGy (absolute dose measured at the center of a CT dose index phantom). SDNR was maximized with the 80-kVp scan technique, and contrast resolution was sufficient for visualization of muscle, fat, ligaments and/or tendons, cartilage joint space, and bone. Spatial resolution in the axial plane exceeded 15 line pairs per centimeter. Streaks associated with x-ray scatter (in thicker regions of the patient—eg, the knee), beam hardening (about cortical bone—eg, the femoral shaft), and cone-beam artifacts (at joint space surfaces oriented along the scanning plane—eg, the interphalangeal joints) presented a slight impediment to visualization. Cadaver images (elbow, hand, knee, and foot) demonstrated excellent visibility of bone detail and good soft-tissue visibility suitable to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal indications. Conclusion A dedicated extremity cone-beam CT scanner capable of imaging upper and lower extremities (including weight-bearing examinations) provides sufficient image quality and favorable dose characteristics to warrant further evaluation for clinical use. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for

  18. The evolution of PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bettye G

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) was the first fused or combined medical imaging technique. Although PET-CT has received widespread acclaim as a major imaging advancement, many questions have surfaced regarding its use. This article answers some of these questions and examines what PET-CT means to medicine and the medical imaging community. PMID:15835615

  19. Calibrator Blocks For Computerized Tomography (CT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, H. Peter

    1990-01-01

    Sets of calibrator blocks developed for use with industrial computerized tomography (CT) systems. Set of blocks (or number of stacked sets of blocks) placed on object table of CT system and scanned in usual way. Blocks include holes of known size, shape, and location. Appearance of holes in output image of CT system used to verify operation of system.

  20. CT45A1 acts as a new proto-oncogene to trigger tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, B; Gao, A; Pan, Y; Zhang, G; Tu, J; Zhou, Y; Yang, P; Cao, Z; Wei, Q; Ding, Y; Zhang, J; Zhao, Y; Zhou, Q

    2014-01-01

    Cancer/testis antigen (CTA)-45 family (CT45) belongs to a new family of genes in phylogenetics and is absent in normal tissues except for testis, but is aberrantly overexpressed in various cancer types. Whether CT45 and other CTAs act as proto-oncogenes has not been determined. Using breast cancer as a model, we found that CT45A1, a representative CT45 family member, alone had a weak tumorigenic effect. However, its neoplastic potency was greatly enhanced in the presence of growth factors. Overexpression of CT45A1 in breast cancer cells markedly upregulated various oncogenic and metastatic genes, constitutively activated ERK and CREB signaling pathways, promoted epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and increased cell stemness, tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastasis, whereas silencing CT45A1 significantly reduced cancer cell migration and invasion. We propose that CT45A1 functions as a novel proto-oncogene to trigger oncogenesis and metastasis. CT45A1 and other CT45 members are therefore excellent targets for anticancer drug discovery and targeted tumor therapy, and valuable genes in the study of a molecular phylogenetic tree. PMID:24901056

  1. [The role of connective tissue dysplasia in the forming of mitral valve prolapse].

    PubMed

    Filipenko, P S; Malookaia, Iu S

    2006-01-01

    Connective tissue (CT) is a multifunctional universal structure of great importance to the human organism. Constituting about 50% of the body mass, CT forms a frame (skeleton) and outer cover (skin), as well as the inner medium, through which all structural elements receive nutrients and extract metabolic products. The great number of links, constituting the CT system, each of which is controlled genetically and is liable to genetic lesions, creates conditions for heterogeneity of malformations and diseases involving CT. Non-differentiated CT dysplasia (NDCTD) is a genetically heterogenous group, presenting a basis for various chronic diseases. NDCTD may present the cause of dysplastic changes in the CT of different organs and systems. Thanks to modern diagnostic techniques, NDCTD is revealed frequently. NDCTD is underlied by molecular-, onto-, and pathogenetic mechanisms, leading to structural and functional changes in CT. This CT "weakness" is manifested by the peculiarities of the structure of various organs and systems. Mesenchimal heart dysplasias are the most widespread visceral markers of the given CT pathology. CT dysplasias of the heart are often combined with varied manifestations of system CT anomaly. Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the most wide-spread and well-studied minor heart anomalies. Primary MVP is a hereditary or congenital pathology and is not connected with a particular disease. It is a genetic pathology--CT dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance. Patients with MVP have an increased expression of Bw35 antigen of HLA system, which causes dysmetabolism of collagen in the mitral cusps. It has been revealed that tissue deficiency of magnesium is associated with antigen expression and correlates with clinical symptoms in MVP. Exogenic factors influencing MVP have been described. PMID:17294876

  2. Exploring miniature insect brains using micro-CT scanning techniques.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dylan B; Bernhardt, Galina; Raine, Nigel E; Abel, Richard L; Sykes, Dan; Ahmed, Farah; Pedroso, Inti; Gill, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to explore soft tissue structures in detail is important in understanding animal physiology and how this determines features such as movement, behaviour and the impact of trauma on regular function. Here we use advances in micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technology to explore the brain of an important insect pollinator and model organism, the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris). Here we present a method for accurate imaging and exploration of insect brains that keeps brain tissue free from trauma and in its natural stereo-geometry, and showcase our 3D reconstructions and analyses of 19 individual brains at high resolution. Development of this protocol allows relatively rapid and cost effective brain reconstructions, making it an accessible methodology to the wider scientific community. The protocol describes the necessary steps for sample preparation, tissue staining, micro-CT scanning and 3D reconstruction, followed by a method for image analysis using the freeware SPIERS. These image analysis methods describe how to virtually extract key composite structures from the insect brain, and we demonstrate the application and precision of this method by calculating structural volumes and investigating the allometric relationships between bumblebee brain structures. PMID:26908205

  3. Exploring miniature insect brains using micro-CT scanning techniques

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dylan B.; Bernhardt, Galina; Raine, Nigel E.; Abel, Richard L.; Sykes, Dan; Ahmed, Farah; Pedroso, Inti; Gill, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to explore soft tissue structures in detail is important in understanding animal physiology and how this determines features such as movement, behaviour and the impact of trauma on regular function. Here we use advances in micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technology to explore the brain of an important insect pollinator and model organism, the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris). Here we present a method for accurate imaging and exploration of insect brains that keeps brain tissue free from trauma and in its natural stereo-geometry, and showcase our 3D reconstructions and analyses of 19 individual brains at high resolution. Development of this protocol allows relatively rapid and cost effective brain reconstructions, making it an accessible methodology to the wider scientific community. The protocol describes the necessary steps for sample preparation, tissue staining, micro-CT scanning and 3D reconstruction, followed by a method for image analysis using the freeware SPIERS. These image analysis methods describe how to virtually extract key composite structures from the insect brain, and we demonstrate the application and precision of this method by calculating structural volumes and investigating the allometric relationships between bumblebee brain structures. PMID:26908205

  4. A hypothesis testing approach for microwave breast imaging in conjunction with CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Kelly, Patrick A.; Siqueira, Paul; Das, Mini

    2010-04-01

    The recent findings of high heterogeneity of human breast tissue and much lower than predicted dielectric contrast between tumors and their host tissue have raised questions about the potential utility of stand-alone microwave breast imaging techniques. Multimodal approaches that employ microwaves together with other imaging techniques seem more promising. This study investigates a CT-microwave combination in which microwave detection makes use of prior information obtained from volumetric CT scans and knowledge of tissue dielectric properties. In particular, a detailed patient-specific tissue distribution is first obtained from a 3D-CT scan of the breast under exam. It is assumed that from this scan a limited suspect region is identified. Then from recent research results on the dielectric properties of breast tissue, complex permittivity (dielectric constant and conductivity) maps of the breast can be constructed under the hypotheses of normal and cancerous tissue in the suspect region. These in turn can be used with electromagnetic (EM) simulation software to generate empirical distributions for the microwave system observations under each hypothesis. Microwave detection is then performed. Instead of trying to recover a complete dielectric image of the breast from the microwave scan, the question of interest in this approach is simply which hypothesis is more consistent with the observed electromagnetic response of the microwave system. A hypothesis testing method based on the likelihood ratio for the empirical distributions and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) optimization is proposed. The results from a simple idealized test case show good potential and invite further study.

  5. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... Many different types of bacteria can cause this infection. A very severe and usually deadly form of necrotizing soft tissue infection is due to the ...

  6. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... L. Goldstein, MD, MMSc (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  7. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes , which is sometimes called "flesh-eating bacteria." Necrotizing soft tissue infection develops when ...

  8. SU-E-J-72: Dosimetric Study of Cone-Beam CT-Based Radiation Treatment Planning Using a Patient-Specific Stepwise CT-Density Table

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S; Le, Q; Mutaf, Y; Yi, B; D’Souza, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess dose calculation accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) based treatment plans using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density conversion table in comparison to conventional CT-based treatment plans. Methods: Unlike CT-based treatment planning which use fixed CT-density table, this study used patient-specific CT-density table to minimize the errors in reconstructed mass densities due to the effects of CBCT Hounsfield unit (HU) uncertainties. The patient-specific CT-density table was a stepwise function which maps HUs to only 6 classes of materials with different mass densities: air (0.00121g/cm3), lung (0.26g/cm3), adipose (0.95g/cm3), tissue (1.05 g/cm3), cartilage/bone (1.6g/cm3), and other (3g/cm3). HU thresholds to define different materials were adjusted for each CBCT via best match with the known tissue types in these images. Dose distributions were compared between CT-based plans and CBCT-based plans (IMRT/VMAT) for four types of treatment sites: head and neck (HN), lung, pancreas, and pelvis. For dosimetric comparison, PTV mean dose in both plans were compared. A gamma analysis was also performed to directly compare dosimetry in the two plans. Results: Compared to CT-based plans, the differences for PTV mean dose were 0.1% for pelvis, 1.1% for pancreas, 1.8% for lung, and −2.5% for HN in CBCT-based plans. The gamma passing rate was 99.8% for pelvis, 99.6% for pancreas, and 99.3% for lung with 3%/3mm criteria, and 80.5% for head and neck with 5%/3mm criteria. Different dosimetry accuracy level was observed: 1% for pelvis, 3% for lung and pancreas, and 5% for head and neck. Conclusion: By converting CBCT data to 6 classes of materials for dose calculation, 3% of dose calculation accuracy can be achieved for anatomical sites studied here, except HN which had a 5% accuracy. CBCT-based treatment planning using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density table can facilitate the evaluation of dosimetry changes resulting from variation in patient anatomy.

  9. Presence of calcitonin-like immunoreactivity (iCT) in human prostate gland: evidence for iCT secretion by cultured prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, G V; Noble, M J; Austenfeld, M; Weigel, J; Deftos, L J; Mebust, W K

    1992-01-01

    Immunoreactive calcitonin (iCT) has been detected in human prostate tissue extracts as well as seminal plasma. The present studies were undertaken to examine whether iSCT (immunoreactive salmon CT-like human peptide) co-exists with iHCT (thyroid CT-like substance) in human prostate tissue extracts, and whether these substances are secreted by primary prostate cells in culture. Since the local secretion of these substances seems to increase in some neoplasms, a second objective of the study was to examine whether basal secretion of iCTs from primary prostate cells is increased in carcinoma. The present results have shown that both iHCT and iSCT were present in prostate tissue extracts. The mean iHCT levels in extracts of benign hyperplastic prostates (BPH) were 0.59 ng/g prostate, and these were significantly lower than iHCT concentrations in prostatic carcinoma (PC) (2.53 ng/g). No significant differences in their iSCT contents were observed. However, the results from culture of over 90 individual prostate tissue specimens from BPH or PC indicate that primary prostate cells secreted detectable quantities of iSCT and the basal release of this material from PC prostate cultures was almost four-fold higher than that from BPH prostate cultures. These results suggest that a CT-like immunoreactive material is secreted by primary prostate cells in culture, and the basal secretion of this material is significantly higher in PC cells as compared to BPH cells. Endogenous secretion of prostatic CT, and the elevation of its expression in PC suggest that it may serve as a regulatory factor in the pathophysiology of the prostate gland. PMID:1409122

  10. New AIRS: The medical imaging software for segmentation and registration of elastic organs in SPECT/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widita, R.; Kurniadi, R.; Darma, Y.; Perkasa, Y. S.; Trianti, N.

    2012-06-01

    We have been successfully improved our software, Automated Image Registration and Segmentation (AIRS), to fuse the CT and SPECT images of elastic organs. Segmentation and registration of elastic organs presents many challenges. Many artifacts can arise in SPECT/CT scans. Also, different organs and tissues have very similar gray levels, which consign thresholding to limited utility. We have been developed a new software to solve different registration and segmentation problems that arises in tomographic data sets. It will be demonstrated that the information obtained by SPECT/CT is more accurate in evaluating patients/objects than that obtained from either SPECT or CT alone. We used multi-modality registration which is amenable for images produced by different modalities and having unclear boundaries between tissues. The segmentation components used in this software is region growing algorithms which have proven to be an effective approach for image segmentation. Our method is designed to perform with clinically acceptable speed, using accelerated techniques (multiresolution).

  11. Multiparametric PET/CT-perfusion does not add significant additional information for initial staging in lung cancer compared with standard PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of CT-perfusion (CTP), 18F-FDG-PET/CT and histological parameters, and the possible added value of CTP to FDG-PET/CT in the initial staging of lung cancer. Methods Fifty-four consecutive patients (median age 65 years, 15 females, 39 males) with suspected lung cancer were evaluated prospectively by CT-perfusion scan and 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan. Overall, 46 tumors were identified. CTP parameters blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and mean transit time (MTT) of the tumor tissue were calculated. Intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) was assessed quantitatively. Differences in CTP parameters concerning tumor type, location, PET positivity of lymph nodes, TNM status, and UICC stage were analyzed. Spearman correlation analyses between CTP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, PETvol, and TLG), MVD, tumor size, and tumor stage were performed. Results The mean BF (mL/100 mL min-1), BV (mL/100 mL), and MTT (s) was 35.5, 8.4, and 14.2, respectively. The BF and BV were lower in tumors with PET-positive lymph nodes (p = 0.02). However, the CTP values were not significantly different among the N stages. The CTP values were not different, depending on tumor size and location. No significant correlation was found between CTP parameters and MVD. Conclusions Overall, the CTP information showed only little additional information for the initial staging compared with standard FDG-PET/CT. Low perfusion in lung tumors might possibly be associated with metabolically active regional lymph nodes. Apart from that, both CTP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameter sets may reflect different pathophysiological mechanisms in lung cancer. PMID:24450990

  12. K-edge ratio method for identification of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents by spectral CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, H; Ay, M R; Shiran, M B; Soltanian-Zadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recently introduced energy-sensitive X-ray CT makes it feasible to discriminate different nanoparticulate contrast materials. The purpose of this work is to present a K-edge ratio method for differentiating multiple simultaneous contrast agents using spectral CT. Methods: The ratio of two images relevant to energy bins straddling the K-edge of the materials is calculated using an analytic CT simulator. In the resulting parametric map, the selected contrast agent regions can be identified using a thresholding algorithm. The K-edge ratio algorithm is applied to spectral images of simulated phantoms to identify and differentiate up to four simultaneous and targeted CT contrast agents. Results: We show that different combinations of simultaneous CT contrast agents can be identified by the proposed K-edge ratio method when energy-sensitive CT is used. In the K-edge parametric maps, the pixel values for biological tissues and contrast agents reach a maximum of 0.95, whereas for the selected contrast agents, the pixel values are larger than 1.10. The number of contrast agents that can be discriminated is limited owing to photon starvation. For reliable material discrimination, minimum photon counts corresponding to 140 kVp, 100 mAs and 5-mm slice thickness must be used. Conclusion: The proposed K-edge ratio method is a straightforward and fast method for identification and discrimination of multiple simultaneous CT contrast agents. Advances in knowledge: A new spectral CT-based algorithm is proposed which provides a new concept of molecular CT imaging by non-iteratively identifying multiple contrast agents when they are simultaneously targeting different organs. PMID:23934964

  13. US and CT of the Liver after Electric Shock.

    PubMed

    Sofić, Amela; Bešlić, Nermina; Efendić, Alma; Čarovac, Aladin; Šabanović, Jusuf; Jahić, Elma; Bukvić, Melika; Krakonja, Fikreta; Kupusović, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Liver injuries caused by high voltage electricity are rare and result in high mortality and morbidity. They are produced by the resistance to the passage of electrical current through the tissue, which creates heat that leads to coagulation necrosis and rupture of the cell membrane. We present a case of an electrical injury to the liver, diagnosed by ultrasound and CT in a 39-year-old man who presented with skin burns on his right hand and right hemiabdomen. Injuries occurred after the contact with 220 kV high voltage electricity. PMID:27006849

  14. US and CT of the Liver after Electric Shock

    PubMed Central

    Sofić, Amela; Bešlić, Nermina; Efendić, Alma; Čarovac, Aladin; Šabanović, Jusuf; Jahić, Elma; Bukvić, Melika; Krakonja, Fikreta; Kupusović, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Liver injuries caused by high voltage electricity are rare and result in high mortality and morbidity. They are produced by the resistance to the passage of electrical current through the tissue, which creates heat that leads to coagulation necrosis and rupture of the cell membrane. We present a case of an electrical injury to the liver, diagnosed by ultrasound and CT in a 39-year-old man who presented with skin burns on his right hand and right hemiabdomen. Injuries occurred after the contact with 220 kV high voltage electricity. PMID:27006849

  15. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  16. CT colonography: techniques, indications, findings.

    PubMed

    Mang, Thomas; Graser, Anno; Schima, Wolfgang; Maier, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive technique for imaging the entire colon. Based on a helical thin-section CT of the cleansed and air-distended colon, two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections are used for image interpretation. Several clinical improvements in patient preparation, technical advances in CT, and new developments in evaluation software have allowed CTC to develop into a powerful diagnostic tool. It is already well established as a reliable diagnostic tool in symptomatic patients. Many experts currently consider CTC a comparable alternative to conventional colonoscopy, although there is still debate about its sensitivity for the detection of colonic polyps in a screening population. This article summarizes the main indications, the current techniques in patient preparation, data acquisition and data analysis as well as imaging features for common benign and malignant colorectal lesions. PMID:17224254

  17. Perfusion CT estimates photosensitizer uptake and biodistribution in a rabbit orthotopic pancreas cancer model: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Stewart, Errol E.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was hypothesized that perfusion computed tomography (CT) blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and vascular permeability surface-area (PS) product parameters would be predictive of therapeutic anti-cancer agent uptake in pancreatic cancer, facilitating image-guided interpretation of human treatments. The hypothesis was tested in an orthotopic rabbit model of pancreatic cancer, by establishing the model, imaging with endoscopic ultrasound and contrast CT, and spatially comparing the perfusion maps to the ex vivo uptake values of injected photosensitizer, vertepofin. Materials and Methods Nine New Zealand White rabbits underwent direct pancreas implantation of VX2 tumors and CT perfusion or endoscopic ultrasound was performed 10 days post-implantation. Verteporfin was injected during CT imaging and tissue was removed 1 h post-injection for frozen tissue fluorescence scanning. Region-of-interest comparisons of CT data with ex vivo fluorescence and histopathological staining were performed. Results DCE-CT showed enhanced BF, BV, and PS in the tumor rim, and decreased BF, BV and PS in the tumor core. Significant correlations were found between ex vivo verteporfin concentration and each of BF, BV, and PS. Conclusions The efficacy of verteporfin delivery in tumors is estimated by perfusion CT, providing a non-invasive method of mapping photosensitizer dose. PMID:25683500

  18. A registration-based segmentation method with application to adiposity analysis of mice microCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bing; Joshi, Anand; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Longo, Valter D.; Conti, Peter S.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2014-04-01

    Obesity is a global health problem, particularly in the U.S. where one third of adults are obese. A reliable and accurate method of quantifying obesity is necessary. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) are two measures of obesity that reflect different associated health risks, but accurate measurements in humans or rodent models are difficult. In this paper we present an automatic, registration-based segmentation method for mouse adiposity studies using microCT images. We co-register the subject CT image and a mouse CT atlas. Our method is based on surface matching of the microCT image and an atlas. Surface-based elastic volume warping is used to match the internal anatomy. We acquired a whole body scan of a C57BL6/J mouse injected with contrast agent using microCT and created a whole body mouse atlas by manually delineate the boundaries of the mouse and major organs. For method verification we scanned a C57BL6/J mouse from the base of the skull to the distal tibia. We registered the obtained mouse CT image to our atlas. Preliminary results show that we can warp the atlas image to match the posture and shape of the subject CT image, which has significant differences from the atlas. We plan to use this software tool in longitudinal obesity studies using mouse models.

  19. A Correlative Method for Imaging Identical Regions of Samples by Micro-CT, Light Microscopy, and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sengle, Gerhard; Tufa, Sara F.; Sakai, Lynn Y.; Zulliger, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method in which a precise region of interest within an intact organism is spatially mapped in three dimensions by non-invasive micro-computed X-ray tomography (micro-CT), then further evaluated by light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tissues are prepared as if for TEM including osmium fixation, which imparts soft tissue contrast in the micro-CT due to its strong X-ray attenuation. This method may therefore be applied to embedded, archived TEM samples. Upon selection of a two-dimensional (2-D) projection from a region of interest (ROI) within the three-dimensional volume, the epoxy-embedded sample is oriented for microtomy so that the sectioning plane is aligned with the micro-CT projection. Registration is verified by overlaying LM images with 2-D micro-CT projections. Structures that are poorly resolved in the micro-CT may be evaluated at TEM resolution by observing the next serial ultrathin section, thereby accessing the same ROI by all three imaging techniques. We compare white adipose tissue within the forelimbs of mice harboring a lipid-altering mutation with their littermate controls. We demonstrate that individual osmium-stained lipid droplets as small as 15 µm and separated by as little as 35 µm may be discerned as separate entities in the micro-CT, validating this to be a high-resolution, non-destructive technique for evaluation of fat content. PMID:23264636

  20. CT-assisted agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, James H.; Yancey, Robert N.

    1996-11-01

    The next century will witness at least two great revolutions in the way goods are produced. First, workers will use the medium of virtual reality in all aspects of marketing, research, development, prototyping, manufacturing, sales and service. Second, market forces will drive manufacturing towards small-lot production and just-in-time delivery. Already, we can discern the merging of these megatrends into what some are calling agile manufacturing. Under this new paradigm, parts and processes will be designed and engineered within the mind of a computer, tooled and manufactured by the offspring of today's rapid prototyping equipment, and evaluated for performance and reliability by advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and sophisticated computational models. Computed tomography (CT) is the premier example of an NDE method suitable for future agile manufacturing activities. It is the only modality that provides convenient access to the full suite of engineering data that users will need to avail themselves of computer- aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer- aided engineering capabilities, as well as newly emerging reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and solid freeform fabrication technologies. As such, CT is assured a central, utilitarian role in future industrial operations. An overview of this exciting future for industrial CT is presented.

  1. Automated extraction method for the center line of spinal canal and its application to the spinal curvature quantification in torso X-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Zhou, Xiangrong; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Miyamoto, Kei; Kobayashi, Tatsunori; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    X-ray CT images have been widely used in clinical routine in recent years. CT images scanned by a modern CT scanner can show the details of various organs and tissues. This means various organs and tissues can be simultaneously interpreted on CT images. However, CT image interpretation requires a lot of time and energy. Therefore, support for interpreting CT images based on image-processing techniques is expected. The interpretation of the spinal curvature is important for clinicians because spinal curvature is associated with various spinal disorders. We propose a quantification scheme of the spinal curvature based on the center line of spinal canal on CT images. The proposed scheme consists of four steps: (1) Automated extraction of the skeletal region based on CT number thresholding. (2) Automated extraction of the center line of spinal canal. (3) Generation of the median plane image of spine, which is reformatted based on the spinal canal. (4) Quantification of the spinal curvature. The proposed scheme was applied to 10 cases, and compared with the Cobb angle that is commonly used by clinicians. We found that a high-correlation (for the 95% confidence interval, lumbar lordosis: 0.81-0.99) between values obtained by the proposed (vector) method and Cobb angle. Also, the proposed method can provide the reproducible result (inter- and intra-observer variability: within 2°). These experimental results suggested a possibility that the proposed method was efficient for quantifying the spinal curvature on CT images.

  2. Human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor subtype distribution: widespread and subtype-selective expression of alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 mRNA in multiple tissues.

    PubMed

    Eason, M G; Liggett, S B

    1993-07-01

    At present, molecular cloning and pharmacological studies have delineated three human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2AR) subtypes, alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2. Assignment of the alpha 2AR subtypes to specific functions has been limited by an unclear definition of tissue alpha 2AR expression outside of the central nervous system. It has been suggested that alpha 2C4 expression is confined to the brain, that alpha 2C2 expression is only in the liver and kidney, and that there is nearly ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C10. However, this is based on studies of a limited number of rat tissues or on studies using non-species-specific approaches. Therefore, to define alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 tissue expression, we used reverse transcription of total RNA isolated from 20 human tissues, followed by amplification of alpha 2AR cDNA using the polymerase chain reaction. This technique provided two advantages: high sensitivity and, with the use of subtype-specific oligonucleotide primers and probes, differentiation between the alpha 2AR subtypes. The tissues studied were aorta, vena cava, heart (epicardium and endocardium), lung, skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas (head and tail), fat (perinephric and subcutaneous), kidney (cortex and medulla), prostate, stomach, ileum, jejunum, colon, adrenal gland, and spleen. We found that the majority of these tissues expressed alpha 2C10, with the exceptions being the head of the pancreas, subcutaneous fat, colon, and spleen. In marked distinction to other studies, however, we found a prolific expression of the alpha 2C4 and alpha 2C2 subtypes. Expression of alpha 2C4 was found in all tissues with the exception of liver, fat, stomach, and colon, and a virtually ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C2 was found, with the exception of epicardium. Of all tissues studied, only colon and subcutaneous fat expressed a single alpha 2AR subtype, which was alpha 2C2. Thus, the alpha 2AR subtypes do not have a confined expression but

  3. Dosimetric impact of image artifact from a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent; Podgorsak, Matthew B.; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Malhotra, Harish K.; Wang, Iris Z.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Traditional computed tomography (CT) units provide a maximum scan field-of-view (sFOV) diameter of 50 cm and a limited bore size, which cannot accommodate a large patient habitus or an extended simulation setup in radiation therapy (RT). Wide-bore CT scanners with increased bore size were developed to address these needs. Some scanners have the capacity to reconstruct the CT images at an extended FOV (eFOV), through data interpolation or extrapolation, using projection data acquired with a conventional sFOV. Objects that extend past the sFOV for eFOV reconstruction may generate image artifacts resulting from truncated projection data; this may distort CT numbers and structure contours in the region beyond the sFOV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of image artifacts from eFOV reconstruction with a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. Methods: Testing phantoms (i.e., a mini CT phantom with equivalent tissue inserts, a set of CT normal phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms of the thorax and the pelvis) were used to evaluate eFOV artifacts. Reference baseline images of these phantoms were acquired with the phantom centrally positioned within the sFOV. For comparison, the phantoms were then shifted laterally and scanned partially outside the sFOV, but still within the eFOV. Treatment plans were generated for the thoracic and pelvic anthropomorphic phantoms utilizing the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) to study the potential effects of eFOV artifacts on dose calculations. All dose calculations of baseline and test treatment plans were carried out using the same MU. Results: Results show that both body contour and CT numbers are altered by image artifacts in eFOV reconstruction. CT number distortions of up to -356 HU for bone tissue and up to 323 HU for lung tissue were observed in the mini CT phantom. Results from the large body normal phantom, which is close to a clinical patient size, show

  4. CT and radiographic appearance of extracranial Onyx(®) embolization.

    PubMed

    Jia, J B; Green, C S; Cohen, A J; Helmy, M

    2015-03-01

    Onyx(®) (ev3, Irvine, CA, USA) is a liquid embolic agent composed of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide used for the treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations. Onyx is a preferred embolizing agent due to its unique properties, non-adhesive nature, and durability. In addition to its approved intracranial application, Onyx is also being used successfully in extracranial embolization in areas including extracranial aneurisms and vascular malformations, trauma, gastrointestinal bleeding, and neoplasms. Because of its increasing utilization, it is important for reporting radiologists to be able to recognize its extracranial appearance across different imaging techniques and to be familiar with its uses. The goal of this review is to describe the extracranial uses of Onyx and its appearance in various extracranial locations at radiography and CT, while providing didactic examples. Onyx appears radiodense at CT and plain radiography and has a curvilinear pattern following the expected path of the vessel embolized. At CT, Onyx creates streak artefact that may obstruct the view of surrounding tissues consistent with descriptions of other tantalum devices. PMID:25481053

  5. Quantification of emphysema severity by histogram analysis of CT scans.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Paulo R S; Padfield, Dirk R; Ross, James C; Miller, James V; Dutta, Sandeep; Gautham, Sardar Mal

    2005-01-01

    Emphysema is characterized by the destruction and over distension of lung tissue, which manifest on high resolution computer tomography (CT) images as regions of low attenuation. Typically, it is diagnosed by clinical symptoms, physical examination, pulmonary function tests, and X-ray and CT imaging. In this paper we discuss a quantitative imaging approach to analyze emphysema which employs low-level segmentations of CT images that partition the data into perceptually relevant regions. We constructed multi-dimensional histograms of feature values computed over the image segmentation. For each region in the segmentation, we derive a rich set of feature measurements. While we can use any combination of physical and geometric features, we found that limiting the scope to two features - the mean attenuation across a region and the region area - is effective. The subject histogram is compared to a set of canonical histograms representative of various stages of emphysema using the Earth Mover's Distance metric. Disease severity is assigned based on which canonical histogram is most similar to the subject histogram. Experimental results with 81 cases of emphysema at different stages of disease progression show good agreement against the reading of an expert radiologist. PMID:16685912

  6. Rodent Brain Imaging with X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngho; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu; Hasegawa, Bruce; Franc, Benjamin

    2007-03-01

    High resolution compact computed tomography (CT) systems have become increasingly important for examining morphology in small animal models of human biology and disease. However, functional measurements of blood flow and tissue perfusion are more challenging due to limited temporal resolution and need for x-ray absorptive contrast media. We therefore have developed methodologies which use x-ray CT for imaging hemorrhagic stroke in the brain of the intact rat. The head of the anesthetized rat was secured in an immobilization device, followed by in vivo imaging with a dedicated small animal CT scanner (X-O, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). Imaging was performed without iodine contrast to visualize a very small volume (less than 0.1 ml) of arterial blood in a rat model of intracranial hemorrhage, and with iodine contrast (iopromide, 300 mgI/ml) to visualize carotid and cerebral arteries in order to study aneurysms and other vascular formations that may precede or indicate intracranial hemorrhage.

  7. Modern CT applications in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Garland, Melissa R; Lawler, Leo P; Whitaker, Brent R; Walker, Ian D F; Corl, Frank M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-01-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) is used primarily for diagnosis in humans, it can also be used to diagnose disease in veterinary patients. CT and associated three-dimensional reconstruction have a role in diagnosis of a range of illnesses in a variety of animals. In a sea turtle with failure to thrive, CT showed a nodal mass in the chest, granulomas in the lungs, and a ball in the stomach. CT of a sea dragon with balance and movement problems showed absence of the swim bladder. In a sloth with failure to thrive, CT allowed diagnosis of a coin in the intestine. CT of a puffin with failure to thrive showed a mass in the chest, which was found to be a hematoma. In a smooth-sided toad whose head was tilted to one side and who was circling in that direction, CT showed partial destruction of the temporal bone. CT of a domestic cat with listlessness showed a mass with focal calcification, which proved to be a leiomyosarcoma. CT of a sea otter showed pectus excavatum, which is caused by the animal smashing oysters against its chest. In a Japanese koi with abdominal swelling, CT allowed diagnosis of a hepatoma. PMID:11796898

  8. MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT in primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhai, Zhijun; Wang, Yang; Zuo, Changjing

    2015-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (PRMC) is an extremely rare neoplasm. We present a case of PRMC with MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT findings. Abdominal MRI showed a cystic lesion in the retroperitoneum with a mural nodule. The mural nodule showed progressive enhancement on enhanced CT and intense FDG uptake on early PET/CT with increased SUVmax on delayed PET/CT. Laparoscopy was performed. Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was confirmed histopathologically. Metastasis from gastrointestinal tract or ovary was excluded. This case indicates, although rare, PRMC should be considered when a hypermetabolic retroperitoneal cystic lesion with bilateral normal ovaries is found on FDG PET/CT. PMID:24445275

  9. Micro-CT of Carotid Arteries: A Tool for Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Andreas; Wenke, Ruediger; Roemer, Frank W.; Lynch, John A.; Gatzka, Christian; Priebe, Markus; Guermazi, Ali; Grigorian, Mikayel; Heller, Martin; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan

    2004-11-15

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a high-resolution, nondestructive tool for two- and three-dimensional imaging and quantification. The ability of this technique to assess atherosclerosis of the carotid artery was evaluated in three human cadaver samples based on the original axial acquisitions, multiplanar reconstructions and volume rendering techniques. Quantitative analysis included the calculation of: (1) the original lumen perimeter, original lumen area, plaque area, residual lumen area, calcified area and gross sectional area reduction of the vascular lumen from two-dimensional slices; (2) the total tissue volume, soft tissue volume and calcified tissue volume from the three-dimensional data set. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of micro-CT as a supplementary method for the two- and three-dimensional ex vivo evaluation of carotid atherosclerosis.

  10. Photoacoustic characterization of ovarian tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Andres; Gamelin, John; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers with a five-year survival rate of only 30%. Because current imaging techniques (ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET) are not capable of detecting ovarian cancer early, most diagnoses occur in later stages (III/IV). Thus many women are not correctly diagnosed until the cancer becomes widely metastatic. On the other hand, while the majority of women with a detectable ultrasound abnormality do not harbor a cancer, they all undergo unnecessary oophorectomy. Hence, new imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed for improving the specificity of ovarian cancer detection and characterization. One such technique is photoacoustic imaging, which has great potential to reveal early tumor angiogenesis through intrinsic optical absorption contrast from hemoglobin or extrinsic contrast from conjugated agents binding to appropriate molecular receptors. To better understand the cancer disease process of ovarian tissue using photoacoustic imaging, it is necessary to first characterize the properties of normal ovarian tissue. We have imaged ex-vivo ovarian tissue using a 3D co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system. The system is capable of volumetric imaging by means of electronic focusing. Detecting and visualizing small features from multiple viewing angles is possible without the need for any mechanical movement. The results show strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea, and low absorption from follicles. We will present correlation of photoacoustic images from animals with histology. Potential application of this technology would be the noninvasive imaging of the ovaries for screening or diagnostic purposes.

  11. Temporal subtraction contrast-enhanced dedicated breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Yang, Kai; Boone, John M.

    2016-09-01

    The development of a framework of deformable image registration and segmentation for the purpose of temporal subtraction contrast-enhanced breast CT is described. An iterative histogram-based two-means clustering method was used for the segmentation. Dedicated breast CT images were segmented into background (air), adipose, fibroglandular and skin components. Fibroglandular tissue was classified as either normal or contrast-enhanced then divided into tiers for the purpose of categorizing degrees of contrast enhancement. A variant of the Demons deformable registration algorithm, intensity difference adaptive Demons (IDAD), was developed to correct for the large deformation forces that stemmed from contrast enhancement. In this application, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated in both mathematically-simulated and physically-acquired phantom images. Clinical usage and accuracy of the temporal subtraction framework was demonstrated using contrast-enhanced breast CT datasets from five patients. Registration performance was quantified using normalized cross correlation (NCC), symmetric uncertainty coefficient, normalized mutual information (NMI), mean square error (MSE) and target registration error (TRE). The proposed method outperformed conventional affine and other Demons variations in contrast enhanced breast CT image registration. In simulation studies, IDAD exhibited improvement in MSE (0–16%), NCC (0–6%), NMI (0–13%) and TRE (0–34%) compared to the conventional Demons approaches, depending on the size and intensity of the enhancing lesion. As lesion size and contrast enhancement levels increased, so did the improvement. The drop in the correlation between the pre- and post-contrast images for the largest enhancement levels in phantom studies is less than 1.2% (150 Hounsfield units). Registration error, measured by TRE, shows only submillimeter mismatches between the concordant anatomical target points in all patient studies. The algorithm was

  12. Temporal subtraction contrast-enhanced dedicated breast CT.

    PubMed

    Gazi, Peymon M; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Yang, Kai; Boone, John M

    2016-09-01

    The development of a framework of deformable image registration and segmentation for the purpose of temporal subtraction contrast-enhanced breast CT is described. An iterative histogram-based two-means clustering method was used for the segmentation. Dedicated breast CT images were segmented into background (air), adipose, fibroglandular and skin components. Fibroglandular tissue was classified as either normal or contrast-enhanced then divided into tiers for the purpose of categorizing degrees of contrast enhancement. A variant of the Demons deformable registration algorithm, intensity difference adaptive Demons (IDAD), was developed to correct for the large deformation forces that stemmed from contrast enhancement. In this application, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated in both mathematically-simulated and physically-acquired phantom images. Clinical usage and accuracy of the temporal subtraction framework was demonstrated using contrast-enhanced breast CT datasets from five patients. Registration performance was quantified using normalized cross correlation (NCC), symmetric uncertainty coefficient, normalized mutual information (NMI), mean square error (MSE) and target registration error (TRE). The proposed method outperformed conventional affine and other Demons variations in contrast enhanced breast CT image registration. In simulation studies, IDAD exhibited improvement in MSE (0-16%), NCC (0-6%), NMI (0-13%) and TRE (0-34%) compared to the conventional Demons approaches, depending on the size and intensity of the enhancing lesion. As lesion size and contrast enhancement levels increased, so did the improvement. The drop in the correlation between the pre- and post-contrast images for the largest enhancement levels in phantom studies is less than 1.2% (150 Hounsfield units). Registration error, measured by TRE, shows only submillimeter mismatches between the concordant anatomical target points in all patient studies. The algorithm was

  13. Quantitative cone-beam CT imaging in radiation therapy using planning CT as a prior: First patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Niu Tianye; Al-Basheer, Ahmad; Zhu Lei

    2012-04-15

    the optional iterations and the gas pocket and couch matching. The image correction on the second patient is more challenging due to the effects of gas pockets and attenuating couch. The improved framework with all new components is used to fully evaluate the correction performance. The enhanced image quality has been evaluated using mean CT number and spatial nonuniformity (SNU) error as well as contrast improvement factor. If the pCT image is considered as the ground truth, on the four patients, the overall mean CT number error is reduced from over 300 HU to below 16 HU in the selected regions of interest (ROIs), and the SNU error is suppressed from over 18% to below 2%. The average soft-tissue contrast is improved by an average factor of 2.6. Conclusions: We further improve our pCT-based CBCT correction algorithm for clinical use. Superior correction performance has been demonstrated on four patient studies. By providing quantitative CBCT images, our approach significantly increases the accuracy of advanced CBCT-based clinical applications for IGRT.

  14. Three-dimensional assessment of brain tissue morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Germann, Marco; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Morel, Anne

    2006-08-01

    The microstructure of brain tissues becomes visible using different types of optical microscopy after the tissue sectioning. This preparation procedure introduces stress and strain in the anisotropic and inhomogeneous soft tissue slices, which are several 10 μm thick. Consequently, the three-dimensional dataset, generated out of the two-dimensional images with lateral submicrometer resolution, needs algorithms to correct the deformations, which can be significant for mellow tissue such as brain segments. The spatial resolution perpendicular to the slices is much worse with respect to the lateral sub-micrometer resolution. Therefore, we propose as complementary method the synchrotron-radiation-based micro computed tomography (SRμCT), which avoids any kind of preparation artifacts due to sectioning and histological processing and yields true micrometer resolution in the three orthogonal directions. The visualization of soft matter by the use of SRμCT, however, is often based on elaborate staining protocols, since the tissue exhibits (almost) the same x-ray absorption as the surrounding medium. Therefore, it is unexpected that human tissue from the pons and the medulla oblongata in phosphate buffer show several features such as the blood vessels and the inferior olivary nucleus without staining. The value of these tomograms lies especially in the precise non-rigid registration of the different sets of histological slices. Applications of this method to larger pieces of brain tissue, such as the human thalamus are planned in the context of stereotactic functional neurosurgery.

  15. X-ray micro-CT scanner for small animal imaging based on Timepix detector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudak, Jan; Zemlicka, Jan; Krejci, Frantisek; Polansky, Stepan; Jakubek, Jan; Mrzilkova, Jana; Patzelt, Matej; Trnka, Jan

    2015-02-01

    We describe a newly developed compact micro-CT scanner with rotating gantry equipped with a Timepix Quad hybrid pixel semiconductor detector and a micro-focus X-ray tube providing spatial resolution down to 30 μm. The resolving power of the device in relation to soft tissue sensitivity is demonstrated using a tissue-equivalent phantom and different types of biological samples. The results demonstrate that the use of noiseless particle counting detectors is a promising way to achieve sufficient soft tissue contrast even without any contrast agents.

  16. Megavoltage CT in helical tomotherapy - clinical advantages and limitations of special physical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sterzing, Florian; Kalz, Jörn; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Schubert, Kai; Bischof, Marc; Roder, Falk; Debus, Jürgen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2009-10-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a form of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy that introduces the ring gantry concept into radiation oncology. The system is a combination of a therapeutic linear accelerator and a megavoltage CT-scanner. This work describes the clinical experience with megavoltage CT with 456 patients in more than 11000 fractions. It also provides a review of the current literature of the possibilities and limitations of megavoltage CT. Between July 2006 and October 2008 456 patients were treated with helical tomotherapy and a pretreatment megavoltage CT was performed in 98.1% of the 11821 fractions to perform position control and correction. CT image acquisition was done with 3.5 MV x-rays in the helical tomotherapy machine. MVCT was used for dose recalculations to quantify doses distributions in cases of changing geometry, tumor shrinkage or presence of metal implants. Inverse treatment planning for prostate cancer patients with bilateral hip replacements was performed based upon an MVCT. A mean 3D-correction vector of 7.1mm with a considerable variation was detected and immediately corrected. Mean shifts were lateral 0.9mm (sd 5.0mm), mean longitudinal shift 1.0mm (sd 5.1mm) and mean vertical shift 3.2mm (sd 5.2mm). The MVCT enables imaging of anatomical structures in the presence of dental metal or orthopedic implants. Especially in these cases, dose recomputations can increase the precision of dose calculations. Due to a mean 3d correction vector of more than 7mm and a variation of corrections of more than 5mm daily image-guidance is recommended to achieve a precise dose application. The MVCT shows evident advantages in cases with metal implants but has limitations due to a reduced soft tissue contrast. Compared with megavoltage cone-beam-CT the tomotherapy fan beam CT adds less extra dose fore the patient and has a better soft tissue contrast. PMID:19754210

  17. Hepatic perfusion in a tumor model using DCE-CT: an accuracy and precision study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Errol E.; Chen, Xiaogang; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2008-08-01

    In the current study we investigate the accuracy and precision of hepatic perfusion measurements based on the Johnson and Wilson model with the adiabatic approximation. VX2 carcinoma cells were implanted into the livers of New Zealand white rabbits. Simultaneous dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and radiolabeled microsphere studies were performed under steady-state normo-, hyper- and hypo-capnia. The hepatic arterial blood flows (HABF) obtained using both techniques were compared with ANOVA. The precision was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV). Under normo-capnia the microsphere HABF were 51.9 ± 4.2, 40.7 ± 4.9 and 99.7 ± 6.0 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 while DCE-CT HABF were 50.0 ± 5.7, 37.1 ± 4.5 and 99.8 ± 6.8 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 in normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. There were no significant differences between HABF measurements obtained with both techniques (P > 0.05). Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between HABF values from both techniques: slope of 0.92 ± 0.05, intercept of 4.62 ± 2.69 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 and R2 = 0.81 ± 0.05 (P < 0.05). The Bland-Altman plot comparing DCE-CT and microsphere HABF measurements gives a mean difference of -0.13 ml min-1 (100 g)-1, which is not significantly different from zero. DCE-CT HABF is precise, with CV of 5.7, 24.9 and 1.4% in the normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. Non-invasive measurement of HABF with DCE-CT is accurate and precise. DCE-CT can be an important extension of CT to assess hepatic function besides morphology in liver diseases.

  18. Fast pseudo-CT synthesis from MRI T1-weighted images using a patch-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrado-Carvajal, A.; Alcain, E.; Montemayor, A. S.; Herraiz, J. L.; Rozenholc, Y.; Hernandez-Tamames, J. A.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Wald, L. L.; Malpica, N.

    2015-12-01

    MRI-based bone segmentation is a challenging task because bone tissue and air both present low signal intensity on MR images, making it difficult to accurately delimit the bone boundaries. However, estimating bone from MRI images may allow decreasing patient ionization by removing the need of patient-specific CT acquisition in several applications. In this work, we propose a fast GPU-based pseudo-CT generation from a patient-specific MRI T1-weighted image using a group-wise patch-based approach and a limited MRI and CT atlas dictionary. For every voxel in the input MR image, we compute the similarity of the patch containing that voxel with the patches of all MR images in the database, which lie in a certain anatomical neighborhood. The pseudo-CT is obtained as a local weighted linear combination of the CT values of the corresponding patches. The algorithm was implemented in a GPU. The use of patch-based techniques allows a fast and accurate estimation of the pseudo-CT from MR T1-weighted images, with a similar accuracy as the patient-specific CT. The experimental normalized cross correlation reaches 0.9324±0.0048 for an atlas with 10 datasets. The high NCC values indicate how our method can accurately approximate the patient-specific CT. The GPU implementation led to a substantial decrease in computational time making the approach suitable for real applications.

  19. Multirigid registration of MR and CT images of the cervical spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R.

    2004-05-01

    We present our work on fusion of MR and CT images of the cervical spine. To achieve the required registration accuracy of approximately 1mm, the spine is treated as a collection of rigid vertebrae, and a separate rigid body transformation applied to each (Hawkes). This in turn requires segmentation of the CT datasets into separate vertebral images, which is difficult because the narrow planes separating adjacent vertebrae are parallel to the axial plane of the CT scans. We solve this problem by evolving all the vertebral contours simultaneously using a level set method, and use contour competition to estimate the position of the vertebral edges when a clean separation between adjacent vertebrae is not seen. Contour competition is based in turn on the vertical scan principle: no part of a given vertebra is vertically below any part of an inferior vertebra. Once segmentation is complete, the individual rigid body transforms are then estimated using mutual information maximization, and the CT images of the vertebrae superimposed on the MR scans. The resultant fused images contain the bony detail of CT and the soft tissue discrimination of MR and appear to be diagnostically equivalent, or superior, to CT myelograms. A formal test of these conclusions is planned for the next phase of our work.

  20. CT angiographic evaluation of perforators in the lower limb and their reconstructive implication

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Visweswar; Agrawal, Neeraj K.; Chaudhary, Gurab R.; Arvind, Srivastava; Bhattacharya, Siddharth

    2012-01-01

    Background: The perforator flaps evolved on the knowledge of the vascular tree from the main vascular trunk up to the subdermal plexus. Therefore, we thought that it's necessary to map the whole vascular arcade by CT angiography. The aim of this study is to evaluate the perforators and the whole vascular tree of the lower limb by peripheral CT angiography with 3D reconstruction and intraoperative evaluation. This study helps in designing flaps of different constituents based on the selected perforators. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients having lower limb defects were selected. CT angiography was done using a non-ionic iodinated contrast media injected through the antecubital vein. The lower limbs were imaged using volume rendering CT scan machine. Three dimensional reconstructions were made. The whole arterial tree, along with the perforators, were mapped. Findings of the audio-Doppler were correlated with the CT angiographic observations. Further these evaluations were confirmed by intraoperative findings. Results: The three dimensional CT angiographic reconstruction with bone and soft tissue provided advanced knowledge of this vascular network. It delineated the main vessel, the perforators, their caliber, distance from fixed bony landmarks and course up to the subdermal plexus. These findings were confirmed during dissection of the proposed flap. The perforators were mainly musculocutaneous in the proximal leg and septocutaneous distally. Conclusions: The vascular details visualized by this technique made advancement over the existing methods namely color Doppler, audio Doppler, two dimensional angiography etc. It improved the understanding of perforator flaps and their successful clinical application. PMID:23450763

  1. Temperature Measurements of the Low-Attenuation Radiographic Ice Ball During CT-Guided Renal Cryoablation

    SciTech Connect

    Permpongkosol, Sompol; Link, Richard E.; Kavoussi, Louis R.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2008-01-15

    During renal cryoablation a low-attenuation area on CT develops around the cryoprobe. Knowledge of the temperature of the growing low-attenuation area can guide therapy and ensure lethal temperatures. Herein, we report thermocouple results and correlating CT images during the development of the low-attenuation 'radiographic ice ball.' Five patients who underwent percutaneous CT-guided renal cryoablation were identified who had thermocouples inserted and serial intraprocedural CT images that included images with thermocouple measurements of 0{sup o} and sub-0{sup o}C. Thermocouples had been percutaneously placed just beyond the edge of the tumors either to ensure adequate cooling or to ensure safety to adjacent critical structures. Renal cryotherapy under CT guidance produced a growing low-attenuation area corresponding to the radiographic ice ball. When the thermocouple measured 0{sup o}C, CT images showed the thermocouple tip at the edge of the low-attenuation ice ball. At lower temperatures the tip was within the low-attenuation ice ball. We conclude that knowledge of the temperature at the ice ball edge during cryoablation can be used to predict the extent of tissue necrosis and thus provide an estimate of cryotherapy effectiveness during the procedure. Further work is necessary to establish a firm relationship between the thermal conditions and the zone of damage.

  2. Three-dimensional spiral CT for craniofacial surgical planning and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, Marcelo G.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1998-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate measurement accuracy of 3D volumetric medical imaging from Spiral CT for craniofacial surgical planing. Material and methods: The study population consisted of 5 cadaver heads that were imaged on a spiral CT scanner with volumetric technique high-resolution contiguous axial slices 3mm thickness and 2mm/sec table feed, with 120Kvp and 200 mA. The archived CT data were stored on optical disks to allow full retrospective review of any image. The data sets were transferred to a networked computer workstation, to generated 3D volumetric images for subsequent manipulation and analyses. The computer graphics workstation allowed to do measurements, based on conventional craniometric anatomic landmarks, by 2 observers with 2 sessions each. The specimens were then submitted to a dynamic blunt force, in an effort to simulate craniofacial fractures, scanned and measured again. The soft tissues were then partially subsequently removed and the measurements were repeated by electromagnetic digitizer. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance. Results: Measurements from 3D spiral CT scans can be precise with high repeatability and sufficient accuracy for surgical planing. Conclusion: 3D computer graphics by spiral CT allowed, in vitro, sufficient precision for assessment of surgical management. Digital volumetric spiral CT imaging is valid quantitatively and qualitatively for craniofacial surgical planning and evaluation.

  3. Motion artifacts in CT scans: a study by computer simulation and mechanical phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Der-Chi; Lung, Jen-Kuang; Liao, Chih-Yu; Yong, Tung-Che; Hsu, Chung-Hsien; Liao, Chih-Chiang; Wu, Ren-Hong; Tseng, Kuo-Hsiung; Tsung, Tsing-Tshih

    2008-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most important tools in the diagnosis of thoracic tumors. However, during the scanning process, respiratory motion causes changes in the position and shape of the tumor, creating motion artifacts in the CT scan. This can lead to misdiagnosis of the size and position of the tumor, and can affect the effectiveness of treatment. This study develops a computer model of the movement of the thorax, and simulates the movement of a lung tumor caused by breathing during a CT scan. We show that adjusting the CT slice thickness is sufficient to determine the center of displacement and maximum displacement of a tumor during normal breathing. This model can be applied in the clinical diagnostic use of CT equipment. It will assist in finding the position of lung tumors from motion artifacts in CT scans. The target margin for treatment can thus be defined more accurately, so that appropriate doses of radiation can be applied to the target area, and irradiation of healthy tissue avoided.

  4. Texture-preserving Bayesian image reconstruction for low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Li, Lihong; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2016-03-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely used in Bayesian image reconstruction to reconstruct piecewise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose X-ray computed tomography (LdCT). While it can preserve edge sharpness via edge-preserving potential function, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it compromises clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodule or colon polyp. This study aims to shift the edge preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF's neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of lung, bone, fat, muscle, etc. from previous full-dose CT scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans (with lung nodule or colon polyp) were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed noticeable gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction with the well-known Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications.

  5. Evaluation of the potential utility of flat panel CT for quantifying relative contrast enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle; Mahvash, Armeen

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Certain directed oncologic therapies seek to take advantage of the fact that tumors are typically more susceptible to directed therapeutic agents than normal tissue owing to their extensive networks of poorly formed, leaky vasculature. If differences between the vascularity of normal and tumor tissues could be quantified, patients could be selected for or excluded from directed treatments on the basis of this difference. However, angiographic imaging techniques such as digital subtraction angiography (DSA) yield two-dimensional data that may be inadequate for this task. As a first step, the authors evaluated the feasibility of using a commercial implementation of flat panel computed tomography (FPCT) to quantify differences in enhancement of a simulated tumor compared with normal tissue based on differences in CT number measured in precontrast and postcontrast scans. Methods: To evaluate the FPCT scanner studied, the authors scanned several phantoms containing simulated normal and tumor tissues. In the first experiment, the authors used an anthropomorphic phantom containing inclusions representing normal, tumor, and bone tissue to evaluate the constancy of CT numbers in scans repeated at clinically relevant intervals of 1 and 3 min. The authors then scanned gelatin phantoms containing dilutions of iodinated contrast to evaluate the accuracy of relative contrast enhancement measurements for a clinical FPCT system. Data were analyzed using widely available software. Results: CT numbers measured in identical locations were constant over both scan intervals evaluated. Measured relative contrast enhancement values were accurate compared with known relative contrast enhancement values. Care must be taken to avoid artifacts in reconstructed images when placing regions of interest. Conclusions: Despite its limitations, FPCT in the interventional laboratory can be used to quantify relative contrast enhancement in phantoms. This is accomplished by measuring CT

  6. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Lavallee, Robert L.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom. Method: A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma KCT at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (RK) as K/ KCT, which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). RK values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. Results: At 120 kV, median RK values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile RK values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile RK values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average RK for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 ± 0.08. Average RK values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to RK values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, RK values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average RK values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in RK value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average RK value by 9%. Conclusions: In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the isocenter (free in air). Conversion from in-patient air KERMA values to tissue dose

  7. Optical-CT scanning of polymer gels

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, M

    2006-01-01

    The application of optical-CT scanning to achieve accurate high-resolution 3D dosimetry is a subject of current interest. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of past research and achievements in optical-CT polymer gel dosimetry, and to review current issues and challenges. The origins of optical-CT imaging of light-scattering polymer gels are reviewed. Techniques to characterize and optimize optical-CT performance are presented. Particular attention is given to studies of artifacts in optical-CT imaging, an important area that has not been well studied to date. The technique of optical-CT simulation by Monte-Carlo modeling is introduced as a tool to explore such artifacts. New simulation studies are presented and compared with experimental data. PMID:17082823

  8. Gastric interposition following transhiatal esophagectomy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Agha, F.P.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.

    1985-04-01

    Transhiatal esophagectomy without thoracotomy (THE) but with gastric interposition results in less morbidity and mortality than standard transpleural esophagectomy with thoracotomy. Barium examination has been the primary radiographic study following THE for detecting postoperative complications. The authors reviewed computed tomography (CT) scans of 21 patients who had undergone THE and correlated CT appearance with clinical status and with findings of the barium studies. Local mediastinal recurrent neoplasm was detected by CT in seven patients; barium study within 2 weeks of the CT scan failed to detect tumor recurrence in three of these patients. CT is the modality of choice for detecting locally recurrent neoplasm and distant metastases following THE and may also be helpful in patients with postoperative mediastinal abscess. Normal mediastinal CT anatomy after esophagectomy is reviewed in order to warn against pitfalls in scan interpretation.

  9. Intracranial vascular malformations: MR and CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharczyk, W.; Lemme-Pleghos, L.; Uske, A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Dooms, G.; Norman, D.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with 29 cerebrovascular malformations were evaluated with a combination of computed tomography (CT), angiography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Characteristics of the malformations on MR images were reviewed retrospectively, and a comparative evaluation of MR and CT images was made. Of 14 angiographically evident malformations, 13 intra-axial lesions were detected on both CT and MR images, and one dural malformation gave false-negative results on both modalities. The appearance of parenchymal lesions on MR images closely mirrored characteristic CT findings. Angiographically evident malformations have a highly characteristic appearance on MR images. MR may be more sensitive than CT in the detection of small hemorrhagic foci associated with cryptic arteriovenous malformations and may add specificity in the diagnosis of occult malformations in some cases, but MR is less sensitive than CT for the detection of small calcified malformations.

  10. Incorporating detection tasks into the assessment of CT image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalzetti, E. M.; Huda, W.; Ogden, K. M.; Khan, M.; Roskopf, M. L.; Ogden, D.

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare traditional and task dependent assessments of CT image quality. Chest CT examinations were obtained with a standard protocol for subjects participating in a lung cancer-screening project. Images were selected for patients whose weight ranged from 45 kg to 159 kg. Six ABR certified radiologists subjectively ranked these images using a traditional six-point ranking scheme that ranged from 1 (inadequate) to 6 (excellent). Three subtle diagnostic tasks were identified: (1) a lung section containing a sub-centimeter nodule of ground-glass opacity in an upper lung (2) a mediastinal section with a lymph node of soft tissue density in the mediastinum; (3) a liver section with a rounded low attenuation lesion in the liver periphery. Each observer was asked to estimate the probability of detecting each type of lesion in the appropriate CT section using a six-point scale ranging from 1 (< 10%) to 6 (> 90%). Traditional and task dependent measures of image quality were plotted as a function of patient weight. For the lung section, task dependent evaluations were very similar to those obtained using the traditional scoring scheme, but with larger inter-observer differences. Task dependent evaluations for the mediastinal section showed no obvious trend with subject weight, whereas there the traditional score decreased from ~4.9 for smaller subjects to ~3.3 for the larger subjects. Task dependent evaluations for the liver section showed a decreasing trend from ~4.1 for the smaller subjects to ~1.9 for the larger subjects, whereas the traditional evaluation had a markedly narrower range of scores. A task-dependent method of assessing CT image quality can be implemented with relative ease, and is likely to be more meaningful in the clinical setting.

  11. CT Perfusion ASPECTS in the Evaluation of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Thrombolytic Therapy Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpaa, Niko; Saarinen, Jukka T.; Rusanen, Harri; Hakomaki, Jari; Lahteela, Arto; Numminen, Heikki; Elovaara, Irina; Dastidar, Prasun; Soimakallio, Seppo

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Advances in the management of acute ischemic stroke and medical imaging are creating pressure to replace the rigid one-third middle cerebral artery (MCA) and non-contrast-enhanced CT (NCCT) Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) thresholds used for the selection of patients eligible for intravenous thrombolytic therapy. The identification of potentially salvageable ischemic brain tissue lies at the core of this issue. In this study, the role of CT perfusion ASPECTS in the detection of reversible ischemia was analyzed. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and imaging data of 92 consecutive patients who received intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute (duration <3 h) ischemic stroke. Most of the patients underwent admission multimodal CT, and all patients had follow-up NCCT at 24 h. ASPECTS was assigned to all modalities and correlated with clinical and imaging parameters. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine optimal thresholds for different parameters to predict clinical outcome. Results A perfusion defect could be detected in 50% of the patients. ASPECTS correlated inversely with the clinical outcome in the following order: follow-up NCCT > cerebral blood volume (CBV) > mean transit time (MTT) > admission NCCT. The follow-up NCCT and the CBV displayed a statistically significant difference from the admission NCCT, while the MTT did not reach statistical significance. The threshold that best differentiated between good and bad clinical outcome on admission was CBV ASPECTS ≥7. In patients with CT perfusion ASPECTS mismatch, MTT and CBV ASPECTS essentially provided the lower and upper limits for the follow-up NCCT ASPECTS, thus defining the spectrum of possible outcomes. Furthermore, CT perfusion ASPECTS mismatch strongly correlated (r = 0.83) with the mismatch between the tissue at risk and the final infarct, i.e. the amount of salvaged tissue. This finding suggests

  12. Chronic Esophageal Perforation With Periesophageal Abscess Mimicking Malignancy on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yang; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-06-01

    A 53-year-old man was admitted because of progressive dysphagia and retrosternal pain for 20 days. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed an irregular submucosal bulge on the distal esophageal wall. A barium swallow showed a triangular-shaped outpouching of contrast material with minimal contained extravasation into the periesophageal area. Enhanced CT showed thickening of the distal esophagus with an area containing air and septa. FDG PET/CT showed intense FDG uptake of the thickened esophageal wall mimicking malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biopsy of the submucosal mass revealed granulation tissue. The imaging and pathologic findings were consistent with chronic esophageal perforation with periesophageal abscess. PMID:26914572

  13. Serendipitous Detection of Hodgkin Lymphoma by 18F-NaF PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fuqiang; Wu, Jingbo; Huang, Zhanwen; Zhou, Fan; Chen, Yue

    2016-10-01

    A 17-year-old girl underwent F-NaF PET/CT to evaluate bone pain after an accident. The images did not identify any osseous lesion. However, there was a focally increased activity in the left upper chest, which corresponded to a partially calcified soft tissue mass in the mediastinum, suggestive of malignancy. The result led to subsequent F-FDG PET/CT imaging, which demonstrated intense activity in the mediastinal mass and in multiple cervical, supraclavicular, and mediastinal lymph nodes. Hodgkin lymphoma was diagnosed histopathologically following the biopsy. PMID:27556800

  14. Pulmonary Aspergillosis: What CT can Offer Before it is too Late!

    PubMed

    Prasad, Akhila; Agarwal, Kshitij; Deepak, Desh; Atwal, Swapndeep Singh

    2016-04-01

    Aspergillus is a large genus of saprophytic fungi which are present everywhere in the environment. However, in persons with underlying weakened immune response this innocent bystander can cause fatal illness if timely diagnosis and management is not done. Chest infection is the most common infection caused by Aspergillus in human beings. Radiological investigations particularly Computed Tomography (CT) provides the easiest, rapid and decision making information where tissue diagnosis and culture may be difficult and time-consuming. This article explores the crucial role of CT and offers a bird's eye view of all the radiological patterns encountered in pulmonary aspergillosis viewed in the context of the immune derangement associated with it. PMID:27190919

  15. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT in Splenic Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kobe, Carsten; Maintz, David; Fischer, Thomas; Drzezga, Alexander; Chang, De-Hua

    2015-11-01

    A 65-year-old man who had prostate cancer presented with slightly progressive prostate-specific antigen values. In this situation of biochemical relapse, prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT has proven to be superior to choline PET. The Ga-PSMA PET/CT of our patient revealed PSMA-positive tissue in the spleen. Although the localization was not typical for metastases, metastasis could not be excluded because of the intense focal tracer uptake. A supplementary MRI was performed but also failed to rule out a malignant origin. Finally, biopsy confirmed benign disease in the spleen in the form of granulomatous disease. PMID:26018688

  16. Dual-Energy CT for Evaluation of Intra- and Extracapsular Silicone Implant Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Glazebrook, Katrina N.; Leng, Shuai; Jacobson, Steven R.; McCollough, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Silicone implants are commonly used for both breast augmentation and breast reconstruction. With aging of the implant, the silicone envelope may become weak or may rupture. The technique of choice for evaluation of implant integrity is breast MRI; however this may be contraindicated in some patients or the cost may be prohibitive. Dual-energy CT allows determination of density and atomic number of tissue and can provide material composition information. We present a case of extracapsular implant rupture with MRI and dual-energy CT imaging and surgical correlation. PMID:26942031

  17. Dual-Energy CT for Evaluation of Intra- and Extracapsular Silicone Implant Rupture.

    PubMed

    Glazebrook, Katrina N; Leng, Shuai; Jacobson, Steven R; McCollough, Cynthia M

    2016-01-01

    Silicone implants are commonly used for both breast augmentation and breast reconstruction. With aging of the implant, the silicone envelope may become weak or may rupture. The technique of choice for evaluation of implant integrity is breast MRI; however this may be contraindicated in some patients or the cost may be prohibitive. Dual-energy CT allows determination of density and atomic number of tissue and can provide material composition information. We present a case of extracapsular implant rupture with MRI and dual-energy CT imaging and surgical correlation. PMID:26942031

  18. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine: part 1: the radiation risk from CT.

    PubMed

    Westra, Sjirk J

    2014-10-01

    The theory of radiation carcinogenesis has been debated for decades. Most estimates of the radiation risks from CT have been based on extrapolations from the lifespan follow-up study of atomic bomb survivors and on follow-up studies after therapeutic radiation, using the linear no-threshold theory. Based on this, many population-based projections of induction of future cancers by CT have been published that should not be used to estimate the risk to an individual because of their large margin of error. This has changed recently with the publication of three large international cohort follow-up studies, which link observed cancers to CT scans received in childhood. A fourth ongoing multi-country study in Europe is expected to have enough statistical power to address the limitations of the prior studies. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) report released in 2013 specifically addresses variability in response of the pediatric population exposed to ionizing radiation. Most authorities now conclude that there is enough evidence to link future cancers to the radiation exposure from a single CT scan in childhood but that cancer risk estimates for individuals must be based on the specifics of exposure, age at exposure and absorbed dose to certain tissues. Generalizations are not appropriate, and the communication of the CT risk to individuals should be conducted within the framework of personalized medicine. PMID:25304714

  19. Tissue oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and method in accordance with the invention for determining the oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2) of a tissue by irradiating the tissue with optical radiation such that the light is emitted from the tissue, and by collecting the reflected or transmitted light from the tissue to form an optical spectrum. A spectral processor determines the PO.sub.2 level in tissue by processing this spectrum with a previously-constructed spectral calibration model. The tissue may, for example, be disposed underneath a covering tissue, such as skin, of a patient, and the tissue illuminated and light collected through the skin. Alternatively, direct tissue illumination and collection may be effected with a hand-held or endoscopic probe. A preferred system also determines pH from the same spectrum, and the processor may determine critical conditions and issue warnings based on parameter values.

  20. Cortical Tremor (CT) with coincident orthostatic movements.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Frucht, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Cortical tremor (CT) is a form of cortical reflex myoclonus that can mimic essential tremor (ET). Clinical features that are helpful in distinguishing CT from ET are the irregular and jerky appearance of the movements. We report two patients with CT with coexisting orthostatic movements, either orthostatic tremor (OT) or myoclonus, who experienced functional improvement in both cortical myoclonus and orthostatic movements when treated with levetiracetam. PMID:26788343

  1. Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

  2. Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han

    2012-05-10

    The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

  3. Anatomical and functional imaging of myocardial infarction in mice using micro-CT and eXIA 160 contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Jeffrey R.; Befera, Nicholas; Clark, Darin; Qi, Yi; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive small animal imaging techniques are essential for evaluation of cardiac disease and potential therapeutics. A novel preclinical iodinated contrast agent called eXIA 160 has recently been developed, which has been evaluated for micro-CT cardiac imaging. eXIA 160 creates strong contrast between blood and tissue immediately after its injection and is subsequently taken up by the myocardium and other metabolically active tissues over time. We focus on these properties of eXIA and show its use in imaging myocardial infarction in mice. Five C57BL/6 mice were imaged ~ 2 weeks after LAD coronary artery ligation. Six C57BL/6 mice were used as controls. Immediately after injection of eXIA 160, an enhancement difference between blood and myocardium of ~340 HU enabled cardiac function estimation via 4D micro-CT scanning with retrospective gating. Four hours post-injection, the healthy perfused myocardium had a contrast difference of ~140 HU relative to blood while the infarcted myocardium showed no enhancement. These differences allowed quantification of infarct size via dual energy micro-CT. In vivo micro-SPECT imaging and ex vivo TTC staining provided validation for the micro-CT findings. Root mean squared error of infarct measurements was 2.7% between micro-CT and SPECT, and 4.7% between micro-CT and TTC. Thus, micro-CT with eXIA 160 can be used to provide both morphological and functional data for preclinical studies evaluating myocardial infarction and potential therapies. Further studies are warranted to study the potential use of eXIA 160 as a CT molecular imaging tool for other metabolically active tissues in the mouse. PMID:24523061

  4. Helical 4D CT and Comparison with Cine 4D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tinsu

    4D CT was one of the most important developments in radiation oncology in the last decade. Its early development in single slice CT and commercialization in multi-slice CT has radically changed our practice in radiation treatment of lung cancer, and has enabled the stereotactic radiosurgery of early stage lung cancer. In this chapter, we will document the history of 4D CT development, detail the data sufficiency condition governing the 4D CT data collection; present the design of the commercial helical 4D CTs from Philips and Siemens; compare the differences between the helical 4D CT and the GE cine 4D CT in data acquisition, slice thickness, acquisition time and work flow; review the respiratory monitoring devices; and understand the causes of image artifacts in 4D CT.

  5. Design of anthropomorphic textured phantoms for CT performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Justin; Bochud, François; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    Commercially available computed tomography (CT) technologies such as iterative reconstruction (IR) have the potential to enable reduced patient doses while maintaining diagnostic image quality. However, systematically determining safe dose reduction levels for IR algorithms is a challenging task due to their nonlinear nature. Most attempts to evaluate IR algorithms rely on measurements made in uniform phantoms. Such measurements may overstate the dose reduction potential of IR because they don't account for the complex relationship between anatomical variability and image quality. The purpose of this study was to design anatomically informed textured phantoms for CT performance evaluation. Two phantoms were designed to represent lung and soft-tissue textures. The lung phantom includes intricate vessel-like structures along with embedded nodules (spherical, lobulated, and spiculated). The soft tissue phantom was designed based on a three-dimensional clustered lumpy background with included low-contrast lesions (spherical and anthropomorphic). The phantoms were built using rapid prototyping (3D printing) technology and imaged on a modern multi-slice clinical CT scanner to assess the noise performance of a commercial IR algorithm in the context of uniform and textured backgrounds. Fifty repeated acquisitions were acquired for each background type and noise was assessed by measuring pixel standard deviation, across the ensemble of repeated acquisitions. For pixels in uniform areas, the IR algorithm reduced noise magnitude (STD) by 60% (compared to FBP). However, for edge pixels, the noise magnitude in the IR images ranged from 20% higher to 40% lower compared to FBP. In all FBP images and in IR images of the uniform phantom, noise appeared to be globally non-stationary (i.e., spatially dependent) but locally stationary (within a reasonably small region of interest). In the IR images of the textured phantoms, the noise was globally and locally non-stationary.

  6. Lung imaging in rodents using dual energy micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Guo, X.; Clark, D.; Johnston, S. M.; Marshall, C.; Piantadosi, C.

    2012-03-01

    Dual energy CT imaging is expected to play a major role in the diagnostic arena as it provides material decomposition on an elemental basis. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of dual energy micro-CT for the estimation of vascular, tissue, and air fractions in rodent lungs using a post-reconstruction three-material decomposition method. We have tested our method using both simulations and experimental work. Using simulations, we have estimated the accuracy limits of the decomposition for realistic micro-CT noise levels. Next, we performed experiments involving ex vivo lung imaging in which intact lungs were carefully removed from the thorax, were injected with an iodine-based contrast agent and inflated with air at different volume levels. Finally, we performed in vivo imaging studies in (n=5) C57BL/6 mice using fast prospective respiratory gating in endinspiration and end-expiration for three different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Prior to imaging, mice were injected with a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. The mean accuracy values were for Air (95.5%), Blood (96%), and Tissue (92.4%). The absolute accuracy in determining all fraction materials was 94.6%. The minimum difference that we could detect in material fractions was 15%. As expected, an increase in PEEP levels for the living mouse resulted in statistically significant increases in air fractions at end-expiration, but no significant changes in end-inspiration. Our method has applicability in preclinical pulmonary studies where various physiological changes can occur as a result of genetic changes, lung disease, or drug effects.

  7. Laxative-free CT colonography

    PubMed Central

    Slater, A; Betts, M; D'Costa, H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine if the introduction of faecal tagging to CT colonography (CTC) made the examination easier to tolerate or reduced the number of false-positives. Methods Our department changed bowel preparation for CT colonography from Picolax (Ferring Pharmaceuticals Ltd, London, UK) to Gastrografin® (Bracco Diagnostics Inc, Princeton, NJ) only with a modified diet. Questionnaires were given to a subgroup of patients within these cohorts. The numbers of false-positives were compared between two cohorts before and after this change. false-positives were defined as lesions reported on CT that were not confirmed by subsequent endoscopic examination. Polyps were matched if they were in the same or adjacent segments, and were within 5 mm of the reported size. Results 412 patients were identified from the Picolax cohort, and 116 from the Gastrografin cohort. 62 patients in each group completed questionnaires. Gastrografin produced less diarrhoea; 34% had five or more bowel motions in the previous day and night, compared with 77% for Picolax (p<0.001), although more patients found drinking it unpleasant compared with Picolax (85% reported drinking Picolax as “easy” vs 61% for Gastrografin; p=0.002). Picolax produced more non-diagnostic examinations, although this difference was not statistically significant. There was not a significant reduction in the numbers of false-positives (2 out of 112 for Gastrografin group, 14 out of 389 for the Picolax group; p=0.54). Conclusion Switching from Picolax to Gastrografin as a CTC preparation technique produced less diarrhoea, but did not reduce the number of false-positives. PMID:22167512

  8. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan T M; Shrimpton, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990's. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10's of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners. PMID:27362736

  9. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  10. Automatic detection and segmentation of liver metastatic lesions on serial CT examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Cohen, Avi; Diamant, Idit; Klang, Eyal; Amitai, Michal; Greenspan, Hayit

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a fully automated method for detection and segmentation of liver metastases on serial CT examinations (portal phase) given a 2D baseline segmentation mask. Our database contains 27 CT scans, baselines and follow-ups, of 12 patients and includes 22 test cases. Our method is based on the information given in the baseline CT scan which contains the lesion's segmentation mask marked manually by a radiologist. We use the 2D baseline segmentation mask to identify the lesion location in the follow-up CT scan using non-rigid image registration. The baseline CT scan is also used to locate regions of tissues surrounding the lesion and to map them onto the follow-up CT scan, in order to reduce the search area on the follow-up CT scan. Adaptive region-growing and mean-shift segmentation are used to obtain the final lesion segmentation. The segmentation results are compared to those obtained by a human radiologist. Compared to the reference standard our method made a correct RECIST 1.1 assessment for 21 out of 22 test cases. The average Dice index was 0.83 +/- 0.07, average Hausdorff distance was 7.85+/- 4.84 mm, average sensitivity was 0.87 +/- 0.11 and positive predictive value was 0.81 +/- 0.10. The segmentation performance and the RECIST assessment results look promising. We are pursuing the methodology further with expansion to 3D segmentation while increasing the dataset we are collecting from the CT abdomen unit at Sheba medical center.

  11. SU-E-J-135: Feasibility of Using Quantitative Cone Beam CT for Proton Adaptive Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jingqian, W; Wang, Q; Zhang, X; Wen, Z; Zhu, X; Frank, S; Li, H; Tsui, T; Zhu, L; Wei, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using scatter corrected cone beam CT (CBCT) for proton adaptive planning. Methods: Phantom study was used to evaluate the CT number difference between the planning CT (pCT), quantitative CBCT (qCBCT) with scatter correction and calibrated Hounsfield units using adaptive scatter kernel superposition (ASKS) technique, and raw CBCT (rCBCT). After confirming the CT number accuracy, prostate patients, each with a pCT and several sets of weekly CBCT, were investigated for this study. Spot scanning proton treatment plans were independently generated on pCT, qCBCT and rCBCT. The treatment plans were then recalculated on all images. Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) parameters and gamma analysis were used to compare between dose distributions. Results: Phantom study suggested that Hounsfield unit accuracy for different materials are within 20 HU for qCBCT and over 250 HU for rCBCT. For prostate patients, proton dose could be calculated accurately on qCBCT but not on rCBCT. When the original plan was recalculated on qCBCT, tumor coverage was maintained when anatomy was consistent with pCT. However, large dose variance was observed when patient anatomy change. Adaptive plan using qCBCT was able to recover tumor coverage and reduce dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: It is feasible to use qu antitative CBCT (qCBCT) with scatter correction and calibrated Hounsfield units for proton dose calculation and adaptive planning in proton therapy. Partly supported by Varian Medical Systems.

  12. Multiscale 3D bioimaging: from cell, tissue to whole organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. H.; Wang, Ge; Chandrasekeran, Margam; Fan, Victor; Nazrul, Mohd; Chang, Hauyee; Fong, Tiffany; Gelb, Jeff; Feser, Michael; Yun, Wenbing

    2009-05-01

    While electron microscopes and AFMs are capable of high resolution imaging to molecular levels, there is an ongoing problem in integrating these results into the larger scale structure and functions of tissue and organs within a complex organism. Imaging biological samples with optical microscopy is predominantly done with histology and immunohistochemistry, which can take up to a several weeks to prepare, are artifact prone and only available as individual 2D images. At the nano resolution scale, the higher resolution electron microscopy and AFM are used, but again these require destructive sample preparation and data are in 2D. To bridge this gap, we describe a rapid non invasive hierarchical bioimaging technique using a novel lab based x-ray computed tomography to characterize complex biological organism in multiscale- from whole organ (mesoscale) to calcified and soft tissue (microscale), to subcellular structures, nanomaterials and cellular-scaffold interaction (nanoscale). While MicroCT (micro x-ray computed tomography) is gaining in popularity for non invasive bones and tissue imaging, contrast and resolution are still vastly inadequate compared to histology. In this study we will present multiscale results from a novel microCT and nanoCT (nano x-ray tomography system). The novel MicroCT can image large specimen and tissue sample at histology resolution of submicron voxel resolution, often without contrast agents, while the nanoCT using x-ray optics similar to those used in synchrotron radiation facilities, has 20nm voxel resolution, suitable for studying cellular, subcellular morphology and nanomaterials. Multiscale examples involving both calcified and soft tissue will be illustrated, which include imaging a rat tibia to the individual channels of osteocyte canaliculli and lacunae and an unstained whole murine lung to its alveoli. The role of the novel CT will also be discussed as a possible means for rapid virtual histology using a biopsy of a human

  13. An outlook on x-ray CT research and development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong; De Man, Bruno

    2008-03-01

    Over the past decade, computed tomography (CT) theory, techniques and applications have undergone a rapid development. Since CT is so practical and useful, undoubtedly CT technology will continue advancing biomedical and non-biomedical applications. In this outlook article, we share our opinions on the research and development in this field, emphasizing 12 topics we expect to be critical in the next decade: analytic reconstruction, iterative reconstruction, local/interior reconstruction, flat-panel based CT, dual-source CT, multi-source CT, novel scanning modes, energy-sensitive CT, nano-CT, artifact reduction, modality fusion, and phase-contrast CT. We also sketch several representative biomedical applications. PMID:18404940

  14. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Jann; Gutte, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emission CT (SPECT) technique as opposed to the planar technique for diagnosing PE. SPECT has been shown to have fewer indeterminate results and a higher diagnostic value. The latest improvement is the combination of a low-dose CT scan with a V/P SPECT scan in a hybrid tomograph. In a study comparing CTPA, planar scintigraphy and SPECT alone, SPECT/CT had the best diagnostic accuracy for PE. In addition, recent developments in the CTPA technique have made it possible to image the pulmonary arteries of the lungs in one breath-hold. This development is based on the change from a single-detector to multidetector CT technology with an increase in volume coverage per rotation and faster rotation. Furthermore, the dual energy CT technique is a promising modality that can provide functional imaging in combination with anatomical information. Newer high-end CT scanners and SPECT systems are able to visualize smaller subsegmental emboli. However, consensus is lacking regarding the clinical impact and treatment. In the present review, SPECT and SPECT in combination with low-dose CT, CTPA and dual energy CT are discussed in the context of diagnosing PE. PMID:24213621

  15. [Development of real-time CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Katada, K; Anno, H; Takeshita, G; Ogura, Y; Koga, S; Ida, Y; Nonomura, K; Kanno, T; Ohashi, A; Sata, S

    1994-10-25

    A new CT system that permits real-time monitoring of CT images was developed. Phantom and volunteer studies revealed that the images were displayed at a rate of six per second with a delay time of 0.83 second with clinically sufficient resolution (256 x 256) using the newly developed fast image processor and partial-reconstruction algorithm. The clinical trial of stereotactic aspiration of intracerebral hematoma was successful. The initial trial with CT fluoroscopy revealed potential usefulness of the system in biopsy and other CT-guided interventions. PMID:9261196

  16. Measuring tissue oxygenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O. (Inventor); Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Yang, Ye (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for calculating tissue oxygenation, e.g., oxygen saturation, in a target tissue are disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods include: (a) directing incident radiation to a target tissue and determining reflectance spectra of the target tissue by measuring intensities of reflected radiation from the target tissue at a plurality of radiation wavelengths; (b) correcting the measured intensities of the reflectance spectra to reduce contributions thereto from skin and fat layers through which the incident radiation propagates; (c) determining oxygen saturation in the target tissue based on the corrected reflectance spectra; and (d) outputting the determined value of oxygen saturation.

  17. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  18. CT of hepatic schistosomiasis mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.A.; Khaffaji, S.; El Magdy, W.; Al-Ansari, A.G.; Hanna, R.

    1985-07-01

    Schistosomal periportal fibrosis produced a typical pattern on computed tomography in five patients. Low-density periportal tissue, present throughout the liver, enhanced strongly after the administration of contrast medium. While rounded in cross section, the thickened periportal tissue produced linear and branching patterns when imaged in longitudinal section. In all cases, the sonographic features were typical of schistosomal periportal fibrosis. A lack of awareness of the distinctive features of periportal fibrosis may result in a mistaken diagnosis of hepatic metastases.

  19. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    PubMed Central

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  20. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  1. Measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. C.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Menk, R.-H.; Vallazza, E.; Xiao, T. Q.; Castelli, E.

    2010-09-01

    The measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues is of fundamental importance in the field of breast x-ray diagnostic imaging. Different groups have evaluated the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by carrying out direct attenuation measurements in which the specimens were thin and selected as homogeneous as possible. Here, we use monochromatic and high-intensity synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) to evaluate the linear attenuation coefficients of surgical breast tissues in the energy range from 15 to 26.5 keV. X-ray detection is performed by a custom digital silicon micro-strip device, developed in the framework of the PICASSO INFN experiment. Twenty-three human surgical breast samples were selected for SR CT and histological study. Six of them underwent CT, both as fresh tissue and after formalin fixation, while the remaining 17 were imaged only as formalin-fixed tissues. Our results for fat and fibrous tissues are in good agreement with the published values. However, in contrast to the published data, our measurements show no significant differences between fibrous and tumor tissues. Moreover, our results for fresh and formalin-fixed tissues demonstrate a reduction of the linear attenuation coefficient for fibrous and tumo