Science.gov

Sample records for periodontal ruffini endings

  1. Encapsulated Ruffini-like endings in human lumbar facet joints

    PubMed Central

    VANDENABEELE, F.; CREEMERS, J.; LAMBRICHTS, I.; LIPPENS, P.; JANS, M.

    1997-01-01

    The innervation of the human lumbar facet joint capsule was studied by light and electron microscopy. Small numbers of encapsulated corpuscular endings were identified in the dense fibrous layer. Clusters of 2 types of endings were found: small cylindrical corpuscles (type 1) and large fusiform corpuscles (type 2). The corpuscles were classified structurally as Ruffini-type endings. The 1st type was predominant and characterised by a compartmentalised receptor complex, a thin perineurial capsule and a narrow subcapsular space. The 2nd type was characterised by a thicker perineurial capsule, a ‘spindle-like’ receptive complex, and an extensive subcapsular space with capillaries and concentrically oriented fibroblast-like cells. Both types of endings were innervated mainly by thinly myelinated group III (A delta) and unmyelinated group IV (C) nerve fibres that branched and terminated in the receptor complex. Their sensory endings were intimately related to the collagen fibre bundles as multiple enlarged axonal segments (‘beads’) with ultrastructural features which were characteristic of receptive sites: an accumulation of mitochondria and vesicles, and ‘bare’ areas of axolemma lacking a Schwann cell investment but covered by a thin basal lamina. Some beads in the 2nd type of ending contained granular vesicles, 30–60 mm in diameter, resembling sympathetic nerve endings. Small diameter collagen fibrils situated within multilayered basal laminae were found among the multiple receptive sites in the receptive complex in both types of ending. Their possible functional significance in mechanoreception is discussed. Particular attention has been given to their apparent variable orientation to the mechanoreceptive site. PMID:9449076

  2. Periodontitis and the end-stage renal disease patient receiving hemodialysis maintenance therapy.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ronald G; Kotanko, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Atherosclerotic complications, including myocardial infarction and stroke, are highly prevalent and associated with increased systemic inflammation in patients who have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and are receiving renal hemodialysis maintenance therapy. In the general population, an increasing body of evidence suggests periodontitis can contribute to systemic inflammation and may contribute to atherosclerotic complications. In addition, results of recent interventional trials suggest effective periodontal therapy may decrease systemic inflammation as well as endothelial dysfunction, an early predictor of atherosclerotic complications. Because moderate-to-severe periodontitis appears to be highly prevalent in the renal hemodialysis population, effective periodontal therapy may reduce systemic inflammation and thereby become a treatment consideration for this population. This article will acquaint dental practitioners with ESRD and the association between systemic inflammation and mortality. Also discussed are the possible contributions of destructive periodontal diseases to systemic inflammation and the dental management of patients receiving renal replacement therapies. PMID:19824568

  3. Changes in the Distribution of Periodontal Nerve Fibers during Dentition Transition in the Cat

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Koji; Honma, Shiho; Ebara, Satomi; Kumamoto, Kenzo; Murakami, Shinya; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal ligament has a rich sensory nerve supply which originates from the trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus. Although various types of mechanoreceptors have been reported in the periodontal ligament, the Ruffini ending is an essential one. It is unknown whether the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous teeth is identical to that in permanent teeth or not. Moreover, morphological changes in the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers during resorption of deciduous teeth and eruption of successional permanent teeth in diphyodont animals have not been reported in detail. Therefore, in this study, we examined changes in the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in the cat during changes in dentition (i.e., deciduous, mixed and permanent dentition) by immunohistochemistry of protein gene product 9.5. During deciduous dentition, periodontal nerve fibers were concentrated at the apical portion, and sparsely distributed in the periodontal ligament of deciduous molars. During mixed dentition, the periodontal nerve fibers of deciduous molars showed degenerative profiles during resorption. In permanent dentition, the periodontal nerve fibers of permanent premolars, the successors of deciduous molars, increased in number. Similar to permanent premolars, the periodontal nerve fibers of permanent molars, having no predecessors, increased in number, and were densely present in the apical portion. The present results indicate that the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition is almost identical to that in permanent dentition although the number of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition was low. The sparse distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition agrees with clinical evidence that children are less sensitive to tooth stimulation than adults. PMID:26083023

  4. Periodontitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... fall out. Periodontitis is the primary cause of tooth loss in adults. This disorder is uncommon in ... damage of the tissues and bone surrounding the tooth. Because plaque contains bacteria, infection is likely, and ...

  5. A unique localization of mechanoreceptors in the periodontal tissue of guinea pig teeth.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Chantha K; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Takano, Yoshiro

    2002-08-01

    This study describes the unique distribution of Ruffini endings (RE) in the periodontal tissues of the guinea pig teeth with special references to their presence in the enamel-related aspects of the continuously growing incisors and molars. In guinea pig incisors, immunohistochemistry for PGP 9.5 and glia specific S-100 protein revealed a condensed distribution of well-developed RE in the bone-related part of the lingual periodontal ligament as has been reported in many other rodents. In most cases, some RE-like nerve elements characterized by dendritic ramification and rounded terminal Schwann cells were found to be located in the labial, enamel-related regions, where no periodontal ligament-like fiber arrangement was established. In the molar periodontal ligament, well-developed RE-like nerve elements were also distributed in the enamel-related part, but in intimate relation to thick periodontal fiber bundles inserted in the cementum pearls grown on the enamel surface. In some cases, few RE were located in the apical region of the alveolar socket, where no periodontal fiber bundles could be identified. Our data provide the first morphological evidence of the presence of RE-like nerve elements in the enamel-related, fibrous connective tissue of continuously erupting rodent incisors. These data indicate that RE in guinea pig periodontal tissues have variable spatial correlation to the surrounding fibers, implicating their diverse mechanoreceptive properties depending on the anatomical location. PMID:12389662

  6. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Li, D.X.; Deng, T.Z.; Lv, J.; Ke, J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction. PMID:25387669

  7. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, D X; Deng, T Z; Lv, J; Ke, J

    2014-12-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80 ± 5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31 ± 1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction. PMID:25387669

  8. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, D X; Deng, T Z; Lv, J; Ke, J

    2014-09-19

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction. PMID:25250588

  9. Healing of experimental apical periodontitis after apicoectomy using different sealing materials on the resected root end.

    PubMed

    Otani, Kaori; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Tomita, Mahito; Hasegawa, Yukiko; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Tenkumo, Taichi; Tanaka, Saori; Motoki, Youji; Takanawa, Yasuhiro; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated apical periodontal healing after root-end sealing using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (SB), and root-end filling using reinforced zinc oxide eugenol cement (EBA) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) when root canal infection persisted. Apical periodontitis was induced in mandibular premolars of beagles by contaminating the root canals with dental plaque. After 1 month, in the SB group, SB was applied to the resected surface following apicoectomy. In the EBA and MTA groups, a root-end cavity was prepared and filled with EBA or MTA. In the control group, the root-end was not filled. Fourteen weeks after surgery, histological and radiographic analyses in a beagle model were performed. The bone defect area in the SB, EBA and MTA groups was significantly smaller than that in the control group. The result indicated that root-end sealing using SB and root-end filling using EBA or MTA are significantly better than control. PMID:21778612

  10. Microbiology of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Eija; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been considered the most likely etiologic agent in aggressive periodontitis. Implementation of DNA-based microbiologic methodologies has considerably improved our understanding of the composition of subgingival biofilms, and advanced open-ended molecular techniques even allow for genome mapping of the whole bacterial spectrum in a sample and characterization of both the cultivable and not-yet-cultivable microbiota associated with periodontal health and disease. Currently, A. actinomycetemcomitans is regarded as a minor component of the resident oral microbiota and as an opportunistic pathogen in some individuals. Its specific JP2 clone, however, shows properties of a true exogenous pathogen and has an important role in the development of aggressive periodontitis in certain populations. Still, limited data exist on the impact of other microbes specifically in aggressive periodontitis. Despite a wide heterogeneity of bacteria, especially in subgingival samples collected from patients, bacteria of the red complex in particular, and those of the orange complex, are considered as potential pathogens in generalized aggressive periodontitis. These types of bacterial findings closely resemble those found for chronic periodontitis, representing a mixed polymicrobial infection without a clear association with any specific microorganism. In aggressive periodontitis, the role of novel and not-yet-cultivable bacteria has not yet been elucidated. There are geographic and ethnic differences in the carriage of periodontitis-associated microorganisms, and they need to be taken into account when comparing study reports on periodontal microbiology in different study populations. In the present review, we provide an overview on the colonization of potential periodontal pathogens in childhood and adolescence, and on specific microorganisms that have been suspected for their role in the initiation and progression of aggressive

  11. Periodontal maintenance.

    PubMed

    Tan, A E S

    2009-09-01

    The main goal of periodontal therapy is to establish an oral environment compatible with periodontal health by the physical disruption of the plaque biofilm and adjunctive chemical means if required. Implicit in this objective is the ongoing requirement of detection and interception of new and recurrent disease, which continues at selected intervals for the life of the dentition after the initial ("active") phase of periodontal treatment. This concept of ongoing periodontal maintenance therapy has been embraced as the mandatory requirement for favourable periodontal outcomes based on institutional clinical trials and in practice-based studies in various parts of the world. This review examines the ramifications of periodontal maintenance therapy based upon a multi-level assessment of logistic issues and risk factors at three levels: (1) The patient level - treatment time; patient attendance compliance; and homecare measures, antiseptics/antibiotics and smoking. (2) The level of the individual tooth - tooth loss; and evaluation of success versus survival. (3) The level of each tooth surface ("site") - probing depth, loss of attachment and bleeding on probing; and changes in clinical attachment levels. In spite of the diversity of studies conducted, there is agreement on the efficacy of periodontal maintenance therapy when compared with studies on untreated populations and in treated cases that were not maintained. PMID:19737263

  12. Association of Periodontitis and Subsequent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Chao; Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lin, Che-Chen; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Periodontitis is a systemic and chronic inflammatory disease associated with multiple physical conditions. Distress and depression are other problems affecting the progression of periodontitis. However, the causal relationship between depression and periodontitis has not been adequately investigated. This aim of this study was to determine the association between periodontitis and the subsequent development of depression. We identified 12,708 patients with newly diagnosed periodontitis from 2000 to 2005 and 50,832 frequency-matched individuals without periodontitis. Both groups were followed until diagnosed with depression, withdrawal from the National Health Insurance program, or the end of 2011. The association between periodontitis and depressio was analyzed using Cox proportional hazard regression models. The incidence density rate of depression was higher in the periodontitis group than in the nonperiodontitis group, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.73 (95% confidence interval 1.58–1.89) when adjusting for sex, age, and comorbidity. Cox models revealed that periodontitis was an independent risk factor for depression in patients, except for comorbidities of diabetes mellitus (DM), alcohol abuse, and cancer. Periodontitis may increase the risk of subsequent depression and was suggested an independent risk factor regardless of sex, age, and most comorbidities. However, DM, alcohol abuse, and cancer may prevent the development of subsequent depression because of DM treatment, the paradoxical effect of alcohol, and emotional distress to cancer, respectively. Prospective studies on the relationship between periodontitis and depression are warranted. PMID:26705230

  13. Periodontics in the next millennium.

    PubMed

    Vandersall, D C

    1998-07-01

    This article prognosticates where periodontology will be in the next millennium. The forecasting of such events is wrought with confusion because such predictions are shadowed by bias, dogmatism, prejudice, experiences, and opinions from either a closed or open mind. The results of the survey from 101 periodontists reflect opinions from varied backgrounds, years of clinical experience, and individual levels of success or failure. The responses cannot be tested for accuracy or duplicated by another survey except to wait out the test of time for the year 2025. Clinicians will be challenged to make decisions on accepting new techniques and concepts as these are brought into the therapeutic fold of periodontics. The clinician will be met with new possibilities as a paradigm shift is inevitable for periodontal practice in the next millennium. After all, who would have thought in the 1960s, the soft tissue augmentation era, that 22 years later in 1982, the regeneration of the lost attachment apparatus (alveolar bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament) would become a reality. This survey strongly suggests that by the end of the first quarter of the twenty-first century, local delivery of antimicrobials, growth and differentiation factors, and root biomodification agents will have a major impact on the practice of periodontics. One thing is certain, in the next millennium, considering the responses from this survey, a new era in periodontics will be here. By the year 2025, the research, development, and dissemination of new periodontal knowledge will be beyond the imagination from what was considered usual and customary for the twentieth century. PMID:9700454

  14. Periodontal Management of a Patient Undergoing Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clozza, Emanuele; Segelnick, Stuart L; Sigal, Samuel H; Rovner, Deborah N; Weinberg, Mea A

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the periodontal management of a patient with end-stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation. In the first part of this article, all medical and dental findings are reported to elaborate adequate diagnoses. A patient-specific treatment plan was structured given the challenging periodontal and systemic scenarios. The second part describes the periodontal therapy delivered in close interaction with the referring physicians. Last, the article reviews current principles and protocols in managing these patients. PMID:26901304

  15. [The relationship of periodontitis and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kasaj, Adrian; Gortan-Kasaj, Aristea; Willerhausen, Brita; Hoffmann, Oliver; Angelov, Nikola; Zafiropoulos, Gregory-George

    2007-09-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic, dental-plaque induced inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, resulting in a gradual loss of connective tissue attachment and alveolar bone. The interrelationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontitis has been studied for many years. At,present, there is strong evidence to suggest that the incidence and severity of periodontitis is influenced by the presence or absence of diabetes mellitus as well as by the degree of diabetes control by patients. Elevated blood glucose levels in poorly controlled diabetics result in an increase of protein glycosylation leading to amplified formation of so-called Advanced Glycation End products (AGE). AGEs are glucose products that have the ability to attract and stimulate inflammatory cells to produce inflammatory cytokines, elevating the risk of periodontal attachment and/or alveolar bone loss. Gram-negative periodontal infection significantly decreases glucose tolerance and can lead, like other types of inflammation, to an increase in the severity of diabetes. Thus, diabetes and periodontal disease form a system in which periodontitis is aggravated and metabolic control of blood glucose levels becomes more difficult. This in turn leads to mutual aggravation that results in a self-enforcing catabolic process, a vicious circle of inflammation, tissue destruction and insulin resistance. PMID:18044471

  16. Periodontal Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ...

  17. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis and Periodontitis In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen and can bleed easily. Gingivitis can usually be reversed with daily brushing and ...

  18. Diabetes and periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Kalyani; Jain, Ashish; Sharma, RaviKant; Prashar, Savita; Jain, Rajni

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this review is to update the reader with practical knowledge concerning the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases. Exclusive data is available on the association between these two chronic diseases till date. Articles published on this relationship often provide the knowledge of definitions of diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases, prevalence, extent, severity of periodontal disease, complications of diabetes along with the possible underlying mechanisms. The authors reviewed human epidemiological studies, cross-sectional observations and longitudinal cohort, case control that evaluated variables exclusively over the past 30 years and the predominant findings from the “certain” articles are summarized in this review. This review clarifies certain queries such as 1) Do periodontal diseases have an effect on the metabolic control of diabetes? 2) Does diabetes act as a risk factor of periodontitis? 3) What are the possible underlying mechanisms relating the connection between these two chronic diseases? 4) What is the effect of periodontal intervention on metabolic control of diabetes? After a thorough survey of literature, it was observed that diabetes acts as a risk factor in development of periodontitis as periodontitis is significantly aggravated in patients suffering from diabetes having long term hyperglycemia. Different mechanisms underlying the association between the accelerated periodontal disease and diabetes are emerging but still more work is required. Major efforts are required to elucidate the impact of periodontal diseases on diabetes. At the same time, patients are needed to be made aware of regular periodontal maintenance schedule and oral hygiene. PMID:21731243

  19. Microflora and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Scapoli, Luca; Girardi, Ambra; Palmieri, Annalisa; Testori, Tiziano; Zuffetti, Francesco; Monguzzi, Riccardo; Lauritano, Dorina; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is a disease that affects and destroys the tissues that support teeth. Tissue damage results from a prolonged inflammatory response to an ecological shift in the composition of subgingival biofilms. Three bacterial species that constitute the red complex group, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, are considered the main pathogens involved in periodontitis. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction bases assay was designed to detect and quantify red complex species, then used to investigate 307 periodontal pocket samples from 127 periodontitis patients and 180 controls. Results: Significant higher prevalence of red complex species and increased amount of P. gingivalis and T. denticola were detected in periodontal pocket of periodontitis patients. Conclusions: Results demonstrated that the test is a valuable tool to improve diagnosis of periodontal disease. PMID:23814584

  20. Antimicrobials in periodontal maintenance.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, M G; Slots, J

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical and chemical antimicrobial intervention is the mainstay of preventive periodontal therapy. Successful periodontal maintenance care depends upon the ability of oral health care professionals to combat periodontal infections, and patient compliance with prescribed follow-up care. Since tooth brushing, flossing, and oral rinsing do not reach pathogens present in furcations and at the depths of deep periodontal pockets, adequate oral hygiene should include subgingival treatment with home irrigators or other appropriate self-care remedies in patients with these conditions. Povidone-iodine for professional use and diluted bleach for self-care are inexpensive and valuable antimicrobial agents in periodontal maintenance. The present article outlines the prudent use of antimicrobial therapy in periodontal maintenance. PMID:11603305

  1. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  2. Smoking and Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Borojevic, Tea

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a group of inflammatory diseases affecting the supporting tissues of the tooth (periodontium). The periodontium consists of four tissues : gingiva, alveolar bone and periodontal ligaments. Tobbaco use is one of the modifiable risk factors and has enormous influance on the development, progres and tretmen results of periodontal disease. The relationship between smoking and periodontal health was investigated as early as the miiddle of last century. Smoking is an independent risk factor for the initiation, extent and severity of periodontal disease. Additionally, smoking can lower the chances for successful tretment. Tretmans in patients with periodontal disease must be focused on understanding the relationship between genetic and environmental factors. Only with individual approach we can identify our pacients risks and achieve better results. PMID:23678331

  3. Smoking and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Borojevic, Tea

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a group of inflammatory diseases affecting the supporting tissues of the tooth (periodontium). The periodontium consists of four tissues : gingiva, alveolar bone and periodontal ligaments. Tobbaco use is one of the modifiable risk factors and has enormous influance on the development, progres and tretmen results of periodontal disease. The relationship between smoking and periodontal health was investigated as early as the miiddle of last century. Smoking is an independent risk factor for the initiation, extent and severity of periodontal disease. Additionally, smoking can lower the chances for successful tretment. Tretmans in patients with periodontal disease must be focused on understanding the relationship between genetic and environmental factors. Only with individual approach we can identify our pacients risks and achieve better results. PMID:23678331

  4. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. Methods: A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including ‘liver cirrhosis’, ‘end-stage liver disease’, ‘liver diseases’, ‘oral health’, ‘periodontal disease’, ‘mouth disease’, ‘gingivitis’, and ‘periodontitis’. Results: Thirteen studies published between 1981 and 2014 were found to include data on oral health and periodontal disease in cirrhotic patients. Studies indicated an increased incidence of periodontal disease in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%–79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among patients who underwent dental treatment versus non-treated patients. Another study suggested an association between periodontal disease and the progression of liver cirrhosis, but data are sparse and conflicting as to whether periodontal disease is correlated to cirrhosis aetiology and severity. Conclusion: Despite the clinical reality of periodontal disease in liver cirrhosis patients, there are few published studies. Before clinical implications can be addressed, more data on the prevalence of and correlation between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis aetiology, duration, and progression are needed. PMID:26770799

  5. Periodontal disease and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Arias-Herrera, Santiago; Criado-Cámara, Elena; Bascones-Ilundáin, Jaime; Bascones-Ilundáin, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is considered to be a genetically and environmentally based chronic metabolic and vascular syndrome caused by a partial or total insulin deficiency with alteration in the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins culminating with different manifestations in different organisms. In humans hyperglycemia is the main consequence of defects in the secretion and/or action of insulin, and its deregulation can produce secondary lesions in various organs, especially kidneys, eyes, nerves, blood vessels and immune systems. Periodontal disease is an entity of localized infection that involves tooth-supporting tissues. The first clinical manifestation of periodontal disease is the appearance of periodontal pockets, which offer a favorable niche for bacterial colonization. The etiology of periodontal disease is multifactorial, being caused by interactions between multiple micro-organisms (necessary but not sufficient primary etiologic factors), a host with some degree of susceptibility and environmental factors. According to current scientific evidence, there is a symbiotic relationship between diabetes and periodontitis, such that diabetes is associated with an increased incidence and progression of periodontitis, and periodontal infection is associated with poor glycaemic control in diabetes due to poor immune systems. Hence, for a good periodontal control it is necessary to treat both periodontal disease and glycaemic control. PMID:23393673

  6. Defining periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the periodontium has relied exclusively on a variety of physical measurements (e.g., attachment level, probing depth, bone loss, mobility, recession, degree of inflammation, etc.) in relation to various case definitions of periodontal disease. Periodontal health was often an afterthought and was simply defined as the absence of the signs and symptoms of a periodontal disease. Accordingly, these strict and sometimes disparate definitions of periodontal disease have resulted in an idealistic requirement of a pristine periodontium for periodontal health, which makes us all diseased in one way or another. Furthermore, the consequence of not having a realistic definition of health has resulted in potentially questionable recommendations. The aim of this manuscript was to assess the biological, environmental, sociological, economic, educational and psychological relationships that are germane to constructing a paradigm that defines periodontal health using a modified wellness model. The paradigm includes four cardinal characteristics, i.e., 1) a functional dentition, 2) the painless function of a dentition, 3) the stability of the periodontal attachment apparatus, and 4) the psychological and social well-being of the individual. Finally, strategies and policies that advocate periodontal health were appraised. I'm not sick but I'm not well, and it's a sin to live so well. Flagpole Sitta, Harvey Danger PMID:26390888

  7. Tissue engineered periodontal products.

    PubMed

    Bartold, P M; Gronthos, S; Ivanovski, S; Fisher, A; Hutmacher, D W

    2016-02-01

    Attainment of periodontal regeneration is a significant clinical goal in the management of advanced periodontal defects arising from periodontitis. Over the past 30 years numerous techniques and materials have been introduced and evaluated clinically and have included guided tissue regeneration, bone grafting materials, growth and other biological factors and gene therapy. With the exception of gene therapy, all have undergone evaluation in humans. All of the products have shown efficacy in promoting periodontal regeneration in animal models but the results in humans remain variable and equivocal concerning attaining complete biological regeneration of damaged periodontal structures. In the early 2000s, the concept of tissue engineering was proposed as a new paradigm for periodontal regeneration based on molecular and cell biology. At this time, tissue engineering was a new and emerging field. Now, 14 years later we revisit the concept of tissue engineering for the periodontium and assess how far we have come, where we are currently situated and what needs to be done in the future to make this concept a reality. In this review, we cover some of the precursor products, which led to our current position in periodontal tissue engineering. The basic concepts of tissue engineering with special emphasis on periodontal tissue engineering products is discussed including the use of mesenchymal stem cells in bioscaffolds and the emerging field of cell sheet technology. Finally, we look into the future to consider what CAD/CAM technology and nanotechnology will have to offer. PMID:25900048

  8. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  9. Nicotine and periodontal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ranjan; Kapoor, Anoop; Grover, Vishakha; Kaushal, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco use has been recognized to be a significant risk factor for the development and progression of periodontal disease. Its use is associated with increased pocket depths, loss of periodontal attachment, alveolar bone and a higher rate of tooth loss. Nicotine, a major component and most pharmacologically active agent in tobacco is likely to be a significant contributing factor for the exacerbation of periodontal diseases. Available literature suggests that nicotine affects gingival blood flow, cytokine production, neutrophil and other immune cell function; connective tissue turnover, which can be the possible mechanisms responsible for overall effects of tobacco on periodontal tissues. Inclusion of tobacco cessation as a part of periodontal therapy encourages dental professionals to become more active in tobacco cessation counseling. This will have far reaching positive effects on our patients’ oral and general health. PMID:20922084

  10. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment.

    PubMed

    Aimetti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of nonsurgical periodontal therapy is to control microbial periodontal infection by removing bacterial biofilm, calculus, and toxins from periodontally involved root surfaces. A review of the scientific literature indicates that mechanical nonsurgical periodontal treatment predictably reduces the levels of inflammation and probing pocket depths, increases the clinical attachment level and results in an apical shift of the gingival margin. Another parameter to be considered, in spite of the lack of scientific evidence, is the reduction in the degree of tooth mobility, as clinically experienced. It is important to point out that nonsurgical periodontal treatment presents limitations such as the long-term maintainability of deep periodontal pockets, the risk of disease recurrence, and the skill of the operator. A high number of posttreatment residual pockets exhibiting bleeding on probing and > 5 mm deep are related to lower clinical stability. The successful treatment of plaque-induced periodontitis will restore periodontal health, but with reduced periodontium. In such cases, anatomical damage from previous periodontal disease will persist and inverse architecture of soft tissue may impair home plaque removal. The clinician can select one of the following therapeutic options according to the individual patient's needs: - Quadrant/sextant wise instrumentation (conventional staged debridement, CSD). - Instrumentation of all pockets within a 24-hour period with (full mouth disinfection [FMD]) or without (full mouth scaling and root planing [FMSRP]) local antiseptics. Both procedures can be associated with systemic antimicrobials. -CSD or FMD in combination with laser or photodynamic therapy. Patients with aggressive periodontitis constitute a challenge to the clinician. To date there are no established protocols for controlling the disease. However, data from the literature on the application of the FMD protocol combined with amoxicillin

  11. Detection of periodontal markers in chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Asa; Carlén, Anette; Bengtsson, Lisbeth; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to compare the detection frequency of periodontopathogens by using the Pado Test 4.5 and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique in chronic periodontitis patients.Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis were tested cross-sectionally with DNA/RNA oligogenomic probe method (IAI Pado Test 4.5) and DNA/DNA whole genomic probe (checkerboard) method. Samples were taken by two paper points at the deepest site in each of the four quadrants and pooled into one sample for each of the two methods. The samples were sent to the two laboratories (IAI, Zuchwil, Switzerland, and Oral Microbiology Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Sweden) and were analyzed in a routine setting for the presence and amount of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola.While Pado Test 4.5 detected the four periodontal pathogens in 11 (36.7%) of the patients, the checkerboard method showed presence in all patients (100%) using the lower score (Score 1 corresponding to 10(4) bacterial cells) and 16 (53.3%) using a higher treshold (score 3 corresponding to between >10(5) and 10(6) cells).The results of the present study showed low agreement for a positive microbiological outcome using the two diagnostic methods. It was also concluded that microbiological analysis in practice should include a larger number of bacterial species to better serve as markers for a diseased associated flora in chronic periodontitis cases. PMID:21769304

  12. Periodontal probing: a review.

    PubMed

    Al Shayeb, Kwthar Nassar A; Turner, Wendy; Gillam, David G

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal probes are the main instruments that are used to assess the status of the periodontium, either for screening purposes or to evaluate periodontal changes throughout the treatment process. With increased knowledge and understanding of periodontal disease, the probes have evolved from a unidimensional manual shape into a more sophisticated computerised instrument. This is due to the need to increase the accuracy and reproducibility of readings and to improve efficiency (time, effort, money). Each probe has characteristic features that makes it unique and, in some cases, specific and limited to use. The aim of this paper is to present a brief introduction to periodontal disease and the methodology of measuring it, followed by probing limitations. The paper will also discuss the methodology of reducing probing error, examiner calibration and probing reproducibility. PMID:25198634

  13. Association of Periodontitis and Subsequent Depression: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Chao; Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lin, Che-Chen; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-12-01

    Periodontitis is a systemic and chronic inflammatory disease associated with multiple physical conditions. Distress and depression are other problems affecting the progression of periodontitis. However, the causal relationship between depression and periodontitis has not been adequately investigated. This aim of this study was to determine the association between periodontitis and the subsequent development of depression.We identified 12,708 patients with newly diagnosed periodontitis from 2000 to 2005 and 50,832 frequency-matched individuals without periodontitis. Both groups were followed until diagnosed with depression, withdrawal from the National Health Insurance program, or the end of 2011. The association between periodontitis and depressio was analyzed using Cox proportional hazard regression models.The incidence density rate of depression was higher in the periodontitis group than in the nonperiodontitis group, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.73 (95% confidence interval 1.58-1.89) when adjusting for sex, age, and comorbidity. Cox models revealed that periodontitis was an independent risk factor for depression in patients, except for comorbidities of diabetes mellitus (DM), alcohol abuse, and cancer.Periodontitis may increase the risk of subsequent depression and was suggested an independent risk factor regardless of sex, age, and most comorbidities. However, DM, alcohol abuse, and cancer may prevent the development of subsequent depression because of DM treatment, the paradoxical effect of alcohol, and emotional distress to cancer, respectively. Prospective studies on the relationship between periodontitis and depression are warranted. PMID:26705230

  14. Microbial dysbiosis in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sameera G.; Raveendran, Ranjith

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is a biofilm-associated inflammatory disease of the periodontium. This disease appears to have multiple etiologies with microbial factor contributing to initiation of the disease and immunological factor of the host propagating the disease. This review is on the concept of “microbial dysbiosis” and molecular nature of periodontitis, and the scope of traditional and emerging technologies for treating this disease. PMID:24174742

  15. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials include calcium phosphate (eg, tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite), calcium sulfate and bioactive glass. The bioactive glass bonds to the bone with the formation of a layer of carbonated hydroxyapatite in situ. The natural polymers include modified polysaccharides (eg, chitosan,) and polypeptides (collagen and gelatin). Synthetic polymers [eg, poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)] provide a platform for exhibiting the biomechanical properties of scaffolds in tissue engineering. The materials usually work as osteogenic, osteoconductive and osteoinductive scaffolds. Polymers are more widely used as a barrier material in guided tissue regeneration (GTR). They are shown to exclude epithelial downgrowth and allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. An attempt to overcome the problems related to a collapse of the barrier membrane in GTR or epithelial downgrowth is the use of a combination of barrier membranes and grafting materials. This article reviews various biomaterials including scaffolds and membranes used for periodontal treatment and their impacts on the experimental or clinical management of periodontal defect. PMID:23507891

  16. Probiotics and periodontal health.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G

    2011-11-14

    Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases. The etiology is clearly bacterial and a number of putative bacterial pathogens have been associated with the disease, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Comparatively, little attention has been paid to the identification of health-associated and potentially beneficial bacterial species that may reside in the gingival sulcus. Probiotic technology represents a breakthrough approach to maintaining oral health by using natural beneficial bacteria, commonly found in healthy mouths, to provide a natural defense against those bacteria which are thought to be harmful to teeth and gums. This article endeavors to introduce the concepts of probiotics in periodontics. PMID:22514571

  17. Periodontitis and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jeftha, A; Holmes, H

    2013-03-01

    Periodontal medicine has been studied and reviewed extensively since its introduction to the dental fraternity. The association of periodontal disease with and its effects on the cardiovascular system are amongst the many topics explored. A summary of the research into these associations and the possible mechanisms of any relationship is presented. Although a link between these two chronic inflammatory diseases is evident, the very heterogeneity of the relevant studies has not provided evidence sufficient to support an actual causal relationship. More stringent epidemiologic and intervention studies are required. PMID:23951765

  18. Probiotics and periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases. The etiology is clearly bacterial and a number of putative bacterial pathogens have been associated with the disease, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Comparatively, little attention has been paid to the identification of health-associated and potentially beneficial bacterial species that may reside in the gingival sulcus. Probiotic technology represents a breakthrough approach to maintaining oral health by using natural beneficial bacteria, commonly found in healthy mouths, to provide a natural defense against those bacteria which are thought to be harmful to teeth and gums. This article endeavors to introduce the concepts of probiotics in periodontics. PMID:22514571

  19. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  20. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  1. Predicting periodontitis progression?

    PubMed

    Ferraiolo, Debra M

    2016-03-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Library, Ovid, Medline, Embase and LILACS were searched using no language restrictions and included information up to July 2014. Bibliographic references of included articles and related review articles were hand searched. On-line hand searching of recent issues of key periodontal journals was performed (Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Dental Research, Journal of Periodontal Research, Journal of Periodontology, Oral Health and Preventive Dentistry).Study selectionProspective and retrospective cohort studies were used for answering the question of prediction since there were no randomised controlled trials on this topic. Risk of bias was assessed using the validated Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale for non-randomised studies. Cross-sectional studies were included in the summary of currently reported risk assessment tools but not for risk of progression of disease, due to the inability to properly assess bias in these types of studies. Titles and abstracts were scanned by two reviewers independently.Full reports were obtained for those articles meeting inclusion criteria or those with insufficient information in the title to make a decision. Any published risk assessment tool was considered. The tool was defined to include any composite measure of patient-level risk directed towards determining the probability for further disease progression in adults with periodontitis. Periodontitis was defined to include both chronic and aggressive forms in the adult population. Outcomes included changes in attachment levels and/or deepening of periodontal pockets in millimeters in study populations undergoing supportive periodontal therapy.Data extraction and synthesisData extraction was performed independently and in collaboration by two reviewers; completed evidence tables were reviewed by three reviewers. Studies were each given a descriptive summary to assess the quantity of data as well as further assessment of study variations

  2. Periodontics II: Course Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordick, Bruce

    A proposal is presented for Periodontics II, a course offered at the Community College of Philadelphia to give the dental hygiene/assisting student an understanding of the disease states of the periodontium and their treatment. A standardized course proposal cover form is given, followed by a statement of purpose for the course, a list of major…

  3. Smoking and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kinane, D F; Chestnutt, I G

    2000-01-01

    Numerous investigations of the relationship between smoking and periodontal disease have been performed over the last 15 years, and there now exists a substantial body of literature upon which this current review is based. From both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, there appears to be strong epidemiological evidence that smoking confers a considerably increased risk of periodontal disease. This evidence is further supported by the data emanating from patients who stop smoking. These patients have levels of risk similar to those of non-smokers. Numerous studies of the potential mechanisms whereby smoking tobacco may predispose to periodontal disease have been conducted, and it appears that smoking may affect the vasculature, the humoral immune system, and the cellular immune and inflammatory systems, and have effects throughout the cytokine and adhesion molecule network. The aim of this review is to consider the evidence for the association between smoking and periodontal diseases and to highlight the biological mechanisms whereby smoking may affect the periodontium. PMID:11021635

  4. Prescribing for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Blair, Fiona M; Chapple, Iain L C

    2014-11-01

    With concerns about the ever-increasing development of antimicrobial resistance, it is imperative that antimicrobials are prescribed responsibly and used appropriately. This article provides an overview and simple guidelines for antimicrobial prescribing in the management of periodontal diseases. PMID:25668374

  5. DKK1 rescues osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligaments of patients with diabetes mellitus induced periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Hu, Cheng-Hu; Zhou, Cui-Hong; Cui, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Kun; Deng, Chao; Xia, Jia-Jia; Wu, Yan; Liu, Lu-Chuan; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for periodontitis. Recently mesenchymal stem cells derived from periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) have been utilized to reconstruct tissues destroyed by chronic inflammation. However, impact of periodontitis with diabetes mellitus on PDLSCs and mechanisms mediating effects of complex microenvironments remain poorly understood. In this study, we found multiple differentiation potential of PDLSCs from chronic periodontitis with diabetes mellitus donors (D-PDLSCs) was damaged significantly. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling could rescue osteogenic potential of PDLSCs from simple chronic periodontitis patients (P-PDLSCs), whereas did not promote D-PDLSCs osteogenesis. In addition, we found expression of DKK1 in D-PDLSCs did not respond to osteogenic signal and decreased osteogenic potential of D-PDLSCs treated with DKK1 could be reversed. To further elucidate different character between P-PDLSCs and D-PDLSCs, we treated PDLSCs with TNF-α and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and find out AGEs which enhance effect of TNF-α in PDLSCs might mediate special personality of D-PDLSCs. The adverse effect of AGEs in PDLSCs could be reversed when PDLSCs were treated with DKK1. These results suggested DKK1 mediating WNT signaling might be a therapy target to rescue potential of PDLSCs in periodontitis with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26278788

  6. Periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell-transferred amnion.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kengo; Komaki, Motohiro; Yokoyama, Naoki; Tanaka, Yuichi; Taki, Atsuko; Honda, Izumi; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Takeda, Masaki; Akazawa, Keiko; Oda, Shigeru; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-02-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Regeneration of periodontal tissues using ex vivo expanded cells has been introduced and studied, although appropriate methodology has not yet been established. We developed a novel cell transplant method for periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC)-transferred amniotic membrane (PDLSC-amnion). The aim of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of PDLSC-amnion in a rat periodontal defect model. Cultured PDLSCs were transferred onto amniotic membranes using a glass substrate treated with polyethylene glycol and photolithography. The properties of PDLSCs were investigated by flow cytometry and in vitro differentiation. PDLSC-amnion was transplanted into surgically created periodontal defects in rat maxillary molars. Periodontal regeneration was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis. PDLSCs showed mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics such as cell surface marker expression (CD90, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and STRO-1) and trilineage differentiation ability (i.e., into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes). PDLSC-amnion exhibited a single layer of PDLSCs on the amniotic membrane and stability of the sheet even with movement and deformation caused by surgical instruments. We observed that the PDLSC-amnion enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration as determined by micro-CT and histology by 4 weeks after transplantation. These data suggest that PDLSC-amnion has therapeutic potential as a novel cell-based regenerative periodontal therapy. PMID:24032400

  7. Comparative bacteriology of juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Cato, E P; Smibert, R M; Burmeister, J A; Palcanis, K G; Ranney, R R

    1985-01-01

    Statistical comparisons of the floras associated with juvenile periodontitis, severe periodontitis, and moderate periodontitis indicated that differences in the bacterial compositions of affected sites in these populations were not statistically significant. The subgingival flora of affected juvenile periodontitis sites was statistically significantly different from the adjacent supragingival flora and from the subgingival floras of people with healthy gingiva and of children with developing (experimental) gingivitis. However, the subgingival flora of affected juvenile periodontitis sites was not significantly different from the flora of sites with gingival index scores of 1 or 2 in adults with developing (experimental) gingivitis. Of 357 bacterial taxa among over 18,000 isolates, 54 non-treponemal species, 2 treponemal species, and mycoplasma were most associated with diseased periodontal sulci. These species comprised an increasing proportion of the flora during developing gingivitis and constituted over half of the cultivable flora of diseased sites. PMID:3988344

  8. Microbiological basis for periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Feres, Magda; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Haffajee, Anne D; Socransky, Sigmund S

    2004-12-01

    The search for the etiologic agents of periodontal diseases started in the Golden Era of medical bacteriology, when the etiologic agents of many bacterial infections were isolated and characterized. After the initial enthusiasm in establishing the infectious nature and the true agents of periodontal diseases, this concept was virtually ignored for the next four decades. Until the early 1970s treatment regimens based on the non-specific plaque hypothesis were directed towards a non-specific reduction in plaque amount. Later, the specific plaque hypothesis established the role of some microorganisms such as A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, T. forsythensis, T. denticola, P. intermedia and F. nucleatum in different forms of periodontal diseases. It was recently suggested that these suspected periodontal pathogens seem to not act alone and interactions between species, especially the balance between pathogenic and beneficial species affect both progression of disease and response of tissues to periodontal therapy. Nowadays it is well established that one of the goals of therapy is to control such periodontal pathogens. Among the most commonly used therapies to treat periodontal infections are scaling and root planing (SRP), supragingival plaque control and periodontal surgeries. Many studies confirmed the reduction of "red complex" species by SRP, and apically repositioned flap can lead to an additional beneficial effect in the subgingival microbiota by decreasing levels of "red" and "orange complexes" species. Furthermore, the level of plaque control maintained by the patients has been considered a crucial step in preventing recurrence of destructive periodontitis. PMID:20976394

  9. Laser therapy for periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efanov, O. I.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying pulsed (lambda) equals 0.89 micrometers laser radiation in the treatment for early diagnosed periodontitis. The investigation was made on 65 patients (47 patients constituted the experimental group and 18 patients constituted a control group) affected by periodontitis. Clinical and functional tests revealed that laser therapy produced a string effect on the course of the illness. It reduced bleeding, inflammation, and pruritus. However, it did not produce an affect on electroexcitation. Biomicroscopic examinations and periodontium rheography revealed that the gingival blood flow became normal after the course of laser therapy. The capillary permeability and venous congestion decreased, which was confirmed by the increased time of vacuum tests, raised gingival temperature, reduced tissue clearance, and increased oxygen tension. Apart from that, laser therapy subsided fibrinolysis, proteolytic tissue activity, and decreased the exudative inflammation of periodontium.

  10. Lasers in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-01-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20th century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics. PMID:23066266

  11. Periodontal disease: the influence of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that include obesity, impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Recently, more attention has been reserved to the correlation between periodontitis and systemic health. MetS is characterized by oxidative stress, a condition in which the equilibrium between the production and the inactivation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) becomes disrupted. ROS have an essential role in a variety of physiological systems, but under a condition of oxidative stress, they contribute to cellular dysfunction and damage. Oxidative stress may act as a common link to explain the relationship between each component of MetS and periodontitis. All those conditions show increased serum levels of products derived from oxidative damage, promoting a proinflammatory state. Moreover, adipocytokines, produced by the fat cells of fat tissue, might modulate the balance between oxidant and antioxidant activities. An increased caloric intake involves a higher metabolic activity, which results in an increased production of ROS, inducing insulin resistance. At the same time, obese patients require more insulin to maintain blood glucose homeostasis – a state known as hyperinsulinemia, a condition that can evolve into type 2 diabetes. Oxidation products can increase neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis, thus favoring oxidative damage. Hyperglycemia and an oxidizing state promote the genesis of advanced glycation end-products, which could also be implicated in the degeneration and damage of periodontal tissue. Thus, MetS, the whole of interconnected factors, presents systemic and local manifestations, such as cardiovascular disease and periodontitis, related by a common factor known as oxidative stress. PMID:23009606

  12. Outcomes of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in severe generalized aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aggressive periodontitis, especially in its severe form, was traditionally considered to have an unfavourable prognosis. It required a complex treatment and its stabilization was often achieved by surgical therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the results of nonsurgical periodontal treatment in severe generalized forms of aggressive periodontitis. Methods Patients with advanced generalized aggressive periodontitis were included in the study. Probing depth (PD) of pockets ≥7 mm and clinical attachment level (CAL) of sites with attachment loss ≥5 mm were measured at baseline before nonsurgical periodontal treatment, at re-evaluation, and after treatment. The following other parameters were recorded: resolution of inflammation and bone fill. We compared the baseline values with re-evaluation and posttreatment values using the Friedman test. The Wilcoxon test with the Bonferroni correction was used for both re-evaluation and posttreatment values. Results Seven patients with 266 periodontal sites were examined. A significant difference was found between values, reported as medians with interquartile ranges, for PD at baseline (7.94 [7.33-8.19] mm) and both re-evaluation (4.33 [3.63-5.08] mm) and posttreatment (3.54 [3.33-4.11] mm) values (P=0.002). A significant difference was also found between values for CAL at baseline (9.02 [7.5-9.2] mm) and both re-evaluation (6.55 [6.30-6.87] mm) and posttreatment (6.45 [5.70-6.61] mm) (P=0.002). Inflammation was resolved and angular bone defects were repaired in all cases. Conclusions These therapeutic results suggest that this form of periodontitis could have positive outcomes after nonsurgical periodontal treatment. The reparative potential of tissue affected by severe aggressive periodontitis should encourage clinicians to save apparently hopeless teeth in cases of this form of periodontitis. Graphical Abstract PMID:25177522

  13. On putative periodontal pathogens: an epidemiological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rodrigo; Hujoel, Philippe; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    The current understanding on the role of microbiology on periodontitis causation is reviewed. An appraisal of the literature reveals several issues that have limited the attempts to investigate candidate periodontal pathogens as causes of periodontitis and confirms that only limited epidemiological evidence is available. Several aspects of the contemporary understanding on causal inference are discussed with examples for periodontitis. PMID:25874553

  14. Periodontal Dressing: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Baghani, Zahra; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the commercially available periodontal dressings, their physical and chemical properties, biocompatibility and therapeutic effects. Electronic search of scientific papers from 1956 to 2012 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley InterScience search engines using the searched terms periodontal dressing, periodontal pack. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have evaluated various properties of periodontal dressings. Physical and chemical properties of dressings are directly related to their dimensional changes and adhesion properties. Their biocompatibility and therapeutic effect are among the other factors evaluated in the literature. Chlorhexidine is the most commonly used antibacterial agent in studies. In general, when comparing the advantages with the disadvantages, application of periodontal dressing seems to be beneficial. Numerous factors are involved in selection of an optimal dressing such as surgeon’s intention, required time for the dressing to remain on the surgery site and its dimensional changes. PMID:24578815

  15. Perilous periodontitis: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Roby V; Neelakantan, Shiba

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether periodontitis in pregnant women could be a risk factor for pre term low birth weight. The oral hygiene status, periodontal status and periodontal treatment needs of mothers who birthed infants with normal birth weight and normal gestation period (group A) and mothers who birthed pre term low birth weight infants (group B) were assessed and compared. The clinical parameters used were Oral Hygiene Index--simplified (OHI-S), gingival bleeding index (GBI), probing pocket depth and Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN). This article presents the study and its findings and draws conclusions as to the relationship between poor periodontal condition and pre term low birth weight. PMID:22216586

  16. Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Treated Periodontitis: A Population-Based Follow-Up Study from Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shing-Hsien; Tung, Ying-Chang; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Pin; Liou, Eric Jein-Wein; Chang, Chee-Jen; Kung, Suefang; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to identify the long-term major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in treated periodontitis patients in Taiwan. Methods From the National Health Insurance Research Database (2001-2010), adult patients (≥ 18 years) with treated periodontitis were identified. Comparison was made between patients with mild form and severe form of treated periodontitis after propensity score matching. The primary end point was the incidence of MACE. Results A total of 32,504 adult patients with treated periodontitis were identified between 2001 and 2010. After propensity score matching, 27,146 patients were preserved for comparison, including 13,573 patients with mild form and 13,573 patients with severe form of treated periodontitis. During follow-up, 728 individuals in mild treated periodontitis group and 1,206 individuals in severe treated periodontitis group had at least 1 MACE event. After adjustment for gender, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes mellitus, severe treated periodontitis was associated with a mildly but significantly increased risk of MACE among older patients > 60 years of age (incidence rate ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–1.46). No association was found among younger patients ≤ 60 years of age. Conclusions Severe form of treated periodontitis was associated with an increased risk of MACE among older Taiwanese patients, but not among younger Taiwanese patients. We should put more efforts on the improvement of periodontal health to prevent further MACE. PMID:26114433

  17. Periodontal medicine: a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Matthews, D C

    2000-10-01

    Recent evidence indicates that we need to change how we think about the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Although bacteria are a necessary factor in the equation, the reaction of the host's immuno-inflammatory system is responsible for most of the destruction found in periodontal disease. Thus, it makes sense that a number of environmental and acquired factors may modify a patient's risk of developing periodontal disease. This paper reviews the scientific evidence for a number of these risk factors including age, genetics, smoking, diabetes mellitus, stress and osteoporosis. PMID:11070627

  18. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils in periodontitis and their possible modulation as a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Nicu, Elena A; Loos, Bruno G

    2016-06-01

    The main focus of this review is polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils play a pivotal role in normal host resistance to subgingival dental-plaque biofilm. Both hyper- and hypo-responsiveness of the immune system toward the microbial challenge in periodontitis have been described. We review polymorphonuclear neutrophil physiology with emphasis on the role of neutrophil functions and dysfunctions in periodontitis. Text boxes are given at the end of each subsection, which present the current knowledge on neutrophil-modulating agents as a potential therapeutic approach in periodontitis. PMID:27045435

  19. Relationship between diabetes and periodontal infection

    PubMed Central

    Llambés, Fernando; Arias-Herrera, Santiago; Caffesse, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a high prevalent disease. In the United States 47.2% of adults ≥ 30 years old have been diagnosed with some type of periodontitis. Longitudinal studies have demonstrated a two-way relationship between diabetes and periodontitis, with more severe periodontal tissue destruction in diabetic patients and poorer glycemic control in diabetic subjects with periodontal disease. Periodontal treatment can be successful in diabetic patients. Short term effects of periodontal treatment are similar in diabetic patients and healthy population but, more recurrence of periodontal disease can be expected in no well controlled diabetic individuals. However, effects of periodontitis and its treatment on diabetes metabolic control are not clearly defined and results of the studies remain controversial. PMID:26185600

  20. Periodontal disease, periodontal treatment and systemic nitric oxide in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nemec, A; Verstraete, F J M; Jerin, A; Šentjurc, M; Kass, P H; Petelin, M; Pavlica, Z

    2013-06-01

    Thirty-two client-owned dogs treated for periodontal disease were divided in group 1 if no periodontitis, group 2 if ≤25%, and group 3 if >25% of the teeth present were affected with periodontitis. Blood was tested before and 2 weeks after periodontal therapy for nitrosyl hemoglobin (HbNO), plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) and 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) levels. No HbNO was detected in any of the animals tested. There was no significant difference in the NOx plasma levels within each group or across the groups before and after the treatment, but a noticeable increase in NOx plasma levels was observed in group 3 after the treatment. Plasma NT was detected in only one third of the animals. NO levels varied greatly across individual dogs. The data are suggestive of an overall increase in systemic NO response 2 weeks after periodontal treatment in dogs with advanced periodontal disease, but the response is greatly individually-dependent. PMID:23158853

  1. Inquiry Teaching in Clinical Periodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heins, Paul J.; Mackenzie, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    An adaptation of the inquiry method of teaching, which develops skills of information retrieval and reasoning through systematic questioning by the teacher, is proposed for instruction in clinical periodontics. (MSE)

  2. Lipoproteins and lipoprotein metabolism in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Rachel; Barbour, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that the incidence of atherosclerosis is increased in subjects with periodontitis – a chronic infection of the oral cavity. This article summarizes the evidence that suggests periodontitis shifts the lipoprotein profile to be more proatherogenic. LDL-C is elevated in periodontitis and most studies indicate that triglyceride levels are also increased. By contrast, antiatherogenic HDL tends to be low in periodontitis. Periodontal therapy tends to shift lipoprotein levels to a healthier profile and also reduces subclinical indices of atherosclerosis. In summary, periodontal disease alters lipoprotein metabolism in ways that could promote atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:20835400

  3. Low-cost periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2012-10-01

    Periodontitis is a complex infectious disease that affects low-income individuals disproportionately. Periodontitis is associated with specific bacterial species and herpesviruses, and successful prevention and treatment of the disease is contingent upon effective control of these pathogens. This article presents an efficacious, highly safe, minimally invasive, practical and low-cost periodontal therapy that involves professional and patient-administered mechanical therapy and antimicrobial agents. The major components are scaling for calculus removal, periodontal pocket irrigation with potent antiseptics, and treatment with systemic antibiotics for advanced disease. Povidone-iodine and sodium hypochlorite have all the characteristics for becoming the first-choice antiseptics in the management of periodontal diseases. Both agents show excellent antibacterial and antiviral properties, are readily available throughout the world, have been safely used in periodontal therapy for decades, offer significant benefits for individuals with very limited financial resources, and are well accepted by most dental professionals and patients. Four per cent chlorhexidine applied with a toothbrush to the most posterior part to the tongue dorsum can markedly reduce or eliminate halitosis in most individuals. Systemic antibiotics are used to treat periodontopathic bacteria that are not readily reached by topical therapy, such as pathogens within gingival tissue, within furcation defects, at the base of periodontal pockets, and on the tongue, tonsils and buccal mucosae. Valuable antibiotic therapies are amoxicillin-metronidazole (250 mg of amoxicillin and 250 mg of metronidazole, three times daily for 8 days) for young and middle-aged patients, and ciprofloxacin-metronidazole (500 mg of each, twice daily for 8 days) for elderly patients and for patients in developing countries who frequently harbor enteric rods subgingivally. Scaling to remove dental calculus and the prudent

  4. Strategies for managing periodontal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, Steven E

    2010-04-01

    Most of the tissue destruction in periodontal disease is caused by the patient's inflammatory response. Classical approaches to controlling inflammation rely on attempts to eliminate pathogenic bacteria that incite the inflammatory response through mechanical or chemical means. This approach still has a place in treating periodontal inflammation today. Emerging and future approaches will rely more on modifying the inflammatory response itself, by limiting the activity of proinflammatory pathways and by amplifying pathways that resolve inflammation. PMID:20509367

  5. Periodontitis and bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Luigi; Francioni, Edoardo; Bianchi, Massimiliano; Mascitelli, Eleonora; Marco, Leila Brancato; Tonelli, Duvina Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Periodontitis is a plaque induced disease characterized by tissue destruction. The extent of the alveolar bone loss depends on the host response stimulated by bacterial infection. Recently researchers have focused on the role of the immune system, of RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway and of cytokines network. Another recent field of interest is osteoimmunology that try to explain the relationship between immune and bone cells in activating bone resorption. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms allowed a better understanding of the relationship with other diseases like osteoporosis and also to hypothesize new therapies based on modulation of host response (host modulatory therapy - HMT). The purpose of this mini-review is to briefly discuss these topics. PMID:26604945

  6. Prevention of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    DuPont, G A

    1998-09-01

    Periodontal disease is the most common disease affecting adult dogs and cats. It is also a very preventable disease. The insidious nature of the disease and requirement for the pet owner to be actively involved make client and public education absolutely vital. Although clients are commonly aware of their pets' bad breath, they rarely notice gingivitis, fractured teeth, and traumatic malocclusions. The annual National Pet Dental Health Month program has resulted in a tremendous increase in public awareness. Veterinarians must carry this further in their everyday practices, convincing our clients of the need for preventive dental care. It is only through clients' ongoing desire and persistence that a long-term preventive program can be successful. This requires a coordinated effort by the entire hospital staff. When successful, clients' pets will live healthier and longer lives. PMID:9779544

  7. Periodontal changes following molar intrusion with miniscrews

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Shahin; Heravi, Farzin; Radvar, Mehrdad; Anbiaee, Najmeh; Madani, Azam Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: With the introduction of skeletal anchorage system, recently it is possible to successfully intrude molar teeth. On the other hand, there have been concerns about periodontal changes associated with intrusion and there are few studies on this topic, especially for posterior teeth. Materials and Methods: Ten female patients were enrolled in this study. Maxillary molar intrusion was achieved by inserting two miniscrews and a 17 × 25 titanium molybdenum alloy spring. Crestal height changes were evaluated at three intervals including: Baseline (T0), end of active treatment (T1) and 6 months after retention (T2). Other variables including probing depth, gingival recession, attachment level and bleeding on probing were evaluated by clinical measurements in the three above mentioned intervals. One-sample Kolmogrov-Smirnov test ascertained the normality of the data. For all patients, the changes in tooth position and crestal height were evaluated using one-sample t-test. (P < 0.05) Results: Supra-erupted molars were successfully intruded a mean of 2.1 ± 0.9 mm during active treatment (T0-T1). A mean bone resorption of 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in mesial crest and 1 ± 0.8 mm in distal crest had occurred in total treatment (T0-T2). A mean of 0.6 ± 1.4 mm bone was deposited on mesial crest during the retention period (T1-T2) following tooth relapse. On average, 0.8 ± 0.4 mm attachment gain was obtained. Gingival margin coronalized a mean of 0.8 ± 0.6 mm throughout the entire treatment. Probing depth showed no significant change during treatment. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, these results suggest that not only periodontal status was not negatively affected by intrusion, but also there were signs of periodontal improvement including attachment gain and shortening of clinical crown height. PMID:26288629

  8. The effect of a periodontal intervention on cardiovascular risk markers in Indigenous Australians with periodontal disease: the PerioCardio study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indigenous Australians experience an overwhelming burden of chronic disease, including cardiovascular diseases. Periodontal disease (inflammation of the tissues surrounding teeth) is also widespread, and may contribute to the risk of cardiovascular diseases via pathogenic inflammatory pathways. This study will assess measures of vascular health and inflammation in Indigenous Australian adults with periodontal disease, and determine if intensive periodontal therapy improves these measures over a 12 month follow-up. The aims of the study are: (i) to determine whether there is a dose response relationship between extent and severity of periodontal disease and measures of vascular health and inflammation among Indigenous Australian adults with moderate to severe periodontal disease; and (ii) to determine the effects of periodontal treatment on changes in measures of vascular health and inflammation in a cohort of Indigenous Australians. Methods/Design This study will be a randomised, controlled trial, with predominantly blinded assessment of outcome measures and blinded statistical analysis. All participants will receive the periodontal intervention benefits (with the intervention delayed 12 months in participants who are randomised to the control arm). Participants will be Indigenous adults aged ≥25 years from urban centres within the Top End of the Northern Territory, Australia. Participants assessed to have moderate or severe periodontal disease will be randomised to the study's intervention or control arm. The intervention involves intensive removal of subgingival and supragingival calculus and plaque biofilm by scaling and root-planing. Study visits at baseline, 3 and 12 months, will incorporate questionnaires, non-fasting blood and urine samples, body measurements, blood pressure, periodontal assessment and non-invasive measures of vascular health (pulse wave velocity and carotid intima-media thickness). Primary outcome measures are pulse wave

  9. Lessons learned and unlearned in periodontal microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Ricardo; Teles, Flavia; Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Paster, Bruce; Haffajee, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are initiated by bacterial species living in polymicrobial biofilms at or below the gingival margin and progress largely as a result of the inflammation initiated by specific subgingival species. In the past few decades, efforts to understand the microbiota of periodontal diseases have led to an exponential increase in information about biofilms associated with periodontal health and disease. In fact, the oral microbiota is one of the best characterized microbiomes that colonize the human body. Despite this increased knowledge, one has to ask if our fundamental concepts of the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases have really changed. In this chapter we will review how our comprehension of the structure and function of the subgingival microbiota evolved over the years in search of lessons learned and unlearned in periodontal microbiology. More specifically, this review focuses on: 1) how the data obtained through molecular techniques has impacted our knowledge of the etiology of periodontal infections; 2) the potential role of viruses in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal diseases; 3) how concepts of microbial ecology have expanded our understanding of host microbial interactions that might lead to periodontal diseases; 4) the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases; and 5) the impact of these evolving concepts on treatment and preventive approaches to periodontal infections. We will conclude by reviewing how novel systems biology approaches promise to unravel new details of the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases and, hopefully, lead to a better understanding of periodontal disease mechanisms. PMID:23574465

  10. Nerve endings in bronchi of the dog that react with antibodies against neurofilament protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y; Atoji, Y; Suzuki, Y

    1995-01-01

    Tree-like nerve endings in the smooth muscle layer of bronchi of the dog were examined by immunohistochemical staining with antibodies against neurofilament protein (NFP). The endings were revealed as ramified axon terminals, with arborisation at their termini. The endings were 100-300 microns in maximal length and 50-100 microns in minimal length. Most of the endings were arranged parallel to the smooth muscle strands. The endings were densely distributed in the proximal region but their density decreased towards the alveoli. In the histological sections, the endings were seen between smooth muscle cells. Terminal Schwann cells, which reacted with antibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein and S-100 protein, and putative 'septal cells' with vimentin-like immunoreactivity were distributed near the endings. In addition, the nerve endings with NFP-like immunoreactivity were surrounded dense connective tissue that contained large amounts of fine elastic fibres. These findings indicate the nerve endings with NFP-like immunoreactivity are similar to other slowly adapting receptors (i.e. Golgi tendon organs, Ruffini endings). Some degenerated endings, which found in the unilaterally vagotomised dog, suggest the endings in the bronchi are originated from vagal nerves. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7591986

  11. Diacerein: A potential therapeutic drug for the management of experimental periodontitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Basma Mostafa; Mahmoud, Enji Ahmed; Aly, Azza Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge about the pathogenic process in the progression of periodontal disease indicates that the central cause of periodontal disease is the loss of a healthy balance between microbial virulence factors and the host’s inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effectiveness of diacerein as an anti-inflammatory drug in the management of experimental periodontitis in rats. Methods: The study included 60 albino rats that were divided into two groups. Periodontitis was induced in both groups. The drug group received systemic administration of diacerein, and the control group received a placebo. IL-1ß was measured two weeks after the induction of periodontitis and before the administration of the drug (baseline measurement), and it was measured again at the end of two and end of four weeks after scaling and root planning and diacerein administration. Results: The results indicated that there was a significant decrease in IL-1ß level in both groups. For the control group, there were significant decreases of the IL-1ß values from the baseline to two weeks and also from the baseline to four weeks, with p-values of 0.0001 for both comparisons. The same results were obtained for the drug group. Conclusion: It was concluded that it is likely that diacerein may play a therapeutic role as a potent anti-inflammatory drug in the management of periodontitis. PMID:26435830

  12. Periodontal plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Giovanni; Mounssif, Ilham

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present article is to summarize current knowledge in terms of the etiology, diagnosis, prognosis and surgical treatment of gingival recession. Whilst the main etiological factors (i.e. toothbrushing trauma and bacterial plaque) are well established, challenges still remain to be solved in the diagnostic, prognostic and classification processes of gingival recession, especially when the main reference parameter - the cemento-enamel junction - is no longer detectable on the affected tooth or when there is a slight loss of periodontal interdental attachment. Root coverage in single type gingival recession defects is a very predictable outcome following the use of various surgical techniques. The coronally advanced flap, with or without connective tissue grafting, is the technique of choice. The adjunctive use of connective tissue grafts improves the probability of achieving complete root coverage. Surgical coverage of multiple gingival recessions is also predictable with the coronally advanced flap and the coronally advanced flap plus the connective tissue graft, but no data are available indicating which, and how many, gingival recessions should be treated adjunctively with connective tissue grafting in order to limit patient morbidity and improve the esthetic outcome. None of the allograft materials currently available can be considered as a full substitute for the connective tissue graft, even if some recent results are encouraging. The need for future studies with patient-based outcomes (i.e. esthetics and morbidity) as primary objectives is emphasized in this review. PMID:25867992

  13. Recent approaches for the treatment of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nilu; Jain, Gaurav K; Javed, Shamama; Iqbal, Zeenat; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahmad, Farhan J; Khar, Roop K

    2008-11-01

    Periodontal disease is a localised inflammatory response caused by the infection of a periodontal pocket arising from the accumulation of subgingival plaque. Periodontal disease has been considered as a possible risk factor for other systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and pre-term low birth weight infants. Advances in understanding the aetiology, epidemiology and microbiology of periodontal pocket flora have revolutionised the therapeutic strategies for the management of periodontal disease progression. This review summarises the recent developments in the field of intra-pocket drug delivery systems and identifies areas where further research may lead to a clinically effective intra-pocket delivery system. PMID:18789399

  14. Association between Postmenopausal Osteoporosis and Experimental Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Kai; Ma, Souzhi; Guo, Jianbin; Huang, Yongling

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) and the pathogenesis of periodontitis, ovariectomized rats were generated and the experimental periodontitis was induced using a silk ligature. The inflammatory factors and bone metabolic markers were measured in the serum and periodontal tissues of ovariectomized rats using an automatic chemistry analyzer, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and immunohistochemistry. The bone mineral density of whole body, pelvis, and spine was analyzed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and image analysis. All data were analyzed using SPSS 13.0 statistical software. It was found that ovariectomy could upregulate the expression of interleukin- (IL-)6, the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) and downregulate IL-10 expression in periodontal tissues, which resulted in progressive alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis. This study indicates that changes of cytokines and bone turnover markers in the periodontal tissues of ovariectomized rats contribute to the damage of periodontal tissues. PMID:24683547

  15. Minimally invasive periodontal therapy for general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Mark I; Armitage, Gary C

    2016-06-01

    There remains a high prevalence of mild-to-moderate forms of periodontal diseases in both developed and developing countries. Although many periodontal specialty practices currently place strong emphasis on implant surgery, periodontal plastic surgery and esthetics, general dentists and hygienists have often assumed more responsibility than periodontal specialty practices for the diagnosis, treatment, assessment and maintenance, and possible referral, of their patients. To address these current trends and challenges, this volume of Periodontology 2000 presents a series of topics on the basic biological principles of periodontal disease, as well as on approaches to diagnosis, treatment planning and treatment, in what is called 'conservative' or 'noninvasive' periodontal therapy. These topics include risk assessment of the periodontal condition; reduction, elimination and/or control of etiologies and risk factors, including mechanical, antimicrobial and host-modulation approaches; considerations for evaluation of clinical outcomes based on treatment approaches; and selected topics in laser therapy, halitosis and gingival recession. PMID:27045427

  16. Accuracy of NHANES periodontal examination protocols.

    PubMed

    Eke, P I; Thornton-Evans, G O; Wei, L; Borgnakke, W S; Dye, B A

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of periodontitis prevalence determined by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) partial-mouth periodontal examination protocols. True periodontitis prevalence was determined in a new convenience sample of 454 adults ≥ 35 years old, by a full-mouth "gold standard" periodontal examination. This actual prevalence was compared with prevalence resulting from analysis of the data according to the protocols of NHANES III and NHANES 2001-2004, respectively. Both NHANES protocols substantially underestimated the prevalence of periodontitis by 50% or more, depending on the periodontitis case definition used, and thus performed below threshold levels for moderate-to-high levels of validity for surveillance. Adding measurements from lingual or interproximal sites to the NHANES 2001-2004 protocol did not improve the accuracy sufficiently to reach acceptable sensitivity thresholds. These findings suggest that NHANES protocols produce high levels of misclassification of periodontitis cases and thus have low validity for surveillance and research. PMID:20858782

  17. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soenjaya, Y.; Foster, B.L.; Nociti, F.H.; Ao, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Hunter, G.K.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp-/-) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp-/- mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp-/- and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro–computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp-/- mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp-/- mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp-/- mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp-/- mice. Bsp-/- incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the importance of BSP

  18. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice.

    PubMed

    Soenjaya, Y; Foster, B L; Nociti, F H; Ao, M; Holdsworth, D W; Hunter, G K; Somerman, M J; Goldberg, H A

    2015-09-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp(-/-)) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp(-/-) mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp(-/-) and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro-computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp(-/-) mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp(-/-) mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp(-/-) mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp(-/-) mice. Bsp(-/-) incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the

  19. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases. PMID:27418983

  20. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sete, Manuela Rubim Camara; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Sztajnbok, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that periodontal disease is a disease characterized by inflammation influenced by infectious factors, such as SLE, it is plausible to suggest that SLE would influence periodontal disease and vice versa. However, this issue is not yet fully elucidated and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association, as deregulation mainly in innate immune system, with action of phagocytic cells and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 in both conditions' pathogenesis, leading to tissue destruction. However, studies assessing the relationship between these diseases are scarce, and more studies focused on common immunological mechanisms should be conducted to further understanding. PMID:27267530

  1. Common Periodontal Diseases of Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kahtani, Salem; Al-Duhaimi, Saad

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2000, studies, experiments, and clinical observations revealed high prevalence of periodontal diseases among children and adolescents. Therefore, this paper was designed to provide an update for dental practitioners on epidemiology, microbiology, pathology, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal diseases in children and adolescents. Methods. This paper reviews the current literature concerning periodontal diseases in pediatric dentistry. It includes MEDLINE database search using key terms: “periodontal diseases in children,” “Periodontal diseasesin adolescents,” “periodontal diseases risk factors,” “microbiology of periodontal diseases,” “classification of periodontal diseases,” “epidemiology of periodontal diseases,” and “treatment of periodontal diseases.” Articles were evaluated by title and/or abstract and relevance to pediatric dentistry. Sixty-five citations were selected by this method and by the references within the chosen articles. A review of the comprehensive textbooks on pediatric dentistry and periodontology was done. Some recommendations were based on the opinions of experienced researchers and clinicians, when data were inconclusive. PMID:25053946

  2. Impact of tobacco use on periodontal status.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G K; Slach, N A

    2001-04-01

    This article reviews the effects of smoked and smokeless tobacco on periodontal status, including the impact of smoking on periodontal therapy and potential mechanisms for the adverse effects of tobacco on the periodontium. Approximately half of periodontitis cases have been attributed to either current or former smoking. Both cigar and cigarette smokers have significantly greater loss of bone height than nonsmokers, and there is a trend for pipe smokers to have more bone loss than nonsmokers. Unlike smokers, who experience widespread periodontal destruction, the most prevalent effects of smokeless tobacco are localized to the site of placement, in the form of gingival recession and white mucosal lesions. Smoking has an adverse effect on all forms of periodontal therapy, and up to 90 percent of refractory periodontitis patients are smokers. The pathogenesis of smoking-related periodontal destruction has been attributed to alterations in the microflora and/or host response. Some data indicates that smoking may increase levels of certain periodontal pathogens, but there is more evidence that smoking has a negative effect on host response, such as neutrophil function and antibody production. An encouraging finding is that periodontal disease progression slows in patients who quit smoking and that these individuals have a similar response to periodontal therapy as nonsmokers. The facts presented in this paper will assist dental health professionals in treatment-planning decisions and provide them with important information to share with patients who use tobacco products. PMID:11336116

  3. The Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate and Nicotine on Periodontal Tissue in a Periodontitis Model Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kenta; Hasegawa, Shiori; Yamashita, Motozo; Yamada, Satoru; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major lifestyle-related risk factor for periodontal diseases. However, the pathophysiological role of cigarette smoking in periodontal disease has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we report that the systemic administration of cigarette smoke condensate or nicotine, which is the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, augmented alveolar bone loss. Concomitantly, the number of osteoclasts in periodontal tissues increased and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand was upregulated at the ligated side in mice with periodontitis. Nicotine also attenuated alveolar bone repair after ligature removal. These observations highlight the destruction of periodontal tissue by smoking and the unfavorable clinical course of periodontal disease in patients with a cigarette smoking habit. The present study demonstrates that periodontal disease models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of cigarette smoking-related periodontal diseases. PMID:27203240

  4. Azithromycin buccal patch in treatment of chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Sajith Abdul; Vandana, K. L.; Thimmashetty, J.; Dalvi, Priyanka Jairaj

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to explore the clinical, microbiological, and biochemical impact of azithromycin (AZM) buccal patch in chronic generalized patients as a monotherapy as well as an adjunct to nonsurgical therapy. Materials and Methods: A parallel design was used forty periodontitis patients were randomly allocated into five groups, namely Group 1 scaling root planing (SRP) alone, Group 2 (SRP + AZM patch group), Group 3 (SRP + AZM tablet group), Group 4 (AZM patch monotherapy), and Group 5 (AZM tablet as monotherapy). Plaque index, gingival bleeding index, modified gingival index, probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were assessed at baseline and 21 and 90 days. Subgingival pooled plaque sample was collected to assess periodontopathogens like Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) by anaerobic culture method. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was also evaluated at baseline and 21 days. Periodontal maintenance was performed in Group 1 until 90th day, and clinical parameter was assessed at the end of 90th day. Results: SRP + AZM tablets showed greater reduction in clinical parameters (P < 0.05) AZM as monotherapy did not offer clinical benefits over SRP. Baseline data were compared at the end, i.e., 90th day a significant reduction in plaque scores, gingival bleeding, and PPD was observed however no significant gain in the clinical attachment was observed. Conclusion: The monotherapy resulted in no improvement of periodontal parameters, microbial parameters, and TNF-α level. It is safe to use AZM + SRP as a mode of nonsurgical treatment in periodontitis patients. PMID:27127325

  5. Poor periodontal health: A cancer risk?

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, K. S.; Thomas, Deepak; Hegde, Shashikanth; Kumar, M. S. Arun

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that chronic infections and inflammation are associated with increased risk of cancer development. There has also been considerable evidence that proves the interrelationship between bacterial and viral infections and carcinogenesis. Periodontitis is a chronic oral infection thought to be caused by gram-negative anaerobic bacteria in the dental biofilm. Periodontal bacteria and viruses may act synergistically to cause periodontitis. Many studies have shown that periodontal pockets may act as reservoirs for human papilloma virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein Barr virus, and suspected agents associated with oral cancer. Periodontitis, characterized by epithelial proliferation and migration, results in a chronic release of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, prostaglandins, and enzymes, all of which are associated with cancer development. This review article intends to shed light on the association between periodontal health and carcinogenesis. PMID:24554877

  6. Proteomics – The research frontier in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Abhaya; Govila, Vivek; Saini, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory condition resulting from the interplay between the infectious agents and host factors. Various protein molecules play a vital role in the initiation, progression and severity of periodontal diseases. The study of proteins as biomarkers in periodontal diseases has been highlighted during the last few years. In periodontitis multiple bacteria derived (e.g. collagen degrading enzymes, elastase like enzymes etc) and host derived mediators (eg. PGE2, TNF, IL1, IL6, MMP's etc) expressed in the saliva and gingival crevicular fluid, can be utilized as diagnostic markers for the disease. Another significant development regarding human genes and proteins has been the discovery of potential new drugs for the treatment of periodontal diseases. Therefore the information of the proteins involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases can be utilized for its diagnosis, prevention and treatment. PMID:25853048

  7. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell-Mediated Treatment for Periodontitis in Miniature Swine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Zheng, Ying; Ding, Gang; Fang, Dianji; Zhang, Chunmei; Bartold, Peter Mark; Gronthos, Stan; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Songlin

    2009-01-01

    Periodontitis is a periodontal tissue infectious disease and the most common cause for tooth loss in adults. It has been linked to many systemic disorders, such as coronary artery disease, stroke, and diabetes. At present, there is no ideal therapeutic approach to cure periodontitis and achieve optimal periodontal tissue regeneration. In this study, we explored the potential of using autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to treat periodontal defects in a porcine model of periodontitis. The periodontal lesion was generated in the first molars area of miniature pigs by the surgical removal of bone and subsequent silk ligament suture around the cervical portion of the tooth. Autologous PDLSCs were obtained from extracted teeth of the miniature pigs and then expanded ex vivo to enrich PDLSC numbers. When transplanted into the surgically created periodontal defect areas, PDLSCs were capable of regenerating periodontal tissues, leading to a favorable treatment for periodontitis. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using stem cell-mediated tissue engineering to treat periodontal diseases. PMID:18238856

  8. Effect of periodontal therapy on arterial structure and function among aboriginal australians: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; Jamieson, Lisa M; Do, Loc G; O'Dea, Kerin; Brown, Alex; Cai, Tommy Y; Anstey, Nicholas M; Sullivan, David R; Wang, Hao; Celermajer, David S; Slade, Gary D; Skilton, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment. Prespecified primary end points measured 12-month change in carotid intima-media thickness, an indicator of arterial structure, and 3- and 12-month change in pulse wave velocity, an indicator of arterial function. ANCOVA used complete case data to evaluate treatment group differences. End points could be calculated for 169 participants with follow-up data at 3 months and 168 participants at 12 months. Intima-media thickness decreased significantly after 12 months in the intervention group (mean reduction=-0.023 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.038 to -0.008] mm) but not in the control group (mean increase=0.002 [95% CI, -0.017 to 0.022] mm). The difference in intima-media thickness change between treatment groups was statistically significant (-0.026 [95% CI, -0.048 to -0.003] mm; P=0.03). In contrast, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in pulse wave velocity at 3 months (mean difference, 0.06 [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.29] m/s; P=0.594) or 12 months (mean difference, 0.21 [95% CI, -0.01 to 0.43] m/s; P=0.062). Periodontal therapy reduced subclinical arterial thickness but not function in Aboriginal Australians with periodontal disease, suggesting periodontal disease and atherosclerosis are significantly associated. PMID:24958498

  9. Neutrophil function and dysfunction in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, T E; Vaikuntam, J

    1994-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear leukocyte or neutrophil is an integral part of the acute inflammatory response. Its function as a protective cell in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease has been studied extensively. Abnormal neutrophil function has been associated (directly or indirectly) with the pathogenesis of early onset periodontal disease. This paper reviews the recent developments in neutrophil function and dysfunction as they relate to periodontal disease progression. PMID:8032460

  10. Mouthrinses as adjuncts in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T F

    1996-05-01

    Periodontal diseases are a group of related inflammatory disorders, initiated by dental plaque and causing destruction of the supporting structures of the teeth. Although the inflammatory response is a fundamental defence mechanism against bacterial infection, its persistence over a long period of time may extensively damage the periodontal tissues: cementum, alveolar bone, periodontal ligament and dentogingival tissues. These disorders, despite recent improvements in oral health are still a major cause of tooth loss in patients over 35 years of age. PMID:8948174

  11. Interaction between periodontitis and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Pengyu; Sun, Dianxing; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an oral disease that is highly prevalent worldwide, with a prevalence of 30–50% of the population in developed countries, but only ~10% present with severe forms. It is also estimated that periodontitis results in worldwide productivity losses amounting to ~54 billion USD yearly. In addition to the damage it causes to oral health, periodontitis also affects other types of disease. Numerous studies have confirmed the association between periodontitis and systemic diseases, such as diabetes, respiratory disease, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidence also indicated that periodontitis may participate in the progression of liver diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as affecting liver transplantation. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no reviews elaborating upon the possible links between periodontitis and liver diseases. Therefore, the current review summarizes the human trials and animal experiments that have been conducted to investigate the correlation between periodontitis and liver diseases. Furthermore, in the present review, certain mechanisms that have been postulated to be responsible for the role of periodontitis in liver diseases (such as bacteria, pro-inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress) are considered. The aim of the review is to introduce the hypothesis that periodontitis may be important in the progression of liver disease, thus providing dentists and physicians with an improved understanding of this issue. PMID:27588170

  12. Relation of Periodontitis to Risk of Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality (from a Danish Nationwide Cohort Study).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gorm Mørk; Egeberg, Alexander; Holmstrup, Palle; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2016-08-15

    Periodontitis and atherosclerosis are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases, and it has been suggested that periodontitis is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and that a causal link may exist between the 2 diseases. Using Danish national registers, we identified a nationwide cohort of 17,691 patients who received a hospital diagnosis of periodontitis within a 15-year period and matched them with 83,003 controls from the general population. We performed Poisson regression analysis to determine crude and adjusted incidence rate ratios of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, cardiovascular death, major adverse cardiovascular events, and all-cause mortality. The results showed that patients with periodontitis were at higher risk of all examined end points. The findings remained significant after adjustment for increased baseline co-morbidity in periodontitis patients compared with controls, for example, with adjusted incidence rate ratio 2.02 (95% CI 1.87 to 2.18) for cardiovascular death and 2.70 (95% CI 2.60 to 2.81) for all-cause mortality. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of periodontitis have a high burden of co-morbidity and an increased risk of CVD and all-cause mortality. In conclusion, our results support that periodontitis may be an independent risk factor for CVD. PMID:27372888

  13. Periodontal Proteomics: Wonders Never Cease!

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Kapoor, Shalini; Saksena, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are vital parts of living organisms, as they are integral components of the physiological metabolic pathways of cells. Periodontal tissues comprise multicompartmental groups of interacting cells and matrices that provide continuous support, attachment, proprioception, and physical protection for the teeth. The proteome map, that is, complete catalogue of the matrix and cellular proteins expressed in alveolar bone, cementum, periodontal ligament, and gingiva, is to be explored for more in-depth understanding of periodontium. The ongoing research to understand the signalling pathways that allow cells to divide, differentiate, and die in controlled manner has brought us to the era of proteomics. Proteomics is defined as the study of all proteins including their relative abundance, distribution, posttranslational modifications, functions, and interactions with other macromolecules, in a given cell or organism within a given environment and at a specific stage in the cell cycle. Its application to periodontal science can be used to monitor health status, disease onset, treatment response, and outcome. Proteomics can offer answers to critical, unresolved questions such as the biological basis for the heterogeneity in gingival, alveolar bone, and cemental cell populations. PMID:24490073

  14. Hypochlorous acid and taurine-N-monochloramine in periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Mainnemare, A; Mégarbane, B; Soueidan, A; Daniel, A; Chapple, I L C

    2004-11-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multi-factorial disease involving anaerobic bacteria and the generation of an inflammatory response, including the production of metalloproteinases, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and eicosanoids. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and taurine-N-monochloramine (TauCl) are the end-products of the neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) respiratory burst. They act synergistically to modulate the inflammatory response. In the extracellular environment, HOCl and TauCl may directly neutralize interleukin 6 (IL-6) and several metalloproteinases, while HOCl increases the capacity of alpha(2)-macroglobulin to bind Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, IL-2, and IL-6, and facilitates the release of various growth factors. TauCl inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide. HOCl activates tyrosine kinase signaling cascades, generating an increase in the production of extracellular matrix components, growth factors, and inflammatory mediators. Thus, HOCl and TauCl appear to play a crucial role in the periodontal inflammatory process. Taken together, these findings may offer opportunities for the development of novel host-modulating therapies for the treatment of periodontitis. PMID:15505230

  15. The role of cyclosporine A on the periodontal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jayasheela, Mallappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a known immunosuppressive agent and can be considered as a lifesaving drug in the organ transplantation cases. However, it is associated with many side-effects on different tissues and body organs including the periodontal tissues. The present animal study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of CsA targeting the tissue triad of periodontal tissues, i.e., gingiva, alveolar bone and cementum in rats. Materials and Methods: Twelve 6-week-old male Wistar rats weighing 150-200 g were considered for the case-control study in rats. The rats were divided into 2 groups: (1) CsA (test) group (2) Saline (control) group and were administered the same subcutaneously daily once for 45 days. Impressions were taken and study casts were prepared on weekly basis for the morphometric analysis. At the end of 45 days, rats were sacrificed and specimens were analyzed for histomorphometric analysis. CsA and saline groups were analyzed to test of association using the Student t-test at 99% confidence interval. Results: The morphometric examination showed significant gingival overgrowth in the CsA group, whereas no such growth in the saline group. Similarly, on histomorphometric analysis, there was a significant loss of alveolar bone in CsA group as compared with control. Furthermore, there was large amount of cementum formation accompanied by insertion of new connective tissue fibers especially in the cervical region of the tooth in CsA group rats. Conclusion: CsA targets the periodontal tissues (gingiva, alveolar bone and cementum) in different pattern. Its role in cementogenesis can be utilized for periodontal regeneration, if its local application is testified and verified in the future animal studies. PMID:24379871

  16. Uncovering the molecular networks in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Fábio; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Amado, Francisco; Gomes, Pedro S.; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a complex immune-inflammatory disease that results from a preestablished infection in gingiva, mainly due to Gram-negative bacteria that colonize deeper in gingival sulcus and latter periodontal pocket. Host inflammatory and immune responses have both protective and destructive roles. Although cytokines, prostaglandins, and proteases struggle against microbial burden, these molecules promote connective tissue loss and alveolar bone resorption, leading to several histopathological changes, namely destruction of periodontal ligament, deepening of periodontal pocket, and bone loss, which can converge to attain tooth loss. Despite the efforts of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics/peptidomics, and metabolomics, there is no available biomarker for periodontitis diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment evaluation, which could assist on the established clinical evaluation. Nevertheless, some genes, transcripts, proteins and metabolites have already shown a different expression in healthy subjects and in patients. Though, so far, ‘omics approaches only disclosed the host inflammatory response as a consequence of microbial invasion in periodontitis and the diagnosis in periodontitis still relies on clinical parameters, thus a molecular tool for assessing periodontitis lacks in current dental medicine paradigm. Saliva and gingival crevicular fluid have been attracting researchers due to their diagnostic potential, ease, and noninvasive nature of collection. Each one of these fluids has some advantages and disadvantages that are discussed in this review. PMID:24828325

  17. Relation between periodontitis and helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Pei; Zhou, Weiying

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The correlation between periodontitis and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the mouth was analyzed. Method: 70 elderly patients with periodontitis treated at our hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 were recruited. Dental plaques and gargle were collected for H. pylori detection using PCR technique. Periodontal health status of the patients was recorded. 70 control cases with healthy periodontium were also included. The symptoms of H. pylori infection in the mouth were compared between the two groups, and the results were analyzed statistically. Results: The positive rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in the periodontitis group was 71.4%; the positive rate of cagA gene was 35.7%. The positive rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in the control group was 34.3% and that of cagA gene was 12.9%. The two groups did not show significant differences in these two indicators (P<0.05). The positive detection rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in subgingival plaques was higher than that in supragingival plaques, and the difference was of statistical significance (P<0.05). The positive detection rate of H. pylori in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis was obviously higher than that of patients with mild periodontitis (P<0.05). Conclusion: Periodontal health status of elderly people with periodontitis correlated with H. pylori infection in the stomach. PMID:26629215

  18. Effect of Intensive Non-Surgical Treatment on the Level of Serum Inflammatory Markers in Advanced Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Radafshar, G.; Shad, B.; Ariamajd, E.; Geranmayeh, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether non-surgical periodontal treatment is associated with changes in serological markers of systemic inflammation. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five systemically healthy subjects with severe generalized periodontitis meeting the inclusion criteria participated in a four-month single blind interventional trial of which thirty-two completed the study. Periodontal parameters and inflammatory markers [C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma fibrinogen] and also the white blood cell count (WBC) were evaluated prior to and four months after delivery of intensive non-surgical periodontal therapy with simultaneous lavage of chlorhexidine 0.1% from the tip of the ultrasonic instrument into the pockets. Results: Significant differences in serum CRP levels were observed four months after treatment compared to the baseline (1.85, SD=1.93 vs 2.46, SD=2.32, respectively, P<0.0001). Periodontal treatment also resulted in a significant difference in WBC and neutrophil counts compared to the baseline (P<0.0001). The reduction in fibrinogen levels was not significant at the end of the research period. Significant improvement in the pocket probing depth and clinical attachment level for pockets with initially 4–6 mm and then more than 7 mm depth was observed. Changes in plaque and bleeding scores were also statistically significant (82.75 vs. 35.84 and 19.03 vs. 1.81, respectively). Conclusion: Periodontal treatment is effective in reducing CRP levels and white blood cell count, while fibrinogen levels are not influenced by periodontal therapy. Periodontal treatment may therefore decrease the systemic inflammatory burden in patients with advanced periodontitis. PMID:21998772

  19. Automated system for periodontal disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalat, Salvador E.; Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Juan, M. Carmen; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Monserrat, Carlos

    1997-04-01

    Evolution of periodontal disease is one of the most important data for the clinicians in order to achieve correct planning and treatment. Clinical measure of the periodontal sulcus depth is the most important datum to know the exact state of periodontal disease. These measures must be done periodically study bone resorption evolution around teeth. Time factor of resorption indicates aggressiveness of periodontitis. Manual probes are commonly used with direct reading. Mechanical probes give automatic signal but this method uses complicated and heavy probes that are only limited for University researchers. Probe position must be the same to have right diagnosis. Digital image analysis of periodontal probing provides practical, accurate and easy tool. Gum and plaque index could also be digitally measured with this method.

  20. Acceleration of purine degradation by periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V M; Teles, R; Trivedi, H M; Devizio, W; Xu, T; Mitchell, M W; Milburn, M V; Guo, L

    2009-09-01

    Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, are characterized by bacterial plaque accumulation around the gingival crevice and the subsequent inflammation and destruction of host tissues. To test the hypothesis that cellular metabolism is altered as a result of host-bacteria interaction, we performed an unbiased metabolomic profiling of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) collected from healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites in humans, by liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The purine degradation pathway, a major biochemical source for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was significantly accelerated at the disease sites. This suggests that periodontal-disease-induced oxidative stress and inflammation are mediated through this pathway. The complex host-bacterial interaction was further highlighted by depletion of anti-oxidants, degradation of host cellular components, and accumulation of bacterial products in GCF. These findings provide new mechanistic insights and a panel of comprehensive biomarkers for periodontal disease progression. PMID:19767584

  1. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek; Sinha, Jolly; Verma, Neelu; Nayan, Kamal; Saimbi, C S; Tripathi, Amitandra K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer) activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis. PMID:26481895

  2. Resistin: a potential biomarker for periodontitis influenced diabetes mellitus and diabetes induced periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Devanoorkar, Archana; Kathariya, Rahul; Guttiganur, Nagappa; Gopalakrishnan, D; Bagchi, Paulami

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers are highly specific and sensitive indicators of disease activity. Resistin is a recently discovered adipocytokine, having a potent biomarker quality. Initially resistin was thought to be produced by adipocytes alone; however, emerging evidence suggests that it is also produced in abundance by various cells of the immunoinflammatory system, indicating its role in various chronic inflammatory diseases. Data suggests that resistin plays a role in obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, and periodontitis. Resistin derived its name from the original observation that it induced insulin resistance (resist-in: resist insulin) in mice and is downregulated in mature murine adipocytes cultured in the presence of insulin sensitizing drugs like thiazolidinediones. It is well recognized that obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes. A three-way relationship has been established between diabetes, obesity and periodontitis. Recent evidence also suggests an association between obesity and increased risk for periodontitis. Our previous research showed incremental elevation of resistin with periodontal disease activity and a reduced level of resistin, after periodontal therapy. Thus resistin would be one of the molecular links connecting obesity, periodontitis, and diabetes and may serve as a marker that links periodontal disease with other systemic diseases. A Medline/PubMed search was carried out for keywords "Diabetes Mellitus," "Periodontitis," and "Resistin," and all relevant research papers from 1990 in English were shortlisted and finalized based on their importance. This review provides an insight into the biological action of resistin and its possible role in periodontitis influenced diabetes mellitus and diabetes induced periodontitis. PMID:24692844

  3. Influences of Fucoxanthin on Alveolar Bone Resorption in Induced Periodontitis in Rat Molars

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Oguz; Arabaci, Taner; Yemenoglu, Hatice; Kara, Adem; Ozkanlar, Seckin; Kayis, Sevki; Duymus, Zeynep Yesil

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of systemic fucoxanthin treatment on alveolar bone resorption in rats with periodontitis. Thirty rats were divided into control, experimental periodontitis (EP), and experimental periodontitis-fucoxanthin (EP-FUCO) groups. Periodontitis was induced by ligature for four weeks. After removal of the ligature, the rats in the EP-FUCO group were treated with a single dose of fucoxanthin (200 mg/kg bw) per day for 28 consecutive days. At the end of the study, all of the rats were euthanized and intracardiac blood and mandible tissue samples were obtained for biochemical, immunohistochemical, and histometric analyses. Fucoxanthin treatment resulted in a slight decrease in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 levels and a significant decrease in oxidative stress index. It was observed that fucoxanthin caused a significant reduction in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-β ligand (RANKL) levels and a statistically non-significant elevation in osteoprotegerin and bone-alkaline phosphatase levels. There were no significant differences in alveolar bone loss levels between the EP and EP-FUCO groups. This experimental study revealed that fucoxanthin provides a limited reduction in alveolar bone resorption in rats with periodontitis. One of the mechanisms underlying the mentioned limited effect might be related to the ability of fucoxanthin to inhibit oxidative stress-related RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis. PMID:27043583

  4. RANKL Expression in Periodontal Disease: Where Does RANKL Come from?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenlei; Sun, Weibin

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by periodontal pocket formation and alveolar bone resorption. Periodontal bone resorption is induced by osteoclasts and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) which is an essential and central regulator of osteoclast development and osteoclast function. Therefore, RANKL plays a critical role in periodontal bone resorption. In this review, we have summarized the sources of RANKL in periodontal disease and explored which factors may regulate RANKL expression in this disease. PMID:24719884

  5. Periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    NEGRATO, Carlos Antonio; TARZIA, Olinda; JOVANOVIČ, Lois; CHINELLATO, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is one of the most commonly known human chronic disorders. The relationship between PD and several systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM) has been increasingly recognized over the past decades. Objective: The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with knowledge concerning the relationship between PD and DM. Many articles have been published in the english and Portuguese literature over the last 50 years examining the relationship between these two chronic diseases. Data interpretation is often confounded by varying definitions of DM, PD and different clinical criteria were applied to determine the prevalence, extent and severity of PD, levels of glycemic control and diabetes-related complications. Methods: This paper provides a broad overview of the predominant findings from research conducted using the BBO (Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia), MEDLINE, LILACS and PubMed for Controlled Trials databases, in english and Portuguese languages published from 1960 to October 2012. Primary research reports on investigations of relationships between DM/DM control, PD/periodontal treatment and PD/DM/diabetes-related complications identified relevant papers and meta-analyses published in this period. Results: This paper describes the relationship between PD and DM and answers the following questions: 1- The effect of DM on PD, 2- The effects of glycemic control on PD and 3- The effects of PD on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Conclusions: The scientific evidence reviewed supports diabetes having an adverse effect on periodontal health and PD having an adverse effect on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Further research is needed to clarify these relationships and larger, prospective, controlled trials with ethnically diverse populations are warranted to establish that treating PD can positively influence glycemic control and possibly reduce the burden of diabetes

  6. Periodontitis and diabetes interrelationships: role of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Iacopino, A M

    2001-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease with several major complications affecting both the quality and length of life. One of these complications is periodontal disease (periodontitis). Periodontitis is much more than a localized oral infection. Recent data indicate that periodontitis may cause changes in systemic physiology. The interrelationships between periodontitis and diabetes provide an example of systemic disease predisposing to oral infection, and once that infection is established, the oral infection exacerbates systemic disease. In this case, it may also be possible for the oral infection to predispose to systemic disease. In order to understand the cellular/molecular mechanisms responsible for such a cyclical association, one must identify common physiological changes associated with diabetes and periodontitis that produce a synergy when the conditions coexist. A potential mechanistic link involves the broad axis of inflammation, specifically immune cell phenotype, serum lipid levels, and tissue homeostasis. Diabetes-induced changes in immune cell function produce an inflammatory immune cell phenotype (upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines from monocytes/polymorphonuclear leukocytes and downregulation of growth factors from macrophages). This predisposes to chronic inflammation, progressive tissue breakdown, and diminished tissue repair capacity. Periodontal tissues frequently manifest these changes because they are constantly wounded by substances emanating from bacterial biofilms. Diabetic patients are prone to elevated low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides (LDL/TRG) even when blood glucose levels are well controlled. This is significant, as recent studies demonstrate that hyperlipidemia may be one of the factors associated with diabetes-induced immune cell alterations. Recent human studies have established a relationship between high serum lipid levels and periodontitis. Some evidence now suggests that periodontitis itself may

  7. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy. PMID:23559912

  8. Drug addiction and periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Gurpreet Kaur; Gupta, N. D.; Prabhat, K. C.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of drug addiction is increasing globally. Drug abuse damages many parts of the body such as oral cavity, lungs, liver, brain, heart etc., Addicts suffer from physical, psychological, emotional and behavioral problems. Their nutrition is also compromised. There is certainly an impact of all these factors on the health of periodontium. Dentists should be aware of the effects of drugs while treating the drug addicts. This article correlates the studies done on the impact of abused drugs such as alcohol, tobacco, opiates, cannabis, amphetamines etc., on general and periodontal health. PMID:24174750

  9. Studies on periodontitis and analyses of individuals at risk for periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an infectious disease initiated by microbial plaque, which accumulates on the tooth surface at the gingival margin and induces an inflammatory reaction. The function of the inflammatory process is to protect the host, however the process may also contribute to tissue destruction. Most individuals show gingival inflammation, but only a limited number suffer from periodontitis i.e. loss of attachment. Without treatment, periodontitis will result in tooth mobility and subsequent tooth mortality. Independent of ethnicity, 10%-15% of an adult population will develop severe periodontitis The aim of this thesis has been to analyse individuals at risk for periodontal disease. Four studies have been conducted in 2 different groups of individuals with: Recurrent periodontitis kept in a maintenance care program--studies I-III. Type 2 diabetes (T2D)--study IV. In study I, the clinicaleffect of local periodontitis treatment with an antibiotic gel was investigated. In study II, the microbiologicaleffect of periodontitis treatment with the same antibiotic gel as in study I was investigated. In study III, it was investigated whether the interleukin-l (IL-1alpha and beta) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene polymorphisms were associated with the susceptibility of chronic periodontitis. In study IV, the prevalence of periodontitis in individuals with T2D was investigated, together with the prevalence of diabetic complications in relation to periodontal disease. We also studied whether there was a difference in dental care habits and knowledge of oral health between T2D subjects with and without periodontal disease. In conclusion, this thesis did not find any significant clinical and microbiological differences between subjects with recurrent periodontal disease treated with a locally delivered metronidazole gel compared to a placebo gel. Neither could we find an association between genetic variants in the IL-lalpha, IL-beta and IL-6 genes in individuals with or

  10. Protein biomarkers of periodontitis in saliva.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John J

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the tissues that surround and support the teeth and is initiated by inappropriate and excessive immune responses to bacteria in subgingival dental plaque leading to loss of the integrity of the periodontium, compromised tooth function, and eventually tooth loss. Periodontitis is an economically important disease as it is time-consuming and expensive to treat. Periodontitis has a worldwide prevalence of 5-15% and the prevalence of severe disease in western populations has increased in recent decades. Furthermore, periodontitis is more common in smokers, in obesity, in people with diabetes, and in heart disease patients although the pathogenic processes underpinning these links are, as yet, poorly understood. Diagnosis and monitoring of periodontitis rely on traditional clinical examinations which are inadequate to predict patient susceptibility, disease activity, and response to treatment. Studies of the immunopathogenesis of periodontitis and analysis of mediators in saliva have allowed the identification of many potentially useful biomarkers. Convenient measurement of these biomarkers using chairside analytical devices could form the basis for diagnostic tests which will aid the clinician and the patient in periodontitis management; this review will summarise this field and will identify the experimental, technical, and clinical issues that remain to be addressed before such tests can be implemented. PMID:24944840

  11. Ultrasonic device for measuring periodontal attachment levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, J. E.; Hinders, M. K.

    2002-07-01

    Periodontal disease is manifested clinically by a degradation of the ligament that attaches the tooth to the bone. The most widely used diagnostic tool for assessment of periodontal diseases, measurement of periodontal attachment loss with a manual probe, may overestimate attachment loss by as much as 2 mm in untreated sites, while underestimating attachment loss by an even greater margin following treatment. Manual probing is also invasive, which causes patient discomfort. This work describes the development and testing of an ultrasonographic periodontal probe designed to replace manual probing. It uses a thin stream of water to project an ultrasonic beam into the periodontal pocket, and then measures echoes off features within the pocket. To do so, the ultrasonic beam must be narrowed from 2 (the diameter of the transducer) to 0.5 mm (the approximate width of the periodontal pocket at the gingival margin). The proper choice of transducer frequency, the proper method for controlling water flow from the probe, and a model for interpreting these echoes are also addressed. Initial results indicate that the device measures echoes from the hard tissue of the tooth surface, and that the periodontal attachment level can be inferred from these echoes.

  12. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity. PMID:25627227

  13. Periodontal antimicrobials--finding the right solutions.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Michael G; Aalam, Alexandre; Slots, Jørgen

    2005-02-01

    Strengthened by promising research data and commercial backing, interest in the field of anti-infective periodontal therapy is rapidly expanding. Management of the periodontal microbiota with antibiotic drugs and antiseptic agents in conjunction with mechanical debridement seems to be more effective than mechanical therapy alone, at least in the treatment of advanced periodontal disease. The choice of a periodontal chemotherapeutic regimen requires an understanding of the usual infecting flora, available antimicrobial agents, and pathogen susceptibility patterns. Systemic administration of combinations of metronidazole and either amoxicillin or ciprofloxacin has been widely used with great success; however the presence of subgingival yeasts and resistant bacteria can be a problem in some periodontitis patients. Valuable antiseptic agents for subgingival application include 10% povidone-iodine for professional use and 0.1-0.5% sodium hypochlorite for patient self-care. These antiseptics have significantly broader spectra of antimicrobial action, are less likely to induce development of resistant bacteria and adverse host reactions, and are considerably less expensive than commercially available antibiotics in controlled release devices. In practice, mechanical debridement combined with subgingival povidone-iodine application in the dental office and sodium hypochlorite irrigation for patient self-care are valuable antimicrobial remedies in the treatment of virtually all types of periodontal disease. Management of moderate to severe periodontitis may require additional systemic antibiotic and/or surgical treatment. PMID:15747646

  14. Treatment of periodontal disease in older adults.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Persson, G Rutger

    2016-10-01

    Within the next 40 years the number of older adults worldwide will more than double. This will impact periodontal treatment needs and presents a challenge to health-care providers and governments worldwide, as severe periodontitis has been reported to be the sixth most prevalent medical condition in the world. Older adults (≥ 80 years of age) who receive regular dental care retain more teeth than those who do not receive such care, but routine general dental care for these individuals is not sufficient to prevent the progression of periodontitis with the same degree of success as in younger individuals. There is a paucity of data on the efficacy of different periodontal therapies for older individuals. However, considering the higher prevalence of chronic medical conditions seen in older adults, it cannot be assumed that periodontal therapy will yield the same degree of success seen in younger individuals. Furthermore, medications can influence the status of the periodontium and the delivery of periodontal care. As an example, anticoagulant drugs are common among older patients and may be a contraindication to certain treatments. Newer anticoagulants will, however, facilitate surgical intervention in older patients. Furthermore, prescription medications taken for chronic conditions, such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases, can affect the periodontium in a variety of ways. In summary, consideration of socio-economic factors, general health status and multiple-drug therapies will, in the future, be an important part of the management of periodontitis in older adults. PMID:27501494

  15. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation. PMID:26963387

  16. Gene expression in periodontal tissues following treatment

    PubMed Central

    Beikler, Thomas; Peters, Ulrike; Prior, Karola; Eisenacher, Martin; Flemmig, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    Background In periodontitis, treatment aimed at controlling the periodontal biofilm infection results in a resolution of the clinical and histological signs of inflammation. Although the cell types found in periodontal tissues following treatment have been well described, information on gene expression is limited to few candidate genes. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the expression profiles of immune and inflammatory genes in periodontal tissues from sites with severe chronic periodontitis following periodontal therapy in order to identify genes involved in tissue homeostasis. Gingival biopsies from 12 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were taken six to eight weeks following non-surgical periodontal therapy, and from 11 healthy controls. As internal standard, RNA of an immortalized human keratinocyte line (HaCaT) was used. Total RNA was subjected to gene expression profiling using a commercially available microarray system focusing on inflammation-related genes. Post-hoc confirmation of selected genes was done by Realtime-PCR. Results Out of the 136 genes analyzed, the 5% most strongly expressed genes compared to healthy controls were Interleukin-12A (IL-12A), Versican (CSPG-2), Matrixmetalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), Down syndrome critical region protein-1 (DSCR-1), Macrophage inflammatory protein-2β (Cxcl-3), Inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (BIRC-1), Cluster of differentiation antigen 38 (CD38), Regulator of G-protein signalling-1 (RGS-1), and Finkel-Biskis-Jinkins murine osteosarcoma virus oncogene (C-FOS); the 5% least strongly expressed genes were Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine Kinase-2 (RIP-2), Complement component 3 (C3), Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (COX-2), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Endothelin-1 (EDN-1), Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2), Matrix-metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14), and Interferon regulating factor-7 (IRF-7). Conclusion Gene expression profiles found in periodontal tissues following therapy

  17. The Association Between Hyperlipidemia and Periodontal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Golpasand Hagh, Leila; Zakavi, Faramarz; Hajizadeh, Fatemeh; Saleki, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is a local chronic inflammatory condition of the supporting structures of the teeth resulting from a dental plaque biofilm attached to teeth surfaces. Recent studies have indicated that this oral disease may have effects on systemic health. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between periodontitis and hyperlipidemia. Patients and Methods: This case-control study was conducted in Iran during March 2011. In this case-control study, levels of serum lipids in 45 subjects with periodontitis were measured and compared with 45 age, gender and body mass index (BMI) matched controls. Data were analyzed using student t-test and chi-square test with P < 0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: Mean values of total cholesterol (CHL) (periodontitis group = 218.11 ± 29.77, control group = 162.31 ± 48.24) and triglycerides (TG) (periodontitis group = 209.77 ± 44.30, control group = 125.60 ± 44.16) were significantly higher in the periodontitis group (P < 0.001). High-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels were higher in the case group, but this difference was not statistically significant. Frequency of pathological values of CHL and TG were significantly higher in cases compared with the controls (P = 0.002 and P = 0.015, respectively). Conclusions: This study indicates that hyperlipidemia may be associated with periodontal disease in healthy individuals; yet whether periodontitis causes an increase in levels of plasma lipids or whether hyperlipidemia is a risk factor for periodontal infection and cardiovascular disease, it needs further investigations. PMID:25763249

  18. [Microcirculation impairment in periodontal tissues in patients with chronic generalized periodontitis combined with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Krechina, E K; Zorina, O A; Molchanov, A M; Shilov, A M

    2016-01-01

    Using the method of laser Doppler flowmetry the study of microcirculation in periodontal tissues in patients with moderate chronic generalized periodontitis and metabolic syndrome was carried out. The analysis of microcirculation values proved not only the reduction of blood flow intensity but also the decreased vasoactivity of microvessels essential to maintain normal microcirculation in periodontal tissues, as it provides active modulation of tissue blood flow and its adaptation to local metabolic needs. PMID:26925562

  19. Comparison of salivary calcium level in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Kambalyal, Preeti; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Hungund, Shital

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare salivary calcium (Ca) level in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: 56 subjects were included in the study and were grouped as follows: 12 subjects who were periodontally healthy (Group I), 12 subjects having chronic periodontitis who were non-smokers (Group II), 12 non-smokers having aggressive periodontitis (Group III), 12 smokers with chronic periodontitis (Group IV), and 8 smokers with aggressive periodontitis (Group V). Clinical measurements and non-stimulated whole saliva samples were obtained and analyzed for Ca levels by ion-selective electrolyte analyzer. Results: When salivary Ca values were compared between the groups, they showed statistically significant values (P < 0.001) with the highest mean Ca level in Group IV and Group V, which include smokers with chronic periodontitis and smokers with aggressive periodontitis, respectively, than in other groups. Between groups II and III also, the mean salivary Ca level was statistically significant (P < 0.001) with higher mean salivary Ca in non-smokers having chronic periodontitis than in non-smokers having aggressive periodontitis. Conclusions: The present study showed that smokers having chronic periodontitis as well as smokers having aggressive periodontitis have higher salivary calcium levels. Also, patients with aggressive periodontitis were found to have lesser salivary calcium level than chronic periodontitis patients by ion-selective electrolyte analyzer. PMID:26942120

  20. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Vieyra, Ricarda; Rosales, Carlos; Uribe-Querol, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque) creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:27019855

  1. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Vieyra, Ricarda; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque) creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:27019855

  2. The periodontal – endodontic continuum: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sunitha V, Raja; Emmadi, Pamela; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan; Thyegarajan, Ramakrishnan; Rajaraman, Vijayalakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Periodontal therapy deals with many aspects of the supporting structures, including the prevention and repair of lesions of the gingival sulcus. Endodontics deals primarily with disease of the pulp and periapical tissues. The success of both periodontal and endodontic therapy depends on the elimination of both disease processes, whether they exist separately or as a combined lesion. The relationship between periodontal and endodontic disease has been a subject of speculation for many years. This paper aims at presenting a comprehensive review of several aspects of perio-endo lesions. PMID:20142886

  3. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vivek Kumar; Bains, Rhythm

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO), is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials. PMID:26604952

  4. Complement and dysbiosis in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Lambris, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling crosstalk between complement and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) normally serves to coordinate host immunity. However, the periodontal bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis expresses C5 convertase-like enzymatic activity and adeptly exploits complement-TLR crosstalk to subvert host defenses and escape elimination. Intriguingly, this defective immune surveillance leads to the remodeling of the periodontal microbiota to a dysbiotic state that causes inflammatory periodontitis. Understanding the mechanisms by which P. gingivalis modulates complement function to cause dysbiosis offers new targets for complement therapeutics. PMID:22964237

  5. Salivary Markers for Periodontal and General Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Podzimek, Stepan; Vondrackova, Lucie; Duskova, Jana; Janatova, Tatjana; Broukal, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    The determination of biomarkers in saliva is becoming an important part of laboratory diagnostics and the prediction of not only periodontal, but also other tissue and organ diseases. Biomarkers in saliva (e.g., enzymes, protein markers, or oxidative stress markers) can be used for activity determination and for periodontal disease prognosis. Saliva also contains many markers which can predict the risk of certain diseases (e.g., diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, oncology, endocrinology, and psychiatric diseases). The study of salivary components proteomics clearly shows the relationship of periodontal diseases and diseases of distant systems, organs, or tissues. PMID:27143814

  6. Maternal periodontal disease, pregnancy, and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dasanayake, Ananda P; Gennaro, Susan; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D; Chhun, Nok

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the association between maternal periodontal disease and poor pregnancy and neonatal outcomes and outline the role nurses can play in improving the oral health of pregnant women. Maternal periodontal disease is linked to preterm birth, low birthweight, and preterm low birthweight, but treatment of periodontal disease during pregnancy has been shown to be safe and effective. Nurses, nurse practitioners, and nurse-midwives are in a position to educate pregnant women on the benefits of good oral health and identify and refer women who are in need of dental care for treatment. PMID:18158527

  7. Supportive periodontal therapy and periodontal biotype as prognostic factors in implants placed in patients with a history of periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo-Aisa, Francisco J.; Estefanía-Fresco, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate bone loss around implants placed in patients with a history of treated chronic periodontitis and who did or did not attend supportive periodontal therapy, after one year in function. Furthermore, the influence of periodontal biotype and level of plaque was also evaluated. Material and Methods: Forty-nine patients participated voluntarily in the study. All subjects had a history of chronic periodontitis, which had been previously treated. After the active treatment, 27 patients attended supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) and the rest did not (No SPT). The O’Leary plaque index and periodontal biotype were recorded for each subject and 246 Astra Tech® OsseospeedTM implants were radiographically analysed (123 placed in SPT patients and 123 in No SPT patients) at the time of loading and one year later, measuring marginal bone loss with the program Dental Studio NX 6.0®. The statistical analysis was performed with Windows SPSS, applying Pearson’s correlation index and the Kruskal-Wallis and U-Mann Whitney non-parametric tests. Results: Six patients were found to have periimplantitis and sixteen mucositis. The survival rate was 99.59% (100% SPT and 99.18% No SPT). Mean bone loss was 0.39 mm (range [-0.71 - 8.05]). Among SPT patients, 95% of the implants had losses less than or equal to the mean (mean bone loss of 0.16 mm) compared to 53.7% for the No SPT group (mean bone loss of 0.62 mm). A statistically significant relationship was demonstrated between bone loss around the implant and the patient’s periodontal biotype and plaque index. Conclusions: The marginal bone loss around implants in patients with treated chronic periodontitis is minimal if they are in a controlled SPT programme and there is individual control of plaque index. Moreover, the presence of a thin periodontal biotype represents a risk factor for additional bone loss. Key words:Peri-implantitis, chronic periodontitis, bacterial plaque, periodontal biotype. PMID:23722147

  8. The Trimeric Model: A New Model of Periodontal Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Tarakji, Bassel

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of periodontal disease is a complex and multidisciplinary procedure, requiring periodontal, surgical, restorative, and orthodontic treatment modalities. Several authors attempted to formulate models for periodontal treatment that orders the treatment steps in a logical and easy to remember manner. In this article, we discuss two models of periodontal treatment planning from two of the most well-known textbook in the specialty of periodontics internationally. Then modify them to arrive at a new model of periodontal treatment planning, The Trimeric Model. Adding restorative and orthodontic interrelationships with periodontal treatment allows us to expand this model into the Extended Trimeric Model of periodontal treatment planning. These models will provide a logical framework and a clear order of the treatment of periodontal disease for general practitioners and periodontists alike. PMID:25177662

  9. Colorimetric Assay for the Detection of Typical Biomarkers for Periodontitis Using a Magnetic Nanoparticle Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wignarajah, Shayalini; Suaifan, Ghadeer A R Y; Bizzarro, Sergio; Bikker, Floris J; Kaman, Wendy E; Zourob, Mohammed

    2015-12-15

    Periodontitis is a chronic disease which affects at least 10% of the population. If untreated, periodontitis can lead to teeth loss. Unfortunately, current diagnostic tests are limited in their sensitivity and specificity. In this study, a novel multiplex hand-held colorimetric diagnostic biosensor, using two typical inflammatory salivary biomarkers, Human Neutrophil Elastase (HNE) and Cathepsin-G, was constructed as proof of concept to potentially detect periodontitis. The biosensing method was based on the measurement of proteolytic activity using specific proteases probes. These probes consist of specific proteases substrates covalently bound to a magnetic bead from one end and to the gold sensor surface by the other end. When intact, this renders the golden sensor black. Upon proteolysis, the cleaved magnetic beads will be attracted by an external magnet revealing the golden color of the sensor surface observable by the naked eye. The biosensor was capable of specific and quantitative detection of HNE and Cathepsin-G in solution and in spiked saliva samples with a lower detection limit of 1 pg/mL and 100 fg/mL for HNE and Cathepsin-G, respectively. Examination of periodontitis patients' sample and a healthy control showed the potential of the multiplex biosensor to detect the presence of HNE and Cathepsin-G activity in situ. This approach is anticipated to be a useful biochip array amenable to low-cost point-of-care devices. PMID:26631371

  10. The epigenetic paradigm in periodontitis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Vamsi; Venkatesan, Vettriselvi; Rao, Suresh Ranga

    2015-01-01

    Epigenome refers to “epi” meaning outside the “genome.” Epigenetics is the field of study of the epigenome. Epigenetic modifications include changes in the promoter CpG Islands, modifications of histone protein structure, posttranslational repression by micro-RNA which contributes to the alteration of gene expression. Epigenetics provides an understanding of the role of gene-environment interactions on disease phenotype especially in complex multifactorial diseases. Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects the supporting structures of the tooth. The role of the genome (in terms of genetic polymorphisms) in periodontitis pathogenesis has been examined in numerous studies, and chronic periodontitis has been established as a polygenic disorder. The potential role of epigenetic modifications in the various facets of pathogenesis of periodontitis is discussed in this paper based on the available literature. PMID:26015662

  11. Optical coherence tomography for diagnosing periodontal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Everett, Matthew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.; Nathel, Howard

    1997-05-01

    We have, in this preliminary study, investigated the use of optical coherence tomography for diagnosis of periodontal disease. We took in vitro OCT images of the dental and periodontal tissues from a young pig and compared them to histological sections. These images distinguish tooth and soft tissue relationships that are important in diagnosing and assessing periodontal disease. We have imaged the attachment of gingiva to the tooth surface and located the cemento-enamel junction. This junction is an important reference point for defining attachment level in the diagnosis of periodontal disease. the boundary between enamel and dentin is also visible for most of the length of the anatomical crown, allowing quantitation of enamel thickness and character.

  12. Defective neutrophil chemotaxis in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R A; Page, R C; Wilde, G

    1977-01-01

    Neutrophil chemotaxis was evaluated in nine patients with juvenile periodontitis, with normal subjects and patients with the adult form of periodontitis as controls. Defective chemotactic responses were observed in neutrophils from seven of nine juvenile patients, and a reduced level of complement-derived chemotactic activity was demonstrated in serum from four patients. These determinations were normal in all the patients with adult periodontitis. Serum from five of the juvenile patients contained a heat-stable, non-dialyzable factor that markedly inhibited the chemotaxis of normal neutrophils. Thus the characteristic tissue destruction seen in juvenile periodontitis may be, at least in part, a consequence of a failure of host defense mechanisms. PMID:591063

  13. Clinical periodontics with the argon laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, R. L.

    1995-04-01

    The argon laser has proven to be a valuable tool for the thermodynamic debridement of the periodontal lesion, incisions and tissue fusion. Illustrations of clinical applications and discussion of laser parameters will be provided.

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Oral Treponemes in Patients with Periodontitis and in Periodontitis-Resistant Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moter, Annette; Riep, Birgit; Haban, Vesna; Heuner, Klaus; Siebert, Gerda; Berning, Moritz; Wyss, Chris; Ehmke, Benjamin; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Göbel, Ulf B.

    2006-01-01

    The etiologic role of oral treponemes in human periodontitis is still under debate. Although seen by dark-field microscopy in large numbers, their possible role is still unclear since they comprise some 60 different phylotypes, most of which are still uncultured. To determine their status as mere commensals or opportunistic pathogens, molecular epidemiological studies are required that include both cultured and as-yet-uncultured organisms. Here we present such data, comparing treponemal populations from chronic periodontitis (CP) or generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) patients. As a periodontitis-resistant (PR) control group, we included elderly volunteers with more than 20 natural teeth and no history of periodontal treatment and no or minimal clinical signs of periodontitis. Almost every treponemal phylotype was present in all three groups. For most treponemes, the proportion of subjects positive for a certain species or phylotype was higher in both periodontitis groups than in the PR group. This difference was pronounced for treponemes of the phylogenetic groups II and IV and for Treponema socranskii and Treponema lecithinolyticum. Between the periodontitis groups the only significant differences were seen for T. socranskii and T. lecithinolyticum, which were found more often in periodontal pockets of GAP patients than of CP patients. In contrast, no difference was found for Treponema denticola. Our findings, however, strengthen the hypothesis of treponemes being opportunistic pathogens. It appears that T. socranskii, T. lecithinolyticum and group II and IV treponemes may represent good indicators for periodontitis and suggest the value of the respective probes for microbiological diagnosis in periodontitis subjects. PMID:16954230

  15. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalın, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women. Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status

  16. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Erhan; Akaln, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women.Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated.Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status markers

  17. Periodontal implications of orthodontic treatment in adults with reduced or normal periodontal tissues versus those of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Leggott, P J; Quinn, R S; Eakle, W S; Chambers, D

    1989-09-01

    This longitudinal study monitored periodontal status in 20 adults and 20 adolescents undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Ten adults had generalized periodontitis and received periodontal treatment, including periodontal surgery, before orthodontic treatment. They also received periodontal maintenance at 3-month intervals during orthodontic treatment. The other 10 adults had normal periodontal tissues. Neither these latter adults nor the adolescents received periodontal maintenance during orthodontic treatment. Periodontal status was determined (1) at six standard sites before fixed appliances were placed (baseline), (2) at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after appliances had been placed, and (3) 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after appliances had been removed. At each of these visits, these sites were assessed for plaque index, gingival index, bleeding tendency, and pocket depth. Loss of attachment between baseline and 3 months after appliances were removed and tooth loss were also determined. Complete data were obtained for 15 adolescents and 14 adults. During orthodontic treatment the adolescent group showed significantly more (p less than 0.05) periodontal inflammation and supragingival plaque than the adults; after appliances were removed, this pattern was no longer statistically significant. For loss of attachment, there were no significant differences among adolescents, adults with normal periodontal tissues, or adults with reduced but healthy periodontal tissues who had undergone treatment for periodontal disease. For tooth loss, three nonstudy site teeth with pockets deeper than 6 mm and/or furcation involvements were lost because of periodontal abscesses in the adult group treated for periodontal disease. PMID:2773862

  18. Periodontal ligament stem cells: an update and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chamila Prageeth Pandula, P K; Samaranayake, L P; Jin, L J; Zhang, Chengfei

    2014-05-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a serious infectious and inflammatory oral disease of humans worldwide. Conventional treatment modalities are effective for controlling periodontal disease. However, the regeneration of damaged periodontal tissues remains a major challenge in clinical practice due to the complex structure of the periodontium. Stem cell-based regenerative approaches combined with the usage of emerging biomaterials are entering a new era in periodontal regeneration. The present review updates the current knowledge of periodontal ligament stem cell-based approaches for periodontal regeneration, and elaborates on the potentials for clinical application. PMID:24610628

  19. Isolated cleft lip with generalized aggressive periodontitis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Metgud, Renuka; Kumar, Ajay; Bhat, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Oro-facial clefts are one of the most common birth defects and may be associated with other genetic anomalies. Aggressive periodontitis is a rare condition that progresses rapidly, but affects only a small percentage of the population. Most of the cases of aggressive periodontitis are familial. Even though, literature has documented the association of various genetic disorders with aggressive periodontitis, the aggressive periodontitis in patients with isolated cleft lip (CL) have never been addressed. Here, we report a rare case of isolated CL with generalized aggressive periodontitis. The concomitant presentation of isolated CL with aggressive periodontitis in an individual has clinical significance for multi-disciplinary care. PMID:25810600

  20. The ins and outs of periodontal antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Michael G; Slots, Jørgen

    2002-04-01

    A multifaceted antimicrobial approach is necessary for the successful management of destructive periodontal disease. Effective antimicrobial periodontal therapy aims to overwhelm periodontal pathogens with aggressive initial therapy and prevent previously suppressed pathogens from rising up anew through daily oral hygiene measures and frequent professional cleaning. Current antimicrobial periodontal therapy employs mechanical debridement performed with and without surgery, antibiotics, and antiseptics. Subgingival irrigation with povidone-iodine at the dentist's office and subgingival irrigation with dilute sodium hypochlorite for home-care constitute effective, safe, and affordable periodontal antimicrobial therapy. This article describes theoretical and practical guidelines for implementing rational and cost-effective antimicrobial principles in the management of periodontal disease. PMID:12005374

  1. Isolated cleft lip with generalized aggressive periodontitis: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Metgud, Renuka; Kumar, Ajay; Bhat, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Oro-facial clefts are one of the most common birth defects and may be associated with other genetic anomalies. Aggressive periodontitis is a rare condition that progresses rapidly, but affects only a small percentage of the population. Most of the cases of aggressive periodontitis are familial. Even though, literature has documented the association of various genetic disorders with aggressive periodontitis, the aggressive periodontitis in patients with isolated cleft lip (CL) have never been addressed. Here, we report a rare case of isolated CL with generalized aggressive periodontitis. The concomitant presentation of isolated CL with aggressive periodontitis in an individual has clinical significance for multi-disciplinary care. PMID:25810600

  2. Quorum Sensing Inhibition, Relevance to Periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Yada, Sudheer; Kamalesh, B; Sonwane, Siddharth; Guptha, Indra; Swetha, R K

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing helps bacteria to communicate with each other and in coordinating their behavior. Many diseases of human beings, plants, and animals are mediated by quorum sensing. Various approaches are being tried to inhibit this communication to control the diseases caused by bacteria. Periodontal pathogens also communicate through quorum sensing and new approaches to treat periodontal disease using quorum sensing inhibition need to explored. PMID:25709373

  3. Newly Identified Pathogens Associated with Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Chaparro, P.J.; Gonçalves, C.; Figueiredo, L.C.; Faveri, M.; Lobão, E.; Tamashiro, N.; Duarte, P.; Feres, M.

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial evidence supporting the role of certain oral bacteria species in the onset and progression of periodontitis. Nevertheless, results of independent-culture diagnostic methods introduced about a decade ago have pointed to the existence of new periodontal pathogens. However, the data of these studies have not been evaluated together, which may generate some misunderstanding on the actual role of these microorganisms in the etiology of periodontitis. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the current weight of evidence for newly identified periodontal pathogens based on the results of “association” studies. This review was conducted and reported in accordance with the PRISMA statement. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched up to September 2013 for studies (1) comparing microbial data of subgingival plaque samples collected from subjects with periodontitis and periodontal health and (2) evaluating at least 1 microorganism other than the already-known periodontal pathogens. From 1,450 papers identified, 41 studies were eligible. The data were extracted and registered in predefined piloted forms. The results suggested that there is moderate evidence in the literature to support the association of 17 species or phylotypes from the phyla Bacteroidetes, Candidatus Saccharibacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes. The phylum Candidatus Saccharibacteria and the Archaea domain also seem to have an association with disease. These data point out the importance of previously unidentified species in the etiology of periodontitis and might guide future investigations on the actual role of these suspected new pathogens in the onset and progression of this infection. PMID:25074492

  4. Risk of Periodontal Diseases in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have reported an association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and periodontal diseases. However, a large-scale population-based cohort study was previously absent from the literature. Therefore, we evaluated the risk of periodontal diseases in patients with COPD in a nationwide population. From the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 22,332 patients with COPD who were newly diagnosed during 2000 to 2010. For each case, two individuals without COPD were randomly selected and frequency matched by age, sex, and diagnosis year. Both groups were followed up till the end of 2011. The overall incidence of periodontal diseases was 1.19-fold greater in the COPD group than in the comparison group (32.2 vs 26.4 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.24). Compared with non-COPD patients, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD increased with the number of emergency room visits (from 1.14 [95% CI 1.10–1.19] to 5.09 [95% CI 4.53–5.72]) and admissions (from 1.15 [95% CI 1.10–1.20] to 3.17 [95% CI 2.81–3.57]). In addition, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD treated with inhaled corticosteroids (1.22, 95% CI 1.11–1.34) and systemic corticosteroids (1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23) were significantly higher than those of patients not treated with corticosteroids. Patient with COPD are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases than the general population. Our results also support that the risk of periodontal diseases is proportional to COPD control. In addition, patients who receive corticosteroid treatment are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases. PMID:26579813

  5. Advanced drug delivery approaches against periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deeksha; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of gums involving the degeneration of periodontal ligaments, creation of periodontal pocket and resorption of alveolar bone, resulting in the disruption of the support structure of teeth. According to WHO, 10-15% of the global population suffers from severe periodontitis. The disease results from the growth of a diverse microflora (especially anaerobes) in the pockets and release of toxins, enzymes and stimulation of body's immune response. Various local or systemic approaches were used for an effective treatment of periodontitis. Currently, controlled local drug delivery approach is more favorable as compared to systemic approach because it mainly focuses on improving the therapeutic outcomes by achieving factors like site-specific delivery, low dose requirement, bypass of first-pass metabolism, reduction in gastrointestinal side effects and decrease in dosing frequency. Overall it provides a safe and effective mode of treatment, which enhances patient compliance. Complete eradication of the organisms from the sites was not achieved by using various surgical and mechanical treatments. So a number of polymer-based delivery systems like fibers, films, chips, strips, microparticles, nanoparticles and nanofibers made from a variety of natural and synthetic materials have been successfully tested to deliver a variety of drugs. These systems are biocompatible and biodegradable, completely fill the pockets, and have strong retention on the target site due to excellent mucoadhesion properties. The review summarizes various available and recently developing targeted delivery devices for the treatment of periodontitis. PMID:25005586

  6. Biochemical markers of the periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cecilia Estela; Koss, Myriam Adriana; López, María Elena

    2003-01-01

    For many years the diagnosis of Periodontal Disease has been based on clinical and radiographic methods. Other more recent methods have the objective of studying the inflammatory response of the host. That way, immunologic and biological methods determine the free mediators in the periodontal infection. The components of the gingivo-crevicular liquid or fluid are used to identify or to diagnose the active disease, to anticipate the risk of acquiring the disease and to determine its progress. For it to be clinically useful important changes should be registered the way a specific site turns active or that a previously disease affected site improves its conditions as a result of periodontal therapy. The response of the neutrophillic granulocytes play an important role in the detection of Periodontal Disease. The unspecific defense system in the gingivo-crevicular fluid can be determined through cytokines and/or interleukines that serve to identify sites at risk on the patient. In Periodontal Disease, the cytokines are not only defense mediators of the gingival sulcus fluid, but are also an indicator of tissue destruction. The liberation of high levels of lysosomal enzymes by neutrophils, proteolytic enzymes as the collagenases, or intercytoplasmatic enzymes as dehydrogenase lactate and aspartate amino transferase can equally help monitor the progress of the Periodontal Disease. PMID:14595256

  7. Regulator of Calcineurin 1 in Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ulrike; Solominidou, Eleni; Korkmaz, Yüksel; Rüttermann, Stefan; Klocke, Astrid; Flemmig, Thomas Frank; Beikler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and NF-kB pathway associated processes are involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory disorders, for example, periodontal disease. The activation of these pathways is controlled by the regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1). The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of RCAN1 in periodontal disease. Healthy and inflamed periodontal tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence using specific rabbit polyclonal anti-RCAN1 antibodies. For expression analysis human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used. HUVEC were incubated for 2 h with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) or with wild type and laboratory strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). Expression analysis of rcan1 and cox2 was done by real time PCR using specific primers for rcan1.4 and cox2. The expression of rcan1 was found to be significantly suppressed in endothelial cells of chronically inflamed periodontal tissues compared to healthy controls. Rcan1 and cox2 were significantly induced by VEGF and wild type and laboratory P. gingivalis strains. Interestingly, the magnitude of the rcan1 and cox2 induction was strain dependent. The results of this study indicate that RCAN1 is suppressed in endothelial cells of chronically inflamed periodontal tissues. During an acute infection, however, rcan1 seems to be upregulated in endothelial cells, indicating a modulating role in immune homeostasis of periodontal tissues. PMID:27403036

  8. In vivo identification of periodontal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Roguljic, H; Matthews, B G; Yang, W; Cvija, H; Mina, M; Kalajzic, I

    2013-08-01

    The periodontal ligament contains progenitor cells; however, their identity and differentiation potential in vivo remain poorly characterized. Previous results have suggested that periodontal tissue progenitors reside in perivascular areas. Therefore, we utilized a lineage-tracing approach to identify and track periodontal progenitor cells from the perivascular region in vivo. We used an alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) promoter-driven and tamoxifen-inducible Cre system (αSMACreERT2) that, in combination with a reporter mouse line (Ai9), permanently labels a cell population, termed 'SMA9'. To trace the differentiation of SMA9-labeled cells into osteoblasts/cementoblasts, we utilized a Col2.3GFP transgene, while expression of Scleraxis-GFP was used to follow differentiation into periodontal ligament fibroblasts during normal tissue formation and remodeling following injury. In uninjured three-week-old SMA9 mice, tamoxifen labeled a small population of cells in the periodontal ligament that expanded over time, particularly in the apical region of the root. By 17 days and 7 weeks after labeling, some SMA9-labeled cells expressed markers indicating differentiation into mature lineages, including cementocytes. Following injury, SMA9 cells expanded, and differentiated into cementoblasts, osteoblasts, and periodontal ligament fibroblasts. SMA9-labeled cells represent a source of progenitors that can give rise to mature osteoblasts, cementoblasts, and fibroblasts within the periodontium. PMID:23735585

  9. Enamel Pearls Implications on Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Vieira, Thaís Ribeiral; Bustamante, Roberta Paula Colen; Gomes, Hayder Egg; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarin

    2015-01-01

    Dental anatomy is quite complex and diverse factors must be taken into account in its analysis. Teeth with anatomical variations present an increase in the rate of severity periodontal tissue destruction and therefore a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. In this context, this paper reviews the literature regarding enamel pearls and their implications in the development of severe localized periodontal disease as well as in the prognosis of periodontal therapy. Radiographic examination of a patient complaining of pain in the right side of the mandible revealed the presence of a radiopaque structure around the cervical region of lower right first premolar. Periodontal examination revealed extensive bone loss since probing depths ranged from 7.0 mm to 9.0 mm and additionally intense bleeding and suppuration. Surgical exploration detected the presence of an enamel pearl, which was removed. Assessment of the remaining supporting tissues led to the extraction of tooth 44. Local factors such as enamel pearls can lead to inadequate removal of the subgingival biofilm, thus favoring the establishment and progression of periodontal diseases. PMID:26491574

  10. Diagnosis of Periodontal Diseases by Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Jun-Ichi; Hino, Mami; Bando, Mika; Hiroshima, Yuka

    Many middle aged and old persons take periodontal diseases that mainly cause teeth loss and result in some systemic diseases. The prevention of periodontal diseases is very important for oral and systemic health, but the present diagnostic examination is not fully objective and suitable. To diagnose periodontal diseases exactly, some biomarkers shown inflammation, tissue degradation and bone resorption, in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and saliva are known. We demonstrated that GCF levels of calprotectin, inflammation-related protein, and carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen, bone metabolism-related protein, were associated with clinical condition of periodontal diseases, and suggested that these proteins may be useful biomarkers for periodontal diseases. Recently, determinations of genes and proteins by using microdevices are studied for diagnosis of some diseases. We detected calprotectin protein by chemiluminescent immunoassay on a microchip and showed the possibility of specific and quantitative detection of calprotectin in a very small amount of GCF. To determine plural markers in GCF by using microdevices contributes to develop accurate, objective diagnostic system of periodontal diseases.

  11. Gingival Tissue Transcriptomes Identify Distinct Periodontitis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kebschull, M.; Demmer, R.T.; Grün, B.; Guarnieri, P.; Pavlidis, P.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The currently recognized principal forms of periodontitis—chronic and aggressive—lack an unequivocal, pathobiology-based foundation. We explored whether gingival tissue transcriptomes can serve as the basis for an alternative classification of periodontitis. We used cross-sectional whole-genome gene expression data from 241 gingival tissue biopsies obtained from sites with periodontal pathology in 120 systemically healthy nonsmokers with periodontitis, with available data on clinical periodontal status, subgingival microbial profiles, and serum IgG antibodies to periodontal microbiota. Adjusted model-based clustering of transcriptomic data using finite mixtures generated two distinct clusters of patients that did not align with the current classification of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Differential expression profiles primarily related to cell proliferation in cluster 1 and to lymphocyte activation and unfolded protein responses in cluster 2. Patients in the two clusters did not differ with respect to age but presented with distinct phenotypes (statistically significantly different whole-mouth clinical measures of extent/severity, subgingival microbial burden by several species, and selected serum antibody responses). Patients in cluster 2 showed more extensive/severe disease and were more often male. The findings suggest that distinct gene expression signatures in pathologic gingival tissues translate into phenotypic differences and can provide a basis for a novel classification. PMID:24646639

  12. Magnesium deficiency is associated with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Meisel, P; Schwahn, C; Luedemann, J; John, U; Kroemer, H K; Kocher, T

    2005-10-01

    In the multifactorial pathogenesis of periodontitis, there are still unknown factors influencing the outcome of the disease. An association between magnesium and periodontitis has been suggested by preliminary studies. However, relevant clinical data are lacking. We investigated the association between magnesium status and periodontal health in a population-based analysis. We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological investigation involving 4290 subjects aged 20-80 yrs. We recorded periodontal risk factors and determined concentrations of serum magnesium and calcium, relating them to periodontal parameters. In a matched-pair study, 60 subjects using oral magnesium-containing drugs and 120 without were compared. In subjects aged 40 yrs and older, increased serum Mg/Ca was significantly associated with reduced probing depth (p<0.001), less attachment loss (p=0.006), and a higher number of remaining teeth (p=0.005). Subjects taking Mg drugs showed less attachment loss (p<0.01) and more remaining teeth than did their matched counterparts. These results suggest that nutritional magnesium supplementation may improve periodontal health. PMID:16183794

  13. Multiphasic Scaffolds for Periodontal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovski, S.; Vaquette, C.; Gronthos, S.; Hutmacher, D.W.; Bartold, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    For a successful clinical outcome, periodontal regeneration requires the coordinated response of multiple soft and hard tissues (periodontal ligament, gingiva, cementum, and bone) during the wound-healing process. Tissue-engineered constructs for regeneration of the periodontium must be of a complex 3-dimensional shape and adequate size and demonstrate biomechanical stability over time. A critical requirement is the ability to promote the formation of functional periodontal attachment between regenerated alveolar bone, and newly formed cementum on the root surface. This review outlines the current advances in multiphasic scaffold fabrication and how these scaffolds can be combined with cell- and growth factor–based approaches to form tissue-engineered constructs capable of recapitulating the complex temporal and spatial wound-healing events that will lead to predictable periodontal regeneration. This can be achieved through a variety of approaches, with promising strategies characterized by the use of scaffolds that can deliver and stabilize cells capable of cementogenesis onto the root surface, provide biomechanical cues that encourage perpendicular alignment of periodontal fibers to the root surface, and provide osteogenic cues and appropriate space to facilitate bone regeneration. Progress on the development of multiphasic constructs for periodontal tissue engineering is in the early stages of development, and these constructs need to be tested in large animal models and, ultimately, human clinical trials. PMID:25139362

  14. Association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regenerative therapy: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Koidou, Vasiliki-Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this review is to systematically investigate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis with the clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration. Material and Methods Based on a focused question, an electronic search identified 155 unique citations. Three journals (Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology and Journal of Periodontal Research), references of relevant studies and review articles were hand-searched. Two independent reviewers implementing eligibility inclusion criteria selected the studies. Results Of the 155, four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All studies were published between 2000 and 2004 and the samples’ size was 40 to 86 patients. Polymorphisms of Interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene were included in all. Three out of four studies failed to identify an association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration, while one found an association. The heterogeneity and small number of studies included prevented the conduct of a meta-analysis. No studies were identified evaluating the effect of other genotypes and as a result only IL-1 genotype studies were included. Conclusions Within the limits of the present review, no direct conclusion for the effect of a susceptible IL-1 genotype status to the clinical outcome after periodontal regeneration could be drawn. The need of more qualitative studies to explore a possible association emerges. Key words:Periodontitis, genotype, periodontal therapy, regeneration, susceptibility, systematic review. PMID:26946210

  15. Adolescents with high periodontal risk in Public Dental Service.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Leif; Adler, Lottie; Jonés, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of adolescents with high periodontal risk and to identify factors with influence on the decision to refer a patient to a specialist clinic of Periodontology, on compliance rate and on treatment outcome. The investigation was conducted as a retrospective study on adolescents at age 13-17. In total, clinical examinations and risk evaluations according to caries- and periodontal risk were performed on 50347 adolescents in general dentistry at ages 13, 15 and 17 in 2007. Individuals with a high periodontal risk were included in the present investigation. A high periodontal risk was defined as presence of sites with periodontal pocket depths >6mm and loss of periodontal tissue support. Multiple logistic regression analyses were adopted to calculate the influence of the potential predictors on the investigated dependent variables. In total, 0.5% of the adolescents were found to have high periodontal risk. The diagnosis local periodontitis and the number of periodontal pockets with probing depths >6 mm were positively and significantly correlated to referral to a periodontist. Eighteen percent dropped out before the treatment was completed. Smokers had a significantly lower compliance than non-smokers. The success rate was significantly lower for individuals with many periodontal pockets and for those with the diagnosis local periodontitis. The prevalence of adolescents classified as having high periodontal risk was low. A large frequency of subjects dropped out before the periodontal treatment was completed, especially at the specialist clinics. PMID:24620506

  16. Fibrinogen Degradation Products and Periodontitis: Deciphering the Connection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fibrinogen degradation products (e.g. D-dimer) arise from digested fibrin clots and fibrinogen. Elevated concentrations accompany activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis and indicate chronic inflammatory diseases. D-Dimer tests are a quick, noninvasive method to rule out abnormal clotting. Periodontitis strongly affects the haemostatic system and evokes a procoagulant state. Correlation of chronic periodontitis with early indicators of disease (biomarkers) might be useful. Aim The aim of the study was to examine whether the plasma D-dimer concentration reflects the progression of chronic periodontitis and the beneficial effect of periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods Forty randomly selected subjects were divided into four groups, Group I: 10 healthy subjects, Group II: 10 with mild periodontitis, Group III: 10 with moderate periodontitis, Group IV: 10 with severe periodontitis. After thorough dental and periodontal examination, 3 mL of venous blood was collected for measurement of fibrinogen degradation products. Results The patients with moderate and chronic periodontitis exhibited high concentrations of D-dimer (mean value 434.98–535.52 mcg/mL), whereas subjects with mild or no periodontitis exhibited values of 329.78–211.29 mcg/mL. Concentrations of D-dimer were significantly reduced after therapy of all classes of periodontitis. Conclusion Periodontal treatment can reduce amount of D-dimer in the plasma. A higher than normal concentration is observed in chronic periodontitis. PMID:26816985

  17. Detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions amenable to prevention

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and chronic periodontitis are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases. Gingivitis affects the majority of people, and advanced periodontitis is estimated to affect 5-15% of adults. The detection and diagnosis of these common diseases is a fundamentally important component of oral health care. All patients should undergo periodontal assessment as part of routine oral examination. Periodontal screening using methods such as the Basic Periodontal Examination/Community Periodontal Index or Periodontal Screening Record should be performed for all new patients, and also on a regular basis as part of ongoing oral health care. If periodontitis is identified, full periodontal assessment is required, involving recording of full mouth probing and bleeding data, together with assessment of other relevant parameters such as plaque levels, furcation involvement, recession and tooth mobility. Radiographic assessment of alveolar bone levels is driven by the clinical situation, and is required to assess bone destruction in patients with periodontitis. Risk assessment (such as assessing diabetes status and smoking) and risk management (such as promoting smoking cessation) should form a central component of periodontal therapy. This article provides guidance to the oral health care team regarding methods and frequencies of appropriate clinical and radiographic examinations to assess periodontal status, to enable appropriate detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions. PMID:26390822

  18. Detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions amenable to prevention.

    PubMed

    Preshaw, Philip M

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and chronic periodontitis are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases. Gingivitis affects the majority of people, and advanced periodontitis is estimated to affect 5-15% of adults. The detection and diagnosis of these common diseases is a fundamentally important component of oral health care. All patients should undergo periodontal assessment as part of routine oral examination. Periodontal screening using methods such as the Basic Periodontal Examination/Community Periodontal Index or Periodontal Screening Record should be performed for all new patients, and also on a regular basis as part of ongoing oral health care. If periodontitis is identified, full periodontal assessment is required, involving recording of full mouth probing and bleeding data, together with assessment of other relevant parameters such as plaque levels, furcation involvement, recession and tooth mobility. Radiographic assessment of alveolar bone levels is driven by the clinical situation, and is required to assess bone destruction in patients with periodontitis. Risk assessment (such as assessing diabetes status and smoking) and risk management (such as promoting smoking cessation) should form a central component of periodontal therapy. This article provides guidance to the oral health care team regarding methods and frequencies of appropriate clinical and radiographic examinations to assess periodontal status, to enable appropriate detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions. PMID:26390822

  19. Periodontitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs when inflammation or infection of the gums ( gingivitis ) is allowed to progress without treatment. Infection and ... Loose teeth Swollen gums Note: Early symptoms resemble gingivitis. Exams and Tests An exam of the mouth ...

  20. Investigation of hemorheological parameters in periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Seringec, Nurten; Guncu, Guliz; Arihan, Okan; Avcu, Nihal; Dikmenoglu, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are frequently associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). On the other hand, occurrence of CVD has also been related with increased blood viscosity. This study was planned to investigate four main hemorheological parameters contributing to blood viscosity - hematocrit, erythrocyte deformability, erythrocyte aggregation and plasma viscosity - and also some biochemical parameters (hs-CRP, fibrinogen, globulin etc.) in patients with periodontal disease. We hypothesized that poor periodontal health would be associated with deterioration of hemorheological properties. According to periodontal health status, subjects were divided into three groups as control (healthy), with plaque induced gingivitis and with chronic periodontitis. All groups included 15 males who had not received periodontal therapy in the last six months before the study, were non-smokers, had no systemic diseases and were not on any medication. Erythrocyte deformability and erythrocyte aggregation were measured with laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyzer (LORCA). Plasma viscosity was measured by a cone-plate viscometer. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U Test and Spearman Correlation Coefficient. Plasma viscosity (1.36 ± 0.01 mPa.s in the control group and 1.43 ± 0.02 mPa.s in the chronic periodontitis group, P <  0.01), erythrocyte aggregation tendency (aggregation index, amplitude and t½ were 58.82 ± 1.78% , 20.22 ± 0.40 au, 2.80 ± 0.25 s respectively in the control group, and 67.05 ± 1.47% , 22.19 ± 0.50 au, 1.84 ± 0.15 s in the chronic periodontitis group, P <  0.01), hs-CRP, fibrinogen and globulin levels were significantly higher, whereas HDL level was significantly lower in the chronic periodontitis group (P <  0.05) compared to the control group. All of these conditions may contribute to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality observed in people with periodontal disease, via increasing blood viscosity. PMID:25261434

  1. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), P. intermedia (P < 0.001), C. ochracea (P < 0.001) and C. rectus (P = 0.003) in epithelial cells from periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the

  2. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), P. intermedia (P < 0.001), C. ochracea (P < 0.001) and C. rectus (P = 0.003) in epithelial cells from periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the

  3. Interdisciplinary Management of Patient with Advanced Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Gagan Deep; Jayan, B; Chopra, S S; Mechery, Reenesh; Goel, Manish; Verma, Munish

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary management of an adult patient with advanced periodontal disease. Treatment involved orthodontic and periodontal management. Good esthetic results and dental relationships were achieved by the treatment. PMID:27319043

  4. The Role of Nutrition in Periodontal Health: An Update.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Almas, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal health is influenced by a number of factors such as oral hygiene, genetic and epigenetic factors, systemic health, and nutrition. Many studies have observed that a balanced diet has an essential role in maintaining periodontal health. Additionally, the influences of nutritional supplements and dietary components have been known to affect healing after periodontal surgery. Studies have attempted to find a correlation between tooth loss, periodontal health, and nutrition. Moreover, bone formation and periodontal regeneration are also affected by numerous vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. The aim of this review is to critically appraise the currently available data on diet and maintenance of periodontal health and periodontal healing. The effects of nutritional intervention studies to improve the quality of life and well-being of patients with periodontal disease have been discussed. PMID:27589794

  5. Relationship between the Pathogenic Representatives of Periodontal Pockets Microbiocenosis in Patients with Periodontitis with Varying Degrees of Severity

    PubMed Central

    Zorina, O.A.; Kulakov, A.A.; Boriskina, O.A.; Rebrikov, D.V.

    2011-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common disease that is considered to be a manifestation of the distortion of the ratio between the normal and conditionally pathogenic microflora of periodontal pockets. In this study, the ratio between the six most important periodontal pathogens and the total microflora of the periodontal pocket in healthy individuals and patients with varying severity of periodontitis was ascertained by quantitative real-time PCR. It was ascertained that the relative content ofPorphyromonas gingivalis,Prevotella intermedia, andTannerella forsythensis(Bacteroides forsythus) persistently develops in the total microflora of the periodontal pocket upon progressing periodontitis; this value is higher than that in the control group by more than two orders of magnitude upon a severe degree of chronic generalized periodontitis. PMID:22649688

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Pain Scores during Periodontal Probing with or without Anesthetic Gels

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka, Mandapathi; Pradeep, Koppolu; Reddy Pathakota, Krishnajaneya

    2016-01-01

    Context. The initial periodontal examination which includes full-mouth periodontal probing is one of the discomforting procedures for a patient. Aim. To evaluate the efficacy of two local anesthetic gels in the reduction of pain during periodontal probing using Florida probe in CGP patients in comparison with manual probing. Materials and Methods. Ninety systemically healthy patients with moderate to severe CGP patients were recruited. In each patient, the quadrants were randomly assigned to manual probing with UNC-15 probe, probing with Florida probe, and Florida probing with lidocaine 10% gel and with benzocaine 20% gel. In the quadrants undergoing probing with anesthetic gels, the sites were isolated and the gel was injected using syringe and a blunt-end cannula. Pain was measured using 10 mm horizontal VAS. Statistical Analysis. The analysis was carried out using SPSS version 18. The comparison of mean VAS scores was done using repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni test. Results. Mean VAS for manual probing was significantly more than Florida probing. Further, the mean VAS score for Florida probing was higher than the two gels. Conclusion. It is suggested that the gels might be useful in reducing pain experienced during full-mouth periodontal probing in patients with CGP. PMID:27034662

  7. Tobacco smoking and vertical periodontal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Baljoon, Mostafa

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with increased prevalence and severity of destructive periodontal disease in terms of periodontal pocketing, periodontal bone loss, and tooth loss. The smoking destructive effect on periodontal bone may be of even "horizontal" and vertical "angular" pattern. The vertical bone loss or the "vertical defect" is a sign of progressive periodontal breakdown that involves the periodontal bone. Water pipe smoking has a sharp rise by the popularity in the recent years by men and women in Middle East countries. The general objective of this thesis was to investigate the relationship between tobacco smoking and vertical periodontal bone loss cross-sectionally and longitudinally. This thesis is based on two study populations, Swedish musicians and a Saudi Arabian population. All participants had a full set of intra-oral radiographs including 16 periapical and 4 bitewing projections that were assessed with regard to presence or absence of vertical defects. In Study I, the number of defects per person increased with age. Vertical defects were more common in the posterior as compared to the anterior region of the dentition and the distribution of defects within the maxilla as well as the mandible typically revealed a right-left hand side symmetry. Cigarette smoking was significantly associated with the prevalence and severity of vertical bone defects (Studies II and III). The relative risk associated with cigarette smoking was 2 to 3-fold increased. The impact of water pipe smoking was of the same magnitude as that of cigarette smoking and the relative risk associated with water pipe smoking was 6-fold increased compared to non-smoking. In addition, the risk of vertical defects increased with increased exposure in cigarette smokers as well as water pipe smokers (Study III). In Study IV, the proportion of vertical defects increased over a 10-year period and the increase over time was significantly associated with smoking. Moreover, the 10-year

  8. Treatment modalities and evaluation models for periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad; Iqbal, Zeenat; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Sahni, Jasjeet K

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is the most common localized dental inflammatory disease related with several pathological conditions like inflammation of gums (gingivitis), degeneration of periodontal ligament, dental cementum and alveolar bone loss. In this perspective, the various preventive and treatment modalities, including oral hygiene, gingival irrigations, mechanical instrumentation, full mouth disinfection, host modulation and antimicrobial therapy, which are used either as adjunctive treatments or as stand-alone therapies in the non-surgical management of periodontal infections, have been discussed. Intra-pocket, sustained release systems have emerged as a novel paradigm for the future research. In this article, special consideration is given to different locally delivered anti-microbial and anti inflammatory medications which are either commercially available or are currently under consideration for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. The various in vitro dissolution models and microbiological strain investigated to impersonate the infected and inflamed periodontal cavity and to predict the in vivo performance of treatment modalities have also been thrashed out. Animal models that have been employed to explore the pathology at the different stages of periodontitis and to evaluate its treatment modalities are enlightened in this proposed review. PMID:23373002

  9. Epigenetic Modifications of Histones in Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, M D; Jiao, Y; Larsson, L; Almeida, L O; Garaicoa-Pazmino, C; Le, J M; Squarize, C H; Inohara, N; Giannobile, W V; Castilho, R M

    2016-02-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease driven by dysbiosis, an imbalance between commensal bacteria and the host organism. Periodontitis is a leading cause of tooth loss in adults and occurs in about 50% of the US population. In addition to the clinical challenges associated with treating periodontitis, the progression and chronic nature of this disease seriously affect human health. Emerging evidence suggests that periodontitis is associated with mechanisms beyond bacteria-induced protein and tissue degradation. Here, we hypothesize that bacteria are able to induce epigenetic modifications in oral epithelial cells mediated by histone modifications. In this study, we found that dysbiosis in vivo led to epigenetic modifications, including acetylation of histones and downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1. In addition, in vitro exposure of oral epithelial cells to lipopolysaccharides resulted in histone modifications, activation of transcriptional coactivators, such as p300/CBP, and accumulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Given that oral epithelial cells are the first line of defense for the periodontium against bacteria, we also evaluated whether activation of pathogen recognition receptors induced histone modifications. We found that activation of the Toll-like receptors 1, 2, and 4 and the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 1 induced histone acetylation in oral epithelial cells. Our findings corroborate the emerging concept that epigenetic modifications play a role in the development of periodontitis. PMID:26496800

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontal Disease. An Update.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Archana; Almas, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    A review of the epidemiological, pathological and immunological relationships between two chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD). RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, characterized by loss of connective tissue and mineralized structures, the so-called "synovial membrane." Periodontitis is the inflammatory destruction of the periodontal attachment and alveolar bone. While the etiology of these two diseases may differ, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are similar. And it is possible that individuals manifesting both PD and RA may suffer from a unifying underlying systemic deregulation of the inflammatory response. There is an overproduction of a variety of cytokines and MMPs that appears to be common in both diseases. Oral health parameters should be more closely monitored in patients with RA, an autoimmune disease. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Interventions to prevent, minimize or treat periodontitis in arthritis patients will definitely promise a better quality of life for these patients. PMID:26521325

  11. Spatiotemporally controlled microchannels of periodontal mimic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Park, C H; Kim, K H; Rios, H F; Lee, Y M; Giannobile, W V; Seol, Y J

    2014-12-01

    Physiologic bioengineering of the oral, dental, and craniofacial complex requires optimized geometric organizations of fibrous connective tissues. A computer-designed, fiber-guiding scaffold has been developed to promote tooth-supporting periodontal tissue regeneration and functional restoration despite limited printing resolution for the manufacture of submicron-scaled features. Here, we demonstrate the use of directional freeze-casting techniques to control pore directional angulations and create mimicked topographies to alveolar crest, horizontal, oblique, and apical fibers of natural periodontal ligaments. For the differing anatomic positions, the gelatin displayed varying patterns of ice growth, determined via internal pore architectures. Regardless of the freezing coordinates, the longitudinal pore arrangements resulted in submicron-scaled diameters (~50 µm), along with corresponding high biomaterial porosity (~90%). Furthermore, the horizontal + coronal ([Formula: see text]) freezing orientation facilitated the creation of similar structures to major fibers in the periodontal ligament interface. This periodontal tissue-mimicking microenvironment is a potential tissue platform for the generation of naturally oriented ligamentous tissues consistent with periodontal ligament neogenesis. PMID:25216511

  12. Human periodontal ligament cell sheets can regenerate periodontal ligament tissue in an athymic rat model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masateru; Yamato, Masayuki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Okano, Teruo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2005-01-01

    Conventional periodontal regeneration methods remain insufficient to attain complete and reliable clinical regeneration of periodontal tissues. We have developed a new method of cell transplantation using cell sheet engineering and have applied it to this problem. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of human periodontal ligament (HPDL) cell sheets retrieved from culture on unique temperature-responsive culture dishes, and to examine whether these cell sheets can regenerate periodontal tissues. The HPDL cell sheets were examined histologically and biochemically, and also were transplanted into a mesial dehiscence model in athymic rats. HPDL cells were harvested from culture dishes as a contiguous cell sheet with abundant extracellular matrix and retained intact integrins that are susceptible to trypsin-EDTA treatment. In the animal study, periodontal ligament-like tissues that include an acellular cementum-like layer and fibrils anchoring into this layer were identified in all the athymic rats transplanted with HPDL cell sheets. This fibril anchoring highly resembles native periodontal ligament fibers; such regeneration was not observed in nontransplanted controls. These results suggest that this technique, based on the concept of cell sheet engineering, can be useful for periodontal tissue regeneration. PMID:15869425

  13. Non-Surgical Chemotherapeutic Treatment Strategies for the Management of Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Krayer, Joe W.; Leite, Renata S.; Kirkwood, Keith L.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Periodontal diseases are initiated by subgingival periodontal pathogens in susceptible periodontal sites. The host immune response towards periodontal pathogens helps to sustain periodontal disease and eventual alveolar bone loss. Numerous adjunctive therapeutic strategies have evolved to manage periodontal diseases. Systemic and local antibiotics, antiseptics, and past and future host immune modulatory agents are reviewed and discussed to facilitate the dental practitioner’s appreciation of this ever-growing field in clinical periodontics. PMID:20103470

  14. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Bagan, Leticia; Bagan, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis has been regarded as a potential risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic review is made to determine whether nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with RA offers benefits in terms of the clinical activity and inflammatory markers of the disease. Material and Methods A search was made of the Medline-PubMed, Cochrane, Embase and Scopus databases to identify studies on the relationship between the two disease processes, and especially on the effects of nonsurgical treatment in patients of this kind. The search was based on the following keywords: rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontitis (MeSH), rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontal treatment. Results Eight articles on the nonsurgical treatment of patients with periodontitis and RA were finally included in the study. All of them evaluated clinical (DAS28) and laboratory test activity (ESR, CRP, IL-6, TNFα) before and after treatment. A clear decrease in DAS28 score and ESR was recorded, while other parameters such as CRP, IL-6 and TNFα showed a non significant tendency to decrease as a result of treatment. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment improved the periodontal condition of patients with periodontitis and RA, with beneficial effects upon the clinical and laboratory test parameters (DAS28 and ESR), while other inflammatory markers showed a marked tendency to decrease. However, all the studies included in the review involved small samples sizes and follow-up periods of no more than 6 months. Larger and particularly longitudinal studies are therefore needed to more firmly establish possible significant relations between the two disease processes. Key words:Periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal treatment. PMID:26946202

  15. Periodontal repair of periapical lesions: the borderland between pulpal and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Gold, S I; Moskow, B S

    1987-05-01

    A series of cases demonstrating the destruction of periapical periodontal structures, without pulpal involvement has been presented. Treatment using both surgery and antibiotics resulted in extensive healing without any concommitant endodontic therapy. The results suggest that lesions affecting the apical periodontium are either periodontal or pulpal in origin. Careful diagnosis allows the maintenance of pulp vitality in cases where apical destruction has a source other than an infected pulp. The commonly held belief that lateral and accessory canals are a significant source of pulpal contamination from deep periodontal pockets has been questioned. PMID:3475293

  16. Tobacco smoking and chronic destructive periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Jan

    2004-09-01

    Tobacco smoking is the main risk factor associated with chronic destructive periodontal disease. No other known factor can match the strength of smoking in causing harm to the periodontium. The harmful effects manifest themselves by interfering with vascular and immunologic reactions, as well as by undermining the supportive functions of the periodontal tissues. The typical characteristic of smoking-associated periodontal disease is the destruction of the supporting tissues of the teeth, with the ensuing clinical symptoms of bone loss, attachment loss, pocket formation, and eventually tooth loss. A review of the international literature that has accumulated over the past 20 years offers convincing evidence that smokers exhibit greater bone loss and attachment loss, as well as more pronounced frequencies of periodontal pockets, than non-smokers do. In addition, tooth loss is more extensive in smokers. Smoking, thus, considerably increases the risk for destructive periodontal disease. Depending on the definition of disease and the exposure to smoking, the risk is 5- to 20-fold elevated for a smoker compared to a never-smoker. For a smoker exposed to heavy long-life smoking, the risk of attracting destructive periodontal disease is equivalent to that of attracting lung cancer. The outcome of periodontal treatment is less favorable or even unfavorable in smokers. Although long-term studies are rare, available studies unanimously agree that treatment failures and relapse of disease are predominantly seen in smokers. This contention is valid irrespective of treatment modality, suggesting that smoking will interfere with an expected normal outcome following commonplace periodontal therapies. The majority of available studies agree that the subgingival microflora of smokers and non-smokers are no different given other conditions. As a consequence, the elevated morbidity in smokers does not depend on particular microflora. The mechanisms behind the destructive effects of

  17. Probiotics in periodontal health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Bhattacharya, Hirak; Kandwal, Abhishek

    2011-01-01

    Macfarlane Burnett stated in 1962 that “By the late twentieth century, we can anticipate the virtual elimination of infectious diseases as a significant factor in social life”. Probiotics have become of interest to researchers in recent times. Time has come to shift the paradigm of treatment from specific bacteria elimination to altering bacterial ecology by probiotics. The development of resistance to a range of antibiotics by some important pathogens has raised the possibility of a return to the pre-antibiotic dark ages. Here, probiotics provide an effective alternative way, which is economical and natural to combat periodontal disease. Thus, a mere change in diet by including probiotic foods may halt, retard, or even significantly delay the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases, promoting a healthy lifestyle to fight periodontal infections. PMID:21772717

  18. Platelet Rich Fibrin in Periodontal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Muthukumaraswamy; Pulikkotil, Shaju J.; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic bacterial infection resulting in destruction of the supporting structures of the teeth. Regeneration of the lost tissues has faced difficulties primarily due to the lack of support during the intricate healing processes. A surgical additive which can ‘jump start’ the healing process to a more predictable regenerative process is always on the wish list of any periodontist. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a second generation platelet concentrate that has been considered to be an important, easy to obtain, predictable surgical additive for periodontal regeneration. This autologous scaffold provides the much needed bio-chemical mediators which has the potential for enhancing reconstruction of the periodontium. This review article tries to understand as to why PRF would be an important link to reach predictable periodontal regeneration. PMID:27386002

  19. Periodontal manifestations of hyperoxaluria and oxalosis.

    PubMed

    Moskow, B S

    1989-05-01

    Dental and periodontal findings associated with primary hyperoxaluria in a 29-year old male patient are described. This is a rare, inherited, metabolic disease which results in excessive calcium oxalate synthesis. The predominant and early manifestation of hyperoxaluria is nephrocalcinosis which results in chronic renal failure. Widespread extrarenal deposits of calcium oxalate crystals, however, is a consistent finding. Extensive infiltration of crystals was noted in the pulps of the teeth, in the marrow spaces of the alveolar bone, in the gingival corium, and in the periodontal ligament. Crystalline calcium oxalate deposits in the periodontal ligament provoked a granulomatous foreign-body reaction. This resulted in aggressive external root resorption leading to pulp exposure and tooth mobility. PMID:2738833

  20. Application of ozone in the treatment of periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Adusumilli; Sathish, Manthena; Sri Harsha, Anumolu Venkatanaga

    2013-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are most common inflammatory diseases of supporting tissues of teeth. Role of microbial etiology and host response in progression of gingival and periodontal diseases has been well established. Because of the beneficial biological effects of ozone, due to its antimicrobial and immunostimulating effect, it is well indicated in the treatment of gingival and periodontal diseases. The objective of this article is to provide a general review about clinical applications of ozone in treatment of periodontal diseases and to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. PMID:23946585

  1. [Periodontitis and systemic diseases: from science to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Z; Loos, B G; Teeuw, W; Kunnen, A; van Winkelhoff, A J; Abbas, F

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for an association between systemic diseases and periodontitis is strongest with diabetes mellitus type 2 and cardiovascular disease. There is a moderate association of periodontitis with adverse pregnancy outcomes and rheumatoid arthritis. Periodontal treatment has, on average, a positive effect on reducing systemic infection and improving the condition of the vascular system. For diabetes patients, periodontal treatment can also have a positive effect on metabolic regulation. There is insufficient evidence that periodontal treatment prevents adverse pregnancy outcomes and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26465017

  2. Emerging Therapeutic Strategies and Future Challenges in Clinical Periodontics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Daniel; Hamada, Yusuke; John, Vanchit

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the protocol for treating periodontitis follows a standardized and straightforward algorithm: 1) review and reinforce oral hygiene; 2) perform scaling and root planing; 3) proceed to periodontal surgery if the disease process has not been arrested; then 4) enroll the patient in a customized periodontal maintenance recall program to maintain the health of the reduced periodontium. Multiple longitudinal studies have demonstrated that the aforementioned treatment regimen can arrest the progression of periodontitis and can increase the likelihood of tooth retention and periodontal stability. PMID:26939412

  3. Ultrasonic vs. hand instrumentation in periodontal therapy: clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Ranjitha; De Stefano, Jamie A

    2016-06-01

    Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease in adults. Traditional nonsurgical periodontal therapy involves subgingival removal of hard and soft deposits on the root surface, along with maintenance of good oral hygiene. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy can either be definitive or part of the initial phase before surgical therapy. Mechanical therapy, either with hand or ultrasonic instrumentation, is the keystone of nonsurgical periodontal therapy. This requires considerable amounts of time and a high level of operator skill. The use of appropriate instruments greatly increases clinical efficiency. This article discusses the use of ultrasonic and hand instrumentation, along with recent advances, and the benefits of adjunctive therapy during nonsurgical periodontal therapy. PMID:27045433

  4. Iatrogenic Damage to the Periodontium Caused by Periodontal Treatment Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Latheef, P; Sirajuddin, Syed; Gundapaneni, Veenadharini; MN, Kumuda; Apine, Ashwini

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting the periodontium i.e. the tissues that surround and support the teeth. Periodontitis manifests as progressive loss of the alveolar bone around the teeth, and if left untreated, can cause loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Periodontitis is initiated by microorganisms that adhere to and grow on the tooth's surfaces, besides an over -aggressive immune response against these microorganisms. The primary goal of periodontal therapy is to preserve the natural dentition by accomplishing and preserving a healthy functional periodontium. Many treatment modalities have been introduced to improve the therapeutic result of periodontal treatment which may also damage the periodontiumiatrogenically. PMID:26312087

  5. Management of chronic generalized periodontitis using diode laser

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Santosh; Doshi, Yogesh; Shah, Mona Udayan; Dabholkar, Charuta Sadanand

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a diode laser with nonsurgical periodontal therapy on chronic periodontitis. The patient, a 37-year-old female, with chronic periodontitis reported to the private dental clinic. Her health history indicated that she had good general health. The periodontal examination included a gingival index and complete periodontal probing depth with William's graduated probe. She was treated with 940 nm diode laser and scaling and root planning. Assessment was done after 6 months following laser therapy; the probing depths improved; gain in clinical attachment levels; no inflammation; the tissue tone was good, showing increased stippling. PMID:27041846

  6. Microbial profiles at baseline and not the use of antibiotics determine the clinical outcome of the treatment of chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarro, S.; Laine, M. L.; Buijs, M. J.; Brandt, B. W.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B. G.; Zaura, E.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are often used in the treatment of chronic periodontitis, which is a major cause of tooth loss. However, evidence in favour of a microbial indication for the prescription of antibiotics is lacking, which may increase the risk of the possible indiscriminate use of antibiotics, and consequent, microbial resistance. Here, using an open-ended technique, we report the changes in the subgingival microbiome up to one year post-treatment of patients treated with basic periodontal therapy with or without antibiotics. Antibiotics resulted in a greater influence on the microbiome 3 months after therapy, but this difference disappeared at 6 months. Greater microbial diversity, specific taxa and certain microbial co-occurrences at baseline and not the use of antibiotics predicted better clinical treatment outcomes. Our results demonstrate the predictive value of specific subgingival bacterial profiles for the decision to prescribe antibiotics in the treatment of periodontitis, but they also indicate the need for alternative therapies based on ecological approaches. PMID:26830979

  7. Periodontal innate immune mechanisms relevant to obesity.

    PubMed

    Amar, S; Leeman, S

    2013-10-01

    Obesity affects over 35% of the adult population of the USA, and obesity-related illnesses have emerged as the leading cause of preventable death worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Obesity's secondary morbidities include increased risk of cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, and cancer, in addition to increased occurrence and severity of infections. Sedentary lifestyle and weight gain caused by consumption of a high-fat diet contribute to the development of obesity, with individuals having a body mass index (BMI) score > 30 being considered obese. Genetic models of obesity (ob/ob mice, db/db mice, and fa/fa rats) have been insufficient to study human obesity because of the overall lack of genetic causes for obesity in human populations. To date, the diet-induced obese (DIO) mouse model best serves research studies relevant to human health. Periodontal disease presents with a wide range of clinical variability and severity. Research in the past decade has shed substantial light on both the initiating infectious agents and host immunological responses in periodontal disease. Up to 46% of the general population harbors the microorganism(s) associated with periodontal disease, although many are able to limit the progression of periodontal disease or even clear the organism(s) if infected. In the last decade, several epidemiological studies have found an association between obesity and increased incidence of periodontal disease. This review focuses on exploring the immunological consequences of obesity that exacerbate effects of infection by pathogens, with focus on infection by the periodontal bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis as a running example. PMID:23911141

  8. Host response mechanisms in periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Nora; ABUSLEME, Loreto; BRAVO, Denisse; DUTZAN, Nicolás; GARCIA-SESNICH, Jocelyn; VERNAL, Rolando; HERNÁNDEZ, Marcela; GAMONAL, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases usually refer to common inflammatory disorders known as gingivitis and periodontitis, which are caused by a pathogenic microbiota in the subgingival biofilm, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola that trigger innate, inflammatory, and adaptive immune responses. These processes result in the destruction of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth, and eventually in tissue, bone and finally, tooth loss. The innate immune response constitutes a homeostatic system, which is the first line of defense, and is able to recognize invading microorganisms as non-self, triggering immune responses to eliminate them. In addition to the innate immunity, adaptive immunity cells and characteristic cytokines have been described as important players in the periodontal disease pathogenesis scenario, with a special attention to CD4+ T-cells (T-helper cells). Interestingly, the T cell-mediated adaptive immunity development is highly dependent on innate immunity-associated antigen presenting cells, which after antigen capture undergo into a maturation process and migrate towards the lymph nodes, where they produce distinct patterns of cytokines that will contribute to the subsequent polarization and activation of specific T CD4+ lymphocytes. Skeletal homeostasis depends on a dynamic balance between the activities of the bone-forming osteoblasts (OBLs) and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCLs). This balance is tightly controlled by various regulatory systems, such as the endocrine system, and is influenced by the immune system, an osteoimmunological regulation depending on lymphocyte- and macrophage-derived cytokines. All these cytokines and inflammatory mediators are capable of acting alone or in concert, to stimulate periodontal breakdown and collagen destruction via tissue-derived matrix metalloproteinases, a characterization of the progression of periodontitis as a stage that

  9. Genetic influences in caries and periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Hassell, T M; Harris, E L

    1995-01-01

    Deciphering the relative roles of heredity and environmental factors ("nature vs. nurture") in the pathogenesis of dental caries and diseases of the periodontium has occupied clinical and basic researchers for decades. Success in the endeavor has come more easily in the case of caries; the complex interactions that occur between host-response mechanisms and putative microbiologic pathogens in periodontal disease have made elucidation of genetic factors in disease susceptibility more difficult. In addition, during the 30-year period between 1958 and 1987, only meager resources were targeted toward the "nature" side of the nature/nurture dipole in periodontology. In this article, we present a brief history of the development of genetic epistemology, then describe the three main research mechanisms by which questions about the hereditary component of diseases in humans can be addressed. A critical discussion of the evidence for a hereditary component in caries susceptibility is next presented, also from a historical perspective. The evolution of knowledge concerning possible genetic ("endogenous", "idiotypic") factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory periodontal disease is initiated with an analysis of some foreign-language (primarily German) literature that is likely to be unfamiliar to the reader. We identify a turning point at about 1960, when the periodontal research community turned away from genetics in favor of microbiology research. During the past five years, investigators have re-initiated the search for the hereditary component in susceptibility to common adult periodontal disease; this small but growing body of literature is reviewed. Recent applications of in vitro methods for genetic analyses in periodontal research are presented, with an eye toward a future in which persons who are at risk--genetically predisposed--to periodontal disease may be identified and targeted for interventive strategies. Critical is the realization that genes and environment

  10. Periodontal Probe Improves Exams, Alleviates Pain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Dentists, comedian Bill Cosby memorably mused, tell you not to pick your teeth with any sharp metal object. Then you sit in their chair, and the first thing they grab is an iron hook!" Conventional periodontal probing is indeed invasive, uncomfortable for the patient, and the results can vary greatly between dentists and even for repeated measurements by the same dentist. It is a necessary procedure, though, as periodontal disease is the most common dental disease, involving the loss of teeth by the gradual destruction of ligaments that hold teeth in their sockets in the jawbone. The disease usually results from an increased concentration of bacteria in the pocket, or sulcus, between the gums and teeth. These bacteria produce acids and other byproducts, which enlarge the sulcus by eroding the gums and the periodontal ligaments. The sulcus normally has a depth of 1 to 2 millimeters, but in patients with early stages of periodontal disease, it has a depth of 3 to 5 millimeters. By measuring the depth of the sulcus, periodontists can have a good assessment of the disease s progress. Presently, there are no reliable clinical indicators of periodontal disease activity, and the best available diagnostic aid, periodontal probing, can only measure what has already been lost. A method for detecting small increments of periodontal ligament breakdown would permit earlier diagnosis and intervention with less costly and time-consuming therapy, while overcoming the problems associated with conventional probing. The painful, conventional method for probing may be destined for the archives of dental history, thanks to the development of ultrasound probing technologies. The roots of ultrasound probes are in an ultrasound-based time-of-flight technique routinely used to measure material thickness and length in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Laboratory at Langley Research Center. The primary applications of that technology have been for corrosion detection and bolt tension

  11. Periodontal considerations of the removable partial overdenture.

    PubMed

    Gomes, B C; Renner, R P

    1990-10-01

    1. An overdenture, whether complete or partial, is an excellent mode of treatment in the mutilated dentition for the preservation of the residual ridge. 2. Selection of patients for an overdenture should be based on past history of dental neglect, the status of the teeth and their periodontium, including present oral hygiene status, and patient motivation. The patients with a history of dental neglect, poor oral hygiene, and lack of motivation in having the teeth and the periodontium restored to health as well as strict compliance to a home-care regimen and recall schedule are not good candidates for treatment with an overdenture. 3. The choice of teeth or roots to serve as overdenture abutments must include their periodontal evaluation, which should consist of a detailed periodontal examination, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment when this is indicated, including chemical protection (fluoride gel) and an oral hygiene regimen tailored to individual needs. 4. The knowledge and expertise in the selection and implementation of appropriate periodontal treatment modalities is of paramount importance in restoring optimum periodontal health to the overdenture abutments before overdenture fabrication. 5. The maintenance phase of the overdenture abutments as well as of the existing natural teeth is of critical importance in the preservation of health of these abutments and teeth. This maintenance phase should consist of periodic recalls based on individual needs; a detailed periodontal evaluation, including patient's motivation and status of oral hygiene and denture hygiene; and detection of caries. If necessary, appropriate periodontal and/or restorative therapy should be performed, and oral hygiene measures reinforced. This will ensure longevity of both abutment teeth or roots and of the existing natural teeth resulting in a long-term success of an overdenture. 6. Because there is evidence of high incidence of periodontal disease and dental caries in overdenture wearers

  12. [Decision to extract for periodontal reasons].

    PubMed

    Bercy, P; Blase, D

    1995-01-01

    The decisions to extract that are discussed here mainly relate to severe periodontal bone losses and plain interradicular attacks. Extractions for periodontal reasons appear at several treatment stages: immediate extraction in terminal stages, e.g. for teeth without any strategic importance, or deferred extraction if one chooses to wait for treatment response. The elements of the decision are various: function and strategic importance of the tooth, extension of the lesion, level of the interradicular attack, any endoperiodontal lesions, fractures and luxations, radicular proximity, implication of wisdom teeth, evolution after treatment. All these factors are discussed. PMID:7480928

  13. Association between Human Body Composition and Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Salekzamani, Yagoub; Shirmohammadi, Adileh; Rahbar, Mohammad; Shakouri, Seyed-Kazem; Nayebi, Farough

    2011-01-01

    Obesity in humans might increase the risk of periodontitis. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between body composition of males and their periodontal status. AS total of 150 males (aged 30-60) were selected: 31 were periodontally healthy, 45 had gingivitis, 39 had initial periodontitis, and 35 suffered from established periodontitis. BMI (body mass index), WC (waist circumference), and body composition parameters (consisting of body water, body fat, and skeletal muscle and bone mass) were measured. After adjusting for age, history of diabetes, smoking, physical activity status, and socioeconomic status, statistically significant correlations were found between periodontitis and BMI, WC, and body composition. There was only a statistically significant difference between the periodontal health and established periodontitis; that is, periodontal disease in mild forms (gingivitis) and initial periodontitis do not influence these variables (BMI, WC, and body composition parameters) and only the severe form of the disease influences the variables. These data suggest that there is a considerable association between severe forms of periodontal disease in males and their body composition, but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed in more extensive studies. PMID:22111011

  14. Epidemiology of periodontal disease: a review and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Irfan, U M; Dawson, D V; Bissada, N F

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assimilate epidemiological evidence for the prevalence of periodontal disease in human populations, and for comprehensive understanding of the disease for health care providers. Periodontal disease is a pathological condition affecting the supporting structures of teeth. It is characterised by a bacterial challenge that can instigate a destructive host response leading to periodontal attachment loss, bone loss and ultimately, possible tooth loss. The specifics of the disease process are obscured by our incomplete understanding of the role of various risk factors. Periodontal epidemiology literature lacks consistency in methodology of research, which includes various definitions for periodontal disease and health; different approaches to measuring periodontal indices of pocket depth, and attachment loss; inconsistent study designs and lack of adjustments to known risk factors. These inconsistencies do not allow for effective comparison of epidemiological studies, which is essential to find strong associations of risk factors with periodontal disease, which in turn is necessary for the interpretation of risk and causality. This paper will address several areas within the topic of periodontal disease epidemiology, including definitions of periodontal disease instituted by researchers, approaches to epidemiological studies in periodontitis, and risk factors in periodontal disease. Consideration is given to aspects of design and analyses relevant to evaluation of reports in the literature. For the clinical practitioner this review provides a theoretical framework to approach patients with comprehensive knowledge of not only the disease presentation, but also the environmental factors that govern past history, present condition and future response to treatments and interventions. PMID:12666973

  15. Diabetes and periodontal disease: a two-way relationship.

    PubMed

    Casanova, L; Hughes, F J; Preshaw, P M

    2014-10-01

    Periodontitis and diabetes are common, complex, chronic diseases with an established bidirectional relationship. That is, diabetes (particularly if glycaemic control is poor) is associated with an increased prevalence and severity of periodontitis, and, severe periodontitis is associated with compromised glycaemic control. Periodontal treatment (conventional non-surgical periodontal therapy) has been associated with improvements in glycaemic control in diabetic patients, with reductions in HbA1c of approximately 0.4% following periodontal therapy. For these reasons, management of periodontitis in people with diabetes is particularly important. The dental team therefore has an important role to play in the management of people with diabetes. An emerging role for dental professionals is envisaged, in which diabetes screening tools could be used to identify patients at high risk of diabetes, to enable them to seek further investigation and assessment from medical healthcare providers. PMID:25342350

  16. Effects of oestrogen deficiency on the alveolar bone of rats with experimental periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    XU, XIN-CHEN; CHEN, HUI; ZHANG, XI; ZHAI, ZAN-JING; LIU, XU-QIANG; ZHENG, XIN-YI; ZHANG, JUN; QIN, AN; LU, ER-YI

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by loss of connective tissue and alveolar bone, and osteoporosis is a common disease characterized by a systemic impairment of bone mass and microarchitecture. To date, the association between periodontitis and osteoporosis has remained to be fully elucidated. In the present study, an experimental rat model of periodontitis was used to explore the effects of oestrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis on the maxillary alveolar bone. Forty-four female, six-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control, ligature, ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX + ligature. One month after ovariectomy, rats in the ligature and OVX + ligature groups received ligatures on their first and second maxillary molars for 1 month. Fluorescent labelling was performed prior to sacrificing the animals. At the end of the experiment, the maxillae and serum were collected and subjected to micro-computed tomography analysis, confocal laser-scanning microscopic observation, Van Gieson's fuchsin staining, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and ELISA. Ligatures slightly reduced the alveolar bone mineral density (BMD) and bone formation rate, but significantly reduced alveolar crest height (ACH). Ovariectomy reduced the alveolar BMD, impaired the trabecular structure, reduced the bone formation rate and increased the serum levels of bone resorption markers. Animals in the OVX + ligature group exhibited a lower alveolar BMD, a poorer trabecular structure, a reduced ACH, a lower bone formation rate and higher serum levels of bone resorption markers compared with those in the control group. The results of the present study showed that ovariectomy enhanced alveolar bone loss and reduced the ACH of rats with experimental periodontitis. Thus, post-menopausal osteoporosis may influence the progression of periodontitis. PMID:26035209

  17. Referring periodontal patients: clinical decision making by dental and dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karen B; Burgardt, Grayson J; Rapley, John W; Bray, Kimberly K; Cobb, Charles M

    2014-03-01

    Referral of periodontal patients requires development of a complex set of decision making skills. This study was conducted to determine criteria used by dental and dental hygiene students regarding the referral of periodontal patients for specialty care. Using mixed methods, a thirteen-item survey was developed to elicit the students' perceptions of their knowledge, confidence regarding managing patients, and clinical reasoning related to periodontal patients. The instrument was administered during the summer prior to (T1) and at the end of the students' final year (T2) of training. Seventy-nine dental students (81 percent of total class) and thirty dental hygiene students (83 percent of total class) completed T1. At T2, forty-two dental (44 percent of total class) and twenty-six dental hygiene students (87 percent of total class) completed the questionnaire. While 90 percent of dental and 96 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported a willingness to refer patients with active disease to specialists, only 40 percent of dental and 36 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported confidence in diagnosing, treating, and appropriately referring such patients. The students' ability to recognize critical disease and risk factors influencing referral was good; however, clinical application of that knowledge indicated a gap between knowledge and applied reasoning. The students' attitudes about the importance of periodontal disease and their perceived competence to identify critical disease risk factors were not significantly related (p>0.05) to correct clinical decisions in the case scenarios. The study concludes that dental and dental hygiene curricula should emphasize both the acquisition and application of knowledge regarding criteria for referral of periodontal patients. PMID:24609346

  18. Pulp temperature increase during photo-activated disinfection (PAD) of periodontal pockets: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    El Yazami, H; Zeinoun, Toni; Bou Saba, S; Lamard, L; Peremans, A; Limme, M; Geerts, S; Lamy, M; Nammour, S

    2010-09-01

    The capacity of photo-sensitizers, used in combination with laser light to kill micro-organisms has been demonstrated in different studies. Photo-activated disinfection (PAD) has been introduced in periodontology as an aid for disinfection of periodontal pockets. The aim of this study is to verify the harm for dental vitality of the use of PAD in periodontal pockets. Root canals of 24 freshly extracted human teeth where prepared using profiles up to a size of ISO #50 and filled with thermo-conductor paste. A silicon-based false gum was made in which a periodontal pocket was created and filled with photo-sensitizer phenothiazine chloride (phenothiazine-5-ium, 3.7-bis (dimethylamino)-, chloride). The external root surface was irradiated during 60 s with a 660-nm diode laser (output power: 20 mW; power density: 0.090 W/cm(2); Energy density: 5.46 J/cm(2)) using a periodontal tip with a diameter of 1 mm and a length of 7 mm. Temperatures were recorded inside the root canal using a thermocouple. Measurements were recorded every second, starting at 10 s before lasering, during the irradiation and were continued for 150 s after the end of irradiation, and six measurements were done per tooth. An average temperature increase of 0.48 +/- 0.11 degrees C was recorded. Our results demonstrated that pulp temperature increase was lower than 3 degrees C, which is considered to be harmless for pulp injury. Regarding pulp temperature increase, the use of PAD for disinfection of periodontal pockets can be considered as a safe procedure for dental vitality. PMID:19529881

  19. A survey on the effects of metabolic syndrome on the periodontal indices of hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohammad; Izadi, Mozhgan; Yaghini, Jaber; Rastegari, Abdolah; Abed, Ahmad Moghareh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome and periodontitis coincide with systemic inflammation and glucose tolerance disorder, which indicate the common pathophysiologic pathway of these diseases. The main goal of this study was to determine the effects of the metabolic syndrome on the periodontal indices of hemodialysis (HD) patient. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 75 persons were selected by the simple method, 50 of them were HD patients, and 25 of them were healthy people. They were divided into three groups each of which included 25 persons. The periodontal conditions of the selected persons were determined by radiography, gingival index, probing pocket depth, and bleeding index. Then, the periodontal indices of the patients suffering from metabolic syndrome and the persons not affected by metabolic syndrome were compared. At the end, the data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 20) using Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests at the meaningful level of α = 0.05. Since the condition of the unilateral variance test could not be provided for this study, the Kruskal–Wallis test was used. To complete the test, the Mann–Whitney test was used in the binary form among the groups being studied. Results: The obtained results showed a meaningful difference among the groups under study (P < 0.001). The results of the test showed a meaningful difference among the obtained indices of the groups being studied in the binary form (P < 0.001) too. Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed when the severity of chronic systemic disease increased the health of the periodontal tissues would decrease. PMID:27605991

  20. [Caries and periodontal state of pregnant women. Part II. Periodontal state].

    PubMed

    Radnai, Márta; Gorzó, István; Nagy, Erzsébet; Urbán, Edit; Eller, József; Novák, Tibor; Pál, Attila

    2005-06-01

    A great number of clinical studies focused on the periodontal health of the pregnant women in the last decades, since an association has been presumed between the pregnant women's periodontal disease and the adverse pregnancy outcome. Altogether 161 healthy women were examined soon after delivery in Szeged/Hungary. The periodontal status of the patients was recorded by the Silness-Löe Plaque index (0.67), frequency of calculus (21.07%), mean probing pocket depth (1.67 mm) and the frequency of bleeding on probing (37.8%). A significant correlation was found between the state of the periodontium and the educational level and the pregnant women's profession. The periodontal state of women with higher education and the intellectuals was much better, than of the less educated patients and the manual workers. PMID:16108413

  1. Influence of nanotopography on periodontal ligament stem cell functions and cell sheet based periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Li, Bei; Zhao, Lingzhou; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is an important part of regenerative medicine, with great clinical significance; however, the effects of nanotopography on the functions of periodontal ligament (PDL) stem cells (PDLSCs) and on PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration have never been explored. Titania nanotubes (NTs) layered on titanium (Ti) provide a good platform to study this. In the current study, the influence of NTs of different tube size on the functions of PDLSCs was observed. Afterward, an ectopic implantation model using a Ti/cell sheets/hydroxyapatite (HA) complex was applied to study the effect of the NTs on cell sheet based periodontal regeneration. The NTs were able to enhance the initial PDLSC adhesion and spread, as well as collagen secretion. With the Ti/cell sheets/HA complex model, it was demonstrated that the PDLSC sheets were capable of regenerating the PDL tissue, when combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets and HA, without the need for extra soluble chemical cues. Simultaneously, the NTs improved the periodontal regeneration result of the ectopically implanted Ti/cell sheets/HA complex, giving rise to functionally aligned collagen fiber bundles. Specifically, much denser collagen fibers, with abundant blood vessels as well as cementum-like tissue on the Ti surface, which well-resembled the structure of natural PDL, were observed in the NT5 and NT10 sample groups. Our study provides the first evidence that the nanotopographical cues obviously influence the functions of PDLSCs and improve the PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration size dependently, which provides new insight to the periodontal regeneration. The Ti/cell sheets/HA complex may constitute a good model to predict the effect of biomaterials on periodontal regeneration. PMID:26150714

  2. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011–2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26251916

  3. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-08-01

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011-2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26251916

  4. Periodontal treatment influences risk markers for atherosclerosis in patients with severe periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Buhlin, Kåre; Hultin, Margareta; Norderyd, Ola; Persson, Lena; Pockley, A Graham; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Rabe, Per; Klinge, Björn; Gustafsson, Anders

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of mechanical infection control for periodontitis and periodontal surgery on the prevalence of well-established risk factors for atherosclerosis, and plasma levels of cytokines, antibodies against heat shock proteins and markers of systemic inflammation. Sixty-eight patients between 39 and 73 years of age with severe periodontitis who had been referred to four specialist periodontology clinics in Sweden were investigated. A fasting venous blood sample was taken at baseline and additional samples were collected after 3 and 12 months. A total of 54 patients underwent periodontal treatment. The periodontal treatment was successful, as pathogenic gingival pockets decreased significantly. Plasma glucose, lipids and markers of systemic inflammation were not significantly altered after 3 months. One year after the initial treatment, HDL-C concentrations were significantly increased (Delta0.08mmol/L) whereas LDL-C concentrations decreased (Delta0.23mmol/L). Haptoglobin concentrations were also lower. Interleukin-18 and interferon-gamma levels were also lower after 12 months (60ng/L (-23%) and 11ng/L (-97%) respectively). Treatment had no effect on plasma levels of IgA, IgG1, IgG2 antibodies against heat shock proteins. In conclusion, this study indicates that standard treatment for periodontal disease induces systemic changes in several biochemical markers that reflect the risk for atherosclerosis. PMID:19411077

  5. Endodontic-periodontal microsurgery for combined endodontic-periodontal lesions: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ritu; Hegde, Vivek; Siddharth, M; Hegde, Rashmi; Manchanda, Gunsha; Agarwal, Pratul

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic and periodontal microsurgery has surpassed the success rates for traditional endodontic and periodontal surgical procedures. Excellent healing results are being attributed to both the techniques, when employed, for isolated endodontic or periodontal defects. Combined endodontic-periodontal lesions have been referred to as a true challenge, requiring not only endodontic microsurgical management but also concurrent bone grafting and membrane barriers techniques. The prevention of epithelial downgrowth and regeneration of periodontal cementum, fiber, and bone seals the fate of these cases. Achieving primary closure with submergence of grafts has a positive effect on GTR outcome. New techniques of periodontal microsurgery, such as minimally invasive papilla preserving flaps with passive internal mattress suturing, have managed to obtain 90% primary flap closure over grafted sites. Root surface treatment and conditioning has also shown to be beneficial for GTR. Endodontic microsurgery for the combined lesion has not integrated these advances yet. These advances, along with a recently suggested treatment strategy, are ushering in the level next in management of the combined lesions. This article offers an overview of the combined lesion, the disease, its classification, treatment strategy, regenerative tools, microsurgical recommendations, and outcome studies. PMID:25506135

  6. The effect of phase-I periodontal therapy on pregnancy outcome in chronic periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B V Ramesh; Tanneeru, S; Chava, V K

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown periodontal diseases (gum diseases) as risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as prematurity and low birth weight. Objectives of the present study were to determine the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on pregnancy outcomes in women with periodontitis and to detect IgM and IgG status in cord blood during delivery. A total of 20 pregnant women in their 2nd trimester and associated with chronic generalised periodontitis were selected and recruited for the study. They were grouped into two: Group 1 (treatment group) and Group 2 (control). Periodontal parameters of all the subjects were recorded at baseline and after delivery. Data related to weight of the infant and type of delivery was recorded. During the delivery, cord blood was collected for the estimation of IgM and IgG antibodies. All the recordings were subjected for statistical analysis. The study concluded that maternal periodontitis was associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:24359045

  7. Biologic Markers for Odontogenic Periradicular Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Burgener, Bruna; Ford, Angelique R.; Situ, Hongsa; Fayad, Mohamed I.; Hao, Jian Jun; Wenckus, Christopher S.; Johnson, Bradford R.; BeGole, Ellen A.; George, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The diagnosis and assessment of apical periodontitis by traditional periapical radiographs can be challenging and might yield false-negative results. The aim of this study was to determine whether interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) can be used as biological markers for apical periodontitis. Methods Forty healthy patients with teeth diagnosed with apical periodontitis of pulpal origin were included in the study. GCF samples were obtained from the diseased tooth and from a healthy contralateral control tooth. Total protein concentration in each sample was determined by using the Bio-Rad protein assay. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to analyze the concentration of IL-1β and DSP in the samples. Results Protein content of the GCF was statistically significantly higher in the disease group compared with the control group. The levels of IL-1β and DSP were not statistically different between disease and control groups. Conclusions Although this study was unable to demonstrate a significantly higher level of IL-1β or DSP in the GCF of teeth with apical periodontitis, the observed presence of a significantly higher level of total protein in the GCF of diseased teeth suggests the possible role of total protein level as a marker for periapical disease. PMID:20647085

  8. Mechanisms of Bone Resorption in Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Hienz, Stefan A.; Paliwal, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar bone loss is a hallmark of periodontitis progression and its prevention is a key clinical challenge in periodontal disease treatment. Bone destruction is mediated by the host immune and inflammatory response to the microbial challenge. However, the mechanisms by which the local immune response against periodontopathic bacteria disturbs the homeostatic balance of bone formation and resorption in favour of bone loss remain to be established. The osteoclast, the principal bone resorptive cell, differentiates from monocyte/macrophage precursors under the regulation of the critical cytokines macrophage colony-stimulating factor, RANK ligand, and osteoprotegerin. TNF-α, IL-1, and PGE2 also promote osteoclast activity, particularly in states of inflammatory osteolysis such as those found in periodontitis. The pathogenic processes of destructive inflammatory periodontal diseases are instigated by subgingival plaque microflora and factors such as lipopolysaccharides derived from specific pathogens. These are propagated by host inflammatory and immune cell influences, and the activation of T and B cells initiates the adaptive immune response via regulation of the Th1-Th2-Th17 regulatory axis. In summary, Th1-type T lymphocytes, B cell macrophages, and neutrophils promote bone loss through upregulated production of proinflammatory mediators and activation of the RANK-L expression pathways. PMID:26065002

  9. Underestimation of periodontitis in NHANES surveys.

    PubMed

    Albandar, Jasim M

    2011-03-01

    The study design of national surveys of periodontal disease often uses partial-mouth examination protocols to rationalize the need for resources so that the collection of data from a large number of subjects can be achieved within the available means without significantly sacrificing precision and validity. Studies show that surveys that use partial examination protocols underestimate the prevalence of periodontitis, and the amount of underestimation varies depending on the number and type of sites examined, the case-definition of periodontal disease, tooth loss, and prevalence and severity of the disease. If a survey uses a partial-mouth examination it is recommended that the amount of underestimation be assessed in the same sample. This could be achieved by performing a full-mouth examination on a randomly selected subsample. Inflation factors should be calculated and used to adjust for the underestimation in disease prevalence because of the use of partial examination. Based on the NHANES III (1988 to 1994) data and adjusting for the bias caused by the examination protocol, it is estimated that approximately half of the United States population aged ≥30 years has periodontitis. PMID:21214340

  10. Assessing risk factors for periodontitis using regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo Pereira, J. A.; Ferreira, Maria Cristina; Oliveira, Teresa

    2013-10-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis is indispensable to assess the associations and interactions between different factors and the risk of periodontitis. Among others, regression analysis is a statistical technique widely used in healthcare to investigate and model the relationship between variables. In our work we study the impact of socio-demographic, medical and behavioral factors on periodontal health. Using regression, linear and logistic models, we can assess the relevance, as risk factors for periodontitis disease, of the following independent variables (IVs): Age, Gender, Diabetic Status, Education, Smoking status and Plaque Index. The multiple linear regression analysis model was built to evaluate the influence of IVs on mean Attachment Loss (AL). Thus, the regression coefficients along with respective p-values will be obtained as well as the respective p-values from the significance tests. The classification of a case (individual) adopted in the logistic model was the extent of the destruction of periodontal tissues defined by an Attachment Loss greater than or equal to 4 mm in 25% (AL≥4mm/≥25%) of sites surveyed. The association measures include the Odds Ratios together with the correspondent 95% confidence intervals.

  11. Crevicular Fluid Biomarkers and Periodontal Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Min; Braun, Thomas M.; Ramseier, Christoph A.; Sugai, Jim V.; Giannobile, William V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Assess the ability of a panel of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) biomarkers as predictors of periodontal disease progression (PDP). Materials and Methods 100 individuals participated in a 12-month longitudinal investigation and categorized into 4 groups according to their periodontal status. GCF, clinical parameters, and saliva were collected bi-monthly. Sub-gingival plaque and serum were collected bi-annually. For 6 months, no periodontal treatment was provided. At 6-months, patients received periodontal therapy and continued participation from 6-12 months. GCF samples were analyzed by ELISA for MMP-8, MMP-9, OPG, CRP and IL-1β. Differences in median levels of GCF biomarkers were compared between stable and progressing participants using Wilcoxon Rank Sum test (p=0.05). Clustering algorithm was used to evaluate the ability of oral biomarkers to classify patients as either stable or progressing. Results Eighty-three individuals completed the 6-month monitoring phase. With the exception of GCF C-reactive protein, all biomarkers were significantly higher in the PDP group compared to stable patients. Clustering analysis showed highest sensitivity levels when biofilm pathogens and GCF biomarkers were combined with clinical measures, 74% (95% CI = 61,86). Conclusions Signature of GCF fluid-derived biomarkers combined with pathogens and clinical measures provides a sensitive measure for discrimination of PDP (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00277745). PMID:24303954

  12. Radiography of spontaneous periodontitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hamp, S E; Hamp, M; Olsson, S E; Lindberg, R; Schauman, P

    1997-10-01

    The pattern and distribution of periodontitis were investigated in 162 randomly selected dogs available for necropsy in veterinary practice. There were 82 males and 80 females of 50 different breeds (150 dogs were pure-bred and 12 were mongrels, aged between 7 months and 14 yr. Presence of periodontitis was determined by assessment of alveolar bone loss on radiographs of the skulls and jaws. Periodontitis occurred frequently with increasing age, although the prevalence varied markedly among and within different breeds. Of the breeds most represented in the sample, periodontitis was most frequently seen in poodles and dachshunds but was rarely recognized in German shepherd dogs. Regardless of age, the vast majority of the dogs displayed either one or both of two different radiographic patterns of alveolar bone loss. One pattern was characterized by slight, horizontal alveolar bone loss involving interradicular and interdental areas. The other pattern was one of predominantly crater-like, or narrow, vertical bone defects which, when advanced, often extended around a single root or tooth to surround the root apices. The two types of patterns did not seem to be breed-dependent. The posterior maxillary and mandibular premolars and molars were the most frequently affected teeth. Alveolar bone loss was most severe in the maxilla, while corresponding bone loss in the mandible was more often related to increasing age. PMID:9401931

  13. Periodontal restorative interrelationships: the isolated restoration.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, P A

    1985-06-01

    Only by controlling plaque early and consistently, before periodontal and restorative problems require intervention in the form of a full prosthetic and periodontal reconstruction, the continued maintenance of a full dentition is assured. Plaque control is not merely continued prophylaxes, but a striving for a healthy biologic situation with the placement of every restoration. This is attainable only through ensuring a normal attachment apparatus and establishing that all restorative margins be accessible to plaque control measures. Deep, subgingival restorations are not only difficult to place and finish correctly, but, by providing an environment conducive to microbial plaque retention and proliferation, also lead to inflammatory periodontal destruction and recurrent carious lesions. Early detection, although difficult, is essential to avoid excessive destruction of the tooth and its supporting structures. A deterrent to early detection may be the response of the patient's tissue. Paradoxically, if the patient's periodontal tissues respond in a fibrotic manner to early gingival inflammation, rather than in a dramatic, edematous manner, the situation may appear clinically healthy. Waerhaug discussed "submarginal gingivitis," a situation in which the tissue will appear pink and firm, elicit to exudate or bleeding on probing, and mimic healthy to the casual examiner. When this is coupled with the difficulty inherent in detecting early recurrent carious lesions, resulting from the radiographic superimposition of the existing restoration or the deep subgingival extent of the restoration, the situation becomes all the more demanding of the practitioner's efforts. PMID:3860551

  14. Pathogenesis of Apical Periodontitis: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lodiene, Greta; Maciulskiene, Vita

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This review article discusses the host response in apical periodontitis with the main focus on cytokines, produced under this pathological condition and contributing to the degradation of periradicular tissues. The pace of research in this field has greatly accelerated in the last decade. Here we provide an analysis of studies published in this area during this period. Material and methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic database. The keywords used for search were pathogenesis of apical periodontitis cytokines, periapical granuloma cytokines, inflammatory infiltrate apical periodontitis. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1999 to December 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the cytokine production, cytokine functions and periapical tissue destruction in the journals and books was performed. Results In total, 97 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The topics covered in this article include cellular composition of an inflammatory infiltrate in the periapical lesions, mechanisms of the formation of the innate and specific immune response. Studies which investigated cytokine secretion and functions were identified and cellular and molecular interactions in the course of apical periodontitis described. Conclusions The abundance and interactions of various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules can influence and alter the state and progression of the disease. Therefore, periapical inflammatory response offers a model, suited for the study of many facets of pathogenesis, biocompatibility of different materials to periapical tissues and development of novel treatment methods, based on the regulation of cytokines expression PMID:24421998

  15. Surgical Procedures in Predoctoral Periodontics Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radentz, William H.; Caffesse, Raul G.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 58 dental school periodontics departments revealed the frequency of predoctoral dental students performing surgery, the frequency of specific procedures, the degree of participation or performance of students, incidence of preclinical surgical laboratories in the curricula, and materials and anesthesia used. A wide range in…

  16. Current status of tests for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Lamster, I B; Celenti, R S; Jans, H H; Fine, J B; Grbic, J T

    1993-08-01

    The methods applied to the diagnosis of periodontal disease are changing. Historically, static clinical and radiographic parameters have formed the basis of the periodontal evaluation. As the limitations of these traditional procedures became clear, several new techniques have been proposed as diagnostic tests for periodontal disease. These tests are based on improved understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, and can be considered in three categories: assessment of physical changes in the periodontium, the bacterial infection, and the host response to the infection. Several technical questions must be addressed before these tests can be widely utilized. These specific concerns include such matters as the information available from the tests (e.g., Does the test provide a measure of disease severity or identify the site, region, or patient experiencing active disease?), the most appropriate test configurations, the statistical analysis of data from trials examining the accuracy of the tests, and selection of patients who would benefit from these procedures. Last, several important practical issues must be examined before these tests can be expected to gain widespread acceptance. These include familiarization of dental practitioners with the use of diagnostic tests and the medical laboratory, the role of regulatory agencies in determining the claims made by these tests, and the medical/dental insurance benefits provided for these services. PMID:8260006

  17. Links between atherosclerotic and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-02-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are highly prevalent in the modern community. Both pathologies are chronic inflammatory disorders, which are influenced by multiple risk factors. In part, these factors such as age, smoking, and diabetes overlap between PD and CVD. Epidemiological studies suggest that PD is strongly associated with increased CVD risk. Biochemical and physiological analyses involving in vitro experiments, animal models, and clinical studies provided evidence for the substantial impact of periodontal pathogens, their virulence factors, and bacterial endotoxins on all general pathogenic CVD mechanisms such as endothelial dysfunction, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, lipid accumulation, vascular remodeling, and atherothrombosis. Interventional studies showed moderate beneficial effects of PD treatment on reducing systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. However, no interventional studies were performed to assess whether periodontal therapy can primarily prevent CVD. In summary, current data suggest for a strong contributory role of periodontal infection to CVD but cannot provide sufficient evidence for a role of PD as a cause for cardiovascular pathology. PMID:26777261

  18. Periodontal disease and the oral-systemic connection: "is it all the RAGE?".

    PubMed

    Katz, Joseph; Wallet, Shannon; Cha, Seunghee

    2010-03-01

    Ample studies have reported on the association between periodontal diseases, a persistent inflammatory process, and other chronic ailments such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer disease, and cancer. Other conditions such as low birth weight and premature delivery due to chorioamnionitis are also known to be linked to poor periodontal health. Although much epidemiologic data support these associations, a cause-and-effect relationship has not been established. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor expressed on various cell membranes, including immune, endothelial, and epithelial, and cells of the central nervous system. This receptor, which is frequently associated with proinflammatory responses, has been shown to be activated by various ligands such as high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1/amphoterin), amyloid fibrils, transthyrein, Mac-1 (Integrin Mac-1), as well as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Recent studies indicate that signaling through RAGE has been implicated as an underlying condition in diverse pathologies including periodontal disease, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer disease, cancer, and neurologic conditions. Review of the literature supports the hypothesis that activation of RAGE by ligands in a variety of cell types and tissues may play a role in oral systemic associations. In addition, the ligand cell source and timing of RAGE stimulation may determine the disease produced by this axis. Understanding the distribution and functions of RAGE and its ligands would enhance clinicians' knowledge on pathogenesis of the oral-systemic connection. PMID:20213024

  19. An update on periodontal aetiopathogenesis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lijian

    2008-06-01

    Periodontal disease is the most commonly occurring yet unusual infection in humans. It is initiated by pathogenic plaque biofilm and characterized by bacteria-induced inflammatory destruction of tooth-supporting structures and alveolar bone. Periodontitis remains the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. Currently, periodontal diseases are also recognized as serious infections with profound effects on general health. In recent years, new concepts and discoveries have been made in further understanding of the nature of periodontal disease and its aetiopathogenesis. These can be well reflected in recognition of dental plaque as a biofilm; identification and characterization of periodontopathogens and their virulence factors; recognition of the importance of host-microbe symbiosis in periodontal health; identification of novel innate host defence molecules in periodontal tissues; further understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue destruction and alveolar bone resorption; appreciation of the crucial role of host susceptibility in periodontal pathogenesis; and identification of risk factors and incorporation of risk assessment in clinical practice. Committed oral health care professionals should therefore keep abreast of these changing concepts in periodontology and updated strategies for appropriate evidence-based practice. These views are fundamentally important for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of periodontal diseases and peri-implant infections, as well as for long-term maintenance of periodontal health and implant stability. This paper updates the advances in aetiopathogenesis of periodontal disease and highlights the relevant clinical implications and future perspectives. PMID:22073461

  20. Periodontal dysbiosis linked to periodontitis is associated with cardiometabolic adaptation to high-fat diet in mice.

    PubMed

    Branchereau, Maxime; Reichardt, François; Loubieres, Pascale; Marck, Pauline; Waget, Aurélie; Azalbert, Vincent; Colom, André; Padmanabhan, Roshan; Iacovoni, Jason S; Giry, Anaïs; Tercé, François; Heymes, Christophe; Burcelin, Remy; Serino, Matteo; Blasco-Baque, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes are connected pandemic diseases, and both are risk factors for cardiovascular complications. Nevertheless, the molecular factors relating these two chronic pathologies are poorly understood. We have shown that, in response to a long-term fat-enriched diet, mice present particular gut microbiota profiles related to three metabolic phenotypes: diabetic-resistant (DR), intermediate (Inter), and diabetic-sensitive (DS). Moreover, many studies suggest that a dysbiosis of periodontal microbiota could be associated with the incidence of metabolic and cardiac diseases. We investigated whether periodontitis together with the periodontal microbiota may also be associated with these different cardiometabolic phenotypes. We report that the severity of glucose intolerance is related to the severity of periodontitis and cardiac disorders. In detail, alveolar bone loss was more accentuated in DS than Inter, DR, and normal chow-fed mice. Molecular markers of periodontal inflammation, such as TNF-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mRNA levels, correlated positively with both alveolar bone loss and glycemic index. Furthermore, the periodontal microbiota of DR mice was dominated by the Streptococcaceae family of the phylum Firmicutes, whereas the periodontal microbiota of DS mice was characterized by increased Porphyromonadaceae and Prevotellaceae families. Moreover, in DS mice the periodontal microbiota was indicated by an abundance of the genera Prevotella and Tannerella, which are major periodontal pathogens. PICRUSt analysis of the periodontal microbiome highlighted that prenyltransferase pathways follow the cardiometabolic adaptation to a high-fat diet. Finally, DS mice displayed a worse cardiac phenotype, percentage of fractional shortening, heart rhythm, and left ventricle weight-to-tibia length ratio than Inter and DR mice. Together, our data show that periodontitis combined with particular periodontal microbiota and microbiome is

  1. Estimation of nitric oxide as an inflammatory marker in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Menaka, K. B.; Ramesh, Amitha; Thomas, Biju; Kumari, N. Suchetha

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is not only important in host defense and homeostasis but it is also regarded as harmful and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The presence of NO in periodontal disease may reflect the participation of an additional mediator of bone resorption responsible for disease progression. The aim of this study was to assess the level of NO in serum in chronic periodontitis, and correlate these levels with the severity of periodontal disease. Sixty subjects participated in the study and were divided into two groups. NO levels were assayed by measuring the accumulation of stable oxidative metabolite, nitrite with Griess reaction. Results showed subjects with periodontitis had significantly high nitrite in serum than healthy subjects. NO production is increased in periodontal disease, this will enable us to understand its role in disease progression and selective inhibition of NO may be of therapeutic utility in limiting the progression of periodontitis. PMID:20407654

  2. Periodontal diseases: current and future indications for local antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Tatakis, D N

    2003-01-01

    The microbial etiology of gingivitis and periodontitis provides the rationale for use of adjunctive antimicrobial agents in the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases. Although mechanical removal of supra- and subgingival calcified and non-calcified plaque deposits has been proved effective to control the gingival inflammatory lesions as well as to halt the progression of periodontal attachment loss, some patients may experience additional benefits from the use of systemic or topical antimicrobial agents. Such agents are able to significantly affect supra- and subgingival plaque accumulation and/or suppress or eradicate periodontal pathogenic microflora. Currently, properly selected local antiseptic and systemic antibiotic therapies can provide periodontal treatment that is generally effective, low-risk and affordable. This paper will briefly review the host-related conditions in which the periodontal preventive and therapeutic approaches may be effectively assisted by a local antimicrobial regimen. Potential future indications for adjunctive local antimicrobial therapy will also be discussed. PMID:12974525

  3. The effect of nutrition on periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Varun; Bhatavadekar, Neel B; Uttamani, Juhi Raju

    2014-05-01

    The link between nutrients and periodontal disease has not been clearly established. A PubMed and Cochrane database literature search was conducted. The published research reveals only a possible relationship between vitamins and minerals and periodontal disease. Vitamin E, zinc, lycopene and vitamin B complex may have useful adjunct benefits. However, there is inadequate evidence to link the nutritional status of the host to periodontal inflammation. More randomized controlled trials are needed to explore this association. PMID:25087348

  4. Validation of self-reported periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Blicher, B; Joshipura, K; Eke, P

    2005-10-01

    Self-report is an efficient and accepted means of assessing many population characteristics, risk factors, and diseases, but has rarely been used for periodontal disease (chronic periodontitis). The availability of valid self-reported measures of periodontal disease would facilitate epidemiologic studies on a much larger scale, allow for integration of new studies of periodontal disease within large ongoing studies, and facilitate lower-cost population surveillance of periodontitis. Several studies have been conducted to validate self-reported measures for periodontal disease, but results have been inconsistent. In this report, we conducted a systematic review of the validation studies. We reviewed the 16 studies that assessed the validity of self-reported periodontal and gingivitis measures against clinical gold standards. Seven of the studies included self-reported measures specific to gingivitis, four included measures only for periodontitis, and five included both gingivitis and periodontal measures. Three of the studies used a self-assessment method where they provided the patient with a detailed manual for performing a self-exam. The remaining 13 studies asked participants to self-report symptoms, presence of periodontal disease itself, or their recollection of a dental health professional diagnosing them or providing treatment for periodontal disease. The review indicates that some measures showed promise, but results varied across populations and self-reported measures. One example of a good measure is, "Has any dentist/hygienist told you that you have deep pockets?", which had a sensitivity of 55%, a specificity of 90%, positive predictive value of 77%, and negative predictive value of 75% against clinical pocket depth. Higher validity could be potentially obtained by the use of combinations of several self-reported questions and other predictors of periodontal disease. PMID:16183785

  5. Periodontal Disease and Systemic Diseases: An Update for the Clinician.

    PubMed

    John, Vanchit; Alqallaf, Hawra; De Bedout, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    A link between periodontal disease and various systemic diseases has been investigated for several years. Interest in unearthing such a link has grown as the health care profession is looking for a better understanding of disease processes and their relationships to periodontal and other oral diseases. The article aims to provide recent information on the relationship between periodontal disease and systemic diseases such as; cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and reproductive system related abnormalities. PMID:26939411

  6. Economics of periodontal care: market trends, competitive forces and incentives.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Thomas F; Beikler, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The adoption of new technologies for the treatment of periodontitis and the replacement of teeth has changed the delivery of periodontal care. The objective of this review was to conduct an economic analysis of a mature periodontal service market with a well-developed workforce, including general dentists, dental hygienists and periodontists. Publicly available information about the delivery of periodontal care in the USA was used. A strong trend toward increased utilization of nonsurgical therapy and decreased utilization of surgical periodontal therapy was observed. Although periodontal surgery remained the domain of periodontists, general dentists had taken over most of the nonsurgical periodontal care. The decline in surgical periodontal therapy was associated with an increased utilization of implant-supported prosthesis. Approximately equal numbers of implants were surgically placed by periodontists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, and general dentists. Porter's framework of the forces driving industry competition was used to analyze the role of patients, dental insurances, general dentists, competitors, entrants, substitutes and suppliers in the periodontal service market. Estimates of out-of-pocket payments of self-pay and insured patients, reimbursement by dental insurances and providers' earnings for various periodontal procedures and alternative treatments were calculated. Economic incentives for providers may explain some of the observed shifts in the periodontal service market. Given the inherent uncertainty about treatment outcomes in dentistry, which makes clinical judgment critical, providers may yield to economic incentives without jeopardizing their ethical standards and professional norms. Although the economic analysis pertains to the USA, some considerations may also apply to other periodontal service markets. PMID:23574473

  7. [Markers of periodontal diseases and sensitivity to taromentine in patients with aggressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Iverieli, M V; Abashidze, N O; Gogishvili, Kh B

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the research was to study sensitivity of specific microorganisms from the periodontal pockets of patients with rapidly progressive periodontal disease to Taromentine. 95 patients aged 21 to 35 years (50 women (52,6+/-33,62) and 45 men (47,36+/-3,62)) with rapidly progressive form of periodontal desease were observed. Porphiromonas gingivalis was identifide in 83 out of 95 patients (87,36+/-2,06). Prevotella intermedia - in 31 patients (32,6+/-2,750); Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans - in 23 patients (24,2+/-2,050); Bacteroides forsythus - in 19 patients (20,0+/-2,360); Treponema denticola - in 16 patients (16,84+/-2,190); Candida - in 11 patients (11,57+/-1,80). The sensitivity of all cultures to Taromentine was investigated: 134 (77,9+/-1,89) out of 183 identified markers demonstrated sensitivity to Taromentine. Demostrated sensitivity to Taromentine: 64 (37,2+/-1,06) out of 83 identified cultures of Porphiromonas gingivalis, 24 (13,95+/-1,85) out of 31 identified cultures of Prevotela intermedia, 18 (10,47+/-1,05) out of 23 identified cultures of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, 15 (8,7+/-1,86) out of 19 identified cultures of Bacteroides forsythus, and 13 (7,84+/-1,09) out of 16 identified cultures of Treponema denticola. Totally 38 (22,1+/-1,59) out of 172 identified periodontal markers demonstrated resistence to Taromentine. The results of analysis showed that Taromentine could be recommended in complex treatment of periodontal diseases. PMID:19430039

  8. Dissemination of Periodontal Pathogens in the Bloodstream after Periodontal Procedures: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Chambrone, Leandro; Foz, Adriana Moura; Artese, Hilana Paula Carillo; Rabelo, Mariana de Sousa; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, there is no compilation of evidence-based information associating bacteremia and periodontal procedures. This systematic review aims to assess magnitude, duration, prevalence and nature of bacteremia caused by periodontal procedures. Study Design Systematic Review Types of Studies Reviewed MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS databases were searched in duplicate through August, 2013 without language restriction. Observational studies were included if blood samples were collected before, during or after periodontal procedures of patients with periodontitis. The methodological quality was assessed in duplicate using the modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS). Results Search strategy identified 509 potentially eligible articles and nine were included. Only four studies demonstrated high methodological quality, whereas five were of medium or low methodological quality. The study characteristics were considered too heterogeneous to conduct a meta-analysis. Among 219 analyzed patients, 106 (49.4%) had positive bacteremia. More frequent bacteria were S. viridans, A. actinomycetemcomitans P. gingivalis, M. micros and species Streptococcus and Actinomyces, although identification methods of microbiologic assays were different among studies. Clinical Implications Although half of the patients presented positive bacteremia after periodontal procedures, accurate results regarding the magnitude, duration and nature of bacteremia could not be confidentially assessed. PMID:24870125

  9. Periodontal treatment in a generalized severe chronic periodontitis patient: A case report with 7-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Agrali, Omer Birkan; Kuru, Bahar Eren

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the periodontal treatment is to provide healthy and functional dentition all through a lifetime. In this report, periodontal treatment of a 42-year-old male patient with generalized severe chronic periodontitis is presented. He received initial periodontal treatment together with adjunctive antimicrobials. The devital teeth were endodontically treated, and free gingival grafts were placed at the inadequate keratinized tissue zones before regenerative surgery. Following the surgical treatment using enamel matrix derivatives and xenogenic bone graft combination, the patient was put on a strict recall program. After 12 months, favorable clinical and radiographical improvements were obtained. The 7-year maintenance of the present case with several initially hopeless teeth has been shown and discussed in this report. It can be concluded that optimum oral hygiene level as well as the positive cooperation of the patient enhanced the success of periodontal treatment results even in extremely severe periodontal destruction. PMID:26038666

  10. Diabetes mellitus related bone metabolism and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying-Ying; Xiao, E; Graves, Dana T

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are chronic diseases affecting a large number of populations worldwide. Changed bone metabolism is one of the important long-term complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Alveolar bone loss is one of the main outcomes of periodontitis, and diabetes is among the primary risk factors for periodontal disease. In this review, we summarise the adverse effects of diabetes on the periodontium in periodontitis subjects, focusing on alveolar bone loss. Bone remodelling begins with osteoclasts resorbing bone, followed by new bone formation by osteoblasts in the resorption lacunae. Therefore, we discuss the potential mechanism of diabetes-enhanced bone loss in relation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:25857702

  11. CDC Periodontal Disease Surveillance Project: background, objectives, and progress report.

    PubMed

    Eke, Paul I; Genco, Robert J

    2007-07-01

    This supplement contains papers presented at the 2006 International Association of Dental Research (IADR) symposium entitled "Development of Self-Reported Measures for Population-Based Surveillance of Periodontitis." These papers highlight activities of an independent periodontal disease surveillance workgroup convened by the Division of Oral Health (DOH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with the American Academy of Periodontology, to examine the feasibility of using self-reported measures for population-based surveillance of periodontal disease in the United States. This workgroup was convened in 2003 as part of a CDC periodontal disease surveillance project. PMID:17610396

  12. Clinical and postextraction evaluation of periodontal disease indicators

    PubMed Central

    Kolte, Rajashri; Kolte, Abhay; Wattamwar, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical attachment level is the most frequently used and acceptable parameter in monitoring periodontal status in diseased individual and denotes patterns of periodontal destruction. Awareness of root morphology and the condition of the periodontal tissues is essential for reliable periodontal pocket probing and for effective debridement of root surfaces. Clinically, it is challenging to observe exact nature of complex periodontal attachment loss. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patterns of periodontal destruction based on vertical and horizontal attachment loss. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 extracted teeth were obtained from chronic periodontitis patients. Prior to extraction, clinical measurements were recorded and after extraction, the teeth were stained with crystal violet. Root length, vertical and horizontal attachment loss were measured using digital caliper. Results: There was a significant difference between clinical attachment level and vertical attachment loss for both maxillary and mandibular teeth. Mean vertical attachment loss varied between 5.17 mm and 9.17 mm. Interproximal surfaces exhibited statistically significant vertical attachment loss in both maxillary and mandibular dentition. Results indicated that vertical attachment loss was more severe with teeth belonging to the anterior sextant whereas the horizontal attachment loss was more pronounced with posterior teeth. Conclusion: Both vertical and horizontal attachment loss were observed in all periodontally involved teeth. There was a difference in clinical measurements and actual periodontal status denoted by postextraction staining. These findings have an impact on determining the prognosis and appropriate treatment plan for patients. PMID:27143828

  13. Periodontitis and carotid atheroma: is there a causal relationship?

    PubMed

    Tzorbatzoglou, I D; Sfyroeras, G S; Giannoukas, A D

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent in the population. Several studies implicated that chronic periodontitis may affect the arterial wall inducing subclinical atherosclerosis by triggering a systemic inflammatory response. Three theories have been put forward to explain potential mechanisms involved: the theory of bacterial invasion, the cytokine theory and the autoimmunization theory. Periodontal inflammation could have a role in the initiation and progression of arterial diseases such as coronary artery disease and carotid atherosclerosis. Further clinical studies are required to investigate if there is a causal relationship of chronic periodontitis with echolucent unstable carotid plaques. PMID:20224528

  14. Periodontal Disease and Adverse Birth Outcomes: A Study from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mobeen, N; Jehan, I; Banjay, N; Moore, J; McClure, EM; Pasha, O; Wright, LL; Goldenberg, RL

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Periodontal disease may increase the risk of adverse birth outcomes; however, results have been mixed. Few studies have examined periodontal disease in developing countries. We describe the relationship between periodontal disease and birth outcomes in a community setting in Pakistan. METHODS Enrollment occurred at 20–26 wks. A study dentist performed the periodontal examination to assess probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), gingivitis index (GI) and plaque index (PI). Outcomes included stillbirth, neonatal mortality, <32 wk preterm birth (PTB), 32–36 wk PTB, and low birthweight (LBW), and are presented for increasing periodontal disease severity by quartiles (Q1-4). RESULTS Dental examinations and outcome data were completed for 1152 women. 81% were multiparous with a mean age of 27 yrs. 33% had no education. Dental caries were present in 47%, missing teeth in 27%, and 92% had no dental care in the last year. Periodontal disease was common: 87% had ≥ 4 teeth with a PD of >3mm, 54% had ≥4 teeth with a PI = 3, and 58% had ≥ 4 teeth with a GI = 3. In general, as the measure of periodontal disease increased, stillbirth, PTB <32 wks and neonatal mortality also increased. Late PTB and LBW were not related to measures of periodontal disease. Adjustment for demographic characteristics did not significantly change the relationships. CONCLUSION Pregnant Pakistani women have high levels of moderate to severe dental disease. Both stillbirth and neonatal mortality increased with the severity of periodontal disease. PMID:18455527

  15. Defining functional signatures of dysbiosis in periodontitis progression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gary P

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common inflammatory disease that leads to tooth loss and has been linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. The periodontal microbiome is highly diverse, and metatranscriptomic studies have indicated that the genes that are expressed by the microbiota are more relevant than the microbial composition in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. A recent study of early metabolic activities in the dysbiotic microbiome reveals a functional signature that distinguishes periodontal sites that will become inflamed, supporting the idea that microbial communities as a whole drive disease progression. PMID:25926890

  16. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Jia, Ru; Cai, Yu; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis. PMID:26783845

  17. National Economic Burden Associated with Management of Periodontitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd Dom, Tuti Ningseh; Ayob, Rasidah; Abd Muttalib, Khairiyah; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study is to estimate the economic burden associated with the management of periodontitis in Malaysia from the societal perspective. Methods. We estimated the economic burden of periodontitis by combining the disease prevalence with its treatment costs. We estimated treatment costs (with 2012 value of Malaysian Ringgit) using the cost-of-illness approach and included both direct and indirect costs. We used the National Oral Health Survey for Adults (2010) data to estimate the prevalence of periodontitis and 2010 national census data to estimate the adult population at risk for periodontitis. Results. The economic burden of managing all cases of periodontitis at the national level from the societal perspective was approximately MYR 32.5 billion, accounting for 3.83% of the 2012 Gross Domestic Product of the country. It would cost the nation MYR 18.3 billion to treat patients with moderate periodontitis and MYR 13.7 billion to treat patients with severe periodontitis. Conclusion. The economic burden of periodontitis in Malaysia is substantial and comparable with that of other chronic diseases in the country. This is attributable to its high prevalence and high cost of treatment. Judicious application of promotive, preventive, and curative approaches to periodontitis management is decidedly warranted. PMID:27092180

  18. National Economic Burden Associated with Management of Periodontitis in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ayob, Rasidah; Abd Muttalib, Khairiyah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study is to estimate the economic burden associated with the management of periodontitis in Malaysia from the societal perspective. Methods. We estimated the economic burden of periodontitis by combining the disease prevalence with its treatment costs. We estimated treatment costs (with 2012 value of Malaysian Ringgit) using the cost-of-illness approach and included both direct and indirect costs. We used the National Oral Health Survey for Adults (2010) data to estimate the prevalence of periodontitis and 2010 national census data to estimate the adult population at risk for periodontitis. Results. The economic burden of managing all cases of periodontitis at the national level from the societal perspective was approximately MYR 32.5 billion, accounting for 3.83% of the 2012 Gross Domestic Product of the country. It would cost the nation MYR 18.3 billion to treat patients with moderate periodontitis and MYR 13.7 billion to treat patients with severe periodontitis. Conclusion. The economic burden of periodontitis in Malaysia is substantial and comparable with that of other chronic diseases in the country. This is attributable to its high prevalence and high cost of treatment. Judicious application of promotive, preventive, and curative approaches to periodontitis management is decidedly warranted. PMID:27092180

  19. Differential Measurement Periodontal Structures Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Companion, John A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to a periodontal structure mapping system employing a dental handpiece containing first and second acoustic sensors for locating the Cemento-Enamel Junction (CEJ) and measuring the differential depth between the CEJ and the bottom of the periodontal pocket. Measurements are taken at multiple locations on each tooth of a patient, observed, analyzed by an optical analysis subsystem, and archived by a data storage system for subsequent study and comparison with previous and subsequent measurements. Ultrasonic transducers for the first and second acoustic sensors are contained within the handpiece and in connection with a control computer. Pressurized water is provided for the depth measurement sensor and a linearly movable probe sensor serves as the sensor for the CEJ finder. The linear movement of the CEJ sensor is obtained by a control computer actuated by the prober. In an alternate embodiment, the CEJ probe is an optical fiber sensor with appropriate analysis structure provided therefor.

  20. Application of ultrasound in periodontics: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vivek K.; Mohan, Ranjana; Bains, Rhythm

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound offers great potential in development of a noninvasive periodontal assessment tool that would offer great yield real time information, regarding clinical features such as pocket depth, attachment level, tissue thickness, histological change, calculus, bone morphology, as well as evaluation of tooth structure for fracture cracks. In therapeutics, ultrasonic instrumentation is proven effective and efficient in treating periodontal disease. When used properly, ultrasound-based instrument is kind to the soft tissues, require less healing time, and are less tiring for the operator. Microultrasonic instruments have been developed with the aim of improving root-surface debridement. The dye/paper method of mapping ultrasound fields demonstrated cavitational activity in an ultrasonic cleaning bath. Piezosurgery resulted in more favorable osseous repair and remodeling in comparison with carbide and diamond burs. The effect of ultrasound is not limited to fracture healing, but that bone healing after osteotomy or osteodistraction could be stimulated as well. PMID:20142946

  1. Green tea extract for periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswara, Babu; Sirisha, K.; Chava, Vijay K.

    2011-01-01

    Tea, the commonly consumed beverage, is gaining increased attention in promoting overall health. In specific, green tea is considered a healthful beverage due to the biological activity of its polyphenols namely catechins. Among the polyphenols Epigallo catechin 3 gallate and Epicatechin 3 Gallate are the most predominant catechins. The antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticollagenase, antimutagenic, and c hemopreventive properties of these catechins proved to be helpful in the treatment of chronic diseases like periodontal disease. Studies have demonstrated that the type of processing mainly effects the concentration of catechins. Several epidemiological studies have proved that green tea also has some general health benefitting properties like antihypertensive, reduction of cardiovascular risk, antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal activity. The present review concentrates on the effects of green tea in periodontal and general health. PMID:21772716

  2. Severe gingival enlargement associated with aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Shyam; Dwarakanath, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    Enlargement of the gingiva can be due to various causes. Most prevalent are the inflammatory type and drug-induced type of gingival hyperplasia. However, sever enlargement associated with an aggressive type of periodontitis is an infrequent finding. Reported here is a case of a female patient aged 18 years who presented with severe enlargement of the maxillary and mandibular gingiva. Examination revealed enlargement extending up to the incisal edge of all the teeth and also an associated generalized loss of attachment with radiographic evidence of reduced bone height resembling an aggressive type of periodontitis. There were no associated systemic signs and symptoms or any family history except that there was generalized vitiligo of the skin and oral mucous membrane. The case was treated by gross electrosection of the gingiva. PMID:23633785

  3. Drinking Hydrogen-Rich Water Has Additive Effects on Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment of Improving Periodontitis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Tetsuji; Yamane, Mayu; Ekuni, Daisuke; Kawabata, Yuya; Kataoka, Kota; Kasuyama, Kenta; Maruyama, Takayuki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. A reduction of oxidative stress by drinking hydrogen-rich water (HW) might be beneficial to periodontal health. In this pilot study, we compared the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment with or without drinking HW on periodontitis. Thirteen patients (3 women, 10 men) with periodontitis were divided into two groups: The control group (n = 6) or the HW group (n = 7). In the HW group, participants consumed HW 4–5 times/day for eight weeks. At two to four weeks, all participants received non-surgical periodontal treatment. Oral examinations were performed at baseline, two, four and eight weeks, and serum was obtained at these time points to evaluate oxidative stress. At baseline, there were no significant differences in periodontal status between the control and HW groups. The HW group showed greater improvements in probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level than the control group at two, four and eight weeks (p < 0.05). The HW group also exhibited an increased serum level of total antioxidant capacity at four weeks, compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Drinking HW enhanced the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment, thus improving periodontitis. PMID:26783840

  4. Surgical and Non-Surgical Procedures Associated with Recurrence of Periodontitis in Periodontal Maintenance Therapy: 5-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cota, Luís Otávio Miranda; Cyrino, Renata Magalhães; Lages, Eugênio José Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Prospective studies that investigated the influence of surgical and nonsurgical procedures in the recurrence of periodontitis and tooth loss in periodontal maintenance therapy (PMT) programs have not been previously reported. The objective of this study was to evaluate longitudinally the recurrence of periodontitis in regular compliers (RC) and irregular compliers (IC) individuals undergoing surgical and non-surgical procedures over 5 years in a program of PMT. Materials and Methods A total of 212 individuals participated in this study. Full-mouth periodontal examination including bleeding on probing, probing depth, and clinical attachment level were determined at all PMT visits over 5 years. The recurrence of periodontitis was evaluated in RC and IC individuals undergoing surgical and non-surgical procedures in PMT. The influences of risk variables of interest were tested through univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression. Results Recurrence of periodontitis was significantly lower among RC when compared to IC. Individuals with recurrence of periodontitis and undergoing surgical procedures showed higher probing depth and clinical attachment loss than those who received non-surgical procedures. Recurrence of periodontitis was higher in individual undergoing surgical procedures and irregular compliance during PMT. Conclusions Irregular compliance and surgical procedures in individuals undergoing PMT presented higher rates of recurrence of periodontitis when compared to regular compliant patients undergoing non-surgical procedures. PMID:26496187

  5. Comparison of Salivary TIMP-1 Levels in Periodontally Involved and Healthy Controls and the Response to Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fenol, Angel; Peter, Maya Rajan; Perayil, Jayachandran; Vyloppillil, Rajesh; Bhaskar, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. Periodontal destruction is an outcome of the imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). We wanted to prove the hypothesis that salivary TIPM-1 level will vary in different people. A decrease in TIMP-1 level could make them more susceptible to periodontitis whereas a normal level could prevent increased tissue destruction thereby inhibiting the progression from gingivitis to periodontitis. This could probably pave the way for TIPM-1 to be a specific salivary biomarker and serve as a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in periodontitis. Methods. Whole unstimulated saliva of 2 ml was collected from twenty-five periodontally healthy and twenty-seven systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis. Clinical parameters recorded at baseline and reevaluated after four weeks in subjects with periodontitis following nonsurgical periodontal therapy were gingival index (GI), oral hygiene index-Simplified (OHI-S), probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL). Salivary TIMP-1 levels in both were analyzed using a commercially available ELISA kit. PMID:26464855

  6. Comparison of Salivary TIMP-1 Levels in Periodontally Involved and Healthy Controls and the Response to Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fenol, Angel; Peter, Maya Rajan; Perayil, Jayachandran; Vyloppillil, Rajesh; Bhaskar, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. Periodontal destruction is an outcome of the imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). We wanted to prove the hypothesis that salivary TIPM-1 level will vary in different people. A decrease in TIMP-1 level could make them more susceptible to periodontitis whereas a normal level could prevent increased tissue destruction thereby inhibiting the progression from gingivitis to periodontitis. This could probably pave the way for TIPM-1 to be a specific salivary biomarker and serve as a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in periodontitis. Methods. Whole unstimulated saliva of 2 ml was collected from twenty-five periodontally healthy and twenty-seven systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis. Clinical parameters recorded at baseline and reevaluated after four weeks in subjects with periodontitis following nonsurgical periodontal therapy were gingival index (GI), oral hygiene index-Simplified (OHI-S), probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL). Salivary TIMP-1 levels in both were analyzed using a commercially available ELISA kit. PMID:26464855

  7. Application of transtheoretical model to assess the compliance of chronic periodontitis patients to periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Shilpa; Thomas, Raison; Shah, Rucha; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to assess whether the transtheoretical model for oral hygiene behavior was interrelated in theoretically consistent directions in chronic periodontitis patients and its applicability to assess the compliance of the chronic periodontitis patients to the treatment suggested. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 chronic periodontitis patients were selected for the proposed study. The selected patients were given four questionnaires that were constructed based on transtheoretical model (TTM), and the patients were divided subsequently into five different groups (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance groups) based on their answers to the questionnaires. Then, each patient was given four appointments for their periodontal treatment spaced with a time gap of 10 days. The patients visit for each appointments scheduled to them was documented. The results obtained were assessed using TTM. Results: Higher mean pro scores of decisional balance, self-efficacy, and process of change scores was recorded in maintenance group followed by action group, preparation group, contemplation group, and precontemplation group, respectively, whereas higher mean cons score was recorded in precontemplation group followed by contemplation group, preparation group, action group, and maintenance group, respectively. The difference scores of TTM constructs were statistically highly significant between all the five groups. Furthermore, the number of appointment attended in were significantly more than maintenance group followed by action group, preparation group, contemplation group, and precontemplation group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that transtheoretical model can be successfully applied to chronic periodontitis patients to assess their compliance to the suggested periodontal treatment. PMID:27307663

  8. Periodontal files--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, R; Clark, S M; Baradaran, S; Adams, D F

    1995-12-01

    Periodontal files are used by many dentists for instrumentation of root surfaces as a part of periodontal treatment. The purposes of this study were: 1) to examine, evaluate, and compare several periodontal files in 3 different conditions: new, used, and used/sharpened and 2) to evaluate the efficacy of 5 sharpening devices. The main characteristics observed included: the number, shape, and interval of blades; the active, rake, and lip angles; changes induced by wear; the influence of sharpening; and the type of metal surfaces comprising the blades. There was a wide range of active angles on each individual file, from a high of 75 degrees to a low of 51 degrees. The range of active angles for all blades on all new files was even greater, from a high of 87 degrees to a low of 30 degrees. Wear, observed on some but not all blades, was not extensive and appeared either as abrasion or, occasionally, as fracture of the blade edge. Sharpness scores (5 = sharpest and 1 = dullest) for new file blades were also extremely variable and spanned the full range of values, with a majority of blades scoring 3.5 and below. Attempts to sharpen files with several devices produced inconsistent results. All 5 sharpening devices had significant shortcomings. It was concluded that the extreme ranges both in active angles and in sharpness scores probably have a significant influence on effectiveness of root instrumentation. PMID:8683416

  9. Non-Inflammatory Destructive Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    José Ricardo Kina; Yumi Umeda Suzuki, Thaís; Fumico Umeda Kina, Eunice; Kina, Juliana; Kina, Mônica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-Inflammatory Destructive Periodontal Disease (NIDPD), is a severe destructive periodontal disease, that is characterized by the attachment loss and alveolar bone loss, without signs of the gingival inflammation, and the periodontal pocket development. Objective: Despite the fact that various cases of NIDPD have been reported; their etiology and disease evolution is still indefinite, and therefore, are open for discussion. Method: An NIDPD case was studied in order to demonstrate features of the disease, and discuss the possible etiology and treatment. Results: In this clinical case, the etiology of NIDPD seems to be an association of endogenous opportunist bacteria with anatomical aspects, occlusion pattern, emotional stress and mouth breathing condition. Conclusion: In spite of all cases described in the literature are comparable and may have similar etiology as related in this clinical case, additional research is needed to identify and clarify the role of the etiologic factors which determine the disease. PMID:27053968

  10. Bonebiomarkers in Periodontal Disease: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Ram, V. Shankar; Parthiban; Sudhakar, Uma; Mithradas, Nimisha

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, is an inflammatory state of the tooth supporting structures and if left untreated, the disease continues to progressive bone destruction and subsequent tooth loss. The increasing prevelance of periodontal disease paved way to the development of new diagnostic tests that could detect the presence of active disease,the course of the disease and its response to treatment. Bone is a metabolically active tissue and undergo continuous remodelling, a process that largely relies on the activity of osteoclasts to remove bone and of osteoblasts to form bone. In health ,bone resorption and formation are coupled to each other and its long term maintenance of skeletal balance is brought about by the systemic hormones and local mediators.In contrasts,during disease there is a pronounced in balance in bone turnover. Bone biomarkers which are produced either in health or in disease state are tell tale markers which would be used to monitor the health status. This review highlights, the recent advances in the use of biomarkers of bone remodelling,that could facilitate the screening, diagnosis and management of periodontal diseases. PMID:25738099

  11. Proresolving Nanomedicines Activate Bone Regeneration in Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, H.; Kantarci, A.; Freire, M.O.; Nguyen, D.; Dalli, J.; Serhan, C.N.

    2015-01-01

    Therapies to reverse tissue damage from osteolytic inflammatory diseases are limited by the inability of current tissue-engineering procedures to restore lost hard and soft tissues. There is a critical need for new therapeutics in regeneration. In addition to scaffolds, cells, and soluble mediators necessary for tissue engineering, control of endogenous inflammation is an absolute requirement for success. Although significant progress has been made in understanding natural resolution of inflammation pathways to limit uncontrolled inflammation in disease, harnessing the biomimetic properties of proresolving lipid mediators has not been demonstrated. Here, we report the use of nano-proresolving medicines (NPRM) containing a novel lipoxin analog (benzo-lipoxin A4, bLXA4) to promote regeneration of hard and soft tissues irreversibly lost to periodontitis in the Hanford miniature pig. In this proof-of-principle experiment, NPRM-bLXA4 dramatically reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate into chronic periodontal disease sites treated surgically and dramatically increased new bone formation and regeneration of the periodontal organ. These findings indicate that NPRM-bLXA4 is a mimetic of endogenous resolving mechanisms with potent bioactions that offers a new therapeutic tissue-engineering approach for the treatment of chronic osteolytic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25389003

  12. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor Mimicking Apical Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Makoto; Kiho, Kazuki; Sekine, Genta; Ohta, Takahisa; Matsubara, Makoto; Yoshida, Takakazu; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Tanuma, Jun-ichi; Sumitomo, Shinichiro

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs) are rare. IMTs of the head and neck occur in all age groups, from neonates to old age, with the highest incidence occurring in childhood and early adulthood. An IMT has been defined as a histologically distinctive lesion of uncertain behavior. This article describes an unusual case of IMT mimicking apical periodontitis in the mandible of a 42-year-old man. At first presentation, the patient showed spontaneous pain and percussion pain at teeth #28 to 30, which continued after initial endodontic treatment. Panoramic radiography revealed a radiolucent lesion at the site. Cone-beam computed tomographic imaging showed osteolytic lesions, suggesting an aggressive neoplasm requiring incisional biopsy. Histopathological examination indicated an IMT. The lesion was removed en bloc under general anesthesia, and the patient manifested no clinical evidence of recurrence for 24 months. Lesions of nonendodontic origin should be included in the differential diagnosis of apical periodontitis. Every available diagnostic tool should be used to confirm the diagnosis. Cone-beam computed tomographic imaging is very helpful for differential diagnosis in IMTs mimicking apical periodontitis. PMID:26602450

  13. Periodontal effects with self ligating appliances and laser biostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Caccianiga, Gianluigi; Cordasco, Giancarlo; Leonida, Alessandro; Zorzella, Paolo; Squarzoni, Nadia; Carinci, Francesco; Crestale, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recently, various biostimulation's effects of low energy laser irradiation have been reported. The present study was designed to examine the effects of low-energy laser irradiation on alveolar bone remodelling during orthodontic tooth movement and finally on formation of new keratinized gingiva. Materials and Methods: 22 patients and 27 teeth in vestibular mucosal without keratinized gingiva were selected. Every patient was treated with self ligating appliances. In every orthodontic session the patient was treated with Diode laser biostimulation. At the moment of debonding, 27 teeth involved in the research were evaluated in terms of quality and quantity of attached gingiva. BOP and CAL loss were investigated. Results: Every tooth considered at the end of orthodontic treatment showed an attached gingiva around the crown: The average of keratinized gingiva at the end of the study was 3.10 mm and the mean increasing at each month was 0,49 mm. Conclusions: The combination between self ligating appliances and laser's biostimulation could improve the differentiation of periodontal ligaments stem cells in fibroblasts, able to promote attached gingiva around the crown of the teeth erupted in oral vestibular mucosa. PMID:23814581

  14. End-to-End Commitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomb, John

    2004-01-01

    The end-to-end test would verify the complex sequence of events from lander separation to landing. Due to the large distances involved and the significant delay time in sending a command and receiving verification, the lander needed to operate autonomously after it separated from the orbiter. It had to sense conditions, make decisions, and act accordingly. We were flying into a relatively unknown set of conditions-a Martian atmosphere of unknown pressure, density, and consistency to land on a surface of unknown altitude, and one which had an unknown bearing strength.

  15. Management of a Periodontal Pocket Using a Removable Orthodontic Appliance and Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Köseoğlu, Serhat; Fidancıoğlu, Ahmet; Sağlam, Mehmet; Savran, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As documented in the literature, bony defects can be managed by an orthodontic approach. Methods. This case report describes the treatment of a bony defect caused by orthodontic malposition through phase I periodontal therapy and a simple removable orthodontic appliance used for the first time in a 20-year-old girl. Results. The periodontal pocket was reduced from 8 mm to 3 mm shortly after treatment. Conclusion. This case report concludes that orthodontic therapy can be used successfully in treatment of bony defects caused by mesially tilted molars. PMID:26421197

  16. Prospective associations between measures of adiposity and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Monik; Hu, Frank B; Marino, Miguel; Li, Yi; Joshipura, Kaumudi J

    2012-08-01

    Obesity induced inflammation may promote periodontal tissue destruction and bone resorption inducing tooth loss. We examined the association between measures of adiposity and self-reported periodontal disease, using data from 36,910 healthy male participants of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS) who were free of periodontal disease at baseline and followed for ≤20 years (1986-2006). Self-reported height, weight, and periodontal disease data were collected at baseline, weight and periodontal disease were additionally collected on biennial follow-up questionnaires and waist and hip circumference were self-reported in 1987. These self-reported measures have been previously validated. The multivariable adjusted associations between BMI (kg/m(2)), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and first report of periodontal disease diagnosis were evaluated using time-varying Cox models. We observed 2,979 new periodontal disease diagnoses during 596,561 person-years of follow-up. Significant associations and trends were observed between all measures of adiposity and periodontal disease after adjusting for age, smoking, race, dental profession, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, alcohol consumption, and diabetes status at baseline. BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) compared to BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2) was significantly associated with greater risk of periodontal disease (hazard ratios (HR) = 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-1.45). Elevated WC and WHR were significantly associated with a greater risk of periodontal disease (HR for extreme quintiles: WC = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.11-1.46; WHR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.17-1.54). The associations of BMI and WC were significant even among nondiabetics and never smokers. Given the high prevalence of overweight, obesity, and periodontal disease this association may be of substantial public health importance. PMID:21979390

  17. Smoking as a Permissive Factor of Periodontal Disease in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Mattheos, Nikos; Gyulai, Rolland; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Background Population-based studies have identified smoking as a pathogenetic factor in chronic periodontitis. At the same time, chronic periodontal disease has also been found to occur more often in persons suffering from psoriasis than in controls with no psoriasis. It is known that smoking aggravates both periodontal disease and psoriasis, but so far it has not been investigated how smoking influences the occurrence and severity of periodontal disease in psoriasis. Methods A hospital-based study was conducted to investigate this question. The study population consisted of 82 psoriasis patients and 89 controls. All patients received a full-mouth periodontal examination, and a published classification based on bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level and probing depth was utilized for staging. Both patients and controls were divided into smoker and non-smoker groups, and the resulting groups were compared in terms of periodontal status. Beyond the descriptive statistics, odds ratios were computed. Results Psoriasis in itself increased the likelihood of severe periodontal disease to 4.373 (OR, as compared to non-smoker controls, p<0.05), while smoking increased it to 24.278 (OR, as compared to non-smoker controls, p<0.001) in the studied population. In other words, the risk of severe periodontal disease in psoriasis turned out to be six times higher in smokers than in non-smokers. Conclusions The results of this study corroborate those of other studies regarding the link between psoriasis and periodontal disease, but they also seem to reveal a powerful detrimental effect of smoking on the periodontal health of psoriasis patients, whereby the authors propose that smoking may have a permissive effect on the development of severe periodontal disease in psoriasis. PMID:24651659

  18. Analysis of the relationships between edentulism, periodontal health, body composition, and bone mineral density in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Ignasiak, Zofia; Radwan-Oczko, Malgorzata; Rozek-Piechura, Krystyna; Cholewa, Marta; Skrzek, Anna; Ignasiak, Tomasz; Slawinska, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and tooth loss in conjunction with periodontal disease is not clear. The suggested effects include alteration in bone remodeling rates as well as the multifaceted etiology of edentulism. There is also a question if other body-related variables besides BMD, such as body composition, may be associated with tooth number and general periodontal health. The aim of this study was to evaluate if tooth number and marginal periodontal status are associated with body composition and BMD in a sample of elderly women. Materials and methods The study involved 91 postmenopausal women. Data included basic anthropometric characteristics, body composition via bioelectrical impedance analysis, and BMD analysis at the distal end of the radial bone of the nondominant arm via peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A dental examination was performed to assess tooth number, periodontal pocket depth (PD), and gingival bleeding. Results In nonosteoporotic women, a significant positive correlation was found between BMD and lean body mass, total body water, and muscle mass. The indicators of bone metabolism correlated negatively with PD. Such relationships did not appear in osteoporotic women. In both groups, basic anthropometric characteristics and body composition were significantly and positively correlated with PD and bleeding on probing. Conclusion The results suggest that body composition and BMD are not significantly correlated with tooth number and gingival bleeding. PMID:27042033

  19. Health from the Hive: Propolis as an Adjuvant in the Treatment of Chronic Periodontitis - A Clinicomicrobiologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Sanghani, Nehal N; S, Savita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was aimed at the clinical and microbiological evaluation of the efficacy of subgingivally delivered Indian propolis extract as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis presenting a minimum of two pockets (probing depth ≥5 mm) were selected. Sites were assigned randomly into control sites (n=20) which received SRP alone or test sites (n=20) which received SRP and locally delivered propolis. At selected sites, the clinical parameters were assessed and subgingival plaque samples were collected at baseline, 15 days and one month. The samples were cultured anerobically for periodontal pathogens. Results: The results indicated that there was a significant improvement in both clinical and microbiological parameters (p<0.01) in the test sites compared to the control sites at the end of the study. Conclusion: Subgingival delivery of propolis showed promising results as an adjunct to SRP in patients with chronic periodontitis when assessed by clinical and microbiological parameters. PMID:25386520

  20. The Effect of Periodontal Treatment on Hemoglobin A1c Levels of Diabetic Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Han, Xu; Guo, Xiaojing; Luo, Xiaolong; Wang, Dalin

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that periodontal treatment may affect glycemic control in diabetic patients. And several systematic reviews have been conducted to assess the effect of periodontal treatment on diabetes outcomes. Researches of this aspect are widely concerned, and several new controlled trials have been published. The aim of this study was to update the account for recent findings. Methods A literature search (until the end of January 2014) was carried out using various databases with language restriction to English. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was selected if it investigated periodontal therapy for diabetic subjects compared with a control group received no periodontal treatment for at least 3 months of the follow-up period. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and secondary outcomes were periodontal parameters included probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Results Ten trials of 1135 patients were included in the analysis. After the follow-up of 3 months, treatment substantially lowered HbA1c compared with no treatment after periodontal therapy (–0.36%, 95%CI, −0.52% to −0.19%, P<0.0001). Clinically substantial and statistically significant reduction of PPD and CAL were found between subjects with and without treatment after periodontal therapy (PPD −0.42 mm, 95%CI: −0.60 to −0.23, P<0.00001; CAL −0.34 mm, 95%CI: −0.52 to −0.16, P = 0.0002). And there is no significant change of the level of HbA1c at the 6-month comparing with no treatment (–0.30%, 95%CI, −0.69% to 0.09%, P = 0.13). Conclusions Periodontal treatment leads to the modest reduction in HbA1c along with the improvement of periodontal status in diabetic patients for 3 months, and this result is consistent with previous systematic reviews. And the effect of periodontal treatment on HbA1c cannot be observed at 6-month after treatment. PMID:25255331

  1. Effect of periodontal treatment on the clinical parameters of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: study protocol of the randomized, controlled ESPERA trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder that leads to joint damage, deformity, and pain. It affects approximately 1% of adults in developed countries. Periodontitis is a chronic oral infection, caused by inflammatory reactions to gram-negative anaerobic bacteria, and affecting about 35 to 50% of adults. If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss. A significant association has been shown to exist between periodontitis and RA in observational studies. Some intervention studies have suggested that periodontal treatment can reduce serum inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate. We hypothesize that periodontitis could be an aggravating factor in patients with RA, and that its treatment would improve RA outcomes. The aim of this clinical trial is to assess the effect of periodontal treatment on the biological and clinical parameters of patients with RA. Methods/design The ESPERA (Experimental Study of Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis) study is an open-label, randomized, controlled trial. Subjects with both RA and periodontitis will be recruited at two university hospitals in southwestern France. In total, 40 subjects will be randomized into two arms (intervention and control groups), and will be followed up for 3 months. Intervention will consist of full-mouth supra-gingival and sub-gingival non-surgical scaling and root planing, followed by systemic antibiotic therapy, local antiseptics, and oral hygiene instructions. After the 3-month follow-up period, the same intervention will be applied to the subjects randomized to the control group. The primary outcome will be change of in Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints (DAS28) at the end of the follow-up period. Secondary outcomes will be the percentages of subjects with 20%, 50%, and 70% improvement in disease according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Health-related quality of life assessments (the Health

  2. Periodontitis-associated risk factors in pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcellos Piscoya, Maria Dilma Bezerra; de Alencar Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes; da Silva, Genivaldo Moura; Jamelli, Sílvia Regina; Coutinho, Sônia Bechara

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to investigate the risk factors associated with periodontitis in pregnant women. METHODS: This study was conducted in two stages. In Stage 1, a cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of periodontitis among 810 women treated at the maternity ward of a university hospital. In Stage 2, the factors associated with periodontitis were investigated in two groups of pregnant women: 90 with periodontitis and 720 without. A hierarchized approach to the evaluation of the risk factors was used in the analysis, and the independent variables related to periodontitis were grouped into two levels: 1) socio-demographic variables; 2a) variables related to nutritional status, smoking, and number of pregnancies; and 2b) variables related to oral hygiene. Periodontitis was defined as a probing depth ≥4 mm and an attachment loss ≥3 mm at the same site in four or more teeth. A logistic regression analysis was also performed. RESULTS: The prevalence of periodontitis in this sample was 11%. The variables that remained in the final multivariate model with the hierarchized approach were schooling, family income, smoking, body mass index, and bacterial plaque. CONCLUSION: The factors identified underscore the social nature of the disease, as periodontitis was associated with socioeconomic, demographic status, and poor oral hygiene. PMID:22249477

  3. [Relationship diabetes mellitus-periodontal disease: etiology and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Foia, Liliana; Toma, Vasilica; Ungureanu, Didona; Aanei, Carmen; Costuleanu, M

    2007-01-01

    The interrelation between diabetes mellitus and inflammatory periodontal disease has been intensively studied for more than 50 years, a real bidirectional influence existing between patient's glycemic level disorder and periodontal territories alteration. Several studies developed in this direction emerged to the evidences that reveal a general increase of prevalence, extent and severity of gingivitis and periodontitis. Inflammation plays an important role in this interrelation, orchestrating both the periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus pathogeny and complications. Conversely, periodontal disease--infectious disease characterized by a significant inflammatory component--can seriously impair metabolic control of some diabetic patient. Moreover, treatment of periodontal disease and reduction of oral signs of inflammation may have a beneficial result on the diabetic condition (1). Less clear are the mechanisms governing this interrelation (even the literature is abundant in this direction), and, very probably, periodontal diseases serve as initiators of insulin resistance (in a way similar to obesity), thereby aggravating glycemic control. Further research is so imposed in order to clarify this aspect of the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease. PMID:18293711

  4. Assignment of Dental School Patients Using Periodontal Treatment Need Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mubarak, Ala

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Periodontal Treatment Need System and the Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need as screening tests for allocation of patients to dental students was assessed and compared. Sixty-one patients reporting to the Department of Periodontology at the University of Oslo were studied. (MLW)

  5. Identification of biomarkers for periodontal disease using the immunoproteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P.; Mohammad, Sani; Alias, Muhamad Shaifunizam; Mu, Alan Kang-Wai; Vaithilingam, Rathna Devi; Baharuddin, Nor Adinar; Safii, Syarida H.; Abdul Rahman, Zainal Ariff; Chen, Yu Nieng

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is one of the most common oral diseases associated with the host’s immune response against periodontopathogenic infection. Failure to accurately diagnose the stage of periodontitis has limited the ability to predict disease status. Therefore, we aimed to look for reliable diagnostic markers for detection or differentiation of early stage periodontitis using the immunoprotemic approach. Method In the present study, patient serum samples from four distinct stages of periodontitis (i.e., mild chronic, moderate chronic, severe chronic, and aggressive) and healthy controls were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), followed by silver staining. Notably, we consistently identified 14 protein clusters in the sera of patients and normal controls. Results Overall, we found that protein levels were comparable between patients and controls, with the exception of the clusters corresponding to A1AT, HP, IGKC and KNG1 (p < 0.05). In addition, the immunogenicity of these proteins was analysed via immunoblotting, which revealed differential profiles for periodontal disease and controls. For this reason, IgM obtained from severe chronic periodontitis (CP) sera could be employed as a suitable autoantibody for the detection of periodontitis. Discussion Taken together, the present study suggests that differentially expressed host immune response proteins could be used as potential biomarkers for screening periodontitis. Future studies exploring the diagnostic potential of such factors are warranted.

  6. Periodontal Disease Is an Independent Predictor of Intracardiac Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Pressman, Gregg S.; Qasim, Atif; Verma, Nitin; Arishiro, Kumiko; Notohara, Yasuhiro; Crudu, Vitalie; Figueredo, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Periodontitis is the most common chronic inflammatory condition worldwide and is associated with incident coronary disease. Hypothesis. We hypothesized that periodontal disease would also be associated with cardiac calcification, a condition which shares many risk factors with atherosclerosis and is considered a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods. Cross-sectional study at two sites (USA and Japan) involving subjects with both clinical echocardiograms and detailed dental examinations. Semiquantitative scoring systems were used to assess severity of periodontal disease and echocardiographic calcification. Results. Fifty-six of 73 subjects (77%) had cardiac calcifications, and 51% had moderate to severe periodontal disease (score > 2). In unadjusted analysis, a significant relationship between periodontal score and cardiac calcification (Spearman rho = 0.4, P = 0.001) was noted, with increases in mean calcification score seen across increasing levels of periodontal disease. On multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, race, glomerular filtration rate, and traditional risk factors, this association remained significant (P = 0.024). There was no significant interaction by study site, race, or gender. Conclusions. In a multiracial population, we found a significant association between the degree of periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory condition, and cardiac calcification. Further, higher periodontal scores were associated with greater degrees of calcification. PMID:24106721

  7. Global oral health inequalities: task group--periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, L J; Armitage, G C; Klinge, B; Lang, N P; Tonetti, M; Williams, R C

    2011-05-01

    Periodontal diseases constitute one of the major global oral health burdens, and periodontitis remains a major cause of tooth loss in adults worldwide. The World Health Organization recently reported that severe periodontitis exists in 5-20% of adult populations, and most children and adolescents exhibit signs of gingivitis. Likely reasons to account for these prevalent diseases include genetic, epigenetic, and environmental risk factors, as well as individual and socio-economic determinants. Currently, there are fundamental gaps in knowledge of such fundamental issues as the mechanisms of initiation and progression of periodontal diseases, which are undefined; inability to identify high-risk forms of gingivitis that progress to periodontitis; lack of evidence on how to prevent the diseases effectively; inability to detect disease activity and predict treatment efficacy; and limited information on the effects of integration of periodontal health as a part of the health care program designed to promote general health and prevent chronic diseases. In the present report, 12 basic, translational, and applied research areas have been proposed to address the issue of global periodontal health inequality. We believe that the oral health burden caused by periodontal diseases could be relieved significantly in the near future through an effective global collaboration. PMID:21490234

  8. Periodontal disease in children and adolescents of Latin America.

    PubMed

    Botero, Javier E; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Duque, Andres; Jaramillo, Adriana; Contreras, Adolfo

    2015-02-01

    Periodontal diseases are a group of infectious diseases that mainly include gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis is the most prevalent form of periodontal disease in subjects of all ages, including children and adolescents. Less frequent types of periodontal disease include aggressive periodontitis, acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and various diseases of herpesviral and fungal origin. This review aimed to retrieve relevant information from Latin America on the prevalence of periodontal diseases among children and adolescents of the region. Gingivitis was detected in 35% of young Latin American subjects and showed the highest frequencies in Colombia (77%) and Bolivia (73%) and the lowest frequency in Mexico (23%). The frequency of gingivitis in subjects from other Latin American countries was between 31% and 56%. Periodontitis may affect <10% of the young population in Latin America, but the data are based on only a few studies. A more precise assessment of the distribution and severity of periodontal disease in children and adolescents of Latin America may help policy makers and dentists to institute more effective public health measures to prevent and treat the disease at an early age to avoid major damage to the permanent dentition. PMID:25494597

  9. Decellularized periodontal ligament cell sheets with recellularization potential.

    PubMed

    Farag, A; Vaquette, C; Theodoropoulos, C; Hamlet, S M; Hutmacher, D W; Ivanovski, S

    2014-12-01

    The periodontal ligament is the key tissue facilitating periodontal regeneration. This study aimed to fabricate decellularized human periodontal ligament cell sheets for subsequent periodontal tissue engineering applications. The decellularization protocol involved the transfer of intact human periodontal ligament cell sheets onto melt electrospun polycaprolactone membranes and subsequent bi-directional perfusion with NH4OH/Triton X-100 and DNase solutions. The protocol was shown to remove 92% of DNA content. The structural integrity of the decellularized cell sheets was confirmed by a collagen quantification assay, immunostaining of human collagen type I and fibronectin, and scanning electron microscopy. ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of residual basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the decellularized cell sheet constructs. The decellularized cell sheets were shown to have the ability to support recellularization by allogenic human periodontal ligament cells. This study describes the fabrication of decellularized periodontal ligament cell sheets that retain an intact extracellular matrix and resident growth factors and can support repopulation by allogenic cells. The decellularized hPDL cell sheet concept has the potential to be utilized in future "off-the-shelf" periodontal tissue engineering strategies. PMID:25270757

  10. Periodontal Disease and Oral Hygiene Among Children. United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Statistical data presented on periodontal disease and oral hygiene among noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States are based on a probability sample of approximately 7,400 children involved in a national health survey during 1963-65. The report contains estimates of the Periodontal Index (PI) and the Simplified Oral Hygiene…

  11. Pyrosequencing Analysis of Subgingival Microbiota in Distinct Periodontal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, O-J; Yi, H; Jeon, J H; Kang, S-S; Koo, K-T; Kum, K-Y; Chun, J; Yun, C-H; Han, S H

    2015-07-01

    Subgingival microorganisms are potentially associated with periodontal diseases. However, changes in the subgingival microbiota during the progress of periodontal diseases are poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed bacterial communities in the subgingival paper point samples from 32 Korean individuals with no sign of disease, gingivitis, or periodontitis using 454 FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. A total of 256,113 reads representing 26 phyla, 433 genera, and 1,016 species were detected. Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Synergistetes, and Spirochaetes were the abundant phyla in periodontitis subjects, whereas Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were identified as the dominant phyla in the gingivitis and healthy subjects, respectively. Although high levels of Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Fretibacterium, Rothia, Filifactor, and Treponema genera were observed in the periodontitis subjects, Streptococcus, Capnocytophaga, Leptotrichia, and Haemophilus genera were found at high frequency in the gingivitis subjects. Species including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Fretibacterium fastidiosum were significantly increased in periodontitis subjects. On the other hand, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, and Leptotrichia hongkongensis were preferentially observed in the gingivitis subjects. Intriguingly, the halophile Halomonas hamiltonii was revealed as a predominant species in the healthy subjects. Based on Fast UniFrac analysis, distinctive bacterial clusters were classified for the healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis state. The current findings might be useful for understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal diseases. PMID:25904141

  12. [Pathogenetic mechanisms in the treatment of periodontitis using xenogeneic peritoneum].

    PubMed

    Borovskiĭ, E V; Volozhin, A I; Lavrova, V S; Seksenova, L Sh

    1990-01-01

    Water-free cattle parietal peritoneum was used in surgical treatment of 62 patients with severe periodontitis. Use of xenoperitoneum in multiple-modality treatment of periodontitis was conducive to bone tissue regeneration in bone pockets, to a more rapid recovery of gingival temperature round incisors and molars. PMID:2389266

  13. Guiding periodontal pocket recolonization: a proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Teughels, W; Newman, M G; Coucke, W; Haffajee, A D; Van Der Mei, H C; Haake, S Kinder; Schepers, E; Cassiman, J-J; Van Eldere, J; van Steenberghe, D; Quirynen, M

    2007-11-01

    The complexity of the periodontal microbiota resembles that of the gastro-intestinal tract, where infectious diseases are treatable via probiotics. In the oropharyngeal region, probiotic or replacement therapies have shown some benefit in the prevention of dental caries, otitis media, and pharyngitis, but their effectiveness in the treatment of periodontitis is unknown. Therefore, this study addressed the hypothesis that the application of selected beneficial bacteria, as an adjunct to scaling and root planing, would inhibit the periodontopathogen recolonization of periodontal pockets. Analysis of the data showed, in a beagle dog model, that when beneficial bacteria were applied in periodontal pockets adjunctively after root planing, subgingival recolonization of periodontopathogens was delayed and reduced, as was the degree of inflammation, at a clinically significant level. The study confirmed the hypothesis and provides a proof of concept for a guided pocket recolonization (GPR) approach in the treatment of periodontitis. PMID:17959900

  14. Utility of Periodontal exploration in patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Santos-García, Rocío; Sánchez-Domínguez, Benito; Cordero, Mario D.; Rios-Santos, José V.; Jaramillo-Santos, María R.; Climent, Mariano H.

    2012-01-01

    Objetive: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology, which affects predominantly women. Mitochondrial alteration could have a role in the pathophysilogical mechanisms of inflammatory conditions as FM and periodontitis. The aim of the present study was assay the relationship between both diseases and mitochondrial dysfunction. Patient and Methods: We study the presence of periodontitis in twelve patients diagnosed of FM and mitochondrial dysfunction described. The diagnosis of FM was established according to ACR criteria and clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results: Only one patients of twelve included and agreed to participate in the study were diagnosed with periodontitis. Conclusions: Pending studies with larger numbers of patients, we can conclude that mitochondrial dysfunction in FM is a itself event not related with periodontitis. Periodontitis could be considered a exclusion criterion in all studies about mitochondrial dysfunction in patients. Key words:Peridontitis, fibromyalgia, mitocondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress. PMID:24558523

  15. Laser phototherapy in the treatment of periodontal disease. A review.

    PubMed

    de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa; Ramalho, Karen Müller; Simões, Alyne; Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Tunér, Jan

    2010-11-01

    Many studies in the literature address the effect of low-power lasers in the management of pathologies related to periodontal tissues. Due to the lack of standardized information and the absence of a consensus, this review presents the current status of laser phototherapy (LPT) in periodontics and discusses its benefits and limits in the treatment of periodontal disease. The literature was searched for reviews and original research articles relating to LPT and periodontal disease. The articles were selected using either electronic search engines or manual tracing of the references cited in key papers. The literature search retrieved references on wound and bone healing, analgesia, hypersensitivity, inflammatory process and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy. Each topic is individually addressed in this review. The current literature suggests that LPT is effective in modulating different periodontal disease aspects in vitro, in animals, and in simple clinical models. Further development of this therapy is now dependent on new clinical trials with more complex study designs. PMID:20640471

  16. [Oxidative stress and antioxitant therapy of chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Y X; Guo, S J; Wu, Y F

    2016-07-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a progressive, infectious inflammation disease, caused by the dysbiosis of oral resident flora, leading to the destruction of periodontium. The onset of pathogenic microorganisms is the etiological factor of periodontitis, while the immuno-inflammatory response affects the progression of the disease. Under chronic periodontitis, oxidative stress occurs when excessive reactive oxygen species are produced and exceed the compensative capacity of the organism. Oxidative stress leads to the destruction of periodontium, in a direct way(damaging the biomolecule) or an indirect way(enhancing the produce of inflammatory cytokine and destructive enzymes). Therefore, as the antagonist of the reactive oxygen species, antioxidants may be helpful to treat the chronic periodontitis. This paper reviewed relevant literatures about the destructive role of excessive reactive oxygen species and protective role of antioxidants in chronic periodontitis. PMID:27480437

  17. Diagnostic Applications of Cone-Beam CT for Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    AlJehani, Yousef A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This paper aims to review the diagnostic application of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the field of periodontology. Data. Original articles that reported on the use of CBCT for periodontal disease diagnosis were included. Sources. MEDLINE (1990 to January 2014), PubMed (using medical subject headings), and Google Scholar were searched using the following terms in different combinations: “CBCT,” “volumetric CT,” “periodontal disease ,” and “periodontitis.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Conclusions. Bony defects, caters, and furcation involvements seem to be better depicted on CBCT, whereas bone quality and periodontal ligament space scored better on conventional intraoral radiography. CBCT does not offer a significant advantage over conventional radiography for assessing the periodontal bone levels. PMID:24803932

  18. Repair potential in localized juvenile periodontitis. A case in point.

    PubMed

    Mattout, P; Moskow, B S; Fourel, J

    1990-10-01

    An aggressive form of localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) in a 12-year old West African female is reported. The case was treated with scaling, root planing, debridement, and tetracycline therapy, which resulted in complete resolution of the disease, including elimination of periodontal inflammation, regeneration of lost periodontal structures, and spontaneous repositioning of teeth that had pathologically migrated. A hopelessly involved mandibular right first molar was successfully replaced by an incompletely developed maxillary third molar tooth bud whose roots and pulp structure continued to develop after autotransplantation. It is suggested, that LJP can be successfully treated without periodontal surgery and that the potential for repair in LJP cases is apparently greater than what one can anticipate in adult forms of periodontitis. PMID:2231233

  19. The Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba Gingivalis in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Maybodi, Fahimeh; Haerian Ardakani, Ahmad; Fattahi Bafghi, Ali; Haerian Ardakani, Alireza; Zafarbakhsh, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Trichomonas tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis are commensal protozoa which inhabit the human oral cavity. These parasites are found in patients with poor oral hygiene and might be a reason for progressive periodontal diseases. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on the frequency of these protozoa in saliva and plaque samples. Materials and Method In this clinical trial, samples of saliva and dental plaque were collected from 46 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy. The samples were assessed for the frequency of parasites. Results The frequency of Entamoeba gingivalis was reduced in saliva (p= 0.007) and plaque (p= 0.027) three weeks after the treatment. Likewise, the frequency of Trichomonas tenax reduced in saliva (p= 0.030); however, the decrease was not significant in plaque (p= 0.913). Trichomonas tenax frequency in dental plaque directly related to the severity of periodontitis (r= 0.565, p≤ 0.000). In contrast, the number of Entamoeba gingivalis in both saliva (r= -0.405, p≤ 0.005) and plaque (r= -0.304, p= 0.040) was inversely related with the severity of the periodontal disease. Conclusion Nonsurgical periodontal treatment could reduce the number of Trichomonas Tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis in the oral environment of patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:27602391

  20. 16S rRNA based microarray analysis of ten periodontal bacteria in patients with different forms of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Topcuoglu, Nursen; Kulekci, Guven

    2015-10-01

    DNA microarray analysis is a computer based technology, that a reverse capture, which targets 10 periodontal bacteria (ParoCheck) is available for rapid semi-quantitative determination. The aim of this three-year retrospective study was to display the microarray analysis results for the subgingival biofilm samples taken from patient cases diagnosed with different forms of periodontitis. A total of 84 patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP,n:29), generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP, n:25), peri-implantitis (PI,n:14), localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP,n:8) and refractory chronic periodontitis (RP,n:8) were consecutively selected from the archives of the Oral Microbiological Diagnostic Laboratory. The subgingival biofilm samples were analyzed by the microarray-based identification of 10 selected species. All the tested species were detected in the samples. The red complex bacteria were the most prevalent with very high levels in all groups. Fusobacterium nucleatum was detected in all samples at high levels. The green and blue complex bacteria were less prevalent compared with red and orange complex, except Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitas was detected in all LAP group. Positive correlations were found within all the red complex bacteria and between red and orange complex bacteria especially in GCP and GAP groups. Parocheck enables to monitoring of periodontal pathogens in all forms of periodontal disease and can be alternative to other guiding and reliable microbiologic tests. PMID:25638399

  1. Are Putative Periodontal Pathogens Reliable Diagnostic Markers?▿

    PubMed Central

    Riep, Birgit; Edesi-Neuß, Lilian; Claessen, Friderike; Skarabis, Horst; Ehmke, Benjamin; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Bernimoulin, Jean-Pierre; Göbel, Ulf B.; Moter, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases. A number of putative bacterial pathogens have been associated with the disease and are used as diagnostic markers. In the present study, we compared the prevalence of oral bacterial species in the subgingival biofilm of generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) (n = 44) and chronic periodontitis (CP) (n = 46) patients with that of a periodontitis-resistant control group (PR) (n = 21). The control group consisted of subjects at least 65 years of age with only minimal or no periodontitis and no history of periodontal treatment. A total of 555 samples from 111 subjects were included in this study. The samples were analyzed by PCR of 16S rRNA gene fragments and subsequent dot blot hybridization using oligonucleotide probes specific for Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, a Treponema denticola-like phylogroup (Treponema phylogroup II), Treponema lecithinolyticum, Campylobacter rectus, Fusobacterium spp., and Fusobacterium nucleatum, as well as Capnocytophaga ochracea. Our data confirm a high prevalence of the putative periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, and T. forsythia in the periodontitis groups. However, these species were also frequently detected in the PR group. For most of the species tested, the prevalence was more associated with increased probing depth than with the subject group. T. lecithinolyticum was the only periodontopathogenic species showing significant differences both between GAP and CP patients and between GAP patients and PR subjects. C. ochracea was associated with the PR subjects, regardless of the probing depth. These results indicate that T. lecithinolyticum may be a diagnostic marker for GAP and C. ochracea for periodontal health. They also suggest that current presumptions of the association of specific bacteria with periodontal health and disease require further

  2. Higher prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in deeper periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ayako; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis, a complex chronic inflammatory disease caused by subgingival infection, is among the most prevalent microbial diseases in humans. Although traditional microbiological research on periodontitis has focused on putative bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, the herpes virus is proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis because bacterial etiology alone does not adequately explain various clinical aspects. In this study, we established for the first time, more Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA is found deeper in periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients. Subgingival samples were collected from 85 patients with chronic periodontitis having two periodontal sites with probing depths (PD) of ≤ 3 mm (shallow) or ≥ 5 mm (deep) and were subjected to a nested polymerase chain reaction. EBV DNA was more frequently detected in patients with deeper PD sites (66%) than in those with shallow PD sites (48%) or healthy controls (45%). Coexistence of EBV DNA and P. gingivalis was significantly higher in patients with deeper PD sites (40%) than in those with shallow PD sites (14%) or healthy controls (13%). Although no difference in clinical index for periodontitis, the odds ratio of EBV DNA in patients with deeper PD sites was 2.36, which was 2.07-fold higher than that in those with shallow PD sites. Interestingly, the odds of acquiring chronic periodontitis (PD ≥ 5 mm) were higher in the presence of both EBV DNA and P. gingivalis compared with either EBV DNA or P. gingivalis only. In addition, we also observed that EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) in positive cells of human gingival tissues. These results would suggest that EBV DNA may serve as a pathogenic factor leading to chronic periodontitis among Japanese patients. PMID:23991022

  3. Chronic Periodontitis in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Oxidative Stress as a Common Factor in Periodontal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijayetha P.; Gokhale, Neeraja; Acharya, Anirudh; Kangokar, Praveenchandra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of periodontitis is significantly higher among people with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. Majority of tissue destruction in periodontitis is considered to be the result of an aberrant inflammatory/immune response to microbial plaque and involve prolonged release of reactive oxygen species (ROS). There is increased evidence for compromised antioxidant capacity in periodontal tissues and fluids which may be an added factor for tissue damage in periodontitis. Aim To study the possible role of Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant status in blood among chronic periodontitis patients with and without Type 2 Diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods The study comprised of total 100 subjects among which 25 were normal healthy controls, 25 were gingivitis patients, 25 were chronic periodontitis patients (CP) and 25 were having chronic periodontitis with type 2 diabetes (CP with DM). ROS levels were determined as MDA (Malondialdehyde) and antioxidant status as plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC), vitamin C and erythrocyte Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activity. Results There was significant increase in MDA levels in all the patient groups compared with healthy controls (p<0.05). The decrease in TAC, Vitamin C and SOD levels among CP with DM patients as compared to controls was highly significant (p<0.01). There was a positive correlation between the probing pocket depth and MDA levels among periodontitis patients with diabetes (r=0.566, p=0.003). Conclusion There is increased oxidative stress in chronic periodontitis with and without type 2 diabetes indicating a common factor involvement in tissue damage. More severe tissue destruction in periodontitis is associated with excessive ROS generation which is positively correlated in type 2 diabetic subjects. PMID:27190790

  4. Quantitative PCR analysis of salivary pathogen burden in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Aino; Kopra, K. A. Elisa; Hyvärinen, Kati; Paju, Susanna; Mäntylä, Päivi; Buhlin, Kåre; Nieminen, Markku S.; Sinisalo, Juha; Pussinen, Pirkko J.

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the value of salivary concentrations of four major periodontal pathogens and their combination in diagnostics of periodontitis. The Parogene study included 462 dentate subjects (mean age 62.9 ± 9.2 years) with coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis who underwent an extensive clinical and radiographic oral examination. Salivary levels of four major periodontal bacteria were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Median salivary concentrations of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, as well as the sum of the concentrations of the four bacteria, were higher in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis compared to subjects with no to mild periodontitis. Median salivary Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans concentrations did not differ significantly between the subjects with no to mild periodontitis and subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, and the number of teeth and implants, high salivary concentrations of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. intermedia were significantly associated with moderate to severe periodontitis. When looking at different clinical and radiographic parameters of periodontitis, high concentrations of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were significantly associated with the number of 4–5 mm periodontal pockets, ≥6 mm pockets, and alveolar bone loss (ABL). High level of T. forsythia was associated also with bleeding on probing (BOP). The combination of the four bacteria, i.e., the bacterial burden index, was associated with moderate to severe periodontitis with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.40 (95% CI 1.39–4.13). When A. actinomycetemcomitans was excluded from the combination of the bacteria, the OR was improved to 2.61 (95% CI 1.51–4.52). The highest OR 3.59 (95% CI 1.94–6.63) was achieved when P. intermedia was further excluded from the combination and only the levels of P. gingivalis and

  5. Periodontal Disease Awareness and Knowledge among Nigerian Primary School Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Azodo, CC; Umoh, AO

    2015-01-01

    Background: Teacher-led oral health education is equally effective in improving the oral health knowledge and oral hygiene status of adolescents as dentist-led and peer-led strategies. Aim: The aim was to determine periodontal disease awareness and knowledge among Nigerian primary school teachers. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among primary school teachers in Edo State, Nigeria. A self-administered questionnaire which elicited information on demography, awareness of the periodontal disease and source of information, knowledge of etiology, and symptoms of the periodontal disease, was the data collection tool.. The test of association was done using either Chi-square or Fisher's exact statistics. P value was set at 0.05 for significance level. Results: Out of 180 teachers recruited from seven public primary schools in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria, 151 of them fully participated by filling the study questionnaires giving a 83.9% (151/180) response rate. The majority 74.2% (112/151) of the participants reported having heard of the periodontal disease and the leading source of information was television. A total of 29.8% (45/151) of participants considered periodontal disease as the main cause of tooth loss among adult Nigerian. Only 12.6% (19/151) of the participants knew dental plaque as soft debris on teeth and 29.1% (44/151) attested that plaque can cause periodontal disease. The majority of the participants were not aware of age 81.5% (123/151) and gender 96.7% (146/151) predisposition to periodontal disease. The perceived manifestations of the periodontal disease reported by were mainly gum bleeding 35.1% (53/151) and swollen gum 20.5% (31/151). A total of 70.2% (106/151) of the participants considered periodontal disease as a preventable disease and about half 49.0% (74/151) of the participants considered daily mouth cleaning as the best preventive method. The majority 95.4% (144/151) of the participants expressed interest in

  6. Photodynamic dosimetry in the treatment of periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Roger C.; Loebel, Nicolas G.; Andersen, Dane M.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been demonstrated to effectively kill human periopathogens in vitro. However, the translation of in vitro work to in vivo clinical efficacy has been difficult due to the number of variables present in any given patient. Parameters such as photosensitizer concentration, duration of light therapy and amount of light delivered to the target tissue all play a role in the dose response of PDT in vivo. In this 121 patient study we kept all parameters the same except for light dose which was delivered at either 150 mW or 220 mW. This clearly demonstrated the clinical benefits of a higher light dose in the treatment of periodontitis.

  7. OCT for diagnosis of periodontal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Colston, B.W., LLNL

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a hand-held in vivo scanning device for use in the oral cavity. We produced, using this scanning device, in vivo OCT images of dental tissues in human volunteers. All the OCT images were analyzed for the presence of clinically relevant anatomical structures. The gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction were visible in all the images. The cemento-enamel junction was discernible in 64% of the images and the alveolar bone presumptively identified for 71% of the images. These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in vivo OCT images of human dental tissue.

  8. Polybacterial Periodontal Pathogens Alter Vascular and Gut BH4/nNOS/NRF2-Phase II Enzyme Expression.

    PubMed

    Gangula, Pandu; Ravella, Kalpana; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Rivera, Mercedes; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Hale, Ashley; Channon, Keith; Southerland, Janet; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent chronic inflammatory disease and is associated with complex microbial infection in the subgingival cavity. Recently, American Heart Association supported a century old association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. We have recently shown that polybacterial periodontal infection led to aortic atherosclerosis and modulation of lipid profiles; however the underlying mechanism(s) has not been yet demonstrated. Altered nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor for nitric oxide synthases (NOS) has long been shown to be associated with vascular dysfunction and gastrointestinal motility disorders. We sought to examine the mechanism of periodontal infection leading to altered vascular and gastrointestinal smooth muscle relaxation, focusing on the BH4/nNOS pathways. In addition, we also have investigated how the antioxidant system (NRF2-Phase II enzyme expression) in vascular and GI specimens is altered by oral infection. Eight week old male ApoEnull mice were either sham-infected or infected orally for 16 weeks with a mixture of major periodontal bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia to induce experimental periodontitis. Serum, vascular (mesenteric), stomach, and colon specimens were collected at the end of periodontal pathogen infection. Bacterial infection induced significant (p<0.05) reductions in the levels of BH4,in ratio of BH4:BH2+B and also in nitric oxide levels compared to sham-infected controls. In addition, we identified a significant (p<0.05) reduction in eNOS dimerization, nNOS dimerization and protein expression of BH4 biosynthesis enzymes; GCH-1, DHFR and NRF2 & Phase II enzymes in infected mice versus controls in both mesenteric artery and colon tissues. However, we found no differences in nNOS/BH4 protein expression in stomach tissues of infected and sham-infected mice. This suggests that a polybacterial infection

  9. Association of periodontal status with liver abnormalities and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aisyah; Furuta, Michiko; Shinagawa, Takashi; Takeuchi, Kenji; Takeshita, Toru; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Although an association between periodontal status and liver abnormalities has been reported, it has not been described in relation to metabolic syndrome (MetS), which often coexists with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We examined the association of a combination of liver abnormality and MetS with periodontal condition in Japanese adults, based on the level of alcohol consumption. In 2008, 4,207 males aged 45.4 ± 8.9 years and 1,270 females aged 45.9 ± 9.7 years had annual workplace health check-ups at a company in Japan. Periodontal status was represented as periodontal pocket depth at the mesio-buccal and mid-buccal sites for all teeth. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and metabolic components were examined. Multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant association between deep pocket depth and the coexistence of elevated ALT and MetS in males with low alcohol consumption. Females showed no such relationship. In conclusion, the association between periodontal condition and the combination of elevated ALT and MetS was confirmed in males. That is, a clear association between liver abnormalities and periodontal condition was seen in male subjects with no or low alcohol consumption and MetS, providing new insights into the connection between liver function and periodontal health. PMID:26666857

  10. Plasmin is essential in preventing periodontitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sulniute, Rima; Lindh, Tomas; Wilczynska, Malgorzata; Li, Jinan; Ny, Tor

    2011-08-01

    Periodontitis involves bacterial infection, inflammation of the periodontium, degradation of gum tissue, and alveolar bone resorption, which eventually leads to loss of teeth. To study the role of the broad-spectrum protease plasmin in periodontitis, we examined the oral health of plasminogen (Plg)-deficient mice. In wild-type mice, the periodontium was unaffected at all time points studied; in Plg-deficient mice, periodontitis progressed rapidly, within 20 weeks. Morphological study results of Plg-deficient mice revealed detachment of gingival tissue, resorption of the cementum layer, formation of necrotic tissue, and severe alveolar bone degradation. IHC staining showed massive infiltration of neutrophils in the periodontal tissues. Interestingly, doubly deficient mice, lacking both tissue- and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, developed periodontal disease similar to that in Plg-deficient mice; however, mice lacking only tissue- or urokinase-type plasminogen activator remained healthy. Supplementation by injection of Plg-deficient mice with human plasminogen for 10 days led to necrotic tissue absorption, inflammation subsidence, and full regeneration of gum tissues. Notably, there was also partial regrowth of degraded alveolar bone. Taken together, our results show that plasminogen is essential for the maintenance of a healthy periodontium and plays an important role in combating the spontaneous development of chronic periodontitis. Moreover, reversal to healthy status after supplementation of Plg-deficient mice with plasminogen suggests the possibility of using plasminogen for therapy of periodontal diseases. PMID:21704601

  11. Pulpal disease and bursts of periodontal attachment loss.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, R S; Clarke, N G

    1993-11-01

    Progression of periodontitis is currently thought to occur during bursts of activity, followed by periods of remission, when healing may occur. This concept contrasts with the older hypothesis that periodontitis was continuously, but slowly, progressive throughout life. At present, there is no proof of the conventional (microbiological) hypothesis which gives a major role to site-specific bacteria in the initiation of bursts of attachment loss. An alternative hypothesis is presented in this paper which accounts for periodontal attachment loss by pathways that are independent of plaque. Severe lesions of the periodontium caused by pulpal pathoses (apical and retrograde periodontitis) are known to form at any level of the periodontium, not only at the root apex. When these lesions cause destruction of the periodontal tissues at the alveolar crest, and when plaque, calculus and gingivitis are also present, an endodontic origin is rarely suspected. Three pathways are proposed to account for the development of localized periodontal attachment loss consequent to pulpal disease. This hypothesis accounts for the sudden deterioration of periodontal sites under regular review, the strict localization of alveolar defects with normal alveolar bone immediately adjacent, the presence of site-specific bacteria (secondary colonizers of deep pockets) which cannot cause disease when transferred to healthy sites, and the antibody responses directed against them. PMID:8144246

  12. Effect of vitamin D and calcium on periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hildebolt, Charles F

    2005-09-01

    The anthropological record indicates that we are exposed to considerably less ultraviolet radiation (required for the synthesis of vitamin D) and consume considerably less calcium than did our early ancestors. Most U.S. citizens have calcium intakes and serum levels of vitamin D far below recommended values. This is despite there having been extensive evidence that optimal calcium and vitamin D intakes not only benefit our postcranial bone health but also have many other health benefits. Numerous articles indicate that vitamin D and calcium deficiencies result in bone loss and increased inflammation, which are well recognized symptoms of periodontal disease. For more than 40 years, investigators have suggested that calcium intake may be associated with alveolar bone resorption, and more recently there have been a number of studies in which investigators have suggested that calcium and vitamin D may benefit periodontal health, and it has been suggested that calcium deficiency may be a risk factor for periodontal disease. There has not, however, been a vitamin-D-calcium-periodontitis clinical trial in which randomization and masking were carefully controlled, the periodontal disease status of patients known, periodontal disease measures were the primary outcomes, and levels of intake optimized to produce maximal effects. Such research might demonstrate that calcium and vitamin D are important adjuncts to standard treatments for preventing and treating periodontal disease. PMID:16171451

  13. Secondhand Smoke and Periodontal Disease: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Gary D.; Beck, James D.; Ágústsdóttir, Helga

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the relationship between secondhand smoke and periodontal disease in nonsmokers. Methods. We undertook a cross-sectional analysis of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study with 2739 lifetime nonsmokers aged 53–74 years, unexposed to other sources of tobacco, who received a complete periodontal examination at visit 4. Exposure was reported as average hours per week in close contact with a smoker in the preceding year. We defined severe periodontitis as 5 or more periodontal sites with probing pocket depth of 5 millimeters or more and clinical attachment levels of 3 millimeters or more in those sites. Other outcomes were extent of periodontal probing depths of 4 millimeters or more and extent of clinical attachment levels of 3 millimeters or more. Results. In a binary logistic regression model, adjusted odds of severe periodontitis for those exposed to secondhand smoke 1 to 25 hours per week increased 29% (95% confidence interval = 1.0, 1.7); for those exposed to secondhand smoke 26 hours per week, the odds were twice as high (95% confidence interval = 1.2, 3.4) as for those who were unexposed. Conclusions. Exposure to secondhand smoke and severe periodontitis among nonsmokers had a dose-dependent relationship. PMID:21551377

  14. Membranes for Periodontal Regeneration--A Materials Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Marco C; Thomas, Vinoy

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting nearly 50% of adults in the United States. If left untreated, it can lead to the destruction of both soft and mineralized tissues that constitute the periodontium. Clinical management, including but not limited to flap debridement and/or curettage, as well as regenerative-based strategies with periodontal membranes associated or not with grafting materials, has been used with distinct levels of success. Unquestionably, no single implantable biomaterial can consistently guide the coordinated growth and development of multiple tissue types, especially in very large periodontal defects. With the global aging population, it is extremely important to find novel biomaterials, particularly bioactive membranes and/or scaffolds, for guided tissue (GTR) and bone regeneration (GBR) to aid in the reestablishment of the health and function of distinct periodontal tissues. This chapter offers an update on the evolution of biomaterials (i.e. membranes and bioactive scaffolds) as well as material-based strategies applied in periodontal regeneration. The authors start by providing a brief summary of the histological characteristics and functions of the periodontium and its main pathological condition, namely periodontitis. Next, a review of commercially available GTR/GBR membranes is given, followed by a critical appraisal of the most recent advances in the development of bioactive materials that enhance the chance for clinical success of periodontal tissue regeneration. PMID:26201279

  15. Tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Dabra, Sarita; Chhina, Kamalpreet; Soni, Nitin; Bhatnagar, Rakhi

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a major public health issue and the development of effective therapies to treat the disease and regenerate periodontal tissue is an important goal of today's medicine. Regeneration of periodontal tissue is perhaps one of the most complex process to occur in the body. Langer and colleagues proposed tissue engineering as a possible technique for regenerating the lost periodontal tissues. Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field, which involves the application of the principles and methods of engineering and life sciences to help in the development of biological substitutes to restore, maintain or improve the function of damaged tissues and organs. A Google/Medline search was conducted and relevant literature evaluating the potential role of the tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration, which included histological studies and controlled clinical trials, was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal regeneration were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicate tissue engineering to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. The purpose behind writing this brief review has been to integrate the evidence of research related to tissue engineering so as to implement them in our daily practice. PMID:23559940

  16. Periodontitis progession in patients subjected to supportive maintenance care.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Leif; Lagervall, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance care following the initial active therapy phase plays an essential part in periodontal treatment to prevent disease progression and includes supportive periodontal therapy based on the patient's individual needs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the longitudinal proximal alveolar bone loss and tooth loss in periodontitis-prone patients during the active treatment and maintenance phase. In addition, the effect on disease progression of potential predictors was investigated. The investigation was conducted as a retrospective longitudinal study over a period of at least 10 years on a randomly selected population of patients referred for periodontal treatment in a specialist periodontal clinic. The mean number of teeth lost between baseline and the first re-evaluation was 2.4 and another 2.3 teeth were lost between the first and last re-evaluation. More than 50% of the periodontal pockets > or = 6 mm were reduced to < or = 5 mm at the re-evaluations. The mean longitudinal bone loss was 9% of the root length, corresponding to a mean annual marginal bone loss of about 0.09 mm. Smoking was significantly correlated to an increased longitudinal tooth loss, while the number of periodontal pockets > or = 6 mm at baseline was significantly correlated to an increased longitudinal bone loss. The magnitudes of marginal bone loss and tooth loss during a maintenance phase of 10-26 years were in accordance with the results from longitudinal studies performed on normal populations in Sweden. PMID:18973081

  17. Evaluation of TLR2 and 4 in Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Arulpari; Parthasarathy, Harinath; Katamreddy, Vineela; Subbareddy, Venkat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodontal disease is the major cause of adult tooth loss and is commonly characterized by a chronic inflammation caused by infection due to oral bacteria. Members of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) family recognize conserved microbial structures, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharides and activate signalling pathways that result in immune responses against microbial infections. Aim The aim of the present study was to assess the mRNA expression of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and 4 in tissues with or without chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods Gingival tissue samples were collected from controls (30 subjects with healthy periodontal tissues) and experimental group (30 subjects with chronic periodontitis). Total RNA was extracted and RT-PCR was done for evaluation of TLR-2 and TLR-4. Mann Whitney U-test, Pearson Chi-square Test was used for statistics. Results The results showed that there is a significant (p-value= 0.004) association between TLR-4 and the experimental group comprising of chronic periodontitis patients in comparison to the insignificant (p-value= 0.085) TLR-2 expression. Conclusion This study concludes that TLR-2 and TLR-4 expressed in the gingival tissues recognize different bacterial cell wall components thus helping us to associate its potential in diagnosing periodontal disease. Hence, in the future, these scientific findings can pave the way in using TLR as a diagnostic biomarker for periodontal disease. PMID:27504418

  18. Immunolocalization of Ki-67 in different periodontal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Preethi, Penubolu Lakshmi; Rao, Suresh Rango; Madapusi, Balaji Thodur; Narasimhan, Malathi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ki-67 which is a non-histone nuclear protein which is expressed in proliferating cells, during all the active phases of the cell cycle. Increased Ki-67 expression has been seen in several inflammatory and malignant conditions like diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, pancreatitis and squamous cell carcinoma. Aim: The aim of the present study is to analyze the expression of Ki-67 in gingival tissues by immunohistochemistry in smokers and non-smokers with healthy gingiva and chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Gingival biopsies (n = 32) were obtained from smokers who had clinically healthy gingiva (n = 8), smokers with periodontitis (n = 8), chronic periodontitis (n = 8) and healthy gingiva (n = 8). The expression of Ki-67 was evaluated immunohistochemically. Statistical analysis used: Mean and standard deviation were estimated for the gingival tissue extract sample for each study group. Mean values were compared between different study groups by, one way ANOVA, post hoc analysis. In this study P < 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: The mean number of Ki-67 positive cells/field was higher in the smokers with periodontitis group. When the mean Ki-67 positive cells were compared between different groups, statistical significant difference was observed between healthy and both the periodontitis groups (P = 0.000) and between smokers group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Ki-67 was maximally expressed in smoker with periodontitis followed by chronic periodontitis patients, healthy smokers and healthy control patients which shed light on the toxic effects of tobacco in dysregulating the cell cycle and cellular proliferation. The findings of this study also help us to understand the role of the cell cycle in resolution of periodontal inflammation which is a salient feature in the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis. PMID:24872622

  19. Epidemiology of periodontal diseases in Indian population since last decade

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Anuja; Yadav, Om Prakash; Narula, Sugandha; Dutta, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: India suffers lot of disparities in terms of oral health care and 95% of the Indian population suffers from periodontal disease. The aim of this review is to estimate the risk factors responsible for periodontal diseases as well as prevalence for the same in the last decade to make an attempt to develop a strategy to improve formulation of an effective oral health care policy in India. Materials and Methods: Keywords such as “prevalence of periodontal diseases,” “epidemiology,” “periodontitis in India,” and “oral hygiene status in India” were searched for appropriate studies to obtain a bibliographic database. The references of selected articles and relevant reviews were searched for any missed publications that included studies conducted in India estimating periodontal diseases with adequate sample size. Clinical parameters, sample size, and findings for each study were tabulated from 2006 to 2015 (till September 15, 2015) in chronological order to observe the prevalence as well as epidemiology of periodontal disease in India. Results: The projection of periodontal disease is disturbing. In addition, the majority of studies done have used the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) as its epidemiological tool that can grossly underestimate the presence of deep pockets. Conclusion: Current knowledge has shown that periodontitis does not present a linear progression and is not age-dependent. Moreover, its distribution and severity are strongly influenced by host susceptibility and risk factors. A structured all-inclusive survey of all districts of the states is a prerequisite for the constitution of an apt and cogent health care policy in our country. PMID:27114945

  20. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. PMID:27335500

  1. Reconstruction of pink esthetics: The periodontal way.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, K; Arshad, L Mohamed; Priya, B Dhathri

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic procedures involving gingival reconstruction have become an integral part of current periodontal practice. The ability to cover unsightly exposed, sensitive roots and recontour soft tissue recessions have added an esthetic angle to the traditional concept of biological and functional periodontal health. The recession of the gingiva, either localized or generalized, may be associated with one or more surfaces, resulting in attachment loss and root exposure, which can lead to clinical problems such as diminished cosmetic appeal and aesthetic concern. Marginal gingival recession, therefore, can cause major functional and aesthetic problems and should not be viewed as merely a soft tissue defect, but rather as the destruction of both the soft and hard tissue. Treatment proposals for this type of defect have evolved based on the knowledge for healing the gingiva and the attachment system. This case report describes a clinical case of severe Miller Class II gingival recession treated by two stages of surgery that combined a free gingival graft and connective tissue grafting. First, a free gingival graft (FGG) was performed to obtain an adequate keratinized tissue level. Three months later, a connective tissue graft (CTG)was performed to obtain root coverage. The results indicated that the FGG allows for a gain in the keratinized tissue level and the CTG allows for root coverage with decreased recession level after 6 months. Therefore, for this type of specific gingival recession, the combined use of FGG and CTG still serves as a Gold Standard in predictable root coverage. PMID:25684918

  2. NSAIDs and Bleeding in Periodontal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    K, Sharath; Thomas, Biju; Shetty, Nitin; Shetty, Arvind; Shetty, Devanand

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the clinical effects of ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium on bleeding during periodontal surgery. Materials and Methods: Thirteen medically healthy men and women of mean age 37.5±17.67 (mean age± standard deviation) were selected for the study. All the subjects were divided into three groups: control (C) and test groups (T1) and (T2). Each subject of T1 group and T2 group was given ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium respectively, prior to surgery. Bleeding times of patients were recorded prior to performance of periodontal flap surgical procedures. Results: It was found that there was increased bleeding time and increased peri-operative bleeding when ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium were taken prior to surgery and this was statistically significant. (2.5538 (T1), 1.8385 (T2) versus 1.2385 (C) minute, p= .001) (mean blood loss) and (62.0325 ± 9.0594 (T1), 51.082 ± 9.792 (T2) versus 37.4992 ± 5.99 (C) millilitre, p = .000). Conclusion: The findings of this study suggested that pre-operative administration of ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium could increase bleeding time and peri - operative blood loss. PMID:24995237

  3. Aging, inflammation, immunity and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L; Graves, Christina L; Gonzalez, Octavio A; Dawson, Dolph; Morford, Lorri A; Huja, Pinar Emecen; Hartsfield, James K; Huja, Sarandeep S; Pandruvada, Subramanya; Wallet, Shannon M

    2016-10-01

    The increased prevalence and severity of periodontal disease have long been associated with aging, such that this oral condition affects the majority of the adult population over 50 years of age. Although the immune system is a critical component for maintaining health, aging can be characterized by quantitative and qualitative modifications of the immune system. This process, termed 'immunosenescence', is a progressive modification of the immune system that leads to greater susceptibility to infections, neoplasia and autoimmunity, presumably reflecting the prolonged antigenic stimulation and/or stress responses that occur across the lifespan. Interestingly, the global reduction in the host capability to respond effectively to these challenges is coupled with a progressive increase in the general proinflammatory status, termed 'inflammaging'. Consistent with the definition of immunosenescence, it has been suggested that the cumulative effect of prolonged exposure of the periodontium to microbial challenge is, at least in part, a contributor to the effects of aging on these tissues. Thus, it has also been hypothesized that alterations in the function of resident immune and nonimmune cells of the periodontium contribute to the expression of inflammaging in periodontal disease. Although the majority of aging research has focused on the adaptive immune response, it is becoming increasingly clear that the innate immune compartment is also highly affected by aging. Thus, the phenomenon of immunosenescence and inflammaging, expressed as age-associated changes within the periodontium, needs to be more fully understood in this era of precision and personalized medicine and dentistry. PMID:27501491

  4. Periodontal regeneration in gingival recession defects.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L

    1999-02-01

    Surgical treatment of gingival recession defects aims at obtaining soft tissue coverage of exposed root surfaces and/or augmentation of gingival tissue dimensions. A variety of protocols have been developed to manage these clinical problems. Since one goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the lost attachment apparatus of the tooth, full restoration of defect should be accomplished following mucogingival procedures. This implies regeneration of all periodontal structures, including formation of new cementum with inserting connective tissue fibers, alveolar bone regeneration and recreation of a functional and aesthetic morphology of the mucogingival complex. Animal and human histological studies have shown that healing at gingiva-root interface following pedicle flaps or free soft tissue grafts generally includes a long junctional epithelium with varying amounts of a new connective tissue attachment in the most apical aspect of the covered root surface. Limited bone regeneration has been observed. Adjunctive use of root conditioning agents and cell excluding, wound-stabilizing devices may amplify regenerative outcomes. Changes in the amount of keratinized tissue, which can significantly affect the aesthetic outcome of treatment, have been shown to depend on the interactions among various tissues involved in the healing process and the selected surgical procedure. PMID:10321221

  5. Periodontal disease in Paget’s disease of bone

    PubMed Central

    Nuti, Niccolò; Ferrari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 59-year-old man suffering from Paget’s disease of bone and periodontal disease was examined in anticipation of bisphosphonate treatment. The previous therapy with clodronate resulted ineffective and markers of bone turnover were markedly elevated. Periodontal disease was correctly approached and treated with an excellent outcome. 5 mg zoledronate iv infusion induced a remarkable reduction of bone markers which persisted on time within the normal range. After zoledronate treatment no signs of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) were observed. A correct management of periodontal disease is mandatory in pagetic patients on bisphosphonate treatment. PMID:26604949

  6. Periodontitis diagnostics using resonance Raman spectroscopy on saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Biryukova, T.; Tsvetkov, M.; Bagratashvily, V.

    2013-07-01

    In view of its wealth of molecular information, Raman spectroscopy has been the subject of active biomedical research. The aim of this work is Raman spectroscopy (RS) application for the determination of molecular biomarkers in saliva with the objective of early periodontitis detection. As was shown in our previous study, carotenoids contained in saliva can be molecular fingerprint information for the periodontitis level. It is shown here that the carotenoid RS lines at wavenumbers of 1156 and 1524 cm-1 can be easily detected and serve as reliable biomarkers of periodontitis using resonance Raman spectroscopy of dry saliva.

  7. Combined Periodontal, Orthodontic, and Prosthetic Treatment in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sabatoski, Claudio Vinicius; Bueno, Regis Claret; Reyes Pacheco, Ariel Adriano; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old man had a significant loss of bone and supporting tissues with pathologic migration of several teeth and several missing teeth. He was treated with an interdisciplinary therapeutic protocol that included nonsurgical periodontal therapy based on strict control of supragingival plaque, subgingival periodontal therapy, orthodontic and endodontic treatment, and replacement of restorations. The orthodontic therapy was performed in a severely reduced bone support and the presence of pathological tooth migration after periodontal disease control. The interdisciplinary treatment protocol was the key to achieve a significant improvement in his facial and dental esthetics, masticatory function, and quality of life. PMID:26587295

  8. Periodontal effects and dental caries associated with smokeless tobacco use.

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, J A; Burt, B A

    1987-01-01

    The prevalence of smokeless tobacco use has been increasing in the United States with concomitant social, medical, legal, and regulatory ramifications. This paper examines the association between the use of smokeless tobacco and the occurrence of periodontal disease and dental caries. Existing literature consists primarily of case reports and cross-sectional studies among teenagers. The limited evidence suggests an association between smokeless tobacco use and gingival recession. There is insufficient evidence to support any associations between smokeless tobacco use and gingivitis, periodontitis, or dental caries. Methods to improve future epidemiologic research to examine possible associations between smokeless tobacco use and periodontal effects or dental caries are discussed. PMID:3101120

  9. Modifications of the dental pulp in marginal periodontitis. Electronomicroscopical contributions.

    PubMed

    Deva, V; Vătăman, Maria; Manolea, H

    2006-01-01

    Histological studies on teeth with marginal periodontitis, but without cavity lesions have shown a frequent apparition of modifications in the pulp tissue structure. In this study, by using the electron microscopy method, we have shown a series of interesting aspects of the intimate modifications that appear on the level of all components of the pulp tissue. The observations show that the degree of affecting can be correlated to the type of marginal periodontitis, and at the same time they contribute to a right evaluation of the defensive abilities of the pulp of the teeth with marginal periodontitis. PMID:16838061

  10. Common dental and periodontal diseases: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Laudenbach, Joel M; Simon, Ziv

    2014-11-01

    Physicians may encounter patients with dental and periodontal diseases in the context of outpatient medical practice. It is important for physicians to be aware of common dental and periodontal conditions and be able to assess for the presence and severity of these diseases. This article reviews common dental and periodontal conditions, their cardinal signs and symptoms, outpatient-setting assessment techniques, as well as common methods of treatment. Physicians detecting gross abnormalities on clinical examination should refer the patient to a dentist for further evaluation and management. PMID:25443675

  11. Does Treatment of Periodontal Disease Influence Systemic Disease?

    PubMed

    Borgnakke, Wenche S

    2015-10-01

    Periodontal diseases are the most common human diseases globally, with gingivitis affecting up to 90% and periodontitis affecting 50% of adults. Tooth enamel is the only nonshedding tissue in the human body. In the absence of proper oral hygiene measures, microbial biofilm (dental plaque) develops on the teeth to include more than 700 different bacterial species, along with viruses, fungi, archea, and parasites. With time, ecological imbalances promote the growth of selected commensal species that induce host inflammatory pathways resulting in tissue destruction, including ulceration of the periodontal epithelium. PMID:26427573

  12. [Active periodontitis as a potential risk factor of preferm delivery].

    PubMed

    Bilińska, Maria; Osmola, Krzysztof

    2014-05-01

    The influence of active periodontitis on the incidence of preterm delivery has been widely described in numerous scientific papers. Studies suggest that an implementation of a periodontal treatment during pregnancy is not only safe for both, the mother and the child, but it also has a beneficial effect on the pregnancy and embryo-fetal development, consequently reducing morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Therefore, mandatory dental examinations in pregnant women may facilitate early implementation of periodontal treatment and reduce the rates of preterm delivery PMID:25011221

  13. Periodontitis treatment improves systemic lupus erythematosus response to immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Cristiana; Fuller, Ricardo; Bonfá, Eloisa; Guedes, Lissiane K N; D'Alleva, Paulo Sergio R; Borba, Eduardo F

    2014-04-01

    Periodontal disease (POD) may affect rheumatic diseases severity, but there are no data regarding the effect of its treatment on disease activity in SLE patients under immunosuppressive therapy. Forty-nine consecutive SLE patients (SLEDAI ≥ 2) with POD and under corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide pulse therapy (IVCYC) were selected. Periodontal assessment included bleeding gingival index (BGI), probing depth (PD), and probing attachment level (PAL). At entry, POD was defined as BGI > 1 and patients were assigned to groups according to the availability of odontological intervention in TREATED (n = 32) and NOT TREATED (n = 17). SLEDAI and POD parameters were determined at entry and after 3 months. Age, female gender, and race were alike among TREATED and NOT TREATED (p > 0.05). Both groups had also comparable disease duration (10.7 ± 6.8 vs. 11.0 ± 6.6, p = 0.83), IVCYC number (5.8 ± 4.8 vs. 4.5 ± 4.8, p = 0.17), and SLEDAI (5.9 ± 4.2 vs. 6.3 ± 4.3, p = 0.73) as well as POD parameters [BGI (40.8 ± 31.0 vs. 40.7 ± 36.2 %, p = 0.89), PD (1.7 ± 1.8 vs. 1.5 ± 0.60 mm, p = 0.80), and PAL (2.5 ± 1.9 vs. 1.9 ± 1.1 mm, p = 0.18)]. At the end of the study, TREATED group had a significant improvement in SLEDAI (5.9 ± 4.2 vs. 3.4 ± 3.3, p = 0.04) with a paralleled reduction in BGI (40.8 ± 31.0 vs. 15.2 ± 17.2 %, p < 0.01), PD (1.7 ± 1.8 vs. 1.1 ± 0.3 mm, p < 0.01), and PAL (2.5 ± 1.9 vs. 1.7 ± 0.9 mm, p < 0.01). In contrast, SLEDAI (6.3 ± 4.3 vs. 6.0 ± 5.5, p = 0.40) and POD parameters [BGI (p = 0.33), PD (p = 0.91), and PAL (p = 0.39)] remained largely unchanged in NOT TREATED group. Periodontal disease treatment seems to have a beneficial effect in controlling disease activity in SLE patients under immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, management of this modifiable risk factor is

  14. Diagnostic Role of Salivary and GCF Nitrite, Nitrate and Nitric Oxide to Distinguish Healthy Periodontium from Gingivitis and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Poorsattar Bejeh-Mir, Arash; Parsian, Hadi; Akbari Khoram, Maryam; Ghasemi, Nafiseh; Bijani, Ali; Khosravi-Samani, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of subclinical and early stage clinical periodontal dysfunction could prevent from further socioeconomic burden. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic applicability of nitric oxide and its end-metabolites in periodontal tissue health and disease. Forty-two patients were enrolled and divided into three groups according to gingivitis (GI) and clinical attachment level (CAL) indices: a healthy group (GI<1, CAL<1), b: gingivitis (GI>1, CAL>1) and c: periodontitis (CAL>1) with 14 patients in each group. Unstimulated saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were collected. Samples were evaluated for nitrite, nitrate and total nitric oxide contents with the ELISA method. In addition, CAL, GI, plaque index (PI), decay, missing, filling (DMFT) and bleeding index (BI) scores were also recorded. Except for GCF nitrite content (P= 0.89), there was an increasing trend for measured biomarkers in both saliva and GCF (Periodontitis> gingivitis> healthy periodontium, P< 0.05). Data remained stable after simultaneous adjustment for DMFT and BI scores as confounding factors. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, cut point and p- value were as the followings: GCF nitrate (0.71, 0.11, 0.29,0.43, 4.97, P= 0.04), nitric oxide GCF ( 0.64, 0.18, 0.28, 0.5, 10.12, P= 0.04), nitrite saliva (0.93, 0.96,0.93,0.96,123.48, P< 0.001), salivary nitrate (0.93, 0.96, 0.93, 0.96, 123.6, P< 0.001), salivary nitric oxide (0.93, 0.96, 0.93, 0.96, 246.65, P <0.001). Our results revealed that NO plays an important role in the process of destruction of periodontal tissues. Within the limitation of our study, detecting NO biomarker and its end metabolites in saliva is of more value to assess the periodontal health comparing to GCF. PMID:25317400

  15. Risk assessment and periodontal prevention in primary care.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Raul I; Compton, Robert; Dietrich, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The role of risk factors and risk assessment in the prediction of clinical periodontal outcomes, and thus in patient management, continues to be a subject of high professional interest and clinical relevance globally. Advances in our understanding of periodontal disease causality and the role of risk factors as predictors of future disease risk have led to the development of various quantitative tools to calculate risk and inform clinical decision-making. We review the conceptual basis for periodontal risk calculation and frame its potential, as well as its limitations, in the context of similar advances in medical care. Lastly, we discuss how broader health-policy changes are taking place that will probably lead to incorporation of risk-factor assessments in periodontal treatment planning and care management. PMID:27045428

  16. Dental Caries and Periodontal Status of Mentally Handicapped Institutilized Children

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sarika; Arya, Astha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental caries and periodontal disease are the most prevalent dental disease among mentally retarded children worldwide. Aims and Objectives: A study was carried out in Jodhpur city of Rajasthan state of India to assess the Dental caries and periodontal Status of Mentally handicapped attending special schools children in Jodhpur city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted in 80 mentally handicapped subjects, attending a Special Needs school in Jodhpur City. Dental caries and Periodontal Status were recorded following the WHO basic oral health survey. Results: None of the subject had healthy periodontal status, dental caries was found in 79.2% of the subjects, Lymphadenopathy was observed in highest number of subjects 55 (76.3%). Conclusion: Health professionals should therefore be aware of the impact of mental illness and its treatment on oral health, Health personnel should receive training to support and provide all possible services to this population. PMID:25177632

  17. Combined Endodontic-Periodontal Treatment of a Palatogingival Groove.

    PubMed

    Castelo-Baz, Pablo; Ramos-Barbosa, Isabel; Martín-Biedma, Benjamín; Dablanca-Blanco, Ana Belén; Varela-Patiño, Purificación; Blanco-Carrión, Juan

    2015-11-01

    A palatogingival groove is a developmental anomaly that predisposes the involved tooth to develop a severe periodontal lesion. These grooves often present a clinical challenge because diagnosis and treatment planning require an interdisciplinary approach. This case report describes the successful management of a right maxillary lateral incisor with a deep palatogingival groove in combination with an extensive periodontal pocket and pulp necrosis of the involved tooth. Collaborative management used a combination of endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, odontoplasty, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using protein complex derived from enamel matrix (Emdogain; Straumann, Basel, Switzerland). Despite a predicted poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This report also discusses the rationale behind the treatment modalities. PMID:26395912

  18. Biological plaque control: novel therapeutic approach to periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Naoyuki

    2012-03-01

    Despite its important role in the control of periodontal disease, mechanical plaque control is not properly practiced by most individuals. Therefore, adjunctive chemical plaque control using chlorhexidine and antibiotics has also been suggested as an additional therapeutic strategy to augment mechanical plaque control. However, the additional effects of adjunctive antibiotic therapy are small, and topical chlorhexidine therapy is not without side effects. Given current limitations, new approaches for the control of biofilm are required. The new therapeutic approaches discussed in this review are divided into two categories: probiotics and vaccines. Probiotics is an interesting new field of periodontology research that aims to achieve biological plaque control by eliminating pathogenic bacteria. In addition, passive immunization using egg yolk antibody raised against periodontal pathogens may be an effective approach for the treatment of periodontitis. Further study to evaluate the possible effects of these biological plaque control methods against periodontal disease is warranted. PMID:22466880

  19. Salivary Antimicrobial Peptides in Early Detection of Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Güncü, Güliz N.; Yilmaz, Dogukan; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Ulvi K.

    2015-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of periodontitis, an infection-induced inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, there is a complex interaction between the subgingival microbiota and host tissues. A periodontal diagnostic tool for detecting the initiation and progression of the disease, monitoring the response to therapy, or measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression has been of interest for a long time. The value of various enzymes, proteins, and immunoglobulins, which are abundant constituents of saliva, as potential biomarkers has been recognized and extensively investigated for periodontal diseases. Gingival defensins and cathelicidins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides that play an important role in innate immune response. However, their applicability as salivary biomarkers is still under debate. The present review focuses on proteomic biomarkers and antimicrobial peptides, in particular, to be used at early phases of periodontitis. PMID:26734583

  20. Relationship between maternal periodontal status and preterm low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Mansi; Khatri, Manish; Kumar, Ashish; Bhatia, Gouri

    2013-01-01

    Throughout history, there has been the belief that diseases that affect the mouth, such as periodontal disease, can have an effect on the rest of the body. It is only very recently that scientists and clinicians have begun to provide an increasing body of scientific evidence suggesting that moderate untreated periodontitis may affect an individual systemically, and may contribute to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and preterm low birth weight. Birth weight is affected by multiple factors and is considered as an outcome of a complex multifactorial system. Periodontitis is a remote gram-negative infection that may play a role in low birth weight. Periodontopathic microorganisms and their products have a wide range of effects mediated through host cytokine production in target cells. Many combined animal studies and data supporting plausible biologic mechanisms suggest that periodontal infection has a negative impact on pregnancy outcome in some women. PMID:24826203

  1. Identification of epithelial auto-antigens associated with periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Ye, P; Simonian, M; Nadkarni, M A; DeCarlo, A A; Chapple, C C; Hunter, N

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported evidence that patients with periodontitis have serum antibodies to oral Gram positive bacteria that are cross-reactive with epithelial antigens. In the present report cross-reactive epithelial antigens including CD24, lactate dehydrogenase A [LDM-A], antioxidant protein 2 [AOP 2] and nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 [NFAT 5], were identified by screening a cDNA expression library with pooled patient sera. Titres of antibodies to CD24 peptide correlated negatively with indices of periodontal disease severity. Strong expression of CD24 in the reactive periodontal epithelium and inflamed gingival attachment contrasted with low to undetectable expression in the external gingival epithelium. In periodontitis, a local action of these auto-reactive antibodies could modulate the regulatory potential associated with expression of CD24 in this epithelium. PMID:15654832

  2. Complement involvement in periodontitis: molecular mechanisms and rational therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Maekawa, Tomoki; Abe, Toshiharu; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a network of interacting fluid-phase and cell surface-associated molecules that trigger, amplify, and regulate immune and inflammatory signaling pathways. Dysregulation of this finely balanced network can destabilize host-microbe homeostasis and cause inflammatory tissue damage. Evidence from clinical and animal model-based studies suggests that complement is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, a polymicrobial community-induced chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. This review discusses molecular mechanisms of complement involvement in the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal microbiome and the resulting destructive inflammation, culminating in loss of periodontal bone support. These mechanistic studies have additionally identified potential therapeutic targets. In this regard, interventional studies in preclinical models have provided proof-of-concept for using complement inhibitors for the treatment of human periodontitis. PMID:26306443

  3. The subgingival periodontal microbiota of the aging mouth.

    PubMed

    Feres, Magda; Teles, Flavia; Teles, Ricardo; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Faveri, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    Different mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain the increase in prevalence and severity of periodontitis in older adults, including shifts in the periodontal microbiota. However, the actual impact of aging on the composition of subgingival biofilms remains unclear. In the present article, we provide an overview of the composition of the subgingival biofilm in older adults and the potential effects of age on the oral microbiome. In particular, this review covers the following topics: (i) the oral microbiota of an aging mouth; (ii) the effects of age and time on the human oral microbiome; (iii) the potential impact of inflammaging and immunosenescence in the host-oral microbiota interactions; and (iv) the relationship of the aging oral microbiota and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we present analyses of data compiled from large clinical studies that evaluated the subgingival microbiota of periodontally healthy subjects and patients with periodontitis from a wide age spectrum (20-83 years of age). PMID:27501490

  4. Immunomicrobial pathogenesis of periodontitis: keystones, pathobionts, and host response.

    PubMed

    Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered novel mechanisms underlying the breakdown of periodontal host-microbe homeostasis, which can precipitate dysbiosis and periodontitis in susceptible hosts. Dysbiotic microbial communities of keystone pathogens and pathobionts are thought to exhibit synergistic virulence whereby not only can they endure the host response but can also thrive by exploiting tissue-destructive inflammation, which fuels a self-feeding cycle of escalating dysbiosis and inflammatory bone loss, potentially leading to tooth loss and systemic complications. Here, I discuss new paradigms in our understanding of periodontitis, which may shed light into other polymicrobial inflammatory disorders. In addition, I highlight gaps in knowledge required for an integrated picture of the interplay between microbes and innate and adaptive immune elements that initiate and propagate chronic periodontal inflammation. PMID:24269668

  5. Quercetin inhibits inflammatory bone resorption in a mouse periodontitis model.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo H; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana T; Macedo, Cristina G; Freitas, Fabiana F; Stipp, Rafael N; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2013-12-27

    Periodontitis is a disease that leads to bone destruction and represents the main cause of tooth loss in adults. The development of aggressive periodontitis has been associated with increased inflammatory response that is induced by the presence of a subgingival biofilm containing Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The flavonoid quercetin (1) is widespread in vegetables and fruits and exhibits many biological properties for possible medical and clinical applications such as its anti-inflamatory and antioxidant effects. Thus, in the present study, the properties of 1 have been evaluated in bone loss and inflammation using a mouse periodontitis model induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans infection. Subcutaneous treatment with 1 reduced A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone loss and IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-17, RANKL, and ICAM-1 production in the gingival tissue without affecting bacterial counts. These results demonstrated that quercetin exhibits protective effects in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis in mice by modulating cytokine and ICAM-1 production. PMID:24246038

  6. A proposed index for residual periodontal ligament support.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yasuhiko; Taji, Tsuyoshi; Hiasa, Kyou; Tsuga, Kazuhiro; Akagawa, Yasumasa

    2010-01-01

    An index was developed to estimate the residual periodontal ligament support for individual teeth during treatment planning for partially edentulous patients. The Residual Periodontal Ligament Index (rPLI) was derived from a formula that calculates the remaining area of periodontal attachment and the Normal Periodontal Ligament Index (nPLI). To illustrate the applicability of the rPLI, the total nPLI scores of the remaining teeth corresponding to Eichner subclasses of partial edentulism were charted by assessing the average occlusal support numerically. The rPLI is proposed to be a possible suitable tool for epidemiologic research on the progression of tooth loss and the survival rate of prostheses. PMID:20859566

  7. Chronic Periodontitis Genome-wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rhodin, K.; Divaris, K.; North, K.E.; Barros, S.P.; Moss, K.; Beck, J.D.; Offenbacher, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of chronic periodontitis (CP) offer rich data sources for the investigation of candidate genes, functional elements, and pathways. We used GWAS data of CP (n = 4,504) and periodontal pathogen colonization (n = 1,020) from a cohort of adult Americans of European descent participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and employed a MAGENTA approach (i.e., meta-analysis gene set enrichment of variant associations) to obtain gene-centric and gene set association results corrected for gene size, number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and local linkage disequilibrium characteristics based on the human genome build 18 (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 36). We used the Gene Ontology, Ingenuity, KEGG, Panther, Reactome, and Biocarta databases for gene set enrichment analyses. Six genes showed evidence of statistically significant association: 4 with severe CP (NIN, p = 1.6 × 10−7; ABHD12B, p = 3.6 × 10−7; WHAMM, p = 1.7 × 10−6; AP3B2, p = 2.2 × 10−6) and 2 with high periodontal pathogen colonization (red complex–KCNK1, p = 3.4 × 10−7; Porphyromonas gingivalis–DAB2IP, p = 1.0 × 10−6). Top-ranked genes for moderate CP were HGD (p = 1.4 × 10−5), ZNF675 (p = 1.5 × 10−5), TNFRSF10C (p = 2.0 × 10−5), and EMR1 (p = 2.0 × 10−5). Loci containing NIN, EMR1, KCNK1, and DAB2IP had showed suggestive evidence of association in the earlier single-nucleotide polymorphism–based analyses, whereas WHAMM and AP2B2 emerged as novel candidates. The top gene sets included severe CP (“endoplasmic reticulum membrane,” “cytochrome P450,” “microsome,” and “oxidation reduction”) and moderate CP (“regulation of gene expression,” “zinc ion binding,” “BMP signaling pathway,” and “ruffle”). Gene-centric analyses offer a promising avenue for efficient interrogation of large-scale GWAS data. These results highlight genes in previously identified loci and

  8. A longitudinal assessment of periodontal disease in 52 miniature schnauzers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease (PD) is the most widespread oral disease in dogs and has been associated with serious systemic diseases. The disease is more prevalent in small breeds compared to large breeds and incidence increases with advancing age. In prevalence studies 84% of beagles over the age of 3 and 100% of poodles over the age of 4 were diagnosed with PD. Current knowledge of the rate of progression of PD is limited. The objective of this study was to determine the rate of PD progression in miniature schnauzers, an at risk small breed of dog. Dogs (n = 52, age 1.3-6.9 years) who had received a regular oral care regime prior to this study were assessed for levels of gingivitis and periodontitis around the whole gingival margin in every tooth under general anaesthetic. Assessments were conducted approximately every six weeks for up to 60 weeks following the cessation of the oral care regime. Results All of the 2155 teeth assessed entered the study with some level of gingivitis. 23 teeth entered the study with periodontitis, observed across 12 dogs aged between 1.3 and 6.9 years. 35 dogs had at least 12 teeth progress to periodontitis within 60 weeks. Of the teeth that progressed to periodontitis, 54% were incisors. The lingual aspect of the incisors was significantly more likely to be affected (p < 0.001). The severity of gingivitis in periodontitis-affected teeth was variable with 24% of the aspects affected having very mild gingivitis, 36% mild gingivitis and 40% moderate gingivitis. Periodontitis progression rate was significantly faster in older dogs. Only one dog (age 3.5) did not have any teeth progress to periodontitis after 60 weeks. Conclusions This is the first study to have assessed the progression rate of periodontitis in miniature schnauzers and highlights that with no oral care regime, the early stages of periodontitis develop rapidly in this breed. An oral care regime and twice yearly veterinary dental health checks should be

  9. Relationship between periodontal status and levels of glycated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Morita, I; Inagaki, K; Nakamura, F; Noguchi, T; Matsubara, T; Yoshii, S; Nakagaki, H; Mizuno, K; Sheiham, A; Sabbah, W

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether there is a bi-directional relationship between periodontal status and diabetes. Study 1 included 5,856 people without periodontal pockets of ≥ 4 mm at baseline. Relative risk was estimated for the 5-year incidence of periodontal pockets of ≥ 4 mm (CPI scores 3 and 4, with the CPI probe), in individuals with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of ≥ 6.5% at baseline. Study 2 included 6,125 people with HbA1c < 6.5% at baseline. The relative risk was assessed for elevation of HbA1c levels in 5 years, with baseline periodontal status, assessed by CPI. Relative risk of developing a periodontal pocket was 1.17 (p = 0.038) times greater in those with HbA1c of ≥ 6.5% at baseline, adjusted for body mass index (BMI), smoking status, sex, and age. Relative risks for having HbA1c ≥ 6.5% at 5-year follow-up in groups with periodontal pockets of 4 to 5 mm and ≥ 6 mm at baseline were 2.47 (p = 0.122) and 3.45 (p = 0.037), respectively, adjusted for BMI, alcohol consumption, smoking status, sex, and age. The risk of developing periodontal disease was associated with levels of HbA1c, and the risk of elevations of HbA1c was associated with developing periodontal pockets of more than 4 mm. PMID:22157098

  10. The microbiome associated with equine periodontitis and oral health.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Rebekah; Lappin, David Francis; Dixon, Padraic Martin; Buijs, Mark Johannes; Zaura, Egija; Crielaard, Wim; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Bennett, David; Brandt, Bernd Willem; Riggio, Marcello Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Equine periodontal disease is a common and painful condition and its severe form, periodontitis, can lead to tooth loss. Its aetiopathogenesis remains poorly understood despite recent increased awareness of this disorder amongst the veterinary profession. Bacteria have been found to be causative agents of the disease in other species, but current understanding of their role in equine periodontitis is extremely limited. The aim of this study was to use high-throughput sequencing to identify the microbiome associated with equine periodontitis and oral health. Subgingival plaque samples from 24 horses with periodontitis and gingival swabs from 24 orally healthy horses were collected. DNA was extracted from samples, the V3-V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplified by PCR and amplicons sequenced using Illumina MiSeq. Data processing was conducted using USEARCH and QIIME. Diversity analyses were performed with PAST v3.02. Linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) was used to determine differences between the groups. In total, 1308 OTUs were identified and classified into 356 genera or higher taxa. Microbial profiles at health differed significantly from periodontitis, both in their composition (p < 0.0001, F = 12.24; PERMANOVA) and in microbial diversity (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney test). Samples from healthy horses were less diverse (1.78, SD 0.74; Shannon diversity index) and were dominated by the genera Gemella and Actinobacillus, while the periodontitis group samples showed higher diversity (3.16, SD 0.98) and were dominated by the genera Prevotella and Veillonella. It is concluded that the microbiomes associated with equine oral health and periodontitis are distinct, with the latter displaying greater microbial diversity. PMID:27080859

  11. IL-33 Exacerbates Periodontal Disease through Induction of RANKL.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, J; Awang, R A; Oliver-Bell, J; Butcher, J P; Campbell, L; Adrados Planell, A; Lappin, D F; Fukada, S Y; Nile, C J; Liew, F Y; Culshaw, S

    2015-07-01

    Cytokines mediate the balance between protective and destructive immunity in periodontitis. We sought to investigate the role of IL-33 in periodontitis. The expression of IL-33 in gingival tissue from healthy controls (n = 10) and patients with chronic periodontitis (n = 17) was investigated. Based on a murine model of periodontal disease, the function of IL-33 was determined first by administration of exogenous IL-33 and second by inhibition of IL-33 signaling using mice deficient in the IL-33 receptor ST2. Alveolar bone level, serum antibody, and lymphocyte responses were assessed in the murine model. Expression of IL-33 and ST2 was elevated in gingival tissues from patients with chronic periodontitis as compared with healthy tissues (P < 0.05). Similarly, Il33 expression was higher in periodontal tissues of Porphyromonas gingivalis-infected mice as compared with sham-infected controls (P < 0.05). IL-33 treatment of P. gingivalis-infected mice significantly exacerbated alveolar bone loss when compared with infection or IL-33 treatment alone (P < 0.001). Conversely, P. gingivalis infection-induced alveolar bone loss was attenuated in mice lacking ST2. The percentages of T and B lymphocytes expressing nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) in the gingival tissues and T lymphocytes expressing RANKL in the cervical draining lymph nodes were higher in IL-33-treated P. gingivalis-infected mice versus phosphate buffered saline-treated P. gingivalis-infected controls (all P < 0.001). Targeting the RANKL pathway by osteoprotegerin administration abrogated periodontal bone destruction in P. gingivalis-infected, IL-33-treated mice. These data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for IL-33 in exacerbating bone loss in a RANKL-dependent manner in the context of bacterial infection and suggest that this pathway may be amenable to manipulation as a novel therapeutic target in periodontitis. PMID:25808546

  12. trkA modulation of developing somatosensory neurons in oro-facial tissues: tooth pulp fibers are absent in trkA knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, S; Ichikawa, H; Henderson, T A; Silos-Santiago, I; Barbacid, M; Arends, J J; Jacquin, M F

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the nerve growth factor requirement of developing oro-facial somatosensory afferents, we have studied the survival of sensory fibers subserving nociception, mechanoreception or proprioception in receptor tyrosine kinase (trkA) knockout mice using immunohistochemistry. trkA receptor null mutant mice lack nerve fibers in tooth pulp, including sympathetic fibers, and showed only sparse innervation of the periodontal ligament. Ruffini endings were formed definitively in the periodontal ligament of the trkA knockout mice, although calcitonin gene-related peptide- and substance P-immunoreactive fibers were reduced in number or had disappeared completely. trkA gene deletion had also no obvious effect on the formation of Meissner corpuscles in the palate. In the vibrissal follicle, however, some mechanoreceptive afferents were sensitive for trkA gene deletion, confirming a previous report [Fundin et al. (1997) Dev. Biol. 190, 94-116]. Moreover, calretinin-positive fibers innervating longitudinal lanceolate endings were completely lost in trkA knockout mice, as were the calretinin-containing parent cells in the trigeminal ganglion.These results indicate that trkA is indispensable for developing nociceptive neurons innervating oral tissues, but not for developing mechanoreceptive neurons innervating oral tissues (Ruffini endings and Meissner corpuscles), and that calretinin-containing, trkA dependent neurons in the trigeminal ganglion normally participate in mechanoreception through longitudinal lanceolate endings of the vibrissal follicle. PMID:11516838

  13. Obesity and periodontitis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Moura-Grec, Patrícia Garcia de; Marsicano, Juliane Avansini; Carvalho, Cristiane Alves Paz de; Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2014-06-01

    The scope of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the studies on the association between obesity and periodontitis. The methods applied included a literature search strategy and selection of studies using inclusion and exclusion in accordance with the criteria for characteristics of the studies and meta-analysis. The research was conducted in the PubMed, Embase and Lilacs databases through 2010. Selected papers were on studies on humans investigating whether or not obesity is a risk factor for periodontitis. Of the 822 studies identified, 31 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The risk of periodontitis was associated with obesity (or had a tendency for this) in 25 studies, though it was not associated in 6 studies. The meta-analysis showed a significant association with obesity and periodontitis (OR = 1.30 [95% Confidence Interval (CI), 1.25 - 1.35]) and with mean Body Mass Index (BMI) and periodontal disease (mean difference = 2.75). Obesity was associated with periodontitis, however the risk factors that aggravate these diseases should be better clarified to elucidate the direction of this association. Working with paired samples and avoiding confusion factors may contribute to homogeneity between the studies. PMID:24897477

  14. Oxidative Stress: A Link between Diabetes Mellitus and Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mezei, Tibor; Popsor, Sorin; Monea, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate oxidative stress (OS) and histological changes that occur in the periodontium of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus without signs of periodontal disease and to establish if oxidative stress is a possible link between diabetes mellitus and periodontal changes. Materials and Methods. Tissue samples from ten adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and eight healthy adults were harvested. The specimens were examined by microscope using standard hematoxylin-eosin stain, at various magnifications, and investigated for tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH). Results. Our results showed that periodontal tissues in patients with T2D present significant inflammation, affecting both epithelial and connective tissues. Mean MDA tissue levels were 3.578 ± 0.60 SD in diabetics versus 0.406 ± 0.27 SD in controls (P < 0.0001), while mean GSH tissue levels were 2.48 ± 1.02 SD in diabetics versus 9.7875 ± 2.42 SD in controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Diabetic subjects had higher MDA levels in their periodontal tissues, suggesting an increased lipid peroxidation in T2D, and decreased GSH tissue levels, suggesting an alteration of the local antioxidant defense mechanism. These results are in concordance with the histological changes that we found in periodontal tissues of diabetic subjects, confirming the hypothesis of OS implication, as a correlation between periodontal disease incidence and T2D. PMID:25525432

  15. New considerations in the prevalence of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Fox, C H

    1992-03-01

    International surveys demonstrate that the prevalence of pocketing of 6 mm or more is between 5% and 20% for much of the world's population. A recently completed national survey of employed adults found the prevalence of gingival bleeding was 44%, the prevalence of pocketing of 4 mm or more was 14%, and the prevalence of attachment loss of 3 mm or more was 44%. Risk indicators for a higher prevalence of periodontal disease include increasing age, poor education, lack of professional dental care, previous periodontal destruction, tobacco use, and diabetes. African-Americans show a higher prevalence of juvenile periodontitis and adult periodontitis than whites. The female-to-male ratio in juvenile periodontitis may be close to 1:1. Another report during the review period suggests that periodontal disease in adults may have a strong genetic component. A doctoral dissertation demonstrated that the sensitivities of methods used in a national survey to detect pocketing and attachment loss range from 0.24 to 0.87 in a high-prevalence population. PMID:1520938

  16. Taxonomy, biology, and periodontal aspects of Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed Central

    Bolstad, A I; Jensen, H B; Bakken, V

    1996-01-01

    The pathogenic potential of Fusobacterium nucleatum and its significance in the development of periodontal diseases, as well as in infections in other organs, have gained new interest for several reasons. First, this bacterium has the potential to be pathogenic because of its number and frequency in periodontal lesions, its production of tissue irritants, its synergism with other bacteria in mixed infections, and its ability to form aggregates with other suspected pathogens in periodontal disease and thus act as a bridge between early and late colonizers on the tooth surface. Second, of the microbial species that are statistically associated with periodontal disease, F. nucleatum is the most common in clinical infections of other body sites. Third, during the past few years, new techniques have made it possible to obtain more information about F. nucleatum on the genetic level, thereby also gaining better knowledge of the structure and functions of the outer membrane proteins (OMPs). OMPs are of great interest with respect to coaggregation, cell nutrition, and antibiotic susceptibility. This review covers what is known to date about F. nucleatum in general, such as taxonomy and biology, with special emphasis on its pathogenic potential. Its possible relationship to other periodontal bacteria in the development of periodontal diseases and the possible roles played by OMPs are considered. PMID:8665477

  17. Role of bacteria in leukocyte adhesion deficiency-associated periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hajishengallis, George; Moutsopoulos, Niki M

    2016-05-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency Type I (LAD-I)-associated periodontitis is an aggressive form of inflammatory bone loss that has been historically attributed to lack of neutrophil surveillance of the periodontal infection. However, this form of periodontitis has proven unresponsive to antibiotics and/or mechanical removal of the tooth-associated biofilm. Recent studies in LAD-I patients and relevant animal models have shown that the fundamental cause of LAD-I periodontitis involves dysregulation of a granulopoietic cytokine cascade. This cascade includes interleukin IL-23 (IL-23) and IL-17 that drive inflammatory bone loss in LAD-I patients and animal models and, moreover, foster a nutritionally favorable environment for bacterial growth and development of a compositionally unique microbiome. Although the lack of neutrophil surveillance in the periodontal pockets might be expected to lead to uncontrolled bacterial invasion of the underlying connective tissue, microbiological analyses of gingival biopsies from LAD-I patients did not reveal tissue-invasive infection. However, bacterial lipopolysaccharide was shown to translocate into the lesions of LAD-I periodontitis. It is concluded that the bacteria serve as initial triggers for local immunopathology through translocation of bacterial products into the underlying tissues where they unleash the dysregulated IL-23-IL-17 axis. Subsequently, the IL-23/IL-17 inflammatory response sustains and shapes a unique local microbiome which, in turn, can further exacerbate inflammation and bone loss in the susceptible host. PMID:26375893

  18. Association of Lifestyle-Related Comorbidities With Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hong; Lee, Jung-Seok; Park, Jin-Young; Choi, Jung-Kyu; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Young-Taek; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the association of periodontitis with lifestyle-related comorbidities (LCs) using data in the Korean National Health Insurance Cohort Database from 2002 to 2013. This was a retrospective study involving a large national cohort with patient samples (representing 2% of the total Korean population) stratified on the basis of sociodemographic information. Using this precisely extracted database, the correlations between LCs (cerebral infarction, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, osteoporosis, and obesity) and periodontitis were investigated while adjusting for confounding bias. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate differences in variable factors. Among a total of 1,025,340 samples, 321,103 (31.3%) cases were diagnosed with periodontitis. Statistically significant associations were found between all LCs except myocardial infarction and periodontitis (P < 0.005). Periodontitis is significantly and positively correlated with LCs (except for myocardial infarction) after adjusting for confounding bias. In particular, lifestyle-related diseases, erectile dysfunction, and osteoporosis seem to be intimately related to periodontitis. PMID:26376407

  19. Herbs as an antioxidant arsenal for periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Asha; Varghese, Sheeja Saji; Doraiswamy, Jayakumar Nadathur; Malaiappan, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Herbal medicines have long been used as a traditional mode of therapy for various ailments in India. They are being used increasingly as dietary supplements to ward off common diseases. Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent and can affect up to 90% of the world population. Gingivitis is the mild form whereas periodontitis results in an irreversible loss of supporting structures of the teeth. Even though periodontal pathogens form a crucial component in the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting oxidative stress playing a pivotal role in the disease initiation and progression. Studies have shown a direct correlation between increased levels of biomarkers for tissue damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the severity of periodontal disease. Thus, the focus of attention has revolved back to herbal medicines due to their wide spectrum of biological and medicinal activities, lower costs, and higher safety margin. Internet databases Pubmed and Google Scholar were searched, and the most relevant articles were considered for review. This review briefly describes the various herbs with antioxidant capacity and their potency in the treating periodontal disease. PMID:27069730

  20. Bone resorption: an actor of dental and periodontal development?

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Andrea; Navet, Benjamin; Vargas, Jorge William; Castaneda, Beatriz; Lézot, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Dental and periodontal tissue development is a complex process involving various cell-types. A finely orchestrated network of communications between these cells is implicated. During early development, communications between cells from the oral epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme govern the dental morphogenesis with successive bud, cap and bell stages. Later, interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cells occur during dental root elongation. Root elongation and tooth eruption require resorption of surrounding alveolar bone to occur. For years, it was postulated that signaling molecules secreted by dental and periodontal cells control bone resorbing osteoclast precursor recruitment and differentiation. Reverse signaling originating from bone cells (osteoclasts and osteoblasts) toward dental cells was not suspected. Dental defects reported in osteopetrosis were associated with mechanical stress secondary to defective bone resorption. In the last decade, consequences of bone resorption over-activation on dental and periodontal tissue formation have been analyzed with transgenic animals (RANKTg and Opg−∕− mice). Results suggest the existence of signals originating from osteoclasts toward dental and periodontal cells. Meanwhile, experiments consisting in transitory inhibition of bone resorption during root elongation, achieved with bone resorption inhibitors having different mechanisms of action (bisphosphonates and RANKL blocking antibodies), have evidenced dental and periodontal defects that support the presence of signals originating bone cells toward dental cells. The aim of the present manuscript is to present the data we have collected in the last years that support the hypothesis of a role of bone resorption in dental and periodontal development. PMID:26594180

  1. Periodontitis-atherosclerosis syndrome: an expanded model of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, S; Madianos, P N; Champagne, C M; Southerland, J H; Paquette, D W; Williams, R C; Slade, G; Beck, J D

    1999-10-01

    The early reports of a linkage between periodontitis and atherosclerosis have garnered further support by additional data generated by several investigative teams in many different countries. The evidence continues to suggest that periodontitis may be an important risk factor or risk indicator for cardiovascular pathology for some individuals. The term periodontitis-atherosclerosis syndrome (PAS) is proposed as a new diagnostic term to describe this condition in these individuals. Current evidence, albeit preliminary in nature, which describes a cluster of clinical signs and symptoms that are associated with this condition, is presented. It is clear that this syndrome will require considerable study and refinement before a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan can be formulated. Potential mechanisms by which systemic inflammation and infectious challenge of periodontal origin may serve as a potential modifier of cardiovascular disease are discussed in the context of a detailed working model of pathogenesis. This hypothetical model embraces many cellular and molecular components of atherogenesis and thromboembolic diseases from the perspective of periodontitis pathogenesis. Many aspects of the hypothetical model remain unproved; however, it is our opinion that only through the clarification of the mechanisms of pathogenesis can we ultimately construct a knowledge framework for accurate diagnoses and successful therapies. The concept of diagnosing and treating a periodontal patient to minimize the deleterious effects of this chronic infectious and inflammatory condition on the cardiovascular system represents an unprecedented challenge to our profession. PMID:10685359

  2. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly – if not exclusively – belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis. PMID:24983705

  3. Environmental tobacco smoke and periodontal disease in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Arbes, S J; Agústsdóttir, H; Slade, G D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cigarette smoking is a leading risk factor for periodontal disease. This cross-sectional study investigated the relation between environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and periodontal disease in the United States. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994). The outcome was periodontal disease, defined as 1 or more periodontal sites with attachment loss of 3 mm or greater and a pocket depth of 4 mm or greater at the same site. Exposure to ETS at home and work was self-reported. The study analyzed 6611 persons 18 years and older who had never smoked cigarettes or used other forms of tobacco. RESULTS: Exposure to ETS at home only, work only, and both was reported by 18.0%, 10.7%, and 3.8% of the study population, respectively. The adjusted odds of having periodontal disease were 1.6 (95% confidence interval = 1.1, 2.2) times greater for persons exposed to ETS than for persons not exposed. CONCLUSIONS: Among persons in the United States who had never used tobacco, those exposed to ETS were more likely to have periodontal disease than were those not exposed to ETS. PMID:11211634

  4. Self-reported measures for surveillance of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Eke, P I; Dye, B A; Wei, L; Slade, G D; Thornton-Evans, G O; Beck, J D; Taylor, G W; Borgnakke, W S; Page, R C; Genco, R J

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of self-reported measures in predicting periodontitis in a representative US adult population, based on 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data. Self-reported gum health and treatment history, loose teeth, bone loss around teeth, tooth not looking right, and use of dental floss and mouthwash were obtained during in-home interviews and validated against full-mouth clinically assessed periodontitis in 3,743 US adults 30 years and older. All self-reported measures (> 95% item response rates) were associated with periodontitis, and bivariate correlations between responses to these questions were weak, indicating low redundancy. In multivariable logistic regression modeling, the combined effects of demographic measures and responses to 5 self-reported questions in predicting periodontitis of mild or greater severity were 85% sensitive and 58% specific and produced an 'area under the receiver operator characteristic curve' (AUROCC) of 0.81. Four questions were 95% sensitive and 30% specific, with an AUROCC of 0.82 in predicting prevalence of clinical attachment loss ≥ 3 mm at one or more sites. In conclusion, self-reported measures performed well in predicting periodontitis in US adults. Where preferred clinically based surveillance is unattainable, locally adapted variations of these self-reported measures may be a promising alternative for surveillance of periodontitis. PMID:24065636

  5. Discrimination of periodontal diseases using diffuse reflectance spectral intensity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Sekhar, Prasanth; Betsy, Joseph; Presanthila, Janam; Subhash, Narayanan

    2012-02-01

    This clinical study was to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) intensity ratio R620/R575 in the quantification and discrimination of periodontitis and gingivitis from healthy gingiva. DR spectral measurements were carried out with white-light illumination from 70 healthy sites in 30 healthy volunteers, and 63 gingivitis- and 58 periodontitis-infected sites in 60 patients. Clinical parameters such as probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, and gingival index were recorded in patient population. Diagnostic accuracies for discrimination of gingivitis and periodontitis from healthy gingiva were determined by comparison of spectral signatures with clinical parameters. Divergence of average DR spectral intensity ratio between control and test groups was studied using analysis of variance. The mean DR spectrum on normalization at 620 nm showed marked differences between healthy tissue, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Hemoglobin concentration and apparent SO2 (oxygen saturation) were also calculated for healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites. DR spectral intensities at 545 and 575 nm showed a decreasing trend with progression of disease. Among the various DR intensity ratios studied, the R620/R575 ratio provided a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94% for discrimination of healthy tissues from gingivitis and a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 100% for discrimination of gingivitis from periodontitis.

  6. Oral Hygiene Behaviour Change During the Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment Phase

    PubMed Central

    Shamani, Saeed; Jansson, Leif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the frequency of smoking cessation and the use of proximal tooth cleaning routines after a nonsurgical periodontal treatment phase in a Specialist clinic of Periodontology and to evaluate if these behaviour changes had any influence on the periodontal healing results. The investigation was conducted as a retrospective longitudinal study on a randomly selected population of 100 patients referred for periodontal treatment. The variables were registered from the dental records and the radiographs. Forty-six individuals declared that they were smokers at baseline and one individual of those quitted smoking during the nonsurgical treatment period. The percentage of individuals who performed proximal tooth cleaning daily was significantly increased from 56% to 72% during the treatment period. The patients practising proximal tooth cleaning daily had significantly lower Plaque index before as well as after the nonsurgical periodontal treatment phase compared to those without the routine. The subjects who did not perform tooth cleaning daily before the treatment and who did not introduce this routine had significantly deeper periodontal pockets compared to those who performed inter-dental cleaning daily before treatment or who had adopted the routine during the treatment phase. However, there were no significant differences according to number of deepened periodontal pockets after nonsurgical treatment irrespective of proximal cleaning routines. In the future, motivational interviewing may be a more effective method to achieve a behaviour change if an extended education of dental hygienists within this area will be implemented. PMID:23284591

  7. Herbs as an antioxidant arsenal for periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Asha; Varghese, Sheeja Saji; Doraiswamy, Jayakumar Nadathur; Malaiappan, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Herbal medicines have long been used as a traditional mode of therapy for various ailments in India. They are being used increasingly as dietary supplements to ward off common diseases. Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent and can affect up to 90% of the world population. Gingivitis is the mild form whereas periodontitis results in an irreversible loss of supporting structures of the teeth. Even though periodontal pathogens form a crucial component in the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting oxidative stress playing a pivotal role in the disease initiation and progression. Studies have shown a direct correlation between increased levels of biomarkers for tissue damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the severity of periodontal disease. Thus, the focus of attention has revolved back to herbal medicines due to their wide spectrum of biological and medicinal activities, lower costs, and higher safety margin. Internet databases Pubmed and Google Scholar were searched, and the most relevant articles were considered for review. This review briefly describes the various herbs with antioxidant capacity and their potency in the treating periodontal disease. PMID:27069730

  8. Genome-wide association study of periodontal pathogen colonization.

    PubMed

    Divaris, K; Monda, K L; North, K E; Olshan, A F; Lange, E M; Moss, K; Barros, S P; Beck, J D; Offenbacher, S

    2012-07-01

    Pathological shifts of the human microbiome are characteristic of many diseases, including chronic periodontitis. To date, there is limited evidence on host genetic risk loci associated with periodontal pathogen colonization. We conducted a genome-wide association (GWA) study among 1,020 white participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy to severe chronic periodontitis, and for whom "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization quantification of 8 periodontal pathogens was performed. We examined 3 traits: "high red" and "high orange" bacterial complexes, and "high" Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) colonization. Genotyping was performed on the Affymetrix 6.0 platform. Imputation to 2.5 million markers was based on HapMap II-CEU, and a multiple-test correction was applied (genome-wide threshold of p < 5 × 10(-8)). We detected no genome-wide significant signals. However, 13 loci, including KCNK1, FBXO38, UHRF2, IL33, RUNX2, TRPS1, CAMTA1, and VAMP3, provided suggestive evidence (p < 5 × 10(-6)) of association. All associations reported for "red" and "orange" complex microbiota, but not for Aa, had the same effect direction in a second sample of 123 African-American participants. None of these polymorphisms was associated with periodontitis diagnosis. Investigations replicating these findings may lead to an improved understanding of the complex nature of host-microbiome interactions that characterizes states of health and disease. PMID:22699663

  9. Evidence-based periodontal therapy: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Anitha, V.; Ramakrishnan, T.; Sudhakar, Uma

    2008-01-01

    Dentists need to make clinical decisions based on limited scientific evidence. In clinical practice, a clinician must weigh a myriad of evidences every day. The goal of evidence-based dentistry is to help practitioners provide their patients with optimal care. This is achieved by integrating sound research evidence with personal clinical expertise and patient values to determine the best course of treatment. Periodontology has a rich background of research and scholarship. Therefore, efficient use of this wealth of research data needs to be a part of periodontal practice. Evidence-based periodontology aims to facilitate such an approach and it offers a bridge from science to clinical practice. The clinician must integrate the evidence with patient preference, scientific knowledge, and personal experience. Most important, it allows us to care for our patients. Therefore, evidence-based periodontology is a tool to support decision-making and integrating the best evidence available with clinical practice. PMID:20142947

  10. Relationships between periodontal disease and bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, F A; Mylotte, J M

    1996-10-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a prevalent and costly infection that is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of all ages. The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (e.g., penicillin-resistant pneumococci) suggests that bacterial pneumonia will assume increasing importance in the coming years. Thus, knowledge of the pathogenesis of, and risk factors for, bacterial pneumonia is critical to the development of strategies for prevention and treatment of these infections. Bacterial pneumonia in adults is the result of aspiration of oropharyngeal flora into the lower respiratory tract and failure of host defense mechanisms to eliminate the contaminating bacteria, which multiply in the lung and cause infection. It is recognized that community-acquired pneumonia and lung abscesses can be the result of infection by anaerobic bacteria; dental plaque would seem to be a logical source of these bacteria, especially in patients with periodontal disease. It is also possible that patients with high risk for pneumonia, such as hospitalized patients and nursing home residents, are likely to pay less attention to personal hygiene than healthy patients. One important dimension of this personal neglect may be diminished attention to oral hygiene. Poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease may promote oropharyngeal colonization by potential respiratory pathogens (PRPs) including Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter species, etc.), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. This paper provides the rationale for the development of this hypothesis especially as it pertains to mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients and nursing home residents, two patient groups with a high risk for bacterial pneumonia. PMID:8910830

  11. Molecular Differences between Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Kebschull, M.; Guarnieri, P.; Demmer, R.T.; Boulesteix, A.L.; Pavlidis, P.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    The 2 major forms of periodontitis, chronic (CP) and aggressive (AgP), do not display sufficiently distinct histopathological characteristics or microbiological/immunological features. We used molecular profiling to explore biological differences between CP and AgP and subsequently carried out supervised classification using machine-learning algorithms including an internal validation. We used whole-genome gene expression profiles from 310 ‘healthy’ or ‘diseased’ gingival tissue biopsies from 120 systemically healthy non-smokers, 65 with CP and 55 with AgP, each contributing with ≥ 2 ‘diseased’ gingival papillae (n = 241; with bleeding-on-probing, probing depth ≥ 4 mm, and clinical attachment loss ≥ 3 mm), and, when available, a ‘healthy’ papilla (n = 69; no bleeding-on-probing, probing depth ≤ 4 mm, and clinical attachment loss ≤ 4 mm). Our analyses revealed limited differences between the gingival tissue transcriptional profiles of AgP and CP, with genes related to immune responses, apoptosis, and signal transduction overexpressed in AgP, and genes related to epithelial integrity and metabolism overexpressed in CP. Different classifying algorithms discriminated CP from AgP with an area under the curve ranging from 0.63 to 0.99. The small differences in gene expression and the highly variable classifier performance suggest limited dissimilarities between established AgP and CP lesions. Future analyses may facilitate the development of a novel, ‘intrinsic’ classification of periodontitis based on molecular profiling. PMID:24122488

  12. Maintenance periodontal therapy after systemic antibiotic and regenerative therapy of generalized aggressive periodontitis. A case report with 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Sergio Júnior; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Villalpando, Karina Teixeira; Cirano, Fabiano Ribeiro; Pimentel, Suzana Peres

    2015-05-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is an inflammatory disease characterized by rapid attachment loss and bone destruction. This case report presents the 10-year results in a subject with generalized AgP treated by a regenerative periodontal therapeutic approach and the adjunctive use of antibiotics, following a systematic maintenance periodontal therapy. The use of enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) and adjunctive antibiotic therapy to treat AgP yielded improvements in clinical parameters and radiographic bony fill. This combined therapeutic approach following a systematic supportive periodontal therapy supports the long-term maintenance of teeth with previous advanced periodontal defects, demonstrating successful stability after 10-years follow-up. Clinical Relevance: The combined treatment protocol using EMD plus adjunctive antibiotic therapy, associated with a systematic supportive periodontal therapy, benefits the long-term maintenance of teeth with previous advanced periodontal defects in subjects presenting AgP, supporting this approach as an alternative in the treatment of AgP. PMID:26062264

  13. Gingival, Plasma and Salivary Levels of Melatonin in Periodontally Healthy Individuals and Chronic Periodontitis Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Thodur Madapusi; Vasanthi, Hannah Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Periodontal disease is an inflammatory condition affecting tooth supporting structures in which dysregulated immune response and oxidative stress mediate tissue destruction. Melatonin, the pineal gland hormone is a regulator of circadian rhythm, an antioxidant and an immunomodulator. Previous studies have shown lowered melatonin levels in saliva, plasma and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with periodontal disease. Till date no study has assessed the melatonin levels in gingival tissues. Materials and Methods: Five healthy individuals and 15 chronic periodontitis patients were recruited for this pilot study. 5ml of whole saliva, 2 ml peripheral blood and gingival tissue samples were obtained from each individual at 8.00 am in fasting state. Melatonin assay was performed with a commercially available ELISA kit. Statistical analysis was done to assess the difference in mean melatonin levels among the groups. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in mean melatonin levels between healthy individuals and chronic periodontitis patients in saliva (p=.266) and plasma (p=.933) samples, whereas in gingival tissue samples (p=.015), the melatonin levels were significantly lowered in chronic periodontitis patients compared to healthy individuals. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the presence of melatonin in gingival tissue. Furthermore, melatonin levels are lowered in gingival tissues of chronic periodontitis patients. PMID:25954699

  14. Orosomucoid, a new biomarker in the association between obesity and periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Rangé, Hélène; Poitou, Christine; Boillot, Adrien; Ciangura, Cécile; Katsahian, Sandrine; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Czernichow, Sébastien; Meilhac, Olivier; Bouchard, Philippe; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate an association between periodontitis and obesity. The biological mechanisms of this relationship remain unclear. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between periodontitis and the common systemic inflammatory markers in 32 morbidly obese patients recruited in a Clinical Nutrition department. Periodontal condition was evaluated using pocket depth (PD) measurement, a classical clinical marker of ongoing periodontitis. Major periodontal risk factors were recorded (age, gender, diabetes and smoking status), as well as plasma levels of inflammatory markers (CRP, orosomucoid, IL-6) and adipokines (adiponectin, leptin). All patients included in the sample exhibited evidence of periodontitis, 16 of whom were diagnosed as having severe disease. Adjusted logistic regression analysis indicated that the severity of periodontitis was associated with the plasma level of orosomucoid (p<0.04) after adjustment for age, gender and smoking. Our study thus suggests that the severity of periodontitis, in morbidly obese patients, is associated with the increase of orosomucoid levels. PMID:23526947

  15. Natural History of Periodontitis and a Review of Technologies to Prevent and Treat It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antczak-Bouckoms, Alexia

    1994-01-01

    The classification scheme for periodontal diseases developed in 1989 is discussed, and technologies, both surgical and nonsurgical, for prevention, control, and regeneration of periodontal tissues are described and compared. Research needs are discussed. (MSE)

  16. Orosomucoid, a New Biomarker in the Association between Obesity and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Rangé, Hélène; Poitou, Christine; Boillot, Adrien; Ciangura, Cécile; Katsahian, Sandrine; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Czernichow, Sébastien; Meilhac, Olivier; Bouchard, Philippe; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate an association between periodontitis and obesity. The biological mechanisms of this relationship remain unclear. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between periodontitis and the common systemic inflammatory markers in 32 morbidly obese patients recruited in a Clinical Nutrition department. Periodontal condition was evaluated using pocket depth (PD) measurement, a classical clinical marker of ongoing periodontitis. Major periodontal risk factors were recorded (age, gender, diabetes and smoking status), as well as plasma levels of inflammatory markers (CRP, orosomucoid, IL-6) and adipokines (adiponectin, leptin). All patients included in the sample exhibited evidence of periodontitis, 16 of whom were diagnosed as having severe disease. Adjusted logistic regression analysis indicated that the severity of periodontitis was associated with the plasma level of orosomucoid (p<0.04) after adjustment for age, gender and smoking. Our study thus suggests that the severity of periodontitis, in morbidly obese patients, is associated with the increase of orosomucoid levels. PMID:23526947

  17. Endodontic and periodontal management of a severely affected maxillary lateral incisor having combined mucosal fenestration and palatogingival groove

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Sood, Vishal; Yadav, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal fenestrations, wherein the tooth root apices are clinically discernible in the oral cavity subsequent to loss of overlying alveolar bone and mucosa, are rare pathologic entities. Palato gingival grooves- anatomic aberrations are also infrequent occurrences that notoriously predispose to periodontal pathologies of varying extent. Both conditions independently are known to popularly affect maxillary lateral incisors. Coexistent fenestration defect and palato gingival groove in the same tooth is extremely rare and undoubtedly is a perfect combination to precipitate severe endodontic-periodontal consequences. In this report, a 34-year-old patient presented to the dental department with complaint of esthetics in relation to exposed root of right maxillary lateral incisor. On closer inspection, a palato gingival groove in addition to fenestration defect was evident on the root surface along with a periodontal pocket of >5 mm. An interdisciplinary treatment was instituted which included endodontic treatment followed by root end resection, osseous bone graft placement and guided tissue regeneration procedures for repair of mucosal fenestration defect. Debridement of the palatal pocket, with saucerization of the groove and restoration with glass ionomer cement were simultaneously employed to correct the palatal defect. PMID:26229283

  18. Periodontal Microbiota and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Desvarieux, Moïse; Demmer, Ryan T.; Rundek, Tatjana; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Jacobs, David R.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Papapanou, Panos N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic infections, including periodontal infections, may predispose to cardiovascular disease. We investigated the relationship between periodontal microbiota and subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Of 1056 persons (age 69±9 years) with no history of stroke or myocardial infarction enrolled in the Oral Infections and Vascular Disease Epidemiology Study (INVEST), we analyzed 657 dentate subjects. Among these subjects, 4561 subgingival plaque samples were collected (average of 7 samples/subject) and quantitatively assessed for 11 known periodontal bacteria by DNA-DNA checkerboard hybridization. Extensive in-person cardiovascular risk factor measurements, a carotid scan with high-resolution B-mode ultrasound, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein values were obtained. In 3 separate analyses, mean carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) was regressed on tertiles of (1) burden of all bacteria assessed, (2) burden of bacteria causative of periodontal disease (etiologic bacterial burden), and (3) the relative predominance of causative/over other bacteria in the subgingival plaque. All analyses were adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, gender, education, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, systolic blood pressure, and LDL and HDL cholesterol. Overall periodontal bacterial burden was related to carotid IMT. This relationship was specific to causative bacterial burden and the dominance of etiologic bacteria in the observed microbiological niche. Adjusted mean IMT values across tertiles of etiologic bacterial dominance were 0.84, 0.85, and 0.88 (P=0.002). Similarly, white blood cell values increased across tertiles of etiologic bacterial burden from 5.57 to 6.09 and 6.03 cells × 109/L (P=0.01). C-reactive protein values were unrelated to periodontal microbial status (P=0.82). Conclusions Our data provide evidence of a direct relationship between periodontal microbiology and subclinical atherosclerosis. This relationship exists independent

  19. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer’s disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer’s disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation. PMID:26963387

  20. Relationship between smoking and periodontal probing pocket depth profile.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lottie; Modin, Carolina; Friskopp, Johan; Jansson, Leif

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the periodontal probing pocket depth profile differs significantly between smokers and non-smokers as well as within the smoking group. Subjects born 1940-1943 were collected from a computer database at a specialist clinic of periodontology. The patients included consisted of 293 individuals between 57 and 64years of age examined by nine periodontists. The periodontal probing depth at site level, age, gender and smoking habits were collected from the database. Former smokers and patients with an uncertain history of smoking habits were excluded. The smokers were stratified into three groups according to the daily consumption of cigarettes (1-10 cig/day, 11-20 cig/day, > 20 cig/day). The relative frequencies of periodontal probing pocket depths of 4-5 mm and > or = 6 mm were calculated and these two categories were used in the analyses. The partial correlation coefficients between smoking and the percentage share of periodontal pocket depths in different tooth regions were calculated by using multiple regression analyses. The smokers had significantly deeper periodontal pockets compared to the nonsmokers. The correlation between smoking and the percentage share of palatal periodontal pockets > or = 6 mm was significant. The percentage share of palatal pockets > or = 6 mm was significantly increased for subjects who smoked > 20 cigarettes per day (25%) compared to non-smokers as well as compared to subjects with a daily consumption of 1-20 cigarettes per day. This difference was significant within all tooth groups in the upper jaw. The results support the hypothesis that smoking has a local effect on periodontal pocket depth beside the systemic effect. PMID:19172916

  1. Investigation of periodontal tissue during a long space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyeva, Zoya; Viacheslav, Ilyin; Skedina, Marina

    Previous studies conducted on the International Space Station found that upon completion of the space flight there are significant changes in the local immunity and periodontal microflora of astronauts. Also research in ground-based experiments that simulate space flight factors showed that prolonged hypokinesia antiorthostatic leads to impaired functional indicators of the periodontal vascular system, an unidirectional change from the microbiota and the immune system. That results in the appearance and progressive increase of the parodontial pathogenic bacteria and increase of the content of immunoglobulins in the oral fluid. All these changes are classified as risk factors for the development of inflammatory periodontal diseases in astronauts. However, the studies were unable to determine whether the changes result from a long space flight and the peculiarities of formation the local immunity and periodontal microbiota during the space flight, or they are one of the specific manifestations of the readaptationary post-flight condition of the body. In this regard, the planned research in a long space flight suggests: to use the means of microbial control, which can retain of the anaerobes periodontal microbiota sampling directly in the space flight; to assess the specificity of changes of the periodontal immune status under the influence of the space flight factors, and to assess the state of microcirculation of periodontal tissue in astronauts. A comprehensive study of the reaction of dentition during the space flight will make it possible to study the pathogenesis of changes for developing an adequate prevention aimed at optimizing the state of dentition of the astronauts.

  2. Occurrence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in Indian chronic periodontitis patients and periodontally healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vinayak Mahableshwar; Bhat, Kishore Gajanan; Kugaji, Manohar Suresh; Ingalgi, Preeti Shivaji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), an important primary periodontal pathogen, is known for its strong virulence characteristics that cause periodontal disease. We investigated Aa occurrence in Indian individuals using culture and 16 s rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study with 100 participants each in the healthy and chronic periodontitis (CP) groups was conducted. The subgingival plaque was collected and immediately plated on selective media for Aa. The remaining plaque samples were used for DNA extraction. PCR was performed using specific primers for Aa. Statistical Analysis Used: The detection of bacteria and the clinical parameters between the groups were compared using the Mann–Whitney U-test. For assessing the agreement between the results of anaerobic culture and PCR, Kappa analyses were performed. Results: Aa levels using culture and PCR was 51% and 69% in the CP group and 12% and 30% in the healthy group, respectively. The two groups showed significant differences (P < 0.00001). The detection accuracy of culture and PCR was assessed, and the coefficient of accuracy (k) was highly significant in the healthy (0.3103; P < 0.0001) and CP groups (0.1536; P < 0.0497). Conclusions: Aa was predominantly found in the CP group compared with the healthy group, which is consistent with previous findings. Our results showed that both techniques can be used for detecting Aa. An ideal technique for detecting subgingival microorganisms should be carefully selected depending on the scope of the intended future work. PMID:27143824

  3. Association of three putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis in Brazilian subjects

    PubMed Central

    GONÇALVES, Cristiane; SOARES, Geisla Mary S.; FAVERI, Marcelo; PÉREZ-CHAPARRO, Paula Juliana; LOBÃO, Eduardo; FIGUEIREDO, Luciene Cristina; BACCELLI, Gustavo Titonele; FERES, Magda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of Porphyromonas endodontalis, Filifactor alocis and Dialister pneumosintes with the occurrence of periodontitis. Material and Methods Thirty subjects with chronic periodontitis (ChP) and 10 with periodontal health (PH) were included in the study. Nine subgingival biofilm samples were collected as follows: i) PH group - from the mesial/buccal aspect of each tooth in two randomly chosen contralateral quadrants; ii) ChP group - from three sites in each of the following probing depth (PD) categories: shallow (≤3 mm), moderate (4-6 mm) and deep (≥7 mm). Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization was used to analyze the samples. Results We found the three species evaluated in a higher percentage of sites and at higher levels in the group with ChP than in the PH group (p<0.05, Mann-Whitney test). We also observed these differences when the samples from sites with PD≤4 mm or ≥5 mm of subjects with ChP were compared with those from subjects with PH (p<0.05, Mann-Whitney test). In addition, the prevalence and levels of D. pneumosintes, and especially of F. alocis were very low in healthy subjects (0.12x105 and 0.01x105, respectively). Conclusion F. alocis and D. pneumosintes might be associated with the etiology of ChP, and their role in the onset and progression of this infection should be further investigated. The role of P. endodontalis was less evident, since this species was found in relatively high levels and prevalence in the PH group. PMID:27119767

  4. Association of three putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis in Brazilian subjects.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristiane; Soares, Geisla Mary S; Faveri, Marcelo; Pérez-Chaparro, Paula Juliana; Lobão, Eduardo; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Baccelli, Gustavo Titonele; Feres, Magda

    2016-04-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of Porphyromonas endodontalis, Filifactor alocis and Dialister pneumosintes with the occurrence of periodontitis. Material and Methods Thirty subjects with chronic periodontitis (ChP) and 10 with periodontal health (PH) were included in the study. Nine subgingival biofilm samples were collected as follows: i) PH group - from the mesial/buccal aspect of each tooth in two randomly chosen contralateral quadrants; ii) ChP group - from three sites in each of the following probing depth (PD) categories: shallow (≤3 mm), moderate (4-6 mm) and deep (≥7 mm). Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization was used to analyze the samples. Results We found the three species evaluated in a higher percentage of sites and at higher levels in the group with ChP than in the PH group (p<0.05, Mann-Whitney test). We also observed these differences when the samples from sites with PD≤4 mm or ≥5 mm of subjects with ChP were compared with those from subjects with PH (p<0.05, Mann-Whitney test). In addition, the prevalence and levels of D. pneumosintes, and especially of F. alocis were very low in healthy subjects (0.12x105 and 0.01x105, respectively). Conclusion F. alocis and D. pneumosintes might be associated with the etiology of ChP, and their role in the onset and progression of this infection should be further investigated. The role of P. endodontalis was less evident, since this species was found in relatively high levels and prevalence in the PH group. PMID:27119767

  5. On the reliability of the holographic method for measurement of soft tissue modifications during periodontal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratul, Stefan-Ioan; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; de Sabata, Aldo; Rominu, Mihai; Ogodescu, Alexandru; Rusu, Darian

    2014-01-01

    Holographic evaluations count among recent measurement tools in orthodontics and prosthodontics. This research introduces holography as an assessment method of 3D variations of gingival retractions. The retraction of gingiva on frontal regions of 5 patients with periodontitis was measured in six points and was evaluated by holographic methods using a He-Ne laser device (1mV, Superlum, Carrigtwohill, Ireland) inside a holographic bank of 200 x 100cm. Impressions were taken during first visit and cast models were manufactured. Six months after the end of periodontal treatment, clinical measurements were repeated and the hologram of the first model was superimposed on a final model cast, by using reference points, while maintaining the optical geometric perimeters. The retractions were evaluated 3D in every point using a dedicated software (Sigma Scan Pro,Systat Software, SanJose, CA, USA). The Wilcoxon test was used to compare the mean recession changes between baseline and six months after treatment, and between values in vivo and the values on hologram. No statistically significant differences between values in vivo and on the hologram were found. In conclusion, holography provides a valuable tool for assessing gingival retractions on virtual models. The data can be stored, reproduced, transmitted and compared at a later time point with accuracy.

  6. Ending a Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ending a Pregnancy Ending a Pregnancy What is abortion? Abortion means ending a pregnancy early. In some cases, ... This is called a miscarriage, or a spontaneous abortion. In other cases, a woman chooses to end ...

  7. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Anzai, Jun; Nagayasu-Tanaka, Toshie; Terashima, Akio; Asano, Taiji; Yamada, Satoru; Nozaki, Takenori; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT). After FGF-2 (0.3%) or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC) were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological healing process

  8. [THE MOLECULAR GENETIC CHARACTERISTIC OF SPECIES CONTENT OF SALIVA AND GINGIVAL RECESS UNDER PERIODONTITIS].

    PubMed

    Tamarova, E R; Baimiev, A Kh; Shvetz, K Yu; Mavzyutov, A R

    2015-12-01

    The examination was carried out of samplings of 110 patients with periodontitis (observation group) and 60 patients without pathology of periodont (comparison group). The polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze samples of saliva and contents of periodontal recesses for detecting species-specific DNA fragments of Porphymmonas gigngivalis, Streptococcus macacae, S. mutans, S. oralis, S. salivarius, S. sangis, S. sobrinus, Treponema denticola. In patients with periodontitis S. mutans, S. oralis S. sobrinus were reliably more often detected in the content of periodontal recesses and S. mutans, S. sobrinus i in saliva. In the observation group the rate of detection of association S. mutans--S. oralis--S. sangis--S. sobrinus was significantly exceeded (up to 15.6%, X2 = 9.1, p = 0.004). In ten days of effective treatment of periodontitis reliable decreastng of rate of detection of S. wasoralis, S. sobrinus was observed in contents of periodontal recesses but not in of saliva. The detection of S.sobrinus using technique of polymerase chain reaction in contents of periodontal recesses and/or saliva of patients with periodontitis has a diagnostic value. The detection of S.sobrinus in contents of periodontal recesses is significant both in monoculture and in association S. mutans--S. oralis--S. sangis--S.sobrinus. The absence of S. sobrinus in contents of periodontal recesses testifies effectiveness of treatment of main disease (periodontitis). PMID:27032255

  9. Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Almerich-Silla, Jose Manuel; Montiel-Company, Jose María; Pastor, Sara; Serrano, Felipe; Puig-Silla, Miriam; Dasí, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (GPx and SOD) were determined in saliva. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the deepest periodontal pocket and PCR was used to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Results. Periodontal disease was found to be associated with increased oxidative stress parameter levels. These levels rose according to the number and type of different periodontal bacteria found in the periodontal pockets. The presence of different types of periodontal bacteria is predictive independent variables in linear regresion models of oxidative stress parameters as dependent variable, above all 8-OHdG. Conclusions. Oxidative stress parameter levels are correlated with the presence of different types of bacteria. Determination of these levels and periodontal bacteria could be a potent tool for controlling periodontal disease development. PMID:26494938

  10. Effects of Caloric Restriction on Inflammatory Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Mark A.; Dawson, Dolphus R.; Novak, Karen F.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Gunsolley, John C.; Branch-Mays, Grishondra L.; Holt, Stanley C.; Mattison, Julie A.; Ingram, Donald K.; Novak, M. John

    2008-01-01

    Objective Dietary caloric restriction (CR) has been found to reduce systemic markers of inflammation and may attenuate the effects of chronic inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of long-term CR on naturally occurring chronic inflammatory periodontal disease in a nonhuman primate model. Methods The effects of long-term CR on extent and severity of naturally occurring chronic periodontal disease, local inflammatory and immune responses, and periodontal microbiology, were evaluated in a cohort of 81 (35 female and 46 male; 13–40 years of age) rhesus monkeys (M. mulatta) with no previous exposure to routine oral hygiene. The CR monkeys had been subjected to 30% CR for 13–17 years relative to control-fed (CON) animals starting at 3–5 years of age. Clinical and laboratory parameters were submitted to analysis of covariance, including Tukey's test for post hoc comparisons, linear regression analysis, and nonparametric correlation analysis. Results Same sex CR and CON monkeys exhibited comparable mean scores for plaque index, calculus index, and bleeding on probing. Among CON animals, males showed significantly greater periodontal breakdown, as reflected by higher mean clinical attachment level (CAL) and periodontal probing depth (PD) scores, than females (p ≤ 0.05). CR males had significantly less periodontal pocketing compared to CON males (p ≤ 0.05). CR males demonstrated a significantly lower IgG antibody response and lower levels of IL-8 and β-glucuronidase in gingival crevicular fluid compared to control males. A similar but nonsignificant reduction was found for IL-1β in CR male monkeys. In contrast, CR females exhibited mean PD and CAL scores comparable to CON females. CR females had a lower IgG antibody response but comparable levels of inflammatory markers in GCF compared to CON females. The CR diet had no demonstrable effects on the periodontal microbiota in male or female monkeys. Conclusion Males exhibited

  11. Associations between the consumption of carbonated beverages and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, In-Seok; Han, Kyungdo; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Yong-Gyu; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Consumption of carbonated beverages was reported to be associated with obesity and other adverse health consequences. This study was performed to assess the relationship between the consumption of carbonated beverages and periodontal disease using nationally representative data. The data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted between 2008 and 2010 were used; the analysis in this study was confined to a total of 5517 respondents >19 years old who had no missing values for the consumption of carbonated beverages or outcome variables. The community periodontal index greater than or equal to code 3 was defined as periodontal disease. The odds ratios of the percentage of individuals with periodontal treatment needs tended to increase with the consumption of carbonated beverages. Adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals adjusted for various factors including age, sex, body mass index, smoking, drinking, exercise, metabolic syndrome, frequency of tooth brushing per day, use of secondary oral products, dental checkup within a year, consumption of coffee of the individuals with the consumption of carbonated beverages once or less per month, once or less per week and twice or more per week were 1.109(0.804,1.528), 1.404(1.035,1.906), and 1.466(1.059,2.029), respectively. A subgroup analysis revealed that in individuals with body mass index < 25 or waist circumference < 90 cm for males or < 80 cm for females, the prevalence of periodontal disease increased with higher consumption of carbonated beverages (P for trend < 0.05). Consumption of carbonated beverages was positively associated with the risk of periodontal disease in Korean adults. In a subgroup analysis, the individuals consuming carbonated beverages with body mass index < 25 or waist circumference < 90 cm for males or < 80 cm for females were more likely to have periodontal disease. Consumption of carbonated beverages may be considered to be

  12. Expression of programmed death 1 ligand 1 on periodontal tissue cells as a possible protective feedback mechanism against periodontal tissue destruction

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIEHUA; WANG, CHIEH-MEI; ZHANG, PING; WANG, XIAOQIAN; CHEN, JIAO; YANG, JUN; LU, WANLU; ZHOU, WENJIE; YUAN, WENWEN; FENG, YUN

    2016-01-01

    Programmed death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) is a negative co-stimulatory molecule in immune responses. Previous reports have indicated that inflammatory cytokines can upregulate the expression of PD-L1 in tumor cells, which in turn suppresses host immune responses. Periodontitis is characterized by persistent inflammation of the periodontium, which is initiated by infection with oral bacteria and results in damage to cells and the matrices of the periodontal connective tissues. In the present study, the expression and function of PD-L1 in periodontal tissue destruction were examined. Periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) were stimulated by inflammatory cytokines and periodontal pathogens. The expression and function of PD-L1 on the surface of PDLCs was investigated using flow cytometry in vitro. Periodontal disease was induced by the injection of Porphyromonas gingivalis in mouse models. The expression levels of PD-L1 in the periodontal tissues of the mice were analyzed using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. PD-L1 was inducibly expressed on the PDLCs by the inflammatory cytokines and periodontal pathogens. The inflammation-induced expression of PD-L1 was shown to cause the apoptosis of activated T lymphocytes and improve the survival of PDLCs. Furthermore, in the mouse model of experimental periodontitis, the expression of PD-L1 in severe cases of periodontitis was significantly lower, compared with that in mild cases. By contrast, no significant differences were observed between the healthy control and severe periodontitis groups. The results of the present study showed that the expression of PD-L1 may inhibit the destruction of periodontal tissues, indicating the involvement of a possible protective feedback mechanism against periodontal infection. PMID:26847035

  13. Inhibitory effect of quercetin on periodontal pathogens in vitro.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, F; Wong, R W K; Rabie, A B M

    2010-06-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) are bacteria strongly associated with early onset, progressive and refractory periodontal disease and associated alveolar bone loss. Quercetin is a flavonoid found in many foods including apples, onions and tea. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quercetin on in vitro growth of periodontal pathogens Aa and Pg. For comparison, quercetin's effect on several oral microbes was also evaluated. Different concentrations of quercetin solution were added to calibrated suspensions of Aa and Pg. All suspensions were incubated for 1, 3, 6, and 24 h in an anaerobic chamber at 37 degrees C. At each time point, selected dilutions from each culture broth were plated on blood agar plates. Colonies appearing on blood agar plates were visually counted on 3 days for Aa and 5 days for Pg. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of both periodontal pathogens were also determined. Both periodontal bacteria showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in viable counts after 1 h. No colony forming units of Pg could be observed after 24 h. The results suggest that quercetin possesses significant antimicrobial properties on periodontal pathogens in vitro. PMID:19957242

  14. Genome wide association scan for chronic periodontitis implicates novel locus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence for a genetic contribution to chronic periodontitis. In this study, we conducted a genome wide association study among 866 participants of the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy (N = 767) to severe chronic periodontitis (N = 99). Methods Genotypingi of over half-million single nucleotide polymorphisms was determined. Analyses were done twice, first in the complete dataset of all ethnicities, and second including only samples defined as self-reported Whites. From the top 100 results, twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms had consistent results in both analyses (borderline p-values ranging from 1E-05 to 1E-6) and were selected to be tested in two independent datasets derived from 1,460 individuals from Porto Alegre, and 359 from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Meta-analyses of the Single nucleotide polymorphisms showing a trend for association in the independent dataset were performed. Results The rs1477403 marker located on 16q22.3 showed suggestive association in the discovery phase and in the Porto Alegre dataset (p = 0.05). The meta-analysis suggested the less common allele decreases the risk of chronic periodontitis. Conclusions Our data offer a clear hypothesis to be independently tested regarding the contribution of the 16q22.3 locus to chronic periodontitis. PMID:25008200

  15. Influence of moderate to severe chronic periodontitis on dental pulp

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, K; Disfani, R; Zare, R; Moeintaghavi, A; Ali, Saadat A.; Boostani, H. R

    2012-01-01

    Background: The relationship between periodontal disease and dental pulp changes is controversial and has been debated for many years. This human study was performed to evaluate the possible effects of moderate to advanced periodontal disease on the different aspect of dental pulp structure. Materials and Methods: Twenty hopeless permanent teeth were extracted from systemically healthy adults because of moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis, with a bone loss of >6 mm and a mobility of grade 2 or 3. Upon extraction, the apical 2 to 3 mm of the roots were immediately sectioned. Four to five sections were mounted on each slide, and every third slide was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The specimens were histologically processed and examined by an oral pathologist. Results: Non-inflamed pulp, with partial or complete necrosis in some sections and several non-necrotic sections, was found in only 6.3% of teeth. Most teeth (58.3%) displayed edematous pulps. Slightly fibrotic pulps were seen in 52.1% of sections. Odontoblastic integrity was seen in 31.3% of teeth. Most teeth (77.1%) displayed no pulp stones. In 43.8% of teeth, the pulp vessels displayed dilatation. Conclusions: Moderate to advanced periodontal disease can affect the dental pulp. Careful consideration of diagnostic and treatment planing in patients with endodontic-periodontal involvement is therefore recommended. PMID:23493524

  16. Design of a Multiple Drug Delivery System Directed at Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, Sharath C.; Thomas, Mark V.; Peyyala, Rebecca; Dziubla, Thomas D.; Puleo, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is highly prevalent, with 90% of the world population affected by either periodontitis or its preceding condition, gingivitis. These conditions are caused by bacterial biofilms on teeth, which stimulate a chronic inflammatory response that leads to loss of alveolar bone and, ultimately, the tooth. Current treatment methods for periodontitis address specific parts of the disease, with no individual treatment serving as a complete therapy. The present research sought to demonstrate development of a multiple drug delivery system for stepwise treatment of different stages of periodontal disease. More specifically, multilayered films were fabricated from an association polymer comprising cellulose acetate phthalate and Pluronic F-127 to achieve sequential release of drugs. The four types of drugs used were metronidazole, ketoprofen, doxycycline, and simvastatin to eliminate infection, inhibit inflammation, prevent tissue destruction, and aid bone regeneration, respectively. Different erosion times and adjustable sequential release profiles were achieved by modifying the number of layers or by inclusion of a slower-eroding polymer layer. Analysis of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory bioactivity showed that drugs released from the devices retained 100% bioactivity. The multilayered CAPP delivery system offers a versatile approach for releasing different drugs based on the pathogenesis of periodontitis and other conditions. PMID:23948165

  17. Composition of Human Peri-implantitis and Periodontitis Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Carcuac, O.; Berglundh, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine differences in cellular characteristics of human peri-implantitis and periodontitis lesions. Two groups of patients were included: 40 patients with generalized severe chronic periodontitis and 40 patients presenting with severe peri-implantitis. Soft tissue biopsies were obtained from diseased sites (probing pocket depth ≥ 7 mm with bleeding on probing) and prepared for histologic and immunohistochemical analysis. In contrast to periodontitis samples, peri-implantitis lesions were more than twice as large and contained significantly larger area proportions, numbers, and densities of CD138-, CD68-, and MPO-positive cells than periodontitis lesions. Peri-implantitis lesions also extended to a position that was apical of the pocket epithelium and not surrounded by noninfiltrated connective tissue. They further presented with significantly larger densities of vascular structures in the connective tissue area lateral to the infiltrated connective tissue than within the infiltrate. This study suggests that peri-implantitis and periodontitis lesions exhibit critical histopathologic differences, which contribute to the understanding of dissimilarities in onset and progression between the 2 diseases. PMID:25261052

  18. Salivary Biomarkers of Periodontal Disease in Response to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, William Michael; Lin, Yushun; Kryscio, Richard J.; Dawson, Dolphus R.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Craig S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Salivary biomarkers of periodontitis were assessed longitudinally to determine response to therapy. Methods A 6-month case-controlled study of adults with chronic periodontitis was performed, with 33 participants receiving oral hygiene instructions (OHI) alone and 35 with scaling and root planing (SRP) combined with OHI. Saliva samples collected at week 0, 16 and 28 were analyzed for interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-α. Clinical measures of periodontal disease were recorded at each visit. Results All parameters of periodontal health improved significantly in both groups by week 16 (p<0.0001) with the SRP group demonstrating greater benefit at week 16 and 28. Baseline OPG and TNF-α levels changed significantly at both follow-up visits (p<0.03), regardless of treatment group. IL-1β and MMP-8 levels decreased significantly from baseline (p≤0.04) in the SRP group only. OPG, MMP-8 and MIP-1α were significantly reduced in responders compared with non-responders (p=0.04, 0.01, 0.05 respectively). In receiver operating characteristic analyses, MMP-8 produced the highest area under the curve (≥ 0.7; p=0.01). Conclusion Salivary levels of IL-1β, MMP-8, OPG and MIP-1α reflected disease severity and response to therapy suggesting their potential utility for monitoring periodontal disease status. PMID:21480939

  19. Vitamin D and periodontal health in older men.

    PubMed

    Alshouibi, E N; Kaye, E K; Cabral, H J; Leone, C W; Garcia, R I

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin D, an anti-inflammatory mediator, has potential benefits for physical and oral health. Although it is produced endogenously, some individuals have a greater need for dietary and supplemental sources. This repeated-measures cross-sectional study assessed associations between total vitamin D intake and periodontal health in older men. Participants were 562 members of the Department of Veterans Affairs Dental Longitudinal Study, mean age 62.9 years, who were examined 1 to 4 times between 1986 and 1998. A calibrated examiner measured probing pocket depth (PPD) and attachment loss (AL) on each tooth. Alveolar bone loss (ABL) was determined from radiographs. Severe periodontal disease was defined as PPD ≥ 5 mm on ≥ 1 tooth and AL ≥ 6 mm at ≥ 2 sites (not on same tooth), and moderate-to-severe alveolar bone loss as ABL ≥ 40% at ≥ 3 sites. Generalized estimating equations were used to compute the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of having periodontal disease by level of vitamin D intake. Total vitamin D intake ≥ 800 IU was associated with lower odds of severe periodontal disease (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.55-0.81) and moderate-to-severe ABL (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.30-0.96) relative to intake < 400 IU/day. Vitamin D intake may protect against periodontal disease progression. PMID:23788610

  20. Antiinflammatory effect of BPC 157 on experimental periodontitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Keremi, B; Lohinai, Z; Komora, P; Duhaj, S; Borsi, K; Jobbagy-Ovari, G; Kallo, K; Szekely, A D; Fazekas, A; Dobo-Nagy, C; Sikiric, P; Varga, G

    2009-12-01

    The pentadecapeptide BPC 157 has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and wound healing effects on multiple target tissues and organs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of BPC 157 on inflammation and bone resorption in experimental periodontitis in rats. First the acute effect of BPC was tested on gingival blood flow by laser doppler flowmetry. Then periodontitis was produced by a silk ligature placed around the lower left first molar. Rats were treated with BPC 157 (once daily for 12 days) or vehicle. At day 13, the gingivomucosal tissues encircling the molars were removed on both sides. Inflammation was assessed by Evans blue plasma extravasation technique and by histology. Alveolar bone loss was analyzed by microCT. BPC 157 had no effect on gingivomucosal blood flow. Twelve day ligature caused a significantly increased Evans blue extravasation in the gingivomucosal tissue, histological signs of inflammation, and alveolar bone destruction. BPC 157 treatment significantly reduced both plasma extravasation, histological alterations and alveolar bone resorption. In conclusion, systemic application of BPC 157 does not alter blood circulation in healthy gingiva. Chronic application of the peptide has potent antiinflammatory effects on periodontal tissues in ligature induced periodontitis in rats. Taken together, this proof of concept study suggests that BPC 157 may represent a new peptide candidate in the treatment of periodontal disease. PMID:20388954

  1. Association between Chronic Periodontitis and Oral/Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Renata Costa de; Dias, Fernando Luiz; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case control study was to assess the association between the extent and severity of chronic periodontitis and oral cavity and/or oropharyngeal cancer. The case group comprised 35 patients (mean age 56.1±8.4), diagnosed for oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer. The control group comprised 40 individuals (mean age 55.4±9.4) without diagnostic of cancer. All individuals were subjected to a periodontal examination, including bleeding on probing, plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and decayed, extracted and filled teeth index (DMFT). The case group had significantly more sites with plaque. GI and BOP had similar values in both groups. The median PPD and CAL values were significantly higher for the case group. Chronic generalized periodontitis was predominant in 80% of patients with oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer. Eighty nine percent of the patients in the case group presented severe chronic periodontitis. There was no significant difference between groups for median values of DMFT. The extent and severity of chronic periodontitis remained as risk indicators for oral cavity and/or oropharyngeal cancer even after the adjustments for traditional confound factors, i.e. smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:27224557

  2. Periodontal Health Condition and Associated Factors among University Students, Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Dhaifullah, Esam; Al-Motareb, Fouad; Halboub, Esam; Elkhatat, Essam; Baroudi, Kusai; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Studies on oral health status among Yemeni population are scarce. Aim This study aimed to evaluate the periodontal health among advantaged section of Yemeni society, university students, in health and non-health fields. Materials and Methods Periodontal health status of a sample of 360 students from dental, medical and literature faculties (120 each with equal gender distribution) at Sana’a University was evaluated by two calibrated examiners using CPI index. Data regarding tooth-brushing practices and smoking and khat chewing habits were obtained using a structured interview questionnaire. Results Only 45 students (12.5%) had healthy periodontium, while 113 (31.4%), 186 (51.7%) and 16 (4.4%) had bleeding, calculus and shallow pocket, respectively, with no significant differences between faculties. Females revealed significantly better periodontal health compared to males, though their bleeding score was higher. Dental and medical students and female students in general were significantly more interested in tooth-brushing and significantly less interested in practicing the deleterious habits such as smoking and khat chewing. Conclusion The overall periodontal health of Sana’a University students is still unsatisfactory even among students in health field. Females and students in health field revealed better periodontal health and oral health practices (tooth-brushing) in comparison to male students and those in non-health field. The negative effects of the highly prevalent smoking and khat chewing habits deserve further reliable researches and proper educational programs at the national level. PMID:26813290

  3. Characterization of stem cells from alveolar periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Shen, Huan; Zheng, Wei; Tang, Liang; Yang, Zhenhua; Gao, Yuan; Yang, Qingtian; Wang, Chen; Duan, Yinzhong; Jin, Yan

    2011-04-01

    Complete and predicable regeneration of complex periodontal structures, which include cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone, has been a great challenge for periodontal researchers. It is generally believed that human PDL from the root surface contains stem cells (r-PDLSCs), which can enhance cementum/PDL-like tissues regeneration in vivo. In this work, PDL was found to possess asymmetrically distributed stem cells observed by long-term bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling. Putative stem cells from human PDL on the alveolar bone surface (a-PDLSCs) were then isolated and characterized. It was shown that a-PDLSCs exhibited strong proliferation capability and expressed high percentages of mesenchymal stem cell markers. Comparatively, a-PDLSCs had higher multilineage differentiation potential than r-PDLSCs with regard to both osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of mineralization-related markers of a-PDLSCs were also higher than those of r-PDLSCs. In vivo, a-PDLSCs could regenerate bone/PDL-like structures and repair critical-size defects created in calvarial bone of NOD/SCID mice. Autologous PDLSC-mediated periodontal regeneration showed that a-PDLSCs could accomplish reconstruction of alveolar bone more perfectly than r-PDLSCs. Our data suggest that PDLSCs may have quite different characteristics depending on locations. a-PDLSCs may take a synergistic effect with r-PDLSCs in periodontal regeneration. PMID:21186958

  4. [Therapy of chronic apical periodontitis in the elderly age].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, S A

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to the actual problem in modern medicine therapy of chronic apical periodontitis in the elderly age. It is shown that periodontitis remains till today the leading cause of tooth extraction in the elderly age; in addition, periodontitis can lead to serious complications such as periostitis, phlegmon, osteomyelitis, which creates additional scientific interest in the study of the above complications at the junction of the two specialties--gerontology and stomatology. In elderly patients regeneration after the periodontal infectious processes takes more time, in this case the traditional approach to treatment of inflammation in the periodontium shows frequent lack of regression of the focus of periapical destruction. Based on the results of the study it is proved that prolonged antiseptic and immune-stimulating effect of therapeutic paste PED used in conjunction with 5% liniment cycloferon, leads to a rapid and marked reduction in inflammatory activity in the affected area both at granulating, and at granulomatous forms of chronic periodontitis, and is accompanied by a significantly larger share of the achieved remission. PMID:24640710

  5. Human periodontal ligament stem cells repair mental nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bohan; Jung, Hun-Jong; Kim, Soung-Min; Kim, Myung-Jin; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells are easily accessible and can differentiate into Schwann cells. We hypothesized that human periodontal ligament stem cells can be used as an alternative source for the autologous Schwann cells in promoting the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. To validate this hypothesis, human periodontal ligament stem cells (1 × 106) were injected into the crush-injured left mental nerve in rats. Simultaneously, autologous Schwann cells (1 × 106) and PBS were also injected as controls. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that at 5 days after injection, mRNA expression of low affinity nerve growth factor receptor was significantaly increased in the left trigeminal ganglion of rats with mental nerve injury. Sensory tests, histomorphometric evaluation and retrograde labeling demonstrated that at 2 and 4 weeks after injection, sensory function was significantly improved, the numbers of retrograde labeled sensory neurons and myelinated axons were significantly increased, and human periodontal ligament stem cells and autologous Schwann cells exhibited similar therapeutic effects. These findings suggest that transplantation of human periodontal ligament stem cells show a potential value in repair of mental nerve injury. PMID:25206604

  6. Could Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Resolve After Periodontitis Treatment Only?

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, Simonetta; Biondo, Michela I.; Fiorentino, Chiara; Argento, Giuseppe; Paolantonio, Michele; Di Murro, Carlo; Malagnino, Vito A.; Canzoni, Marco; Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; D’Amelio, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated polyarthritis; currently no pathogenic agent has been identified as a disease trigger. A patient with RA, presumably caused by periodontal infection, whose remission has been observed after periodontitis treatment in absence of specific RA therapy, is reported here for the first time, to our knowledge. A 61-year-old male patient presented migrant arthritis associated with antibodies against citrullinated protein antigens positivity. The clinical features allowed to make RA diagnosis according to the 2010 European League against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology RA classification criteria. X-ray of the second upper molar showed chronic apical periodontitis. After its treatment, arthritis remission has been observed in the absence of specific RA therapy. It has been suggested that periodontitis may have a trigger role in RA pathogenesis. This could be explained by the enzymatic action of Porphyromonas gingivalis, probably leading to break tolerance to collagen. The identification and subsequent treatment of periodontitis should therefore be considered pivotal in RA prophylaxis and management. PMID:25501069

  7. The Correlation between Chronic Periodontitis and Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Maximilian; Hansen, Torsten; Kasaj, Adrian; Moergel, Maximilian

    2013-01-01

    Infections are increasingly considered as potential trigger for carcinogenesis apart from risk factors like alcohol and tobacco. The discussion about human papilloma virus (HPV) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) points at a general role of infection for the development of oral carcinomas. Furthermore, first studies describe a correlation between chronic periodontitis and OSCC, thus, characterizing chronic inflammation as being a possible trigger for OSCC. In front of this background, we present four well-documented clinical cases. All patients showed a significant anatomical relation between OSCC and clinical signs of chronic periodontitis. The interindividual differences of the clinical findings lead to different theoretical concepts: two with coincidental appearance of OSCC and chronic periodontitis and two with possible de novo development of OSCC triggered by chronic inflammation. We conclude that the activation of different inflammatory cascades by chronic periodontitis negatively affects mucosa and bone. Furthermore, the inflammatory response has the potential to activate carcinogenesis. Apart from a mere coincidental occurrence, two out of four patients give first clinical hints for a model wherein chronic periodontitis represents a potential risk factor for the development of OSCC. PMID:23936684

  8. Toll gates to periodontal host modulation and vaccine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George

    2009-01-01

    Summary Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are central mediators of innate antimicrobial and inflammatory responses and play instructive roles in the development of the adaptive immune response. Thus when stimulated by certain agonists, TLRs serve as adjuvant receptors that link innate and adaptive immunity. However, when excessively activated or inadequately controlled during an infection, TLRs may contribute to immunopathology associated with inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis. Moreover, certain microbial pathogens appear to exploit aspects of TLR signalling in ways that enhance their adaptive fitness. The diverse and important roles played by TLRs suggest that therapeutic manipulation of TLR signalling may have implications in the control of infection, attenuation of inflammation, and the development of vaccine adjuvants for the treatment of periodontitis. Successful application of TLR-based therapeutic modalities in periodontitis would require highly selective and precisely targeted intervention. This would in turn necessitate precise characterization of TLR signalling pathways in response to periodontal pathogens, as well as development of effective and specific agonists or antagonists of TLR function and signalling. This review summarizes the current status of TLR biology as it relates to periodontitis, and evaluates the potential of TLR-based approaches for host-modulation therapy in this oral disease. PMID:19878475

  9. Periodontal associations in cardiovascular diseases: The latest evidence and understanding.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, C M; Kim, J W M; Quan, V H; Nguyen, B H; Tran, S D

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are inflammatory diseases. Recent epidemiological studies have associated the effect of periodontitis on CVD progression. Findings of oral pathogens in carotid atheromas provided a plausible relationship between these two diseases. One possible mechanism is the infiltration of oral/periodontal pathogens through inflamed and ulcerated gingival epithelium. This results in translocation of oral pathogens throughout the systemic circulation affecting vascular tissues, and initiating a cascade of inflammatory reactions detrimental to the cardiovascular system. In addition, leakage of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines from the ulcerated periodontium into the bloodstream may cause the production of hepatic acute-phase proteins. Moreover, as chronic bacteremia occurs, the adaptive immune system is activated. Antibodies produced in response to periodontal pathogens trigger a cross-reaction between endothelial cells and modified low-density lipoprotein to enhance the movement of lipids into cells within the vessel wall. Some antibodies and inflammatory cytokines promote the Th1 response, thereby further activating macrophages within the atheroma. These plausible mechanisms are contributing factors in initiating and propagating atherogenesis. This review discusses the current understanding of CVD pathology/periodontitis, potential underlying mechanisms regarding this association, and general guidelines for treating patients with CVD risks. PMID:26587382

  10. Design of a multiple drug delivery system directed at periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Sundararaj, Sharath C; Thomas, Mark V; Peyyala, Rebecca; Dziubla, Thomas D; Puleo, David A

    2013-11-01

    Periodontal disease is highly prevalent, with 90% of the world population affected by either periodontitis or its preceding condition, gingivitis. These conditions are caused by bacterial biofilms on teeth, which stimulate a chronic inflammatory response that leads to loss of alveolar bone and, ultimately, the tooth. Current treatment methods for periodontitis address specific parts of the disease, with no individual treatment serving as a complete therapy. The present research sought to demonstrate development of a multiple drug delivery system for stepwise treatment of different stages of periodontal disease. More specifically, multilayered films were fabricated from an association polymer comprising cellulose acetate phthalate and Pluronic F-127 to achieve sequential release of drugs. The four types of drugs used were metronidazole, ketoprofen, doxycycline, and simvastatin to eliminate infection, inhibit inflammation, prevent tissue destruction, and aid bone regeneration, respectively. Different erosion times and adjustable sequential release profiles were achieved by modifying the number of layers or by inclusion of a slower-eroding polymer layer. Analysis of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory bioactivity showed that drugs released from the devices retained 100% bioactivity. The multilayered CAPP delivery system offers a versatile approach for releasing different drugs based on the pathogenesis of periodontitis and other conditions. PMID:23948165

  11. Personalized medicine: an update of salivary biomarkers for periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Korte, Dina L; Kinney, Janet

    2016-02-01

    This article provides an up-to-date review of the more robust salivary biomarkers, as well as of panels of combinatorial markers and periodontal pathogens, that reveal high sensitivity and specificity for enhancing clinical decision-making in periodontal disease progression, risk and diagnosis. Periodontal diseases are complex and require an inflammatory response to bacterial pathogens in a susceptible host to stimulate tissue destruction. When used alone, traditional clinical assessments provide a diagnosis of periodontitis only after the biologic onset of the disease process, and are unable to substantiate disease activity or future risk. New technologies are becoming available that are capable of measuring combinations of inflammatory cytokines and proteinases for rapid chair-side testing. Utilizing saliva to identify and measure specific phenotypes and host-derived mediators will allow highly individualized diagnosis, prognosis and treatments for periodontal diseases. This personalized medicine approach will strengthen the power of the clinical oral examination and medical history assessments, providing patients with evidence-based, targeted risk care. PMID:26662480

  12. Gingivitis Susceptibility and its Relation to Periodontitis in Men

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, T.; Kaye, E. Krall; Nunn, M.E.; Van Dyke, T.; Garcia, R.I.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate whether gingivitis susceptibility is associated with periodontitis. We analyzed data of 462 men in the VA Dental Longitudinal Study aged 47 to 92 years who had never smoked or had quit smoking 5+ years previously. Multiple logistic regression models, with tooth-level bleeding on probing at sites with attachment loss ≤ 2 mm as the dependent variable, were derived with adjustment for plaque, calculus, crown coverage, age, income, education, marital status, body mass index, diabetes, and vitamin C intake, and stratification by age (< 65, 65+ years). Periodontitis and mean attachment loss were positively associated with bleeding on probing, with stronger associations among men < 65 years old (for periodontitis, OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.5, 3.1) than men 65+ years of age (OR 1.2; 95% CI 0.9, 1.6). Our results suggest that among never and former smokers, gingivitis susceptibility is higher among men with periodontitis compared with that in men without periodontitis. PMID:17122168

  13. A Videoscope for use in Minimally Invasive Periodontal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Harrel, Stephen K.; Wilson, Thomas G.; Rivera-Hidalgo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Minimally invasive periodontal procedures have been reported to produce excellent clinical results. Visualization during minimally invasive procedures has traditionally been obtained by the use of surgical telescopes, surgical microscopes, glass fiber endoscopes, or a combination of these devices. All of these methods for visualization are less than fully satisfactory due to problems with access, magnification, and blurred imaging. Clinical Innovation A videoscope for use with minimally invasive periodontal procedures has been developed to overcome some of the difficulties that exist with current visualization approaches. This videoscope incorporates a gas shielding technology that eliminates the problems of fogging and fouling of the optics of the videoscope that has previously prevented the successful application of endoscopic visualization to periodontal surgery. Additionally, as part of the gas shielding technology the videoscope also includes a moveable retractor specifically adapted for minimally invasive surgery. Discussion The clinical use of the videoscope during minimally invasive periodontal surgery is demonstrated and discussed. Conclusion The videoscope with gas shielding alleviates many of the difficulties associated with visualization during minimally invasive periodontal surgery PMID:23782239

  14. Periodontal status of a subject sample of Yemen.

    PubMed

    Mengel, R; Eigenbrodt, M; Schünemann, T; Florès-de-Jacoby, L

    1996-05-01

    From August to October 1991, the periodontal status of 1001 Yemenis representing the age groups 12-14, 15-19, 20-24 and 35-44 years was recorded and evaluated with reference to the CPITN, the calculus index and clinical attachment levels. The impact of chewing khat, the leaves of a cultivated, alkaloid shrub, and of using the traditional miswak chewing stick for oral hygiene purposes were investigated. The results show that 6.9% of the juvenile probands (15-19 years) had healthy periodontal tissue (CPITN 0), whereas bleeding on probing and calculus (CPITN 1 + 2) were registered in 86.2%. In the 35-44 year age group, 1.7% were periodontally healthy, whereas 84.5% displayed plaque retention or shallow pocketing (CPITN 2 + 3) and 12.5% deep pocketing (CPITN 4). The treatment needs in all age groups are confined primarily to calculus removal and instruction in oral hygiene. The clinical attachment level and the calculus index revealed age-related attachment loss and calculus formation, primarily among male probands. The higher khat consumption among the male population is reflected in its detrimental effect on the periodontal tissue, especially among younger probands. Oral hygiene aids have also an influence on periodontal status, with a toothbrush proving more efficient than the miswak. WHO efforts directed towards prophylactic programs need to be intensified but can be staffed by dental hygienists. PMID:8783048

  15. microRNA Expression in Rat Apical Periodontitis Bone Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bo; Zheng, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    Apical periodontitis, dominated by dense inflammatory infiltrates and increased osteoclast activities, can lead to alveolar bone destruction and tooth loss. It is believed that miRNA participates in regulating various biological processes, osteoclastogenesis included. This study aims to investigate the differential expression of miRNAs in rat apical periodontitis and explore their functional target genes. Microarray analysis was used to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in apical periodontitis. Bioinformatics technique was applied for predicting the target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs and their biological functions. The result provided us with an insight into the potential biological effects of the differentially expressed miRNAs and showed particular enrichment of target genes involved in the MAPK signaling pathways. These findings may highlight the intricate and specific roles of miRNA in inflammation and osteoclastogenesis, both of which are key aspects of apical periodontitis, thus contributing to the future investigation into the etiology, underlying mechanism and treatment of apical periodontitis. PMID:26273501

  16. Bacteriology of severe periodontitis in young adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Smibert, R M; Hash, D E; Burmeister, J A; Ranney, R R

    1982-01-01

    A total of 78 bacteriological samples were taken from the supragingival tooth surface after superficial cleaning with toothpicks or from the periodontal sulci of 42 affected sites in 21 adolescents or young adults with severe generalized periodontitis. Of 190 bacterial species, subspecies, or serotypes detected among 2,723 isolates, 11 species exceeded 1% of the subgingival flora and were most closely associated with the diseased sulci. Eleven others were also sufficiently frequent to be suspect agents of tissue destruction. Many of these species are known pathogens of other body sites. In addition, 10 species of Treponema were isolated. One of these and the "large treponeme" were also more closely associated with severe periodontitis than they were with healthy sites or gingivitis. There were highly significant differences between the composition of the flora of the affected sulci and the flora of (i) the adjacent supragingival tooth surface, (ii) the gingival crevice of periodontally healthy people, and (iii) sites with a gingival index score of 0 or 2 in experimental gingivitis studies. The floras of different individuals were also significantly different. There was no statistically detectable effect of sampling per se upon the composition of the flora of subsequent samples from the same sites. The composition of the supragingival flora of the patients with severe generalized periodontitis that had serum antibody to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was significantly different from the supragingival flora of patients without this serum antibody. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the composition of their subgingival floras. PMID:7152665

  17. Mechanoresponsive Properties of the Periodontal Ligament.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Liu, B; Cha, J Y; Yuan, G; Kelly, M; Singh, G; Hyman, S; Brunski, J B; Li, J; Helms, J A

    2016-04-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) functions as an enthesis, a connective tissue attachment that dissipates strains created by mechanical loading. Entheses are mechanoresponsive structures that rapidly adapt to changes in their mechanical loading; here we asked which features of the PDL are sensitive to such in vivo loading. We evaluated the PDL in 4 physiologically relevant mechanical environments, focusing on mitotic activity, cell density, collagen content, osteogenic protein expression, and organization of the tissue. In addition to examining PDLs that supported teeth under masticatory loading and eruptive forces, 2 additional mechanical conditions were created and analyzed: hypoloading and experimental tooth movement. Collectively, these data revealed that the adult PDL is a remarkably quiescent tissue and that only when it is subjected to increased loads--such as those associated with mastication, eruption, and orthodontic tooth movement-does the tissue increase its rate of cell proliferation and collagen production. These data have relevance in clinical scenarios where PDL acclimatization can be exploited to optimize tooth movement. PMID:26767771

  18. Chronic renal failure and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kitsou, V K; Konstantinidis, A; Siamopoulos, K C

    2000-05-01

    In order to define the effects of chronic renal failure (CRF) in the progress of gingival inflammation, we studied 6 patients (4 male, 2 female) with CRF who were on chronic hemodialysis for 4.25 (range 1-15) years. Six healthy individuals, age and sex matched were used as controls. The protocol which we used comprised of two periods (a) a 40-day duration period of preparation and (b) a 28-day duration experimental period. During the (a) period, all subjects went through: (1) therapy of the chronic gingivitis and (2) complete control of dental plaque by oral hygiene. During the experimental period, all subjects were advised to avoid, for at least 21 days, any mechanical or chemical media of oral hygiene and went through photographing, recording of gingival index (GI), recording of plaque index (PII), and the collection and quantification of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). On the 21st day, root planning and polishing were performed and subjects were advised to carry out oral hygiene. On the 28th day, all previous examinations (GI, PII, GCF) were repeated. In both patients and controls, GI, PII and GCF were increased on 7th, 14th and 21st day, without significant differences between the groups and returned to normal (close to zero point) on the 28th day. There are no significant differences between patients with CRF and normal controls in the evolution of experimental gingivitis. Therefore, chronic uremia has no effect on the defense of periodontal tissue against microbial plaque. PMID:10843241

  19. Role of the NK Cell-Activating Receptor CRACC in Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Benjamin; Kebschull, Moritz; Nowak, Michael; Demmer, Ryan T.; Haupt, Manuela; Körner, Christian; Perner, Sven; Jepsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent, biofilm-mediated chronic inflammatory disease that results in the loss of the tooth-supporting tissues. It features two major clinical entities: chronic periodontitis, which is more common, and aggressive periodontitis, which usually has an early onset and a rapid progression. Natural killer (NK) cells are a distinct subgroup of lymphocytes that play a major role in the ability of the innate immune system to steer immune responses. NK cells are abundant in periodontitis lesions, and NK cell activation has been causally linked to periodontal tissue destruction. However, the exact mechanisms of their activation and their role in the pathophysiology of periodontitis are elusive. Here, we show that the predominant NK cell-activating molecule in periodontitis is CD2-like receptor activating cytotoxic cells (CRACC). We show that CRACC induction was significantly more pronounced in aggressive than chronic periodontitis and correlated positively with periodontal disease severity, subgingival levels of specific periodontal pathogens, and NK cell activation in vivo. We delineate how Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral pathogen that is causally associated with aggressive periodontitis, indirectly induces CRACC on NK cells via activation of dendritic cells and subsequent interleukin 12 (IL-12) signaling. In contrast, we demonstrate that fimbriae from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a principal pathogen in chronic periodontitis, actively attenuate CRACC induction on NK cells. Our data suggest an involvement of CRACC-mediated NK cell activation in periodontal tissue destruction and point to a plausible distinction in the pathobiology of aggressive and chronic periodontitis that may help explain the accelerated tissue destruction in aggressive periodontitis. PMID:23250953

  20. The impact of antioxidant agents complimentary to periodontal therapy on oxidative stress and periodontal outcomes: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Francisco Wilker Mustafa Gomes; Nogueira, Sergiana Barbosa; Mendes, Francisco Lucas Vasconcelos; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Moreira, Maria Mônica Studart Mendes; de Andrade, Geanne Matos; Carvalho, Rosimary de Sousa

    2015-09-01

    There is significant evidence linking chronic periodontitis (CP) and oxidative stress (OS). CP is a multifactorial infecto-inflammatory disease caused by the interaction of microbial agents present in the biofilm associated with host susceptibility and environmental factors. OS is a condition that arises when there is an imbalance between the levels of free radicals (FR) and its antioxidant defences. Antioxidants, defined as substances that are able to delay or prevent the oxidation of a substrate, exist in all bodily tissues and fluids, and their function is to protect against FR. This systematic review assessed the effects of the complimentary use of antioxidant agents to periodontal therapy in terms of oxidative stress/antioxidants. Only randomised, controlled, double-blind or blind studies were included. The majority of the included studies were performed in chronic periodontitis patients. Lycopene, vitamin C, vitamin E, capsules with fruits/vegetables/berry and dietary interventions were the antioxidant approaches employed. Only the studies that used lycopene and vitamin E demonstrated statistically significant improvement when compared to a control group in terms of periodontal parameters. However, oxidative stress outcomes did not follow the same pattern throughout the studies. It may be concluded that the use of some antioxidants has the potential to improve periodontal clinical parameters. The role of antioxidant/oxidative stress parameters needs further investigations. PMID:26067357

  1. Causes and management of post-treatment apical periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, J F; Rôças, I N; Ricucci, D; Hülsmann, M

    2014-03-01

    Endodontic treatment failure is usually characterised by the presence of post-treatment apical periodontitis, which may be persistent, emergent or recurrent. The major aetiology of post-treatment disease is persistent intraradicular infection, but in some cases a secondary intraradicular infection due to coronal leakage or an extraradicular infection may be the cause of failure. Understanding the causes of endodontic treatment failure is of paramount importance for the proper management of this condition. Teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis can be managed by either nonsurgical endodontic retreatment or periradicular surgery, both of which have very high chances of restoring the health of the periradicular tissues and maintaining the tooth function in the oral cavity. This review article focuses on the aetiological factors of post-treatment apical periodontitis and discusses the indications and basics of the procedures for optimal clinical management of this condition. PMID:24651336

  2. Periodontal and peri-implant diseases: identical or fraternal infections?

    PubMed

    Robitaille, N; Reed, D N; Walters, J D; Kumar, P S

    2016-08-01

    Peri-implant diseases (peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis) are bacterially driven infections. Peri-implantitis leads to aggressive bone resorption and eventual loss of the implant. Traditionally, peri-implantitis was regarded as microbially similar to periodontitis, and translocation of periodontal pathogens into the peri-implant crevice was considered as a critical factor in disease causation. However, evidence is emerging to suggest that the peri-implant and periodontal ecosystems differ in many important ways. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence supporting microbial congruence and discordance in these two communities. Current evidence suggests that osseointegrated implants truly create unique microenvironments that force microbial adaptation and selection. Further studies that revisit the "microbial reservoir" hypothesis and identify species that play an etiologic role in peri-implant disease and examine their transmission from teeth are needed. PMID:26255984

  3. How beneficial is bacterial prophylaxis to periodontal health?

    PubMed

    Reddy, Manchala Sesha; Narendera Babu, Mandalapu

    2011-05-01

    The term "probiotics" has become common among general practitioners. There has been an explosion in the interest regarding this topic, which is reflected in the number of scientific publications. The World Health Organization defined probiotics as: "Living microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confirms a health benefit on the host". Probiotics have been studied extensively in the gastrointestinal tract for their health-promoting effects and have shown promising results. However, in recent times, probiotics have also been used in periodontal health and have shown promising results in controlling gastrointestinal tract infections. Probiotics have potential, but as with many other clinical situations, multicenter or randomized, controlled studies on humans are still required before they can be recommended as prophylaxis for caries or periodontal disease. In the present study, we review the effects of probiotics on maintaining periodontal health. Relevant studies were identified from 1970 to February 2010 using Old Medline, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. PMID:25426602

  4. Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A.; Lewgoy, H. R.

    2013-05-01

    In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 ± 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 ± 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at São Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

  5. Recurrent periodontal abscess associated with "teeth as a tool".

    PubMed

    Bhat, G Subraya; Singh, Vishal; Bhat, K Mahalinga

    2012-01-01

    We report an unusual case of recurrent periodontal abscess in a 31-year-old male electrician due to his habit of using his teeth as a tool for stripping electrical wires. The patient was not aware of the consequences of this habit. Clinically, there was presence of moderate depth of periodontal pocket around the tooth and, radiographically, there was a vertical defect mesial to the involved teeth. The patient was educated about the consequences of his habit and surgical treatment was undertaken. A papilla preservation flap with regenerative periodontal surgical procedure was done, orthodontic and restorative treatment was planned at the follow-up. This case highlights the importance of eliciting a proper and complete personal history, including occupational details. In our patient these details helped us correlate the destruction of the periodontium to the unusual etiology. PMID:22628975

  6. Choice of diagnostic and therapeutic imaging in periodontics and implantology

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Swarna; Sirisha, K.; Srilalitha, Anumadi; Srinivas, Moogala

    2013-01-01

    Imaging forms an integral component for diagnosis of dental and in specific periodontal diseases. To date, intra-oral radiographic techniques are the main non-invasive diagnostic aids for the detection and assessment of internal changes in mineralized periodontal tissues like alveolar bone. These analog radiographic techniques suffer from inherent limitations like: Two dimensional projection, magnification, distortion, superimposition and misrepresentation of anatomic structures. The evolution of novel imaging modalities, namely cone beam computed tomography, tuned aperture CT empowered dental researchers to visualize the periodontium three dimensionally. This improves interpretation of structural and biophysical changes, ensures densitometric assessments of dentoalveolar structures including variations in alveolar bone density, and peri-implant bone healing more precisely. This detailed review, highlights current leading edge concepts, envisions a wide range of imaging modalities which pave the way for better understanding and early intervention of periodontal diseases. PMID:24554878

  7. Proinflammatory and Oxidative Stress Markers in Patients with Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Borges Jr., Ivan; Moreira, Emília Addison Machado; Filho, Danilo Wilhem; de Oliveira, Tiago Bittencourt; da Silva, Marcelo Barreto Spirelle; Fröde, Tânia Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the involvement of proinflammatory and oxidative stress markers in gingival tissue in individuals with chronic periodontitis. Subject and methods. Eighteen subjects were divided in two groups: experimental (age 52.9±5.0) and control (age 51.1±9.6). The activities of enzymatic antioxidants such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase, nonenzymatic antioxidants: total glutathione and reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione (GSSG), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) were evaluated in gingival tissues from interproximal sites. Statistical differences between groups were determined by independent Student t test and P<.05. Results. Individuals with periodontal disease exhibited a significant increase in the activities of MPO, GPx, GST, and also in TBARS and GSSG levels in gingival tissue compared to the control group (P<.05). Conclusion. The results of the present work showed an important correlation between oxidative stress biomarkers and periodontal disease. PMID:18288271

  8. [The phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes in progressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Konopka, T; Zietek, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this paper was the evaluation of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood and in gingival pocket fluid in patients suffering from rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and postjuvenile periodontitis (PJP). Prior to periodontal treatment the authors evaluated the capacity to phagocytose latex particles of peripheral blood neutrophils from 21 patients with RPP, 51 with PJP and 59 healthy subjects (control group) as well as the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in pocket fluid from 21 patients with RPP, 14 with PJP and from 20 healthy subjects. This phagocytic activity was significantly lower in all examined groups in comparison with the control group. A similar evaluation executed 3 months after treatment revealed normal phagocytosis of blood neutrophils from patients with RPP. In patients receiving complementary pharmacotherapy (spiramycine combined with metronidazol), a better improvement of phagocytosis was noted, than that observed in patients treated only surgically. PMID:7481699

  9. Interleukin polymorphisms in aggressive periodontitis: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Maney, Pooja; Owens, Jessica Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AgP), occurs in a younger age group (≤35 years) and is associated with the rapid destruction of periodontal attachment and supporting bone. Genetic polymorphisms are allelic variants that occur in at least 1% of the population that could potentially alter the function of the proteins that they encode. Interleukins are a group of cytokines that have complex immunological functions including proliferation, migration, growth and differentiation of cells and play a key role in the immunopathogenesis of periodontal disease. The aim of this review was to summarize the findings of studies that reported associations or potential associations of polymorphisms in the interleukin family of cytokines, specifically with AgP. PMID:26015661

  10. Metabolomics reveals elevated macromolecular degradation in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V M; Ciancio, S G; Shibly, O; Xu, T; Devizio, W; Trivedi, H M; Guo, L; Jönsson, T J

    2011-11-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by tissue destruction. In the diseased oral environment, saliva has primarily been considered to act as a protectant by lubricating the tissue, mineralizing the bones, neutralizing the pH, and combating microbes. To understand the metabolic role that saliva plays in the diseased state, we performed untargeted metabolomic profiling of saliva from healthy and periodontitic individuals. Several classes of biochemicals, including dipeptide, amino acid, carbohydrate, lipids, and nucleotide metabolites, were altered, consistent with increased macromolecular degradation of proteins, triacylglycerol, glycerolphospholipids, polysaccharides, and polynucleotides in the individuals with periodontal disease. These changes partially reflected the enhanced host-bacterial interactions in the diseased state as supported by increased levels of bacterially modified amino acids and creatine metabolite. More importantly, the increased lipase, protease, and glycosidase activities associated with periodontitis generated a more favorable energy environment for oral bacteria, potentially exacerbating the disease state. PMID:21856966

  11. Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A.

    2013-05-06

    In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 {+-} 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 {+-} 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at Sao Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

  12. Susceptibility to gingivitis: a way to predict periodontal disease?

    PubMed

    Trombelli, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that gingival inflammatory response to plaque accumulation may vary between individuals. Evidence seems to indicate that there is an association between susceptibility to gingivitis and susceptibility to periodontitis. Recently, among participants in a large scale experimental gingivitis trial, we were able to identify and characterize subjects that differ significantly in their gingival inflammatory response to plaque accumulation. Research efforts are being focused on the effect of genetic, anatomic and environmental host-related factors which may be implicated in the pathogenesis of the gingival inflammatory process, and whether susceptibility to periodontitis and susceptibility to gingivitis may partly share common risk factors. In this respect, it is possible that identification of factors related to increased susceptibility to gingivitis may help identify, at an early age, subjects at risk of periodontitis. PMID:15646584

  13. Current understanding of the relationship between periodontal and systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mawardi, Hani H.; Elbadawi, Lena S.; Sonis, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is among the most common infectious diseases affecting humans. While the burden of periodontal disease on oral health has been extensively investigated, a possible specific relationship between the disease and systemic health is a relatively new area of interest. More recently it has been suggested that PD has an etiological role in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and preterm low-birth weight, among others. In this review, we critically evaluate the current knowledge on the relation between PD and systemic diseases overall, and specifically with cardiovascular diseases. The best available evidence today suggests that the infection and inflammatory reaction associated with PD may contribute toward systemic disease. It is critical that dentists and physicians are well informed of the potential general health impact of periodontal disease so that they are in a position to knowledgeably counsel patients. PMID:25719577

  14. [Complex treatment of chronic periodontitis with balneopeloid therapy].

    PubMed

    Leonova, L E; Smelova, L Z; Pavlova, G A; Chernyshova, L E

    2013-01-01

    Complex investigation and treatment has been realized on 127 patients aged from 27 to 45 years with chronic generalized periodontitis. Patients were divided into two groups. In the fist group (68 patients) complex treatment included course of balneopeloid therapy with irrigation of high mineralized natural water (sanatorium "Tumentransgas" chink №1-95, Ugorsk) followed by application of sapropel mud (the Pake lake). The second group (59 patients) received only conventional periodontal treatment. Positive effect of balneopeloid therapy was identified, which was reflected in stabilizations of pathological process in the periodontal tissues in 78% of patients, as well as changes in physical and chemical properties of the oral gluid. Also the number of periodontopahogenic germs of gingival pockets was decreased. PMID:23528399

  15. Cranberry polyphenols: potential benefits for dental caries and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Bonifait, Laetitia; Grenier, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, cranberries and their molecular components have received increasing attention from researchers in human health. In particular, the properties of the high-molecular-weight polyphenols isolated from cranberries have shown promise with regard to dental caries and periodontal disease. These potential anticaries agents inhibit the production of organic acids and the formation of biofilms by cariogenic bacteria. In addition, cranberry polyphenols may reduce the inflammatory response, as well as the production and activity of proteolytic enzymes contributing to the destruction of the extracellular matrix in periodontal disease. The polyphenols of cranberries also interfere with various activities (including formation of biofilm and adhesion) of Porphyromonas gingivalis, the main etiologic agent in chronic periodontitis. This article summarizes the scientific evidence supporting the potential of cranberry polyphenols to prevent and/or treat diseases of the mouth. PMID:20943032

  16. The Role of Low-Level Laser in Periodontal Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sobouti, Farhad; Khatami, Maziar; Heydari, Mohaddase; Barati, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Treatment protocols with low-level Laser (also called ‘soft laser therapy) have been used in health care systems for more than three decades. Bearing in mind the suitable sub-cellular absorption and the cellular-vascular impacts, low-level laser may be a treatment of choice for soft tissues. Low-level lasers have played crucial and colorful roles in performing periodontal surgeries. Their anti-inflammatory and painless effects have been variously reported in in-vitro studies. In this present review article, searches have been made in Pub Med, Google Scholar, and Science Direct, focusing on the studies which included low-level lasers, flap-periodontal surgeries, gingivectomy, and periodontal graft. The present study has sought to review the cellular impacts of low-level lasers and its role on reducing pain and inflammation following soft tissue surgical treatments. PMID:25987968

  17. The role of low-level laser in periodontal surgeries.

    PubMed

    Sobouti, Farhad; Khatami, Maziar; Heydari, Mohaddase; Barati, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Treatment protocols with low-level Laser (also called 'soft laser therapy) have been used in health care systems for more than three decades. Bearing in mind the suitable sub-cellular absorption and the cellular-vascular impacts, low-level laser may be a treatment of choice for soft tissues. Low-level lasers have played crucial and colorful roles in performing periodontal surgeries. Their anti-inflammatory and painless effects have been variously reported in in-vitro studies. In this present review article, searches have been made in Pub Med, Google Scholar, and Science Direct, focusing on the studies which included low-level lasers, flap-periodontal surgeries, gingivectomy, and periodontal graft. The present study has sought to review the cellular impacts of low-level lasers and its role on reducing pain and inflammation following soft tissue surgical treatments. PMID:25987968

  18. A systematic format for resolving ethical issues in clinical periodontics.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Alexander J

    2012-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in dentistry and periodontics. Clinicians, challenged with such dilemmas, may not know how to apply the appropriate moral reasoning needed to resolve these situations especially when any of the five fundamental principles of ethics that form the foundation of the American Dental Association Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct--patient autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, and veracity--come into conflict with each other. The author describes one clinical case that presented with an ethical dilemma. An analytic framework, used in medicine, is introduced and used to solve the clinical case on whether to proceed with periodontal surgery on a patient who is not aware of his terminal prognosis from metastatic prostate cancer. Upon using the analytic framework, recommendations are made on the ethically appropriate path for the periodontist to follow in providing care for the patient's periodontal problem consistent with the principles of patient autonomy, respect for persons, and veracity. PMID:23189804

  19. [Clinical reasoning of impact of contemporary partial dentures constructions on the condition of periodontal tissues of patients with generalized periodontitis of I-II severity].

    PubMed

    Kochkina, N A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation of the effectiveness of using partial dentures made of thermoplastic materials for patients with generalized periodontitis of I-II degree of severity based on the results of clinical research. The effect of partial dentures made of acrylic, metal and thermoplastic materials with and without splinting elements of fixation on the state of periodontal tissues in patients with generalized periodontitis was studied. The results of clinical studies of patients periodontal tissues condition ,who have had dental defects on the background I-II severity of GP using partial splinting elements of fixation showed a significant improvement in oral hygiene, positive change in activity indicators current of generalized periodontitis. The group of patients for whom were made orthopedic constructions of thermoplastic masses, noticed reducing of the depth of periodontal pockets, tooth mobility, bleeding and inflammation of the interdental papillae and the gingival margin. PMID:25617097

  20. PDT in periodontal disease of HAART resistance patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovani, Elcio M.; Noro-Filho, Gilberto A.; Caputo, Bruno V.; Casarin, Renato; Costa, Claudio; Salgado, Daniela; Santos, Camila C.

    2016-03-01

    HIV/Aids patients present a change of microbiota associated with host immunodeficiency. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) showed as a promising and viable alternative in reducing microbiota. Present study evaluate effectiveness of photodynamic therapy in periodontal disease of AIDS patients with highly activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) failure, measuring the clinical periodontal parameters and periodontal microbiota. Twelve patients with HARRT resistance (R group) divided into two groups (control and PDT) and 12 patients with no HAART resistance (NR group) divided into two groups (control and PDT). The results show the difference in baseline of CD4 cells count, NR group 640.0 +/- 176.2 cells/mm3 R group and 333.3 +/- 205.8 cells / mm3 (p<0.05), and in 8.3% detectable viral load in NR group and 75% detectable (p <0.001) in R group. As clinical periodontal parameters (PD and CAL), PDT was more effective than the control group only in the NR group (p <0.05%), moreover, there was no difference in the evaluation of clinical periodontal parameters between the both R groups (p>0.05%). Microbiological evaluation in R group presents a general reduction in the Aa at 3 and 6 months. Furthermore, demonstrated a reduction of Pg in all groups at 6 months and in R group at 3 months. The impact assessment of photodynamic therapy in patients with different levels of immunosuppression determined that the combination of mechanical periodontal treatment with photodynamic therapy in patients with HAART failure did not cause additional benefits. Therefore, PDT in this study could not been indicated in HAART resistance patients.

  1. MicroRNA modulation in obesity and periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Perri, R; Nares, S; Zhang, S; Barros, S P; Offenbacher, S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this pilot investigation was to determine if microRNA expression differed in the presence or absence of obesity, comparing gingival biopsies obtained from patients with or without periodontal disease. Total RNA was extracted from gingival biopsy samples collected from 20 patients: 10 non-obese patients (BMI < 30 kg/m(2)) and 10 obese patients (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)), each group with 5 periodontally healthy sites and 5 chronic periodontitis sites. MicroRNA expression patterns were assessed with a quantitative microRNA PCR array to survey 88 candidate microRNA species. Four microRNA databases were used to identify potential relevant mRNA target genes of differentially expressed microRNAs. Two microRNA species (miR-18a, miR-30e) were up-regulated among obese individuals with a healthy periodontium. Two microRNA species (miR-30e, miR-106b) were up-regulated in non-obese individuals with periodontal disease. In the presence of periodontal disease and obesity, 9 of 11 listed microRNAs were significantly up-regulated (miR-15a, miR-18a, miR-22, miR-30d, miR-30e, miR-103, miR-106b, miR-130a, miR-142-3p, miR-185, and miR-210). Predicted targets include 69 different mRNAs from genes that comprise cytokines, chemokines, specific collagens, and regulators of glucose and lipid metabolism. The expression of specific microRNA species in obesity, which could also target and post-transcriptionally modulate cytokine mRNA, provides new insight into possible mechanisms of how risk factors might modify periodontal inflammation and may represent novel therapeutic targets. PMID:22043006

  2. Periodontal regeneration of transplanted rat molars after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Naoko; Hamamoto, Yoshioki; Nakajima, Tamio; Irie, Kazuharu; Ozawa, Hidehiro

    2004-01-01

    The effects of cryopreservation on periodontal regeneration of transplanted rat molars were investigated histologically and histochemically in rats. Bilateral first and second maxillary molars of 4-week-old Wistar rats were gently extracted and transplanted into the abdominal subcutaneous connective tissue immediately or after cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen overnight. Donor teeth were slowly frozen by a rate-controlling freezer (program freezer) using 5% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) as cryoprotectants. One-four weeks after transplantation, they were carefully excised with the surrounding tissues. Regeneration of acellular cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone were observed 2 weeks after immediate transplantation. The pulp was repaired by the ingrowth of granulation tissue from the root apex followed by the formation of calcified tissue. The regenerated periodontal ligament was positive for alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Small or mononuclear tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive cells were scattered on the newly formed alveolar bone and on the hard tissue in the pulp, but there was no external or internal progressive root resorption at 4 weeks. Cryopreserved teeth had acellular cementum with a rough surface at 1 week, but with the increase of cementoblasts and the appearance of periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, the surface became smooth at 3 weeks. Epithelial rests of Malassez (ERM) also revived. After regeneration of the periodontal tissues at 4 weeks, there was no evidence of root resorption. Although the process proceeded slowly, the cryopreserved teeth showed the periodontal regeneration substantially similar to that of the immediately transplanted teeth without progressive root resorption, indicating that they could be applicable for clinical use. PMID:14693198

  3. Role of PHOSPHO1 in Periodontal Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Zweifler, L E; Ao, M; Yadav, M; Kuss, P; Narisawa, S; Kolli, T N; Wimer, H F; Farquharson, C; Somerman, M J; Millán, J L; Foster, B L

    2016-07-01

    The tooth root and periodontal apparatus, including the acellular and cellular cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone, are critical for tooth function. Cementum and bone mineralization is regulated by factors including enzymes and extracellular matrix proteins that promote or inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. Orphan Phosphatase 1 (Phospho1, PHOSPHO1) is a phosphatase expressed by chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and odontoblasts that functions in skeletal and dentin mineralization by initiating deposition of hydroxyapatite inside membrane-limited matrix vesicles. The role of PHOSPHO1 in periodontal formation remains unknown and we aimed to determine its functional importance in these tissues. We hypothesized that the enzyme would regulate proper mineralization of the periodontal apparatus. Spatiotemporal expression of PHOSPHO1 was mapped during periodontal development, and Phospho1(-/-) mice were analyzed using histology, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, radiography, and micro-computed tomography. The Phospho1 gene and PHOSPHO1 protein were expressed by active alveolar bone osteoblasts and cementoblasts during cellular cementum formation. In Phospho1(-/-) mice, acellular cementum formation and mineralization were unaffected, whereas cellular cementum deposition increased although it displayed delayed mineralization and cementoid. Phospho1(-/-) mice featured disturbances in alveolar bone mineralization, shown by accumulation of unmineralized osteoid matrix and interglobular patterns of protein deposition. Parallel to other skeletal sites, deposition of mineral-regulating protein osteopontin (OPN) was increased in alveolar bone in Phospho1(-/-) mice. In contrast to the skeleton, genetic ablation of Spp1, the gene encoding OPN, did not ameliorate dentoalveolar defects in Phospho1(-/-) mice. Despite alveolar bone mineralization defects, periodontal attachment and function appeared undisturbed in Phospho1(-/-) mice, with normal PDL

  4. Insulin Response Genes in Different Stages of Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, N; Barros, S P; Zhang, S; Moss, K L; Phillips, S T; Offenbacher, S

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial infections are known to alter glucose metabolism within tissues via mechanisms of inflammation. We conducted this study to examine whether insulin response genes are differentially expressed in gingival tissues, comparing samples from experimental gingivitis and periodontitis subjects to those from healthy individuals. Total RNA was extracted from gingival biopsies from 26 participants: 8 periodontally healthy, 9 experimental gingivitis, and 9 periodontitis subjects. Gene expression patterns were evaluated with a polymerase chain reaction array panel to examine 84 candidate genes involved with glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and obesity. Array data were evaluated with a t test adjusted by the false discover rate (P < 0.05), and ingenuity pathway analysis was performed for statistical testing of pathways. Although tissue samples were not sufficient to enable protein quantification, we confirmed the upregulation of the key gene using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated primary gingival epithelial cells by Western blot. The mRNA expression patterns of genes that are associated with insulin response and glucose metabolism are markedly different in experimental gingivitis subjects compared with healthy controls. Thirty-two genes are upregulated significantly by at least 2-fold, adjusted for false discover rate (P < 0.05). Periodontitis subjects show similar but attenuated changes in gene expression patterns, and no genes meet the significance criteria. Ingenuity pathway analysis demonstrates significant activation of the carbohydrate metabolism network in experimental gingivitis but not in periodontitis. G6PD protein increases in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation in primary gingival epithelial cells, which is in the same direction as upregulated mRNA in tissues. Acute gingival inflammation may be associated with tissue metabolism changes, but these changes are not evident in chronic periodontitis. This study suggests that acute gingival inflammation

  5. The relationship between oral malodor, gingivitis, and periodontitis. A review.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, P A; Johnson, P W

    1999-05-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) are a family of gases which are primarily responsible for halitosis, a condition in which objectionable odors are present in mouth air. Although most patients perceive this condition as primarily a cosmetic problem, an increasing volume of evidence is demonstrating that extremely low concentrations of many of these compounds are highly toxic to tissues. VSC may, therefore, play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory conditions such as periodontitis. Since these compounds result from bacterial putrefaction of protein, investigations have been conducted to determine whether specific bacteria are associated with odor production. Two members of this family, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), are primarily responsible for mouth odor. Although many bacteria produce H2S, the production of CH3SH, especially at high levels, is primarily restricted to periodontal pathogens. Direct exposure to either of these metabolites adversely affects protein synthesis by human gingival fibroblasts in culture. However, methyl mercaptan has the greatest effect. Other in vitro experiments have demonstrated that cells exposed to methyl mercaptan synthesize less collagen, degrade more collagen, and accumulate collagen precursors which are poorly cross-linked and susceptible to proteolysis. CH3SH also increases permeability of intact mucosa and stimulates production of cytokines which have been associated with periodontal disease. VSC, and in particular methyl mercaptan, are therefore capable of inducing deleterious changes in both the extracellular matrix and the local immune response of periodontal tissues to plaque antigens. This article reviews these data and emphasizes the potential importance of VSC in the transition of periodontal tissues from clinical health to gingivitis and then to periodontitis. PMID:10368052

  6. The relationship between periodontal disease (pd) and cardiovascular disease (cvd).

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Maurizio; Dorn, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The recent focus on the potential link between periodontal and cardiovascular disease (PD and CVD) is part of the larger renewed interest on the role of infection and inflammation in the etiology of atherosclerosis and its clinical manifestations. Periodontal Disease is an inflammatory process affecting the periodontium, the tissue that surrounds and supports the teeth. The process usually starts with an inflammatory process of the gum (gingivitis) but it may progress with an extensive involvement of the gum, as well as the periodontal ligament and the bone surrounding the teeth resulting in substantial bone loss. Periodontal disease is a common oral pathological condition in the adult age and represents the leading cause of tooth loss. PD prevalence increases with age and there are estimates that up to 49,000,000 Americans may suffer from some form of gum disease. The gingival plaque associated with PD is colonized by a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to affect the initiation and development of PD and have been associated with the potential etiological role of PD in CVD and other chronic conditions. A potential etiological link between PD and CVD may have important public health implications as both the exposure (PD) and the outcomes (CVD) are highly prevalent in industrialized societies. In situations in which both the exposure and the outcome are highly prevalent even modest associations, like those observed in the studies reporting on the link between PD and CVD outcomes, may have relevance. There are not definite data on the effect of periodontal treatment on CVD clinical outcomes (either in primary or secondary prevention) however it should be pointed out that the limited (both in terms of numbers and study design) experimental evidence in humans suggests a possible beneficial effect of periodontal treatment of indices of functional and structural vascular health. PMID:21415980

  7. Effect of hyaluronan on periodontitis: A clinical and histological study

    PubMed Central

    Gontiya, Gauri; Galgali, Sushama R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Conventional, non-surgical periodontal therapy consists of supra- and subgingival tooth debridement. However, it is a technically demanding procedure and is not always efficient at eradicating all periodontal pathogens and in reducing inflammation. Therefore, local subgingival application of other chemotherapeutic agents may be used as an adjunct to non-surgical therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and histological outcomes of local subgingival application of 0.2% hyaluronic acid gel (GENGIGEL®) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty sites were chosen from 26 patients with chronic periodontitis (criteria being periodontal pockets ≥5mm). Experimental sites additionally received HA gel subgingivally at baseline, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd week. Clinical parameters were re-assessed at 4th, 6th, and 12th week. At 4th week recall, a gingival biopsy was obtained from test and control site for histologic examination. Results: Intra-group analysis of all the clinical parameters at all sites from baseline to 4th, 6th, and 12th week showed statistically significant changes. Experimental sites showed statistically significant improvement in Gingival index and Bleeding index at 6th and 12th week when compared with control sites. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in the PPD and RAL between control and experimental sites at 4th, 6th, and 12th week time interval. No statistically significant association was found between the histological grading of the sites that received HA treatment. Conclusion: Subgingival placement of 0.2% HA gel along with SRP provided a significant improvement in gingival parameters. However, no additional benefit was found in periodontal parameters. Histologically, experimental sites showed reduced inflammatory infiltrate, but it was not statistically significant. PMID:23055583

  8. Prevalence of Actinomyces spp. in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Vielkind, Paul; Jentsch, Holger; Eschrich, Klaus; Rodloff, Arne C; Stingu, Catalina-Suzana

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Actinomyces spp. in shallow, deep and very deep pockets of patients with chronic periodontitis compared to healthy controls and correlated the results with clinical status. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 15 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Clinical indices were recorded in a six-point measurement per tooth. From each patient samples of supra and subgingival plaque were taken separately from teeth with shallow, deep and very deep pockets. Samples of supragingival plaque and sulcular microflora were collected from the healthy subjects. All the samples were cultivated on different media at 37̊C in an anaerobic atmosphere for 7 days. All the suspect colonies were identified using a rapid ID 32 A system (bioMèrieux) and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis using an Autoflex II Instrument (Bruker Daltonics) together with in house developed identification software and a reference spectra database. A total of 977 strains were identified as Actinomyces. Actinomyces naeslundii/oris/johnsonii (430 isolates) was the most prevalent species and was found in all patients and in almost all of the healthy subjects. Significant differences (p=0.003) between the groups were found for Actinomyces odontolyticus/meyeri and Actinomyces israelii which were associated with periodontitis patients. Actinomyces dentalis was found in higher percentage (p=0.015) in the periodontitis group. Actinomyces gerencseriae and Actinomyces massiliensis were significantly more often found supragingivally than subgingivally (p=0.004, p=0.022, respectively) in the periodontitis group. Whether some Actinomyces species, definitely important plaque formers, are actively involved in the pathogenicity of chronic periodontitis needs further investigation. PMID:26324012

  9. Freeze gelated porous membranes for periodontal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Saad B; Delaine-Smith, Robin M; Fey, Tobias; Rawlinson, Andrew; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2015-09-01

    Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) membranes have been used for the management of destructive forms of periodontal disease as a means of aiding regeneration of lost supporting tissues, including the alveolar bone, cementum, gingiva and periodontal ligaments (PDL). Currently available GTR membranes are either non-biodegradable, requiring a second surgery for removal, or biodegradable. The mechanical and biofunctional limitations of currently available membranes result in a limited and unpredictable treatment outcome in terms of periodontal tissue regeneration. In this study, porous membranes of chitosan (CH) were fabricated with or without hydroxyapatite (HA) using the simple technique of freeze gelation (FG) via two different solvents systems, acetic acid (ACa) or ascorbic acid (ASa). The aim was to prepare porous membranes to be used for GTR to improve periodontal regeneration. FG membranes were characterized for ultra-structural morphology, physiochemical properties, water uptake, degradation, mechanical properties, and biocompatibility with mature and progenitor osteogenic cells. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of hydroxyapatite and its interaction with chitosan. μCT analysis showed membranes had 85-77% porosity. Mechanical properties and degradation rate were affected by solvent type and the presence of hydroxyapatite. Culture of human osteosarcoma cells (MG63) and human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal progenitors (hES-MPs) showed that all membranes supported cell proliferation and long term matrix deposition was supported by HA incorporated membranes. These CH and HA composite membranes show their potential use for GTR applications in periodontal lesions and in addition FG membranes could be further tuned to achieve characteristics desirable of a GTR membrane for periodontal regeneration. PMID:25968357

  10. SOCS-3 Regulates Alveolar Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Papathanasiou, E; Kantarci, A; Konstantinidis, A; Gao, H; Van Dyke, T E

    2016-08-01

    The host immune response plays a key role in bacteria-induced alveolar bone resorption. Endogenous control of the magnitude and duration of inflammatory signaling is considered an important determinant of the extent of periodontal pathology. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are inhibitors of cytokine signaling pathways and may play a role in restraining periodontal inflammation. We hypothesized that SOCS-3 regulates alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis. Periodontal bone loss was induced in 16-wk-old myeloid-specific SOCS-3-knockout and wild-type (WT) C57Bl6-B.129 mice by oral inoculation 9 times with 10(9) colony-forming units of Porphyromonas gingivalis A7436 through an oral gavage model for periodontitis. Sham controls for both types of mice received vehicle without bacteria. The mice were euthanized 6 wk after the last oral inoculation. Increased bone loss was demonstrated in P. gingivalis-infected SOCS-3-knockout mice as compared with P. gingivalis-infected WT mice by direct morphologic measurements, micro-computed tomography analyses, and quantitative histology. Loss of SOCS-3 function resulted in an increased number of alveolar bone osteoclasts and increased RANKL expression after P. gingivalis infection. SOCS-3 deficiency in myeloid cells also promotes a higher P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response with higher secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, and KC (IL-8) by peritoneal macrophages as compared with WT controls. Our data implicate SOCS-3 as a critical negative regulator of alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. PMID:27126447

  11. Association of Common Variants in MMPs with Periodontitis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyang; Zhu, Ying; Singh, Pradeep; Ajmera, Deepal Haresh; Song, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are considered to play an important role during tissue remodeling and extracellular matrix degradation. And functional polymorphisms in MMPs genes have been reported to be associated with the increased risk of periodontitis. Recently, many studies have investigated the association between MMPs polymorphisms and periodontitis risk. However, the results remain inconclusive. In order to quantify the influence of MMPs polymorphisms on the susceptibility to periodontitis, we performed a meta-analysis and systematic review. Results. Overall, this comprehensive meta-analysis included a total of 17 related studies, including 2399 cases and 2002 healthy control subjects. Our results revealed that although studies of the association between MMP-8 −799 C/T variant and the susceptibility to periodontitis have not yielded consistent results, MMP-1 (−1607 1G/2G, −519 A/G, and −422 A/T), MMP-2 (−1575 G/A, −1306 C/T, −790 T/G, and −735 C/T), MMP-3 (−1171 5A/6A), MMP-8 (−381 A/G and +17 C/G), MMP-9 (−1562 C/T and +279 R/Q), and MMP-12 (−357 Asn/Ser), as well as MMP-13 (−77 A/G, 11A/12A) SNPs are not related to periodontitis risk. Conclusions. No association of these common MMPs variants with the susceptibility to periodontitis was found; however, further larger-scale and multiethnic genetic studies on this topic are expected to be conducted to validate our results. PMID:27194818

  12. Periodontal conditions of Colombian university students aged 16 to 35.

    PubMed

    Marulanda, Ana María; Coral, Diana; Sabogal, Diego; Serrano, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data on the periodontal health and oral hygiene practices of young individuals in Latin America are limited. This study was conducted in a sample of 355 first-year students randomly selected from 3,251 new students entering the largest university in Colombia. Participants received a periodontal examination and were interviewed about oral hygiene practices. Specifically, this study assessed the relationship between oral hygiene practices (including smoking tobacco) and plaque accumulation and/or periodontal bleeding on probing (BOP). Participants had extensive plaque accumulation and BOP, with a mean O´Leary plaque index of 56% and mean BOP of 37%. Both measures were higher for proximal surfaces. Plaque indices of at least 50% were not associated with any oral hygiene factors; however, plaque index and use of dental floss were associated with a BOP of at least 50%. Frequency of tooth brushing was higher in female than in male participants. Only 5% of participants reported smoking tobacco. On average, participants had 2.7±4.6 pockets of at least 4 mm (18% of participants had ≥5 and 9% of participants had ≥10 pockets of this depth, respectively). On average, participants had 2.1±4.4 sites with clinical attachment loss of at least 2 mm (15% and 6% of participants had ≥5 and ≥10 sites with this level of loss). Only 8% of participants were diagnosed with moderate periodontitis, and no participants were diagnosed with severe periodontitis. In conclusion, although participants had high levels of plaque and BOP, signs of advanced destructive periodontal disease were minimal. PMID:24878670

  13. [Development and use of periodontal dressing of collagen and Lactobacillus casei 37 cell suspension in combined treatment of periodontal disease of inflammatory origin (a microbiological study)].

    PubMed

    Volozhin, A I; Il'in, V K; Maksimovskiĭ, Iu M; Sidorenko, A B; Istranov, L P; Tsarev, V N; Istranova, E V; Aboiants, R K

    2004-01-01

    Periodontal dressing consisting of collagen and Lactobacillus casei 37 cell suspension (cell concentration 108 cells/ml) was created and used in combined treatment of patients with chronic generalized parodontitis. Efficacy of the developed isolation was explained by a considerable decrease of the number and frequency of isolation of aggressive microbial representatives (pigment synthesizing Bacteroids, Actinomyces and Str. intermedius) in periodontal pockets and also Fungus (Candida albicans). This periodontal dressing provided remission up to 10-12 months. PMID:15602477

  14. Quantitative detection of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in human oral epithelial cells from subjects with periodontitis and periodontal health.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Andrea V; Barbosa, Graziela M; Higashi, Daniela; di Micheli, Giorgio; Rodrigues, Paulo H; Simionato, Maria Regina L

    2013-10-01

    Epithelial cells in oral cavities can be considered reservoirs for a variety of bacterial species. A polymicrobial intracellular flora associated with periodontal disease has been demonstrated in buccal cells. Important aetiological agents of systemic and nosocomial infections have been detected in the microbiota of subgingival biofilm, especially in individuals with periodontal disease. However, non-oral pathogens internalized in oral epithelial cells and their relationship with periodontal status are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to detect opportunistic species within buccal and gingival crevice epithelial cells collected from subjects with periodontitis or individuals with good periodontal health, and to associate their prevalence with periodontal clinical status. Quantitative detection of total bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis in oral epithelial cells was determined by quantitative real-time PCR using universal and species-specific primer sets. Intracellular bacteria were visualized by confocal microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Overall, 33% of cell samples from patients with periodontitis contained at least one opportunistic species, compared with 15% of samples from healthy individuals. E. faecalis was the most prevalent species found in oral epithelial cells (detected in 20.6% of patients with periodontitis, P = 0.03 versus healthy individuals) and was detected only in cells from patients with periodontitis. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that high levels of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were present in both the periodontitis and healthy groups. However, the proportion of these species was significantly higher in epithelial cells of subjects with periodontitis compared with healthy individuals (P = 0.016 for P. aeruginosa and P = 0.047 for S. aureus). Although E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa were detected in 57% and 50% of patients, respectively, with probing depth and

  15. Alternative medicine in periodontal therapy--a review.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Brijesh; Sugandhi, Ayushi; Kumathalli, Kanteshwari I; Sridhar, Raja

    2012-04-01

    Periodontal diseases continue to be most commonly occurring oral diseases in modern times. Many therapeutic modalities have been tried and tested to relieve these problems. The conventional therapy--scaling and root planing (SRP)--stands out to be the most used mode of treatment, and other treatments remain applicable as adjuncts to SRP, including acupuncture, acupressure, and aromatherapy. The present article discusses the applications of the abovementioned therapeutic modes and their relevance in current scenarios. Alternative medicine may be preferred as an adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy to relieve pain, bad breath, gingival inflammation, mouth ulcers, and mouth sores. PMID:22483182

  16. Periodontal and peri-implant wound healing following laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Akira; Mizutani, Koji; Schwarz, Frank; Sculean, Anton; Yukna, Raymond A; Takasaki, Aristeo A; Romanos, Georgios E; Taniguchi, Yoichi; Sasaki, Katia M; Zeredo, Jorge L; Koshy, Geena; Coluzzi, Donald J; White, Joel M; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Ishikawa, Isao; Izumi, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    Laser irradiation has numerous favorable characteristics, such as ablation or vaporization, hemostasis, biostimulation (photobiomodulation) and microbial inhibition and destruction, which induce various beneficial therapeutic effects and biological responses. Therefore, the use of lasers is considered effective and suitable for treating a variety of inflammatory and infectious oral conditions. The CO2 , neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers have mainly been used for periodontal soft-tissue management. With development of the erbium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium-doped yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers, which can be applied not only on soft tissues but also on dental hard tissues, the application of lasers dramatically expanded from periodontal soft-tissue management to hard-tissue treatment. Currently, various periodontal tissues (such as gingiva, tooth roots and bone tissue), as well as titanium implant surfaces, can be treated with lasers, and a variety of dental laser systems are being employed for the management of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. In periodontics, mechanical therapy has conventionally been the mainstream of treatment; however, complete bacterial eradication and/or optimal wound healing may not be necessarily achieved with conventional mechanical therapy alone. Consequently, in addition to chemotherapy consisting of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents, phototherapy using lasers and light-emitting diodes has been gradually integrated with mechanical therapy to enhance subsequent wound healing by achieving thorough debridement, decontamination and tissue stimulation. With increasing evidence of benefits, therapies with low- and high-level lasers play an important role in wound healing/tissue regeneration in the treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. This article discusses the outcomes of laser therapy in soft-tissue management, periodontal

  17. A periodontal case report by Dr. S.L. Clemens.

    PubMed

    Maloney, W J

    2010-07-01

    Mark Twain provides a humorous and insightful look into the origins of periodontal therapy and anesthesia in "Happy Memories of the Dental Chair". The main character of this story is Dr. John Riggs, the father of periodontics. Dr. Horace Wells, a pioneer in the field of anesthesia, also appears in the story. Twain presents his autobiographical experiences with dentistry in his literary work in a form that can be seen to be similar to a case report in a professional dental journal. PMID:20400720

  18. Intraoral fiber optic-based diagnostic for periodontal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P W; Gutierrez, D M; Everett, M J; Brown, S B; Langry, K C; Colston, B W; Roe, J N

    2000-01-21

    The purpose of this initial study was to begin development of a new, objective diagnostic instrument that will allow simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteases within a single periodontal pocket using a chemical fiber optic sensor. This approach could potentially be adapted to use specific antibodies and chemiluminescence to detect and quantitate virtually any compound and compare concentrations of different compounds within the same periodontal pocket. The device could also be used to assay secretions in salivary ducts or from a variety of wounds. The applicability is, therefore, not solely limited to dentistry and the device would be important both for clinical diagnostics and as a research tool.

  19. Green tea: A boon for periodontal and general health

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Saluja, Mini; Agarwal, Gunjan; Alam, Mahtab

    2012-01-01

    Green tea is particularly rich in health-promoting flavonoids (which account for 30% of the dry weight of a leaf), including catechins and their derivatives. The most abundant catechin in green tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate, which is thought to play a pivotal role in the green tea's anticancer and antioxidant effects. Catechins should be considered right alongside of the better-known antioxidants like vitamins E and C as potent free radical scavengers and health-supportive for this reason. It has been suggested that green tea also promotes periodontal health by reducing inflammation, preventing bone resorption and limiting the growth of certain bacteria associated with periodontal diseases. PMID:23055579

  20. Canine stage 1 periodontal disease: a latent pathology.

    PubMed

    Whyte, A; Bonastre, C; Monteagudo, L V; Les, F; Obon, J; Whyte, J; Tejedor, M T

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the potential health issues associated with periodontal disease (PD) in dogs, 1004 teeth from 25 dogs were examined. The dogs were randomly selected, aged 2-14 years, and had at least 95% of their teeth at the first PD stage. Significant positive correlations between plaque grade (PG) and gum inflammation, gingival regression, periodontal pocket, age and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity were identified. In contrast, PG was negatively correlated to total platelet count. Altogether, these findings suggest that prevention and therapy at the first PD stages can have an important impact on the general health condition of dogs. PMID:24878263

  1. Subgingival Microbiome Shifts and Community Dynamics in Periodontal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Patricia I; Hoare, Anilei; Hong, Bo-Young

    2016-07-01

    High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing has allowed the characterization of subgingival microbiome shifts from health to periodontitis identifying health-associated, periodontitis-associated and core species, which preserve their proportions from health to disease. The development of gingivitis is also characterized by distinct shifts. Microbiome shifts resemble microbial successions and result from interspecies interactions and community adaptation to the changing environment as inflammation ensues. Gingivitis-associated and core species are proposed as likely mediators of microbiome transitions. PMID:27514154

  2. Biologic width and its importance in periodontal and restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Nugala, Babitha; Kumar, Bb Santosh; Sahitya, S; Krishna, P Mohana

    2012-01-01

    An adequate understanding of the relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure adequate form, function, esthetics and comfort of the dentition. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainty remains regarding specific concepts such as biologic width, its maintenance and applications of crown lengthening in cases of biologic width violation. Relevant publications regarding biologic width, its violation and management were identified up to August 2011 using manual and electronic database search in Medline, Embase, Directory of Open Access Journals and Google Scholar. This review discusses the concept of biologic width around tooth and its relationship to periodontal health and restorative dentistry. PMID:22368328

  3. Role of nitro-oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of experimental rat periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    BOŞCA, ADINA BIANCA; MICLĂUŞ, VIOREL; ILEA, ARANKA; CÂMPIAN, RADU SEPTIMIU; RUS, VASILE; RUXANDA, FLAVIA; RAŢIU, CRISTIAN; UIFĂLEAN, ANA; PÂRVU, ALINA ELENA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Periodontitis is a common chronic adult condition that implicates oxidative damage to gingival tissue, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. This study aimed at assessing the association between the nitro-oxidative stress and the periodontal tissues destructions in experimental rat periodontitis. Methods Periodontitis was induced in 15 male albino rats by repetitive lesions to the gingiva adjacent to the inferior incisors, performed daily, for 16 days. On D1, D3, D6, D8, and D16 the onset and evolution of periodontitis were monitored by clinical and histopathological examinations; blood was collected and serum nitro-oxidative stress was evaluated through total nitrites and nitrates, total oxidative status, total antioxidant capacity, and oxidative stress index. Results The results demonstrated that there was a graded and continuous increase in serum levels of total nitrites and nitrates, total oxidative status and oxidative stress index, which was consistent with the severity of periodontal destructions during periodontitis progression. However, total antioxidant capacity was not significantly influenced by the disease progression. Conclusions In experimental rat periodontitis, the systemic nitro-oxidative stress was associated with the severity of periodontal destructions assessed clinically and histopathologically. Therefore, systemic nitro-oxidative stress parameters might be used as diagnostic tools in periodontitis. PMID:27004039

  4. Odanacatib, A Cathepsin K-Specific Inhibitor, Inhibits Inflammation and Bone Loss Caused by Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Liang; Chen, Jianwei; Zhu, Zheng; Reddy, Michael S.; Mountz, John D.; Chen, Wei; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a bacteria-induced inflammatory disease mainly affecting periodontal tissues, leading to periodontal inflammation, bone breakdown, and loss of the tooth. The main obstacle for treating periodontitis effectively is the difficulty in finding a target that can inhibit bone loss and inflammation simultaneously. Recent studies showed that cathepsin K (CTSK) might have functions in the immune system besides its role in osteoclasts. Thus, targeting CTSK would have a potential therapeutic effect in both the bone system and the immune system during the progression of periodontitis. Methods In the current study, a small molecular inhibitor (odanacatib [ODN]) is explored to inhibit the function of CTSK in a bacteria-induced periodontitis mouse model. Results The application of ODN decreased the number of osteoclasts, macrophages, and T cells, as well as the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the periodontitis lesion area. Furthermore, lack of CTSK inhibited the expression of TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 and their downstream cytokine signaling in the gingival epithelial cells in periodontitis lesions, demonstrating that the innate immune response was inhibited in periodontitis. Conclusion The present results show that inhibition of CTSK can prevent bone loss and the immune response during the progression of periodontitis, indicating that CTSK is a promising target for treating inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis by affecting both osteoclasts and the immune system. PMID:25879791

  5. Repair of an extensive periodontal defect after tetracycline administration. A case report.

    PubMed

    Moskow, B S

    1986-01-01

    A pathologically migrated maxillary central incisor tooth with a poor periodontal prognosis was treated successfully with conventional periodontal therapy. After almost 4 years, an extensive periodontal lesion developed on the same tooth and extraction was recommended. The patient did not comply and the acute symptoms disappeared after the administration of 1 gm of Tetracycline a day for 2 weeks. Although no definitive periodontal therapy was done, complete resolution of the lesion occurred with the healing of the structures of the periodontium and a dramatic reduction in mobility of the tooth. Antibacterial therapy could be an effective means of treating some periodontal lesions once a more exact and direct association is established between the various clinical forms of periodontitis and specific periodontal or groups of pathogens. PMID:3456037

  6. Evaluation of the relationship between periodontal risk and carotid artery calcifications on panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Kamak, Gulen; Yildirim, Eren; Rencber, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate if there is a relationship between findings of carotid artery calcification (CAC) and periodontal risk in nonsmoker subjects by using panoramic radiographs (DPR). Materials and Methods: A total of 1146 DPRs were investigated. Gender, age, severity of bone loss, tooth loss, periodontal risk, and findings of carotid calcification were recorded. The periodontal risk was evaluated and classified according to the degree of alveolar bone loss. Results: CAC was diagnosed in %13.6 (n: 156) of DPRs. Of 1146 patients, 338 (29.5%) had low, 668 (60%) had moderate, and 120 (10.5%) had high periodontal risk. A statistically significant relation was observed between carotid calcification and periodontal risk. Conclusion: Positive findings of carotid calcification may be related with periodontal problems. Clinicians must be careful about diagnosing CACs on DPRs during routine examinations. In the case of positive findings of CAC and periodontitis together, the patient may be consulted to a specialist for further investigation. PMID:26929685

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 gene polymorphism is associated with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan-Sheng; Zhao, Yue; Xiao, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) contribute to the immune response by recognizing patterns presented by bacteria and other pathogens. These receptors have been implicated in the inflammatory response that contributes to gingivitis and periodontitis. Conflicting reports have suggested that variations in the genes encoding TLRs, particularly TLR2 and TLR4, may influence susceptibility to periodontitis. In this study, the contribution of variations in the genes encoding TLR2 and TLR4 in the context of periodontitis was examined in 254 patients with moderate periodontitis, 418 patients with severe periodontitis, and 260 healthy controls free of gum disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from participants' whole blood, and genotyping of TLR2/TLR4 as performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction with TaqMan MGB primer. The genotype, allele, and haplotype frequencies were compared among control, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis groups. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square and logistic regression analyses. Of the 9 polymorphic loci detected in the two genes, one, rs11536889 (G>C) in TLR4, displayed a statistically significant difference in distribution between individuals with moderate periodontitis and severe periodontitis (P<0.05). The distribution of the GG genotype in moderate periodontitis was higher than in the severe periodontitis group (P<0.05). Further, for the haplotype rs7873784, rs1927907, and rs1153688 of TLR4, the distribution of haplotype GCG was statistically different between moderate periodontitis and severe periodontitis (P<0.05, OR=1.501). These findings indicate that variation in TLR4 may affect chronic periodontitis susceptibility in a Han Chinese population. PMID:26131223

  8. Evaluation of a New Self-Reported Tool for Periodontitis Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kottmann, Tanja; Schwarzenberger, Fabian; Jentsch, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodontitis is still highly prevalent in industrial population whereas at the same time appropriate screening programs are missing. Aim To evaluate, a self-reported questionnaire about periodontal risk factors in combination with the Periodontal Screening Index (PSI) to identify an existing need for periodontal treatment combined with the early recognition of high-risk patients. Materials and Methods Total 200 patients took part in the questionnaire based study and were examined using the PSI. Thereafter the participants were divided into two groups, subjects with periodontitis (Group 1; PSI 0-2) and subjects without periodontitis (Group 2; PSI 3-4). The answers were evaluated using a point system ranging from 0 to 8, based on known periodontal risk factors and their assumed degree of influence. Receiver-Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were applied to examine the overall discriminatory power, sensitivity, specificity and corresponding cut-off points of the self-reported periodontal disease scale. Results There was a significant difference between Group 1 and 2 concerning the majority of the inquired items (12 of 16, p<0.05). The distribution of the individual total score exhibited a high statistical significance (p<0.001) of robustness in terms of differing definitions of periodontitis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) was 0.912 with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 76%. Conclusion The questionnaire produced a reliable assessment of the individual risk (total score) and the need for periodontal treatment as well as the differentiation between gingivitis and periodontitis. Clinical relevance Patient-based data (clinical variables and periodontal risk factors of periodontitis) were adequate to make a preliminary assessment of a possible need for periodontal treatment. PMID:27504399

  9. Periotest for measuring periodontal characteristics--correlation with periodontal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Schulte, W; d'Hoedt, B; Lukas, D; Maunz, M; Steppeler, M

    1992-05-01

    The Periotest measures the reaction of the periodontium to a defined percussive force. The percussion is applied to the tooth by an electronically controlled tapping head. Information on structural change is obtained by measurement of both the elastic and viscous characteristics of the periodontium. The latter prevent oscillations of the tooth in the alveolar bone. A value is calculated and is displayed as a "Periotest value". The following research report shows the relation of Periotest values to bone loss. Bone loss was quantitatively determined for 2312 teeth from orthopantomographic radiographs and for 900 teeth exposed to intra-oral films using the standard paralleling technique. A differentiation was made between vertical and horizontal bone loss. Clinical mobility index, pocket depth, gingival recession and papillary hemorrhagic index were also measured. There was a strong association between the Periotest value and bone loss. These results suggest that Periotest evaluation provides an objective indication of the extent of periodontal bone loss. PMID:1608031

  10. Systemic labeling and visualization of dental sensory nerves by the novel fluorescent marker AM1-43.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Sumio

    2006-09-01

    Systemic labeling of sensory nerves was performed by injecting a small amount of the styryl dye AM1-43 subcutaneously to the back skin of 4-week-old mice in order to determine its ability to stain sensory nerves. One or 3 days later, dental tissues were fixed and cryosectioned. Molars showed bright nerve fibers in the periodontal ligament and pulp. Nerve fibers in dentinal tubules approximately 100 microm from the pulp were also labeled. In the incisor, there were only few labelings in the pulp, although free nerve endings and Ruffini-type mechanosensors in the periodontal ligament on the lingual side were brightly labeled. The AM1-43-positive fibers were also labeled by anti-PGP9.5. AM1-43 is an excellent marker for sensory nerves and it may be useful for further investigations of dental innervation and in exploring new analgesics for tooth pain. PMID:16955669

  11. Assessment of CASP gene polymorphisms in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, S W; Kim, S K; Chung, J H; Ban, J Y

    2015-01-01

    Caspases (CASP) are intracellular proteases that play roles as mediators of apoptosis. Activation of caspase 3 is enhanced in chronic periodontitis. Thus, we hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CASP genes might be associated with this condition in the Korean population. To investigate whether such polymorphisms might be involved in the development of periodontal disease, 51 patients and 33 control subjects were assessed. A total of 201 CASP gene SNPs were analyzed with genotypes being determined using and Axiom(TM) genome-wide human assay. SNPStats and SPSS 18.0 were used for the analysis of genetic data and logistic regression models were utilized to evaluate odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and P values. Of the 201 SNPs, only three (rs12108497, rs4647602, and rs113420705, all in the CASP3 gene) were significantly associated with chronic periodontitis (P < 0.05). The minor allele frequencies of these SNPs were higher in the patient group than in the control group. In addition, the TC and GT haplotypes formed by rs4647602 and rs113420705 were found to be associated with chronic this disease (TC haplotype, P = 0.0039; GT haplotype, P = 0.002). These results suggest that CASP3 gene polymorphisms may be associated with susceptibility to periodontal disease in the Korean population. PMID:26782454

  12. Eugenol nanocapsule for enhanced therapeutic activity against periodontal infections.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Kannissery; Aji Alex, M R; Singh, Manisha; Dang, Shweta; Ansari, Shahid H; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    Eugenol is a godsend to dental care due to its analgesic, local anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. The aim of the present research work was to prepare, characterize and evaluate eugenol-loaded nanocapsules (NCs) against periodontal infections. Eugenol-loaded polycaprolactone (PCL) NCs were prepared by solvent displacement method. The nanometric size of the prepared NCs was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The in vitro drug release was found to follow a biphasic pattern and followed Michaelis-Menten like model. The percentage cell viability values near to 100 in the cell viability assay indicated that the NCs are not cytotoxic. In the in vivo studies, the eugenol NC group displayed significant difference in the continuity of epithelium of the interdental papilla in comparison to the untreated, pure eugenol and placebo groups. The in vivo performance of the eugenol-loaded NCs using ligature-induced periodontitis model in rats indicated that eugenol-loaded NCs could prevent septal bone resorption in periodontitis. On the basis of our research findings it could be concluded that eugenol-loaded PCL NCs could serve as a novel colloidal drug delivery system for enhanced therapeutic activity of eugenol in the treatment of periodontal infections. PMID:26079717

  13. Evaluation of bone morphogenic proteins in periodontal practice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Supreet; Grover, Vishakha; Kaur, Harkiran; Malhotra, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Forty years ago Marshal R. Urist discovered a substance in bone matrix that had inductive properties for the development of bone and cartilage, until date, at least 20 bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been identified, some of which have been shown in vitro to stimulate the process of stem cell differentiation into osteoblasts in human and animal models. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief overview of BMPs and to review critically the clinical data currently available on the use of BMPs in various periodontal applications. The literature on BMPs was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal applications were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicates BMPs to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. On the basis of the data provided in the studies that were reviewed BMPs provide revolutionary therapies in periodontal practice. PMID:27134452

  14. Cytoskeletal disease: a role in the etiology of adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Binderman, I; Gadban, N; Yaffe, A

    2014-01-01

    All cells and organisms across the evolutionary spectrum, from the most primitive to the most complex, are mechanosensitive. As the cytoskeleton is a key in controlling the normal basal prestress of cells and therefore is involved in virtually all physiological cellular processes, abnormalities in this essential cellular characteristic may result in diseases. Indeed, many diseases have now been associated with abnormalities in cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal proteins. We propose that adult periodontitis is, at least in part, such a cytoskeletal disease. It is well established that adult periodontitis starts by bacterial invasion at the interface between the tooth surface and marginal gingiva that induces a local inflammatory response. The inflammatory cells release metalloproteinases which degrade gingival collagenous fibrous tissue and loss of local tissue integrity that reduces the normal prestressed cell-extracellular matrix network. This is a major signaling trigger that induces a local and rapid release of ATP, which then activates P2X receptors and stimulates a calcium influx, further activating osteoclastic resorption of the alveolar bone. As periodontitis is a chronic disease, it seems reasonable to suggest that agents that maintain cytoskeletal tensegrity, for example, inhibitors of ATP receptors, may diminish the bone loss and may have a role in future periodontal therapy. PMID:23679579

  15. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in periodontal healing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozono, Sayaka; Matsuyama, Takashi; Biwasa, Kamal Krishna; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Nakajima, Yumiko; Yoshimoto, Takehiko; Yonamine, Yutaka; Kadomatsu, Hideshi; Tancharoen, Salunya; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2010-04-16

    Endocannabinoids including anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are important lipid mediators for immunosuppressive effects and for appropriate homeostasis via their G-protein-coupled cannabinoid (CB) receptors in mammalian organs and tissues, and may be involved in wound healing in some organs. The physiological roles of endocannabinoids in periodontal healing remain unknown. We observed upregulation of the expression of CB1/CB2 receptors localized on fibroblasts and macrophage-like cells in granulation tissue during wound healing in a wound-healing model in rats, as well as an increase in AEA levels in gingival crevicular fluid after periodontal surgery in human patients with periodontitis. In-vitro, the proliferation of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) by AEA was significantly attenuated by AM251 and AM630, which are selective antagonists of CB1 and CB2, respectively. CP55940 (CB1/CB2 agonist) induced phosphorylation of the extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), and Akt in HGFs. Wound closure by CP55940 in an in-vitro scratch assay was significantly suppressed by inhibitors of MAP kinase kinase (MEK), p38MAPK, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K). These findings suggest that endocannabinoid system may have an important role in periodontal healing.

  16. Periodontal disease and systemic conditions: a bidirectional relationship.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jemin; Amar, Salomon

    2006-09-01

    For decades, physicians and dentists have paid close attention to their own respective fields, specializing in medicine pertaining to the body and the oral cavity, respectively. However, recent findings have strongly suggested that oral health may be indicative of systemic health. Currently, this gap between allopathic medicine and dental medicine is quickly closing, due to significant findings supporting the association between periodontal disease and systemic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and osteoporosis. Significant effort has brought numerous advances in revealing the etiological and pathological links between this chronic inflammatory dental disease and these other conditions. Therefore, there is reason to hope that the strong evidence from these studies may guide researchers towards greatly improved treatment of periodontal infection that would also ameliorate these systemic illnesses. Hence, researchers must continue not only to uncover more information about the correlations between periodontal and systemic diseases but also to focus on positive associations that may result from treating periodontal disease as a means of ameliorating systemic diseases. PMID:16998613

  17. Role of suspected periodontopathogens in microbiological monitoring of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Dahlén, G

    1993-08-01

    Periodontal disease is the clinical result of a complex interaction between the host and plaque bacteria. Although a specificity to some degree is found for Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), it has been difficult to obtain evidence for a specific etiological role of the bacteria associated with periodontal disease in adults. What we see is the net result of host-parasite interactions which in an unpredictable moment accumulate and exceed the threshold of tissue integrity. This hypothesis is concomitant with the view of periodontal disease as a polymicrobial infection, predominantly anaerobic, which occurs commonly in the oral cavity or elsewhere in the body. Some micro-organisms (risk markers) occur more frequently than others and may significantly determine the outcome of this host-parasite interaction. Microbiological sampling and analysis seem to be of limited value in risk assessment; however, they can be used as tools in diagnosis in LJP patients and acute infections, and in treatment decision and therapy control in "refractory" patients. Suspected pathogens (risk markers) are Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and some species of spirochetes, while the roles of Prevotella intermedia, Bacteroidesforsythus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus, and Peptostreptococcus micros are more uncertain. The presence of periodontopathogens as well as enterics, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida especially, should be considered in patients with systemic individual disorders--e.g., diabetes mellitus, neutropenia, agranulocytosis, and AIDS--or with implants. PMID:8260004

  18. Effect of Ozonised water on Chronic Periodontitis - A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Katti, Sandeep S; Chava, Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to study the clinical effects of ozonated water on periodontal tissues. Materials & Methods: In the present study 30 subjects were selected with age ranging from 20 to 60 yearsand pocket depth of ≥5mm. Two sites were selected in each patient whichwere divided into two groups. Group 1(control group-irrigation with saline) and Group 2(study group-irrigation with ozonized water) and clinical parameters were recorded at baseline, 15 days and 30 days. Results: When the comparison of mean values of Plaque Index and Gingival Index between the groups and at different time intervals were made, statistically significant difference were observed at 30 days at 5% level. When the mean values of clinical attachment level on mesial and distal site was compared between the groups, statistical significance was observed at 5% level and 1% level respectively.Similarly statistical significance at 5% level was observed at 15 and 30 days on buccal site. Conclusion: Subgingival irrigation with ozonized water is beneficial adjunct treatment modality to enhance periodontal health with significant role in periodontal therapy. How to cite this article: Katti SS, Chava VK. Effect of Ozonised water on Chronic Periodontitis - A Clinical Study. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):79-84. PMID:24324309

  19. Evaluation of bone morphogenic proteins in periodontal practice

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Supreet; Grover, Vishakha; Kaur, Harkiran; Malhotra, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Forty years ago Marshal R. Urist discovered a substance in bone matrix that had inductive properties for the development of bone and cartilage, until date, at least 20 bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been identified, some of which have been shown in vitro to stimulate the process of stem cell differentiation into osteoblasts in human and animal models. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief overview of BMPs and to review critically the clinical data currently available on the use of BMPs in various periodontal applications. The literature on BMPs was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal applications were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicates BMPs to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. On the basis of the data provided in the studies that were reviewed BMPs provide revolutionary therapies in periodontal practice. PMID:27134452

  20. A Study of Treatment Planning: Periodontal Services for the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgrom, Peter; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A study undertaken to explore how dentists use patient data to plan treatment is presented. Three hundred forty-six general dentists used oral and general health findings to determine periodontal treatment for seven prototypic elderly patients. The results indicated that oral hygiene and major medications best discriminated between treatment…

  1. Lasers in minimally invasive periodontal and peri-implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Koji; Aoki, Akira; Coluzzi, Donald; Yukna, Raymond; Wang, Chen-Ying; Pavlic, Verica; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    Laser therapy has the potential to be an effective, minimally invasive procedure in periodontal therapy. The aim of the present review was to survey the relevant literature on the clinical application of lasers as a minimally invasive treatment for periodontitis and peri-implant disease. Currently, there are a large number of published clinical studies and case reports that evaluate the adjunctive use of diode, carbon dioxide, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG), erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium-doped: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers or antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for nonsurgical and minimally invasive surgical treatment of periodontal pockets. These procedures are expected not only to control inflammation but also to provide biostimulation effects with photonic energy. Recent meta-analyses did not show statistically significant differences in pocket reduction and clinical attachment gain compared with mechanical debridement alone, although limited positive effects of adjunctive laser therapy were reported. At present, systematic literature approaches suggest that more evidence-based studies need to be performed to support the integration of various laser therapies into the treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. The disparity between previous statistical analyses and individual successful clinical outcomes of laser applications might reveal the necessity of developing optimal laser-treatment modalities of different wavelengths and better-defined indications for each protocol. PMID:27045437

  2. Periodontal regeneration of transplanted rat teeth subcutaneously after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Izumi, N; Yoshizawa, M; Ono, Y; Kobayashi, T; Hamamoto, Y; Saito, C

    2007-09-01

    The periodontal regeneration of transplanted teeth after cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen overnight was previously examined using an animal model. The results showed that overnight cryopreservation did not have any severe adverse effects on periodontal healing. For clinical application, it is necessary to make the period of storage longer than in the preliminary study. In this study, the regeneration of periodontal tissues after cryopreservation for 4 weeks was examined. The maxillary molars of 4-week-old Wistar rats were extracted and transplanted into the abdominal subcutaneous tissue either immediately or after cryopreservation in a deep freezer at -80 degrees C. The donor teeth were frozen in a rate-controlling freezer. At 1, 2 and 4 weeks after transplantation, they were excised and observed under light microscopy. The cryopreserved teeth had acellular cementum with a rough surface at 1 week. With an increase in cementoblasts and the appearance of periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, the surface had become smooth at 2 weeks. There was no progressive root resorption. Although the process took somewhat more time, the teeth cryopreserved for 4 weeks showed regeneration that was similar to that of the immediately transplanted teeth. PMID:17804198

  3. The enduring importance of animal modelsin understanding periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Lamont, Richard J; Graves, Dana T

    2015-01-01

    Whereas no single animal model can reproduce the complexity of periodontitis, different aspects of the disease can be addressed by distinct models. Despite their limitations, animal models are essential for testing the biological significance of in vitro findings and for establishing cause-and-effect relationships relevant to clinical observations, which are typically correlative. We provide evidence that animal-based studies have generated a durable framework for dissecting the mechanistic basis of periodontitis. These studies have solidified the etiologic role of bacteria in initiating the inflammatory response that leads to periodontal bone loss and have identified key mediators (IL-1, TNF, prostaglandins, complement, RANKL) that induce inflammatory breakdown. Moreover, animal studies suggest that dysbiosis, rather than individual bacterial species, are important in initiating periodontal bone loss and have introduced the concept that organisms previously considered commensals can play important roles as accessory pathogens or pathobionts. These studies have also provided insight as to how systemic conditions, such as diabetes or leukocyte adhesion deficiency, contribute to tissue destruction. In addition, animal studies have identified and been useful in testing therapeutic targets. PMID:25574929

  4. Periodontal tissue engineering strategies based on nonoral stem cells.

    PubMed

    Requicha, João Filipe; Viegas, Carlos Alberto; Muñoz, Fernando; Reis, Rui Luís; Gomes, Manuela Estima

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease which constitutes an important health problem in humans due to its enormous prevalence and life threatening implications on systemic health. Routine standard periodontal treatments include gingival flaps, root planning, application of growth/differentiation factors or filler materials and guided tissue regeneration. However, these treatments have come short on achieving regeneration ad integrum of the periodontium, mainly due to the presence of tissues from different embryonic origins and their complex interactions along the regenerative process. Tissue engineering (TE) aims to regenerate damaged tissue by providing the repair site with a suitable scaffold seeded with sufficient undifferentiated cells and, thus, constitutes a valuable alternative to current therapies for the treatment of periodontal defects. Stem cells from oral and dental origin are known to have potential to regenerate these tissues. Nevertheless, harvesting cells from these sites implies a significant local tissue morbidity and low cell yield, as compared to other anatomical sources of adult multipotent stem cells. This manuscript reviews studies describing the use of non-oral stem cells in tissue engineering strategies, highlighting the importance and potential of these alternative stem cells sources in the development of advanced therapies for periodontal regeneration. PMID:24293355

  5. Periodontal status of patient’s underwent hemodialysis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jenabian, Niloofar; Ghazi Mirsaeed, Ali Mohammad; Ehsani, Hodis; Kiakojori, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic renal failure patients undergoing hemodialysis are susceptible to periodontal diseases due to systemic complications of the disease and using different drugs. The present study investigated the periodontal status of patient’s who underwent hemodialysis, in Babol, northern Iran. Methods: One-hundred-fifteen hemodialysis patients (63 males, 52 females) with the mean age of 47.9±15.3 years were studied at Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Babol, Iran. Periodontal parameters including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), clinical attachment level (CAL) and probing pocket depth (PPD) were measured in these patients. The data were collected and analyzed. Results: The PI, GI, CAL and PPD were 2.37±0.55, 2.36±0.63, 3.98±1.61 and 4.41±1.4, respectively. Significant positive correlations were found between the participants’ age and PI (p<0.024) and p<0.001, respectively. Also, CAL was significantly higher in males than females (4.39±1.57 vs. 3.53±1.56, p<0.02). Conclusion: The results show that longer duration of hemodialysis is associated with severe periodontal diseases, especially in males. PMID:24009955

  6. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Green, David W.; Lee, Jung-Seok; Jung, Han-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a “water-tight” barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachment complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia, and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organizing cell–cell connections, cell–matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption, and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis. PMID:26903872

  7. Occlusion and periodontal disease--where is the link?

    PubMed

    Fu, Jia Hui; Yap, Adrian U J

    2007-12-01

    The effect of occlusion on the periodontium has been the subject of much debate. Interest on this subject has decreased over the years but has been renewed with the popularity of implant dentistry. This paper reviews the literature and explores the relationship between trauma from occlusion with periodontal disease and peri-implant bone loss. With regards to periodontal disease, there are two schools of thought on the effect that trauma from occlusion has on the periodontium. One believes that trauma from occlusion is a co-destructive factor in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease. The other believes that it is not. Up till now, there are no conclusive explanations on the association between trauma from occlusion and periodontal disease. For dental implants, current literature suggests that there is an association between occlusal overloading and peri-implant bone loss even in the absence of inflammation. However, there is a need for more randomized clinical trials to validate this relationship. PMID:18472527

  8. Decision Making in Periodontics: A Review of Outcome Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Debora C.

    1994-01-01

    The complexity of decision making concerning periodontic treatment is discussed, and it is suggested that patient input concerning risks and benefits is important. Research into this area is recommended so that decisions can be based on empirical evidence, not opinion. (MSE)

  9. Advanced Biomatrix Designs for Regenerative Therapy of Periodontal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.H.; Park, C.H.; Perez, R.A.; Lee, H.Y.; Jang, J.H.; Lee, H.H.; Wall, I.B.; Shi, S.; Kim, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth-supporting apparatus, including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. A broad range of treatment options is currently available to restore the structure and function of the periodontal tissues. A regenerative approach, among others, is now considered the most promising paradigm for this purpose, harnessing the unique properties of stem cells. How to make full use of the body’s innate regenerative capacity is thus a key issue. While stem cells and bioactive factors are essential components in the regenerative processes, matrices play pivotal roles in recapitulating stem cell functions and potentiating therapeutic actions of bioactive molecules. Moreover, the positions of appropriate bioactive matrices relative to the injury site may stimulate the innate regenerative stem cell populations, removing the need to deliver cells that have been manipulated outside of the body. In this topical review, we update views on advanced designs of biomatrices—including mimicking of the native extracellular matrix, providing mechanical stimulation, activating cell-driven matrices, and delivering bioactive factors in a controllable manner—which are ultimately useful for the regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues. PMID:25139364

  10. Mandibulectomy for treatment of fractures associated with severe periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Carina Marchiori; Rahal, Sheila Canevese; dos Reis Mesquita, Luciane; Castilho, Maíra Sales; Kano, Washington Takashi; Mamprim, Maria Jaqueline

    2015-01-01

    Six cases of mandibular fractures associated with severe periodontal disease that had been treated by mandibulectomy, due to intense bone loss, were evaluated retrospectively. The dogs were mainly older, small breed dogs that had suffered a traumatic event. Four dogs had a bilateral mandibulectomy and 2 a unilateral mandibulectomy. PMID:25750452

  11. Shikonin Inhibits Inflammatory Cytokine Production in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Satoru; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Hosokawa, Ikuko; Ozaki, Kazumi; Matsuo, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Shikonin, which is derived from Lithospermum erythrorhizon, a herb used in traditional medicine, has long been considered to be a useful treatment for various diseases in traditional oriental medicine. Shikonin has recently been reported to have several pharmacological properties, e.g., it has anti-microbial, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to examine whether shikonin is able to influence the production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and/or chemokine C-C motif ligand (CCL)20, which contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, in human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLC). The production levels of IL-6, IL-8, and CCL20 in HPDLC were determined using an ELISA. Western blot analysis was used to detect nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway activation in HPDLC. Shikonin prevented IL-1β- or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated IL-6, IL-8, and CCL20 production in HPDLC. Moreover, we found that shikonin suppressed the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of kappa B-alpha (IκB-α) in IL-1β- or TNF-α-stimulated HPDLC. These findings suggest that shikonin could have direct beneficial effects against periodontal disease by reducing IL-6, IL-8, and CCL20 production in periodontal lesions. PMID:27072015

  12. Periodontal tissue regeneration with PRP incorporated gelatin hydrogel sponges.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Dai; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sato, Soh

    2015-09-01

    Gelatin hydrogels have been designed and prepared for the controlled release of the transforming growth factor (TGF-b1) and the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). PRP (Platelet rich plasma) contains many growth factors including the PDGF and TGF-b1. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regeneration of periodontal tissue following the controlled release of growth factors in PRP. For the periodontal ligament cells and osteoblast, PRP of different concentrations was added. The assessment of DNA, mitochondrial activity and ALP activity were measured. To evaluate the TGF-β1 release from PRP incorporated gelatin sponge, amounts of TGF-β1 in each supernatant sample were determined by the ELISA. Transplantation experiments to prepare a bone defect in a rat alveolar bone were an implanted gelatin sponge incorporated with different concentration PRP. In DNA assay and MTT assay, after the addition of PRP to the periodontal ligament cells and osteoblast, the cell count and mitochondrial activity had increased the most in the group with the addition of 5  ×  PRP. In the ALP assay, after the addition of PRP to the periodontal ligament cells, the cell activity had increased the most in the group with the addition of 3  ×  PRP. In the transplantation, the size of the bone regenerated in the defect with 3  ×  PRP incorporated gelatin sponge was larger than that of the other group. PMID:26481592

  13. What has ageing to do with periodontal health and disease?

    PubMed

    Persson, G Rutger

    2006-08-01

    Periodontitis is a multi-factorial disease and in most cases also a disease with a chronic progression. Exposure to factors which contribute to periodontitis occurs over a long period, so that at the time of diagnosis it may be difficult to identify and evaluate what co-factors have contributed to its development. These include exposure to bacteria and viruses, inflammation, genetic factors, health behaviours and a variety of social factors, socio-economic status, behavioural and nutritional habits, the ability to cope with stress and the ability of the immune system to fight infections. Many patients in their 50s also experience other conditions such as heart disease, diabetes mellitus, or rheumatoid arthritis and recent reports on the associations and potential biological mechanisms by which periodontitis can be linked to other systemic diseases suggest that the patient with periodontitis is a challenged individual. Neither individuals nor their oral health care providers are currently prepared for the challenges in oral health care as the expectation of successful ageing with remaining and aesthetically functional teeth is increasing. The scientific evidence is, however, growing, and while the opportunities to prepare for successful ageing exist they must be included in the educational process of both current and future oral health care providers and their patients. PMID:16972399

  14. Differential expression of salivary glycoproteins in aggressive and chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    ROCHA, Daniela de Morais; ZENÓBIO, Elton Gonçalves; VAN DYKE, Thomas; SILVA, Karine Simões; COSTA, Fernando Oliveira; SOARES, Rodrigo Villamarim

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the pattern of secretion and the expression of mucin glycoprotein-2 (MG2) and lactoferrin in individuals with or without periodontitis. Material and Methods Five individuals with aggressive periodontitis (APG), 5 with generalized chronic periodontitis (CPG) and 5 without periodontitis (CG) were enrolled after informed consent. Non-stimulated and stimulated submandibular and sublingual saliva was collected and samples analyzed by Western blot probed with specific antibodies. Results Stimulated and non-stimulated salivary flow rates did not differ among groups. Western blot analysis revealed that stimulation led to: an increase in MG2 expression in all groups, and to lactoferrin expression in APG and CPG. In non-stimulated saliva, CG exhibited the highest expression of both glycoproteins. In stimulated saliva, CG exhibited the highest expression of MG2, whereas APG the highest of lactoferrin. Conclusions The pattern of secretion of MG2 and lactoferrin in health and disease is complex. Although the present study analyzed samples from a limited number of participants, the reduced expression of MG2 and lactoferrin in APG and CPG under non-stimulated condition, the predominant circumstance of salivary secretion during the day, suggests that these salivary constituents may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:22666834

  15. Novel Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of Periodontitis by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Madhu; Pentyala, Kishore Babu; Urolagin, Sarvesh Basavaraj; K B, Menaka; Bhoi, Shreedevi

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological efficacy of locally delivered 1% curcumin gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 25 patients, belonging to both sex, aged between 21-45 years. All patients diagnosed as chronic periodontitis with periodontal pockets of depth >5mm bilaterally were randomly selected. A split mouth design was followed and the patients received a complete prophylaxis including scaling and root planing. Examination of plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were measured for each patient. The test group received 1% curcumin gel along with scaling and root planing whereas the control group received scaling and root planing alone followed by microbiological samples taken at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months interval. Results: The 1% curcumin gel appeared to provide significant improvements in clinical parameters. Microbiological counts of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and capnocytophaga showed significant reduction in periopathogens at the test sites after six months when compared with that of control sites. Conclusion: Locally delivered 1% curcumin gel was more effective in inhibiting the growth of oral bacteria when used as an adjunct to SRP in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:25654035

  16. Leptin Effects on the Regenerative Capacity of Human Periodontal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nokhbehsaim, Marjan; Keser, Sema; Jäger, Andreas; Jepsen, Søren; Bourauel, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is increasing throughout the globe and characterized by excess adipose tissue, which represents a complex endocrine organ. Adipose tissue secrets bioactive molecules called adipokines, which act at endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine levels. Obesity has recently been shown to be associated with periodontitis, a disease characterized by the irreversible destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues, that is, periodontium, and also with compromised periodontal healing. Although the underlying mechanisms for these associations are not clear yet, increased levels of proinflammatory adipokines, such as leptin, as found in obese individuals, might be a critical pathomechanistic link. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of leptin on the regenerative capacity of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and also to study the local leptin production by these cells. Leptin caused a significant downregulation of growth (TGFβ1, and VEGFA) and transcription (RUNX2) factors as well as matrix molecules (collagen, and periostin) and inhibited SMAD signaling under regenerative conditions. Moreover, the local expression of leptin and its full-length receptor was significantly downregulated by inflammatory, microbial, and biomechanical signals. This study demonstrates that the hormone leptin negatively interferes with the regenerative capacity of PDL cells, suggesting leptin as a pathomechanistic link between obesity and compromised periodontal healing. PMID:25136363

  17. Acute Phase Proteins and Their Role in Periodontitis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Polepalle, Tejaswin; Moogala, Srinivas; Boggarapu, Shalini; Pesala, Divya Sai; Palagi, Firoz Babu

    2015-11-01

    Acute phase proteins are a class of proteins whose plasma concentration increase (positive acute phase proteins) or decrease (negative acute phase proteins) in response to inflammation. This response is called as the acute phase reaction, also called as acute phase response, which occurs approximately 90 minutes after the onset of a systemic inflammatory reaction. In Periodontitis endotoxins released from gram negative organisms present in the sub gingival plaque samples interact with Toll- like receptors (TLR) that are expressed on the surface of Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) and monocytes which are in abundance in periodontal inflammation. The complex formed due to interaction of Endotoxins and TLR activates the Signal transduction pathway in both innate and adaptive immunity resulting in production of Cytokines that co- ordinate the local and systemic inflammatory response. The pro inflammatory cytokines originating at the diseased site activates the liver cells to produce acute phase proteins as a part of non specific response. The production of Acute phase proteins is regulated to a great extent by Cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and to a lesser extent by Glucocorticoid hormones. These proteins bind to bacteria leading to activation of complement proteins that destroys pathogenic organisms. Studies have shown that levels of acute phase proteins are increased in otherwise healthy adults with poor periodontal status. This article highlights about the synthesis, structure, types and function of acute phase proteins and the associated relation of acute phase proteins in Periodontitis. PMID:26674303

  18. Systemic Antibiotics and Tooth Loss in Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, J.; Hujoel, P.P.; Maupome, G.; Saver, B.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics have been recommended for the treatment of destructive periodontal disease. Our goal was to relate antibiotic use for medical or dental reasons to subsequent tooth loss in a cohort of 12,631 persons with destructive periodontal disease. After adjustment for age, smoking, and other confounders, the dispensing of antibiotics for 1-13 days, 14-20 days, or 21 or more days was not associated with reduced tooth loss [Adjusted rate ratio (RR) = 1.0; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.8-1.1; RR = 1.2; 95% CI = 0.9-1.4, and RR =1.2, 95% CI =1.0-1.3, respectively]. Numerous subgroup analyses were consistent with these overall null findings, with two exceptions: Longer courses of tetracyclines were associated with reduced tooth loss among persons receiving periodontal care, and penicillin was associated with reduced tooth loss among persons with more severe disease. Long-term, larger randomized trials are needed to provide evidence that antibiotics reduce tooth loss when used in the management of destructive periodontal disease. PMID:18719216

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Oral Treponemes Associated with Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moter, Annette; Hoenig, Carina; Choi, Bong-Kyu; Riep, Birgit; Göbel, Ulf B.

    1998-01-01

    Periodontitis, a disease responsible for tooth loss worldwide, is characterized by chronic inflammation of the periodontium, eventually leading to destruction of periodontal ligaments and supporting alveolar bone. Spirochetes, identified by dark-field microscopy as being the most predominant bacteria in advanced lesions, are thought to play a causative role. Various spirochetal morphotypes were observed, but most of these morphotypes are as yet uncultivable. To assess the role of these organisms we designed oligonucleotide probes for the identification of both cultivable and so far uncultivable spirochetes in periodontitis patients. Subgingival plaque specimens taken from diseased sites (n = 200) and healthy control sites (n = 44) from 53 patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) were submitted to direct in situ hybridization or dot blot hybridization after prior amplification with eubacterial primers. Spirochetes were found in all patients, but their distributions varied considerably. Parallel use of oligonucleotide probes specific for cultivable or so far uncultivable treponemes suggested the presence of novel yet unknown organisms at a high frequency. These uncultivable treponemes were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and their morphologies, sizes, and numbers could be estimated. All RPP patients included in this study harbored oral treponemes that represent either novel species, e.g., Treponema maltophilum, or uncultivable phylotypes. Therefore, it is necessary to include these organisms in etiologic considerations and to strengthen efforts to cultivate these as yet uncultivable treponemes. PMID:9574713

  20. Ultrasonic Periodontal Probing Based on the Dynamic Wavelet Fingerprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinders, Mark K.; Hou, Jidong

    2005-04-01

    Manual pocket depth probing has been widely used as a retrospective diagnosis method in periodontics. However, numerous studies have questioned its ability to accurately measure the anatomic pocket depth. In this paper, an ultrasonic periodontal probing method is described, which involves using a hollow water-filled probe to focus a narrow beam of ultrasound energy into and out of the periodontal pocket, followed by automatic processing of pulse-echo signals to obtain the periodontal pocket depth. The signal processing algorithm consists of three steps: peak detection/characterization, peak classification and peak identification. A dynamic wavelet fingerprint (DWFP) technique was first applied to detect suspected scatterers in the A-scan signal and generate a two-dimensional black and white pattern to characterize the local transient signal corresponding to each scatterer. These DWFP patterns were then classified by a two-dimensional FFT procedure and mapped to an inclination index curve. The location of the pocket bottom was identified as the third broad peak in the inclination index curve. The algorithm was tested on full mouth probing data from two sequential visits of 14 patients. Its performance was evaluated by comparing ultrasonic probing results with that of full-mouth manual probing at the same sites, which was taken as the `gold standard'.

  1. Ultrasonic Periodontal Probing Based on the Dynamic Wavelet Fingerprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jidong; Rose, S. Timothy; Hinders, Mark K.

    2005-12-01

    Manual pocket depth probing has been widely used as a retrospective diagnosis method in periodontics. However, numerous studies have questioned its ability to accurately measure the anatomic pocket depth. In this paper, an ultrasonic periodontal probing method is described, which involves using a hollow water-filled probe to focus a narrow beam of ultrasound energy into and out of the periodontal pocket, followed by automatic processing of pulse-echo signals to obtain the periodontal pocket depth. The signal processing algorithm consists of three steps: peak detection/characterization, peak classification, and peak identification. A dynamic wavelet fingerprint (DWFP) technique is first applied to detect suspected scatterers in the A-scan signal and generate a two-dimensional black and white pattern to characterize the local transient signal corresponding to each scatterer. These DWFP patterns are then classified by a two-dimensional FFT procedure and mapped to an inclination index curve. The location of the pocket bottom was identified as the third broad peak in the inclination index curve. The algorithm is tested on full-mouth probing data from two sequential visits of 14 patients. Its performance is evaluated by comparing ultrasonic probing results with that of full-mouth manual probing at the same sites, which is taken as the "gold standard."

  2. Stress and periodontal disease: The link and logic!!

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sachin; Gupta, Garima; Thomas, Betsy; Bhat, K. M.; Bhat, G. S.

    2013-01-01

    Stress is an equated response to constant adverse stimuli. At one point or another everybody suffers from stress. Stress is compatible with good health, being necessary to cope with the challenges of everyday life. Problems start when the stress response is inappropriate to the intensity of the challenge. Psychological stress can down regulate the cellular immune response. Communication between the central nervous system and the immune system occurs via a complex network of bidirectional signals linking the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. Stress disrupts the homeostasis of this network, which in turn, alters immune function. Direct association between periodontal disease and stress remains to be proven, which is partly due to lack of an adequate animal models and difficulty to quantifying the amount and duration of stress and also there are many factors influencing the incidence and severity of periodontal disease. Nevertheless, more recent studies indicate that psychosocial stress represents a risk indicator for periodontal disease and should be addressed before and during treatment. This paper discusses how stress may modulate host response to bacteria and influence the course and progression of periodontal disease. PMID:24459366

  3. Critical Discussion of Essentials of Diagnosis and Recording in Periodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellen, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Issues to be addressed before writing standards of care for the diagnosis of adult periodontal disease are discussed. These include considerations in screening and examination; arriving at diagnosis and prognosis, informing the patient, and referral; monitoring outcomes using diagnostic signs and tests; and new technology for and approaches to…

  4. Relationship between Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Vilana Maria Adriano; Melo, Iracema Matos; Lima, Vilma

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis (PD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are immunoinflammatory diseases where leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory mediators induce alveolar bone loss, synovitis, and joint destruction, respectively. Thus, we reviewed the relationship between both diseases considering epidemiological aspects, mechanical periodontal treatment, inflammatory mediators, oral microbiota, and antibodies, using the keywords “periodontitis” and “rheumatoid arthritis” in PubMed database between January 2012 and March 2015, resulting in 162 articles. After critical reading based on titles and abstracts and following the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 26 articles were included. In the articles, women over 40 years old, smokers and nonsmokers, mainly constituted the analyzed groups. Eight studies broached the epidemiological relationship with PD and RA. Four trials demonstrated that the periodontal treatment influenced the severity of RA and periodontal clinical parameters. Nine studies were related with bacteria influence in the pathogenesis of RA and the presence of citrullinated proteins, autoantibodies, or rheumatoid factor in patients with PD and RA. Five studies investigated the presence of mediators of inflammation in PD and RA. In summary, the majority of the articles have confirmed that there is a correlation between PD and RA, since both disorders have characteristics in common and result from an imbalance in the immunoinflammatory response. PMID:26347200

  5. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Green, David W; Lee, Jung-Seok; Jung, Han-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a "water-tight" barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachment complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia, and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organizing cell-cell connections, cell-matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption, and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis. PMID:26903872

  6. Acute Phase Proteins and Their Role in Periodontitis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Moogala, Srinivas; Boggarapu, Shalini; Pesala, Divya Sai; Palagi, Firoz Babu

    2015-01-01

    Acute phase proteins are a class of proteins whose plasma concentration increase (positive acute phase proteins) or decrease (negative acute phase proteins) in response to inflammation. This response is called as the acute phase reaction, also called as acute phase response, which occurs approximately 90 minutes after the onset of a systemic inflammatory reaction. In Periodontitis endotoxins released from gram negative organisms present in the sub gingival plaque samples interact with Toll- like receptors (TLR) that are expressed on the surface of Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) and monocytes which are in abundance in periodontal inflammation. The complex formed due to interaction of Endotoxins and TLR activates the Signal transduction pathway in both innate and adaptive immunity resulting in production of Cytokines that co- ordinate the local and systemic inflammatory response. The pro inflammatory cytokines originating at the diseased site activates the liver cells to produce acute phase proteins as a part of non specific response. The production of Acute phase proteins is regulated to a great extent by Cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and to a lesser extent by Glucocorticoid hormones. These proteins bind to bacteria leading to activation of complement proteins that destroys pathogenic organisms. Studies have shown that levels of acute phase proteins are increased in otherwise healthy adults with poor periodontal status. This article highlights about the synthesis, structure, types and function of acute phase proteins and the associated relation of acute phase proteins in Periodontitis. PMID:26674303

  7. [Computed tomography in the study of periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Lavezzi, P; Mengalli, P; Savoldi, E

    1993-10-01

    Periodontal disease, an affection of bacterial etiology, causes the destruction of the periodontal tissue. From both the diagnostic and the prognostic points of view, it is extremely important to evaluate the changes occurring in the alveolar bone in patients affected with periodontal disease. The information obtained by conventional radiographic techniques is usually poor due to the overlapping of anatomical structures and to the lack of an axial view of the structures. CT, thanks to millimetrical sections of the dental structures along the planes which parallel the hard palate, allows the evaluation of: 1) the size and the relationship between teeth roots, with no overlapping of anatomical structures; 2) bone thickness; 3) very early bone lesions around the teeth roots. The authors suggest CT as a valuable tool in the study of periodontal disease in its early stage and in the evaluation of advanced lesions, both before treatment and during follow-up, when it is important to check the results of conservative treatment. PMID:8248581

  8. Effect of Exposure to Portland Cement Dust on the Periodontal Status and on the Outcome of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background Cement dust contains heavy metals like nickel, cobalt, lead and chromium, pollutants hazardous to the biotic environment, with adverse impact for vegetation, human and animal health and ecosystems. Objective To investigate if long term exposure to cement dust can affect the periodontal health and affect the outcome of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Methods A total of sixty subjects were included in this study. Forty patients with chronic periodontitis were grouped into; Group I comprised of 20 patients with chronic periodontitis working in the Portland Cement Company and Group II comprised of 20 patients with chronic periodontitis who does not work in cement factories nor live near any of them. Twenty healthy subjects were included in this study as healthy control group (Group III). Clinical parameters including gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CLA) were scored for all patients before and after periodontal therapy. All patients received non-surgical periodontal therapy together with strict oral hygiene program for one month. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were collected from both groups at baseline and one month after periodontal therapy. Real time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze the GCF samples for detection and assessment of the levels of IL-1β and TNFα. Results The two studied groups responded well to non-surgical periodontal treatment and there was no significant difference between GI and GII (P>0.05). The levels of TNFα was higher in GI than in GII before and after periodontal therapy (P<0.05). The levels of IL-1β did not show any significant difference between the two groups at base line (P>0.05), but represented with a highly significant difference between G1 and GII after periodontal therapy (P<0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between the levels of both IL-1β and TNFα and all the clinical parameters in GI before and after periodontal therapy and in GII

  9. Long noncoding RNA related to periodontitis interacts with miR-182 to upregulate osteogenic differentiation in periodontal mesenchymal stem cells of periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Wu, F; Song, Y; Li, X; Wu, Q; Duan, Y; Jin, Z

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis impairs the osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal mesenchymal stem cells (hPDLSCs), but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been demonstrated to have significant roles under both physiologic and pathological conditions. In this study, we performed comprehensive lncRNA profiling by lncRNA microarray analysis and identified a novel lncRNA, osteogenesis impairment-related lncRNA of PDLSCs from periodontitis patients (lncRNA-POIR), the expression of which was significantly decreased in PDLSCs from periodontitis patients (pPDLSCs) and was upregulated by osteogenic induction. To study the functions of lncRNA-POIR, we prepared cells with overexpression and knockdown of lncRNA-POIR and found that lncRNA-POIR positively regulated osteogenic differentiation of hPDLSCs and pPDLSCs both in vitro and in vivo. Using quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCRs) and luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrated that lncRNA-POIR may act as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) for miR-182, leading to derepression of its target gene, FoxO1. In this process, lncRNA-POIR and miR-182 suppress each other and form a network to regulate FoxO1. FoxO1 increased bone formation of pPDLSCs by competing with TCF-4 for β-catenin and inhibiting the canonical Wnt pathway. Finally, inflammation increases miR-182 expression through the nuclear factor-κB pathway, and the miR-182 overexpression in the inflammatory microenvironment resulted in an imbalance in the lncRNA-POIR-miR-182 regulatory network. In conclusion, our results provide novel evidence that this lncRNA-miRNA (microRNA) regulatory network has a significant role in osteogenic differentiation of pPDLSCs and that it has potential as a therapeutic target in mesenchymal stem cells during inflammation. PMID:27512949

  10. Levels of Candidate Periodontal Pathogens in Subgingival Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R R D S; Fermiano, D; Feres, M; Figueiredo, L C; Teles, F R F; Soares, G M S; Faveri, M

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, several new periodontal taxa have been associated with the etiology of periodontitis. A recent systematic review provides further support for the pathogenic role of 17 species/phylotypes. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and levels of these species in subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis (GChP; n = 30), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP; n = 30), and periodontal health (PH; n = 30). All subjects underwent clinical and microbiological assessment. Nine subgingival plaque samples were collected from each subject and analyzed for their content of 20 bacterial species/phylotypes through the RNA-oligonucleotide quantification technique. Subjects from the GChP and GAgP groups presented the highest mean values for all clinical parameters in comparison with the PH group (P < 0.05). Subjects with GChP and GAgP showed significantly higher mean levels of Bacteroidetes sp. human oral taxon (HOT) 274, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, and TM7 sp. HOT 356 phylotypes, as well as higher mean levels of Filifactor alocis, Fretibacterium fastidiosum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Selenomonas sputigena species than PH subjects (P < 0.05). GAgP subjects presented higher mean levels of TM7 sp. HOT 356 and F. alocis than GChP subjects (P < 0.05). A significantly higher mean prevalence of Bacteroidales sp. HOT 274, Desulfobulbus sp. HOT 041, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, and Fretibacterium sp. HOT 362 was found in subjects with GChP and GAgP than in PH subjects. Mean levels of P. gingivalis (r = 0.68), T. forsythia (r = 0.62), F. alocis (r = 0.51, P = 0.001), and Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360 (r = 0.41) were correlated with pocket depth (P < 0.001). In conclusion, Bacteroidales sp. HOT 274, Desulfobulbus sp. HOT 041, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 362, and TM7 sp. HOT 356 phylotypes, in addition to F. alocis, F. fastidiosum, and S. sputigena, seem to be associated with periodontitis, and their role

  11. Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

  12. Phylogenetic and functional gene structure shifts of the oral microbiomes in periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; He, Jinzhi; He, Zhili; Zhou, Yuan; Yuan, Mengting; Xu, Xin; Sun, Feifei; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Jiyao; Xie, Wenbo; Deng, Ye; Qin, Yujia; VanNostrand, Joy D; Xiao, Liying; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Shi, Wenyuan; Zhou, Xuedong

    2014-01-01