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Sample records for perioperative intensive care

  1. Peri-operative intensive care.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Sandra A; Peters, Mark J

    2015-10-01

    All good intensive care requires attention to detail of the routine elements of care. These include staffing and monitoring, drug prescription and administration, feeding and fluid balance, analgesia and sedation, organ support and reducing the risk of healthcare-associated infection. Doing this well requires an understanding of the relevant physiology and an awareness of the limited evidence base. Detailed protocols and implementation checklist are valuable in ensuring that these minimum standards are met. However, peri-operative care is not all predictable and amenable to protocolization. This is especially true following separation of conjoined twins. Despite the sophisticated imaging and multi-disciplinary planning that precede elective separation, the acute physiological changes in each twin cannot always be predicted reliably. In this article, we review briefly each element of peri-operative care and how this might vary in conjoined twins. PMID:26382268

  2. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings.

    PubMed

    Das, Rekha; Hansda, Upendra

    2014-09-01

    Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT). They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and underlying condition of the patient. Challenges to safe BT continue due to new emerging pathogens and various management problems. Strategies to restrict BT, optimal surgical and anaesthetic techniques to reduce blood loss and efforts to develop transfusion alternatives should be made. Literature search was performed using search words/phrases blood transfusion, transfusion, transfusion transmitted diseases, transfusion transmitted bacterial diseases, transfusion transmitted viral diseases, transfusion transmitted protozoal diseases or combinations, on PubMed and Google Scholar from 1990 to 2014. PMID:25535416

  3. Noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring in perioperative and intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Saugel, B; Cecconi, M; Wagner, J Y; Reuter, D A

    2015-04-01

    The determination of blood flow, i.e. cardiac output, is an integral part of haemodynamic monitoring. This is a review on noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring in perioperative and intensive care medicine. We present the underlying principles and validation data of the following technologies: thoracic electrical bioimpedance, thoracic bioreactance, vascular unloading technique, pulse wave transit time, and radial artery applanation tonometry. According to clinical studies, these technologies are capable of providing cardiac output readings noninvasively and continuously. They, therefore, might prove to be innovative tools for the assessment of advanced haemodynamic variables at the bedside. However, for most technologies there are conflicting data regarding the measurement performance in comparison with reference methods for cardiac output assessment. In addition, each of the reviewed technology has its own limitations regarding applicability in the clinical setting. In validation studies comparing cardiac output measurements using these noninvasive technologies in comparison with a criterion standard method, it is crucial to correctly apply statistical methods for the assessment of a technology's accuracy, precision, and trending capability. Uniform definitions for 'clinically acceptable agreement' between innovative noninvasive cardiac output monitoring systems and criterion standard methods are currently missing. Further research must aim to further develop the different technologies for noninvasive continuous cardiac output determination with regard to signal recording, signal processing, and clinical applicability. PMID:25596280

  4. [Recommendations of the German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine on structured patient handover in the perioperative phase : SBAR concept].

    PubMed

    von Dossow, V; Zwissler, B

    2016-02-01

    Teamwork in the operating room and in the intensive care unit necessitates clear and precise communication; however, interruptions in communication frequently occur, especially in the perioperative phase. Patient are particularly susceptible to deficits in communication due to higher stress peaks, simultaneous admission of several patients and concomitant treatment of emergency cases etc. The German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI) therefore recommends the implementation of the so-called SBAR concept (S: "situation", B: "background", A: "assessment", R: "recommendation") for standardization of patient handover. This concept was originally developed for high-risk areas and organizations with the aim of guaranteeing a rapid, effective and consistent transfer of information. PMID:26841942

  5. Perioperative Care of the Liver Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Mark T; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    With the evolution of surgical and anesthetic techniques, liver transplantation has become "routine," allowing for modifications of practice to decrease perioperative complications and costs. There is debate over the necessity for intensive care unit admission for patients with satisfactory preoperative status and a smooth intraoperative course. Postoperative care is made easier when the liver graft performs optimally. Assessment of graft function, vigilance for complications after the major surgical insult, and optimization of multiple systems affected by liver disease are essential aspects of postoperative care. The intensivist plays a vital role in an integrated multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:27339683

  6. Gender and its implications for cardiothoracic perioperative care and anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Schopper, Miriam; Irnich, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Differences in gender can influence perioperative outcome, with men and women being differently affected by adverse events in the perioperative period. Differences relating to specific drug effects, comorbidities and outcomes after anesthesia or intensive care have been demonstrated. There is a gender bias in diagnosis and therapy. While knowledge regarding this field is still growing, certain aspects have already been integrated into clinical practice (prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting, target-controlled infusion, male-only policy with production of blood products). There is a need to study the influence of gender, age, and race on perioperative outcome to optimize treatment and move toward more individualized therapy. This article highlights already identified differences and discusses potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:23225515

  7. Effective Perioperative Communication to Enhance Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J Hudson

    2016-08-01

    Breakdowns in health care communication are a significant cause of sentinel events and associated patient morbidity and mortality. Effective communication is a necessary component of a patient safety program, which enables all members of the interdisciplinary health care team to effectively manage their individual roles and responsibilities in the perioperative setting; set expectations for safe, high-reliability care; and measure and assess outcomes. To sustain a culture of safety, effective communication should be standardized, complete, clear, brief, and timely. Executive leadership and support helps remove institutional barriers and address challenges to support the engagement of patients in health care communication, which has been shown to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and improve the patient experience. PMID:27472971

  8. The bariatric patient: an overview of perioperative care.

    PubMed

    Fencl, Jennifer L; Walsh, Angela; Vocke, Dawn

    2015-08-01

    Obesity (ie, a body mass index of ≥30 kg/m(2)) is increasing in the United States. As a result, more overweight individuals are being surgically treated for weight loss, thus making it imperative for perioperative RNs to understand obesity's effects on patients' health, its contribution to significant comorbidities (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, sleep apnea, musculoskeletal issues, stroke), the perioperative care requirements (eg, specialized instruments and equipment, positioning and lifting aids), and unique needs of these patients (eg, diet, counseling). It is vital that the perioperative nurse accurately assesses the patient undergoing bariatric surgery to provide safe and appropriate nursing interventions during the perioperative continuum of care. PMID:26227516

  9. The perioperative surgical home: An innovative, patient-centred and cost-effective perioperative care model.

    PubMed

    Desebbe, Olivier; Lanz, Thomas; Kain, Zeev; Cannesson, Maxime

    2016-02-01

    Contrary to the intraoperative period, the current perioperative environment is known to be fragmented and expensive. One of the potential solutions to this problem is the newly proposed perioperative surgical home (PSH) model of care. The PSH is a patient-centred micro healthcare system, which begins at the time the decision for surgery is made, is continuous through the perioperative period and concludes 30 days after discharge from the hospital. The model is based on multidisciplinary involvement: coordination of care, consistent application of best evidence/best practice protocols, full transparency with continuous monitoring and reporting of safety, quality, and cost data to optimize and decrease variation in care practices. To reduce said variation in care, the entire continuum of the perioperative process must evolve into a unique care environment handled by one perioperative team and coordinated by a leader. Anaesthesiologists are ideally positioned to lead this new model and thus significantly contribute to the highest standards in transitional medicine. The unique characteristics that place Anaesthesiologists in this framework include their systematic role in hospitals (as coordinators between patients/medical staff and institutions), the culture of safety and health care metrics innate to the specialty, and a significant role in the preoperative evaluation and counselling process, making them ideal leaders in perioperative medicine. PMID:26613678

  10. Delirium: a key challenge for perioperative care.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, N A; Fitzgerald, J; Timmons, S; O'Connell, H; Meagher, D

    2013-01-01

    Delirium is highly prevalent, occurring in 20% of acute hospital inpatients and up to 62% of surgical patients. It is a significant predictor of poor outcomes including mortality and institutionalisation, however it is often viewed as simply a marker of underlying illness and is frequently overlooked in older adults. Although delirium is commonly comorbid with dementia, it represents a more urgent diagnosis, requiring prompt intervention. Delirium presents most commonly with hypoactive features (e.g. withdrawal and reduced spontaneous movement and speech). The common stereotype of hyperactive delirium tremens (e.g. agitation, hallucinations), although more visible, is less common. All presentations share acute disimprovement of cognitive function. Delirium is a highly predictable and preventable occurrence, however a major barrier to improving delirium care and impacting upon outcomes is that it remains poorly detected, particularly in surgical populations and especially in patients with hypoactive presentations. Routine ward-based screening for delirium, particularly in high-risk populations, and improved staff awareness of the significance of the problem can improve detection rates. Preventative strategies, particularly multicomponent approaches, have been most efficacious in improving patient outcomes. Optimising perioperative risk factors can lead to reduced incidence. Appropriate treatment of delirium requires thorough investigation, management of the underlying illness, avoidance of complications and simplification of the care environment. Studies suggest a role for pharmacological prophylaxis, particularly in relation to anaesthetic and sedative agents used intra- and post-operatively. Furthermore, gathering evidence suggests that judicious use of antipsychotic medications may be helpful in delirium prevention and treatment. PMID:23277227

  11. Perioperative care of the elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Robert M

    2006-03-01

    Perioperative management is typically more complicated in older patients than in younger patients and requires more assessment and evaluation before surgery as well as precautionary steps after surgery to manage these high-risk patients. PMID:16570559

  12. Impact of different sedation protocols and perioperative procedures on patients admitted to the intensive care unit after maxillofacial tumor surgery of the lower jaw: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Tudor, Bianca; Krenn, Claus G; Roth, Georg A; Seemann, Rudolf

    2016-04-01

    Maxillofacial tumor surgery often necessitates prolonged invasive ventilation to prevent blockage of the respiratory tract. To tolerate ventilation, continuously administered sedatives are recommended. Half-time of sedative or analgesic medication is an important characteristic by which narcotic drugs are chosen, due to the fact that weaning period increases with half-time. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a change in sedation regimen would affect the length of invasive ventilation or intensive care unit stay and medical costs. Additionally, the impact of various surgical procedures was analyzed. Data of 157 patients after mandibular surgery were retrospectively analyzed over 5 years in count regression models. Of those patients, 84 received a sedation regimen with sufentanil and midazolam and 73 with remifentanil and propofol. The impact of the surgical procedures (tracheostomy, tumor resection, neck dissection and length of operation) and the patient age and sex were analyzed with respect to length of ventilation and ICU days. Cost savings were calculated. Our data show that patients receiving remifentanil/propofol had fewer ventilation days (2.5 ± 2.5 versus 6.1 ± 4.6 days, P < 0.001) and were discharged earlier from the intensive care unit than patients receiving sufentanil/midazolam (5.1 ± 3.8 versus 9.2 ± 6.2 days, P < 0.001), leading to calculated cost savings of about 8000 Euro per patient. Length of operation negatively influenced length of ICU stay (P < 0.001). In conclusion, short-acting drugs such as remifentanil/propofol, as well as tracheostoma and shortened surgery duration may reduce the postoperative need for invasive ventilation and length of intensive care unit stay. PMID:26874556

  13. Thermal care in the perioperative period.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Andrea

    2008-03-01

    Perioperative hypothermia is a common and serious complication of anesthesia and surgery. Core body temperature, which is normally regulated to within a few tenths of a degree centigrade, can fall by as much as 6 degrees C during anesthesia. The combination of anesthetic-induced impairment of thermoregulatory control and exposure to a cool operating room environment causes most surgical patients to become hypothermic. Mild intraoperative hypothermia triples the incidence of postoperative wound infections, triples the incidence of postoperative myocardial events and increases perioperative blood loss. Furthermore, it prolongs postoperative recovery and prolongs the duration of action of almost all anesthestic drugs. Effective methods are available for preventing inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Consequently, it is now routine to maintain intraoperative normothermia. There is no widely accepted definition for the term 'mild hypothermia'. Furthermore, the term is not used consistently within the literature. For the purpose of this review, mild hypothermia refers to core temperatures between 34 and 36 degrees C. PMID:18494388

  14. Perioperative Smartphone Apps and Devices for Patient-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Lingappan, Arul M; Ahumada, Luis M; Rehman, Mohamed A; Gálvez, Jorge A

    2015-09-01

    Smartphones have grown in ubiquity and computing power, and they play an ever-increasing role in patient-centered health care. The "medicalized smartphone" not only enables web-based access to patient health resources, but also can run patient-oriented software applications and be connected to health-related peripheral devices. A variety of patient-oriented smartphone apps and devices are available for use to facilitate patient-centered care throughout the continuum of perioperative care. Ongoing advances in smartphone technology and health care apps and devices should expand their utility for enhancing patient-centered care in the future. PMID:26265239

  15. Coordinating perioperative care for the 'high risk' general surgical patient using risk prediction scoring.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Shaziz; Lees, Nicholas Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying 'high risk' (> 5% mortality score) emergency general surgical patients early, allows appropriate perioperative care to be allocated by securing critical care beds and ensuring the presence of senior surgeons and senior anesthetists intraoperatively. Scoring systems can be used to predict perioperative risk and coordinate resources perioperatively. Currently it is unclear which estimate of risk correlates with current resource deployment. A retrospective study was undertaken assessing the relationship between deployment of perioperative resources: senior surgeon, senior anesthetist and critical care bed. The study concluded that almost all high risk patients with high POSSUM mortality and morbidity scores had a consultant senior surgeon present intraoperatively. Critically unwell patients with higher operative severity and perioperative morbidity scores received higher care (HDU/ICU) beds postoperatively, ensuring that they received appropriate care if their condition deteriorated. Therefore POSSUM scoring should be used perioperatively in emergency cases to coordinate appropriate perioperative care for high risk general surgical patients. PMID:26901929

  16. Perioperative Care of the Transgender Patient.

    PubMed

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-02-01

    Transgender patients are individuals whose gender identity is not related to their biological sex. Assuming a new gender identity that does not conform to societal norms often results in discrimination and barriers to health care. The exact number of transgender patients is unknown; however, these patients are increasingly seen in health care. Transgender individuals may experience provider-generated discrimination in health care facilities, including refusal of service, disrespect, and abuse, which contribute to depression and low self-esteem. Transgender therapies include mental health counseling for depression and low self-esteem, hormone therapy, and sex reassignment surgery. Health care professionals require cultural competence, an understanding of the different forms of patient identification, and adaptive approaches to care for transgender patients. VA (Veterans Affairs) hospitals provide a model for the care for transgender patients and staff. PMID:26849981

  17. An Overview of Perioperative Care for Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Derieg, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Care of pediatric surgical patients is not limited to pediatric facilities, and all perioperative RNs should have a basic understanding of the specialized care that children require. This knowledge set includes an understanding of the basic terminology used to describe this patient population as well as the developmental stages of pediatric patients. Preoperatively, the nurse should conduct a thorough assessment and evaluation and address the anxieties and questions of the patient and his or her parent or guardian. Intraoperatively, the nurse should be prepared to help manage difficult intubation, laryngospasm during induction and extubation, difficult IV access, positioning, skin care, surgical site preparation, and thermoregulation. Postoperative care considerations include addressing airway differences, vital signs, pain assessment and management, fluid management, and preparation for discharge. Awareness of the anatomic and physiologic differences, developmental stages, and surgical needs of children will allow the perioperative RN to provide high-quality, safe care to the pediatric surgical patient. PMID:27350350

  18. PERIOPERATIVE CARE OF A CHILD WITH CRISPONI SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Mahmood; Almasry, Shadi; Abdulrahman, Anas; Al-Sohabani, Mazen; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-06-01

    Crisponi syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intermittent episodes of muscular contraction of the facial muscles with trismus and excessive salivation simulating a tetanic spasm. These episodes occur in response to tactile stimulation or during crying. Associated physical and constitutional findings include characteristic facial anomalies, camptodactyly, intermittent hyperthermia, and feeding difficulties. We present a 15-month-old girl who required anesthetic care during laparoscopic fundoplication and gastric tube insertion. The perioperative implications of the disorder are reviewed and suggestions for anesthetic management provided. PMID:27487643

  19. Promoting perioperative advance care planning: a systematic review of advance care planning decision aids.

    PubMed

    Aslakson, Rebecca A; Schuster, Anne L R; Reardon, Jessica; Lynch, Thomas; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina; Miller, Judith A; Moldovan, Rita; Johnston, Fabian; Anton, Blair; Weiss, Matthew; Bridges, John F P

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review identifies possible decision aids that promote perioperative advance care planning (ACP) and synthesizes the available evidence regarding their use. Using PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, SCOPUS, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Sociological Abstracts, researchers identified and screened articles for eligibility. Data were abstracted and risk of bias assessed for included articles. Thirty-nine of 5327 articles satisfied the eligibility criteria. Primarily completed in outpatient ambulatory populations, studies evaluated a variety of ACP decision aids. None were evaluated in a perioperative population. Fifty unique outcomes were reported with no head-to-head comparisons conducted. Findings are likely generalizable to a perioperative population and can inform development of a perioperative ACP decision aid. Future studies should compare the effectiveness of ACP decision aids. PMID:26346494

  20. Variation in Perioperative Care across Centers for Infants Undergoing the Norwood Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Sara K.; Ohye, Richard G.; Lu, Minmin; Kaltman, Jonathan; Caldarone, Christopher A.; Pizarro, Christian; Dunbar-Masterson, Carolyn; Gaynor, J. William; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Kaza, Aditya K.; Newburger, Jane; Rhodes, John F.; Scheurer, Mark; Silver, Eric; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Tabbutt, Sarah; Tweddell, James; Uzark, Karen; Wells, Winfield; Mahle, William T.; Pearson, Gail D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In the Single Ventricle Reconstruction Trial, infants undergoing the Norwood procedure were randomized to a right ventricle-to-pulmonary-artery shunt or modified Blalock-Taussig shunt. Apart from shunt type, subjects received local standard of care. We evaluated variation in peri-operative care during the Norwood hospitalization across 14 trial sites. Methods Data on pre-operative, operative, and post-operative variables were collected prospectively on standardized case report forms, and variation across centers described for 546 enrolled subjects who underwent the Norwood procedure. Results Subjects' gestational age, birth weight, and proportion with hypoplastic left heart syndrome were similar across sites. In contrast, all recorded variables related to pre-operative care varied across centers, including fetal diagnosis (range 55–85%), preoperative intubation (range 29–91%), and enteral feeding. Perioperative/operative factors were also variable across sites including median total support time (range 74–189 minutes) and other perfusion variables, arch reconstruction technique, intraoperative medication use, and use of modified ultrafiltration (range 48–100%). Additional variation across centers was seen in variables related to postoperative care, including proportion with an open sternum (range 35–100%), median intensive care unit length of stay (range 9–44 days), type of feeding at discharge, and enrollment in a home monitoring program (range 1–100%; 5 sites did not have a program). Overall inhospital death/transplant occurred in 18% (range across sites 7–39%). Conclusions Perioperative care during the Norwood hospitalization varies across centers. Further analysis evaluating the underlying causes and relationship of this variation to outcome is needed to inform future studies and quality improvement efforts. PMID:22698562

  1. Perioperative care of a patient with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses

    PubMed Central

    Kako, Hiromi; Martin, David P.; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of inherited, autosomal recessive, and progressive neurodegenerative diseases, which result from an enzymatic defect or the deficiency of a transmembrane protein, leading to the accumulation of lipopigments (lipofuscin) in various tissues. NCL results in the impairment of function in several end-organs including the central nervous system with loss of cognitive and motor function, myoclonus, and intractable seizures. Additional involvement includes the cardiovascular system with arrhythmias and bradycardia as well as impairment of thermoregulation leading to perioperative hypothermia. Given the complexity of the end-organ involvement and the progressive nature of the disorder, the anesthetic care of such patients can be challenging. Till date, there are a limited number of reports regarding the anesthetic management of patients with NCL. We present an 18-year-old patient with NCL who required anesthetic care during replacement of a vagal nerve stimulator. Previous reports of anesthetic care for these patients are reviewed, the end-organ involvement of NCL discussed, and options for anesthetic care presented. PMID:24015141

  2. Perioperative care of a patient with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses.

    PubMed

    Kako, Hiromi; Martin, David P; Tobias, Joseph D

    2013-07-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of inherited, autosomal recessive, and progressive neurodegenerative diseases, which result from an enzymatic defect or the deficiency of a transmembrane protein, leading to the accumulation of lipopigments (lipofuscin) in various tissues. NCL results in the impairment of function in several end-organs including the central nervous system with loss of cognitive and motor function, myoclonus, and intractable seizures. Additional involvement includes the cardiovascular system with arrhythmias and bradycardia as well as impairment of thermoregulation leading to perioperative hypothermia. Given the complexity of the end-organ involvement and the progressive nature of the disorder, the anesthetic care of such patients can be challenging. Till date, there are a limited number of reports regarding the anesthetic management of patients with NCL. We present an 18-year-old patient with NCL who required anesthetic care during replacement of a vagal nerve stimulator. Previous reports of anesthetic care for these patients are reviewed, the end-organ involvement of NCL discussed, and options for anesthetic care presented. PMID:24015141

  3. Transforming Perioperative Care: The Case for a Novel Curriculum for Anesthesiology Resident Training.

    PubMed

    Alem, Navid; Cohen, Neal; Cannesson, Maxime; Kain, Zeev

    2016-06-15

    Currently, perioperative health care is undergoing transformative changes. One prospect for the specialty of anesthesiology is a reorientation of resident education to focus more on the entire spectrum of perioperative care as exemplified by the perioperative surgical home (PSH). To advance this novel paradigm for patients and anesthesiologists, one must also consider further incorporating the competencies fundamental to the PSH during residency training. As such, the purpose of this case report is to outline the successful implementation of a comprehensive PSH curriculum for anesthesiology residents. PMID:27166744

  4. Intensive Care Unit Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Monks, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients who become psychotic in intensive care units are usually suffering from delirium. Underlying causes of delirium such as anxiety, sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation and overload, immobilization, an unfamiliar environment and pain, are often preventable or correctable. Early detection, investigation and treatment may prevent significant mortality and morbidity. The patient/physician relationship is one of the keystones of therapy. More severe cases may require psychopharmacological measures. The psychotic episode is quite distressing to the patient and family; an educative and supportive approach by the family physician may be quite helpful in patient rehabilitation. PMID:21279016

  5. How Well Is Quality Improvement Described in the Perioperative Care Literature? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emma L.; Lees, Nicholas; Martin, Graham; Dixon-Woods, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality improvement (QI) approaches are widely used across health care, but how well they are reported in the academic literature is not clear. A systematic review was conducted to assess the completeness of reporting of QI interventions and techniques in the field of perioperative care. Methods Searches were conducted using Medline, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care database, and PubMed. Two independent reviewers used the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist, which identifies 12 features of interventions that studies should describe (for example, How: the interventions were delivered [e.g., face to face, internet]), When and how much: duration, dose, intensity), to assign scores for each included article. Articles were also scored against a small number of additional criteria relevant to QI. Results The search identified 16,103 abstracts from databases and 19 from other sources. Following review, full-text was obtained for 223 articles, 100 of which met the criteria for inclusion. Completeness of reporting of QI in the perioperative care literature was variable. Only one article was judged fully complete against the 11 TIDieR items used. The mean TIDieR score across the 100 included articles was 6.31 (of a maximum 11). More than a third (35%) of the articles scored 5 or lower. Particularly problematic was reporting of fidelity (absent in 74% of articles) and whether any modifications were made to the intervention (absent in 73% of articles). Conclusions The standard of reporting of quality interventions and QI techniques in surgery is often suboptimal, making it difficult to determine whether an intervention can be replicated and used to deliver a positive effect in another setting. This suggests a need to explore how reporting practices could be improved. PMID:27066922

  6. Safety considerations for Health care Workers involved in Cytoreductive Surgery and Perioperative chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Aditi; Mittal, Sourabh; Gopinath, K S

    2016-06-01

    The combined modality treatment of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has gained worldwide acceptance for management of selected patients with peritoneal metastases from various cancers. Cytoreductive surgery is performed with the goal of removing all macroscopic disease and is coupled with perioperative chemotherapy (POC) in the form of HIPEC with or without EPIC (early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy) to deal with the microscopic residual disease. These treatments entail the use of cytotoxic drugs in the operation theatre or in the intensive care unit where they are not commonly used and put the healthcare workers participating in the treatment at risk of exposure. CRS is performed with high voltage electrocautery generating a large amount of surgical smoke which is inhaled by the involved personnel and has potential health hazards. This article outlines the safety measures to be taken while performing CRS and POC. PMID:27065717

  7. Update on a Quality Initiative to Standardize Perioperative Care for Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Patricia A.; Thompson, Bithika M.; Boyle, Mary E.; Apsey, Heidi A.; Seifert, Karen M.; Schlinkert, Richard T.; Stearns, Joshua D.; Cook, Curtiss B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the analysis was to review the effectiveness of a care process model (CPM) developed to guide management of patients on insulin pump therapy undergoing elective surgical procedures. Methods: Electronic medical records were reviewed to assess the impact of the CPM on documentation of insulin pump status, glucose monitoring, and safety during the perioperative phase of care. Post-CPM care was compared with management provided before CPM implementation. Results: We reviewed 45 cases on insulin pump therapy in the pre-CPM cohort and 106 in the post-CPM cohort. Demographic characteristics, categories of surgery, and perioperative times were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Recommended hemoglobin A1c monitoring occurred in 73% of cases in the pre-CPM cohort but improved to 94% in the post-CPM group (P < .01). There was a higher frequency of documentation of the insulin pump during the preoperative, intraoperative, and postanesthesia care unit segments of care in the post- vs pre-CPM periods (all P < .01). The number of cases with intraoperative glucose monitoring increased (57% pre-CPM vs 81% post-CPM; P < .01). Glycemic control was comparable between the 2 CPM periods. Hypoglycemia was rare, with only 3 episodes in the pre-CPM group and 4 in the post-CPM. No adverse events associated with perioperative insulin pump use were observed. Conclusions: This analysis adds to previous data on use of insulin pump therapy during the perioperative period. Some processes require additional attention, but data continue to indicate that a standardized approach to care can lead to a successful and safe transition of insulin pump therapy throughout the perioperative period. PMID:26092687

  8. Intensive Care, Intense Conflict: A Balanced Approach.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Erin Talati; Kolaitis, Irini N

    2015-01-01

    Caring for a child in a pediatric intensive care unit is emotionally and physically challenging and often leads to conflict. Skilled mediators may not always be available to aid in conflict resolution. Careproviders at all levels of training are responsible for managing difficult conversations with families and can often prevent escalation of conflict. Bioethics mediators have acknowledged the important contribution of mediation training in improving clinicians' skills in conflict management. Familiarizing careproviders with basic mediation techniques is an important step towards preventing escalation of conflict. While training in effective communication is crucial, a sense of fairness and justice that may only come with the introduction of a skilled, neutral third party is equally important. For intense conflict, we advocate for early recognition, comfort, and preparedness through training of clinicians in de-escalation and optimal communication, along with the use of more formally trained third-party mediators, as required. PMID:26752393

  9. Nursing perspectives for intensive care.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, P

    1997-06-01

    Within health care, market forces increasingly determine what services have economic value. For nursing to survive this economic onslaught, nurses must clarify their values and roles. While nurses working in intensive care develop useful technical skills and normally work within a constructive multi-disciplinary team framework, they have a potentially unique contribution to care, focusing on the patient as a whole person rather than intervening to solve a problem. The need for both physiological and psychological care creates a need for holistic values, best achieved through humanistic perspectives. Humanistic nursing places patients as people at the centre of nursing care, as illustrated by the limitations of reality orientation compared with the potentials of validation therapy. Intensive care nurses asserting and developing such patient-centred roles offer a valuable way forward for nursing to develop into the 21st century. PMID:9287577

  10. Intensive care of conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Kobylarz, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Conjoined twinning is one of the most uncommon congenital anomalies. Maintenance in an intensive care setting during this time allows for close monitoring, stabilisation, and nutritional supplementation of the infants as necessary to optimise preoperative growth and development. The birth of conjoined twins is a very difficult and dramatic moment for parents. It is also a very difficult situation for the team of physicians, nurses and other required hospital staff to carry out treatment and care of these specific developmental anomalies. The diagnostics and treatment in this extraordinary situation requires close cooperation of the multidisciplinary medical team, which includes their personal experience and medical knowledge, with a team of intensive care unit nurses. This report presents the rules in cease of conjoined twins during their intensive care unit stay with special reference to the proceedings before and after complete separation. PMID:24858974

  11. Review article: Perioperative care in enhanced recovery for total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Marinus D J; Lemanu, Daniel P; Coleman, Brendan; Hill, Andrew G; Munro, Jacob T

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced recovery pathways for total hip and knee arthroplasty can reduce length of hospital stay and perioperative morbidity. 22 studies were reviewed for identification of perioperative care interventions, including preoperative (n=4), intra-operative (n=8), and postoperative (n=4) care interventions. Factors that improve outcomes included use of pre-emptive and multimodal analgesia regimens to reduce opioid consumption, identification of patients with poor nutritional status and provision of supplements preoperatively to improve wound healing and reduce length of hospital stay, use of warming systems and tranexamic acid, avoidance of drains to reduce operative blood loss and subsequent transfusion, and early ambulation with pharmacological and mechanical prophylaxis to reduce venous thromboembolism and to speed recovery. PMID:25550024

  12. Intensity modulated perioperative HDR brachytherapy for recurrent and/or advanced head and neck metastases.

    PubMed

    Teudt, Ingo U; Kovàcs, György; Ritter, Matthias; Melchert, Corinna; Soror, Tamer; Wollenberg, Barbara; Meyer, Jens E

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent neck metastases following surgery and full dose adjuvant radiotherapy of squamous cell head and neck cancer remain a clinical challenge. After revision neck dissection and chemotherapy re-irradiation dosage is often limited and survival prognosis deteriorates. Here, adjuvant high-dose rate intensity modulated perioperative brachytherapy (HDR IMBT) offers a second full radiation dose with a limited volume of normal tissue radiation in the neck. In this retrospective study patients were identified who underwent revision surgery and perioperative HDR IMBT for recurrent neck metastases. Survival rates were estimated and the scarce literature on interstitial brachytherapy of the neck was reviewed. From 2006 to 2014, nine patients were treated for recurrent or palliative neck metastases using salvage surgery and HDR IMBT. Eight patients received previous surgery and external beam radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Two and five year overall survival was calculated to be 78 and 67 %, respectively. HDR IMBT is a salvage treatment option for selected cases in the neck following surgical revision or last-line treatment strategies. In the literature and this small cohort radiation toxicity and the risk of "carotid blow-out" seemed to be low. PMID:26498949

  13. Contracting for intensive care services.

    PubMed

    Dorman, S

    1996-01-01

    Purchasers will increasingly expect clinical services in the NHS internal market to provide objective measures of their benefits and cost effectiveness in order to maintain or develop current funding levels. There is limited scientific evidence to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of intensive care services in terms of mortality/morbidity. Intensive care is a high-cost service and studies of cost-effectiveness need to take account of case-mix variations, differences in admission and discharge policies, and other differences between units. Decisions over development or rationalisation of intensive care services should be based on proper outcome studies of well defined patient groups. The purchasing function itself requires development in order to support effective contracting. PMID:9873335

  14. The influence of context on role behaviors of perioperative nurses.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, Helen E; Chambers, Mary G A; Boore, Jennifer R P

    2004-12-01

    Using a case study approach, researchers conducted a focused exploration of the role of perioperative nurses. Data were collected in three different hospitals during 358 hours of observation and 34 hours of interviews with 35 nurses. Researchers also analyzed nursing documents, including the care plans of 230 patients. Findings show that various contextual mechanisms are influential in the role performance of perioperative nurses. This study highlights the importance of providing adequate support for perioperative nurses to perform their role in an intensely stressful environment. Patient-focused leadership and the promotion of a caring philosophy are needed to strengthen perioperative nursing and, ultimately, improve patient care. PMID:15641664

  15. Myasthenia gravis: a careful perioperative anesthetic management of coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Michał; Nestorowicz, Andrzej; Stachurska, Katarzyna; Fijałkowska, Anna; Stążka, Janusz

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, even hazardous cardiac surgery can be performed on patients with autoimmune diseases like myasthenia gravis. It requires a sensitive perioperative anesthetic approach especially in relation to nondepolarizing muscle relaxant administration. Myasthenic patients produce antibodies against the end-plate acetylcholine receptors causing muscle weakness and sensitivity to nondepolarizing muscle relaxants that could lead to respiratory failure. Perioperative nurse care is critical for uncomplicated course of treatment; therefore, apprehension of surgical procedure should be helpful on an everyday basis. We describe successful management without any pulmonary complications of two patients with myasthenia gravis undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. In addition, antiacetylcholine receptor antibodies concentrations were evaluated during treatment time. In conclusion, we have found that reduced titrated doses of cisatracurium may be safely used in patients with myasthenia gravis undergoing cardiac surgery without anesthesia and respiratory-related complications. PMID:25943997

  16. Kaizen: a process improvement model for the business of health care and perioperative nursing professionals.

    PubMed

    Tetteh, Hassan A

    2012-01-01

    Kaizen is a proven management technique that has a practical application for health care in the context of health care reform and the 2010 Institute of Medicine landmark report on the future of nursing. Compounded productivity is the unique benefit of kaizen, and its principles are change, efficiency, performance of key essential steps, and the elimination of waste through small and continuous process improvements. The kaizen model offers specific instruction for perioperative nurses to achieve process improvement in a five-step framework that includes teamwork, personal discipline, improved morale, quality circles, and suggestions for improvement. PMID:22201574

  17. Acute and Perioperative Care of the Burn-Injured Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Edward A.; Shank, Erik; Woodson, Lee; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2016-01-01

    Care of burn-injured patients requires knowledge of the pathophysiologic changes affecting virtually all organs from the onset of injury until wounds are healed. Massive airway and/or lung edema can occur rapidly and unpredictably after burn and/or inhalation injury. Hemodynamics in the early phase of severe burn injury are characterized by a reduction in cardiac output, increased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance. Approximately 2–5 days after major burn injury, a hyperdynamic and hypermetabolic state develops. Electrical burns result in morbidity much higher than expected based on burn size alone. Formulae for fluid resuscitation should serve only as guideline; fluids should be titrated to physiologic end points. Burn injury is associated basal and procedural pain requiring higher than normal opioid and sedative doses. Operating room concerns for the burn-injured patient include airway abnormalities, impaired lung function, vascular access, deceptively large and rapid blood loss, hypothermia and altered pharmacology. PMID:25485468

  18. Perioperative medicine. Are the anesthesiologists ready?

    PubMed

    Carli, F

    2001-04-01

    Perioperative medicine starts with preoperative assessment and preparation of patients undergoing various procedures. It includes intraoperative care and continues postproceudral management, from recovery room to intensive care and step-down facilities. Acute pain management must be optimized in order to enhance rehabilitation and restoration of functions. Perioperative medicine also includes management of acute and chronic pain. Potential areas of anesthesia involvement, still unclear, include preoperative and postoperative ward management and complete preparation such as cardiology or pulmonary testing. Further steps to take in the direction of perioperative medicine are the development of a different model of resident training, and the improvement of information technology and medical record. PMID:11376518

  19. Do Not Resuscitate, Anesthesia, and Perioperative Care: A Not So Clear Order

    PubMed Central

    Sumrall, William D.; Mahanna, Elizabeth; Sabharwal, Vivek; Marshall, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Advance directives guide healthcare providers to listen to and respect patients' wishes regarding their right to die in circumstances when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is required, and hospitals accredited by The Joint Commission are required to have a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) policy in place. However, when surgery and anesthesia are necessary for the care of the patient with a DNR order, this advance directive can create ethical dilemmas specifically involving patient autonomy and the physician's responsibility to do no harm. Methods: This paper discusses the ethical considerations regarding perioperative DNR orders and provides guidance on how to handle situations that may arise in the conduct of perioperative care. Results: Because of the potential conflicts between ethical care and the restrictions of DNR orders, it is critically important to discuss the medical and ethical issues surrounding this clinical scenario with the patient or surrogate prior to any surgical intervention. However, many anesthesiologists do not adequately address this ethical dilemma prior to the procedure. Conclusion: Practitioners are advised to first consider what is best for the patient and, when in doubt, to communicate with patients or surrogates and with colleagues to arrive at the most appropriate care plan. If irreconcilable conflicts arise, consultation with the institution's bioethics committee, if available, is beneficial to help reach a resolution. PMID:27303230

  20. [Care and prognosis of elderly people in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Guidet, Bertrand; Thomas, Caroline; Patron, Dominique; N'Guyend, Yen Lan

    2013-01-01

    The absence of formal documentation on the benefits of intensive care for elderly people explains the lack of standardised practices while their numbers are increasing in intensive care departments. The improved prognosis of acute pathologiesjustifyingtheir admission to intensive care units requires a multi-disciplinary approach and an optimisation of all the care structures upstream and downstream of a stay in intensive care. This must be based on the collective definition of the care pathway for these elderly patients requiring instead of in an intensive care unit. PMID:24437010

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. PMID:26333755

  2. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  3. PERIOPERATIVE CARE OF AN INFANT WITH GOMEZ-LOPEZ-HERNANDEZ SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Onur; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-06-01

    Gomez-Lopez-Hernandez syndrome, also known as cerebello-trigeminal dermal dysplasia, is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome classically characterized by the triad of rhombencephalosynapsis, trigeminal anesthesia, and bilateral parietal alopecia. Associated clinical features include a characteristic facial appearance (mid-face hypoplasia, hypertelorism, and low-set, posteriorly rotated ears), brachycephaly, strabismus, ataxia, developmental delay, short stature, and corneal opacities. Given the associated congenital anomalies, anesthetic care may be required for various surgical interventions. We report a 7-month-old with Gomez-Lopez-Hernandez syndrome scheduled for laparoscopic gastrostomy with tube placement and frenulotomy under general anesthesia. The potential perioperative implications of such patients are reviewed and options for anesthetic care discussed. PMID:27487646

  4. [Gastrointestinal bleeding in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Vartic, M; Chilie, A; Beuran, M

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is a frequent finding in intensive care unit (ICU) and has considerable morbidity particularly for the elderly. The most common etiology for upper digestive bleeding is the stress ulcer and for the lower bleeding the diverticular disease of the colon. The predictive risk factors for GIB are age, organ failure, mechanical ventilation and length of stay in ICU. Even though a 4.5 times increase in mortality is seen in these patients it cannot be directly correlated to the bleeding. Routine use of H2 inhibitors is effective only in high risk patients, opposing enteral nutrition which is valuable in all patients. Prophylactic measures resulted in a 50% decrease in incidence of GIB in ICU and also of the mortality. Most of the patients are now treated non-operatively. PMID:17059147

  5. An approach to quality management in anaesthesia: a focus on perioperative care and outcome.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, K G; Albrecht, D M

    2001-01-01

    Health care systems throughout the world are faced with continuously rising health care expenditure. In Germany, a fee per capita system will be introduced by 2003 to keep the budgets for hospital care within limits. As a result, numbers of hospital beds and hospitals will be cut in the coming years. On the other hand, more and more patients and health care providers are asking if they are really receiving an adequate value for their money in the treatment they receive. All this will have a strong impact on the anaesthesiologist's work and her/his perception of the different facets of quality. Quality has various aspects for the anaesthesiologist. The patient as a customer should not incur any detrimental effects after a surgical procedure, and is accompanied by the anaesthesiologist throughout the perioperative setting. The surgeon needs optimal conditions to perform a procedure. The hospital must balance equally costs and income; this requires optimal operating room utilization. Finally, health insurance companies and the government are responsible for covering the cost of treatment according to the quality of the care delivered. Quality assessment concerning structure, process and outcome has to take these demands into account. Continuous quality improvement in the spirit of Deming's 'plan-do-check-act cycle' has to be part of anaesthesiologist's everyday routine. In future, the traditional barriers between the specialities treating a patient will be disrupted when reimbursement for treatment is made according to quality and efficacy of treatment. PMID:11766245

  6. [Perioperative management of transthoracic oesophagectomies : Fundamentals of interdisciplinary care and new approaches to accelerated recovery after surgery].

    PubMed

    Lambertz, R; Drinhaus, H; Schedler, D; Bludau, M; Schröder, W; Annecke, T

    2016-06-01

    Locally advanced carcinomas of the oesophagus require multimodal treatment. The core element of curative therapy is transthoracic en bloc oesophagectomy, which is the standard procedure carried out in most specialized centres. Reconstruction of intestinal continuity is usually achieved with a gastric sleeve, which is anastomosed either intrathoracically or cervically to the remaining oesophagus. This thoraco-abdominal operation is associated with significant postoperative morbidity, not least because of a vast array of pre-existing illnesses in the surgical patient. For an optimal outcome, the careful interdisciplinary selection of patients, preoperative risk evaluation and conditioning are essential. The caseload of the centres correlates inversely with the complication rate. The leading surgical complication is anastomotic leakage, which is diagnosed endoscopically and usually treated with the aid of endoscopic procedures. Pulmonary infections are the most frequent non-surgical complication. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia and perfusion-orientated fluid management can reduce the rate of pulmonary complications. Patients are ventilated protecting the lungs and are extubated as early as possible. Oesophagectomies should only be performed in high-volume centres with the close cooperation of surgeons and anaesthesia/intensive care specialists. Programmes of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) hold further potential for the patient's quicker postoperative recovery. In this review article the fundamental aspects of the interdisciplinary perioperative management of transthoracic oesophagectomy are described. PMID:27245922

  7. The perioperative dialogue - a model of caring for the patient undergoing a hip or a knee replacement surgery under spinal anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, Maria; Junttila, Kristiina; Lindwall, Lillemor

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to describe how patients undergoing either a hip or a knee replacement surgery under spinal anaesthesia experienced to be a part of the perioperative dialogue as an ideal model of caring. A qualitative approach was chosen as a method. Nineteen patients undergoing either a hip or a knee replacement surgery under spinal anaesthesia participated. These patients and their nurse anaesthetists had three perioperative dialogues in the pre-, intra- and postoperative phase of care. Data were collected by means of conversational interviews by four voluntary nurse anaesthetists who wrote the dialogues from each perioperative phase. The text from the collected data was analysed by qualitative, latent content analysis. The findings of the analysis show three identified themes: Suffering while waiting for surgery (preoperative dialogue), Continuity creates togetherness (intraoperative dialogue) and Uniqueness - the patient has been seen (postoperative dialogue). The findings show evidence that the perioperative dialogue is an ideal model of caring and serves the patients' desires of individual and dignified care. The patients have a deep appreciation when there is time to develop a caring encounter with his or her own nurse. When a caring encounter has been established, the patient is involved in his or her own care. This model of caring offers the perioperative nurses a new way of caring and arouses reflections about their main task caring for the suffering patient. The continuity created by the perioperative dialogue probably has an influence on both patient satisfaction and patient safety. PMID:25919943

  8. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to external quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:24493011

  9. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to extern quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:23846174

  10. Critical palliative care: intensive care redefined.

    PubMed

    Civetta, J M

    2001-01-01

    In the area of end-of-life bioethical issues, patients, families, and health care providers do not understand basic principles, often leading to anguish, guilt, and anger. Providers lack communication skills, concepts, and practical bedside information. Linking societal values of the sanctity of life and quality of life with medical goals of preservation of life and alleviation of suffering respectively provides an essential structure. Medical care focuses on cure when possible but when the patient is dying, the focus switches to caring for patients and their families. Clinicians need to learn how to balance the benefits and burdens of medications and treatments, control symptoms, and orchestrate withdrawal of treatment. Finally, all need to learn more about the dying process to benefit society, their own families, and themselves. PMID:11406456

  11. Management of lacerated and swollen tongue after convulsive seizure with a mouth protector: interprofessional collaboration including dentists in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Reiko; Soga, Yoshihiko; Moriya, Yoshie; Okui, Akemi; Takeuchi, Tetsuo; Sato, Kenji; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Morita, Manabu

    2014-12-01

    We encountered a 74-year-old male patient with tongue laceration after convulsive seizures under intensive care. The tongue showed severe swelling, and the right ventral surface had been lacerated by his isolated and pointed right lower canine. Our university hospital has established a perioperative management center, and is promoting interprofessional collaboration, including dentists, in perioperative management. Dentists collaborating in the perioperative management center took dental impressions, with the support of anesthesiologists who opened the patient's jaw under propofol sedation, to produce a mouth protector. By raising the patient's bite, the completed mouth protector prevented the isolated tooth from contacting the tongue and protected the lacerated wound. Use of the mouth protector prevented the lacerated tongue from coming into contact with the pointed tooth, and the tongue healed gradually. These findings underscore that interprofessional collaboration including dentists can improve the quality of medical care. PMID:25519032

  12. [Psychiatric complications in patients under intensive care].

    PubMed

    Brand, M P; Suter, P; Gunn-Séchéhaye, A; Gardaz, J P; Gemperlé, M

    1978-01-01

    Ten adult patients with psychiatric disorders in the intensive care ward were examined. The length of stay varied from one week to four months and mechanical ventilation was necessary for all patients. Their experience of intensive care and their psychosensorial problems were as follows: temperospatial disorientation, perturbation of the sense of posture, hallucinations which could go as far as oneiric delirium, anguish and symptoms of depression. No psychotic syndrome, literraly speaking, was observed objectively. In the monthes that followed the stay under intensive care many patients presented important psychosomatic disorders. Organic factors are responsible for these complications, though the environment of the intensive care could induce a marked disafferentation. An effort by the attending staff, aimed at orientating or "reafferenting" these patients, could reduce these problems. PMID:30349

  13. [Delirium and intensive care unit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Muhl, E

    2006-05-01

    Delirium and intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome are frequently seen postoperatively, especially in intensive care. Hospital mortality and complication rates are higher in patients with these disorders. Delirium is characterized by disturbance of consciousness and cognition and short development time. Drugs, drug withdrawal, and manifold metabolic syndromes may be causative. Knowledge of differential diagnosis and causality is essential for curative therapy. Drug therapy is recommended for the treatment of psychotic symptoms and vegetative disorders. PMID:16521003

  14. Monitoring in the Intensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Kipnis, Eric; Ramsingh, Davinder; Bhargava, Maneesh; Dincer, Erhan; Cannesson, Maxime; Broccard, Alain; Vallet, Benoit; Bendjelid, Karim; Thibault, Ronan

    2012-01-01

    In critical care, the monitoring is essential to the daily care of ICU patients, as the optimization of patient's hemodynamic, ventilation, temperature, nutrition, and metabolism is the key to improve patients' survival. Indeed, the decisive endpoint is the supply of oxygen to tissues according to their metabolic needs in order to fuel mitochondrial respiration and, therefore, life. In this sense, both oxygenation and perfusion must be monitored in the implementation of any resuscitation strategy. The emerging concept has been the enhancement of macrocirculation through sequential optimization of heart function and then judging the adequacy of perfusion/oxygenation on specific parameters in a strategy which was aptly coined “goal directed therapy.” On the other hand, the maintenance of normal temperature is critical and should be regularly monitored. Regarding respiratory monitoring of ventilated ICU patients, it includes serial assessment of gas exchange, of respiratory system mechanics, and of patients' readiness for liberation from invasive positive pressure ventilation. Also, the monitoring of nutritional and metabolic care should allow controlling nutrients delivery, adequation between energy needs and delivery, and blood glucose. The present paper will describe the physiological basis, interpretation of, and clinical use of the major endpoints of perfusion/oxygenation adequacy and of temperature, respiratory, nutritional, and metabolic monitorings. PMID:22970356

  15. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  16. Meta-analysis of high- versus low-chloride content in perioperative and critical care fluid resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, M L; Raghunathan, K; Paluszkiewicz, S M; Schermer, C R; Shaw, A D

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the relationship between the chloride content of intravenous resuscitation fluids and patient outcomes in the perioperative or intensive care setting. Methods Systematic searches were performed of PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) databases in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical trials and observational studies were included if they compared outcomes in acutely ill or surgical patients receiving either high-chloride (ion concentration greater than 111 mmol/l up to and including 154 mmol/l) or lower-chloride (concentration 111 mmol/l or less) crystalloids for resuscitation. Endpoints examined were mortality, measures of kidney function, serum chloride, hyperchloraemia/metabolic acidosis, blood transfusion volume, mechanical ventilation time, and length of hospital and intensive care unit stay. Risk ratios (RRs), mean differences (MDs) or standardized mean differences (SMDs) and confidence intervals were calculated using fixed-effect modelling. Results The search identified 21 studies involving 6253 patients. High-chloride fluids did not affect mortality but were associated with a significantly higher risk of acute kidney injury (RR 1·64, 95 per cent c.i. 1·27 to 2·13; P < 0·001) and hyperchloraemia/metabolic acidosis (RR 2·87, 1·95 to 4·21; P < 0·001). High-chloride fluids were also associated with greater serum chloride (MD 3·70 (95 per cent c.i. 3·36 to 4·04) mmol/l; P < 0·001), blood transfusion volume (SMD 0·35, 0·07 to 0·63; P = 0·014) and mechanical ventilation time (SMD 0·15, 0·08 to 0·23; P < 0·001). Sensitivity analyses excluding heavily weighted studies resulted in non-statistically significant effects for acute kidney injury and mechanical ventilation time. Conclusion A weak but significant association between higher chloride content fluids and unfavourable

  17. Intensive Care Unit death and factors influencing family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit care

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit (FS-ICU) care is believed to be associated with ICU survival and ICU outcomes. A review of literature was done to determine factors influencing FS-ICU care in ICU deaths. Results: Factors that positively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Honesty, accuracy, active listening, emphatic statements, consistency, and clarity; (b) family support: Respect, compassion, courtesy, considering family needs and wishes, and emotional and spiritual support; (c) family meetings: Meaningful explanation and frequency of meetings; (d) decision-making: Shared decision-making; (e) end of life care support: Support during foregoing life-sustaining interventions and staggered withdrawal of life support; (f) ICU environment: Flexibility of visiting hours and safe hospital environment; and (g) other factors: Control of pain and physical symptoms, palliative care consultation, and family-centered care. Factors that negatively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Incomplete information and unable to interpret information provided; (b) family support: Lack of emotional and spiritual support; (c) family meetings: Conflicts and short family meetings; (d) end of life care support: Resuscitation at end of life, mechanical ventilation on day of death, ICU death of an elderly, prolonged use of life-sustaining treatment, and unfamiliar technology; and (e) ICU environment: Restrictive visitation policies and families denied access to see the dying loved ones. Conclusion: Families of the patients admitted to ICU value respect, compassion, empathy, communication, involvement in decision-making, pain and symptom relief, avoiding futile medical interventions, and dignified end of life care. PMID:27076710

  18. [Intensive care, a department where relational care counts].

    PubMed

    Novosad, Julien

    2016-03-01

    The intensive care unit is a department where the seriousness of the patients' condition requires a high level of technical skill. It is also a place where professionals need to demonstrate relational care in their practice. A nurse shares her experience of what she describes as an extremely rewarding role. PMID:26944645

  19. A Multi-Center International Study Assessing the Impact of Differences in Baseline Characteristics and Perioperative Care Following Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Takahiro; Lee, Cheryl T.; Abe, Takashige; Takada, Norikata; Hafez, Khaled S.; Montgomery, Jeffrey S.; Weizer, Alon Z.; Hollenbeck, Brent K.; Skolarus, Ted A.; Murai, Sachiyo; Shinohara, Nobuo; Morgan, Todd M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To identify potential avenues for quality improvement, we compared the variations in clinical practice and their association with perioperative morbidity and mortality following radical cystectomy (RC) for bladder cancer in the United States (US) and Japan. Methods: We reviewed our retrospectively collected database of 2240 patients who underwent RC for bladder cancer at the University of Michigan (n = 1427) and in 21 Japanese institutions (n = 813) between 1997 and 2014. We performed a systematic comparison of clinical and perioperative factors and assessed predictors of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Death within 90 days of surgery was the primary outcome. Results: There were apparent differences between the two study populations. Notably, US patients had a significantly greater BMI and higher ASA score. In Japanese institutions, median postoperative hospital stay was significantly higher (40 days vs. 7 days, p <  0.001) and 90-day readmission rates were significantly lower (0.6% vs. 26.8% , p <  0.001). There was a total of 1372/2240 (61.2%) patients with complications within 90 days and 66/2240 (2.9%) patient deaths. Significant predictors of 90-day mortality were older age (OR 1.04, CI 1.01–1.07), higher body mass index (OR 1.07, CI 1.02–1.12), node-positive disease (OR 3.14, CI 1.78–5.47), increased blood loss (OR 1.02, CI 1.01–1.03), and major (Clavien-grade 3 or greater) complication (OR 3.29, CI 1.88–5.71). Conclusion: Despite major differences in baseline characteristics and care of cystectomy patients between the two study populations, peri-operative mortality rates proved to be comparable. This data supports an exploration of non-traditional factors that may influence mortality after cystectomy. PMID:27376144

  20. Medicare Managed Care Spillovers and Treatment Intensity.

    PubMed

    Callison, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggests that the share of Medicare managed care enrollees in a region affects the costs of treating traditional fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare beneficiaries; however, little is known about the mechanisms through which these 'spillover effects' operate. This paper examines the relationship between Medicare managed care penetration and treatment intensity for FFS enrollees hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of AMI. I find that increased Medicare managed care penetration is associated with a reduction in both the costs and the treatment intensity of FFS AMI patients. Specifically, as Medicare managed care penetration increases, FFS AMI patients are less likely to receive surgical reperfusion and mechanical ventilation and to experience an overall reduction in the number of inpatient procedures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25960418

  1. Trends in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care.

    PubMed

    Maree, Carin; Downes, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Family-centered care in neonatal intensive care changed over the last decades. Initially, parents and infants were separated and parents were even being blamed for cau-sing infections in their infants. The importance, though, of the parents being the constant in the infant's life emerged and with that the importance of early bonding and attachment for the parents to take on their role and responsibi-lities as primary caregivers. Facilitation of family-centered care includes involving the parents in daily care activities, kangaroo care, developmental care, interaction and communication with the infant, as well as involving grandparents and siblings. Implementation of family-centered care requires appropriate policies, facilities and resources, education of all involved, and a positive attitude. PMID:27465463

  2. Ethics in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is the most common place to die. Also, ethical conflicts among stakeholders occur frequently in the ICU. Thus, ICU clinicians should be competent in all aspects for ethical decision-making. Major sources of conflicts are behavioral issues, such as verbal abuse or poor communication between physicians and nurses, and end-of-life care issues including a lack of respect for the patient's autonomy. The ethical conflicts are significantly associated with the job strain and burn-out syndrome of healthcare workers, and consequently, may threaten the quality of care. To improve the quality of care, handling ethical conflicts properly is emerging as a vital and more comprehensive area. The ICU physicians themselves need to be more sensitive to behavioral conflicts and enable shared decision making in end-of-life care. At the same time, the institutions and administrators should develop their processes to find and resolve common ethical problems in their ICUs. PMID:26175769

  3. [The family's place in intensive care departments].

    PubMed

    Rohrbacher, Emmanuel

    2011-06-01

    The presence of the family in an intensive care department calls for collaboration between the nursing team and the patient's family. The nurse's role is important. She must use all her nursing skills to act as an effective intermediary between the family and the doctor, to ensure in particular that everyone can understand the information being conveyed. PMID:21919298

  4. [Oncological intensive care: 2011 year's review].

    PubMed

    Sculier, J P; Berghmans, T; Meert, A P

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the literature published in 2011 in the field of intensive care and emergency related to oncology. Are discussed because of new original publications: prognosis, resuscitation techniques, oncologic emergencies, serious toxicities of cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapies, complicated aplastic anemia, toxicity of bisphosphonates, respiratory complications, pulmonary embolism and neurological complications. PMID:23373125

  5. Pulmonary aspiration in perioperative medicine.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Perioperative aspiration into the lungs is an infrequent but potentially serious cause of anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. It is still a leading cause of death from pulmonary complications. Aspiration occurs in approximately three per 10.000 anesthetic procedures with higher incidences in special patient populations and emergency situations. Any patient with symptoms following aspiration that last for more than two hours in the recovery room should be admitted to an intensive care unit for further observation and therapy. This article reviews incidence, morbidity and mortality of perioperative aspiration as well as risk factors and preventive measures. Among preventive measures the use of drugs designed to increase gastric pH, recent developments in supraglottic airway devices and application of rapid sequence induction with cricoid pressure are discussed. Also, international fasting guidelines and clinical management following aspiration are provided. PMID:23767172

  6. Major themes for 2012 in cardiovascular anesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Riha, H; Patel, P; Al-Ghofaily, L; Valentine, E; Sophocles, A; Augoustides, J G T

    2013-01-01

    There was major progress through 2012 in cardiovascular anesthesia and intensive care. Although recent meta-analysis has supported prophylactic steroid therapy in adult cardiac surgery, a large Dutch multicenter trial found no outcome advantage with dexamethasone. A second large randomized trial is currently testing the outcome effects of methyprednisolone in this setting. Due to calibration drift, the logistic EuroSCORE has recently been recalibrated. Despite this model revision, EuroSCORE II still overestimates mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. It is likely that a specific perioperative risk model will be developed for this unique patient population. Recent global consensus has prioritized 12 non-surgical interventions that merit further study for reducing mortality after surgery. There is currently a paradigm shift in the conduct of adult aortic arch repair. Recent advances have facilitated aortic arch reconstruction with routine antegrade cerebral perfusion at mild-to-moderate hypothermia. Further integration of hybrid endovascular techniques may allow future aortic arch repair without hypothermia or circulatory arrest. These advances will likely further improve patient outcomes. PMID:23734284

  7. End-of-Life Care in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Engelberg, Ruth A.; Bensink, Mark E.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and costs of critical illness are increasing in the United States at a time when there is a focus both on limiting the rising costs of healthcare and improving the quality of end-of-life care. More than 25% of healthcare costs are spent in the last year of life, and approximately 20% of deaths occur in the intensive care unit (ICU). Consequently, there has been speculation that end-of-life care in the ICU represents an important target for cost savings. It is unclear whether efforts to improve end-of-life care in the ICU could significantly reduce healthcare costs. Here, we summarize recent studies suggesting that important opportunities may exist to improve quality and reduce costs through two mechanisms: advance care planning for patients with life-limiting illness and use of time-limited trials of ICU care for critically ill patients. The goal of these approaches is to ensure patients receive the intensity of care that they would choose at the end of life, given the opportunity to make an informed decision. Although these mechanisms hold promise for increasing quality and reducing costs, there are few clearly described, effective methods to implement these mechanisms in routine clinical practice. We believe basic science in communication and decision making, implementation research, and demonstration projects are critically important if we are to translate these approaches into practice and, in so doing, provide high-quality and patient-centered care while limiting rising healthcare costs. PMID:22859524

  8. Perioperative hypertension management

    PubMed Central

    Varon, Joseph; Marik, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Perioperative hypertension is commonly encountered in patients that undergo surgery. While attempts have been made to standardize the method to characterize the intraoperative hemodynamics, these methods still vary widely. In addition, there is a lack of consensus concerning treatment thresholds and appropriate therapeutic targets, making absolute recommendations about treatment difficult. Nevertheless, perioperative hypertension requires careful management. When treatment is necessary, therapy should be individualized for the patient. This paper reviews the pharmacologic agents and strategies commonly used in the management of perioperative hypertension. PMID:18827911

  9. The Gap Between Clinical Research and Standard of Care: A Review of Frailty Assessment Scales in Perioperative Surgical Settings.

    PubMed

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Baddigam, Ramya; Wajahn, Jennifer; Sipes, Angela C; Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Gastaldo, Nicholas; Bergese, Sergio D

    2016-01-01

    The elderly population in the United States is increasing exponentially in tandem with risk for frailty. Frailty is described by a clinically significant state where a patient is at risk for developing complications requiring increased assistance in daily activities. Frailty syndrome studied in geriatric patients is responsible for an increased risk for falls, and increased mortality. In efforts to prepare for and to intervene in perioperative complications and general frailty, a universal scale to measure frailty is necessary. Many methods for determining frailty have been developed, yet there remains a need to define clinical frailty and, therefore, the most effective way to measure it. This article reviews six popular scales for measuring frailty and evaluates their clinical effectiveness demonstrated in previous studies. By identifying the most time-efficient, criteria comprehensive, and clinically effective scale, a universal scale can be implemented into standard of care and reduce complications from frailty in both non-surgical and surgical settings, especially applied to the perioperative surgical home model. We suggest further evaluation of the Edmonton Frailty Scale for inclusion in patient care. PMID:27493935

  10. The Gap Between Clinical Research and Standard of Care: A Review of Frailty Assessment Scales in Perioperative Surgical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Baddigam, Ramya; Wajahn, Jennifer; Sipes, Angela C.; Arias-Morales, Carlos E.; Gastaldo, Nicholas; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    The elderly population in the United States is increasing exponentially in tandem with risk for frailty. Frailty is described by a clinically significant state where a patient is at risk for developing complications requiring increased assistance in daily activities. Frailty syndrome studied in geriatric patients is responsible for an increased risk for falls, and increased mortality. In efforts to prepare for and to intervene in perioperative complications and general frailty, a universal scale to measure frailty is necessary. Many methods for determining frailty have been developed, yet there remains a need to define clinical frailty and, therefore, the most effective way to measure it. This article reviews six popular scales for measuring frailty and evaluates their clinical effectiveness demonstrated in previous studies. By identifying the most time-efficient, criteria comprehensive, and clinically effective scale, a universal scale can be implemented into standard of care and reduce complications from frailty in both non-surgical and surgical settings, especially applied to the perioperative surgical home model. We suggest further evaluation of the Edmonton Frailty Scale for inclusion in patient care. PMID:27493935

  11. [Anesthesiological care in orthogeriatric co-management. Perioperative treatment of geriatric trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Luger, Thomas J; Luger, Markus F

    2016-04-01

    Elderly patients increasingly need to undergo surgery under anesthesia, especially following trauma. A timely interdisciplinary approach to the perioperative management of these patients is decisive for the long-term outcome. Orthogeriatric co-management, which includes geriatricians and anesthesiologists from an early stage, is of great benefit for geriatric patients. Patient age, comorbidities and self-sufficiency in activities of daily life are decisive for an anesthesiological assessment of the state of health and preoperative risk stratification. If necessary additional investigations, such as echocardiography must be carried out, in order to guarantee optimal perioperative anesthesiological management. Certain medical factors can delay the initiation of anesthesia and it is absolutely necessary that these are taken into consideration for surgical management. Not every form of anesthesia is equally suitable for every geriatric patient. PMID:27090913

  12. Negotiating natural death in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Seymour, J E

    2000-10-01

    Recent empirical evidence of barriers to palliative care in acute hospital settings shows that dying patients may receive invasive medical treatments immediately before death, in spite of evidence of their poor prognosis being available to clinicians. The difficulties of ascertaining treatment preferences, predicting the trajectory of dying in critically ill people, and assessing the degree to which further interventions are futile are well documented. Further, enduring ethical complexities attending end of life care mean that the process of withdrawing or withholding medical care is associated with significant problems for clinical staff. Specific difficulties attend the legitimation of treatment withdrawal, the perceived differences between 'killing' and 'letting die' and the cultural constraints which attend the orchestration of 'natural' death in situations where human agency is often required before death can follow dying. This paper draws on ethnographic research to examine the way in which these problems are resolved during medical work within intensive care. Building on insights from the literature, an analysis of observational case study data is presented which suggests that the negotiation of natural death in intensive care hinges upon four strategies. These, which form a framework with which to interpret social interaction between physicians during end of life decision-making in intensive care, are as follows: firstly, the establishment of a 'technical' definition of dying--informed by results of investigations and monitoring equipment--over and above 'bodily' dying informed by clinical experience. Secondly, the alignment of the trajectories of technical and bodily dying to ensure that the events of non-treatment have no perceived causative link to death. Thirdly, the balancing of medical action with non-action, allowing a diffusion of responsibility for death to the patient's body; and lastly, the incorporation of patient's companions and nursing staff

  13. Sedation in neurological intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Birinder S.; Paul, Gunchan

    2013-01-01

    Analgesia and sedation has been widely used in intensive care units where iatrogenic discomfort often complicates patient management. In neurological patients maximal comfort without diminishing patient responsiveness is desirable. In these patients successful management of sedation and analgesia incorporates a patient based approach that includes detection and management of predisposing and causative factors, including delirium, monitoring using sedation scales, proper medication selection, emphasis on analgesia based drugs and incorporation of protocols or algorithms. So, to optimize care clinician should be familiar with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variables that can affect the safety and efficacy of analgesics and sedatives. PMID:23956563

  14. Filters in anaesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, A; Kumar, R; Bhattacharya, A; Sethi, A K

    2003-08-01

    The use of various types of filters in anaesthesia and intensive care seems ubiquitous, yet authentication of the practice is scarce and controversies abound. This review examines evidence for the practice of using filters with blood and blood product transfusion (standard blood filter, microfilter, leucocyte depletion filter), infusion of fluids, breathing systems, epidural catheters, and at less common sites such as with Entonox inhalation in non-intubated patients, forced air convection warmers, and air-conditioning systems. For most filters, the literature failed to support routine usage, despite this seemingly being popular and innocuous. The controversies, as well as guidelines if available, for each type of filter, are discussed. The review aims to rationalize the place of various filters in the anaesthesia and intensive care environment. PMID:12973967

  15. Adverse incident reporting in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Hart, G K; Baldwin, I; Gutteridge, G; Ford, J

    1994-10-01

    This prospective, observational, anonymous incident reporting study aimed to identify and correct factors leading to reduced patient safety in intensive care. An incident was any event which caused or had the potential to cause harm to the patient, but included problems in policy or procedure. Reports were discussed at monthly meetings. Of 390 incidents, 106 occasioned "actual" harm and 284 "potential" harm. There was one death, 86 severe complications and 88 complications of minor severity. Most were transient but the effects of 24 lasted up to a week. Most incidents affected cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Incident categories involved drugs, equipment, management or procedures. Incident causes were knowledge-based, rule-based, technical, slip/lapse, no error or unclassifiable. The study has identified some human and equipment performance problems in our intensive care unit. Correction of these should lead to a reduction in the future incidence of those events and hence an increased level of patient safety. PMID:7818059

  16. Nursing activity in general intensive care.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lynne; Nixon, Gillian

    2002-03-01

    1. In this cost-conscious climate there is a need to make explicit and justify the rationale to support direct patient contact by Registered Nurses. The current shortage of qualified nursing staff means that it is essential that experience and expertise be utilized to the benefit of patients and the service as a whole. 2. This study used a descriptive approach to describe, categorize and quantify the activities of nurses working in a six-bed general intensive care unit. 3. Data were collected using a self-reporting diary log sheet that identified the focus of an individual's activity at 5-minute intervals. All Registered Nurses, on all shifts over a 7-day period, completed log sheets. 4. The results demonstrate that nurses working in this general intensive care unit spent 85% of their time in activities associated with providing direct patient care. However, up to 6% of time was spent undertaking non-nursing duties, and analysis of unit activity provided data to support an increase in the establishment and review of the shift patterns of health care assistants. 5. The findings of the study indicate that nurses in charge of shifts spend 24.1% of their time in managerial and administrative activity; this reduces the amount of time spent in direct patient contact. PMID:11903715

  17. Unintended Perioperative Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Stuart R.; Bordes, Brianne; Hart, Jennifer; Corsino, Daniel; Harmon, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypothermia, defined as a core body temperature less than 36°C (96.8°F), is a relatively common occurrence in the unwarmed surgical patient. A mild degree of perioperative hypothermia can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A threefold increase in the frequency of surgical site infections is reported in colorectal surgery patients who experience perioperative hypothermia. As part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project, guidelines aim to decrease the incidence of this complication. Methods We review the physiology of temperature regulation, mechanisms of hypothermia, effects of anesthetics on thermoregulation, and consequences of hypothermia and summarize recent recommendations for maintaining perioperative normothermia. Results Evidence suggests that prewarming for a minimum of 30 minutes may reduce the risk of subsequent hypothermia. Conclusions Monitoring of body temperature and avoidance of unintended perioperative hypothermia through active and passive warming measures are the keys to preventing its complications. PMID:21960760

  18. Intensive Perioperative Glucose Control Does Not Improve Outcomes of Patients Submitted to Open-Heart Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Raquel Pei Chen; Galas, Filomena Regina Barbosa Gomes; Hajjar, Ludhmila Abrahão; Bello, Carmen Narvaes; Piccioni, Marilde Albuquerque; Auler, José Otávio Costa

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between different target levels of glucose and the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: We designed a prospective study in a university hospital where 109 consecutive patients were enrolled during a six-month period. All patients were scheduled for open-heart surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. One group consisted of 55 patients and had a target glucose level of 80–130 mg/dl, while the other contained 54 patients and had a target glucose level of 160–200 mg/dl. These parameters were controlled during surgery and for 36 hours after surgery in the intensive care unit. Primary outcomes were clinical outcomes, including time of mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the intensive care unit, infection, hypoglycemia, renal or neurological dysfunction, blood transfusion and length of stay in the hospital. The secondary outcome was a combined end-point (mortality at 30 days, infection or length of stay in the intensive care unit of more than 3 days). A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The anthropometric and clinical characteristics of the patients from each group were similar, except for weight and body mass index. The mean glucose level during the protocol period was 126.69 mg/dl in the treated group and 168.21 mg/dl in the control group (p<0.0016). There were no differences between groups regarding clinical outcomes, including the duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the intensive care unit, blood transfusion, postoperative infection, hypoglycemic event, neurological dysfunction or 30-day mortality (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In 109 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, both protocols of glycemic control in an intraoperative setting and in the intensive care unit were found to be safe, easily achieved and not to

  19. Should perioperative immunonutrition for elective surgery be the current standard of care?

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Trivax, Brandon; Tandon, Parul; Alkam, Bilal; Hanouneh, Ibrahim; Steiger, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative infectious complications are independently associated with increased hospital length of stay (LOS) and cost and contribute to significant inpatient morbidity. Many strategies such as avoidance of long periods of preoperative fasting, re-establishment of oral feeding as early as possible after surgery, metabolic control and early mobilization have been used to either prevent or reduce the incidence of postoperative infections. Despite these efforts, it remains a big challenge to our current healthcare system to mitigate the cost of postoperative morbidity. Furthermore, preoperative nutritional status has also been implicated as an independent risk factor for postoperative morbidity. Perioperative nutritional support using enteral and parenteral routes has been shown to decrease postoperative morbidity, especially in high-risk patients. Recently, the role of immunonutrition (IMN) in postoperative infectious complications has been studied extensively. These substrates have been found to positively modulate postsurgical immunosuppression and inflammatory responses. They have also been shown to be cost-effective by decreasing both tpostoperative infectious complications and hospital LOS. In this review, we discuss the postoperative positive outcomes associated with the use of perioperative IMN, their cost-effectiveness, current guidelines and future clinical implications. PMID:27081153

  20. Should perioperative immunonutrition for elective surgery be the current standard of care?

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Trivax, Brandon; Tandon, Parul; Alkam, Bilal; Hanouneh, Ibrahim; Steiger, Ezra

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative infectious complications are independently associated with increased hospital length of stay (LOS) and cost and contribute to significant inpatient morbidity. Many strategies such as avoidance of long periods of preoperative fasting, re-establishment of oral feeding as early as possible after surgery, metabolic control and early mobilization have been used to either prevent or reduce the incidence of postoperative infections. Despite these efforts, it remains a big challenge to our current healthcare system to mitigate the cost of postoperative morbidity. Furthermore, preoperative nutritional status has also been implicated as an independent risk factor for postoperative morbidity. Perioperative nutritional support using enteral and parenteral routes has been shown to decrease postoperative morbidity, especially in high-risk patients. Recently, the role of immunonutrition (IMN) in postoperative infectious complications has been studied extensively. These substrates have been found to positively modulate postsurgical immunosuppression and inflammatory responses. They have also been shown to be cost-effective by decreasing both tpostoperative infectious complications and hospital LOS. In this review, we discuss the postoperative positive outcomes associated with the use of perioperative IMN, their cost-effectiveness, current guidelines and future clinical implications. PMID:27081153

  1. Implementing a regional anesthesia block nurse team in the perianesthesia care unit increases patient safety and perioperative efficiency.

    PubMed

    Russell, Rebecca Ann; Burke, Kimberly; Gattis, Katherine

    2013-02-01

    A lack of standardized nursing procedures regarding the management of patients receiving preoperative regional anesthesia in the perianesthesia setting raises a number of issues for perianesthesia nurses. In January 2010, Duke University Hospital's perianesthesia care unit implemented a regional anesthesia "block nurse" team in the preoperative holding area as a patient safety initiative. In January 2011, a retrospective data review was conducted. Results indicated that the implementation of the block nurse team not only increased patient safety but also increased perioperative efficiency and productivity, and decreased delays to operating room start times. This article describes the role of the regional anesthesia block nurse, the development of a block nurse team, and the early benefits of implementing a dedicated regional anesthesia block nurse team in the perianesthesia setting. PMID:23351242

  2. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin-Ling

    2016-07-01

    On one hand, advances in neonatal care and rescue technology allow for the healthy survival or prolonged survival time of critically ill newborns who, in the past, would have been non-viable. On the other hand, many of the surviving critically ill infants have serious long-term disabilities. If an infant eventually cannot survive or is likely to suffer severe disability after surviving, ethical issues in the treatment process are inevitable, and this problem arises not only in developed countries but is also becoming increasingly prominent in developing countries. In addition, ethical concerns cannot be avoided in medical research. This review article introduces basic ethical guidelines that should be followed in clinical practice, including respecting the autonomy of the parents, giving priority to the best interests of the infant, the principle of doing no harm, and consent and the right to be informed. Furthermore, the major ethical concerns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in China are briefly introduced. PMID:26382713

  3. Managing malaria in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Marks, M.; Gupta-Wright, A.; Doherty, J. F.; Singer, M.; Walker, D.

    2014-01-01

    The number of people travelling to malaria-endemic countries continues to increase, and malaria remains the commonest cause of serious imported infection in non-endemic areas. Severe malaria, mostly caused by Plasmodium falciparum, often requires intensive care unit (ICU) admission and can be complicated by cerebral malaria, respiratory distress, acute kidney injury, bleeding complications, and co-infection. The mortality from imported malaria remains significant. This article reviews the manifestations, complications and principles of management of severe malaria as relevant to critical care clinicians, incorporating recent studies of anti-malarial and adjunctive treatment. Effective management of severe malaria includes prompt diagnosis and early institution of effective anti-malarial therapy, recognition of complications, and appropriate supportive management in an ICU. All cases should be discussed with a specialist unit and transfer of the patient considered. PMID:24946778

  4. Neurologic Complications in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Rubinos, Clio; Ruland, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Complications involving the central and peripheral nervous system are frequently encountered in critically ill patients. All components of the neuraxis can be involved including the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. Neurologic complications adversely impact outcome and length of stay. These complications can be related to underlying critical illness, pre-existing comorbid conditions, and commonly used and life-saving procedures and medications. Familiarity with the myriad neurologic complications that occur in the intensive care unit can facilitate their timely recognition and treatment. Additionally, awareness of treatment-related neurologic complications may inform decision-making, mitigate risk, and improve outcomes. PMID:27098953

  5. Role of music in intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The role of music in intensive care medicine is still unclear. However, it is well known that music may not only improve quality of life but also effect changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Reactions to music are considered subjective, but studies suggest that cardio/cerebrovascular variables are influenced under different circumstances. It has been shown that cerebral flow was significantly lower when listening to "Va pensioero" from Verdi's "Nabucco" (70.4+3.3 cm/s) compared to "Libiam nei lieti calici" from Verdi's "La Traviata" (70.2+3.1 cm/s) (P<0,02) or Bach's Cantata No. 169 "Gott soll allein mein Herze haben" (70.9+2.9 cm/s) (P<0,02). There was no significant influence on cerebral flow in Beethoven's Ninth Symphony during rest (67.6+3.3 cm/s) or music (69.4+3.1 cm/s). It was reported that relaxing music plays an important role in intensive care medicine. Music significantly decreases the level of anxiety for patients in a preoperative setting (STAI-X-1 score 34) to a greater extent even than orally administered midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 36) (P<0.001). In addition, the score was better after surgery in the music group (STAI-X-1 score 30) compared to midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 34) (P<0.001). Higher effectiveness and absence of apparent adverse effects make relaxing, preoperative music a useful alternative to midazolam. In addition, there is sufficient practical evidence of stress reduction suggesting that a proposed regimen of listening to music while resting in bed after open-heart surgery is important in clinical use. After 30 min of bed rest, there was a significant difference in cortisol levels between the music (484.4 mmol/l) and the non-music group (618.8 mmol/l) (P<0.02). Vocal and orchestral music produces significantly better correlations between cardiovascular and respiratory signals in contrast to uniform emphasis (P<0.05). The most benefit on health in intensive care medicine patients is visible in classical (Bach, Mozart or

  6. Role of music in intensive care medicine

    PubMed Central

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The role of music in intensive care medicine is still unclear. However, it is well known that music may not only improve quality of life but also effect changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Reactions to music are considered subjective, but studies suggest that cardio/cerebrovascular variables are influenced under different circumstances. It has been shown that cerebral flow was significantly lower when listening to “Va pensioero” from Verdi's “Nabucco” (70.4+3.3 cm/s) compared to “Libiam nei lieti calici” from Verdi's “La Traviata” (70.2+3.1 cm/s) (P<0,02) or Bach's Cantata No. 169 “Gott soll allein mein Herze haben” (70.9+2.9 cm/s) (P<0,02). There was no significant influence on cerebral flow in Beethoven's Ninth Symphony during rest (67.6+3.3 cm/s) or music (69.4+3.1 cm/s). It was reported that relaxing music plays an important role in intensive care medicine. Music significantly decreases the level of anxiety for patients in a preoperative setting (STAI-X-1 score 34) to a greater extent even than orally administered midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 36) (P<0.001). In addition, the score was better after surgery in the music group (STAI-X-1 score 30) compared to midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 34) (P<0.001). Higher effectiveness and absence of apparent adverse effects make relaxing, preoperative music a useful alternative to midazolam. In addition, there is sufficient practical evidence of stress reduction suggesting that a proposed regimen of listening to music while resting in bed after open-heart surgery is important in clinical use. After 30 min of bed rest, there was a significant difference in cortisol levels between the music (484.4 mmol/l) and the non-music group (618.8 mmol/l) (P<0.02). Vocal and orchestral music produces significantly better correlations between cardiovascular and respiratory signals in contrast to uniform emphasis (P<0.05). The most benefit on health in intensive care medicine patients is visible in

  7. FASTING IN ELECTIVE SURGICAL PATIENTS: COMPARISON AMONG THE TIME PRESCRIBED, PERFORMED AND RECOMMENDED ON PERIOPERATIVE CARE PROTOCOLS

    PubMed Central

    FRANCISCO, Saionara Cristina; BATISTA, Sandra Teixeira; PENA, Geórgia das Graças

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged preoperative fasting may impair nutritional status of the patient and their recovery. In contrast, some studies show that fasting abbreviation can improve the response to trauma and decrease the length of hospital stay. Aim: Investigate whether the prescribed perioperative fasting time and practiced by patients is in compliance with current multimodal protocols and identify the main factors associated. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 65 patients undergoing elective surgery of the digestive tract or abdominal wall. We investigated the fasting time in the perioperative period, hunger and thirst reports, physical status, diabetes diagnosis, type of surgery and anesthesia. Results: The patients were between 19 and 87 years, mostly female (73.8%). The most performed procedure was cholecystectomy (47.69%) and general anesthesia the most used (89.23%). The most common approach was to start fasting from midnight for liquids and solids, and most of the patients received grade II (64.6%) to the physical state. The real fasting average time was 16 h (9.5-41.58) was higher than prescribed (11 h, 6.58 -26.75). The patients submitted to surgery in the afternoon were in more fasting time than those who did in the morning (p<0.001). The intensity of hunger and thirst increased in postoperative fasting period (p=0.010 and 0.027). The average period of postoperative fasting was 18.25 h (3.33-91.83) and only 23.07% restarted feeding on the same day. Conclusion: Patients were fasted for prolonged time, higher even than the prescribed time and intensity of the signs of discomfort such as hunger and thirst increased over time. To better recovery and the patient's well-being, it is necessary to establish a preoperative fasting abbreviation protocol. PMID:26734794

  8. Optimizing cost-effectiveness in perioperative care for liver transplantation: a model for low- to medium-income countries.

    PubMed

    Rando, Karina; Niemann, Claus U; Taura, Pilar; Klinck, John

    2011-11-01

    Although liver transplantation (LT) is a highly effective treatment, it has been considered too costly for publicly funded health systems in many countries with low to medium average incomes. However, with economic growth and improving results, some governments are reconsidering this position. Cost-effectiveness data for LT are limited, especially in perioperative care, and the techniques and costs vary widely between centers without overt differences in outcomes. Anesthesiologists working in new programs find it difficult to determine which modalities are essential, which are needed only in exceptional circumstances, and which may be omitted without effects on outcomes. We investigated key elements of preoperative evaluations, intraoperative management, and early postoperative care that might significantly affect costs in order to develop a best-value approach for new programs in resource-limited health systems. We identified all modalities of care commonly used in anesthesia and perioperative care for adult LT along with their costs. Those considered to be universally accepted as minimum requirements for safe care were excluded from the analysis, and so were those considered to be safe and low-cost, even when evidence of efficacy was lacking. The remaining items were, therefore, those with uncertain or context-restricted value and significant costs. A systematic review of the published evidence, practice surveys, and institutional guidelines was performed, and the evidence was graded and summarized. With respect to costs and benefits, each modality was then cited as strongly recommended, recommended or optional, or no recommendation was made because of insufficient evidence. Sixteen modalities, which included preoperative cardiovascular imaging, venovenous bypass, pulmonary artery catheterization, high-flow fluid warming devices, drug therapies for hemostasis, albumin, cell salvage, anesthetic drugs, personnel (staffing) requirements, and early extubation, were

  9. Data privacy considerations in Intensive Care Grids.

    PubMed

    Luna, Jesus; Dikaiakos, Marios D; Kyprianou, Theodoros; Bilas, Angelos; Marazakis, Manolis

    2008-01-01

    Novel eHealth systems are being designed to provide a citizen-centered health system, however the even demanding need for computing and data resources has required the adoption of Grid technologies. In most of the cases, this novel Health Grid requires not only conveying patient's personal data through public networks, but also storing it into shared resources out of the hospital premises. These features introduce new security concerns, in particular related with privacy. In this paper we survey current legal and technological approaches that have been taken to protect a patient's personal data into eHealth systems, with a particular focus in Intensive Care Grids. However, thanks to a security analysis applied over the Intensive Care Grid system (ICGrid) we show that these security mechanisms are not enough to provide a comprehensive solution, mainly because the data-at-rest is still vulnerable to attacks coming from untrusted Storage Elements where an attacker may directly access them. To cope with these issues, we propose a new privacy-oriented protocol which uses a combination of encryption and fragmentation to improve data's assurance while keeping compatibility with current legislations and Health Grid security mechanisms. PMID:18560120

  10. Hot topics in liver intensive care.

    PubMed

    Bacher, A; Zimpfer, M

    2008-05-01

    Liver dysfunction is an independent predictor of mortality among intensive care patients. Avoidance or early restoration of normal liver function should therefore be targeted in all critically ill patients. The present work seeks to provide an overview of the "hottest topics" among liver-related problems in intensive care. The management of increased intracranial pressure in severe hepatic encephalopathy is still not sufficiently documented. The promising results with regard to intracranial pressure control by the molecular adsorbent recycling system (MARS) in animal studies are only partially reproducible in patients. Intracranial pressure monitoring is inconsistently applied in various centers, mainly because of the lack of information about the risk benefit ratio. Further, we still do not know which coagulation management protocol reduces the risk of intracranial bleeding. Type I hepatorenal syndrome is a complication of liver failure that is strongly associated with bad outcomes. Only about the half of the patients will recover from dialysis-dependent hepatorenal syndrome after liver transplantation. The usefulness of combined liver and kidney transplantation has not been sufficiently clarified. Terlipressin together with fluid and albumin substitution appear to be the most promising therapeutic interventions. Extracorporeal liver support systems, such as single-pass albumin dialysis, MARS, and the dialysis- and plasmapheresis-based Prometheus, are still under investigation with regard to effectiveness of toxin elimination, appropriate indications, and number duration of treatments. PMID:18555143

  11. [Delirium in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    von Haken, R; Gruss, M; Plaschke, K; Scholz, M; Engelhardt, R; Brobeil, A; Martin, E; Weigand, M A

    2010-03-01

    In recent years delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) has internationally become a matter of rising concern for intensive care physicians. Due to the design of highly sophisticated ventilators the practice of deep sedation is nowadays mostly obsolete. To assess a ventilated ICU patient for delirium easy to handle bedside tests have been developed which permit a psychiatric scoring. The significance of ICU delirium is equivalent to organ failure and has been proven to be an independent prognostic factor for mortality and length of ICU and hospital stay. The pathophysiology and risk factors of ICU delirium are still insufficiently understood in detail. A certain constellation of pre-existing patient-related conditions, the current diagnosis and surgical procedure and administered medication entail a higher risk for the occurrence of ICU delirium. A favored hypothesis is that an imbalance of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine and dopamine serotonin results in an unpredictable neurotransmission. Currently, the administration of neuroleptics, enforced physiotherapy, re-orientation measures and appropriate pain treatment are the basis of the therapeutic approach. PMID:20127059

  12. Hepatorenal syndrome in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wadei, Hani M; Gonwa, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a functional form of acute kidney injury (AKI) associated with advanced liver cirrhosis or fulminant hepatic failure. Various new concepts have emerged since the initial diagnostic criteria and definition of HRS was initially published. These include better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in HRS, identification of bacterial infection (especially spontaneous bacterial peritonitis) as the most important HRS-precipitating event, recognition that insufficient cardiac output plays a role in the occurrence of HRS, and evidence that renal failure reverses with pharmacotherapy. Patients with HRS are often critically ill and, by definition, have multiorgan failure. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on novel advances in HRS, with emphasis on the different aspects of management of these patients in the intensive care unit. PMID:21859679

  13. Continuous haemofiltration in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Ronco, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was first described in 1977 for the treatment of diuretic-unresponsive fluid overload in the intensive care unit (ICU). Since that time this treatment has undergone a remarkable technical and conceptual evolution. It is now available in most tertiary ICUs around the world and has almost completely replaced intermittent haemodialysis (IHD) in some countries. Specially made machines are now available, and venovenous therapies that use blood pumps have replaced simpler techniques. Although, it remains controversial whether CRRT decreases mortality when compared with IHD, much evidence suggests that it is physiologically superior. The use of CRRT has also spurred renewed interest in the broader concept of blood purification, particularly in septic states. Experimental evidence suggests that this is a promising approach to the management of septic shock in critically ill patients. The evolution and use of CRRT is likely to continue and grow over the next decade. PMID:11123877

  14. Intensive care unit syndrome: a dangerous misnomer.

    PubMed

    McGuire, B E; Basten, C J; Ryan, C J; Gallagher, J

    2000-04-10

    The terms intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome and ICU psychosis have been used interchangeably to describe a cluster of psychiatric symptoms that are unique to the ICU environment. It is often postulated that aspects of the ICU, such as sleep deprivation and sensory overload or monotony, are causes of the syndrome. This article reviews the empirical support for these propositions. We conclude that ICU syndrome does not differ from delirium and that ICU syndrome is caused exclusively by organic stressors on the central nervous system. We argue further that the term ICU syndrome is dangerous because it impedes standardized communication and research and may reduce the vigilance necessary to promptly investigate and reverse the medical cause of the delirium. Directions for future research are suggested. PMID:10761954

  15. Antibiotic stewardship in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Heather M; Micek, Scott T; Skrupky, Lee P; Kollef, Marin H

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship encompasses the optimization of agent selection, dose, and duration leading to the best clinical outcome in the treatment or prevention of infection. Ideally, these goals are met while producing the fewest side effects and lowest risk for subsequent resistance. The concept of antimicrobial stewardship can be directly applied to the prescription of empirical antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU) because it is well described that inappropriate initial regimens lead to increased mortality. As such, care should be taken to identify factors that place patients at risk for infection with pathogens demonstrating reduced susceptibility or multidrug resistance. Research efforts have concentrated on molecular diagnostic techniques to aid in more rapid organism detection and thus potential for earlier therapy appropriateness and deescalation, although limitations prohibiting widespread implementation of this technology exist. Also of great importance with regard to stewardship efforts is infection prevention. Effective prophylactic strategies reduce the occurrence of nosocomial infections and may therefore improve patient outcomes while obviating the need for otherwise necessary antimicrobial exposure. PMID:21506058

  16. Building collaborative teams in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Dara; Gupta, Munish; Quinn, Mary; Smallcomb, Jane; Mao, Wenyang; Koyama, Nina; May, Virginia; Waldo, Karen; Young, Susan; Pursley, DeWayne M

    2013-05-01

    The complex multidisciplinary nature of neonatal intensive care combined with the numerous hand-offs occurring in this shift-based environment, requires efficient and clear communication and collaboration among staff to provide optimal care. However, the skills required to function as a team are not typically assessed, discussed, or even taught on a regular basis among neonatal personnel. We developed a multidisciplinary, small group, interactive workshop based on Team STEPPS to provide staff with formal teamwork skills, and to introduce new team-based practices; 129 (95%) of the eligible 136 staff were trained. We then compared the results of the pretraining survey (completed by 114 (84%) of staff) with the post-training survey (completed by 104 (81%) of participants) 2 years later. We found an improvement in the overall teamwork score from 7.37 to 8.08 (p=<0.0001) based on a range of poor (1) to excellent (9). Respondents provided higher ratings in 9 out of 15 team-based categories after the training. Specifically, staff found improvements in communication (p=0.037), placed greater importance on situation awareness (p=<0.00010), and reported that they supported each other more (p=<0.0001). Staff satisfaction was rated higher post-training, with responses showing that staff had greater job fulfilment (p=<0.0001), believed that their abilities were being utilised properly (p=0.003), and felt more respected (p=0.0037). 90% of staff found the new practice of team meetings to help increase awareness of unit acuity, and 77% of staff noted that they had asked for help or offered assistance because of information shared during these meetings. In addition to summarising the results of our training programme, this paper also provides practical tools that may be of use in developing team training programmes in other neonatal units. PMID:23396854

  17. Factors Affecting Intensive Care Units Nursing Workload

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Mosavi, Seyed Masod; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The nursing workload has a close and strong association with the quality of services provided for the patients. Therefore, paying careful attention to the factors affecting nursing workload, especially those working in the intensive care units (ICUs), is very important. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the factors affecting nursing workload in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional and analytical-descriptive study that has done in Iran. All nurses (n = 400) who was working in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014 were selected and studied using census method. The required data were collected using a researcher–made questionnaire which its validity and reliability were confirmed through getting the opinions of experts and using composite reliability and internal consistency (α = 0.89). The collected data were analyzed through exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and using SPSS 18.0 and AMOS 18.0. Results: Twenty-five factors were divided into three major categories through EFA, including structure, process, and activity. The following factors among the structure, process and activity components had the greatest importance: lack of clear responsibilities and authorities and performing unnecessary tasks (by a coefficient of 0.709), mismatch between the capacity of wards and the number of patients (by a coefficient of 0.639), and helping the students and newly employed staff (by a coefficient of 0.589). Conclusions: The nursing workload is influenced by many factors. The clear responsibilities and authorities of nurses, patients' admission according to the capacity of wards, use of the new technologies and equipment, and providing basic training for new nurses can decrease the workload of nurses. PMID:25389493

  18. [Decubitus ulcers in intensive care units. Analysis and care].

    PubMed

    Arrondo Díez, I; Huizi Egileor, X; Gala de Andrés, M; Gil Alvarez, G; Apaolaza Garayalde, C; Berridi Puy, K; Sarasola Lujambio, M J

    1995-01-01

    The fact that intensive care patients suffer from ulcera is a daily evidence which has a negative repercussion. We have analysed prospectively a sample of 215 patients to know the incidence, prevalence, levels, and placement of the decubit ulceras to observe whether there is an association between the variables age, sex, staying end, diagnosis, diabetes, risk level and postural changes and ulceration incidence. To do so, we have created a nursing care protocol for decubit ulceras to unify criteria and norm the performances. One out of every five I.C.U. patients suffers from ulcera and 30% of them show four or more ulceras, being the sacro and the heels the most usual places. There is an association between the patient's age, number of days staying in I.C.U. and diabetes and a higher incidence of ulceration. On the other hand, patients with politraumatisms diagnosis, infections and respiratory pathologies suffer from ulcera more than others. There is a clear association between the time of staying without postural changes and the incidence of ulceration. The same thing happens with the high risk stay. Our population is over 61% of I.C.U. stay in high risk, and its incidence of ulceration is 21%. Comparing both parametres we obtain an idea of the prevention which nursing professionals perform. PMID:8715359

  19. Conflicts in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wujtewicz, Maria; Wujtewicz, Magdalena Anna; Owczuk, Radosław

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts in intensive care units (ICUs) are common and concern all professional groups, patients and their families. Both intra- and inter-team conflicts occur. The most common conflicts occur between nurses and physicians, followed by those within nursing teams and between ICU personnel and family members. The main causes of conflicts are considered to be unsatisfactory quality of the information provided, inappropriate ways of communication and improper approach towards treatment of patients. ICU conflicts can have serious consequences not only for families but also for patients, physicians, nurses and wider society. Lack of communication among ICU teams is likely to impair cooperation and ICU team-family contacts. From the point of view of patients and their families, communication skills, as one of the factors affecting the satisfaction of families with treatment, are essential to ensure high quality of ICU treatment. While conflicts are generally unfavourable, they can also have positive implications for the parties involved, depending on their prevalence and management, as well as the community they concern. PMID:26401743

  20. [Volume replacement in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Nohé, B; Ploppa, A; Schmidt, V; Unertl, K

    2011-05-01

    Volume substitution represents an essential component of intensive care medicine. The amount of fluid administered, the composition and the timing of volume replacement seem to affect the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. Although restrictive volume strategies bear the risk of tissue hypoperfusion and tissue hypoxia in hemodynamically unstable patients liberal strategies favour the development of avoidable hypervolemia with edema and resultant organ dysfunction. However, neither strategy has shown a consistent benefit. In order to account for the heavily varying oxygen demand of critically ill patients, a goal-directed, demand-adapted volume strategy is proposed. Using this strategy, volume replacement should be aligned to the need to restore tissue perfusion and the evidence of volume responsiveness. As the efficiency of volume resuscitation for correction of tissue hypoxia is time-dependent, preload optimization should be completed in the very first hours. Whether colloids or crystalloids are more suitable for this purpose is still controversially discussed. Nevertheless, a temporally limited use of colloids during the initial stage of tissue hypoperfusion appears to represent a strategy which uses the greater volume effect during hypovolemia while minimizing the risks for adverse reactions. PMID:21350879

  1. Sedation in the intensive care setting

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Christopher G; McGrane, Stuart; Pandharipande, Pratik P

    2012-01-01

    Critically ill patients are routinely provided analgesia and sedation to prevent pain and anxiety, permit invasive procedures, reduce stress and oxygen consumption, and improve synchrony with mechanical ventilation. Regional preferences, patient history, institutional bias, and individual patient and practitioner variability, however, create a wide discrepancy in the approach to sedation of critically ill patients. Untreated pain and agitation increase the sympathetic stress response, potentially leading to negative acute and long-term consequences. Oversedation, however, occurs commonly and is associated with worse clinical outcomes, including longer time on mechanical ventilation, prolonged stay in the intensive care unit, and increased brain dysfunction (delirium and coma). Modifying sedation delivery by incorporating analgesia and sedation protocols, targeted arousal goals, daily interruption of sedation, linked spontaneous awakening and breathing trials, and early mobilization of patients have all been associated with improvements in patient outcomes and should be incorporated into the clinical management of critically ill patients. To improve outcomes, including time on mechanical ventilation and development of acute brain dysfunction, conventional sedation paradigms should be altered by providing necessary analgesia, incorporating propofol or dexmedetomidine to reach arousal targets, and reducing benzodiazepine exposure. PMID:23204873

  2. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Serra, Gregorio; Stronati, Mauro; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued use of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in the setting of negative cultures especially in preterm infants may not be harmless.The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued use of antibiotics without any microbiological justification is dangerous and only leads to adverse events. The purpose of this review is to highlight the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the NICUs, to exam the impact of antibiotic treatment in preterm infants with negative cultures and to summarize existing knowledge regarding the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agents and optimal duration of therapy in neonates with suspected or culture-proven sepsis in order to prevent serious consequences. PMID:25887621

  3. Tissue oximetry in anaesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Biedrzycka, Aleksandra; Lango, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Conventional monitoring during surgery and intensive care is not sufficiently sensitive to detect acute changes in vital organs perfusion, while its good quality is critical for maintaining their function. Disturbed vital organ perfusion may lead to the development of postoperative complications, including neurological sequel and renal failure. Near-infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) represents one of up-to-date techniques of patient monitoring which is commonly used for the assessment of brain oximetry in thoracic aorta surgery, and - increasingly more often -in open-heart surgery. Algorithms for maintaining adequate brain saturation may result in a decrease of neurological complications and cognitive dysfunction following cardiac surgery. The assessment of kidney and visceral perfusion with tissue oximetry is gaining increasing interest during pediatric cardiac surgery. Attempts at decreasing complications by the use of brain oximetry during carotid endarterectomy, as well as thoracic and abdominal surgery demonstrated conflicting results. In recent years NIRS technique was proposed as a tool for muscle perfusion assessment under short term ischemia and reperfusion, referred to as vascular occlusion test (VOT). This monitoring extension allows for the identification of early disturbances in tissue perfusion. Results of recent studies utilizing VOT suggest that the muscle saturation decrease rate is reduced in septic shock patients, while decreased speed of saturation recovery on reperfusion is related to disturbed microcirculation. Being non-invasive and feasible technique, NIRS offers an improvement of preoperative risk assessment in cardiac surgery and promises more comprehensive intraoperative and ICU patient monitoring allowing for better outcome. PMID:26966109

  4. Perioperative care of the morbidly obese patient in the lithotomy position.

    PubMed

    Bennicoff, Geraldine

    2010-09-01

    The lithotomy position is used daily in the OR to position patients for vaginal, rectal, and urologic procedures. Use of this position requires a careful nursing assessment to ensure that the patient can tolerate having his or her legs placed in the stirrups and to ensure that no pressure points exist for the duration of the surgery. Caring for a patient who is morbidly obese and who requires surgery in the lithotomy position can be especially challenging, and the possibility of injury to the patient or staff members should be considered. A case study involving the care of a patient who weighed almost 600 lb undergoing surgery in the lithotomy position demonstrates ways to provide safe care for this type of challenging patient. PMID:20816103

  5. New additions to the intensive care armamentarium.

    PubMed

    Rice, Todd W; Bernard, Gordon R

    2004-02-01

    Many advances have improved the care of critically ill patients, but only a few have been through the use of pharmaceutical agents. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drotrecogin alfa (activated), or recombinant human activated protein C, for the treatment of patients with a high risk of death from severe sepsis. Drotrecogin alfa (activated) has antiinflammatory, antithrombotic and fibrinolytic properties. When given as a continuous intravenous infusion, recombinant human activated protein C decreases absolute mortality of severely septic patients by 6.1%, resulting in a 19.4% relative reduction in mortality. The absolute reduction in mortality increases to 13% if the population treated is restricted to patients with an APACHE II score greater than 24, as suggested by the FDA. The most frequent and serious side effect is bleeding. Severe bleeds increased from 2% in patients given placebo to 3.5% in patients receiving drotrecogin alfa (activated). The risk of bleeding was only increased during the actual infusion time of the drug, and the bleeding risk returned to placebo levels 24 hours after the infusion was discontinued. Patients treated in the intensive care unit frequently develop anemia, usually severe enough to require at least one transfusion of red blood cells. With the recent discovery of the harmful effects of allogeneic red blood cell transfusions and the increasing shortage of available red blood cell products, emphasis has been placed on minimizing transfusions. Patients who receive exogenous recombinant human erythropoietin maintain higher hemoglobin levels, in spite of requiring fewer transfusions during their stay in the intensive care unit. Recombinant human erythropoietin appears to be effective whether it is given as 300 units/kg of body weight subcutaneously every other day or as 40,000 units subcutaneously every week. Differences in hemoglobin values were not apparent until at least one week of therapy, but they

  6. Acquired Muscle Weakness in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Nosology, Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Hassan; Moreno-Duarte, Ingrid; Latronico, Nicola; Zafonte, Ross; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is common in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU). Low muscle mass at ICU admission is a significant predictor of adverse outcomes. The consequences of ICU-acquired muscle weakness depend on the underlying mechanism. Temporary drug-induced weakness when properly managed may not affect outcome. Severe perioperative acquired weakness that is associated with adverse outcomes (prolonged mechanical ventilation, increases in ICU length of stay, and mortality) occurs with persistent (time frame: days) activation of protein degradation pathways, decreases in the drive to the skeletal muscle, and impaired muscular homeostasis. ICU-acquired muscle weakness can be prevented by early treatment of the underlying disease, goal-directed therapy, restrictive use of immobilizing medications, optimal nutrition, activating ventilatory modes, early rehabilitation, and preventive drug therapy. In this article, the authors review the nosology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and prevention of ICU-acquired weakness in surgical ICU patients. PMID:26445385

  7. Does the presence of oral care guidelines affect oral care delivery by intensive care unit nurses? A survey of Saudi intensive care unit nurses.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Ahmed K; Alshayiqi, Mohammed; Ramalingam, Sundar

    2014-08-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients rely on nurses for their oral care needs, signifying the importance of nurses in intensive care units (ICUs). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of oral care guidelines on the oral care delivered to mechanically ventilated patients by ICU nurses. A total of 215 nurses were enrolled. Demographic data and oral care practices were recorded through a self-administered survey. Participants governed by oral care guidelines had significantly higher oral care practice scores than their counterparts from ICUs without similar guidelines (P = .034; t = 2.13). Oral care guidelines in ICUs can contribute to reduction of morbidity and mortality caused by ventilator-associated pneumonia. PMID:25087146

  8. A call for new standard of care in perioperative gynecologic oncology practice: Impact of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs.

    PubMed

    Miralpeix, Ester; Nick, Alpa M; Meyer, Larissa A; Cata, Juan; Lasala, Javier; Mena, Gabriel E; Gottumukkala, Vijaya; Iniesta-Donate, Maria; Salvo, Gloria; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2016-05-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs aim to hasten functional recovery and improve postoperative outcomes. However, there is a paucity of data on ERAS programs in gynecologic surgery. We reviewed the published literature on ERAS programs in colorectal surgery, general gynecologic surgery, and gynecologic oncology surgery to evaluate the impact of such programs on outcomes, and to identify key elements in establishing a successful ERAS program. ERAS programs are associated with shorter length of hospital stay, a reduction in overall health care costs, and improvements in patient satisfaction. We suggest an ERAS program for gynecologic oncology practice involving preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative strategies including; preadmission counseling, avoidance of preoperative bowel preparation, use of opioid-sparing multimodal perioperative analgesia (including loco-regional analgesia), intraoperative goal-directed fluid therapy (GDT), and use of minimally invasive surgical techniques with avoidance of routine use of nasogastric tube, drains and/or catheters. Postoperatively, it is important to encourage early feeding, early mobilization, timely removal of tubes and drains, if present, and function oriented multimodal analgesia regimens. Successful implementation of an ERAS program requires a multidisciplinary team effort and active participation of the patient in their goal-oriented functional recovery program. However, future outcome studies should evaluate the efficacy of an intervention within the pathway, include objective measures of symptom burden and control, study measures of functional recovery, and quantify outcomes of the program in relation to the rates of adherence to the key elements of care in gynecologic oncology such as oncologic outcomes and return to intended oncologic therapy (RIOT). PMID:26906066

  9. Healthcare assistants in the children's intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    King, Peter; Crawford, Doreen

    2009-02-01

    Recruiting and retaining qualified nurses for children's intensive care units is becoming more difficult because of falling numbers of recruits into the child branch and inadequate educational planning and provision. Meeting the staffing challenge and maintaining the quality of children's intensive care services requires flexible and creative approaches, including considered evolution of the role of healthcare assistants. Evidence from adult services indicates that the addition of healthcare assistants to the intensive care team can benefit patient care. The evolution of the healthcare assistant role to support provision of safe, effective care in the children's intensive care setting requires a comprehensive strategy to ensure that appropriate education, training and supervision are in place. Career development pathways need to be in place and role accountability clearly defined at the different stages of the pathway. Experience in one unit in Glasgow suggests that healthcare assistants make a valuable contribution to the care of critically ill children and young people. PMID:19266786

  10. Cost of intensive care in India

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Raja; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2008-01-01

    Critical care is often described as expensive care. However, standardized methodology that would enable determination and international comparisons of cost is currently lacking. This article attempts to review this important issue and develop a framework through which cost of critical care in India could be analyzed. PMID:19742248

  11. Inpatient Transfers to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael P; Gooder, Valerie J; McBride, Karen; James, Brent; Fisher, Elliott S

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine if delayed transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) after physiologic deterioration is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. DESIGN Inception cohort. SETTING Community hospital in Ogden, Utah. PATIENTS Ninety-one consecutive inpatients with noncardiac diagnoses at the time of emergent transfer to the ICU. We determined the time when each patient first met any of 11 pre-specified physiologic criteria. We classified patients as “slow transfer” when patients met a physiologic criterion 4 or more hours before transfer to the ICU. Patients were followed until discharge. INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS In-hospital mortality, functional status at hospital discharge, hospital resources. MAIN RESULTS At the time when the first physiologic criterion was met on the ward, slow- and rapid-transfer patients were similar in terms of age, gender, diagnosis, number of days in hospital prior to ICU transfer, prehospital functional status, and APACHE II scores. By the time slow-transfer patients were admitted to the ICU, they had significantly higher APACHE II scores (21.7 vs 16.2; P = .002) and were more likely to die in-hospital (41% vs 11%; relative risk [RR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 9.5). Slow-transfer patients were less likely to have had their physician notified of deterioration within 2 hours of meeting physiologic criteria (59% vs 31%; P = .001) and less likely to have had a bedside physician evaluation within the first 3 hours after meeting criteria (23% vs 83%; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS Slow transfer to the ICU of physiologically defined high-risk hospitalized patients was associated with increased risk of death. Slow response to physiologic deterioration may explain these findings. PMID:12542581

  12. An analysis of methodologies that can be used to validate if a perioperative surgical home improves the patient-centeredness, evidence-based practice, quality, safety, and value of patient care.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Thomas R; Ivankova, Nataliya V; Goeddel, Lee A; McGwin, Gerald; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 80 million inpatient and outpatient surgeries are performed annually in the United States. Widely variable and fragmented perioperative care exposes these surgical patients to lapses in expected standard of care, increases the chance for operational mistakes and accidents, results in unnecessary and potentially detrimental care, needlessly drives up costs, and adversely affects the patient healthcare experience. The American Society of Anesthesiologists and other stakeholders have proposed a more comprehensive model of perioperative care, the Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH), to improve current care of surgical patients and to meet the future demands of increased volume, quality standards, and patient-centered care. To justify implementation of this new healthcare delivery model to surgical colleagues, administrators, and patients and maintain the integrity of evidenced-based practice, the nascent PSH model must be rigorously evaluated. This special article proposes comparative effectiveness research aims or objectives and an optimal study design for the novel PSH model. PMID:24005578

  13. Intelligence Care: A Nursing Care Strategy in Respiratory Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Saadat, Soheil; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Working in respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) is multidimensional that requires nurses with special attributes to involve with the accountability of the critically ill patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the appropriate nursing care strategy in the RICU in order to unify and coordinate the nursing care in special atmosphere of the RICU. Materials and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted on 23 health care providers working in the RICU of Sina and Shariati hospitals affiliated to Tehran university of medical sciences and the RICU of Baqiyatallah university of medical sciences from August 2012 to the end of July 2013. In addition to in-depth semistructured interviews, uninterrupted observations, field notes, logs, patient’s reports and documents were used. Information saturation was determined as an interview termination criterion. Results: Intelligence care emerged as a main theme, has a broad spectrum of categories and subcategories with bridges and barriers, including equality of bridges and barriers (contingency care, forced oriented task); bridges are more than barriers (human-center care, innovative care, cultural care, participatory care, feedback of nursing services, therapeutic-professional communication, specialized and independent care, and independent nurse practice), and barriers are higher than bridges (personalized care, neglecting to provide proper care, ineffectiveness of supportive caring wards, futility care, nurse burnout, and nonethical-nonprofessional communications). Conclusions: Intelligence care is a comprehensive strategy that in addition to recognizing barriers and bridges of nursing care, with predisposing and precipitating forces it can convert barriers to bridges. PMID:26734480

  14. Insulin therapy in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit. Insulin therapy has emerged in adult intensive care units, and several pediatric studies are currently being conducted. This review discusses hyperglycemia and the effects of insulin on metabolic a...

  15. Considerations for emergencies & disasters in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Ronni; Pouletsos, Cheryl; Combs, Adriann

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines outside principles of emergency and disaster planning for neonatal intensive care units and includes resources available to organizations to support planning and education, and considerations for nurses developing hospital-specific neonatal intensive care unit disaster plans. Hospital disaster preparedness programs and unit-specific policies and procedures are essential in facilitating an effective response to major incidents or disasters, whether they are man-made or natural. All disasters place extraordinary stress on existing resources, systems, and personnel. If nurses in neonatal intensive care units work collaboratively to identify essential services in disasters, the result could be safer care for vulnerable patients. PMID:18664900

  16. Nosocomial infections in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Baltimore, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Nosocomial (hospital-acquired) infections are a major complication of serious illnesses. Severely ill patients have a greater risk of acquiring nosocomial infections, so this problem is greatest in intensive care units. Studies have demonstrated that nosocomial infections are largely preventable. Adherence to recommended techniques for patient care will have the greatest benefit in the intensive care unit. In this paper the background epidemiology of nosocomial infections is reviewed and related to pediatrics and intensive care units. Types of diseases, assistance equipment, and monitoring devices which are associated with a high risk of nosocomial infections are emphasized and specific steps for lowering this risk are listed. PMID:6382835

  17. Nursing workload in public and private intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lilia de Souza; Koike, Karina Mitie; Sardinha, Débora Souza; Padilha, Katia Grillo; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study sought to compare patients at public and private intensive care units according to the nursing workload and interventions provided. Methods This retrospective, comparative cohort study included 600 patients admitted to 4 intensive care units in São Paulo. The nursing workload and interventions were assessed using the Nursing Activities Score during the first and last 24 hours of the patient's stay at the intensive care unit. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, the Mann-Whitney test, and Student's t test were used to compare the patient groups. Results The average Nursing Activities Score upon admission to the intensive care unit was 61.9, with a score of 52.8 upon discharge. Significant differences were found among the patients at public and private intensive care units relative to the average Nursing Activities Score upon admission, as well as for 12 out of 23 nursing interventions performed during the first 24 hours of stay at the intensive care units. The patients at the public intensive care units exhibited a higher average score and overall more frequent nursing interventions, with the exception of those involved in the "care of drains", "mobilization and positioning", and "intravenous hyperalimentation". The groups also differed with regard to the evolution of the Nursing Activities Score among the total case series as well as the groups of survivors from the time of admission to discharge from the intensive care unit. Conclusion Patients admitted to public and private intensive care units exhibit differences in their nursing care demands, which may help managers with nursing manpower planning. PMID:24213086

  18. Perioperative management of severe anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Hirose, M; Tanaka, K; Kawahito, S; Tamaki, T; Oshita, S

    2014-02-01

    As the prevalence of anorexia nervosa (AN) increased, surgery in severe AN patients also increased in the 2000s. We experienced a surgical case of a patient with severe AN, showing an extremely low BMI of 8.6 kg m(-2). We investigated the problems associated with this case and propose criteria to manage severe AN. We endeavour to report on the perioperative management of rare and severe symptoms and surgical indications of severely malnourished patients. All published reports were identified through comprehensive searches using PubMed, BioMedLib, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society with the following terms and keywords: 'anorexia nervosa', 'eating disorder', 'hypoglycaemia', 'leucocytopaenia', 'gelatinous bone marrow', 'surgery', and 'operation'. In cases of AN with a BMI under 13 kg m(-2), marked hypoglycaemia, leucocytopaenia <3.0×10(9) litre(-1), or both, potentially fatal complications frequently occur. Accordingly, patients need strict nutritional support to avoid re-feeding syndrome until surgery. During the course of anaesthesia, careless loading of glucose or catecholamine may lead to disturbance of electrolytes or fatal arrhythmia. Intensive care and early feeding as soon as possible after surgery are important to prevent surgical site infection. Although not many perioperative cases of AN have been reported, clinicians must be aware of the danger and the causes of mortality in critical cases. Thus, the decision to undertake surgery must be taken carefully and close perioperative coordination among physicians, surgeons, psychiatrists, anaesthesiologists, and intensivists is essential. PMID:24366724

  19. [The coma awakening unit, between intensive care and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Mimouni, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    After intensive care and before classic neurological rehabilitation is possible, patients in an altered state of consciousness are cared for at early stages in so-called coma awakening units. The care involves, on the one hand, the complex support of the patient's awakening from coma as a neurological and existential process, and on the other, support for their families. PMID:26365640

  20. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth. PMID:17242604

  1. Acute kidney injury in the perioperative period and in intensive care units (excluding renal replacement therapies).

    PubMed

    Ichai, Carole; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Souweine, Bertrand; Armando, Fabien; Canet, Emmanuel; Clec'h, Christophe; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Darmon, Michaël; Duranteau, Jacques; Gaillot, Théophille; Garnier, Arnaud; Jacob, Laurent; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; Juillard, Laurent; Journois, Didier; Lautrette, Alexandre; Muller, Laurent; Legrand, Matthieu; Lerolle, Nicolas; Rimmelé, Thomas; Rondeau, Eric; Tamion, Fabienne; Walrave, Yannick; Velly, Lionel

    2016-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a syndrome that has progressed a great deal over the last 20 years. The decrease in urine output and the increase in classical renal biomarkers, such as blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, have largely been used as surrogate markers for decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which defines AKI. However, using such markers of GFR as criteria for diagnosing AKI has several limits including the difficult diagnosis of non-organic AKI, also called "functional renal insufficiency" or "pre-renal insufficiency". This situation is characterized by an oliguria and an increase in creatininemia as a consequence of a reduction in renal blood flow related to systemic haemodynamic abnormalities. In this situation, "renal insufficiency" seems rather inappropriate as kidney function is not impaired. On the contrary, the kidney delivers an appropriate response aiming to recover optimal systemic physiological haemodynamic conditions. Considering the kidney as insufficient is erroneous because this suggests that it does not work correctly, whereas the opposite is occurring, because the kidney is healthy even in a threatening situation. With current definitions of AKI, normalization of volaemia is needed before defining AKI in order to avoid this pitfall. PMID:27230984

  2. [Long-haul intensive care transports by air].

    PubMed

    Graf, Jürgen; Seiler, Olivier; Pump, Stefan; Günther, Marion; Albrecht, Roland

    2013-03-01

    The need for inter-hospital transports over long distances aboard air ambulances or airlines has increased in recent years, both in the civil as well as the military sector. More often severely ill intensive care patients with multiple organ failure and appropriate supportive care (e.g. mechanical ventilation, catecholamines, dialysis, cardiac assist devices) are transported by air. Despite the fact that long-haul intensive care transports by air ambulance and airlines via Patient Transport Compartment (PTC) are considered established modes of transport they always provide a number of challenges. Both modes of transport have distinct logistical and medical advantages and disadvantages. These-as well as the principal risks of an air-bound long-haul intensive care transport -have to be included in the risk assessment and selection of means of transport. Very often long-haul intensive care transports are a combination of air ambulance and scheduled airlines utilizing the PTC. PMID:23504461

  3. Spinal dysraphisms in the parturient: implications for perioperative anaesthetic care and labour analgesia.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C J; Stanley, E; Kavanagh, E; Lenane, P E; McCaul, C L

    2015-08-01

    Anaesthetists may encounter parturients with a spectrum of anatomical and functional abnormalities secondary to spinal dysraphisms, which are among the most common neurodevelopmental anomalies. These range from surgically corrected open dysraphisms to previously undiagnosed closed dysraphisms. Both bony and neural structures may be abnormal. In true bony spina bifida, which occurs in up to 50% of the population, failure of fusion of the vertebral arch is seen and neural structures are normal. Ninety percent of such cases are confined to the sacrum. In open dysraphisms, sensory preservation is variable and may be present even in those with grossly impaired motor function. Both epidural and spinal blockade have been described for labour analgesia and operative anaesthesia in selected cases but higher failure and complication rates are reported. Clinical assessment should be performed on an outpatient basis to assess neurological function, evaluate central nervous system shunts and determine latex allergy status. Magnetic resonance imagining is recommended to clarify anatomical abnormalities and to identify levels at which neuraxial techniques can be performed. Of particular concern when performing neuraxial blockade is the possibility of a low-lying spinal cord or conus medullaris and spinal cord tethering. Previous corrective de-tethering surgery frequently does not result in ascent of the conus and re-tethering may be asymptomatic. Ultrasound is not sufficiently validated at the point of care to reliably detect low-lying cords. Epidurals should be performed at anatomically normal levels but spread of local anaesthetic may be impaired by previous surgery. PMID:26072279

  4. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. Method: descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. Results: the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. Conclusion: the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization. PMID:26487133

  5. [Care grading in Intensive Medicine: Intermediate Care Units].

    PubMed

    Castillo, F; López, J M; Marco, R; González, J A; Puppo, A M; Murillo, F

    2007-01-01

    Intermediate Care Units are created for patients who predictably have low risk of requiring therapeutic life support measures but who require more monitoring and nursing cares than those received in the conventional hospitalization wards. Previous studies have demonstrated that Intermediate Care Units may promote hospital care grading, allowing for better classification in critical patients, improving efficacy and efficiency of the ICUs and thus decreasing costs and above all mortality in the conventional hospitalization wards. This document attempts to group the currently existing knowledge that served as a base for the consensus meeting on the application of them in the establishment of future ICUs in our hospital setting. PMID:17306139

  6. [Asthma in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Bautista Bautista, Edgar Gildardo

    2009-01-01

    All asthma patients are at risk of suffering an asthma attack in the course of their life, which can eventually be fatal. Hospitalizations and attention at critical care services are a fundamental aspect of patient care in asthma, which invests a significant percentage of economic contributions to society as a whole does, therefore it is particularly important establish plans for prevention, treatment education and rationalization in the primary care level to stabilize the disease and reduce exacerbations. The severity of exacerbations can range from mild to crisis fatal or potentially fatal asthma; there is a fundamental link between mortality and inadequate assessment of the severity of the patient, which results in inadequate treatment for their condition. PMID:20873061

  7. Telemedicine in the intensive care unit: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Corey; D'Ambrosio, Carolyn

    2015-04-01

    Critical care medicine is at a crossroads in which limited numbers of staff care for increasing numbers of patients as the population ages and use of ICUs increases. Also at this time health care spending must be curbed. The high-intensity intensivist staffing model has been linked to improved mortality, complications, and costs. Tele-ICU uses technology to implement this high-intensity staffing model in areas that are relatively underserved. When implemented correctly and in the right populations this technology has improved outcomes. Future studies regarding implementation, organization, staffing, and innovation are needed to determine the optimal use of this critical care professional enhanced technology. PMID:25814449

  8. Cost-analysis of neonatal intensive and special care.

    PubMed

    Tudehope, D I; Lee, W; Harris, F; Addison, C

    1989-04-01

    In the present economic climate and with increasing expenditure on neonatal intensive care, there has been a demand for economic evaluation and justification of neonatal intensive care programmes. This study assesses the inhospital costs of neonatal intensive care. Fixed and variable costs were calculated for services and uses of an Intensive/Special Care Nursery for the year 1985 and corrected to 1987 Australian dollar equivalents. Establishing a new neonatal intensive care unit of 43 costs in an existing hospital with available floor space including operating costs for a year were estimated in Australian dollars for 1987 at $6,408,000. Daily costs per baby for each were $1282 ventilator, $481 intensive, $293 transitional and $287 recovery, respectively. The cost per survivor managed in the Intensive/Special Care Nursery in 1985 showed the expected inverse relationship to birthweight being $2400 for greater than 2500 g, $4050 for 2000-2500 g, $9200 for 1500-1999 g, $23,900 for 1000-1499 g and $63,450 for less than 1000 g. Further analysis for extremely low birthweight infants managed in 1986 and 1987 demonstrated costs per survivor of $128,400 for infants less than 800 g birthweight and $43,950 for those 800-999 g. This methodology might serve as a basis for further accounting and cost-evaluation exercises. PMID:2735885

  9. Predictors of Prolonged Stay in the Intensive Care Unit following Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Eltheni, Rokeia; Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Brokalaki, Hero; Galanis, Petros; Nenekidis, Ioannis; Fildissis, George

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of intensive care unit length of stay (ICU-LOS) could contribute to more efficient ICU resources' allocation and better planning of care among cardiac surgery patients. The aim of this study was to identify the preoperative and intraoperative predictors for prolonged cardiac surgery ICU-LOS. An observational cohort study was conducted among 150 consecutive patients, who were admitted to the cardiac surgery ICU of a tertiary hospital of Athens, Greece from September 2010 to January 2011. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that patients with increased creatinine levels preoperatively (odds ratio (OR) 3.0, P = 0.049), history of atrial fibrillation (AF) (OR 6.3, P = 0.012) and high EuroSCORE values (OR 2.6, P = 0.017) had a significant greater probability to stay in the ICU for more than 2 days. In addition, intraoperative hyperglycemia (OR 3.0, P = 0.004) was strongly associated with longer ICU-LOS. In conclusion, the high perioperative risk, the history of AF and renal dysfunction, and the intraoperative hyperglycemia are significant predictors of prolonged ICU stay. The early identification of patients at risk could allow the efficient ICU resources' allocation and the reduction of healthcare costs. This would contribute to nursing care planning depending on the availability of healthcare personnel and ICU bed capacity. PMID:22919512

  10. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. Methods This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p < 0.05. Results The mean ages of patients were 55.63 ± 13.58 years in the coronary intensive care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “being bored”. For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “not being able to communicate”. The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. “Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed” was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, “hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises” and “hearing people talk about you” were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). Conclusion The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients

  11. [Pain, delirium and sedation in intensive unit care].

    PubMed

    Mazul-Sunko, Branka; Brozović, Gordana; Goranović, Tatjana

    2012-03-01

    Delirium is a complication of intensive care treatment associated with permanent cognitive decline and increased mortality after hospital discharge. In several studies, postoperative pain was found as a possible precipitating factor. Aggressive pain treatment is part of current multicompartment protocols for delirium prevention after hip fracture. Protocol based sedation, pain and delirium management in intensive care units have been shown to have clinical and economic advantages. PMID:23088085

  12. Clinical Risk Assessment in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Asefzadeh, Saeed; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Nikpey, Ahmad; Atighechian, Golrokh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin's Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital) through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG) performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN) was in respiratory care “Ventilator's alarm malfunction (no alarm)” with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal “not washing the NG-Tube” with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care. PMID:23930171

  13. [Specialized neurological neurosurgical intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Kuramatsu, J B; Huttner, H B; Schwab, S

    2016-06-01

    In Germany dedicated neurological-neurosurgical critical care (NCC) is the fastest growing specialty and one of the five big disciplines integrated within the German critical care society (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin; DIVI). High-quality investigations based on resilient evidence have underlined the need for technical advances, timely optimization of therapeutic procedures, and multidisciplinary team-work to treat those critically ill patients. This evolution has repeatedly raised questions, whether NCC-units should be run independently or better be incorporated within multidisciplinary critical care units, whether treatment variations exist that impact clinical outcome, and whether nowadays NCC-units can operate cost-efficiently? Stroke is the most frequent disease entity treated on NCC-units, one of the most common causes of death in Germany leading to a great socio-economic burden due to long-term disabled patients. The main aim of NCC employs surveillance of structural and functional integrity of the central nervous system as well as the avoidance of secondary brain damage. However, clinical evaluation of these severely injured commonly sedated and mechanically ventilated patients is challenging and highlights the importance of neuromonitoring to detect secondary damaging mechanisms. This multimodal strategy not only requires medical expertise but also enforces the need for specialized teams consisting of qualified nurses, technical assistants and medical therapists. The present article reviews most recent data and tries to answer the aforementioned questions. PMID:27206707

  14. Intensive care outcomes in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Nates, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    Although outcomes of intensive care for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have improved in the last two decades, the short-term mortality still remains above 50% among allogeneic HSCT patients. Better selection of HSCT patients for intensive care, and consequently reduction of non-beneficial care, may reduce financial costs and alleviate patient suffering. We reviewed the studies on intensive care outcomes of patients undergoing HSCT published since 2000. The risk factors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission identified in this report were primarily patient and transplant related: HSCT type (autologous vs allogeneic), conditioning intensity, HLA mismatch, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At the same time, most of the factors associated with ICU outcomes reported were related to the patients’ functional status upon development of critical illness and interventions in ICU. Among the many possible interventions, the initiation of mechanical ventilation was the most consistently reported factor affecting ICU survival. As a consequence, our current ability to assess the benefit or futility of intensive care is limited. Until better ICU or hospital mortality prediction models are available, based on the available evidence, we recommend practitioners to base their ICU admission decisions on: Patient pre-transplant comorbidities, underlying disease status, GVHD diagnosis/grade, and patients’ functional status at the time of critical illness. PMID:26862493

  15. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness in the burn population.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Davies, Menna; Lye, George; Evans, Janine; Combellack, Tom; Dickson, William; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2016-05-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness is an evolving problem in the burn population. As patients are surviving injuries that previously would have been fatal, the focus of treatment is shifting from survival to long-term outcome. The rehabilitation of burn patients can be challenging; however, a certain subgroup of patients have worse outcomes than others. These patients may suffer from intensive care unit-acquired weakness, and their treatment, physiotherapy and expectations need to be adjusted accordingly. This study investigates the condition of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in our burn centre. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all the admissions to our burn centre between 2008 and 2012 and identified 22 patients who suffered from intensive care unit-acquired weakness. These patients were significantly younger with significantly larger burns than those without intensive care unit-acquired weakness. The known risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired weakness are commonplace in the burn population. The recovery of these patients is significantly affected by their weakness. PMID:26975787

  16. Supporting families of dying patients in the intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad Reza; Norouzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Family support in the intensive care units is a challenge for nurses who take care of dying patients. This article aimed to determine the Iranian nurses' experience of supporting families in end-of-life care. Using grounded theory methodology, 23 critical care nurses were interviewed. The theme of family support was extracted and divided into 5 categories: death with dignity; facilitate visitation; value orientation; preparing; and distress. With implementation of family support approaches, family-centered care plans will be realized in the standard framework. PMID:25099985

  17. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  18. Coping with Poor Prognosis in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, David A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The intensive care pediatrician who prophesies to parents that their child's illness is irreversible may encounter denial and hostility. Four cases are reported in which parents rejected their child's hopeless prognosis, counterprophesied miraculous cures, resolved to obtain exorcism, criticized the care, or accused nurses of neglect. Journal…

  19. Receiving family of a patient in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Clavagnier, Isabelle

    2012-10-01

    Pierre is currently working in the intensive care unit (ICU). The rules for visitors are strict. Visiting time is short and only two persons are allowed at a time, in the patient's ward. Standards of hygiene have to be respected carefully. This evening Pierre accompanies the husband of a Japanese tourist whose health is in a critical condition. PMID:23092085

  20. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  1. [The difficulties of staff retention in neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Deparis, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units attract nurses due to the technical and highly specific nature of the work. However, there is a high turnover in these departments. Work-related distress and the lack of team cohesion are the two main causes of this problem. Support from the health care manager is essential in this context. PMID:26183101

  2. [Measuring the sources of discomfort in patients in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Haubertin, Carole; Crozes, Fanny; Le Page, Melody; Seailles, Severine

    2016-05-01

    A study carried out in 2014 in a hospital focused on the sources of discomfort of patients in intensive care. Resulting in raised awareness across all disciplines, it has enabled the actions to be undertaken to improve professional practices to be prioritised, in a culture of compassionate care. PMID:27157560

  3. [The organization of a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit].

    PubMed

    Barnay, Claire; Luauté, Jacques; Tell, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    When a patient is admitted to a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit, the functional outcome is the main objective of the care. The motivation of the team relies on strong cohesion between professionals. Personalised support provides a heightened observation of the patient's progress. Listening and sharing favour a relationship of trust between the patient, the team and the families. PMID:26365639

  4. Multimedia abstract generation of intensive care data: the automation of clinical processes through AI methodologies.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Desmond; Rose, Sydney E

    2010-04-01

    Medical errors from communication failures are enormous during the perioperative period of cardiac surgical patients. As caregivers change shifts or surgical patients change location within the hospital, key information is lost or misconstrued. After a baseline cognitive study of information need and caregiver workflow, we implemented an advanced clinical decision support tool of intelligent agents, medical logic modules, and text generators called the "Inference Engine" to summarize individual patient's raw medical data elements into procedural milestones, illness severity, and care therapies. The system generates two displays: 1) the continuum of care, multimedia abstract generation of intensive care data (MAGIC)-an expert system that would automatically generate a physician briefing of a cardiac patient's operative course in a multimodal format; and 2) the isolated point in time, "Inference Engine"-a system that provides a real-time, high-level, summarized depiction of a patient's clinical status. In our studies, system accuracy and efficacy was judged against clinician performance in the workplace. To test the automated physician briefing, "MAGIC," the patient's intraoperative course, was reviewed in the intensive care unit before patient arrival. It was then judged against the actual physician briefing and that given in a cohort of patients where the system was not used. To test the real-time representation of the patient's clinical status, system inferences were judged against clinician decisions. Changes in workflow and situational awareness were assessed by questionnaires and process evaluation. MAGIC provides 200% more information, twice the accuracy, and enhances situational awareness. This study demonstrates that the automation of clinical processes through AI methodologies yields positive results. PMID:20012610

  5. Intensive Care in India: The Indian Intensive Care Case Mix and Practice Patterns Study

    PubMed Central

    Divatia, Jigeeshu V.; Amin, Pravin R.; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Kapadia, Farhad N.; Todi, Subhash; Sahu, Samir; Govil, Deepak; Chawla, Rajesh; Kulkarni, Atul P.; Samavedam, Srinivas; Jani, Charu K.; Rungta, Narendra; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Mehta, Sujata; Venkataraman, Ramesh; Hegde, Ashit; Bande, BD; Dhanuka, Sanjay; Singh, Virendra; Tewari, Reshma; Zirpe, Kapil; Sathe, Prachee

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To obtain information on organizational aspects, case mix and practices in Indian Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Patients and Methods: An observational, 4-day point prevalence study was performed between 2010 and 2011 in 4209 patients from 124 ICUs. ICU and patient characteristics, and interventions were recorded for 24 h of the study day, and outcomes till 30 days after the study day. Data were analyzed for 4038 adult patients from 120 ICUs. Results: On the study day, mean age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were 54.1 ± 17.1 years, 17.4 ± 9.2 and 3.8 ± 3.6, respectively. About 46.4% patients had ≥1 organ failure. Nearly, 37% and 22.2% patients received mechanical ventilation (MV) and vasopressors or inotropes, respectively. Nearly, 12.2% patients developed an infection in the ICU. About 28.3% patients had severe sepsis or septic shock (SvSpSS) during their ICU stay. About 60.7% patients without infection received antibiotics. There were 546 deaths and 183 terminal discharges (TDs) from ICU (including left against medical advice or discharged on request), with ICU mortality 729/4038 (18.1%). In 1627 patients admitted within 24 h of the study day, the standardized mortality ratio was 0.67. The APACHE II and SOFA scores, public hospital ICUs, medical ICUs, inadequately equipped ICUs, medical admission, self-paying patient, presence of SvSpSS, acute respiratory failure or cancer, need for a fluid bolus, and MV were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: The high proportion of TDs and the association of public hospitals, self-paying patients, and inadequately equipped hospitals with mortality has important implications for critical care in India. PMID:27186054

  6. Preparing the Next Generation of Perioperative Nurses.

    PubMed

    Chappy, Sharon; Madigan, Patricia D; Doyle, Deborah S; Conradt, Laurie A; Tapio, Nathan C

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative nursing faces a workforce crisis. There are too few perioperative nurses entering the workforce to replace those who will reach retirement age. Further, the costs of orienting perioperative nurses is high, and turnover rates in the first year after graduation are significant. To address these issues, nursing leaders at Theda Clark Medical Center, Neenah, Wisconsin, and the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh College of Nursing partnered with local medical centers to form a precepted clinical immersion program intended to orient senior baccalaureate nursing students to the perioperative setting. The students were hired after graduation, and the cost savings for orienting each new employee was estimated at $16,000 to $25,000 per student. Other benefits include identifying students who are and are not a good fit for perioperative nursing. The collaboration of health care and academic leaders is one solution for addressing the perioperative nursing workforce crisis. PMID:26746037

  7. Candida Pneumonia in Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Ronny M.; Linssen, Catharina F.; Guion, Nele; van Mook, Walther N.; Bergmans, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    It has been questioned if Candida pneumonia exists as a clinical entity. Only histopathology can establish the definite diagnosis. Less invasive diagnostic strategies lack specificity and have been insufficiently validated. Scarcity of this pathomechanism and nonspecific clinical presentation make validation and the development of a clinical algorithm difficult. In the present study, we analyze whether Candida pneumonia exists in our critical care population. We used a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimen database that we have built in a structural diagnostic approach to ventilator-associated pneumonia for more than a decade consisting of 832 samples. Microbiological data were linked to clinical information and available autopsy data. We searched for critically ill patients with respiratory failure with no other microbiological or clinical explanation than exclusive presence of Candida species in BAL fluid. Five cases could be identified with Candida as the likely cause of pneumonia. PMID:25734099

  8. The knowledge of intensive care professionals about diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Lordani, Cláudia Regina Felicetti; Eckert, Raquel Goreti; Tozetto, Altevir Garcia; Lordani, Tarcísio Vitor Augusto; Duarte, Péricles Almeida Delfino

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the opinions and practices of intensive care professionals with regard to diarrhea in critically ill patients. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted among health care professionals working at three adult intensive care units. Participants responded individually to a self-administered questionnaire about their length of work experience in intensive care; the definition, characterization, and causes of diarrhea; types of records in the patient's medical record; and training received. Results A total of 78 professionals participated in this study, of whom 59.0% were nurse technicians, 25.7% were nurses, and 15.3% were physicians; 77.0% of them had worked in intensive care for over 1 year. Only 37.2% had received training on this topic. Half of the interviewees defined diarrhea as "liquid and/or pasty stools" regardless of frequency, while the other 50.0% defined diarrhea based on the increased number of daily bowel movements. The majority of them mentioned diet as the main cause of diarrhea, followed by "use of medications" (p<0.001). Distinct nutritional practices were observed among the analyzed professionals regarding episodes of diarrhea, such as discontinuing, maintaining, or reducing the volume of enteral nutrition; physicians reported that they do not routinely communicate the problem to other professionals (for example, to a nutritionist) and do not routinely record and quantify diarrhea events in patients' medical records. Conclusion Different opinions and practices were observed in intensive care professionals with regard to diarrhea. PMID:25295825

  9. Perioperative management of pediatric trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ivashkov, Yulia; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric trauma presents significant challenges to the anesthesia provider. This review describes the current trends in perioperative anesthetic management, including airway management, choice of anesthesia agents, and fluid administration. The review is based on the PubMed search of literature on perioperative care of severely injured children. PMID:23181208

  10. Intensive care unit telemedicine: review and consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Joseph; Krsek, Cathleen; Vermoch, Kathy; Matuszewski, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Intensive care unit telemedicine involves nurses and physicians located at a remote command center providing care to patients in multiple, scattered intensive care units via computer and telecommunication technology. The command center is equipped with a workstation that has multiple monitors displaying real-time patient vital signs, a complete electronic medical record, a clinical decision support tool, a high-resolution radiographic image viewer, and teleconferencing for every patient and intensive care unit room. In addition to communication functions, the video system can be used to view parameters on ventilator screens, infusion pumps, and other bedside equipment, as well as to visually assess patient conditions. The intensivist can conduct virtual rounds, communicate with on-site caregivers, and be alerted to important patient conditions automatically via software-monitored parameters. This article reviews the technology's background, status, significance, clinical literature, financial effect, implementation issues, and future developments. Recommendations from a University HealthSystem Consortium task force are also presented. PMID:17656728

  11. Identifying research priorities in anaesthesia and perioperative care: final report of the joint National Institute of Academic Anaesthesia/James Lind Alliance Research Priority Setting Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Boney, Oliver; Bell, Madeline; Bell, Natalie; Conquest, Ann; Cumbers, Marion; Drake, Sharon; Galsworthy, Mike; Gath, Jacqui; Grocott, Michael P W; Harris, Emma; Howell, Simon; Ingold, Anthony; Nathanson, Michael H; Pinkney, Thomas; Metcalf, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify research priorities for Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine. Design Prospective surveys and consensus meetings guided by an independent adviser. Setting UK. Participants 45 stakeholder organisations (25 professional, 20 patient/carer) affiliated as James Lind Alliance partners. Outcomes First ‘ideas-gathering’ survey: Free text research ideas and suggestions. Second ‘prioritisation’ survey: Shortlist of ‘summary’ research questions (derived from the first survey) ranked by respondents in order of priority. Final ‘top ten’: Agreed by consensus at a final prioritisation workshop. Results First survey: 1420 suggestions received from 623 respondents (49% patients/public) were refined into a shortlist of 92 ‘summary’ questions. Second survey: 1718 respondents each nominated up to 10 questions as research priorities. Top ten: The 25 highest-ranked questions advanced to the final workshop, where 23 stakeholders (13 professional, 10 patient/carer) agreed the 10 most important questions: ▸ What can we do to stop patients developing chronic pain after surgery? ▸ How can patient care around the time of emergency surgery be improved? ▸ What long-term harm may result from anaesthesia, particularly following repeated anaesthetics? ▸ What outcomes should we use to measure the ‘success’ of anaesthesia and perioperative care? ▸ How can we improve recovery from surgery for elderly patients? ▸ For which patients does regional anaesthesia give better outcomes than general anaesthesia? ▸ What are the effects of anaesthesia on the developing brain? ▸ Do enhanced recovery programmes improve short and long-term outcomes? ▸ How can preoperative exercise or fitness training, including physiotherapy, improve outcomes after surgery? ▸ How can we improve communication between the teams looking after patients throughout their surgical journey? Conclusions Almost 2000 stakeholders contributed their views

  12. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. Methods: This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers’s concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. Results: The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family’s respect and dignity (importance of families’ differences, recognizing families’ tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. Conclusion: The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit.  PMID:25349870

  13. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli; Valentin, Niels; Wagner, Kari

    2015-05-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics during the 1950s initiated a combination of clinical development and technical innovations. Blood gas analyses technology and interpretation in combination with improved positive pressure ventilators were developed in Scandinavia contributing to general and pediatric anesthesia and intensive care practice. Scandinavian specialist training and accreditation includes both anesthesia and intensive care. Although pediatric anesthesia/intensive care is not a separate specialty, an 'informal accreditation' for a specialist position is obtained after training. The pleasure of working in a relatively small group of devoted colleagues and staff has persisted from the pioneering years. It is still one of the most inspiring and pleasant gifts for those working in this demanding specialty. PMID:25641001

  14. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    PubMed

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care. PMID:26944066

  15. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Gupta, A; Singh, TK; Saxsena, A

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP. PMID:26955317

  16. Magic bullets in cardiac anesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Landoni, Giovanni; Ruggeri, Laura; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2012-06-01

    Even if the first quasi-randomized study in history was published in 1747, there is still a need for evidence-based medicine. In the specific field of cardiac anesthesia, there are few magic bullets (ie, drugs/techniques/strategies that might reduce perioperative mortality), and a recent international consensus conference attempted to list them all. In the absence of evidence-based medicine, medical decisions are made by eminence, experience, or physiopathologic reasoning. Even if increased or decreased mortality could be observed when administering almost every drug used in the current clinical context, if correctly studied, research is slowed by bureaucracy, which, together with ignorance, is indirectly killing thousands of patients per year. Patients should be fully aware of the reduced complication rates and the improved outcomes that occur in patients involved in randomized "researcher-driven" clinical trials, the so-called "Hawthorne effect." In conclusion, physicians have to do their best although they sometimes have little information. Their ability must counteract the lack of scientific evidences. Caring for critical patients involves making decisions based on realistic tradeoffs of clinical benefit and side effects, but too often these choices are made on the basis of extrapolations and educated guesses. PMID:22459929

  17. Severe hypernatremia associated catheter malposition in an intensive care patient.

    PubMed

    Silahli, Musa; Gökdemir, Mahmut; Duman, Enes; Gökmen, Zeynel

    2016-09-01

    We present a catheter related severe hypernatremia in a 2-month-old baby who was admitted to the pediatric intensive care. Imbalance of plasma sodium is commonly seen in pediatric intensive care patients. The water and sodium balance is a complex process. Especially, brain and kidneys are the most important organs that affect the water and sodium balance. Other mechanisms of the cellular structure include osmoreceptors, Na-K ATPase systems, and vasopressin. Hypernatremia is usually an iatrogenic condition in hospitalized patients due to mismanagement of water electrolyte imbalance. Central venous catheterization is frequently used in pediatric intensive care patients. Complications of central venous catheter placement still continue despite the usage of ultrasound guidance. Malposition of central venous catheter in the brain veins should be kept in mind as a rare cause of iatrogenic hypernatremia. PMID:27555161

  18. Environmental sustainability in the intensive care unit: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Huffling, Katie; Schenk, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In acute care practice sites, the intensive care unit (ICU) is one of the most resource-intense environments. Replete with energy-intensive equipment, significant waste production, and multiple toxic chemicals, ICUs contribute to environmental harm and may inadvertently have a negative impact on the health of patients, staff, and visitors. This article evaluates the ICU on four areas of environmental sustainability: energy, waste, toxic chemicals, and healing environment and provides concrete actions ICU nurses can take to decrease environmental health risks in the ICU. Case studies of nurses making changes within their hospital practice are also highlighted, as well as resources for nurses starting to make changes at their health care institutions. PMID:24896556

  19. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit1

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Büscher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care. METHOD: Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units. RESULTS: built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions); "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context); "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions); "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy) and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences). CONCLUSION: confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients". PMID:26155009

  20. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27399015

  1. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA. PMID:10169231

  2. [Do not resuscitate orders in the intensive care setting].

    PubMed

    Kleiren, P; Sohawon, S; Noordally, S O

    2010-01-01

    Even if Belgium (2002), The Netherlands (2002) and Luxemburg (2009) are the first three countries in the world to have legalized active euthanasia, there still is not a law on the do not resuscitate concept (NTBR or DNR). Nevertheless, numerous royal decrees and some consensus as well as advice given by the Belgian Medical Council, hold as jurisprudence. These rules remain amenable to change so as to suite the daily practice in intensive care units. This article describes the actual Belgian legal environment surrounding the intensive care specialist when he has to take such decisions. PMID:20687449

  3. Controversies and Misconceptions in Intensive Care Unit Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Michael H; Marik, Paul E

    2015-09-01

    The early initiation of enteral nutrition remains a fundamental component of the management of critically ill and injured patients in the intensive care unit. Trophic feeding is equivalent, if not superior, to full-dose feeding. Parenteral nutrition has no proved benefit over enteral nutrition, which is the preferred route of nutritional support in intensive care unit patients with a functional gastrointestinal tract. Continuous enteral and parental nutrition inhibits the release of important enterohormones. These changes are reversed with intermittent bolus feeding. Whey protein, which is high in leucine, has a greater effect on insulin release and protein synthesis than does a soy- or casein-based enteral formula. PMID:26304278

  4. A Review of Visiting Policies in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Maleki, Majid; Peyrovi, Hamid; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Admission to intensive care units is potentially stressful and usually goes together with disruption in physiological and emotional function of the patient. The role of the families in improving ill patients’ conditions is important. So this study investigates the strategies, potential challenges and also the different dimensions of visiting hours’ policies with a narrative review. The search was carried out in scientific information databases using keywords “visiting policy”, “visiting hours” and “intensive care unit” with no time limitation on accessing the published studies in English or Farsi. Of a total of 42 articles, 22 conformed to our study objectives from 1997 to 2013. The trajectory of current research shows that visiting in intensive care units has, since their inception in the 1960s, always considered the nurses’ perspectives, patients’ preferences and physiological responses, and the outlook for families. However, little research has been carried out and most of that originates from the United States, Europe and since 2010, a few from Iran. It seems that the need to use the research findings and emerging theories and practices is necessary to discover and challenge the beliefs and views of nurses about family-oriented care and visiting in intensive care units. PMID:26755480

  5. Year in review 2007: Critical Careintensive care unit management

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Clayton; Carson, Shannon S; Amaral, André Carlos

    2008-01-01

    With the development of new technologies and drugs, health care is becoming increasisngly complex and expensive. Governments and health care providers around the world devote a large proportion of their budgets to maintaining quality of care. During 2007, Critical Care published several papers that highlight important aspects of critical care management, which can be subdivided into structure, processes and outcomes, including costs. Great emphasis was given to quality of life after intensive care unit stay, especially the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder. Significant attention was also given to staffing level, optimization of intensive care unit capacity, and drug cost-effectiveness, particularly that of recombinant human activated protein C. Managing costs and providing high-quality care simultaneously are emerging challenges that we must understand and meet. PMID:18983704

  6. Clinical practice in perioperative monitoring in adult cardiac surgery: is there a standard of care? Results from an national survey.

    PubMed

    Bignami, Elena; Belletti, Alessandro; Moliterni, Paola; Frati, Elena; Guarnieri, Marcello; Tritapepe, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    This study was to investigate and define what is considered as a current clinical practice in hemodynamic monitoring and vasoactive medication use after cardiac surgery in Italy. A 33-item questionnaire was sent to all intensive care units (ICUs) admitting patients after cardiac surgery. 71 out of 92 identified centers (77.2 %) returned a completed questionnaire. Electrocardiogram, invasive blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulse oximetry, diuresis, body temperature and blood gas analysis were identified as routinely used hemodynamic monitoring, whereas advanced monitoring was performed with pulmonary artery catheter or echocardiography. Crystalloids were the fluids of choice for volume replacement (86.8 % of Centers). To guide volume management, central venous pressure (26.7 %) and invasive blood pressure (19.7 %) were the most frequently used parameters. Dobutamine was the first choice for treatment of left heart dysfunction (40 %) and epinephrine was the first choice for right heart dysfunction (26.8 %). Half of the Centers had an internal protocol for vasoactive drugs administration. Intra-aortic balloon pump and extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation were widely available among Cardiothoracic ICUs. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were suspended in 28 % of the Centers. The survey shows what is considered as standard monitoring in Italian Cardiac ICUs. Standard, routinely used monitoring consists of ECG, SpO2, etCO2, invasive BP, CVP, diuresis, body temperature, and BGA. It also shows that there is large variability among the various Centers regarding hemodynamic monitoring of fluid therapy and inotropes administration. Further research is required to better standardize and define the indicators to improve the standards of intensive care after cardiac surgery among Italian cardiac ICUs. PMID:26089166

  7. Perioperative Nurse Leaders and Professionalism.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Dawn

    2016-08-01

    Professionalism in nursing leadership encompasses key elements that include a common body of knowledge, autonomous practice, self-regulation through education and licensure, a set code of ethics, and a commitment to altruism. Perioperative nurse leaders also must embrace collaboration, vision, accountability, and patient and staff member advocacy based on established ethics, values, and standards of care. Nurse leaders who are committed to professional development through pursuit of higher degrees, application of evidence-based practice, collaboration with colleagues, and certification show a strong commitment to their profession and serve as role models for staff members. This article discusses professionalism in nursing and offers information specific to perioperative nurse leaders. PMID:27472973

  8. [Principles and challenges of mobilisation in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Simons, Julien; Thévoz, David; Piquilloud, Lise

    2016-06-01

    The harmful consequences of bed rest and inactivity in patients in intensive care have been widely described. The point at which these patients should be mobilised and the methods used however still remain unclear. It is nevertheless important that the mobilisation is implemented early and often, adapted to the condition of the patient and overseen by a cross-disciplinary team. PMID:27338680

  9. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  10. [Intensive and palliative care medicine. From academic distance to caring affection].

    PubMed

    Burchardi, H

    2014-02-01

    Intensive care medicine has made great contributions to the immense success of modern curative medicine. However, emotional care and empathy for the patient and his family seem to be sparse. There is an assumed constraint to objectivity and efficiency, as well as a massive economic pressure which transfers the physician into an agent of the disease instead of a trustee of the ill human being. The physician struggles against the disease and feels the death of his patient as his personal defeat. However, in futile situations the intensivist must learn to let go. He is responsible for futile overtreatment as well as for successful treatment. Today, in futile situations in the intensive care unit (ICU), it is possible to change the goal from curative treatment to palliative care. This is a consequent further development from critical care medicine. In end-of-life situations in the intensive care unit, emotional care and empathy are mandatory using intensive dialogues with the family. Despite great workload stress enough time for such conversation should be taken, because the physician will generously be repaid by the way he sees his medical activity. The maintenance of a culture of empathy within the intensive care team is a major task for the leader. In this manner, the ICU will become and remain a place for living humanity. PMID:24384728

  11. Reducing hospital acquired pressure ulcers in intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Cullen Gill, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a definite problem in our health care system and are growing in numbers. Unfortunately, it is usually the most weak and vulnerable of our culture that faces these complications, causing the patient and their families discomfort, anguish, and economic hardship due to their expensive treatment. Data collected by the tissue viability department showed high incidence of hospital acquire pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit in March 2013. An action plan was initiated and implemented by the tissue viability team, senior nursing management, pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) team and respiratory therapists (RT's) within the ICU. Our objective was to reduce hospital acquired pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit using the plan, do, check, act quality improvement process. PMID:26734370

  12. Neurorehabilitation after neonatal intensive care: evidence and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, Nathalie L

    2016-01-01

    Neonatologists and paediatric providers of developmental care have documented poor neurodevelopmental outcomes of infants who have received neonatal intensive care due to prematurity, perinatal neurological insults such as asphyxia or congenital anomalies such as congenital heart disease. In parallel, developmental specialists have researched treatment options in these high-risk children. The goal of this review is connect the main categories of poor outcomes (sensory and motor function, cognition, communication, behaviour) studied by neonatal intensive care follow-up specialists to the research focused on improving these outcomes. We summarise challenges in designing diagnostic and interventional approaches in infants <2 years of age and review the evidence for existing therapies and future treatments aimed at improving functionality. PMID:25710178

  13. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units regional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Abril, A.; Terrón, A.; Boschi, C.; Gómez, M.

    2007-11-01

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  14. Ethical issues and palliative care in the cardiovascular intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Swetz, Keith M; Mansel, J Keith

    2013-11-01

    Medical advances over the past 50 years have helped countless patients with advanced cardiac disease or who are critically ill in the intensive care unit (ICU), but have added to the ethical complexity of the care provided by clinicians, particularly at the end of life. Palliative care has the primary aim of improving symptom burden, quality of life, and the congruence of the medical plan with a patient's goals of care. This article explores ethical issues encountered in the cardiac ICU, discusses key analyses of these issues, and addresses how palliative care might assist medical teams in approaching these challenges. PMID:24188227

  15. From the coronary care unit to the cardiovascular intensive care unit: the evolution of cardiac critical care.

    PubMed

    Gidwani, Umesh K; Kini, Annapoorna S

    2013-11-01

    This article presents an overview of the evolution of cardiac critical care in the past half century. It tracks the rapid advances in the management of cardiovascular disease and how the intensive care area has kept pace, improving outcomes and incorporating successive innovations. The current multidisciplinary, evidence based unit is vastly different from the early days and is expected to evolve further in keeping with the concept of 'hybrid' care areas where care is delivered by the 'heart team'. PMID:24188215

  16. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  17. A new neurological focus in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C; Peloquin, Susan; Ferriero, Donna M

    2011-09-01

    Advances in the care of high-risk newborn babies have contributed to reduced mortality rates for premature and term births, but the surviving neonates often have increased neurological morbidity. Therapies aimed at reducing the neurological sequelae of birth asphyxia at term have brought hypothermia treatment into the realm of standard care. However, this therapy does not provide complete protection from neurological complications and a need to develop adjunctive therapies for improved neurological outcomes remains. In addition, the care of neurologically impaired neonates, regardless of their gestational age, clearly requires a focused approach to avoid further injury to the brain and to optimize the neurodevelopmental status of the newborn baby at discharge from hospital. This focused approach includes, but is not limited to, monitoring of the patient's brain with amplitude-integrated and continuous video EEG, prevention of infection, developmentally appropriate care, and family support. Provision of dedicated neurocritical care to newborn babies requires a collaborative effort between neonatologists and neurologists, training in neonatal neurology for nurses and future generations of care providers, and the recognition that common neonatal medical problems and intensive care have an effect on the developing brain. PMID:21808297

  18. Competence of nurses in the intensive cardiac care unit

    PubMed Central

    Nobahar, Monir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Competence of nurses is a complex combination of knowledge, function, skills, attitudes, and values. Delivering care for patients in the Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) requires nurses’ competences. This study aimed to explain nurses’ competence in the ICCU. Methods This was a qualitative study in which purposive sampling with maximum variation was used. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 23 participants during 2012–2013. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by using the content-analysis method. Results The main categories were “clinical competence,” comprising subcategories of ‘routine care,’ ‘emergency care,’ ‘care according to patients’ needs,’ ‘care of non-coronary patients’, as well as “professional competence,” comprising ‘personal development,’ ‘teamwork,’ ‘professional ethics,’ and ‘efficacy of nursing education.’ Conclusion The finding of this study revealed dimensions of nursing competence in ICCU. Benefiting from competence leads to improved quality of patient care and satisfaction of patients and nurses and helps elevate nursing profession, improve nursing education, and clinical nursing. PMID:27382450

  19. Family experience survey in the surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Twohig, Bridget; Manasia, Anthony; Bassily-Marcus, Adel; Oropello, John; Gayton, Matthew; Gaffney, Christine; Kohli-Seth, Roopa

    2015-11-01

    The experience of critical care is stressful for both patients and their families. This is especially true when patients are not able to make their own care decisions. This article details the creation of a Family Experience Survey in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) to capture and improve overall experience. Kolcaba's "Enhanced Comfort Theory" provided the theoretical basis for question formation, specifically in regards to the four aspects of comfort: "physical," "psycho-spiritual," "sociocultural" and "environmental." Survey results were analyzed in real-time to identify and implement interventions needed for issues raised. Overall, there was a high level of satisfaction reported especially with quality of care provided to patients, communication and availability of nurses and doctors, explanations from staff, inclusion in decision making, the needs of patients being met, quality of care provided to patients and cleanliness of the unit. It was noted that 'N/A' was indicated for cultural needs and spiritual needs, a chaplain now rounds on all patients daily to ensure these services are more consistently offered. In addition, protocols for doctor communication with families, palliative care consults, daily bleach cleaning of high touch areas in patient rooms and nurse-led progressive mobility have been implemented. Enhanced comfort theory enabled the opportunity to identify and provide a more 'broad' approach to care for patients and families. PMID:26608426

  20. The challenge of admitting the very elderly to intensive care.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Yên-Lan; Angus, Derek C; Boumendil, Ariane; Guidet, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    The aging of the population has increased the demand for healthcare resources. The number of patients aged 80 years and older admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) increased during the past decade, as has the intensity of care for such patients. Yet, many physicians remain reluctant to admit the oldest, arguing a "squandering" of societal resources, that ICU care could be deleterious, or that ICU care may not actually be what the patient or family wants in this instance. Other ICU physicians are strong advocates for admission of a selected elderly population. These discrepant opinions may partly be explained by the current lack of validated criteria to select accurately the patients (of any age) who will benefit most from ICU hospitalization. This review describes the epidemiology of the elderly aged 80 years and older admitted in the ICU, their long-term outcomes, and to discuss some of the solutions to cope with the burden of an aging population receiving acute care hospitalization. PMID:21906383

  1. Meaning of caring in pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne; Arman, Maria; Castren, Maaret; Forsner, Maria

    2014-12-01

    When children are critically ill, parents still strive to be present and participate in the care of their child. Pediatric intensive care differs from other realms of pediatric care as the nature of care is technically advanced and rather obstructing than encouraging parental involvement or closeness, either physically or emotionally, with the critically ill child. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of caring in the pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents. The design of this study followed Benner's interpretive phenomenological method. Eleven parents of seven children participated in observations and interviews. The following aspects of caring were illustrated in the themes arising from the findings: being a bridge to the child on the edge, building a sheltered atmosphere, meeting the child's needs, and adapting the environment for family life. The overall impression is that the phenomenon of caring is experienced exclusively when it is directed toward the exposed child. The conclusion drawn is that caring is present when providing expert physical care combined with fulfilling emotional needs and supporting continuing daily parental care for the child in an inviting environment. PMID:23939721

  2. The Leapfrog initiative for intensive care unit physician staffing and its impact on intensive care unit performance: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Gasperino, James

    2011-10-01

    The field of critical care has changed markedly in recent years to accommodate a growing population of chronically critically ill patients. New administrative structures have evolved to include divisions, departments, and sections devoted exclusively to the practice of critical care medicine. On an individual level, the ability to manage complex multisystem critical illnesses and to introduce invasive monitoring devices defines the intensivist. On a systems level, critical care services managed by an intensivist-led multidisciplinary team are now recognized by their ability to efficiently utilize hospital resources and improve patient outcomes. Due to the numerous cost and quality issues related to the delivery of critical care medicine, intensive care unit physician staffing (IPS) has become a charged subject in recent years. Although the federal government has played a large role in regulating best practices by physicians, other third parties have entered the arena. Perhaps the most influential of these has been The Leapfrog Group, a consortium representing 130 employers and 65 Fortune 500 companies that purchase health care for their employees. This group has proposed specific regulatory guidelines for IPS that are purported to result in substantial cost containment and improved quality of care. This narrative review examines the impact of The Leapfrog Group's recommendations on critical care delivery in the United States. PMID:21439669

  3. Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Intensive Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Andrew J; Altemeier, William A; Johnston, Christine; Gernsheimer, Terry; Becker, Pamela S

    2015-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are newly diagnosed or relapsed and those who are receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy are predisposed to conditions such as sepsis due to bacterial and fungal infections, coagulopathies, hemorrhage, metabolic abnormalities, and respiratory and renal failure. These conditions are common reasons for patients with AML to be managed in the intensive care unit (ICU). For patients with AML in the ICU, providers need to be aware of common problems and how to manage them. Understanding the pathophysiology of complications and the recent advances in risk stratification as well as newer therapy for AML are relevant to the critical care provider. PMID:24756309

  4. The hostile environment of the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Donchin, Yoel; Seagull, F Jacob

    2002-08-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) were developed for patients with special needs and include an array of technology to support medical care. However, basic lessons in ergonomics, human factors, and human performance fail to propagate in this complex medical environment. Complicated, error-prone devices are commonly used. There are too many patient data for one person to process effectively. Lighting, ambient noise, and scheduling all result in provider and patient stress. These difficult working conditions make errors more probable and are risk factors for provider burnout and negative outcomes for patients. Auditory alarms on ICU equipment, ICU syndrome, and needle sticks are discussed as examples of such problems. PMID:12386492

  5. Giving a nutritional fast hug in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Monares Zepeda, Enrique; Galindo Martín, Carlos Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Implementing a nutrition support protocol in critical care is a complex and dynamic process that involves the use of evidence, education programs and constant monitoring. To facilitate this task we developed a mnemonic tool called the Nutritional FAST HUG (F: feeding, A: analgesia, S: stools, T: trace elements, H: head of bed, U: ulcers, G: glucose control) with a process also internally developed (both modified from the mnemonic proposed by Jean Louis Vincent) called MIAR (M: measure, I: interpret, A: act, R: reanalysis) showing an easy form to perform medical rounds at the intensive care unit using a systematic process. PMID:25929396

  6. The costs of nonbeneficial treatment in the intensive care setting.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, Todd; Schneiderman, Lawrence J; Teetzel, Holly; Blustein, Jeffrey; Briggs, Kathleen; Cohn, Felicia; Cranford, Ronald; Dugan, Daniel; Kamatsu, Glen; Young, Ernlé

    2005-01-01

    Ethics consultations have been shown to reduce the use of "nonbeneficial treatments," defined as life-sustaining treatments delivered to patients who ultimately did not survive to hospital discharge, when treatment conflicts occurred in the adult intensive care unit (ICU). In this paper we estimated the costs of nonbeneficial treatment using the results from a randomized trial of ethics consultations. We found that ethics consultations were associated with reductions in hospital days and treatment costs among patients who did not survive to hospital discharge. We conclude that consultations resolved conflicts that would have inappropriately prolonged nonbeneficial or unwanted treatments in the ICU instead of focusing on more appropriate comfort care. PMID:16136635

  7. Perioperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Pyati, Srinivas; Gan, Tong J

    2007-01-01

    The under-treatment of postoperative pain has been recognised to delay patient recovery and discharge from hospital. Despite recognition of the importance of effective pain control, up to 70% of patients still complain of moderate to severe pain postoperatively. The mechanistic approach to pain management, based on current understanding of the peripheral and central mechanisms involved in nociceptive transmission, provides newer options for clinicians to manage pain effectively. In this article we review the rationale for a multimodal approach with combinations of analgesics from different classes and different sites of analgesic administration. The pharmacological options of commonly used analgesics, such as opioids, NSAIDs, paracetamol, tramadol and other non-opioid analgesics, and their combinations is discussed. These analgesics have been shown to provide effective pain relief and their combinations demonstrate a reduction in opioid consumption. The basis for using non-opioid analgesic adjuvants is to reduce opioid consumption and consequently alleviate opioid-related adverse effects. We review the evidence on the opioid-sparing effect of ketamine, clonidine, gabapentin and other novel analgesics in perioperative pain management. Most available data support the addition of these adjuvants to routine analgesic techniques to reduce the need for opioids and improve quality of analgesia by their synergistic effect. Local anaesthetic infiltration, epidural and other regional techniques are also used successfully to enhance perioperative analgesia after a variety of surgical procedures. The use of continuous perineural techniques that offer prolonged analgesia with local anaesthetic infusion has been extended to the care of patients beyond hospital discharge. The use of nonpharmacological options such as acupuncture, relaxation, music therapy, hypnosis and transcutaneous nerve stimulation as adjuvants to conventional analgesia should be considered and incorporated to

  8. Optimizing antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit setting

    PubMed Central

    Kollef, Marin H

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most common therapies administered in the intensive care unit setting. In addition to treating infections, antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use and optimizing the administration of antimicrobial agents will help to improve patient outcomes while minimizing further pressures for resistance. This review will present several strategies aimed at achieving optimal use of antimicrobial agents. It is important to note that each intensive care unit should have a program in place which monitors antibiotic utilization and its effectiveness. Only in this way can the impact of interventions aimed at improving antibiotic use (e.g. antibiotic rotation, de-escalation therapy) be evaluated at the local level. PMID:11511331

  9. [Management of decompensated liver cirrhosis in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Lerschmacher, O; Koch, A; Streetz, K; Trautwein, C; Tacke, F

    2013-11-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the end-stage of long-standing chronic liver diseases. The occurrence of complications from liver cirrhosis increases the mortality risk, but the prognosis can be improved by optimal management in the intensive care unit (ICU). Defined diagnostic algorithms allow the etiology and presence of typical complications upon presentation to the ICU to be identified. Acute variceal bleeding requires endoscopic intervention, vasoactive drugs, antibiotics, supportive intensive care measures and, where necessary, urgent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis needs to be diagnosed and immediately treated in patients with ascites. Hepatorenal syndrome should be treated by albumin and terlipressin. In case of respiratory failure, differential diagnosis should not only consider pneumonia, pulmonary embolism and cardiac failure, but also hepatic hydrothorax, portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome. The feasibility of liver transplantation should be always discussed in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Artificial liver support devices may only serve as a bridging procedure until transplant. PMID:24030843

  10. The obese child in the Intensive Care Unit. Update.

    PubMed

    Donoso Fuentes, Alejandro; Córdova L, Pablo; Hevia J, Pilar; Arriagada S, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Given that childhood obesity is an epidemic, the frequency of critically-ill patients who are overweight or obese seen at intensive care units has increased rapidly. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ that secretes a number of protein hormones, including leptin, which stands out because it regulates adipose tissue mass. The presence of arterial hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease and chronic kidney disease may become apparent and complicate the course of obese pediatric patients in the Intensive Care Unit. Obesity management is complex and should involve patients, their families and the medical community. It should be coordinated with comprehensive government health policies and implemented in conjunction with a change in cultural context. PMID:27164340

  11. Intensive care patients' evaluations of the informed consent process.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul Alexander

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the informed consent process from the perspective of intensive care patients. Using the largest single-method database of patient-derived information in the United States, we systematically outlined and tested several key factors that influence patient evaluations of the intensive care unit (ICU) informed consent process. Measures of information, understanding, and decision-making involvement were found to predict overall patient satisfaction and patient loyalty intentions. Specific actions supportive of ICU informed consent, such as giving patients information on advance directives, patient's rights, and organ donation, resulted in significantly higher patient evaluation scores with large effect sizes. This research suggests that the effectiveness of the informed consent process in the ICU from the patient's perspective can be measured and evaluated and that ICU patients place a high value on the elements of the informed consent process. PMID:17704678

  12. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  13. [Alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, G; Minguet, G; Brichant, J F

    2014-02-01

    Alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists have long been used in the treatment of arterial hypertension. However, in that indication they have progressively been replaced by antihypertensive drugs with a more interesting therapeutic profile. Nonetheless, pharmacological activation of alpha-2 adrenoreceptors leads to a variety of clinical effects that are of major interest for anaesthesia and intensive care practice. Indeed, the sedative and analgesic properties of alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists allow a reduction of hypnotic and opioid needs during general anaesthesia. In addition, they induce a down-regulation of the level of consciousness comparable to that of natural slow-wave sleep during post-anaesthesia and intensive care unit stay. These drugs may also prevent some deleterious effects of the sympathetic discharge in response to surgical stress. Furthermore, alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists are potent adjuncts for locoregional anaesthesia. In this article, we will summarize the most frequent applications of alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonists in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine. We will focus on the clinical data available for the two most representative molecules of this pharmacological class: clonidine and dexmedetomidine. PMID:24683831

  14. Costing of consumables: use in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Mann, S A

    1999-08-01

    In 1991, the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Middlemore Hospital manually costed the treatment and care of asthmatic patients. This was long-winded and labour-intensive, but provided hard data to support anecdotal beliefs that intensive care patients are more expensive than was currently believed or accepted. It is a known problem that funder and provider organizations see a huge disparity on the funding issue. With additional accurate information on the actual cost of individual patients, which can be grouped into disease categories, funding applications can be backed with accurate, up-to-date quantitative data. After a long preparation time, we are now costing individual patient stays in the ICU. Each individual resource was established, costed and entered into an MS ACCESS computerized database. Schedules have been prepared for updating prices, as these change. The final report available gives a detailed list of resource use within certain categories. Some items proved to be impractical to cost on an individual patient basis, and these have been grouped together, costed, and divided by the number of patient days for the last year, and assigned to each individual patient as an hourly unit cost. Believed to be a world-first, this information now forms the basis for variance reporting and pricing. PMID:10786509

  15. [Current status of fibreoptic bronchoscopy in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Martin-Loeches, I; Artigas, A; Gordo, F; Añón, J M; Rodríguez, A; Blanch, Ll; Cuñat, J

    2012-12-01

    Flexible bronchoscopy (FB) has been of great help in the management of critically ill patients. Its safety and usefulness in the hands of experienced professionals, with the required measures of caution, has resulted in the increasingly widespread use of the technique even in unstable critical patients subjected to mechanical ventilation and with high oxygen demands. The Spanish Society of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine and Coronary Units (SEMICYUC), through its Acute Respiratory Failure (GT-IRA) and Infectious Diseases (GT-EI) Work Groups, aims to promote knowledge and standards of quality in the use of FB among all specialists in Intensive Care Medicine. Through an expert committee, the SEMICYUC has established the objective of accrediting such training, with the preparation of a curriculum and definition of those Units qualified for providing training in the different techniques and levels. The accreditation process seeks to stimulate good learning practice and quality in training. Both specialists in Intensive Care Medicine and other specialists, and the patients, will benefit from the commitment and control afforded by such accreditation, and from the learning and training which the mentioned process entails. PMID:23141554

  16. Information technology and CPP management in neuro intensive care.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P H; Burr, R L; Kirkness, C J

    2002-01-01

    This study developed and tested the acceptability of a computer interface intended to provide better information about CPP to Neuro Intensive Care nurses. Maintaining adequate CPP is crucial in preventing secondary brain injury, yet current monitoring data displays have poor ergonomics that minimize usable information for clinicians. Information systems developmental methods were used to 1) formulate the model for CPP information display, 2) develop the system with end-users, and 3) install the system in the Neuro Intensive Care Unit. System testing for effects on clinicians and patient outcomes is occurring in a randomized clinical trial. Metaphor graphic and universal graphic displays were tested with 37 staff nurses from three intensive care units using continuous ICP monitoring. Nursing staff preferred an augmented universal data display to the metaphor graphics, endorsing a modified trend area graph with threshold-dependent properties. The preferred model was programmed in Visual Basic and installed on small computers that were randomly allocated as live or blank displays to beds of newly admitted head injury or aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with continuous monitoring. Nursing acceptability of the information interface was achieved through the use of end-user focus groups that resulted in modifying the metaphor graphic approach to a more readily understandable one. PMID:12168293

  17. Ethical intensive care research: development of an ethics handbook.

    PubMed

    Rischbieth, A; Blythe, D

    2005-12-01

    Conduct of research involving humans in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting is complex and challenging. The vulnerable nature of critically ill patients raises issues of patient safety, and informed consent is difficult. With an increasing global interest in human research ethics, broadened government mandates have targeted improvements in research participant protection and research governance. A parallel rise in health consumerism and advocacy for privacy and protection of personal health information requires a clear understanding of the research participant role and importance of risk disclosure. In addition, the potential for conflicts of interest in a climate of increasingly competitive research funding, requires caution and transparency in related financial and contractual arrangements. The Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group (ANZICS CTG) fosters collaborative ICU research activity. We have developed An Ethics Handbook for Researchers (EH) for the ANZICS CTG for intended use by researchers in Australian and New Zealand ICUs. The purpose of the EH is to act as a practical advisory guide/supplement; to add clarification regarding ethical issues specific to intensive care research, to assist in the expedition of ethics committee research submission and to summarise available useful resources. This article introduces a précis of key issues from the EH including specific ethical difficulties pertaining to ICU research, a summary of the process by which ethics committee decisions in Australia and New Zealand are informed, and the use of ethical checklists to assist researchers. PMID:16539587

  18. [Factors causing stress in patients in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Pérez de Ciriza, A; Otamendi, S; Ezenarro, A; Asiain, M C

    1996-01-01

    Intensive care units have been considered stress generating areas. Knowing the causes why this happens will allow us to take specific measures to prevent or minimize it. This study has been performed with the aim to identify stress raising factors, as they are perceived by intensive care patients. The study has been performed in 49 patients most of whom were being attended in postoperatory control. The valuation of the degree of stress was performed using the "Scale of Environmental Stressors in Intensive Care" by Ballard in 1981, modified and adapted to our environment, with a result of 43 items distributed in six groups; Immobilization, Isolation, Deprivation of sleep, Time-spacial disorientation, Sensorial deprivation and overestimulation, and depersonalization and loss of autocontrol. The level of stress perceived by patients was low. The factors considered as most stressing were those related to physical aspects; presence of tubes in nose and mouth, impossibility to sleep and presence of noise, whereas those less stressing referred to Nursing attention. We conclude that patients perceive ICU as a little stressing place in spite of the excessive noise, remark the presence of invasive tubes and the difficulty to sleep as the most stressing factors, and in the same way, express a high degree of satisfaction about the attention received. PMID:8997954

  19. [Safety in intensive care medicine. Can we learn from aviation?].

    PubMed

    Graf, J; Pump, S; Maas, W; Stüben, U

    2012-05-01

    Safety is of extraordinary value in commercial aviation. Therefore, sophisticated and complex systems have been developed to ensure safe operation. Within this system, the pilots are of specific concern: they form the human-machine interface and have a special responsibility in controlling and monitoring all aircraft systems. In order to prepare pilots for their challenging task, specific selection of suitable candidates is crucial. In addition, for every commercial pilot regulatory requirements demand a certain number of simulator training sessions and check flights to be completed at prespecified intervals. In contrast, career choice for intensive care medicine most likely depends on personal reasons rather than eligibility or aptitude. In intensive care medicine, auditing, licensing, or mandatory training are largely nonexistent. Although knowledge of risk management and safety culture in aviation can be transferred to the intensive care unit, the diversity of corporate culture and tradition of leadership and training will represent a barrier for the direct transfer of standards or procedures. To accomplish this challenging task, the analysis of appropriate fields of action with regard to structural requirements and the process of change are essential. PMID:22526119

  20. Dynamic workflow model for complex activity in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bricon-Souf, N; Renard, J M; Beuscart, R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperation is very important in Medical care, especially in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) where the difficulties increase which is due to the urgency of the work. Workflow systems are considered as well adapted to modelize productive work in business process. We aim at introducing this approach in the Health Care domain. We have proposed a conversation-based Workflow in order to modelize the therapeutics plan in the ICU [1]. But in such a complex field, the flexibility of the workflow system is essential for the system to be usable. In this paper, we focus on the main points used to increase the dynamicity. We report on affecting roles, highlighting information, and controlling the system We propose some solutions and describe our prototype in the ICU. PMID:10384452

  1. Postpartum depression on the neonatal intensive care unit: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tahirkheli, Noor N; Cherry, Amanda S; Tackett, Alayna P; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    As the most common complication of childbirth affecting 10%–15% of women, postpartum depression (PPD) goes vastly undetected and untreated, inflicting long-term consequences on both mother and child. Studies consistently show that mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience PPD at higher rates with more elevated symptomatology than mothers of healthy infants. Although there has been increased awareness regarding the overall prevalence of PPD and recognition of the need for health care providers to address this health issue, there has not been adequate attention to PPD in the context of the NICU. This review will focus on an overview of PPD and psychological morbidities, the prevalence of PPD in mothers of infants admitted to NICU, associated risk factors, potential PPD screening measures, promising intervention programs, the role of NICU health care providers in addressing PPD in the NICU, and suggested future research directions. PMID:25473317

  2. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs. PMID:26714997

  3. Human error in daily intensive nursing care1

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Sabrina da Costa Machado; Queiroz, Ana Beatriz Azevedo; Büscher, Andreas; Stipp, Marluci Andrade Conceição

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to identify the errors in daily intensive nursing care and analyze them according to the theory of human error. Method: quantitative, descriptive and exploratory study, undertaken at the Intensive Care Center of a hospital in the Brazilian Sentinel Hospital Network. The participants were 36 professionals from the nursing team. The data were collected through semistructured interviews, observation and lexical analysis in the software ALCESTE(r). Results: human error in nursing care can be related to the approach of the system, through active faults and latent conditions. The active faults are represented by the errors in medication administration and not raising the bedside rails. The latent conditions can be related to the communication difficulties in the multiprofessional team, lack of standards and institutional routines and absence of material resources. Conclusion: the errors identified interfere in nursing care and the clients' recovery and can cause damage. Nevertheless, they are treated as common events inherent in daily practice. The need to acknowledge these events is emphasized, stimulating the safety culture at the institution. PMID:26625998

  4. [Patient's Risk Factors for Perioperative Aspiration Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Teruhiko; Isono, Shiroh

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews patient's own risk factors for perioperative aspiration pneumonia. Maintaining the function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the airway protective reflex, and the oral hygiene are the most important to prevent the pneumonia. The LES is adversely affected by excessive stomach distention, some medication given in perioperative periods, and habitual smoking, as well as pathological status such as esophageal hiatus hernia and achalasia. Postapoplectic patients may have insufficient airway protective reflex including swallowing and laryngeal reflex. It is emphasized that the perioperative oral care is increasing in its importance for the prevention of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:27004381

  5. Pediatric intensive care sedation: survey of fellowship training programs.

    PubMed

    Marx, C M; Rosenberg, D I; Ambuel, B; Hamlett, K W; Blumer, J L

    1993-02-01

    Children hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit are frequently distressed. The purpose of this study was to identify the patterns of use of sedative agents in pediatric critical care patients. A questionnaire survey was mailed to 45 directors of Pediatric Critical Care Fellowship Training Programs listed in Critical Care Medicine, January 1989. The response rate was 75.6% (34 questionnaires). The most commonly identified goals of sedation were reduced patient discomfort or distress and fewer unplanned extubations. The agents most frequently employed for this purpose were opioids (morphine or fentanyl), chloral hydrate, or benzodiazepines. Although conventional doses are used, opioids and benzodiazepines are often given hourly or by continuous infusion. Satisfaction with the efficacy and safety of commonly used opioids was greater (most common response "very satisfied") than for the benzodiazepines ("somewhat satisfied"). The physician's or nurse's clinical impression was reported to be the "most important" criterion for deciding when a patient required a dose of sedative; objective criteria were selected as less important. The majority of patients (65.7%) in the surveyed units were ideally "sedated to the point of no distress with as-needed medication." The majority of respondents (76.4%) identified efficacy as the major problem with sedation. Drug withdrawal was considered to be the major problem with sedative use by only a minority of respondents (6.9%). Although withdrawal is seen in 61.8% of units, it is generally treated when recognized, rather than prevented by routine tapering of sedation. Optimal sedation of pediatric intensive care unit patients is considered problematic, despite the use of frequent doses of many sedatives. Systematic investigation of pharmacodynamic response to these agents in the pediatric critical care population is indicated. PMID:8424013

  6. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Nelson, J E; Danis, M

    2001-02-01

    A growing body of evidence and experience has effaced what were once thought to be clear distinctions between "critical illness" and "terminal illness" and has exposed the problems of postponing palliative care for intensive care patients until death is obviously imminent. Integration of palliative care as a component of comprehensive intensive care is now seen as more appropriate for all critically ill patients, including those pursuing aggressive treatments to prolong life. At present, however, data on which to base practice in this integrated model remain insufficient, and forces of the healthcare economy and other factors may constrain its application. The purpose of this article is to map where we are now in seeking to improve palliative care in the intensive care unit. We review existing evidence, which suggests that both symptom management and communication about preferences and goals of care warrant improvement and that prevailing practices for limitation of life-sustaining treatments are inconsistent and possibly irrational. We also address the need for assessment tools for research and quality improvement. We discuss recent initiatives and ongoing obstacles. Finally, we identify areas for further exploration and suggest guiding principles. PMID:11228566

  7. Innovation in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care: An Exponential Convergence Toward Transformation of Care.

    PubMed

    Maher, Kevin O; Chang, Anthony C; Shin, Andrew; Hunt, Juliette; Wong, Hector R

    2015-10-01

    The word innovation is derived from the Latin noun innovatus, meaning renewal or change. Although companies such as Google and Apple are nearly synonymous with innovation, virtually all sectors in our current lives are imbued with yearn for innovation. This has led to organizational focus on innovative strategies as well as recruitment of chief innovation officers and teams in a myriad of organizations. At times, however, the word innovation seems like an overused cliché, as there are now more than 5,000 books in print with the word "innovation" in the title. More recently, innovation has garnered significant attention in health care. The future of health care is expected to innovate on a large scale in order to deliver sustained value for an overall transformative care. To date, there are no published reports on the state of the art in innovation in pediatric health care and in particular, pediatric cardiac intensive care. This report will address the issue of innovation in pediatric medicine with relevance to cardiac intensive care and delineate possible future directions and strategies in pediatric cardiac intensive care. PMID:26467873

  8. Integrating palliative care in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit: A report from the Improving Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit (IPAL-ICU) Project Advisory Board and the Center to Advance Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Mosenthal, Anne C.; Weissman, David E.; Curtis, J. Randall; Hays, Ross M.; Lustbader, Dana R.; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Ray, Daniel E.; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D.; Brasel, Karen J.; Campbell, Margaret; Nelson, Judith E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although successful models for palliative care delivery and quality improvement in the intensive care unit have been described, their applicability in surgical intensive care unit settings has not been fully addressed. We undertook to define specific challenges, strategies, and solutions for integration of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit. Data Sources We searched the MEDLINE database from inception to May 2011 for all English language articles using the term “surgical palliative care” or the terms “surgical critical care,” “surgical ICU,” “surgeon,” “trauma” or “transplant,” and “palliative care” or “end-of- life care” and hand-searched our personal files for additional articles. Based on review of these articles and the experiences of our interdisciplinary expert Advisory Board, we prepared this report. Data Extraction and Synthesis We critically reviewed the existing literature on delivery of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit setting focusing on challenges, strategies, models, and interventions to promote effective integration of palliative care for patients receiving surgical critical care and their families. Conclusions Characteristics of patients with surgical disease and practices, attitudes, and interactions of different disciplines on the surgical critical care team present distinctive issues for intensive care unit palliative care integration and improvement. Physicians, nurses, and other team members in surgery, critical care and palliative care (if available) should be engaged collaboratively to identify challenges and develop strategies. “Consultative,” “integrative,” and combined models can be used to improve intensive care unit palliative care, although optimal use of trigger criteria for palliative care consultation has not yet been demonstrated. Important components of an improvement effort include attention to efficient work systems and practical tools and to

  9. Perioperative assistants are a new resource.

    PubMed

    Speers, A T; Ziolkowski, L

    1998-02-01

    In the current health care environment, buzzwords such as redesign, reengineering, restructuring, right-sizing, customer service, diversity, quality, multiskilled workers, and unlicensed assistive personnel conjure up many notions about how perioperative nurses can meet the needs and wants of their patients. Unlicensed assistive personnel are becoming commonplace in our hospitals and have assumed a variety of positions and functions. This article describes a project that one hospital undertook to create unlicensed, multiskilled workers in the perioperative area. PMID:9505122

  10. Breaking bad news and discussing goals of care in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hollyday, Sheryl L; Buonocore, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit is a high-stakes environment in which nurses, including advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), often assist patients and families to navigate life and death situations. These high-stakes situations often require discussions that include bad news and discussions about goals of care or limiting aggressive care, and APRNs must develop expertise and techniques to be skilled communicators for conducting these crucial conversations. This article explores the art of communication, the learned skill of delivering bad news in the health care setting, and the incorporation of this news into a discussion about goals of care for patients. As APRNs learn to incorporate effective communication skills into practice, patient care and communication will ultimately be enhanced. PMID:25898881

  11. Effects of stress management program on the quality of nursing care and intensive care unit nurses

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saied; Asgari, Zohreh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: High level of stress in intensive care unit nurses affects the quality of their nursing care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of a stress management program on the quality of nursing care of intensive care unit nurses. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial that was conducted on 65 nurses. The samples were selected by stratified sampling of the nurses working in intensive care units 1, 2, 3 in Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan, Iran and were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group underwent an intervention, including 10 sessions of stress management that was held twice a week. In the control group, placebo sessions were held simultaneously. Data were gathered by demographic checklist and Quality Patient Care Scale before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention in both groups. Then, the data were analyzed by Student's t-test, Mann–Whitney, Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) through SPSS software version 18. Results: Mean scores of overall and dimensions of quality of care in the intervention group were significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to pre-intervention (P < 0.001). The results showed that the quality of care in the intervention group was significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: As stress management is an effective method to improve the quality of care, the staffs are recommended to consider it in improvement of the quality of nursing care. PMID:27186196

  12. The Use of Modafinil in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Michal; Weinhouse, Gerald

    2016-02-01

    As patients recover from their critical illness, the focus of intensive care unit (ICU) care becomes rehabilitation. Fatigue, excessive daytime somnolence (EDS), and depression can delay their recovery and potentially worsen outcomes. Psychostimulants, particularly modafinil (Provigil), have been shown to alleviate some of these symptoms in various patient populations, and as clinical trials are underway exploring this novel use of the drug, we present a case series of 3 patients in our institution's Thoracic Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Our 3 patients were chosen as a result of their fatigue, EDS, and/or depression, which prolonged their ICU stay and precluded them from participating in physical therapy, an integral component of the rehabilitative process. The patients were given 200 mg of modafinil each morning to increase patient wakefulness, encourage their participation, and enable a more restful sleep during the night. Although the drug was undoubtedly not the sole reason why our patients became more active, the temporal relationship between starting the drug and our patients' clinical improvement makes it likely that it contributed. Based on our observations with these patients, the known effects of modafinil, its safety profile, and the published experiences of others, we believe that modafinil has potential benefits when utilized in some critically ill patients and that the consequences of delayed patient recovery and a prolonged ICU stay may outweigh the risks of potential modafinil side effects. PMID:25716122

  13. Obesity in the intensive care unit: risks and complications.

    PubMed

    Selim, Bernardo J; Ramar, Kannan; Surani, Salim

    2016-08-01

    The steady growing prevalence of critically ill obese patients is posing diagnostic and management challenges across medical and surgical intensive care units. The impact of obesity in the critically ill patients may vary by type of critical illness, obesity severity (obesity distribution) and obesity-associated co-morbidities. Based on pathophysiological changes associated with obesity, predominately in pulmonary reserve and cardiac function, critically ill obese patients may be at higher risk for acute cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal complications in comparison to non-obese patients. Obesity also represents a dilemma in the management of other critical care areas such as invasive mechanical ventilation, mechanical ventilation liberation, hemodynamic monitoring and pharmacokinetics dose adjustments. However, despite higher morbidity associated with obesity in the intensive care unit (ICU), a paradoxical lower ICU mortality ("obesity paradox") is demonstrated in comparison to non-obese ICU patients. This review article will focus on the unique pathophysiology, challenges in management, and outcomes associated with obesity in the ICU. PMID:27098774

  14. The changing face of critical care medicine: nurse practitioners in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Molitor-Kirsch, Shirley; Thompson, Lisa; Milonovich, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, healthcare has undergone countless changes. Some of the important changes in recent years have been budget cuts, decreased resident work hours, and increased patient acuity. The need for additional clinical expertise at the bedside has resulted in nurse practitioners becoming an integral part of the healthcare delivery team. To date, little has been published regarding the role of the nurse practitioners in intensive care units. This article outlines how one pediatric hospital has successfully utilized nurse practitioners in the intensive care unit. PMID:15876885

  15. [Managed care. Its impact on health care in the USA, especially on anesthesia and intensive care].

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; Bach, A

    1998-06-01

    Managed care, i.e., the integration of health insurance and delivery of care under the direction of one organization, is gaining importance in the USA health market. The initial effects consisted of a decrease in insurance premiums, a very attractive feature for employers. Managed care promises to contain expenditures for health care. Given the shrinking public resources in Germany, managed care seems attractive for the German health system, too. In this review the development of managed care, the principal elements, forms of organisation and practical tools are outlined. The regulation of the delivery of care by means of controlling and financial incentives threatens the autonomy of physicians: the physician must act as a "double agent", caring for the interest for the individual patient and being restricted by the contract with the managed care organisation. Cost containment by managed care was achieved by reducing the fees for physicians and hospitals (and partly by restricting care for patients). Only a fraction of this cost reduction was handed over to the enrollee or employer, and most of the money was returned with profit to the shareholders of the managed care organisations. The preeminent role of primary care physicians as gatekeepers of the health network led to a reduced demand for specialist services in general and for university hospitals and anesthesiologists in particular. The paradigm of managed care, i.e., to guide the patient and the care giver through the health care system in order to achieve cost-effective and high quality care, seems very attractive. The stress on cost minimization by any means in the daily practice of managed care makes it doubtful if managed care should be an option for the German health system, in particular because there are a number of restrictions on it in German law. PMID:9676303

  16. Noise Pollution in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Wards

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Gholamreza; Roudi, Masoumeh; Shah Farhat, Ahmad; Shahabian, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The improvement of technology has increased noise levels in hospital Wards to higher than international standard levels (35-45 dB). Higher noise levels than the maximum level result in patient’s instability and dissatisfaction. Moreover, it will have serious negative effects on the staff’s health and the quality of their services. The purpose of this survey is to analyze the level of noise in intensive care units and emergency wards of the Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Mashhad. Procedure: This research was carried out in November 2009 during morning shifts between 7:30 to 12:00. Noise levels were measured 10 times at 30-minute intervals in the nursing stations of 10 wards of the emergency, the intensive care units, and the Nephrology and Kidney Transplant Departments of Imam Reza University Hospital, Mashhad. The noise level in the nursing stations was tested for both the maximum level (Lmax) and the equalizing level (Leq). The research was based on the comparison of equalizing levels (Leq) because maximum levels were unstable. Results: In our survey the average level (Leq) in all wards was much higher than the standard level. The maximum level (Lmax) in most wards was 85-86 dB and just in one measurement in the Internal ICU reached 94 dB. The average level of Leq in all wards was 60.2 dB. In emergency units, it was 62.2 dB, but it was not time related. The highest average level (Leq) was measured at 11:30 AM and the peak was measured in the Nephrology nursing station. Conclusion: The average levels of noise in intensive care units and also emergency wards were more than the standard levels and as it is known these wards have vital roles in treatment procedures, so more attention is needed in this area. PMID:24303374

  17. [Phthalate exposure in the neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Fischer Fumeaux, C J; Stadelmann Diaw, C; Palmero, D; M'Madi, F; Tolsa, J-F

    2015-02-01

    There are growing concerns on long-term health consequences, notably on fertility rates, of plasticizers such as phthalates. While di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is currently used in several medical devices, newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit are both more exposed and more vulnerable to DEHP. The objectives of this study were to identify, count, and describe possible sources of DEHP in a neonatal care unit. Our method consisted in the listing and the inspection of the information on packaging, complemented by contact with manufacturers when necessary. According to the results, 6% of all products and 10% of plastic products contained some DEHP; 71% of these involved respiratory support devices. A vast majority of the items showed no information on the content of DEHP. Further research is needed, particularly to determine the effects of such an early exposure and to study and develop safer alternatives. PMID:25554670

  18. Technics of touch in the neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    van Manen, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Medical technologies, although often crucial for the provision of healthcare, may carry unintended significance for patients and their families. The highly technicised neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is the place where parents of hospitalised baby have their early encounters with their child. The aim of this study is to investigate phenomenologically how the contact and relation between parent and child may be affected by the mediating presence and use of the techno-medical features and equipments of the NICU. Three common technologies are examined for the ways they condition the kinds of contact afforded between parents and child: the isolette, the feeding tube and the brain imaging equipment. The concluding recommendations speak of the need for understanding the relational experiences of parents of hospitalised babies, and the tactful sensitivities required of the healthcare teams who provide care to these families. PMID:22774005

  19. Intravenous Medication Administration in Intensive Care: Opportunities for Technological Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jacqueline; Berner, Eta; Bothe, Olaf; Rymarchuk, Irina

    2008-01-01

    Medication administration errors have been shown to be frequent and serious. Error is particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as critical care. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of intravenous medication administration in five intensive care units. These data were used within the context of a larger study to design information system decision support to decrease medication administration errors in these settings. Nurses were observed during the course of their work and their intravenous medication administration process, medication order source, references used, calculation method, number of medications prepared simultaneously, and any interruptions occurring during the preparation and delivery phases of the administration event were recorded. In addition, chart reviews of medication administration records were completed and nurses were asked to complete an anonymous drop-box questionnaire regarding their experiences with medication administration error. The results of this study are discussed in terms of potential informatics solutions for reducing medication administration error. PMID:18998790

  20. [Intensive care of traumatic brain injury in children].

    PubMed

    Kizilov, A V; Babaev, B D; Malov, A G; Ermolaev, V V; Mikhaĭlov, E V; Ostreĭkov, I F

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury among other injuries of human body reaches up to 30-50% and, according to the WHO, it grows by 2%. Severe traumatic brain injury (such as severe brain contusion, epidural, subdural and intracerebral hematoma, intracerebral hygroma, diffuse axonal injury) in the structure of general trauma amounts 4-20%. The prognosis of traumatic brain injury mainly depends on the timeliness of the first aid. The therapeutic measures usually begin at the place of the accident or in the ambulance vehicle (hence the clear role of the specialist team). It is advised for children with severe traumatic brain injury to be directed to specialized neurosurgical or trauma hospitals, where it is possible to provide them with adequate medical care. This work is dedicated to the enhancement of the intensive care quality during severe traumatic brain injury in children of Chuvash Republic, by the means of integrated patient assessment. PMID:21513069

  1. Implementation of an electronic logbook for intensive care units.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Carrie J.; Stansfield, Dennis; Gibb Ellis, Kathryn A.; Clemmer, Terry P.

    2002-01-01

    Logbooks of patients treated in acute care units are commonly maintained; the data may be used to justify resource use, analyze patient outcomes, and encourage clinical research. We report herein the conversion of a paper-based logbook to an electronic logbook in three hospital intensive care units. The major difference between the paper logbook and electronic logbook data was the addition of clinician-entered data to the electronic logbook. Despite extensive computerization of patient information extant in the participating units, there was considerable reluctance to replace the paper-based logbook. The project's success can be attributed to the use of feedback from the clinical users in the development and implementation process to create accessible, high quality data. These data provide clinicians with the capability to monitor trends in a variety of patient groups. Advantages of the electronic logbook include more efficient data access, higher data quality and increased ability to conduct quality improvement and clinical research activities. PMID:12463943

  2. Prevention and control of infections in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Scott, G

    2000-01-01

    Small intensive care units (ICUs) functioning within their capacity and caring mainly for post-operative patients have fewer problems with infection control than larger ICUs with a varied case mix, sub-optimal staffing levels, and high levels of antibiotic consumption. Under these circumstances chronic cross colonisation and infection are inevitable and outbreaks may occur. Little can be done to reduce the risks of infection which arise as a direct result of the patient's clinical condition and prior colonisation status. However, selection pressure from antibiotic usage can be modified, as can environmental hygiene, ventilation and architectural design. One of the simplest measures for reducing cross infection remains one of the most intractable: compliance by staff with protocols and standards for maintaining hand hygiene. Simplification of procedures by the ready availability of alcohol hand rub preparations with or without chlorhexidine may improve matters. PMID:10786954

  3. Psycho-affective disorder in intensive care units: a review.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Jeanette

    2002-09-01

    This paper reviews the literature related to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Syndrome. The intention of the paper is to explore the range of psychotic and affective phenomena that may be observed in practice, together with the management of contributory stressors. Patients experience a range of psycho-affective disturbances that may be triggered by drugs, the environment, dehumanizing practices and sleep deprivation. Symptoms do not always disappear following discharge and further research is required to determine the long-term psychological effects of an ICU. Comprehensive assessment of the patient's psychological state, using an appropriate tool, is necessary and should form an integral part of ongoing care. Interventions identified include eradication of dehumanizing behaviour, modification of environmental stimuli, effective communication and therapeutic touch. Where possible, communication needs should be addressed prior to admission, and patients and their families prepared for the unfamiliar world of the ICU. PMID:12201884

  4. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: Report from the Task Force of World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, John; Abillama, Fayez; Chiumello, Davide; Dobb, Geoff; Jacobe, Stephen; Kleinpell, Ruth; Koh, Younsuk; Martin, Claudio; Michalsen, Andej; Pelosi, Paolo; Torra, Lluis Blanch; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Yeager, Susan; Zimmerman, Janice

    2016-08-01

    End-of-life care in the intensive care unit (ICU) was identified as an objective in a series of Task Forces developed by the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine Council in 2014. The objective was to develop a generic statement about current knowledge and to identify challenges relevant to the global community that may inform regional and local initiatives. An updated summary of published statements on end-of-life care in the ICU from national Societies is presented, highlighting commonalities and differences within and between international regions. The complexity of end-of-life care in the ICU, particularly relating to withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment while ensuring the alleviation of suffering, within different ethical and cultural environments is recognized. Although no single statement can therefore be regarded as a criterion standard applicable to all countries and societies, the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine endorses and encourages the role of Member Societies to lead the debate regarding end-of-life care in the ICU within each country and to take a leading role in developing national guidelines and recommendations within each country. PMID:27288625

  5. Intermittent Demand Forecasting in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chiang, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Meng-Yin

    2016-10-01

    Forecasts of the demand for medical supplies both directly and indirectly affect the operating costs and the quality of the care provided by health care institutions. Specifically, overestimating demand induces an inventory surplus, whereas underestimating demand possibly compromises patient safety. Uncertainty in forecasting the consumption of medical supplies generates intermittent demand events. The intermittent demand patterns for medical supplies are generally classified as lumpy, erratic, smooth, and slow-moving demand. This study was conducted with the purpose of advancing a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit's efforts to achieve a high level of accuracy in its forecasting of the demand for medical supplies. On this point, several demand forecasting methods were compared in terms of the forecast accuracy of each. The results confirm that applying Croston's method combined with a single exponential smoothing method yields the most accurate results for forecasting lumpy, erratic, and slow-moving demand, whereas the Simple Moving Average (SMA) method is the most suitable for forecasting smooth demand. In addition, when the classification of demand consumption patterns were combined with the demand forecasting models, the forecasting errors were minimized, indicating that this classification framework can play a role in improving patient safety and reducing inventory management costs in health care institutions. PMID:27562485

  6. [Insulin therapy and parenteral nutrition in intensive care: practical aspects].

    PubMed

    Limonta, A; Gastaldi, G; Heidegger, C P; Pichard, C

    2015-03-25

    Critically ill patients are hypercatabolic due to stress and inflammation. This condition induces hyperglycemia. Muscle wasting is intense during critical illness. Its prevention is essential. This is possible by early and appropriate nutritional support. Preserving the function of the gastrointestinal tract with enteral nutrition is the gold standard. However, when targeted protein-caloric intake is not met through enteral nutrition within the first three days in the intensive care unit (ICU), supplemental parenteral nutrition is administered to reduce morbidity and mortality. In addition, in order to limit metabolic imbalance and reduce mortality, glycemic control using insulin therapy is mandatory. This article reviews the current understanding of parenteral nutrition and insulin therapy in ICU patients, and provides the decision model applied in our institution. PMID:26027204

  7. Electroconvulsive therapy in a psychiatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hafner, R J; Holme, G

    1994-06-01

    This study reviewed all patients (N = 37) treated with ECT in a psychiatric intensive care unit during 1989-91. Diagnoses were: psychotic depression (8); bipolar disorder, manic phase (13); schizoaffective disorder (14); and schizophrenia (2). All patients were very severely disturbed and had failed to respond to medication given at highest levels judged to be safe, usually over 3-4 weeks. Response to ECT was generally rapid and marked, allowing substantial reductions in medication. To achieve the same clinical outcome for each course of ECT, 50% more unilateral than bilateral treatments were required, suggesting that bilateral ECT has a more rapid effect in this highly disturbed population. PMID:7993281

  8. Mobile intensive care unit. Present conception and realisation.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, H; Hanegreefs, G; Hanquet, M; Rolly, G; de Temmerman, P; Van De Walle, J; Delooz, H

    1976-01-01

    A new Mobile Intensive Care Unit has been put in use at the "Service 900" of the Ministry of Health in Belgium. Its size was decided to enable efficient treatment of one patient. The type of suspension was chosen to give the patient adequate protection against untoward effects of travelling sickness. Radio-communication with the control center and hospital is ensured. The O2 supply-system provides an autonomy of 11 hours. Besides an electric distribution of 12 V. DC, a 220 V. AC is also available. PMID:1070899

  9. Centralized vs. Distributed PACS for Intensive Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Paul S.; Huang, H. K.; Tillisch, Jan

    1989-05-01

    One clinical environment which can immediately benefit from the implementation of a radiologic PACS is the intensive care unit (ICU). Our previous study has demonstrated the feasibility and timeliness of routine image transmission to an ICU. In anticipation of future expansion of this service, we have investigated two different models for a hospital-wide ICU PACS. These models included a centralized and a distributed processing PACS configuration. Their comparison indicated that although the distributed model offers some major advantages over the centralized model, the latter may hold a rightful place in the inter-departmental service, especially if the cost issue is a critical factor.

  10. Intensive care sedation: the past, present and the future

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite the universal prescription of sedative drugs in the intensive care unit (ICU), current practice is not guided by high-level evidence. Landmark sedation trials have made significant contributions to our understanding of the problems associated with ICU sedation and have promoted changes to current practice. We identified challenges and limitations of clinical trials which reduced the generalizability and the universal adoption of key interventions. We present an international perspective regarding current sedation practice and a blueprint for future research, which seeks to avoid known limitations and generate much-needed high-level evidence to better guide clinicians' management and therapeutic choices of sedative agents. PMID:23758942

  11. Intensive care sedation: the past, present and the future.

    PubMed

    Shehabi, Yahya; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Mehta, Sangeeta; Riker, Richard; Takala, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Despite the universal prescription of sedative drugs in the intensive care unit (ICU), current practice is not guided by high-level evidence. Landmark sedation trials have made significant contributions to our understanding of the problems associated with ICU sedation and have promoted changes to current practice. We identified challenges and limitations of clinical trials which reduced the generalizability and the universal adoption of key interventions. We present an international perspective regarding current sedation practice and a blueprint for future research, which seeks to avoid known limitations and generate much-needed high-level evidence to better guide clinicians' management and therapeutic choices of sedative agents. PMID:23758942

  12. [Occurrence and prevention of errors in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Valentin, A

    2012-05-01

    Recognition and analysis of error constitutes an essential tool for quality improvement in intensive care units (ICUs). The potential for the occurrence of error is considerably high in ICUs. Although errors will never be completely preventable, it is necessary to reduce frequency and consequences of error. A system approach needs to consider human limitations and to design working conditions, workplace, and processes in ICUs in a way that promotes reduction of error. The development of a preventive safety culture must be seen as an essential task for ICUs. PMID:22476763

  13. How do patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experience care in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    Torheim, Henny; Kvangarsnes, Marit

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to gain insight into how patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience care in the acute phase. The study has a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach. The empirics consist of qualitative in-depth interviews with ten patients admitted to the intensive care units in two Norwegian hospitals. The interviews were carried out from November 2009 to June 2011. The data have been analysed through meaning condensation, in accordance with Amadeo Giorgi's four-step method. Kari Martinsen's phenomenological philosophy of nursing has inspired the study. An essential structure of the patients' experiences of care in the intensive care unit by acute COPD-exacerbation may be described as: Feelings of being trapped in a life-threatening situation in which the care system assumes control over their lives. This experience is conditioned not only by the medical treatment, but also by the entire interaction with the caregivers. The essence of the phenomenon is presented through three themes which describe the patient's lived experience: preserving the breath of life, vulnerable interactions and opportunities for better health. Acute COPD-exacerbation is a traumatic experience and the patients become particularly vulnerable when they depend on others for breathing support. The phenomenological analysis shows that the patients experience good care during breath of life preservation when the care is performed in a way that gives patients more insight into their illness and gives new opportunities for the future. PMID:24313779

  14. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    SciTech Connect

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various /sup 192/Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from /sup 192/Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  15. Cognitive Workload of Computerized Nursing Process in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Dal Sasso, Grace Marcon; Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to measure the cognitive workload to complete printed nursing process versus computerized nursing process from International Classification Practice of Nursing in intensive care units. It is a quantitative, before-and-after quasi-experimental design, with a sample of 30 participants. Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index. Six cognitive categories were measured. The "temporal demand" was the largest contributor to the cognitive workload, and the role of the nursing process in the "performance" category has excelled that of computerized nursing process. It was concluded that computerized nursing process contributes to lower cognitive workload of nurses for being a support system for decision making based on the International Classification Practice of Nursing. The computerized nursing process as a logical structure of the data, information, diagnoses, interventions and results become a reliable option for health improvement of healthcare, because it can enhance nurse safe decision making, with the intent to reduce damage and adverse events to patients in intensive care. PMID:26061562

  16. Intensive care medicine trainees' perception of professionalism: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    van Mook, W N K A; De Grave, W S; Gorter, S L; Zwaveling, J H; Schuwirth, L W; van der Vleuten, P M

    2011-01-01

    The Competency-Based Training program in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe identified 12 competency domains. Professionalism was given a prominence equal to technical ability. However, little information pertaining to fellows' views on professionalism is available. A nationwide qualitative study was performed. The moderator asked participants to clarify the terms professionalism and professional behaviour, and to explore the questions "How do you learn the mentioned aspects?" and "What ways of learning do you find useful or superfluous?". Qualitative data analysis software (MAXQDA2007) facilitated analysis using an inductive coding approach. Thirty-five fellows across eight groups participated. The themes most frequently addressed were communication, keeping distance and boundaries, medical knowledge and expertise, respect, teamwork, leadership and organisation and management. Medical knowledge, expertise and technical skills seem to become more tacit when training progresses. Topics can be categorised into themes of workplace-based learning, by gathering practical experience, by following examples and receiving feedback on action, including learning from own and others' mistakes. Formal teaching courses (e.g. communication) and scheduled sessions addressing professionalism aspects were also valued. The emerging themes considered most relevant for intensivists were adequate communication skills and keeping boundaries with patients and relatives. Professionalism is mainly learned 'on the job' from role models in the intensive care unit. Formal teaching courses and sessions addressing professionalism aspects were nevertheless valued, and learning from own and others' mistakes was considered especially useful. Self-reflection as a starting point for learning professionalism was stressed. PMID:21375100

  17. Models for intensive care training. A European perspective.

    PubMed

    Bion, Julian; Rothen, Hans U

    2014-02-01

    The diversity of European culture is reflected in its healthcare training programs. In intensive care medicine (ICM), the differences in national training programs were so marked that it was unlikely that they could produce specialists of equivalent skills. The Competency-Based Training in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe (CoBaTrICE) program was established in 2003 as a Europe-based worldwide collaboration of national training organizations to create core competencies for ICM using consensus methodologies to establish common ground. The group's professional and research ethos created a social identity that facilitated change. The program was easily adaptable to different training structures and incorporated the voice of patients and relatives. The CoBaTrICE program has now been adopted by 15 European countries, with another 12 countries planning to adopt the training program, and is currently available in nine languages, including English. ICM is now recognized as a primary specialty in Spain, Switzerland, and the UK. There are still wide variations in structures and processes of training in ICM across Europe, although there has been agreement on a set of common program standards. The combination of a common "product specification" for an intensivist, combined with persisting variation in the educational context in which competencies are delivered, provides a rich source of research inquiry. Pedagogic research in ICM could usefully focus on the interplay between educational interventions, healthcare systems and delivery, and patient outcomes, such as including whether competency-based program are associated with lower error rates, whether communication skills training is associated with greater patient and family satisfaction, how multisource feedback might best be used to improve reflective learning and teamworking, or whether increasing the proportion of specialists trained in acute care in the hospital at weekends results in better patient outcomes. PMID

  18. Nurses’ Experiences of Futile Care at Intensive Care Units: A Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen’s analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility. Nurses defined futile care as “useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects” As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  19. Nurses' experiences of futile care at intensive care units: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen's analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility.Nurses defined futile care as "useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects" As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  20. [Treatment in the Intensive Care Unit: continue or withdraw?].

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, Claudia; de Graeff, Nienke; Kompanje, Erwin J O; Tjan, Dave H T

    2016-01-01

    End-of-life decision-making in the Intensive Care Unit is a common and complex process. The step-by-step process of decision-making leading to withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is illustrated in this paper by a clinical case. A variety of factors influences the decision to adjust the initial curative treatment policy towards withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy and the pursuit of comfort care. For a smooth decision-making process, it is necessary to make a prognosis and obtain consensus amongst the healthcare team. Withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is ultimately a medical decision and a consensual decision should be reached by all medical staff and nurses, and preferably also by the patient and family. Timely involvement of a legal representative of the patient is essential for an uncomplicated decision-making process. Advance care planning and advance directives provide opportunities for patients to express their preferences beforehand. It is important to realise that end-of-life decisions are significantly influenced by personal and cultural values. PMID:27050494

  1. [Creating baby-friendly neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Fang; Gau, Meei-Ling

    2013-02-01

    Most expectant parents anticipate giving birth to a healthy newborn. Admission of a neonate to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is thus nearly always a significant and negative shock to parents and family members. We derived core concepts for this article from the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund (WHO/UNICEF)'s Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, updated, and expanded for integrated care (2009). This framework document advocates expanding to NICUs guidelines that were originally developed for maternity units. This paper reviews the importance of breastfeeding to the mother-baby dyad and family integration. We suggest how to build a breastfeeding-friendly environment within the NICU using 10 steps that adhere to the NEO-BFHI's three "Guiding Principles". The proposed environment gives special emphasis to providing continued and unlimited kangaroo care, creating a family-centered NICU design, implementing an effective milk expression and monitoring plan, and respecting mothers' individual needs. Suggestions are provided as a reference to government policymakers and medical centers to facilitate the creation of breastfeeding-friendly environments in NICUs. PMID:23386520

  2. Dynamic workflow model for complex activity in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bricon-Souf, N; Renard, J M; Beuscart, R

    1999-01-01

    Co-operation is very important in Medical care, especially in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) where the difficulties increase which is due to the urgency of the work. Workflow systems are considered as well adapted to modelize productive work in business process. We aim at introducing this approach in the Health Care domain. We have proposed a conversation-based workflow in order to modelize the therapeutics plan in the ICU [1]. But in such a complex field, the flexibility of the workflow system is essential for the system to be usable. We have concentrated on three main points usually proposed in the workflow models, suffering from a lack of dynamicity: static links between roles and actors, global notification of information changes, lack of human control on the system. In this paper, we focus on the main points used to increase the dynamicity. We report on affecting roles, highlighting information, and controlling the system. We propose some solutions and describe our prototype in the ICU. PMID:10193884

  3. Let Them In: Family Presence during Intensive Care Unit Procedures.

    PubMed

    Beesley, Sarah J; Hopkins, Ramona O; Francis, Leslie; Chapman, Diane; Johnson, Joclynn; Johnson, Nathanael; Brown, Samuel M

    2016-07-01

    Families have for decades advocated for full access to intensive care units (ICUs) and meaningful partnership with clinicians, resulting in gradual improvements in family access and collaboration with ICU clinicians. Despite such advances, family members in adult ICUs are still commonly asked to leave the patient's room during invasive bedside procedures, regardless of whether the patient would prefer family to be present. Physicians may be resistant to having family members at the bedside due to concerns about trainee education, medicolegal implications, possible effects on the technical quality of procedures due to distractions, and procedural sterility. Limited evidence from parallel settings does not support these concerns. Family presence during ICU procedures, when the patient and family member both desire it, fulfills the mandates of patient-centered care. We anticipate that such inclusion will increase family engagement, improve patient and family satisfaction, and may, on the basis of studies of open visitation, pediatric ICU experience, and family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, decrease psychological distress in patients and family members. We believe these goals can be achieved without compromising the quality of patient care, increasing provider burden significantly, or increasing risks of litigation. In this article, we weigh current evidence, consider historical objections to family presence at ICU procedures, and report our clinical experience with the practice. An outline for implementing family procedural presence in the ICU is also presented. PMID:27104301

  4. Radiologic assessment in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, R. I.

    1984-01-01

    The severely ill infant or child who requires admission to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) often presents with a complex set of problems necessitating multiple and frequent management decisions. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role, not only in the initial assessment of the patient's condition and establishing a diagnosis, but also in monitoring the patient's progress and the effects of interventional therapeutic measures. Bedside studies obtained using portable equipment are often limited but can provide much useful information when a careful and detailed approach is utilized in producing the radiograph and interpreting the examination. This article reviews some of the basic principles of radiographic interpretation and details some of the diagnostic points which, when promptly recognized, can lead to a better understanding of the patient's condition and thus to improved patient care and management. While chest radiography is stressed, studies of other regions including the upper airway, abdomen, skull, and extremities are discussed. A brief consideration of the expanding role of new modality imaging (i.e., ultrasound, CT) is also included. Multiple illustrative examples of common and uncommon problems are shown. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 FIG. 11 FIG. 12 FIG. 13 FIG. 14 FIG. 15 FIG. 16 FIG. 17 FIG. 18 FIG. 19 FIG. 20 FIG. 21 FIG. 22 FIG. 23 FIG. 24 FIG. 25 FIG. 26 FIG. 27 FIG. 28 FIG. 29 FIG. 30 FIG. 31 FIG. 32 FIG. 33 PMID:6375164

  5. Point of Care Cardiac Ultrasound Applications in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Arntfield, Robert T; Millington, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    The use of point of care echocardiography by non-cardiologist in acute care settings such as the emergency department (ED) or the intensive care unit (ICU) is very common. Unlike diagnostic echocardiography, the scope of such point of care exams is often restricted to address the clinical questions raised by the patient’s differential diagnosis or chief complaint in order to inform immediate management decisions. In this article, an overview of the most common applications of this focused echocardiography in the ED and ICU is provided. This includes but is not limited to the evaluation of patients experiencing hypotension, cardiac arrest, cardiac trauma, chest pain and patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:22894759

  6. [The integrality of care and communicative actions in the cross-discipline practice in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Pirolo, Sueli Moreira; Ferraz, Clarice Aparecida; Gomes, Romeu

    2011-12-01

    Cross-disciplinary work in health is an important element to deliver comprehensive health care actions. The present study analyzed cross-disciplinary actions in intensive care according to Habermas. This case study was performed using a qualitative approach. The empiric material capture was collected by observing the setting and using semi-structured interviews with health workers. The information was analyzed using the meaning interpretation technique. The analysis revealed two thematic lines: individual instrumental care in view of the clinical inconstancy, and the collective care fragmented by functions. This result weakens the worker/worker and the worker/patient interactions and compromises the association between health actions. As it does not favor communicative actions, it becomes fragile and the strategic/instrumental action is evinced. PMID:22241198

  7. Intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for brain dead organ donor patients.

    PubMed

    Pearson, A; Robertson-Malt, S; Walsh, K; Fitzgerald, M

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the feelings and experiences of critical care nurses who have been involved in nursing brain dead patients prior to organ donation. The purpose of the study was to generate knowledge which informs the discipline of nursing. A number of themes relating to nurses' experiences of caring for brain dead organ donor patients were uncovered in this interpretative study. Overall, caring for patients who are diagnosed as brain dead is a challenging experience for nurses and they are intensely involved in a search for meaning in each event. The interpretative analysis in this study has revealed a range of meanings articulated by the nurses involved. However, the primary focus of care--as identified by the participating nurses--was the donor family. PMID:11820230

  8. Confronting youth gangs in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang violence has continued its upward trend nationwide. It was once thought that gangs convened only in selected areas, which left churches, schools, and hospitals as "neutral" territory. Unfortunately, this is a fallacy. The results of gang violence pour into hospitals and into intensive care units regularly. The media portrays California as having a gang violence problem; however, throughout the United States, gang violence has risen more than 35% in the past year. Youth gang violence continues to rise dramatically with more and more of our youth deciding to join gangs each day. Sadly, every state has gangs, and the problem is getting much worse in areas that would never have thought about gangs a year ago. These "new generation" of gang members is younger, much more violent, and staying in the gang longer. Gangs are not just an urban problem. Gang activity is a suburban and rural problem too. There are more than 25 500 gangs in the United States, with a total gang membership of 850 000. Ninety-four percent of gang members are male and 6% are female. The ethnic composition nationwide includes 47% Latino, 31% African American, 13% White, 7% Asian, and 2% "mixed," according to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice. As a result of the ongoing proliferation of youth street gangs in our communities, it is imperative that critical care nurses and others involved with the direct care become educated about how to identify gang members, their activities, and understand their motivations. Such education and knowledge will help provide solutions to families and the youth themselves, help eradicate the problem of gang violence, and keep health care professionals safe. PMID:25463004

  9. [Evaluation of respiratory intensive care units at pneumology services].

    PubMed

    Vergnenègre, A

    2001-10-01

    Audits should be conducted in respiratory intensive care units (ICU) as in all other ICU using patient-specific indicators to assess medical activity and quality of care. However, other criteria, such as those developed by the SRLF ("Société de Réanimation de Langue Française"), should also be used. These criteria include the description of the patients previous health status, prognosis of underlying diseases, the SAPS I or SAPS II severity score at admission, the omega or TISS therapeutic scores, and the PRN index of health care burden. Medial and administrative audits are conducted using diagnosis-related groups (DRG) and case mix classification. The DRGs are used to establish an aggregate index of activity (ISA points) which contribute to the complex mechanism of budget allowance. Unfortunately, the French DRG case mix system does not provide an appropriate description of the costs of ICU stays. One of the special features of respiratory ICUs is related to patient flow. Patients are referred from a respiratory unit and discharged to a respiratory unit or a respiratory rehabilitation center. Readmissions are frequent. Many patients are also admitted only for diagnosis or a respiratory procedure requiring close surveillance. The SRLF criteria, which take into consideration all of these features, should always be used for the evaluation of quality of care. The French Society of Lung Disease (SPLF) has proposed specific standards of quality for respiratory ICU. We present here examples issuing for the ICU of the Hôtel-Dieu Hospital in Paris. The results show that non-specific national indicators, in combination with other indicators specific for respiratory ICU, provide appropriate audit data. PMID:11887768

  10. The influence of care interventions on the continuity of sleep of intensive care unit patients1

    PubMed Central

    Hamze, Fernanda Luiza; de Souza, Cristiane Chaves; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify care interventions, performed by the health team, and their influence on the continuity of sleep of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit. Method: descriptive study with a sample of 12 patients. A filming technique was used for the data collection. The awakenings from sleep were measured using the actigraphy method. The analysis of the data was descriptive, processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results: 529 care interventions were identified, grouped into 28 different types, of which 12 (42.8%) caused awakening from sleep for the patients. A mean of 44.1 interventions/patient/day was observed, with 1.8 interventions/patient/hour. The administration of oral medicine and food were the interventions that caused higher frequencies of awakenings in the patients. Conclusion: it was identified that the health care interventions can harm the sleep of ICU patients. It is recommended that health professionals rethink the planning of interventions according to the individual demand of the patients, with the diversification of schedules and introduction of new practices to improve the quality of sleep of Intensive Care Unit patients. PMID:26487127