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Sample records for peripheral vasculature implications

  1. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia: Implications of the effects produced in brain vasculature and peripheral organs to forebrain neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    The adverse effects of amphetamine- (AMPH) and methamphetamine- (METH) induced hyperthermia on vasculature, peripheral organs and peripheral immune system are discussed. Hyperthermia alone does not produce amphetamine-like neurotoxicity but AMPH and METH exposures that do not produce hyperthermia (≥40°C) are minimally neurotoxic. Hyperthermia likely enhances AMPH and METH neurotoxicity directly through disruption of protein function, ion channels and enhanced ROS production. Forebrain neurotoxicity can also be indirectly influenced through the effects of AMPH- and METH- induced hyperthermia on vasculature. The hyperthermia and the hypertension produced by high doses amphetamines are a primary cause of transient breakdowns in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) resulting in concomitant regional neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation in laboratory animals. This BBB breakdown can occur in the amygdala, thalamus, striatum, sensory and motor cortex and hippocampus. Under these conditions, repetitive seizures greatly enhance neurodegeneration in hippocampus, thalamus and amygdala. Even when the BBB is less disrupted, AMPH- or METH- induced hyperthermia effects on brain vasculature may play a role in neurotoxicity. In this case, striatal and cortical vascular function are adversely affected, and even greater ROS, immune and damage responses are seen in the meninges and cortical surface vasculature. Finally, muscle and liver damage and elevated cytokines in blood can result when amphetamines produce hyperthermia. Proteins, from damaged muscle may activate the peripheral immune system and exacerbate liver damage. Liver damage can further increase cytokine levels, immune system activation and increase ammonia levels. These effects could potentially enhance vascular damage and neurotoxicity.

  2. Optoacoustic angiography of peripheral vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermilov, Sergey; Su, Richard; Zamora, Mario; Hernandez, Travis; Nadvoretsky, Vyacheslav; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    We developed a new optoacoustic microangiography system (OmAS) intended for in-vivo vascular imaging of a human finger. The system employs an arc-shaped acoustic array that is rotated 360 degrees around the finger providing optoacoustic data necessary for tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional images of a finger. A near-infrared Q-switched laser is used to generate optoacoustic signals with increased contrast of blood vessels. The laser is coupled through two randomized fiberoptic bundles oriented in orthogonal optoacoustic mode. To demonstrate OmAS capabilities, we present a time-series of optoacoustic images of a human finger taken after the hypothermia stress test. The images show a detailed vascular anatomy of a finger down to the capillary level. A series of quick 30s scans allowed us to visualize the thermoregulatory response within the studied finger as it was manifested via vasomotor activity during the hypothermia recovery. We propose that the developed system can be used for diagnostics of various medical conditions that are manifested in change of the peripheral (finger) blood flow. Examples of the medical conditions that could be diagnosed and staged using the OmAS include the peripheral arterial disease (PAD), thrombosis, frostbite, and traumas.

  3. Real time imaging of peripheral nerve vasculature using optical coherence angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Srikanth; Kumsa, Doe; Takmakov, Pavel; Welle, Cristin G.; Hammer, Daniel X.

    2016-03-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) carries bidirectional information between the central nervous system and distal organs. PNS stimulation has been widely used in medical devices for therapeutic indications, such as bladder control and seizure cessation. Investigational uses of PNS stimulation include providing sensory feedback for improved control of prosthetic limbs. While nerve safety has been well documented for stimulation parameters used in marketed devices, novel PNS stimulation devices may require alternative stimulation paradigms to achieve maximum therapeutic benefit. Improved testing paradigms to assess the safety of stimulation will expedite the development process for novel PNS stimulation devices. The objective of this research is to assess peripheral nerve vascular changes in real-time with optical coherence angiography (OCA). A 1300-nm OCA system was used to image vasculature changes in the rat sciatic nerve in the region around a surface contacting single electrode. Nerves and vasculature were imaged without stimulation for 180 minutes to quantify resting blood vessel diameter. Walking track analysis was used to assess motor function before and 6 days following experiments. There was no significant change in vessel diameter between baseline and other time points in all animals. Motor function tests indicated the experiments did not impair functionality. We also evaluated the capabilities to image the nerve during electrical stimulation in a pilot study. Combining OCA with established nerve assessment methods can be used to study the effects of electrical stimulation safety on neural and vascular tissue in the periphery.

  4. Endoscopic Doppler optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence imaging of peripheral pulmonary nodules and vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Ritchie, Alexander; Shaipanich, Tawimas; Zhang, Wei; Ionescu, Diana N.; Hohert, Geoffrey; MacAulay, Calum; Lam, Stephen; Lane, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We present the first endoscopic Doppler optical coherence tomography and co-registered autofluorescence imaging (DOCT-AFI) of peripheral pulmonary nodules and vascular networks in vivo using a small 0.9 mm diameter catheter. Using exemplary images from volumetric data sets collected from 31 patients during flexible bronchoscopy, we demonstrate how DOCT and AFI offer complementary information that may increase the ability to locate and characterize pulmonary nodules. AFI offers a sensitive visual presentation for the rapid identification of suspicious airway sites, while co-registered OCT provides detailed structural information to assess the airway morphology. We demonstrate the ability of AFI to visualize vascular networks in vivo and validate this finding using Doppler and structural OCT. Given the advantages of higher resolution, smaller probe size, and ability to visualize vasculature, DOCT-AFI has the potential to increase diagnostic accuracy and minimize bleeding to guide biopsy of pulmonary nodules compared to radial endobronchial ultrasound, the current standard of care. PMID:26504665

  5. Peripheral arterial disease: implications beyond the peripheral circulation.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Whayne, Thomas F

    2013-11-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects a considerable percentage of the population. The manifestations of this disease are not always clinically overt. As a result, PAD remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. PAD is not just a disease of the peripheral arteries, but also an indication of generalized vascular atherosclerosis. PAD patients also have a high prevalence of other arterial diseases, such as coronary/carotid artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms. PAD is also a predictor of increased risk of lung and other cancers. The most often used examination for the establishment of the diagnosis of PAD, the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI), is also a predictor of generalized atherosclerosis, future cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality. Several markers that have been linked with PAD (e.g. C-reactive protein, serum bilirubin levels) may also have predictive value for other conditions besides PAD (e.g. kidney dysfunction). The management of PAD should therefore not be restricted to the peripheral circulation but should include measurements to manage and decrease the systemic atherosclerotic burden of the patient. PMID:23221278

  6. Structure of solid tumors and their vasculature: Implications for therapy with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, H.F.; Nagy, J.A.; Dvorak, A.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Delivery of monoclonal antibodies to solid tumors is a vexing problem that must be solved if these antibodies are to realize their promise in therapy. Such success as has been achieved with monoclonal antibodies is attributable to the local hyperpermeability of the tumor vasculature, a property that favors antibody extravasation at tumor sites and that is mediated by a tumor-secreted vascular permeability factor. However, leaky tumor blood vessels are generally some distance removed from target tumor cells, separated by stroma and by other tumor cells that together represent significant barriers to penetration by extravasated monoclonal antibodies. For this reason, alternative approaches may be attractive. These include the use of antibody-linked cytotoxins, which are able to kill tumor cells without immediate contact, and direction of antibodies against nontumor cell targets, for example, antigens unique to the tumor vascular endothelium or to tumor stroma. 50 refs.

  7. Sex Steroids Modulate Uterine-Placental Vasculature: Implications for Obstetrics and Neonatal Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Maliqueo, Manuel; Echiburú, Bárbara; Crisosto, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Adequate blood supply to the uterine-placental region is crucial to ensure the transport of oxygen and nutrients to the growing fetus. Multiple factors intervene to achieve appropriate uterine blood flow and the structuring of the placental vasculature during the early stages of pregnancy. Among these factors, oxygen concentrations, growth factors, cytokines, and steroid hormones are the most important. Sex steroids are present in extremely high concentrations in the maternal circulation and are important paracrine and autocrine regulators of a wide range of maternal and placental functions. In this regard, progesterone and estrogens act as modulators of uterine vessels and decrease the resistance of the spiral uterine arteries. On the other hand, androgens have the opposite effect, increasing the vascular resistance of the uterus. Moreover, progesterone and estrogens modulate the synthesis and release of angiogenic factors by placental cells, which regulates trophoblastic invasion and uterine artery remodeling. In this scenario, it is not surprising that women with pregnancy-related pathologies, such as early miscarriages, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, and fetal growth restriction, exhibit altered sex steroid concentrations. PMID:27199767

  8. Sex Steroids Modulate Uterine-Placental Vasculature: Implications for Obstetrics and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Maliqueo, Manuel; Echiburú, Bárbara; Crisosto, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Adequate blood supply to the uterine-placental region is crucial to ensure the transport of oxygen and nutrients to the growing fetus. Multiple factors intervene to achieve appropriate uterine blood flow and the structuring of the placental vasculature during the early stages of pregnancy. Among these factors, oxygen concentrations, growth factors, cytokines, and steroid hormones are the most important. Sex steroids are present in extremely high concentrations in the maternal circulation and are important paracrine and autocrine regulators of a wide range of maternal and placental functions. In this regard, progesterone and estrogens act as modulators of uterine vessels and decrease the resistance of the spiral uterine arteries. On the other hand, androgens have the opposite effect, increasing the vascular resistance of the uterus. Moreover, progesterone and estrogens modulate the synthesis and release of angiogenic factors by placental cells, which regulates trophoblastic invasion and uterine artery remodeling. In this scenario, it is not surprising that women with pregnancy-related pathologies, such as early miscarriages, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, and fetal growth restriction, exhibit altered sex steroid concentrations. PMID:27199767

  9. MicroRNA in the Diseased Pulmonary Vasculature: Implications for the Basic Scientist and Clinician

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Richard C.; Min, Pil-Ki; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Since the first descriptions of their active functions more than ten years ago, small non-coding RNA species termed microRNA (miRNA) have emerged as essential regulators in a broad range of adaptive and maladaptive cellular processes. With an exceptionally rapid pace of discovery in this field, the dysregulation of many individual miRNAs has been implicated in the development and progression of various cardiovascular diseases. MiRNA are also expected to play crucial regulatory roles in the progression of pulmonary vascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension (PH), yet direct insights in this field are only just emerging. This review will provide an overview of pulmonary hypertension and its molecular mechanisms, tailored for both basic scientists studying pulmonary vascular biology and physicians who manage PH in their clinical practice. We will describe the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension and mechanisms of action of miRNA relevant to this disease. Moreover, we will summarize the potential roles of miRNA as biomarkers and therapeutic targets as well as future strategies for defining the cooperative actions of these powerful effectors in pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:26705533

  10. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRA with centric ordering in k space: a preliminary clinical experience in imaging the abdominal aorta and renal and peripheral arterial vasculature.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A N; Bis, K G; Vrachliotis, T G; Kirsch, M; Shirkhoda, A; Ellwood, R

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical utility of a contrast-enhanced, centric reordered, three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography (MRA) pulse sequence in imaging the abdominal aorta and renal and peripheral lower extremity arteries. Twenty-eight MRA studies were performed on 23 patients and four volunteers at 1.5 T using a 3D contrast-enhanced, centric reordered pulse sequence. In 20 patients, the abdominal aorta and renal arteries were imaged, and in seven patients, the lower extremity arteries were imaged. In 19 patients, a total of 51 renal vessels were evaluated (33 renal arteries using .1 mmol/kg of gadopentetate dimeglumine and 18 renal arteries using .2 mmol/kg of gadoteridol). A total of 70 peripheral arterial segments were assessed using .2 mmol/kg of gadoteridol. Correlation with conventional angiography was made for the following 14 cases: renal artery stenosis (four cases), abdominal aortic stenosis (one case), arteriovenous fistula in a transplant kidney (one case), renal arteriovenous malformation (one case), common iliac artery aneurysms (one case), and peripheral lower extremity (six cases). Of the 70 peripheral arterial segments evaluated, in 35, there was correlation with x-ray angiography. The mean percent of aortic signal enhancement was significantly higher in the .2 mmol/kg dose group (370.8 +/- 190.3) than in the .1 mmol/kg dose group (184.5 +/- 128.9) (P = .02). However, there was no apparent difference between the two doses for visualization of the renal and accessory renal arteries. There was concordance between the contrast-enhanced 3D MRA studies and conventional angiography in all cases of renal artery and peripheral arterial stenoses and occlusions, including visualization of reconstituted peripheral arterial segments. There was no evidence of spin dephasing effects at sites of stenoses on the 3D contrast-enhanced MRA studies. Contrast-enhanced, centric reordered, 3D MRA can rapidly image the abdominal aorta and renal

  11. Ergot alkaloids induce vasoconstriction of bovine foregut vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alkaloids produced by the Neotyphodium coenophialum endophyte in association with tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) are imputed to cause peripheral symptoms of fescue toxicosis. We hypothesized that theses compounds could correspondingly affect foregut vasculature. The objective of this study was to...

  12. Peripheral arterial calcification: Prevalence, mechanism, detection, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Singh, Krishna J; Zeller, Thomas; Jaff, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC), particularly medial (Mönckeberg's medial sclerosis) arterial calcification, is common in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and genetic pathways of VC are not fully known, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and the suppression of parathyroid hormone activity are central to the development of vessel mineralization and, consequently, bone demineralization. In addition to preventive measures, such as the modification of atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk factors, current treatment strategies include the use of calcium-free phosphate binders, vitamin D analogs, and calcium mimetics that have shown promising results, albeit in small patient cohorts. The impact of intimal and medial VC on the safety and effectiveness of endovascular devices to treat symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remains poorly defined. The absence of a generally accepted, validated vascular calcium grading scale hampers clinical progress in assessing the safety and utility of various endovascular devices (e.g., atherectomy) in treating calcified vessels. Accordingly, we propose the peripheral arterial calcium scoring system (PACSS) and a method for its clinical validation. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and the development of optimal medical and endovascular treatment strategies are crucial as the population ages and presents with more chronic comorbidities. PMID:24402839

  13. Central and peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance: Implications for who should undergo pulmonary thromboendarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Poullis, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy remains a technically challenging procedure with variable outcomes with regard to improvement in pulmonary function. Reducing the resistance to flow between the pulmonary valve and the pulmonary capillary bed is the key aim of surgery. The resistance to flow is due to the combination of resistance due to the central clot and distal capillary resistance. We hypothesise that the use of fluid mechanics in combination with modern radiology and electronic circuit theory can potentially predict who should or should not undergo a thromboendarterectomy. Electronic circuit theory of two resistors in series was utilised to demonstrate the concept of a model of a central clot and the peripheral pulmonary capillary bed. A simplified 2D model of the lungs utilising finite element analysis and Poiseuille's law was constructed for proof of principle. Modelling predicts that cardiac output and anatomical obstruction interplay and can have profound effects on the outcomes after thromboendarterectomy. Identical pulmonary artery pressures, due to differing cardiac outputs and identical anatomical obstructions due to thrombus can have very different physiological outcomes with regard to changes in pulmonary artery pressure. Modelling the pulmonary vasculature to determine central and peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance may help in predicting who should undergo pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. Mathematical modelling can potentially predict which patients have haemodynamically significant clots in their pulmonary arteries that thromboendarterectomy may potentially help in the setting of pulmonary capillary disease. PMID:25997984

  14. Ghrelin: central and peripheral implications in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Langlet, Fanny; Zgheib, Sara; Dickson, Suzanne; Dehouck, Bénédicte; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Increasing clinical and therapeutic interest in the neurobiology of eating disorders reflects their dramatic impact on health. Chronic food restriction resulting in severe weight loss is a major symptom described in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, and they also suffer from metabolic disturbances, infertility, osteopenia, and osteoporosis. Restrictive AN, mostly observed in young women, is the third largest cause of chronic illness in teenagers of industrialized countries. From a neurobiological perspective, AN-linked behaviors can be considered an adaptation that permits the endurance of reduced energy supply, involving central and/or peripheral reprograming. The severe weight loss observed in AN patients is accompanied by significant changes in hormones involved in energy balance, feeding behavior, and bone formation, all of which can be replicated in animals models. Increasing evidence suggests that AN could be an addictive behavior disorder, potentially linking defects in the reward mechanism with suppressed food intake, heightened physical activity, and mood disorder. Surprisingly, the plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone that drives food-motivated behavior, are increased. This increase in plasma ghrelin levels seems paradoxical in light of the restrained eating adopted by AN patients, and may rather result from an adaptation to the disease. The aim of this review is to describe the role played by ghrelin in AN focusing on its central vs. peripheral actions. In AN patients and in rodent AN models, chronic food restriction induces profound alterations in the « ghrelin » signaling that leads to the development of inappropriate behaviors like hyperactivity or addiction to food starvation and therefore a greater depletion in energy reserves. The question of a transient insensitivity to ghrelin and/or a potential metabolic reprograming is discussed in regard of new clinical treatments currently investigated. PMID:23549309

  15. Ghrelin: Central and Peripheral Implications in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Langlet, Fanny; Zgheib, Sara; Dickson, Suzanne; Dehouck, Bénédicte; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Increasing clinical and therapeutic interest in the neurobiology of eating disorders reflects their dramatic impact on health. Chronic food restriction resulting in severe weight loss is a major symptom described in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, and they also suffer from metabolic disturbances, infertility, osteopenia, and osteoporosis. Restrictive AN, mostly observed in young women, is the third largest cause of chronic illness in teenagers of industrialized countries. From a neurobiological perspective, AN-linked behaviors can be considered an adaptation that permits the endurance of reduced energy supply, involving central and/or peripheral reprograming. The severe weight loss observed in AN patients is accompanied by significant changes in hormones involved in energy balance, feeding behavior, and bone formation, all of which can be replicated in animals models. Increasing evidence suggests that AN could be an addictive behavior disorder, potentially linking defects in the reward mechanism with suppressed food intake, heightened physical activity, and mood disorder. Surprisingly, the plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone that drives food-motivated behavior, are increased. This increase in plasma ghrelin levels seems paradoxical in light of the restrained eating adopted by AN patients, and may rather result from an adaptation to the disease. The aim of this review is to describe the role played by ghrelin in AN focusing on its central vs. peripheral actions. In AN patients and in rodent AN models, chronic food restriction induces profound alterations in the « ghrelin » signaling that leads to the development of inappropriate behaviors like hyperactivity or addiction to food starvation and therefore a greater depletion in energy reserves. The question of a transient insensitivity to ghrelin and/or a potential metabolic reprograming is discussed in regard of new clinical treatments currently investigated. PMID:23549309

  16. Clinical implication of ocular torsion in peripheral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Woong; Kang, Seong Il; Rhee, Ji Hye; Choi, Byung Yoon; Choi, Byeong Yoon; Kim, Ji-Soo; Koo, Ja-Won

    2015-07-01

    Acute unilateral vestibular loss presents as ocular torsion (OT) and caloric unilateral weakness (UW). However, the amount of OT is frequently dissociated from UW depending on when the examination was performed and the extent and cause of the vestibular lesion. This study evaluated the relationship between OT and UW in peripheral vestibular diseases, including Ménière's disease (MD) and vestibular neuritis (VN), and determined whether it contributed to OT as a means of differentiating between the two diseases. A retrospective chart review was performed in 64 patients with VN and 67 patients with MD. We divided the patients into three groups according to the interval from symptom onset to when the tests were performed: within 7 (group A), from 8 to 30 (group B) and over 30 (group C) days. UW, OT and the chronological correlation/dissociation between the two parameters were analyzed. For the 64 patients with VN, the degree of OT and severity of UW were positively correlated in group A (r = 0.749, P < 0.001). OT and UW were significantly dissociated with time (P < 0.001). For the 67 patients with MD, no correlation between the degree of OT and severity of UW was seen in MD group A. No significant dissociation change was revealed among the groups (P = 0.114). The OT abnormality is remarkable during the acute phase of VN, whereas it might not be remarkable immediately after a vertigo attack in MD. This finding can be used to differentiate MD and VN, especially when no definite hearing loss is seen or VN recurs. PMID:24609644

  17. Clinical implications of peripheral myelin protein 22 for nerve compression and neural regeneration: a review.

    PubMed

    Hui-Chou, Helen G; Hashemi, Sharyhar S; Hoke, Ahmet; Dellon, A Lee

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a major component of the peripheral myelin sheath. The PMP22 gene is located on chromosome 17p11.2, and defects in PMP22 gene have been implicated in several common inherited peripheral neuropathies. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), Dejerine-Sottas syndrome, and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy are all associated with defects in PMP22 gene. The disease phenotypes mirror the range of expression of PMP22 due to the corresponding genetic defect. HNPP, characterized by a milder recurrent episodic focal demyelinating neuropathy, is attributed to a deletion leading to PMP22 underexpression. On the other end of the spectrum, CMT1A leads to a more uniform demyelination and axonal loss, resulting in severe progressive distal weakness and paresthesias; it is due to a duplication at 17p11.2 leading to PMP22 overexpression. Additional point mutations result in varying phenotypes due to dysfunction of the resultant PMP22 protein. All inherited neuropathies are diagnosed with a combination of physical findings on examination, electromyography, sural nerve biopsies, and genetic testing. Treatment and management of these disorders differ depending on the underlying genetic defect, nerves involved, and resulting functional impairments. A review of current literature elucidates clinical, microsurgical implications, and management of patients with PMP22-related neuropathy. PMID:20976668

  18. Validation of Right Ruminal Vein and Artery as Models of Bovine Foregut Vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) produces alkaloids that have been associated with peripheral vasoconstriction in grazing animals and ingestion of these alkaloids may effect splanchnic vasculature. Because of significant differences in morphological an...

  19. An Interdependent Model of Central/Peripheral Chemoreception: Evidence and Implications for Ventilatory Control

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Curtis A.; Forster, Hubert V.; Blain, Grégory M.; Dempsey, Jerome A.

    2010-01-01

    In this review we discuss the implications for ventilatory control of newer evidence suggesting that central and peripheral chemoreceptors are not functionally separate but rather that they are dependent upon one another such that the sensitivity of the medullary chemoreceptors is critically determined by input from the carotid body chemoreceptors and vice versa i.e., they are interdependent. We examine potential interactions of the interdependent central and carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors with other ventilatory-related inputs such as central hypoxia, lung stretch, and exercise. The limitations of current approaches addressing this question are discussed and future studies are suggested. PMID:20206717

  20. Nicotine stimulates expression of proteins implicated in peripheral and central sensitization.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, J L; Denson, J E; Miley, D R; Durham, P L

    2015-04-01

    Pain patients who are nicotine dependent report a significantly increased incidence and severity of pain intensity. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged nicotine administration on inflammatory proteins implicated in the development of peripheral and central sensitization of the trigeminal system. Behavioral, immunohistochemical, and microarray studies were utilized to investigate the effects of nicotine administered daily for 14 days via an Alzet® osmotic pump in Sprague Dawley rats. Systemic nicotine administration caused a significant increase in nocifensive withdrawals to mechanical stimulation of trigeminal neurons. Nicotine stimulated expression of the pro-inflammatory signal transduction proteins phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), phosphorylated-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), and protein kinase A (PKA) in the spinal trigeminal nucleus. Nicotine also promoted elevations in the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a biomarker of activated astrocytes, and the microglia biomarker ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1). Similarly, levels of eleven cytokines were significantly elevated with the largest increase in expression of TNF-α. Levels of PKA, p-ERK, and p-JNK in trigeminal ganglion neurons were increased by nicotine. Our findings demonstrate that prolonged systemic administration of nicotine promotes sustained behavioral and cellular changes in the expression of key proteins in the spinal trigeminal nucleus and trigeminal ganglion implicated in the development and maintenance of peripheral and central sensitization. PMID:25637801

  1. Age-dependent changes in Ca2+ homeostasis in peripheral neurones: implications for changes in function.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, John N; Behringer, Erik J; Pottorf, William J; Pearce, William J; Vanterpool, Conwin K

    2007-06-01

    Calcium ions represent universal second messengers within neuronal cells integrating multiple cellular functions, such as release of neurotransmitters, gene expression, proliferation, excitability, and regulation of cell death or apoptotic pathways. The magnitude, duration and shape of stimulation-evoked intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) transients are determined by a complex interplay of mechanisms that modulate stimulation-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i that occur with normal neuronal function. Disruption of any of these mechanisms may have implications for the function and health of peripheral neurones during the aging process. This review focuses on the impact of advancing age on the overall function of peripheral adrenergic neurones and how these changes in function may be linked to age-related changes in modulation of [Ca2+]i regulation. The data in this review suggest that normal aging in peripheral autonomic neurones is a subtle process and does not always result in dramatic deterioration in their function. We present studies that support the idea that in order to maintain cell viability peripheral neurones are able to compensate for an age-related decline in the function of at least one of the neuronal calcium-buffering systems, smooth endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases, by increased function of other calcium-buffering systems, namely, the mitochondria and plasmalemma calcium extrusion. Increased mitochondrial calcium uptake may represent a 'weak point' in cellular compensation as this over time may contribute to cell death. In addition, we present more recent studies on [Ca2+]i regulation in the form of the modulation of release of calcium from smooth endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. These studies suggest that the contribution of the release of calcium from smooth endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores is altered with age through a combination of altered ryanodine receptor levels and modulation of these receptors by neuronal nitric oxide containing neurones

  2. Constriction of bovine vasculature caused by endophyte-infected tall fescue seed extract is similar to pure ergovaline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mixture of ergot alkaloids does not increase the contractile response of peripheral bovine vasculature, but may increase the contractile response of foregut vasculature. Preliminary data indicated that an extract of tall fescue seed induced a greater contractile response in ruminal artery and vein...

  3. The Vasculature in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Cibele M.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Weiss, Louis M.; Factor, Stephen M.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Rossi, Marcos A.

    2013-01-01

    The cardiovascular manifestations of Chagas disease are well known. However, the contribution of the vasculature and specifically the microvasculature has received little attention. This chapter reviews the evidence supporting the notion that alterations in the microvasculature especially in the heart contribute to the pathogenesis of chagasic cardiomyopathy. These data may also be important in understanding the contributions of the microvasculature in the aetiologies of other cardiomyopathies. The role of endothelin-1 and of thromboxane A2 vascular spasm and platelet aggregation is also discussed. Further, these observations may provide target(s) for intervention. PMID:21884888

  4. [Regeneration and repair of peripheral nerves: clinical implications in facial paralysis surgery].

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, B; Vidal, A

    2000-01-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions are one of the most frequent causes of chronic incapacity. Upper or lower limb palsies due to brachial or lumbar plexus injuries, facial paralysis and nerve lesions caused by systemic diseases are one of the major goals of plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, the poor results obtained in repaired peripheral nerves during the Second World War lead to a pessimist vision of peripheral nerve repair. Nevertheless, a well understanding of microsurgical principles in reconstruction and molecular biology of nerve regeneration have improved the clinical results. Thus, although the results obtained are quite far from perfect, these procedures give to patients a hope in the recuperation of their lesions and then on function. Technical aspects in nerve repair are well established; the next step is to manipulate the biology. In this article we will comment the biological processes which appear in peripheral nerve regeneration, we will establish the main concepts on peripheral nerve repair applied in facial paralysis cases and, finally, we will proportionate some ideas about how clinical practice could be affected by manipulation of the peripheral nerve biology. PMID:11002897

  5. Developmental angiogenesis: quail embryonic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Poole, T J; Coffin, J D

    1988-03-01

    We have examined the segregation and early morphogenesis of the embryonic vasculature by using a monoclonal antibody for immunofluorescence and by scanning electron microscopy. This antibody labels the presumptive endothelial cells (PECs) as they segregate from mesoderm. Similar embryos prepared for SEM revealed finer details of how these segregated cells interact to form the rudiments of the major blood vessels. Here we concentrate on the development of the dorsal aortae and the posterior cardinal veins. The dorsal aortae form from single PECs which segregate from the lateral mesoderm and aggregate into a loose cord ventral to the somites. These cells become more closely associated and a lumen forms. The posterior cardinal veins form from a loose plexus of cells segregated from the lateral mesoderm on its dorsal surface. These cells become intimately associated with the Wolffian ducts. PMID:3285464

  6. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  7. Control of somatic membrane potential in nociceptive neurons and its implications for peripheral nociceptive transmission.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaona; Hao, Han; Gigout, Sylvain; Huang, Dongyang; Yang, Yuehui; Li, Li; Wang, Caixue; Sundt, Danielle; Jaffe, David B; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral sensory ganglia contain somata of afferent fibres conveying somatosensory inputs to the central nervous system. Growing evidence suggests that the somatic/perisomatic region of sensory neurons can influence peripheral sensory transmission. Control of resting membrane potential (Erest) is an important mechanism regulating excitability, but surprisingly little is known about how Erest is regulated in sensory neuron somata or how changes in somatic/perisomatic Erest affect peripheral sensory transmission. We first evaluated the influence of several major ion channels on Erest in cultured small-diameter, mostly capsaicin-sensitive (presumed nociceptive) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The strongest and most prevalent effect on Erest was achieved by modulating M channels, K2P and 4-aminopiridine-sensitive KV channels, while hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated, voltage-gated Na(+), and T-type Ca(2+) channels to a lesser extent also contributed to Erest. Second, we investigated how varying somatic/perisomatic membrane potential, by manipulating ion channels of sensory neurons within the DRG, affected peripheral nociceptive transmission in vivo. Acute focal application of M or KATP channel enhancers or a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker to L5 DRG in vivo significantly alleviated pain induced by hind paw injection of bradykinin. Finally, we show with computational modelling how somatic/perisomatic hyperpolarization, in concert with the low-pass filtering properties of the t-junction within the DRG, can interfere with action potential propagation. Our study deciphers a complement of ion channels that sets the somatic Erest of nociceptive neurons and provides strong evidence for a robust filtering role of the somatic and perisomatic compartments of peripheral nociceptive neuron. PMID:25168672

  8. Control of somatic membrane potential in nociceptive neurons and its implications for peripheral nociceptive transmission

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaona; Hao, Han; Gigout, Sylvain; Huang, Dongyang; Yang, Yuehui; Li, Li; Wang, Caixue; Sundt, Danielle; Jaffe, David B.; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral sensory ganglia contain somata of afferent fibres conveying somatosensory inputs to the central nervous system. Growing evidence suggests that the somatic/perisomatic region of sensory neurons can influence peripheral sensory transmission. Control of resting membrane potential (Erest) is an important mechanism regulating excitability, but surprisingly little is known about how Erest is regulated in sensory neuron somata or how changes in somatic/perisomatic Erest affect peripheral sensory transmission. We first evaluated the influence of several major ion channels on Erest in cultured small-diameter, mostly capsaicin-sensitive (presumed nociceptive) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The strongest and most prevalent effect on Erest was achieved by modulating M channels, K2P and 4-aminopiridine-sensitive KV channels, while hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated, voltage-gated Na+, and T-type Ca2+ channels to a lesser extent also contributed to Erest. Second, we investigated how varying somatic/perisomatic membrane potential, by manipulating ion channels of sensory neurons within the DRG, affected peripheral nociceptive transmission in vivo. Acute focal application of M or KATP channel enhancers or a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker to L5 DRG in vivo significantly alleviated pain induced by hind paw injection of bradykinin. Finally, we show with computational modelling how somatic/perisomatic hyperpolarization, in concert with the low-pass filtering properties of the t-junction within the DRG, can interfere with action potential propagation. Our study deciphers a complement of ion channels that sets the somatic Erest of nociceptive neurons and provides strong evidence for a robust filtering role of the somatic and perisomatic compartments of peripheral nociceptive neuron. PMID:25168672

  9. Retinal vasculature classification using novel multifractal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Ward, W. O. C.; Duan, Jinming; Auer, D. P.; Gowland, Penny; Bai, L.

    2015-11-01

    Retinal blood vessels have been implicated in a large number of diseases including diabetic retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases, which cause damages to retinal blood vessels. The availability of retinal vessel imaging provides an excellent opportunity for monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, and automatic analysis of retinal vessels will help with the processes. However, state of the art vascular analysis methods such as counting the number of branches or measuring the curvature and diameter of individual vessels are unsuitable for the microvasculature. There has been published research using fractal analysis to calculate fractal dimensions of retinal blood vessels, but so far there has been no systematic research extracting discriminant features from retinal vessels for classifications. This paper introduces new methods for feature extraction from multifractal spectra of retinal vessels for classification. Two publicly available retinal vascular image databases are used for the experiments, and the proposed methods have produced accuracies of 85.5% and 77% for classification of healthy and diabetic retinal vasculatures. Experiments show that classification with multiple fractal features produces better rates compared with methods using a single fractal dimension value. In addition to this, experiments also show that classification accuracy can be affected by the accuracy of vessel segmentation algorithms.

  10. LOWER EXTREMITY MANIFESTATIONS OF PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE: THE PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC AND FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF LEG ISCHEMIA

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary McGrae

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is frequently under-diagnosed, in part because of the wide variety of leg symptoms manifested by patients with PAD and in part because of the high prevalence of asymptomatic PAD. In primary care medical practices, 30% to 60% of PAD patients report no exertional leg symptoms and approximately 45–50% report exertional leg symptoms that are not consistent with classic intermittent claudication. The prevalence and extent of functional impairment and functional decline in PAD may also be underappreciated. Functional impairment and functional decline is common in PAD, even among those who are asymptomatic. Lower extremity ischemia is also associated with pathophysiologic changes in calf skeletal muscle including smaller calf muscle area, increased calf muscle fat content, impaired leg strength, and impaired metabolic function. People with severe PAD have poorer peroneal nerve conduction velocity compared to people with mild PAD or no PAD. The degree of ischemia-related pathophysiologic changes in lower extremity muscles and peripheral nerves of people with PAD are associated with the degree of functional impairment. New interventions are needed to improve functional performance and prevent mobility loss in the large number of PAD patients, including in those who are asymptomatic or who have exertional leg symptoms other than claudication. PMID:25908727

  11. The Toll of Vascular Insufficiency: Implications for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Sachdev, Ulka

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can result in limb loss within six months of diagnosis in a subset of patients who cannot undergo endovascular or surgical revascularization yet continues to maintain a marginal position in cardiovascular research. While a body of literature continues to grow describing the role of danger signaling and innate immunity in cardiac biology, the role of these pathways in the ischemic myopathy associated with PAD has not been extensively studied. The following report will review the current literature on the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in cardiovascular biology as well as in nonischemic myopathy. While attenuation of TLR signaling has not been shown to be clinically useful in the treatment of infectious inflammation, it may show promise in the management of severe arterial insufficiency. PMID:26998496

  12. In Vitro Study of Directly Bioprinted Perfusable Vasculature Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yahui; Yu, Yin; Akkouch, Adil; Dababneh, Amer; Dolati, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    The ability to create three dimensional (3D) thick tissues is still a major tissue engineering challenge. It requires the development of a suitable vascular supply for an efficient media exchange. An integrated vasculature network is particularly needed when building thick functional tissues and/or organs with high metabolic activities, such as the heart, liver and pancreas. In this work, human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUVSMCs) were encapsulated in sodium alginate and printed in the form of vasculature conduits using a coaxial deposition system. Detailed investigations were performed to understand the dehydration, swelling and degradation characteristics of printed conduits. In addition, because perfusional, permeable and mechanical properties are unique characteristics of natural blood vessels, for printed conduits these properties were also explored in this work. The results show that cells encapsulated in conduits had good proliferation activities and that their viability increased during prolonged in vitro culture. Deposition of smooth muscle matrix and collagen was observed around the peripheral and luminal surface in long-term cultured cellular vascular conduit through histology studies. PMID:25574378

  13. Productive Infection of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: Implications for Vector Development

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, James; Power, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 101.3 to 102.1 50% tissue culture infective doses/106 cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy. PMID:9971834

  14. Limb-state information encoded by peripheral and central somatosensory neurons: Implications for an afferent interface

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Douglas J.; London, Brian M.; Hokanson, James A.; Ayers, Christopher A.; Gaunt, Robert A.; Torres, Ricardo R.; Zaaimi, Boubker; Miller, Lee E.

    2013-01-01

    A major issue to be addressed in the development of neural interfaces for prosthetic control is the need for somatosensory feedback. Here, we investigate two possible strategies: electrical stimulation of either dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or primary somatosensory cortex (S1). In each approach, we must determine a model that reflects the representation of limb state in terms of neural discharge. This model can then be used to design stimuli that artificially activate the nervous system to convey information about limb state to the subject. Electrically activating DRG neurons using naturalistic stimulus patterns, modeled on recordings made during passive limb movement, evoked activity in S1 that was similar to that of the original movement. We also found that S1 neural populations could accurately discriminate different patterns of DRG stimulation across a wide range of stimulus pulse-rates. In studying the neural coding of limb-state in S1, we also decoded the kinematics of active limb movement using multi-electrode recordings in the monkey. Neurons having both proprioceptive and cutaneous receptive fields contributed equally to this decoding. Some neurons were most informative of limb state in the recent past, but many others appeared to signal upcoming movements suggesting that they also were modulated by an efference copy signal. Finally, we show that a monkey was able to detect stimulation through a large percentage of electrodes implanted in area 2. We discuss the design of appropriate stimulus paradigms for conveying time-varying limb state information, and the relative merits and limitations of central and peripheral approaches. PMID:21878419

  15. Dynamics of axonal mRNA transport and implications for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Soonmoon; van Niekerk, Erna A.; Merianda, Tanuja T.; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    Locally generating new proteins in subcellular regions provides means to spatially and temporally modify protein content in polarized cells. Recent years have seen resurgence of the concept that axonal processes of neurons can locally synthesize proteins. Experiments from a number of groups have now shown that axonal protein synthesis helps to initiate growth, provides a means to respond to guidance cues, and generates retrograde signaling complexes. Additionally, there is increasing evidence that locally synthesized proteins provide functions beyond injury responses and growth in the mature peripheral nervous system. A key regulatory event in this translational regulation is moving the mRNA templates into the axonal compartment. Transport of mRNAs into axons is a highly regulated and specific process that requires interaction of RNA binding proteins with specific cis-elements or structures within the mRNAs. mRNAs are transported in ribonucleoprotein particles that interact with microtubule motor proteins for long-range axonal transport and likely use microfilaments for short-range movement in the axons. The mature axon is able to recruit mRNAs into translation with injury and possibly other stimuli suggesting that mRNAs can be stored in a dormant state in the distal axon until needed. Axotomy triggers a shift in the populations of mRNAs localized to axons indicating a dynamic regulation of the specificity of the axonal transport machinery. In this review, we discuss how axonal mRNA transport and localization are regulated to achieve specific changes in axonal RNA content in response to axonal stimuli. PMID:19699200

  16. Central orchestration of peripheral nutrient partitioning and substrate utilization: implications for the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Denis, R G P; Joly-Amado, A; Cansell, C; Castel, J; Martinez, S; Delbes, A S; Luquet, S

    2014-06-01

    Energy homoeostasis is maintained through a complex interplay of nutrient intake and energy expenditure. The central nervous system is an essential component of this regulation, as it integrates circulating signals of hunger and satiety to develop adaptive responses at the behavioural and metabolic levels, while the hypothalamus is regarded as a particularly crucial structure in the brain in terms of energy homoeostasis. The arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus contains at least two intermingled neuronal populations: the neurons that produce neuropeptide Y (NPY); and the Agouti-related protein (AgRP) produced by AgRP/NPY neurons situated below the third ventricle in close proximity to proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-producing neurons. POMC neurons exert their catabolic and anorectic actions by releasing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), while AgRP neurons oppose this action by exerting tonic GABAergic inhibition of POMC neurons and releasing the melanocortin receptor inverse agonist AgRP. The release of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides by second-order AgRP neurons appears to take place on a multiple time scale, thereby allowing neuromodulation of preganglionic neuronal activity and subsequent control of nutrient partitioning - in other words, the coordinated regulation of conversion, storage and utilization of carbohydrates vs. lipids. This suggests that the function of AgRP neurons extends beyond the strict regulation of feeding to the regulation of efferent organ activity, such that AgRP neurons may now be viewed as an important bridge between central detection of nutrient availability and peripheral nutrient partitioning, thus providing a mechanistic link between obesity and obesity-related disorders. PMID:24332017

  17. Nonclassical Patrolling Monocyte Function in the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Graham; Tacke, Robert; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2015-01-01

    Nonclassical patrolling monocytes are characterized by their unique ability to actively patrol the vascular endothelium under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Patrolling monocyte subsets (CX3CR1highLy6C− in mouse, and CX3CR1highCD14dimCD16+ in humans) are distinct from the classical monocyte subsets (CCR2highLy6C+ in mouse, and CCR2highCD14+CD16− in humans) and exhibit unique functions in the vasculature and inflammatory disease. Patrolling monocytes function in a number of disease settings to remove damaged cells and debris from the vasculature, and have been associated with wound healing and the resolution of inflammation in damaged tissues. This review highlights the unique functions of these patrolling monocytes in the vasculature and during inflammation. PMID:25838429

  18. Nonclassical patrolling monocyte function in the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Graham; Tacke, Robert; Hedrick, Catherine C; Hanna, Richard N

    2015-06-01

    Nonclassical patrolling monocytes are characterized by their unique ability to actively patrol the vascular endothelium under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Patrolling monocyte subsets (CX3CR1(high)Ly6C(-) in mouse and CX3CR1(high)CD14(dim)CD16(+) in humans) are distinct from the classical monocyte subsets (CCR2(high)Ly6C(+) in mouse and CCR2(high)CD14(+)CD16(-) in humans) and exhibit unique functions in the vasculature and inflammatory disease. Patrolling monocytes function in several disease settings to remove damaged cells and debris from the vasculature and have been associated with wound healing and the resolution of inflammation in damaged tissues. This review highlights the unique functions of these patrolling monocytes in the vasculature and during inflammation. PMID:25838429

  19. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  20. Developmental conditioning of the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Clough, Geraldine F

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence from epidemiological and experimental animal studies that the early life environment, of which nutrition is a key component, acts through developmental adaptive responses to set the capacity of cardiovascular and metabolic pathways to respond to physiological and pathophysiological challenges in later life. One finding that is consistent to both population studies and animal models is the propensity for such effects to induce endothelial dysfunction throughout the vascular tree, including the microvasculature. Obesity, type 2 diabetes and hypertension are associated with changes in microvascular function affecting multiple tissues and organs. These changes may be detected early, often before the onset of macrovascular disease and the development of end organ damage. Suboptimal maternal nutrition and fetal growth result in reduced microvascular perfusion and functional dilator capacity in the offspring, which together with microvascular rarefaction and remodeling serve to limit capillary recruitment, reduce exchange capacity and increase diffusion distances of metabolic substrates; they also increase local and overall peripheral resistance. This article explores how a developmentally conditioned disadvantageous microvascular phenotype may represent an important and additional risk factor for increased susceptibility to the development of cardio-metabolic disease in adult life and considers the cell signaling pathways associated with microvascular dysfunction that may be "primed" by the maternal environment. As the microvasculature has been shown to be a potential target for early therapeutic and lifestyle intervention, this article also considers evidence for the efficacy of such strategies in humans and in animal models of the developmental origins of health and disease. PMID:25589274

  1. Functional implications of the localization and activity of acid-sensitive channels in rat peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Alvarez de la Rosa, Diego; Zhang, Ping; Shao, Deren; White, Fletcher; Canessa, Cecilia M

    2002-02-19

    Acid-sensitive ion channels (ASIC) are proton-gated ion channels expressed in neurons of the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems. The functional role of these channels is still uncertain, but they have been proposed to constitute mechanoreceptors and/or nociceptors. We have raised specific antibodies for ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3, and ASIC4 to examine the distribution of these proteins in neurons from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and to determine their subcellular localization. Western blot analysis demonstrates that all four ASIC proteins are expressed in DRG and sciatic nerve. Immunohistochemical experiments and functional measurements of unitary currents from the ASICs with the patch-clamp technique indicate that ASIC1 localizes to the plasma membrane of small-, medium-, and large-diameter cells, whereas ASIC2 and ASIC3 are preferentially in medium to large cells. Neurons coexpressing ASIC2 and ASIC3 form predominantly heteromeric ASIC2-3 channels. Two spliced forms, ASIC2a and ASIC2b, colocalize in the same population of DRG neurons. Within cells, the ASICs are present mainly on the plasma membrane of the soma and cellular processes. Functional studies indicate that the pH sensitivity for inactivation of ASIC1 is much higher than the one for activation; hence, increases in proton concentration will inactivate the channel. These functional properties and localization in DRG have profound implications for the putative functional roles of ASICs in the nervous system. PMID:11842212

  2. Functional implications of the localization and activity of acid-sensitive channels in rat peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez de la Rosa, Diego; Zhang, Ping; Shao, Deren; White, Fletcher; Canessa, Cecilia M.

    2002-01-01

    Acid-sensitive ion channels (ASIC) are proton-gated ion channels expressed in neurons of the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems. The functional role of these channels is still uncertain, but they have been proposed to constitute mechanoreceptors and/or nociceptors. We have raised specific antibodies for ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3, and ASIC4 to examine the distribution of these proteins in neurons from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and to determine their subcellular localization. Western blot analysis demonstrates that all four ASIC proteins are expressed in DRG and sciatic nerve. Immunohistochemical experiments and functional measurements of unitary currents from the ASICs with the patch–clamp technique indicate that ASIC1 localizes to the plasma membrane of small-, medium-, and large-diameter cells, whereas ASIC2 and ASIC3 are preferentially in medium to large cells. Neurons coexpressing ASIC2 and ASIC3 form predominantly heteromeric ASIC2–3 channels. Two spliced forms, ASIC2a and ASIC2b, colocalize in the same population of DRG neurons. Within cells, the ASICs are present mainly on the plasma membrane of the soma and cellular processes. Functional studies indicate that the pH sensitivity for inactivation of ASIC1 is much higher than the one for activation; hence, increases in proton concentration will inactivate the channel. These functional properties and localization in DRG have profound implications for the putative functional roles of ASICs in the nervous system. PMID:11842212

  3. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  4. Altered Peripheral Blood Monocyte Phenotype and Function in Chronic Liver Disease: Implications for Hepatic Recruitment and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gadd, Victoria L.; Patel, Preya J.; Jose, Sara; Horsfall, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Liver and systemic inflammatory factors influence monocyte phenotype and function, which has implications for hepatic recruitment and subsequent inflammatory and fibrogenic responses, as well as host defence. Methods Peripheral blood monocyte surface marker (CD14, CD16, CD163, CSF1R, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, HLA-DR, CD62L, SIGLEC-1) expression and capacity for phagocytosis, oxidative burst and LPS-stimulated TNF production were assessed in patients with hepatitis C (HCV) (n = 39) or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 34) (classified as non-advanced disease, compensated cirrhosis and decompensated cirrhosis) and healthy controls (n = 11) by flow cytometry. Results The selected markers exhibited similar monocyte-subset-specific expression patterns between patients and controls. Monocyte phenotypic signatures differed between NAFLD and HCV patients, with an increased proportion of CD16+ non-classical monocytes in NAFLD, but increased expression of CXCR3 and CXCR4 in HCV. In both cohorts, monocyte CCR2 expression was reduced and CCR4 elevated over controls. CD62L expression was specifically elevated in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and positively correlated with the model-for-end-stage-liver-disease score. Functionally, monocytes from patients with decompensated cirrhosis had equal phagocytic capacity, but displayed features of dysfunction, characterised by lower HLA-DR expression and blunted oxidative responses. Lower monocyte TNF production in response to LPS stimulation correlated with time to death in 7 (46%) of the decompensated patients who died within 8 months of recruitment. Conclusions Chronic HCV and NAFLD differentially affect circulating monocyte phenotype, suggesting specific injury-induced signals may contribute to hepatic monocyte recruitment and systemic activation state. Monocyte function, however, was similarly impaired in patients with both HCV and NAFLD, particularly in advanced disease, which

  5. Experimental splenosis in the liver and lung spread through the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Seguchi, S; Yue, F; Asanuma, K; Sasaki, K

    2015-05-01

    To demonstrate that intra-organ splenosis can engraft and develop after being distributed through the vasculature, tiny fragments of splenic tissues were injected into the inferior vena cava or the portal vein to induce intrapulmonary and intrahepatic splenosis in rats. After 1 month, splenic autograft structures in the lung and liver were assessed for structure by histology, for immunologic compartments by immunohistochemistry, for phagocytic function by carbon uptake and for vascular formation by Microfil (a silicon rubber compound) injection. Intrapulmonary and intrahepatic splenoses were indeed able to spread through the vasculature. The intrapulmonary splenic autografts were trapped and spread out in the interstitium, without forming a capsule. White pulp was markedly developed, showing lymphocyte aggregations that consisted in B cells surrounding the dilated vessel. Splenic sinuses were not definitively observed. Although macrophages were detected by immunohistochemistry, they showed no indication of having phagocytized carbon particles from the vessels, implying a closed circulation. In contrast, intrahepatic splenic autografts formed well-developed capsules, trabeculae and red pulp with splenic sinuses. Macrophages detected by immunohistochemistry were observed capturing carbon particles, which clearly revealed an open system circulation, as seen in normal rat spleen. The development of white pulp was poor and lymphocytes consisting in B cells aggregated in the peripheral margins. These results demonstrate that intra-organ splenosis can spread through the vasculature and that the morphologic and immunologic structures formed in these regenerated autografts are influenced by the organ vasculature and extracellular matrix wherein the tissue fragments settled. PMID:25526699

  6. Popliteal vasculature injuries in paediatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, S A; Roberts, D C; Clarke, N M P

    2012-10-01

    Popliteal-artery injuries in the paediatric-trauma patient are uncommon, difficult to diagnose and with prolonged ischaemia lead to substantial complications. We report three cases of popliteal-vasculature injury in paediatric-trauma patients with diverse mechanisms of injury: blunt trauma, penetrating injury and a Salter-Harris I fracture. We present a range of the significant sequelae that can result from paediatric popliteal-artery injury, both physically and psychologically. It is imperative that clinicians have a high index of suspicion when confronted with paediatric patients with trauma around the knee and that popliteal-vasculature injuries are diagnosed early. If insufficiencies are detected, further imaging should be considered, but surgical exploration should not be delayed in the presence of ischaemia. PMID:22776610

  7. Diagnostic angiography of the cerebrospinal vasculature.

    PubMed

    Rabinov, James D; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic catheter angiography remains the gold standard for evaluation of vascular lesions of the brain, head and neck, and spine. It is often combined with cross-sectional and functional imaging to provide a complete anatomic and physiologic workup of patients. Such data are combined with clinical information to help make treatment decisions. This chapter describes the specific techniques for arterial access and catheter navigation of the cerebrospinal vasculature. Discussion of patient positioning, injection rates, and basic anatomy of arterial and venous systems is included. Finally, important safety issues related to contrast allergy, renal failure, and complications are considered. PMID:27432664

  8. Regulation of the ovarian follicular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Hamish M

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis is associated with follicular development and is regulated independently within each follicle potentially making the functioning of its vasculature critically important in determining its fate. This review examines the various ways in which follicular angiogenesis may be monitored, describes the follicular localisation and changes in pro- and anti-angiogenic factors that may regulate the process and how antagonists may be used to elucidate their physiological role in vivo. Thus, inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2, vascular endothelial cell cadherin or interference with the angiopoietin system can inhibit follicular development or prevent ovulation. PMID:16611363

  9. Pulmonary vasculature in COPD: The silent component.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Isabel; Piccari, Lucilla; Barberà, Joan Albert

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow obstruction that results from an inflammatory process affecting the airways and lung parenchyma. Despite major abnormalities taking place in bronchial and alveolar structures, changes in pulmonary vessels also represent an important component of the disease. Alterations in vessel structure are highly prevalent and abnormalities in their function impair gas exchange and may result in pulmonary hypertension (PH), an important complication of the disease associated with reduced survival and worse clinical course. The prevalence of PH is high in COPD, particularly in advanced stages, although it remains of mild to moderate severity in the majority of cases. Endothelial dysfunction, with imbalance between vasodilator/vasoconstrictive mediators, is a key determinant of changes taking place in pulmonary vasculature in COPD. Cigarette smoke products may perturb endothelial cells and play a critical role in initiating vascular changes. The concurrence of inflammation, hypoxia and emphysema further contributes to vascular damage and to the development of PH. The use of drugs that target endothelium-dependent signalling pathways, currently employed in pulmonary arterial hypertension, is discouraged in COPD due to the lack of efficacy observed in randomized clinical trials and because there is compelling evidence indicating that these drugs may worsen pulmonary gas exchange. The subgroup of patients with severe PH should be ideally managed in centres with expertise in both PH and chronic lung diseases because alterations of pulmonary vasculature might resemble those observed in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Because this condition entails poor prognosis, it warrants specialist treatment. PMID:27028849

  10. Role of vasculature in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, Martin; Steinhoff, Antje; Homey, Bernhard; Luger, Thomas A; Schneider, Stefan W

    2006-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) lesions are characterized by differences in the activation state of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells and the release of inflammatory mediators by and toward the vasculature. The vascular system, including endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, is ultimately involved in clinical symptoms of AD, such as erythema, edema, leukocyte recruitment, and white dermographism. Various mediators and bidirectional neurovascular interactions regulate the inflammatory response during AD. T cell-endothelial cell interactions are a crucial component to establish acute AD. Various immune cells, including monocytes and mast cells, communicate with the endothelium by releasing inflammatory mediators, thereby stimulating inflammatory mediator release from activated endothelial cells. The process of adhesion, tethering, and transmigration of infiltrating cells is a highly regulated and an active communication process between endothelial cells and leukocytes. Endothelial cells play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of AD and represent future targets for the treatment of AD. PMID:16815154

  11. Tendon Vasculature in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tendons represent a bradytrophic tissue which is poorly vascularized and, compared to bone or skin, heal poorly. Usually, a vascularized connective scar tissue with inferior functional properties forms at the injury site. Whether the increased vascularization is the root cause of tissue impairments such as loss of collagen fiber orientation, ectopic formation of bone, fat or cartilage, or is a consequence of these pathological changes remains unclear. This review provides an overview of the role of tendon vasculature in healthy and chronically diseased tendon tissue as well as its relevance for tendon repair. Further, the nature and the role of perivascular tendon stem/progenitor cells residing in the vascular niche will be discussed and compared to multipotent stromal cells in other tissues. PMID:26635616

  12. Genetic determinants of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Yolanda; Cederlund, Maria L; Cottell, David C; Bill, Brent R; Ekker, Stephen C; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Weinstein, Brant M; Hyde, David R; Vihtelic, Thomas S; Kennedy, Breandan N

    2007-01-01

    Background The retinal vasculature is a capillary network of blood vessels that nourishes the inner retina of most mammals. Developmental abnormalities or microvascular complications in the retinal vasculature result in severe human eye diseases that lead to blindness. To exploit the advantages of zebrafish for genetic, developmental and pharmacological studies of retinal vasculature, we characterised the intraocular vasculature in zebrafish. Results We show a detailed morphological and developmental analysis of the retinal blood supply in zebrafish. Similar to the transient hyaloid vasculature in mammalian embryos, vessels are first found attached to the zebrafish lens at 2.5 days post fertilisation. These vessels progressively lose contact with the lens and by 30 days post fertilisation adhere to the inner limiting membrane of the juvenile retina. Ultrastructure analysis shows these vessels to exhibit distinctive hallmarks of mammalian retinal vasculature. For example, smooth muscle actin-expressing pericytes are ensheathed by the basal lamina of the blood vessel, and vesicle vacuolar organelles (VVO), subcellular mediators of vessel-retinal nourishment, are present. Finally, we identify 9 genes with cell membrane, extracellular matrix and unknown identity that are necessary for zebrafish hyaloid and retinal vasculature development. Conclusion Zebrafish have a retinal blood supply with a characteristic developmental and adult morphology. Abnormalities of these intraocular vessels are easily observed, enabling application of genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish to identify molecular regulators of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in development and disease. PMID:17937808

  13. Hippo signaling mediators Yap and Taz are required in the epicardium for coronary vasculature development

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anamika; Ramesh, Sindhu; Cibi, Dasan Mary; Yun, Lim Sze; Li, Jun; Li, Li; Manderfield, Lauren J.; Olson, Eric N.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Singh, Manvendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Formation of the coronary vasculature is a complex and precisely coordinated morphogenetic process that begins with the formation of epicardium. The epicardium gives rise to many components of the coronary vasculature, including fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells and endothelium. Hippo signaling components have been implicated in cardiac development and regeneration. However a role of Hippo signaling in the epicardium has not been explored. Employing a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that inhibition of Hippo signaling mediators Yap and Taz leads to impaired epicardial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a reduction in epicardial cell proliferation and differentiation into coronary endothelial cells. We provide evidence that Yap and Taz control epicardial cell behavior, in part by regulating Tbx18 and Wt1 expression. Our findings show a role for Hippo signaling in epicardial cell proliferation, EMT and cell fate specification during cardiac organogenesis. PMID:27160901

  14. Effector lymphocyte-induced lymph node-like vasculature enables naïve T-cell entry into tumors and enhanced anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Peske, J. David; Thompson, Elizabeth D.; Gemta, Lelisa; Baylis, Richard A.; Fu, Yang-Xin; Engelhard, Victor H.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of lymph node (LN)-like vasculature in tumors, characterized by expression of peripheral node addressin and chemokine CCL21, is correlated with T-cell infiltration and positive prognosis in breast cancer and melanoma patients. However, mechanisms controlling the development of LN-like vasculature and how it might contribute to a beneficial outcome for cancer patients are unknown. Here we demonstrate that LN-like vasculature is present in murine models of melanoma and lung carcinoma. It enables infiltration by naïve T-cells that significantly delay tumor outgrowth after intratumoral activation. Development of this vasculature is controlled by a mechanism involving effector CD8 T-cells and NK cells that secrete LTα3 and IFNγ. LN-like vasculature is also associated with organized aggregates of B-lymphocytes and gp38+ fibroblasts that resemble tertiary lymphoid organs that develop in models of chronic inflammation. These results establish LN-like vasculature as both a consequence of and key contributor to anti-tumor immunity. PMID:25968334

  15. Effector lymphocyte-induced lymph node-like vasculature enables naive T-cell entry into tumours and enhanced anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Peske, J David; Thompson, Elizabeth D; Gemta, Lelisa; Baylis, Richard A; Fu, Yang-Xin; Engelhard, Victor H

    2015-01-01

    The presence of lymph node (LN)-like vasculature in tumours, characterized by expression of peripheral node addressin and chemokine CCL21, is correlated with T-cell infiltration and positive prognosis in breast cancer and melanoma patients. However, mechanisms controlling the development of LN-like vasculature and how it might contribute to a beneficial outcome for cancer patients are unknown. Here we demonstrate that LN-like vasculature is present in murine models of melanoma and lung carcinoma. It enables infiltration by naive T cells that significantly delay tumour outgrowth after intratumoral activation. Development of this vasculature is controlled by a mechanism involving effector CD8 T cells and NK cells that secrete LTα3 and IFNγ. LN-like vasculature is also associated with organized aggregates of B lymphocytes and gp38(+) fibroblasts, which resemble tertiary lymphoid organs that develop in models of chronic inflammation. These results establish LN-like vasculature as both a consequence of and key contributor to anti-tumour immunity. PMID:25968334

  16. Mathematical modeling of light-mediated HPA axis activity and downstream implications on the entrainment of peripheral clock genes.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Panteleimon D; Corbett, Siobhan A; Calvano, Steven E; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-10-15

    In this work we propose a semimechanistic model that describes the photic signal transduction to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that ultimately regulates the synchronization of peripheral clock genes (PCGs). Our HPA axis model predicts that photic stimulation induces a type-1 phase response curve to cortisol's profile with increased cortisol sensitivity to light exposure in its rising phase, as well as the shortening of cortisol's period as constant light increases (Aschoff's first rule). Furthermore, our model provides insight into cortisol's phase and amplitude dependence on photoperiods and reveals that cortisol maintains highest amplitude variability when it is entrained by a balanced schedule of light and dark periods. Importantly, by incorporating the links between HPA axis and PCGs we were able to investigate how cortisol secretion impacts the entrainment of a population of peripheral cells and show that disrupted light schedules, leading to blunted cortisol secretion, fail to synchronize a population of PCGs which further signifies the loss of circadian rhythmicity in the periphery of the body. PMID:25073602

  17. The choroid plexus is modulated by various peripheral stimuli: implications to diseases of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Fernanda; Sousa, João C.

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) and the blood cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) form the barriers of the brain. These barriers are essential not only for the protection of the brain, but also in regulating the exchange of cells and molecules in and out of the brain. The choroid plexus (CP) epithelial cells and the arachnoid membrane form the BCSFB. The CP is structurally divided into two independent compartments: one formed by a unique and continuous line of epithelial cells that rest upon a basal lamina; and, a second consisting of a central core formed by connective and highly vascularized tissue populated by diverse cell types (fibroblasts, macrophages and dendritic cells). Here, we review how the CP transcriptome and secretome vary depending on the nature and duration of the stimuli to which the CP is exposed. Specifically, when the peripheral stimulation is acute the CP response is rapid, strong and transient, whereas if the stimulation is sustained in time the CP response persists but it is weaker. Furthermore, not all of the epithelium responds at the same time to peripheral stimulation, suggesting the existence of a synchrony system between individual CP epithelial cells. PMID:26236190

  18. Expression of the Kynurenine Pathway in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Implications for Inflammatory and Neurodegenerative Disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon P; Franco, Nunzio F; Varney, Bianca; Sundaram, Gayathri; Brown, David A; de Bie, Josien; Lim, Chai K; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brew, Bruce J

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway is a fundamental mechanism of immunosuppression and peripheral tolerance. It is increasingly recognized as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and malignant disorders. However, the temporal dynamics of kynurenine pathway activation and metabolite production in human immune cells is currently unknown. Here we report the novel use of flow cytometry, combined with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to sensitively quantify the intracellular expression of three key kynurenine pathway enzymes and the main kynurenine pathway metabolites in a time-course study. This is the first study to show that up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), kynurenine 3-monoxygenase (KMO) and quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) is lacking in lymphocytes treated with interferon gamma. In contrast, peripheral monocytes showed a significant elevation of kynurenine pathway enzymes and metabolites when treated with interferon gamma. Expression of IDO-1, KMO and QPRT correlated significantly with activation of the kynurenine pathway (kynurenine:tryptophan ratio), quinolinic acid concentration and production of the monocyte derived, pro-inflammatory immune response marker: neopterin. Our results also describe an original and sensitive methodological approach to quantify kynurenine pathway enzyme expression in cells. This has revealed further insights into the potential role of these enzymes in disease processes. PMID:26114426

  19. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of diabetic vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Arie; Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-06-01

    We used functional photoacoustic microscopy to image diabetes-induced damage to the microvasculature. To produce an animal model for Type 1 diabetes, we used streptozotocin (STZ), which is particularly toxic to the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas in mammals. A set number of ND4 Swiss Webster mice received intraperitoneal injections of STZ for five consecutive days at 50 mg/kg. Most mice developed a significant rise in blood glucose level (~400 mg/dL) within three weeks of the first injection. Changes in vasculature and hemodynamics were monitored for six weeks. The mouse ear was imaged with an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope at a main blood vessel branch from the root of the ear. There are noticeable and measurable changes associated with the disease, including decreased vessel diameter and possible occlusion due to vessel damage and polyurea. We also observed an increase in the blood flow speed in the vein and a decrease in the artery, which could be due to compensation for the dehydration and vessel diameter changes. Functional and metabolic parameters such as hemoglobin oxygen saturation, oxygen extraction fraction, and oxygen consumption rate were also measured, but showed no significant change.

  20. Thioaptamer Conjugated Liposomes for Tumor Vasculature Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Aman P.; Bhavane, Rohan C.; Somasunderam, Anoma; Montalvo-Ortiz, Brenda Liz; Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Volk, David; Nieves-Alicea, René; Suh, K. Stephen; Ferrari, Mauro; Annapragada, Ananth; Gorenstein, David G.; Tanaka, Takemi

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in multi-functional nanoparticles offer a great potential for targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds and imaging contrast agents to specific cell types, in turn, enhancing therapeutic effect and minimizing side effects. Despite the promise, site specific delivery carriers have not been translated into clinical reality. In this study, we have developed long circulating liposomes with the outer surface decorated with thioated oligonucleotide aptamer (thioaptamer) against E-selectin (ESTA) and evaluated the targeting efficacy and PK parameters. In vitro targeting studies using Human Umbilical Cord Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) demonstrated efficient and rapid uptake of the ESTA conjugated liposomes (ESTA-lip). In vivo, the intravenous administration of ESTA-lip resulted in their accumulation at the tumor vasculature of breast tumor xenografts without shortening the circulation half-life. The study presented here represents an exemplary use of thioaptamer for targeting and opens the door to testing various combinations of thioaptamer and nanocarriers that can be constructed to target multiple cancer types and tumor components for delivery of both therapeutics and imaging agents. PMID:21666286

  1. Cocaine Constrictor Mechanisms of the Cerebral Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Robert M; Yoon, SeongHun; Zuccarello, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Cocaine constriction of the cerebral vasculature is thought to contribute to the ischemia associated with cocaine use. However, the mechanisms whereby cocaine elicits relevant vasoconstriction remain elusive. Indeed, proposed intra- and intercellular mechanisms based on over 3 decades of ex vivo vascular studies are, for the most part, of questionable relevancy due to the generally low contractile efficacy of cocaine combined with the use of nonresistance-type vessels. Furthermore, the significance attached to mechanisms derived from in vivo animal studies may be limited by the inability to demonstrate cocaine-induced decreased cerebral blood flow, as observed in (awake) humans. Despite these apparent limitations, we surmise that the vasoconstriction relevant to cocaine-induced ischemia is elicited by inhibition of dilator and activation of constrictor pathways because of cocaine action on the neurovascular unit (neuron, astrocyte, and vessel) and on vessels outside the unit. Furthermore, previous cocaine exposure, that is, conditions present in human subjects, downregulates and sensitizes these dilator and constrictor pathways, respectively, thereby enhancing constriction to acute cocaine. Identification of specific intra- and intercellular mechanisms requires investigations in the isolated microvasculature and the neurovascular unit from species chronically exposed to cocaine and in which cocaine decreases cerebral blood flow. PMID:26771152

  2. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy. PMID:21874492

  3. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Groeneweg, George; Huygen, Frank JPM; Coderre, Terence J; Zijlstra, Freek J

    2009-01-01

    Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropathic, inflammatory, nociceptive, or functional nature, or of mixed origin. Summary The origin of the pain should be the basis of the symptomatic therapy. Since the difference in temperature between both hands fluctuates over time in cold CRPS, when in doubt, the clinician should prioritize the patient's report of a persistent cold extremity over clinical tests that show no difference. Future research should focus on developing easily applied methods for clinical use to differentiate between central and peripheral blood flow regulation disorders in individual patients. PMID:19775468

  4. Central and peripheral regulation of feeding and nutrition by the mammalian circadian clock: implications for nutrition during manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassone, Vincent M.; Stephan, Friedrich K.

    2002-01-01

    Circadian clocks have evolved to predict and coordinate physiologic processes with the rhythmic environment on Earth. Space studies in non-human primates and humans have suggested that this clock persists in its rhythmicity in space but that its function is altered significantly in long-term space flight. Under normal circumstances, the clock is synchronized by the light-dark cycle via the retinohypothalamic tract and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. It is also entrained by restricted feeding regimes via a suprachiasmatic nucleus-independent circadian oscillator. The site of this suboscillator (or oscillators) is not known, but new evidence has suggested that peripheral tissues in the liver and viscera may express circadian clock function when forced to do so by restricted feeding schedules or other homeostatic disruptions. New research on the role of the circadian clock in the control of feeding on Earth and in space is warranted.

  5. SCN9A Variants May be Implicated in Neuropathic Pain Associated With Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy and Pain Severity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Peter; Favis, Reyna; Wickenden, Alan; Romano, Gary; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Previous studies have established the role of SCN9A in various pain conditions, including idiopathic small fiber neuropathy. In the present study, we interrogate the relationship between common and rare variants in SCN9A gene and chronic neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Design: Using a cohort of 938 patients of European ancestry with chronic neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy enrolled in 6 clinical studies and 2 controls (POPRES, n=2624 and Coriell, n=1029), we examined the relationship between SCN9A variants and neuropathic pain in a case-control study using a 2-stage design. The exonic regions of SCN9A were sequenced in a subset of 244 patients with neuropathic pain, and the variants discovered were compared with POPRES control (stage 1). The top associated variants were followed up by genotyping in the entire case collection and Coriell controls restricting the analysis to the matching patients from the United States and Canada only (stage 2). Results: Seven variants were found to be associated with neuropathic pain at the sequencing stage. Four variants (Asp1908Gly, Val991Leu/Met932Leu, and an intronic variant rs74449889) were confirmed by genotyping to occur at a higher frequency in cases than controls (odds ratios ∼2.1 to 2.6, P=0.05 to 0.009). Val991Leu/Met932Leu was also associated with the severity of pain as measured by pain score Numeric Rating Scale (NRS-11, P=0.047). Val991Leu/Met932Leu variants were in complete linkage disequilibrium and previously shown to cause hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglia neurons. Conclusions: The association of SCN9A variants with neuropathic pain and pain severity suggests a role of SCN9A in the disease etiology of neuropathic pain. PMID:25585270

  6. Simultaneous segmentation and anatomical labeling of the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Robben, David; Türetken, Engin; Sunaert, Stefan; Thijs, Vincent; Wilms, Guy; Fua, Pascal; Maes, Frederik; Suetens, Paul

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the simultaneous segmentation and anatomical labeling of the cerebral vasculature. Unlike existing approaches that first attempt to obtain a good segmentation and then perform labeling, we optimize for both by simultaneously taking into account the image evidence and the prior knowledge about the geometry and connectivity of the vasculature. This is achieved by first constructing an overcomplete graph capturing the vasculature, and then selecting and labeling the subset of edges that most likely represents the true vasculature. We formulate the latter problem as an Integer Program (IP), which can be solved efficiently to provable optimality. We evaluate our approach on a publicly available dataset of 50 cerebral MRA images, and demonstrate that it compares favorably against state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27131026

  7. Non-Physiologic Blood Flow Triggers Endothelial and Arterial Remodeling In Vivo: Implications for Novel LVADs with a Peripheral Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Carlo R.; Spence, Paul A.; Siess, Thorsten; Raess, Daniel H.; Koenig, Steven C.; Dowling, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Less-invasive circulatory support devices have been developed that require anastomosis to a peripheral artery. The Symphony Heart Assist System is a volume displacement pump sewn to the subclavian artery to provide partial circulatory support. The surgical configuration produces non-physiologic blood pressure and bidirectional flow in the subclavian artery. Our objective was to identify effects of altered hemodynamics on arterial structure and function. Methods In calves (n=23, 80-100kg), the Symphony pump was sewn end-to-side to the carotid artery. Acutely, carotid blood pressure and flow were recorded to evaluate hemodynamic changes. After medium-term support (1-4 weeks), carotid artery cross sections were studied. Histology and molecular assays evaluated architectural changes. Quantitative real-time PCR evaluated gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In vitro carotid arterial-ring studies evaluated physiological responses. Results During Symphony support, carotid arterial pressure was 200/15mmHg. Antegrade flow increased significantly (p<0.05) from 1.40±0.32 to 4.29±0.33L/min. Flow during native cardiac diastole reversed completely from 0.25±0.05 to -4.15±0.38L/min in carotid artery proximal to the anastomosis. After medium-term support, the carotid artery was significantly dilated with significantly thinner tunica media and thicker tunica adventitia versus controls. MMP-9 gene expression decreased significantly, CTGF gene expression increased significantly, and collagen, elastin, and total extracellular matrix increased significantly. Endothelial cells were significantly hypertrophied and produced significantly more von Willebrand factor. Endothelial apoptosis increased significantly. Platelet-endothelial interactions decreased significantly. Endothelial-independent contraction decreased significantly, whereas endothelial-dependant relaxation increased modestly. Conclusions

  8. Comparison of the function of the serotonin transporter in the vasculature of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Linder, Aurea Elizabeth; Davis, Robert Patrick; Burnett, Robert; Watts, Stephanie W

    2011-05-01

    1. The serotonin transporter (SERT) handles serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) and is blocked by the antidepressant SERT inhibitors fluoxetine and fluvoxamine. Although the importance of SERT in the central nervous system is clear, SERT also functions in the peripheral vasculature. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the vasculature from female rats has increased SERT function compared with male rats because females are more responsive to SERT inhibitors. 2. In addition to in vitro experiments, in vivo experiments were used to evaluate how male and female rats handle chronically elevated levels of 5-HT. Wild-type (WT) and SERT-knockout (SERT-KO) rats were infused with 5-HT (25 μg/kg per min) for 7 days by minipump. 3. Using HPLC analysis, we demonstrated that blood vessels (aorta, carotid artery, jugular vein and vena cava) from naïve, non-infused female rats took up 5-HT acutely in vitro in a SERT-dependent manner. In in vitro experiments, SERT affected the contractility of aortas from female rats, as evidenced by an eightfold increase in potency of 5-HT in fluvoxamine (1 μmol/L)-incubated WT aortas compared with control. Fluvoxamine did not alter 5-HT-induced contraction in aortas from SERT-KO female rats. 4. Infusion of 5-HT resulted in an increase in tissue 5-HT that was reduced to a larger extent in blood vessels from female than male SERT-KO rats. Aortic contractions to 5-HT were abolished in aortas from male and female 5-HT-infused SERT-KO rats compared with WT rats. 5. Collectively, these data suggest that SERT function, when challenged with 5-HT, is modestly more important in the vasculature of the female compared with male rat. PMID:21371073

  9. Antibody drug-conjugates targeting the tumor vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Hans-Peter; Senter, Peter D

    2009-01-01

    Reducing the blood supply of tumors is one modality to combat cancer. Monoclonal antibodies are now established as a key therapeutic approach for a range of diseases. Owing to the ability of antibodies to selectively target endothelial cells within the tumor vasculature, vascular targeting programs have become a mainstay in oncology drug development. However, the antitumor activity of single agent administration of conventional anti-angiogenic compounds is limited and the improvements in patient survival are most prominent in combinations with chemotherapy. Furthermore, prolonged treatment with conventional anti-angiogenic drugs is associated with toxicity and drug resistance. These circumstances provide a strong rationale for novel approaches to enhance the efficacy of mAbs targeting tumor vasculature such as antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). Here, we review trends in the development of ADCs targeting tumor vasculature with the aim of informing future research and development of this class of therapeutics. PMID:20069754

  10. The Multifaceted Role of the Vasculature in Endochondral Fracture Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bahney, Chelsea S.; Hu, Diane P.; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    Fracture healing is critically dependent upon an adequate vascular supply. The normal rate for fracture delayed or non-union is estimated to be between 10 and 15%, and annual fracture numbers are approximately 15 million cases per year. However, when there is decreased vascular perfusion to the fracture, incidence of impaired healing rises dramatically to 46%. Reduction in the blood supply to the fracture can be the result of traumatic injuries that physically disrupt the vasculature and damage supportive soft tissue, the result of anatomical location (i.e., distal tibia), or attributed to physiological conditions such as age, diabetes, or smoking. The role of the vasculature during repair is multifaceted and changes during the course of healing. In this article, we review recent insights into the role of the vasculature during fracture repair. Taken together these data highlight the need for an updated model for endochondral repair to facilitate improved therapeutic approaches to promote bone healing. PMID:25699016

  11. Pulmonary vasculature and critical asthma syndromes: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Avdalovic, Mark

    2015-02-01

    One of the important factors and consequences in persistent asthma is the change in the vasculature of the airways and lung parenchyma. These changes could contribute to worsening asthma control and predispose asthmatics to critical asthma syndromes. For many years, the contribution of vasculature to severe asthma was limited to discussion of small and medium vessel vasculitis commonly referred to as Churg-Strauss syndrome. This comprehensive review will explore the known mechanisms that are associated with remodeling of the vasculature in a variety of critical asthma presentations. Inflammation of pulmonary and bronchial small blood vessels may contribute significantly but silently to asthma pathobiology. Inflammation in the vasculature of the lung parenchyma can decrease lung capacity while inflammation in airway vasculature can decrease airflow. This review will provide a modern perspective on Churg-Strauss syndromes with a focus on phenotyping, mechanism, and ultimately modern therapeutic approaches. Vascular remodeling and airway remodeling are not mutually exclusive concepts in understanding the progression of asthma and frequency of acute exacerbations. Furthermore, the contribution of vascular leak, particularly in the parenchymal vasculature, has become an increasingly recognized component of certain presentations of poorly controlled, severe persistent asthmatic and during exacerbations. We highlight how these mechanisms can contribute to some the severe presentations of influenza infection in patients with a history of asthma. The ultimate aim of this review is to summarize the current literature concerning vasculitis and the contribution of airway and parenchymal vascular remodeling to presentation of persistent asthma and its consequences during acute exacerbations and critical asthma syndromes. PMID:24752370

  12. A survey on the visualization and reconstruction of vasculatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qingqi

    2014-01-01

    Visualization and reconstruction of blood vessel from standard medical datasets play an important role in many clinical situations. This paper presents a survey on the visualization and reconstruction of vascular structures. Firstly, the visualization techniques of vasculatures are introduced, which includes volume rendering and surface rendering of vasculatures. Then, we focus on the reconstruction techniques of vascular structures, which can be classified into two categories: explicit reconstruction and implicit reconstruction of vascular structures. With reconstructed vascular geometry, it is quite easy to produce smooth visualization of vessel surfaces. In addition, finding the accurate geometric representation of vascular structures is crucial in developing computer aided vascular surgery systems.

  13. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Metabolic and endocrine disorders impair the body’s ability to transform nutrients into ... to neuropathies as a result of chemical imbalances. Endocrine disorders that lead to hormonal imbalances can disturb normal ...

  14. Imaging and treating tumor vasculature with targeted radiolabeled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Villa, Carlos H; Holland, Jason P; Sprinkle, Shanna R; May, Chad; Lewis, Jason S; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) constructs were covalently appended with radiometal-ion chelates (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid [DOTA] or desferrioxamine B [DFO]) and the tumor neovascular-targeting antibody E4G10. The E4G10 antibody specifically targeted the monomeric vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cad) epitope expressed in the tumor angiogenic vessels. The construct specific activity and blood compartment clearance kinetics were significantly improved relative to corresponding antibodyalone constructs. We performed targeted radioimmunotherapy with a SWCNT-([(225)Ac]DOTA) (E4G10) construct directed at the tumor vasculature in a murine xenograft model of human colon adenocarcinoma (LS174T). The specific construct reduced tumor volume and improved median survival relative to controls. We also performed positron emission tomographic (PET) radioimmunoimaging of the tumor vessels with a SWCNT-([(89)Zr]DFO)(E4G10) construct in the same murine LS174T xenograft model and compared the results to appropriate controls. Dynamic and longitudinal PET imaging of LS174T tumor-bearing mice demonstrated rapid blood clearance (<1 hour) and specific tumor accumulation of the specific construct. Incorporation of the SWCNT scaffold into the construct design permitted us to amplify the specific activity to improve the signal-to-noise ratio without detrimentally impacting the immunoreactivity of the targeting antibody moiety. Furthermore, we were able to exploit the SWCNT pharmacokinetic (PK) profile to favorably alter the blood clearance and provide an advantage for rapid imaging. Near-infrared three-dimensional fluorescent-mediated tomography was used to image the LS174T tumor model, collect antibody-alone PK data, and calculate the number of copies of VE-cad epitope per cell. All of these studies were performed as a single administration of construct and were found to be safe and well tolerated by the murine model. These data have implications that

  15. MR Molecular Imaging of Tumor Vasculature and Vascular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Arvind P.; Penet, Marie-France; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis and the ability of cancer cells to induce neovasculature continue to be a fascinating area of research. As the delivery network that provides substrates and nutrients, as well as chemotherapeutic agents to cancer cells, but allows cancer cells to disseminate, the tumor vasculature is richly primed with targets and mechanisms that can be exploited for cancer cure or control. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of tumor vasculature, and the heterogeneity of response to targeting, make noninvasive imaging essential for understanding the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis, tracking vascular targeting, and detecting the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapies. With its noninvasive characteristics, exquisite spatial resolution and range of applications, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have provided a wealth of functional and molecular information on tumor vasculature in applications spanning from “bench to bedside”. The integration of molecular biology and chemistry to design novel imaging probes ensures the continued evolution of the molecular capabilities of MRI. In this review, we have focused on developments in the characterization of tumor vasculature with functional and molecular MRI. PMID:20807600

  16. Effect of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Foregut Vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids induce vasoconstriction of bovine foregut vasculature. Ergovaline induced the greatest response in ruminal artery while ergovaline and ergotamine induced the greatest response in ruminal vein. Lysergic acid did not stimulate a contractile response in either the ruminal artery or vein...

  17. The lymphatic vasculature: development and role in shaping immunity.

    PubMed

    Betterman, Kelly L; Harvey, Natasha L

    2016-05-01

    The lymphatic vasculature is an integral component of the immune system. Lymphatic vessels are a key highway via which immune cells are trafficked, serving not simply as a passive route of transport, but to actively shape and coordinate immune responses. Reciprocally, immune cells provide signals that impact the growth, development, and activity of the lymphatic vasculature. In addition to immune cell trafficking, lymphatic vessels are crucial for fluid homeostasis and lipid absorption. The field of lymphatic vascular research is rapidly expanding, fuelled by rapidly advancing technology that has enabled the manipulation and imaging of lymphatic vessels, together with an increasing recognition of the involvement of lymphatic vessels in a myriad of human pathologies. In this review we provide an overview of the genetic pathways and cellular processes important for development and maturation of the lymphatic vasculature, discuss recent work revealing important roles for the lymphatic vasculature in directing immune cell traffic and coordinating immune responses and highlight the involvement of lymphatic vessels in a range of pathological settings. PMID:27088921

  18. Thermal modelling using discrete vasculature for thermal therapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kok, H.P.; Gellermann, J.; van den Berg, C.A.T.; Stauffer, P.R.; Hand, J.W.; Crezee, J.

    2013-01-01

    Reliable temperature information during clinical hyperthermia and thermal ablation is essential for adequate treatment control, but conventional temperature measurements do not provide 3D temperature information. Treatment planning is a very useful tool to improve treatment quality and substantial progress has been made over the last decade. Thermal modelling is a very important and challenging aspect of hyperthermia treatment planning. Various thermal models have been developed for this purpose, with varying complexity. Since blood perfusion is such an important factor in thermal redistribution of energy in in vivo tissue, thermal simulations are most accurately performed by modelling discrete vasculature. This review describes the progress in thermal modelling with discrete vasculature for the purpose of hyperthermia treatment planning and thermal ablation. There has been significant progress in thermal modelling with discrete vasculature. Recent developments have made real-time simulations possible, which can provide feedback during treatment for improved therapy. Future clinical application of thermal modelling with discrete vasculature in hyperthermia treatment planning is expected to further improve treatment quality. PMID:23738700

  19. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  20. Small GTPase Rap1 Is Essential for Mouse Development and Formation of Functional Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; White, Gilbert C.; Quilliam, Lawrence A.; Whitehead, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Small GTPase Rap1 has been implicated in a number of basic cellular functions, including cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, proliferation and regulation of polarity. Evolutionarily conserved, Rap1 has been studied in model organisms: yeast, Drosophila and mice. Mouse in vivo studies implicate Rap1 in the control of multiple stem cell, leukocyte and vascular cell functions. In vitro, several Rap1 effectors and regulatory mechanisms have been proposed. In particular, Rap1 has been implicated in maintaining epithelial and endothelial cell junction integrity and linked with cerebral cavernous malformations. Rationale How Rap1 signaling network controls mammalian development is not clear. As a first step in addressing this question, we present phenotypes of murine total and vascular-specific Rap1a, Rap1b and double Rap1a and Rap1b (Rap1) knockout (KO) mice. Results and Conclusions The majority of total Rap1 KO mice die before E10.5, consistent with the critical role of Rap1 in epithelial morphogenesis. At that time point, about 50% of Tie2-double Rap1 KOs appear grossly normal and develop normal vasculature, while the remaining 50% suffer tissue degeneration and show vascular abnormalities, including hemorrhages and engorgement of perineural vessels, albeit with normal branchial arches. However, no Tie2-double Rap1 KO embryos are present at E15.5, with hemorrhages a likely cause of death. Therefore, at least one Rap1 allele is required for development prior to the formation of the vascular system; and in endothelium–for the life-supporting function of the vasculature. PMID:26714318

  1. Enhanced Vascular PI3K/Akt-NOX Signaling Underlies the Peripheral NMDAR-Mediated Pressor Response in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Marie A.; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for peripheral N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated vascular oxidative stress and pressor response are not known. We conducted integrative (in vivo) and ex vivo biochemical studies to test the hypothesis that ROS-dependent calcium influx, triggered by activation of vascular kinases, underlies the NMDAR-mediated pressor response. Pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/Akt (Wortmannin; 15 μg/kg), PKC (Chelerythrine; 5 mg/kg, i.v.), Ca2+ influx (nifedipine; 0.35 or 0.75 mg/kg) or NOX (apocynin; 5 mg/kg) attenuated the peripheral NMDAR-mediated pressor response in conscious male Sprague-Dawley rats. NMDAR activation enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt, ERK1, JNK and p38 (Western blot) and NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity in vascular tissues collected during the pressor response caused by NMDA infusion (180 μg/kg/min, 30 min). Further, ex vivo studies showed that wortmannin, chelerythrine or apocynin abrogated the NMDAR-mediated vascular NO and ROS generation and NOX activation in the vasculature. These findings implicate vascular PI3K/Akt-PKC signaling in the peripheral NMDAR-mediated increases in vascular NO and NOX activation (ROS), which ultimately lead to calcium influx and pressor response in conscious rats. PMID:24336015

  2. Lipopolysaccharide-induced early response genes in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells implicate GLG1/E-selectin as a key ligand–receptor interaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study uses a systems biology approach, integrating global gene expression information and knowledge of the regulatory events in cells to identify transcription networks controlling peripheral blood mononuclear cells’ (PBMCs) immune response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to identify the molecu...

  3. Role of taurine in the vasculature: an overview of experimental and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Worku; Mozaffari, Mahmood S

    2011-01-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid-like endogenous compound found in substantial amounts in mammalian tissues. It exerts a diverse array of biological effects, including cardiovascular regulation, antioxidation, modulation of ion transport, membrane stabilization, osmoregulation, modulation of neurotransmission, bile acid conjugation, hypolipidemia, antiplatelet activity and modulation of fetal development. This brief review summarizes the role of taurine in the vasculature and modulation of blood pressure, based on experimental and human studies. Oral supplementation of taurine induces antihypertensive effects in various animal models of hypertension. These effects of taurine have been shown to be both centrally and peripherally mediated. Consistent with this, taurine produces endothelium-dependent and independent relaxant effects in isolated vascular tissue preparations. Oral administration of taurine also ameliorates impairment of vascular reactivity, intimal thickening, arteriosclerosis, endothelial apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation, associated primarily with diabetes and, to a lesser extent with obesity, hypertension and nicotine-induced vascular adverse events. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), taurine acts as an antiproliferative and antioxidant agent. In endothelial cells, taurine inhibits apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress and cell death while increasing NO generation. Oral taurine in hypertensive human patients alleviates the symptoms of hypertension and also reverses arterial stiffness and brachial artery reactivity in type 1 diabetic patients. However, despite these favorable findings, there is a need to further establish certain aspects of the reported results and also consider addressing unresolved related issues. In addition, the molecular mechanism (s) involved in the vascular effects of taurine is largely unknown and requires further investigations. Elucidation of the mechanisms through which taurine

  4. Angiography reveals novel features of the retinal vasculature in healthy and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    McLenachan, Samuel; Magno, Aaron Len; Ramos, David; Catita, Joana; McMenamin, Paul G; Chen, Fred Kuanfu; Rakoczy, Elizabeth Piroska; Ruberte, Jesus

    2015-09-01

    The mouse retina is a commonly used animal model for the study of pathogenesis and treatment of blinding retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we aimed to characterize normal and pathological variations in vascular anatomy in the mouse retina using fluorescein angiography visualized with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography (SLO-OCT). We examined eyes from C57BL/6J wild type mice as well as the Ins2(Akita) and Akimba mouse models of diabetic retinopathy using the Heidelberg Retinal Angiography (HRA) and OCT system. Angiography was performed on three focal planes to examine distinct vascular layers. For comparison with angiographic data, ex vivo analyses, including Indian ink angiography, histology and 3D confocal scanning laser microscopy were performed in parallel. All layers of the mouse retinal vasculature could be readily visualized during fluorescein angiography by SLO-OCT. Blood vessel density was increased in the deep vascular plexus (DVP) compared with the superficial vascular plexus (SVP). Arteriolar and venular typologies were established and structural differences were observed between venular types. Unexpectedly, the hyaloid artery was found to persist in 15% of C57BL/6 mice, forming anastomoses with peripheral retinal capillaries. Fluorescein leakage was easily detected in Akimba retinae by angiography, but was not observed in Ins2(Akita) mice. Blood vessel density was increased in the DVP of 6 month old Ins2(Akita) mice, while the SVP displayed reduced branching in precapillary arterioles. In summary, we present the first comprehensive characterization of the mouse retinal vasculature by SLO-OCT fluorescein angiography. Using this clinical imaging technique, we report previously unrecognized variations in C57BL/6J vascular anatomy and novel features of vascular retinopathy in the Ins2(Akita) mouse model of diabetes. PMID:26122048

  5. System for definition of the central-chest vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeprasartsit, Pinyo; Higgins, William E.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate definition of the central-chest vasculature from three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector CT (MDCT) images is important for pulmonary applications. For instance, the aorta and pulmonary artery help in automatic definition of the Mountain lymph-node stations for lung-cancer staging. This work presents a system for defining major vascular structures in the central chest. The system provides automatic methods for extracting the aorta and pulmonary artery and semi-automatic methods for extracting the other major central chest arteries/veins, such as the superior vena cava and azygos vein. Automatic aorta and pulmonary artery extraction are performed by model fitting and selection. The system also extracts certain vascular structure information to validate outputs. A semi-automatic method extracts vasculature by finding the medial axes between provided important sites. Results of the system are applied to lymph-node station definition and guidance of bronchoscopic biopsy.

  6. Imaging of retinal vasculature using adaptive optics SLO/OCT

    PubMed Central

    Felberer, Franz; Rechenmacher, Matthias; Haindl, Richard; Baumann, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Pircher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We use our previously developed adaptive optics (AO) scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO)/ optical coherence tomography (OCT) instrument to investigate its capability for imaging retinal vasculature. The system records SLO and OCT images simultaneously with a pixel to pixel correspondence which allows a direct comparison between those imaging modalities. Different field of views ranging from 0.8°x0.8° up to 4°x4° are supported by the instrument. In addition a dynamic focus scheme was developed for the AO-SLO/OCT system in order to maintain the high transverse resolution throughout imaging depth. The active axial eye tracking that is implemented in the OCT channel allows time resolved measurements of the retinal vasculature in the en-face imaging plane. Vessel walls and structures that we believe correspond to individual erythrocytes could be visualized with the system. PMID:25909024

  7. Interrelationships between the Retinal Neuroglia and Vasculature in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For years, diabetic retinopathy has been defined based on vascular lesions, and neural abnormalities were not regarded as important. This review summarizes evidence that the neural retina has important effects on the retinal vasculature under normal conditions, and the interaction between the retinal neuroglial cells and vascular function is altered in diabetes. Importantly, new evidence raises a possibility that abnormalities within retinal neuroglial cells (notably photoreceptors) might actually be causing or initiating the vascular disease in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25003068

  8. Segmentation and separation of venous vasculatures in liver CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Hansen, Christian; Zidowitz, Stephan; Hahn, Horst K.

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided analysis of venous vasculatures including hepatic veins and portal veins is important in liver surgery planning. The analysis normally consists of two important pre-processing tasks: segmenting both vasculatures and separating them from each other by assigning different labels. During the acquisition of multi-phase CT images, both of the venous vessels are enhanced by injected contrast agent and acquired either in a common phase or in two individual phases. The enhanced signals established by contrast agent are often not stably acquired due to non-optimal acquisition time. Inadequate contrast and the presence of large lesions in oncological patients, make the segmentation task quite challenging. To overcome these diffculties, we propose a framework with minimal user interactions to analyze venous vasculatures in multi-phase CT images. Firstly, presented vasculatures are automatically segmented adopting an efficient multi-scale Hessian-based vesselness filter. The initially segmented vessel trees are then converted to a graph representation, on which a series of graph filters are applied in post-processing steps to rule out irrelevant structures. Eventually, we develop a semi-automatic workow to refine the segmentation in the areas of inferior vena cava and entrance of portal veins, and to simultaneously separate hepatic veins from portal veins. Segmentation quality was evaluated with intensive tests enclosing 60 CT images from both healthy liver donors and oncological patients. To quantitatively measure the similarities between segmented and reference vessel trees, we propose three additional metrics: skeleton distance, branch coverage, and boundary surface distance, which are dedicated to quantifying the misalignment induced by both branching patterns and radii of two vessel trees.

  9. Physics of the tumor vasculature: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Heiko; Fredrich, Thierry; Welter, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Growing solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth and gain of metastatic potential. Consequently the tumor vasculature has been a major target of anti cancer therapies since four decades. The main underlying strategic concepts range from "starving a tumor to death" over "blood vessel normalization" to "blood vessel growth promotion" for improved drug delivery and oxygenation for increased success rates of radiation therapy. A mechanistic understanding of the these strategies is often elusive and call for a quantitative analysis of the underlying physics. Oxygen supply as well as drug delivery is determined by blood and interstitial fluid flow, for which reason such an analysis must focus on the relation between the intra- and extra-vascular transport characteristics and the tumor vasculature morphology. Here we review the current status of theoretical concepts and computational analysis of physical determinants of the tumor vasculature and the emerging predictions for blood flow, oxygen distribution, interstitial fluid pressure and efficiency of drug delivery.

  10. Molecular Changes in the Vasculature of Injured Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A.H.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2007-01-01

    We have explored molecular specialization of the vasculature of regenerating wound tissue in the skin and tendons to identify a different repertoire of markers from that obtained by studying tumor vasculature. We screened a phage-displayed peptide library for peptides that home to wounds in mice and identified two peptides that selectively target phage to skin and tendon wounds: CARSKNKDC (CAR) and CRKDKC (CRK). CAR is homologous to heparin-binding sites in various proteins and binds to cell surface heparan sulfate and heparin. CRK is similar to a segment in thrombospondin type 1 repeat. Intravenously injected CAR and CRK phage, as well as fluorescein-labeled CAR and CRK peptides, selectively accumulated at wound sites, where they partially co-localized with blood vessels. The CAR peptide showed a preference for early stages of wound healing, whereas the CRK favored wounds at later stages of healing. The CAR peptide was internalized into the target cells and delivered the fluorescent label into the cell nuclei. These results identify new molecular markers in wound tissues and show that the expression of these markers in wound vasculature changes as healing progresses. The peptides recognizing these markers may be useful in delivering treatments into regenerating tissues. PMID:17600129

  11. Combinatorial function of ETS transcription factors in the developing vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Van N.; Lawson, Nathan D.; Mugford, Joshua W.; Dye, Louis; Castranova, Daniel; Lo, Brigid; Weinstein, Brant M.

    2007-01-01

    Members of the ETS family of transcription factors are among the first genes expressed in the developing vasculature, but loss-of-function experiments for individual ETS factors in mice have not uncovered important early functional roles for these genes. However, multiple ETS factors are expressed in spatially and temporally overlapping patterns in the developing vasculature, suggesting possible functional overlap. We have taken a comprehensive approach to exploring the function of these factors during vascular development by employing the genetic and experimental tools available in the zebrafish to analyze four ETS family members expressed together in the zebrafish vasculature; fli1, fli1b, ets1, and etsrp. We isolated and characterized an ENU-induced mutant with defects in trunk angiogenesis and positionally cloned the defective gene from this mutant, etsrp. Using the etsrp morpholinos targeting each of the four genes, we show that the four ETS factors function combinatorially during vascular and hematopoietic development. Reduction of etsrp or any of the other genes alone results in either partial or no defects in endothelial differentiation, while combined reduction in the function of all four genes causes dramatic loss of endothelial cells. Our results demonstrate that combinatorial ETS factor function is essential for early endothelial specification and differentiation. PMID:17125762

  12. CD146(+) cells are essential for kidney vasculature development.

    PubMed

    Halt, Kimmo J; Pärssinen, Heikki E; Junttila, Sanna M; Saarela, Ulla; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Koivunen, Peppi; Myllyharju, Johanna; Quaggin, Susan; Skovorodkin, Ilya N; Vainio, Seppo J

    2016-08-01

    The kidney vasculature is critical for renal function, but its developmental assembly mechanisms remain poorly understood and models for studying its assembly dynamics are limited. Here, we tested whether the embryonic kidney contains endothelial cells (ECs) that are heterogeneous with respect to VEGFR2/Flk1/KDR, CD31/PECAM, and CD146/MCAM markers. Tie1Cre;R26R(YFP)-based fate mapping with a time-lapse in embryonic kidney organ culture successfully depicted the dynamics of kidney vasculature development and the correlation of the process with the CD31(+) EC network. Depletion of Tie1(+) or CD31(+) ECs from embryonic kidneys, with either Tie1Cre-induced diphtheria toxin susceptibility or cell surface marker-based sorting in a novel dissociation and reaggregation technology, illustrated substantial EC network regeneration. Depletion of the CD146(+) cells abolished this EC regeneration. Fate mapping of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-marked CD146(+)/CD31(-) cells indicated that they became CD31(+) cells, which took part in EC structures with CD31(+) wild-type ECs. EC network development depends on VEGF signaling, and VEGF and erythropoietin are expressed in the embryonic kidney even in the absence of any external hypoxic stimulus. Thus, the ex vivo embryonic kidney culture models adopted here provided novel ways for targeting renal EC development and demonstrated that CD146(+) cells are critical for kidney vasculature development. PMID:27165833

  13. Lung vasculature imaging using speckle variance optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Michelle; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Lane, Pierre M.; McWilliams, Annette; Shaipanich, Tawimas; MacAulay, Calum E.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Lam, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Architectural changes in and remodeling of the bronchial and pulmonary vasculature are important pathways in diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer. However, there is a lack of methods that can find and examine small bronchial vasculature in vivo. Structural lung airway imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) has previously been shown to be of great utility in examining bronchial lesions during lung cancer screening under the guidance of autofluorescence bronchoscopy. Using a fiber optic endoscopic OCT probe, we acquire OCT images from in vivo human subjects. The side-looking, circumferentially-scanning probe is inserted down the instrument channel of a standard bronchoscope and manually guided to the imaging location. Multiple images are collected with the probe spinning proximally at 100Hz. Due to friction, the distal end of the probe does not spin perfectly synchronous with the proximal end, resulting in non-uniform rotational distortion (NURD) of the images. First, we apply a correction algorithm to remove NURD. We then use a speckle variance algorithm to identify vasculature. The initial data show a vascaulture density in small human airways similar to what would be expected.

  14. Image fusion for visualization of hepatic vasculature and tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Jin-Shin; Chen, Shiuh-Yung J.; Sudakoff, Gary S.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Dachman, Abraham H.

    1995-05-01

    We have developed segmentation and simultaneous display techniques to facilitate the visualization of the three-dimensional spatial relationships between organ structures and organ vasculature. We concentrate on the visualization of the liver based on spiral computed tomography images. Surface-based 3-D rendering and maximal intensity projection algorithms are used for data visualization. To extract the liver in the serial of images accurately and efficiently, we have developed a user-friendly interactive program with a deformable-model segmentation. Surface rendering techniques are used to visualize the extracted structures, adjacent contours are aligned and fitted with a Bezier surface to yield a smooth surface. Visualization of the vascular structures, portal and hepatic veins, is achieved by applying a MIP technique to the extracted liver volume. To integrate the extracted structures they are surface-rendered and their MIP images are aligned and a color table is designed for simultaneous display of the combined liver/tumor and vasculature images. By combining the 3-D surface rendering and MIP techniques, portal veins, hepatic veins, and hepatic tumor can be inspected simultaneously and their spatial relationships can be more easily perceived. The proposed technique will be useful for visualization of both hepatic neoplasm and vasculature in surgical planning for tumor resection or living-donor liver transplantation.

  15. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation. PMID:26888065

  16. Anatomic Eponyms in Neuroradiology: Brain, Cerebral Vasculature, and Calvarium.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Paul M; Zamani, Amir A

    2016-06-01

    Medical eponyms are ubiquitous, numerous, and at times controversial. They are often useful for succinctly conveying complex concepts, and familiarity with eponyms is important for proper usage and appropriate communication. In this historical review, we identify 18 anatomic eponyms used to describe structures of the brain, cerebral vasculature, and calvarium. For each structure, we first offer a biographical sketch of the individual for whom the structure is named. This is followed by a description of the anatomic structure and a brief discussion of its clinical relevance. PMID:26916250

  17. Vascular Tissue Engineering: Building Perfusable Vasculature for Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Liqiong; Niklason, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement is required when there are no alternative therapies available. Although vascular tissue engineering was originally developed to meet the clinical demands of small-diameter vascular conduits as bypass grafts, it has evolved into a highly advanced field where perfusable vasculatures are generated for implantation. Herein, we review several cutting-edge techniques that have led to implantable human blood vessels in clinical trials, the novel approaches that build complex perfusable microvascular networks in functional tissues, the use of stem cells to generate endothelial cells for vascularization, as well as the challenges in bringing vascular tissue engineering technologies into the clinics. PMID:24533306

  18. Osmotic Drug Delivery to Ischemic Hindlimbs and Perfusion of Vasculature with Microfil for Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Su; Yang, Zhongwei; Willerson, James T.; Dixon, Richard A. F.; Liu, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical research in animal models of peripheral arterial disease plays a vital role in testing the efficacy of therapeutic agents designed to stimulate microcirculation. The choice of delivery method for these agents is important because the route of administration profoundly affects the bioactivity and efficacy of these agents1,2. In this article, we demonstrate how to locally administer a substance in ischemic hindlimbs by using a catheterized osmotic pump. This pump can deliver a fixed volume of aqueous solution continuously for an allotted period of time. We also present our mouse model of unilateral hindlimb ischemia induced by ligation of the common femoral artery proximal to the origin of profunda femoris and epigastrica arteries in the left hindlimb. Lastly, we describe the in vivo cannulation and ligation of the infrarenal abdominal aorta and perfusion of the hindlimb vasculature with Microfil, a silicone radiopaque casting agent. Microfil can perfuse and fill the entire vascular bed (arterial and venous), and because we have ligated the major vascular conduit for exit, the agent can be retained in the vasculature for future ex vivo imaging with the use of small specimen micro-CT3. PMID:23852145

  19. High spatial and temporal resolution imaging of the arterial vasculature of the lower extremity with contrast enhanced MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, Petrice M; Haider, Clifton R; Glockner, James F; Young, Phillip M; Riederer, Stephen J

    2011-05-01

    Vascular imaging can be essential in the diagnosis, monitoring, and planning and assessment of treatment of patients with peripheral vascular disease. The purpose of this work is to describe a recently developed three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) technique, Cartesian Acquisition with Projection Reconstruction-like sampling (CAPR), and its application to imaging of the vasculature of the lower legs and feet. CAPR implements accelerated imaging techniques and uses specialized multielement imaging coil arrays to achieve high temporal and high spatial resolution imaging. Volunteer and patient studies of the vasculature of the lower legs and feet have been performed. Temporal resolution of 4.9-6.5 sec and spatial resolution less than or equal to 1 mm in all directions allow for the depiction of progressive arterial filling and complex flow patterns as well as sharp visualization of vascular structure as small as the fine muscular branches. High-quality diagnostic imaging is made possible with CAPR's advanced acquisition and reconstruction techniques and the use of specialized coil arrays. PMID:21509813

  20. High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Imaging of the Arterial Vasculature of the Lower Extremity With Contrast Enhanced MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    MOSTARDI, PETRICE M.; HAIDER, CLIFTON R.; GLOCKNER, JAMES F.; YOUNG, PHILLIP M.; RIEDERER, STEPHEN J.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular imaging can be essential in the diagnosis, monitoring, and planning and assessment of treatment of patients with peripheral vascular disease. The purpose of this work is to describe a recently developed three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) technique, Cartesian Acquisition with Projection Reconstruction-like sampling (CAPR), and its application to imaging of the vasculature of the lower legs and feet. CAPR implements accelerated imaging techniques and uses specialized multielement imaging coil arrays to achieve high temporal and high spatial resolution imaging. Volunteer and patient studies of the vasculature of the lower legs and feet have been performed. Temporal resolution of 4.9–6.5 sec and spatial resolution less than or equal to 1 mm in all directions allow for the depiction of progressive arterial filling and complex flow patterns as well as sharp visualization of vascular structure as small as the fine muscular branches. High-quality diagnostic imaging is made possible with CAPR’s advanced acquisition and reconstruction techniques and the use of specialized coil arrays. PMID:21509813

  1. Architecture of GnRH-Gonadotrope-Vasculature Reveals a Dual Mode of Gonadotropin Regulation in Fish.

    PubMed

    Golan, Matan; Zelinger, Einat; Zohar, Yonathan; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2015-11-01

    The function and components of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are conserved among vertebrates; however, in fish, a neuroglandular mode of delivery (direct contact between axons and endocrine cells) was considered dominant, whereas in tetrapods hypothalamic signals are relayed to their targets via the hypophysial portal blood system (neurovascular delivery mode). By using a transgenic zebrafish model we studied the functional and anatomical aspects of gonadotrope regulation thus revisiting the existing model. FSH cells were found to be situated close to the vasculature whereas the compact organization of LH cells prevented direct contact of all cells with the circulation. GnRH3 fibers formed multiple boutons upon reaching the pituitary, but most of these structures were located in the neurohypophysis rather than adjacent to gonadotropes. A close association was observed between FSH cells and GnRH3 boutons, but only a fifth of the LH cells were in direct contact with GnRH3 axons, suggesting that FSH cells are more directly regulated than LH cells. GnRH3 fibers closely followed the vasculature in the neurohypophysis and formed numerous boutons along these tracts. These vessels were found to be permeable to relatively large molecules, suggesting the uptake of GnRH3 peptides. Our findings have important implications regarding the differential regulation of LH and FSH and contradict the accepted notion that fish pituitary cells are mostly regulated directly by hypothalamic fibers. Instead, we provide evidence that zebrafish apply a dual mode of gonadotrope regulation by GnRH3 that combines both neuroglandular and neurovascular components. PMID:26261873

  2. Alterations of Retinal Vasculature in Cystathionine–β-Synthase Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Amany; Markand, Shanu; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Mayo, Jamie N.; Reynolds, Jason; Bearden, Shawn E.; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2015-01-01

    Mild to moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is prevalent in humans and is implicated in neurovascular diseases, including recently in certain retinal diseases. Herein, we used hyperhomocysteinemic mice deficient in the Cbs gene encoding cystathionine–β-synthase (Cbs+/−) to evaluate retinal vascular integrity. The Cbs+/+ (wild type) and Cbs+/− (heterozygous) mice (aged 16 to 52 weeks) were subjected to fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography to assess vasculature in vivo. Retinas harvested for cryosectioning or flat mount preparations were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy to detect blood vessels (isolectin-B4), angiogenesis [anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and anti-CD105], gliosis [anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)], pericytes (anti-neural/glial antigen 2), blood-retinal barrier [anti–zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and anti-occludin], and hypoxia [anti–pimonidazole hydrochloride (Hypoxyprobe-1)]. Levels of VEGF, GFAP, ZO-1, and occludin were determined by immunoblotting. Results of these analyses showed a mild vascular phenotype in young mice, which progressed with age. Fluorescein angiography revealed progressive neovascularization and vascular leakage in Cbs+/− mice; optical coherence tomography confirmed new vessels in the vitreous by 1 year. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated vascular patterns consistent with ischemia, including a capillary-free zone centrally and new vessels with capillary tufts midperipherally in older mice. This was associated with increased VEGF, CD105, and GFAP and decreased ZO-1/occludin levels in the Cbs+/− retinas. Retinal vein occlusion was observed in some Cbs+/− mouse retinas. We conclude that mild to moderate elevation of homocysteine in Cbs+/− mice is accompanied by progressive alterations in retinal vasculature characterized by ischemia, neovascularization, incompetent blood-retinal barrier, and vascular occlusion. PMID:25016930

  3. Targeting tumor vasculature through oncolytic virotherapy: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Toro Bejarano, Marcela; Merchan, Jaime R

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic virotherapy field has made significant advances in the last decade, with a rapidly increasing number of early- and late-stage clinical trials, some of them showing safety and promising therapeutic efficacy. Targeting tumor vasculature by oncolytic viruses (OVs) is an attractive strategy that offers several advantages over nontargeted viruses, including improved tumor viral entry, direct antivascular effects, and enhanced antitumor efficacy. Current understanding of the biological mechanisms of tumor neovascularization, novel vascular targets, and mechanisms of resistance has allowed the development of oncolytic viral vectors designed to target tumor neovessels. While some OVs (such as vaccinia and vesicular stomatitis virus) can intrinsically target tumor vasculature and induce vascular disruption, the majority of reported vascular-targeted viruses are the result of genetic manipulation of their viral genomes. Such strategies include transcriptional or transductional endothelial targeting, “armed” viruses able to downregulate angiogenic factors, or to express antiangiogenic molecules. The above strategies have shown preclinical safety and improved antitumor efficacy, either alone, or in combination with standard or targeted agents. This review focuses on the recent efforts toward the development of vascular-targeted OVs for cancer treatment and provides a translational/clinical perspective into the future development of new generation biological agents for human cancers.

  4. FOXC2 and fluid shear stress stabilize postnatal lymphatic vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Sabine, Amélie; Bovay, Esther; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Kimura, Wataru; Jaquet, Muriel; Agalarov, Yan; Zangger, Nadine; Scallan, Joshua P.; Graber, Werner; Gulpinar, Elgin; Kwak, Brenda R.; Mäkinen, Taija; Martinez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kiefer, Friedemann; Davis, Michael J.; Djonov, Valentin; Miura, Naoyuki; Petrova, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical forces, such as fluid shear stress, govern multiple aspects of endothelial cell biology. In blood vessels, disturbed flow is associated with vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, and promotes endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identified an important role for disturbed flow in lymphatic vessels, in which it cooperates with the transcription factor FOXC2 to ensure lifelong stability of the lymphatic vasculature. In cultured lymphatic endothelial cells, FOXC2 inactivation conferred abnormal shear stress sensing, promoting junction disassembly and entry into the cell cycle. Loss of FOXC2-dependent quiescence was mediated by the Hippo pathway transcriptional coactivator TAZ and, ultimately, led to cell death. In murine models, inducible deletion of Foxc2 within the lymphatic vasculature led to cell-cell junction defects, regression of valves, and focal vascular lumen collapse, which triggered generalized lymphatic vascular dysfunction and lethality. Together, our work describes a fundamental mechanism by which FOXC2 and oscillatory shear stress maintain lymphatic endothelial cell quiescence through intercellular junction and cytoskeleton stabilization and provides an essential link between biomechanical forces and endothelial cell identity that is necessary for postnatal vessel homeostasis. As FOXC2 is mutated in lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome, our data also underscore the role of impaired mechanotransduction in the pathology of this hereditary human disease. PMID:26389677

  5. Control of the Adaptive Immune Response by Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Mauge, Laetitia; Terme, Magali; Tartour, Eric; Helley, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is nowadays described as an entire organ that regulates various processes: vascular tone, coagulation, inflammation, and immune cell trafficking, depending on the vascular site and its specific microenvironment as well as on endothelial cell-intrinsic mechanisms like epigenetic changes. In this review, we will focus on the control of the adaptive immune response by the tumor vasculature. In physiological conditions, the endothelium acts as a barrier regulating cell trafficking by specific expression of adhesion molecules enabling adhesion of immune cells on the vessel, and subsequent extravasation. This process is also dependent on chemokine and integrin expression, and on the type of junctions defining the permeability of the endothelium. Endothelial cells can also regulate immune cell activation. In fact, the endothelial layer can constitute immunological synapses due to its close interactions with immune cells, and the delivery of co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory signals. In tumor conditions, the vasculature is characterized by an abnormal vessel structure and permeability, and by a specific phenotype of endothelial cells. All these abnormalities lead to a modulation of intra-tumoral immune responses and contribute to the development of intra-tumoral immunosuppression, which is a major mechanism for promoting the development, progression, and treatment resistance of tumors. The in-depth analysis of these various abnormalities will help defining novel targets for the development of anti-tumoral treatments. Furthermore, eventual changes of the endothelial cell phenotype identified by plasma biomarkers could secondarily be selected to monitor treatment efficacy. PMID:24734218

  6. Interplay of macrophages and T cells in the lung vasculature.

    PubMed

    Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia; Kratzer, Adelheid; Sidiakova, Asya; Salys, Jonas; Zamora, Martin; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute

    2012-05-15

    In severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), vascular lesions are composed of phenotypically altered vascular and inflammatory cells that form clusters or tumorlets. Because macrophages are found in increased numbers in intravascular and perivascular space in human PAH, here we address the question whether macrophages play a role in pulmonary vascular remodeling and whether accumulation of macrophages in the lung vasculature could be compromised by the immune system. We used the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 because these cells are resistant to apoptosis, have high proliferative capacity, and resemble cells in the plexiform lesions that tend to pile up instead of maintaining a monolayer. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry with cell surface markers (Lycopersicon Esculentum Lectin, CD117, CD133, FVIII, CD31, VEGFR-2, and S100). Activated, but not quiescent, T cells were able to suppress RAW 264.7 cell proliferative and migration activity in vitro. The carboxyfluorescein diacetate-labeled RAW 264.7 cells were injected into the naïve Sprague Dawley (SD) rat and athymic nude rat. Twelve days later, cells were found in the lung vasculature of athymic nude rats that lack functional T cells, contributing to vascular remodeling. No labeled RAW 264.7 cells were detected in the lungs of immune-competent SD rats. Our data demonstrate that T cells can inhibit in vitro migration and in vivo accumulation of macrophage-like cells. PMID:22387295

  7. Three-dimensional vasculature reconstruction of tumour microenvironment via local clustering and classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanqiao; Li, Fuhai; Vadakkan, Tegy J.; Zhang, Mei; Landua, John; Wei, Wei; Ma, Jinwen; Dickinson, Mary E.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Lewis, Michael T.; Zhan, Ming; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2013-01-01

    The vasculature inside breast cancers is one important component of the tumour microenvironment. The investigation of its spatial morphology, distribution and interactions with cancer cells, including cancer stem cells, is essential for elucidating mechanisms of tumour development and treatment response. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescent markers, we have acquired three-dimensional images of vasculature within mammary tumours and normal mammary gland of mouse models. However, it is difficult to segment and reconstruct complex vasculature accurately from the in vivo three-dimensional images owing to the existence of uneven intensity and regions with low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). To overcome these challenges, we have developed a novel three-dimensional vasculature segmentation method based on local clustering and classification. First, images of vasculature are clustered into local regions, whose boundaries well delineate vasculature even in low SNR and uneven intensity regions. Then local regions belonging to vasculature are identified by applying a semi-supervised classification method based on three informative features of the local regions. Comparison of results using simulated and real vasculature images, from mouse mammary tumours and normal mammary gland, shows that the new method outperforms existing methods, and can be used for three-dimensional images with uneven background and low SNR to achieve accurate vasculature reconstruction. PMID:24511379

  8. Three-dimensional vasculature reconstruction of tumour microenvironment via local clustering and classification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanqiao; Li, Fuhai; Vadakkan, Tegy J; Zhang, Mei; Landua, John; Wei, Wei; Ma, Jinwen; Dickinson, Mary E; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T; Zhan, Ming; Wong, Stephen T C

    2013-08-01

    The vasculature inside breast cancers is one important component of the tumour microenvironment. The investigation of its spatial morphology, distribution and interactions with cancer cells, including cancer stem cells, is essential for elucidating mechanisms of tumour development and treatment response. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescent markers, we have acquired three-dimensional images of vasculature within mammary tumours and normal mammary gland of mouse models. However, it is difficult to segment and reconstruct complex vasculature accurately from the in vivo three-dimensional images owing to the existence of uneven intensity and regions with low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). To overcome these challenges, we have developed a novel three-dimensional vasculature segmentation method based on local clustering and classification. First, images of vasculature are clustered into local regions, whose boundaries well delineate vasculature even in low SNR and uneven intensity regions. Then local regions belonging to vasculature are identified by applying a semi-supervised classification method based on three informative features of the local regions. Comparison of results using simulated and real vasculature images, from mouse mammary tumours and normal mammary gland, shows that the new method outperforms existing methods, and can be used for three-dimensional images with uneven background and low SNR to achieve accurate vasculature reconstruction. PMID:24511379

  9. Three-dimensional stereotactic atlas of the extracranial vasculature correlated with the intracranial vasculature, cranial nerves, skull and muscles

    PubMed Central

    Shoon Let Thaung, Thant; Choon Chua, Beng; Hnin Wut Yi, Su; Yang, Yili; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to construct a 3D, interactive, and reference atlas of the extracranial vasculature spatially correlated with the intracranial blood vessels, cranial nerves, skull, glands, and head muscles. The atlas has been constructed from multiple 3T and 7T magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) brain scans, and 3T phase contrast and inflow MRA neck scans of the same specimen in the following steps: vessel extraction from the scans, building 3D tubular models of the vessels, spatial registration of the extra- and intracranial vessels, vessel editing, vessel naming and color-coding, vessel simplification, and atlas validation. This new atlas contains 48 names of the extracranial vessels (25 arterial and 23 venous) and it has been integrated with the existing brain atlas. The atlas is valuable for medical students and residents to easily get familiarized with the extracranial vasculature with a few clicks; is useful for educators to prepare teaching materials; and potentially can serve as a reference in the diagnosis of vascular disease and treatment, including craniomaxillofacial surgeries and radiologic interventions of the face and neck. PMID:25923683

  10. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  11. I. Embryonal vasculature formation recapitulated in transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted pseudo-orthotopicly into mouse dorsal skin fold: the organoblasts concept

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate understanding of cancer biology is a problem. This work focused on cellular mechanisms of tumor vascularization. According to earlier studies, the tumor vasculature derives from host endothelial cells (angiogenesis) or their precursors of bone marrow origin circulating in the blood (neo-vasculogenesis) unlike in embryos. In this study, we observed the neo-vasculature form in multiple ways from local precursor cells. Recapitulation of primitive as well as advanced embryonal stages of vasculature formation followed co-implantation of avascular ( in vitro cultured) N202 breast tumor spheroids and homologous tissue grafts into mouse dorsal skin chambers. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical analysis of tissue sections exposed the interactions between the tumor and the graft tissue stem cells. It revealed details of vasculature morphogenesis not seen before in either tumors or embryos. A gradual increase in complexity of the vascular morphogenesis at the tumor site reflected a range of steps in ontogenic evolution of the differentiating cells. Malignant- and surgical injury repair-related tissue growth prompted local cells to initiate extramedullar erythropoiesis and vascular patterning. The new findings included: interdependence between the extramedullar hematopoiesis and assembly of new vessels (both from the locally differentiating precursors); nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion (karyolysis) as the mechanism of erythroblast enucleation; the role of megakaryocytes and platelets in vascular pattern formation before emergence of endothelial cells; lineage relationships between hematopoietic and endothelial cells; the role of extracellular calmyrin in tissue morphogenesis; and calmyrite, a new ultrastructural entity associated with anaerobic energy metabolism. The central role of the extramedullar erythropoiesis in the formation of new vasculature (blood and vessels) emerged here as part of the tissue building process including the lymphatic system and nerves

  12. A multifactorial conceptual model of peripheral neuromusculoskeletal predisposing factors in task-specific focal hand dystonia in musicians: etiologic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Leijnse, J N A L; Hallett, M; Sonneveld, G J

    2015-02-01

    A model is presented showing how peripheral factors may cause a process of movement adaptation that leads to task-specific focal hand dystonia in musicians (FHDM). To acquire a playing technique, the hand must find effective and physiologically sustainable movements within a complex set of functional demands and anatomic, ergonomic, and physiological constraints. In doing so, individually discriminating constraints may become effective, such as limited anatomic independence of finger muscles/tendons, limited joint ranges of motion, or (subclinical) neuromusculoskeletal defects. These factors may, depending on the instrument-specific playing requirements, compromise or exclude functional playing movements. The controller (i.e., the brain) then needs to develop alternative motions to execute the task, which is called compensation. We hypothesize that, if this compensation process does not converge to physiologically sustainable muscle activation patterns that satisfy all constraints, compensation could increase indefinitely under the pressure of practice. Dystonic symptoms would become manifest when overcompensation occurs, resulting in motor patterns that fail in proper task execution. The model presented in this paper only concerns the compensatory processes preceding such overcompensations and does not aim to explain the nature of the dystonic motions themselves. While the model considers normal learning processes in the development of compensations, neurological predispositions could facilitate developing overcompensations or further abnormal motor programs. The model predicts that if peripheral factors are involved, FHDM symptoms would be preceded by long-term gradual changes in playing movements, which could be validated by prospective studies. Furthermore, the model implies that treatment success might be enhanced by addressing the conflict between peripheral factors and playing tasks before decompensating/retraining the affected movements. PMID:25323627

  13. [(3) H]-L685,458 binding sites are abundant in multiple peripheral organs in rats: implications for safety assessment of putative γ-secretase targeting drugs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Ying; Li, Jian-Ming; Xiao, Ling; Mou, Lin; Cai, Yan; Huang, He; Luo, Xue-Gang; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2014-12-01

    γ-Secretase is a multimeric enzyme complex that carries out proteolytic processing to a variety of cellular proteins. It is currently explored as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Mechanism-based toxicity needs to be thoroughly evaluated for γ-secretase inhibitory and/or modulatory drugs. This study comparatively assessed putative γ-secretase catalytic sites in rat peripheral tissues relative to brain and explored an effort of its pharmacological inhibition on hair regeneration. Using [(3) H]-labelled L685,458, a potent γ-secretase inhibitor, as probe, we found more abundant presence of γ-secretase binding sites in the liver, gastrointestinal tract, hair follicle, pituitary gland, ovary and testis, as compared to the brain. Local application of L658,458 delayed vibrissal regrowth following whisker removal. These results suggest that γ-secretase may execute important biological functions in many peripheral systems, as in the brain. The development of γ-secretase inhibitors/modulators for AD and cancer therapy should include close monitoring of toxicological panels for hepatic, gastrointestinal, endocrinal and reproductive functions. PMID:24861611

  14. Endurance Exercise Mobilizes Developmentally Early Stem Cells into Peripheral Blood and Increases Their Number in Bone Marrow: Implications for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Suszynska, Ewa; Malicka, Iwona; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Endurance exercise has been reported to increase the number of circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) in peripheral blood (PB) as well as in bone marrow (BM). We therefore became interested in whether endurance exercise has the same effect on very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), which have been described as a population of developmentally early stem cells residing in BM. Mice were run daily for 1 hour on a treadmill for periods of 5 days or 5 weeks. Human volunteers had trained in long-distance running for one year, six times per week. FACS-based analyses and RT-PCR of murine and human VSELs and HSPCs from collected bone marrow and peripheral blood were performed. We observed that endurance exercise increased the number of VSELs circulating in PB and residing in BM. In parallel, we observed an increase in the number of HSPCs. These observations were subsequently confirmed in young athletes, who showed an increase in circulating VSELs and HSPCs after intensive running exercise. We provide for the first time evidence that endurance exercise may have beneficial effects on the expansion of developmentally early stem cells. We hypothesize that these circulating stem cells are involved in repairing minor exercise-related tissue and organ injuries. PMID:26664409

  15. Daily expression of genes coding for neurotransmitters in central and peripheral tissues of redheaded bunting: Implication for circadian regulation of physiology in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ila; Singh, Devraj; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    In birds, circadian control of tissue level communication is not well understood. The present study investigated this, by monitoring daily oscillation of genes coding for peptides (neuropeptide Y, NPY; vasoactive intestinal peptide, VIP; somatostatis, SST) and intermediary enzymes of amine and amino acid neurotransmitters (dopamine [tyrosine hydroxylase, TH]; glutamate [glutaminase, GLS; glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase 2, GOT2]; gamma amino butyric actid, GABA [glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65]) biosynthetic pathway, along with c-FOS as an activation marker, in different tissues of migratory redheaded buntings, Emberiza bruniceps. We cloned a partial sequence of these genes, and measured their mRNA expression in the 'central' clock (retina, hypothalamus) and peripheral (heart, stomach, gut, liver) tissues, collected at six times (ZT 2, 6, 11, 13, 18 and 23; ZT 0 = lights on) from birds (n = 4/ ZT) in the 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle. There were daily mRNA oscillations of all genes, although with a tissue-specific expression pattern as well as with the differential phase relationships in genes within and between tissues. These results support a conserved tissue level circadian regulation of genes coding for peptide, amine and amino acid neurotransmitters, and substantiate the expression and plausible role of neurotransmitters in the peripheral tissues. We suggest a tissue-specific contribution of neurotransmitters in the circadian regulation of physiology and behaviour in a seasonal migratory species, the redheaded bunting. PMID:26930260

  16. Pharmacology of transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Zholos, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) non-selective cation channels, the largest TRP subfamily, are widely expressed in excitable and non-excitable cells where they perform diverse functions ranging from detection of cold, taste, osmolarity, redox state and pH to control of Mg2+ homeostasis and cell proliferation or death. Recently, TRPM gene expression has been identified in vascular smooth muscles with dominance of the TRPM8 channel. There has been in parallel considerable progress in decoding the functional roles of several TRPMs in the vasculature. This research on native cells is aided by the knowledge of the activation mechanisms and pharmacological properties of heterologously expressed TRPM subtypes. This paper summarizes the present state of knowledge of vascular TRPM channels and outlines several anticipated directions of future research in this area. PMID:20233227

  17. Contrast-enhanced imaging of cerebral vasculature with laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, K.; Li, N.; Rege, A.; Jia, X.; All, A.; Thakor, N.

    2007-08-01

    High-resolution cerebral vasculature imaging has applications ranging from intraoperative procedures to basic neuroscience research. Laser speckle, with spatial contrast processing, has recently been used to map cerebral blood flow. We present an application of the technique using temporal contrast processing to image cerebral vascular structures with a field of view a few millimeters across and approximately 20 μm resolution through a thinned skull. We validate the images using fluorescent imaging and demonstrate a factor of 2-4 enhancement in contrast-to-noise ratios over reflectance imaging using white or spectrally filtered green light. The contrast enhancement enables the perception of approximately 10%-30% more vascular structures without the introduction of any contrast agent.

  18. Visualization of vasculature with convolution surfaces: method, validation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Oeltze, Steffen; Preim, Bernhard

    2005-04-01

    We present a method for visualizing vasculature based on clinical computed tomography or magnetic resonance data. The vessel skeleton as well as the diameter information per voxel serve as input. Our method adheres to these data, while producing smooth transitions at branchings and closed, rounded ends by means of convolution surfaces. We examine the filter design with respect to irritating bulges, unwanted blending and the correct visualization of the vessel diameter. The method has been applied to a large variety of anatomic trees. We discuss the validation of the method by means of a comparison to other visualization methods. Surface distance measures are carried out to perform a quantitative validation. Furthermore, we present the evaluation of the method which has been accomplished on the basis of a survey by 11 radiologists and surgeons. PMID:15822811

  19. Emerging concepts regarding pannexin 1 in the vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Good, Miranda E.; Begandt, Daniela; DeLalio, Leon J.; Keller, Alexander S.; Billaud, Marie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2016-01-01

    Pannexin channels are newly discovered ATP release channels expressed throughout the body. Pannexin 1 (Panx1) channels have become of great interest as they appear to participate in a multitude of signalling cascades, including regulation of vascular function. Although numerous Panx1 pharmacological inhibitors have been discovered, these inhibitors are not specific for Panx1 and have additional effects on other proteins. Therefore, molecular tools, such as RNA interference and knockout animals, are needed to demonstrate the role of pannexins in various cellular functions. This review focuses on the known roles of Panx1 related to purinergic signalling in the vasculature focusing on post-translational modifications and channel gating mechanisms that may participate in the regulated release of ATP. PMID:26009197

  20. New ways to successfully target tumor vasculature in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyun; Shen, Fangrong; Hu, Wei; Coleman, Robert L.; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this paper was to review the recent literature on potential therapeutic strategies for overcoming resistance to anti-VEGF drugs in ovarian cancer. Recent findings Although clinical benefits of anti-VEGF therapy were observed in ovarian cancer treatment trials, this use yielded only modest improvement in progression-free survival, and with the exception of cediranib no effect on overall survival. Adaptive resistance and escape from anti-angiogenesis therapy is likely a multifactorial process, including induction of hypoxia, vascular modulators and the immune response. New drugs targeting the tumor vasculature or other components of the surrounding microenvironment have shown promising results. Summary When to start and end antiangiogenesis therapy and the choice of optimal treatment combinations remain controversial. Further evaluation of personalized novel angiogenesis-based therapy is warranted. Defining the critical interaction of these agents and pathways and the appropriate predictive markers will become an increasingly important objective for effective treatment. PMID:25502429

  1. PHACE syndrome with lip haemangioma, microphthalmos and persistent fetal vasculature.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Lipika; Nayak, Bhagabat; Sinha, Gautam; Khokhar, Sudarshan

    2016-01-01

    An 11-month-old baby girl presented with white reflex in her left eye. On examination, there was a 6.5×5 mm(2)haemangioma present over her face involving on her lower lip. Systemic examinations were within normal limits. The left eye was small, with an axial length of 16.08 mm and had a cataract. Ultrasonography of the left eye was suggestive of the presence of a vascular stalk, persistent hyperplasia of a primary vitreous, or persistent fetal vasculature with vitreous haemorrhage. On MRI, the left eye was small with vitreous haemorrhage. Left eye lens aspiration was performed and the bleeding vascular stalk behind the lens was cauterised with diathermy. The right eye was normal. The patient was diagnosed as having PHACE syndrome (Posterior fossa malformations, Hemangiomas, Arterial anomalies, Coarctation of the aorta and other cardiac defects, and Eye abnormalities syndrome). On follow-up, she was able to follow light with her left eye. PMID:27033295

  2. Ultrasound Imaging Beyond the Vasculature with New Generation Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Reshani H.; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 μm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer. PMID:25580914

  3. Current status of high on-treatment platelet reactivity in patients with coronary or peripheral arterial disease: Mechanisms, evaluation and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Pastromas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy with aspirin or clopidogrel or both is the standard care for patients with proven coronary or peripheral arterial disease, especially those undergoing endovascular revascularization procedures. However, despite the administration of the antiplatelet regiments, some patients still experience recurrent cardiovascular ischemic events. So far, it is well documented by several studies that in vitro response of platelets may be extremely variable. Poor antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel or high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) is under investigation by numerous recent studies. This review article focuses on methods used for the ex vivo evaluation of HTPR, as well as on the possible underlying mechanisms and the clinical consequences of this entity. Alternative therapeutic options and future directions are also addressed. PMID:26730297

  4. Effects of simulated neural mobilization on fluid movement in cadaveric peripheral nerve sections: implications for the treatment of neuropathic pain and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Roger James, C.; Apte, Gail; Brown, Cynthia; Sizer, Phillip S.; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Smith, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Neural mobilization techniques are used clinically to treat neuropathic pain and dysfunction. While selected studies report efficacy of these techniques, the mechanisms of benefit are speculative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of in vitro simulated stretch/relax neural mobilization cycles on fluid dispersion within sections of unembalmed cadaveric peripheral nerve tissue. Methods Bilateral sciatic nerve sections were harvested from six cadavers. Matched pairs of nerve sections were secured in a tissue tester and injected with a plasma/Toluidine Blue dye solution. Once the initial dye spread stabilized, the experimental nerve sections underwent 25 stretch/relaxation cycles (e.g. simulated neural mobilization) produced by a mechanical tissue tester. Post-test dye spread measurements were compared to pre-test measurements as well as control findings (no simulated mobilization). Data were analyzed using paired t-tests. Results Individual dye spread measurements were reliable [ICC(3,1) = 0·99]. The post-test intraneural fluid movement (dye spread) in the experimental section increased significantly with simulated neural mobilization compared to pre-test measurements (3·2±2·1 mm; P = 0·015) and control measurements (3·3±2·7 mm; P = 0·013). Conclusion Repetitive simulated neural mobilization, incorporating stretch/relax cycles, of excised cadaveric peripheral nerve tissue produced an increase in intraneural fluid dispersion. Neural mobilization may alter nerve tissue environment, promoting improved function and nerve health, by dispersing tissue fluid and diminishing intraneural swelling and/or pressure. PMID:26917940

  5. Percentage of Peripheral CD19+CD24hiCD38hi Regulatory B Cells in Neonatal Sepsis Patients and Its Functional Implication

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiao; Ji, Zuoquan; Xue, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Background As a major cause of mortality in neonates, neonatal sepsis is often accompanied by immune dysfunctions, which are frequently caused by dysregulated T cell sub-populations. The role of regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis, however, remains unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the percentage and functional variation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in peripheral blood of neonatal sepsis patients in an attempt to elucidate the role of these regulatory B cells in pathogenesis of sepsis. Material/Methods Flow cytometry was used to quantify the percentage of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells from peripheral blood samples. The correlation between B cell percentage and C reactive protein (CRP) level was analyzed. Secretion level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and effects on the proliferation of naïve CD4+ T cells were further analyzed. Results The percentage of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis patients was significantly higher compared to healthy controls (p<0.05), and was positively correlated with serum CRP level. The percentage of IL-10+ CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells was also higher in sepsis patients, and also had more potent inhibition on naïve CD4+ T cells (p<0.01). Conclusions The elevation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis can inhibit body immune function and thus may participate in the pathogenesis of sepsis. PMID:27389933

  6. Peripheral Retinal Vascular Patterns in Patients with Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, San-Ni; Hwang, Jiunn-Feng; Wu, Wen-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    This is an observational study of fluorescein angiography (FA) in consecutive patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in Changhua Christian Hospital to investigate the peripheral retinal vascular patterns in those patients. All patients had their age, sex, axial length (AXL), and refraction status (RF) recorded. According to the findings in FA of the peripheral retina, the eyes were divided into 4 groups: in group 1, there was a ramified pattern of peripheral retinal vasculature with gradual tapering; in group 2, there was an abrupt ending of peripheral vasculature with peripheral non-perfusion; in group 3, there was a curving route of peripheral vasculature forming vascular arcades or anastomosis; and in group 4, the same as in group 3, but with one or more wedge-shaped avascular notches. Comparisons of age, sex, AXL, and RF, association of breaks with lattice degeneration and retinal non-perfusion, surgical procedures utilized, and mean numbers of operations were made among the four groups. Of the 73 eyes studied, there were 13 eyes (17.8%) in group 1, 3 eyes (4.1%) in group 2, 40 eyes (54.8%) in group 3 and 17 eyes (23.3%) in group 4. Significant differences in age, AXL and RF, and association of retinal breaks to non-perfusion were noted among the four groups. Patients in group 1 had older ages, while younger ages were noted in groups 3 and 4. Eyes in group 1 had the shortest average AXL and were least myopic in contrast to the eyes in groups 3 and 4. Association of retinal breaks and retinal non-perfusion was significantly higher in groups 2, 3 and 4 than in group 1. In conclusion, peripheral vascular anomalies are common in cases with RRD. Patients with peripheral non-perfusion tend to be younger, with longer axial length and have the breaks associated with retinal non-perfusion. PMID:26909812

  7. Deoxypodophyllotoxin suppresses tumor vasculature in HUVECs by promoting cytoskeleton remodeling through LKB1-AMPK dependent Rho A activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yurong; Wang, Bin; Guerram, Mounia; Sun, Li; Shi, Wei; Tian, Chongchong; Zhu, Xiong; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Luyong

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of tumors, which makes it an attractive target for anti-tumor drug development. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a natural product isolated from Anthriscus sylvestris, inhibits cell proliferation and migration in various cancer cell types. Our previous studies indicate that DPT possesses both anti-angiogenic and vascular-disrupting activities. Although the RhoA/ RhoA kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is implicated in DPT-stimulated cytoskeleton remodeling and tumor vasculature suppressing, the detailed mechanisms by which DPT mediates these effects are poorly understood. In the current study, we found that DPT promotes cytoskeleton remodeling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and that this effect is abolished by either treatment with a selective AMPK inhibitor or knockdown. Moreover, the cellular levels of LKB1, a kinase upstream of AMPK, were enhanced following DPT exposure. DPT-induced activation of AMPK in tumor vasculature effect was also verified by transgenic zebrafish (VEGFR2:GFP), Matrigel plug assay, and xenograft model in nude mice. The present findings may lay the groundwork for a novel therapeutic approach in treating cancer. PMID:26470595

  8. Deoxypodophyllotoxin suppresses tumor vasculature in HUVECs by promoting cytoskeleton remodeling through LKB1-AMPK dependent Rho A activatio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yurong; Wang, Bin; Guerram, Mounia; Sun, Li; Shi, Wei; Tian, Chongchong; Zhu, Xiong; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Luyong

    2015-10-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of tumors, which makes it an attractive target for anti-tumor drug development. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a natural product isolated from Anthriscus sylvestris, inhibits cell proliferation and migration in various cancer cell types. Our previous studies indicate that DPT possesses both anti-angiogenic and vascular-disrupting activities. Although the RhoA/ RhoA kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is implicated in DPT-stimulated cytoskeleton remodeling and tumor vasculature suppressing, the detailed mechanisms by which DPT mediates these effects are poorly understood. In the current study, we found that DPT promotes cytoskeleton remodeling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and that this effect is abolished by either treatment with a selective AMPK inhibitor or knockdown. Moreover, the cellular levels of LKB1, a kinase upstream of AMPK, were enhanced following DPT exposure. DPT-induced activation of AMPK in tumor vasculature effect was also verified by transgenic zebrafish (VEGFR2:GFP), Matrigel plug assay, and xenograft model in nude mice. The present findings may lay the groundwork for a novel therapeutic approach in treating cancer. PMID:26470595

  9. In vivo imaging of pulmonary nodule and vasculature using endoscopic co-registered optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Lee, Anthony; Hohert, Geoffrey; Schwartz, Carely; Shaipanich, Tawimas; Ritchie, Alexander J.; Zhang, Wei; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Lane, Pierre M.

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral lung nodules found by CT-scans are difficult to localize and biopsy bronchoscopically particularly for those ≤ 2 cm in diameter. In this work, we present the results of endoscopic co-registered optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence imaging (OCT-AFI) of normal and abnormal peripheral airways from 40 patients using 0.9 mm diameter fiber optic rotary pullback catheter. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can visualize detailed airway morphology endoscopically in the lung periphery. Autofluorescence imaging (AFI) can visualize fluorescing tissue components such as collagen and elastin, enabling the detection of airway lesions with high sensitivity. Results indicate that AFI of abnormal airways is different from that of normal airways, suggesting that AFI can provide a sensitive visual presentation for rapidly identifying possible sites of pulmonary nodules. AFI can also rapidly visualize in vivo vascular networks using fast scanning parameters resulting in vascular-sensitive imaging with less breathing/cardiac motion artifacts compared to Doppler OCT imaging. It is known that tumor vasculature is structurally and functionally different from normal vessels. Thus, AFI can be potentially used for differentiating normal and abnormal lung vasculature for studying vascular remodeling.

  10. Angiotensin antagonists with increased specificity for the renal vasculature.

    PubMed Central

    Taub, K J; Caldicott, W J; Hollenberg, N K

    1977-01-01

    This study was designed to ascertain whether renal vascular angiotensin receptors differ from other systemic angiotensin receptors and whether, on that basis, antagonists with greater specificity for the renal vasculature can be defined. Femoral and renal blood flow and their responses to angiotensin II (AII) and its heptapeptide analogue, 1-des Asp AII (AIII), were measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter in 26 dogs. For the kidney, the threshold doses of AII and AIII were identical (2.5+/-0.27 vs. 2.3+/-0.35 pmol/100 ml renal blood flow, with similar dose-response curves. In contrast, AII had a greater pressor effect (P less than 0.001) and produced more femoral vasoconstriction (P less than 0.001) than AIII. All four antagonists studied (1-Sar, 8-Ala AII [P113]; 8-Ala AII; 1-des Asp, 8-Ala AII; 1-des Asp, 8-Ile AII) induced parallel shifts in the renal blood flow response to AII and AIII. P113 induced greater blockade than 8-Ala AII (P less than 0.001) which, in turn, was more effective than 1-des Asp, 8-Ala AII (P less than 0.001). 1-des Asp, 8-Ile AII was as effective as P113. Each analogue induced an identical inhibition of the renal vascular response to AII and AIII. In addition, AII and AIII induced cross-tachyphylaxis. All lines of evidence suggested that AII and AIII act on a single receptor in the kidney, which differs at least functionally from other systemic vascular receptors. The possibility that heptapeptide analogues represent angiotensin antagonists with greater specificity for the renal vasculature was pursued in a model in which the renin-angiotensin system is activated. Acute, partial thoracic inferior vena caval occlusion was induced in an additional 16 dogs. P113 induced progressive, dose-related hypotension and a limited increase in renal blood flow in this model. The 1-des Asp, 8-Ile AII analogue, conversely, induced a consistent, larger, dose-related renal blood flow increase, with significantly less hypotension over a wide dose range

  11. NORMALIZATION OF THE VASCULATURE FOR TREATMENT OF CANCER AND OTHER DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shom; Duda, Dan G.; Xu, Lei; Munn, Lance L.; Boucher, Yves; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2012-01-01

    New vessel formation (angiogenesis) is an essential physiological process for embryologic development, normal growth, and tissue repair. Angiogenesis is tightly regulated at the molecular level. Dysregulation of angiogenesis occurs in various pathologies and is one of the hallmarks of cancer. The imbalance of pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling within tumors creates an abnormal vascular network that is characterized by dilated, tortuous, and hyperpermeable vessels. The physiological consequences of these vascular abnormalities include temporal and spatial heterogeneity in tumor blood flow and oxygenation and increased tumor interstitial fluid pressure. These abnormalities and the resultant microenvironment fuel tumor progression, and also lead to a reduction in the efficacy of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy. With the discovery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as a major driver of tumor angiogenesis, efforts have focused on novel therapeutics aimed at inhibiting VEGF activity, with the goal of regressing tumors by starvation. Unfortunately, clinical trials of anti-VEGF monotherapy in patients with solid tumors have been largely negative. Intriguingly, the combination of anti-VEGF therapy with conventional chemotherapy has improved survival in cancer patients compared with chemotherapy alone. These seemingly paradoxical results could be explained by a “normalization” of the tumor vasculature by anti-VEGF therapy. Preclinical studies have shown that anti-VEGF therapy changes tumor vasculature towards a more “mature” or “normal” phenotype. This “vascular normalization” is characterized by attenuation of hyperpermeability, increased vascular pericyte coverage, a more normal basement membrane, and a resultant reduction in tumor hypoxia and interstitial fluid pressure. These in turn can lead to an improvement in the metabolic profile of the tumor microenvironment, the delivery and efficacy of exogenously administered therapeutics

  12. Schistosomiasis and the pulmonary vasculature (2013 Grover Conference series)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Inflammation is associated with multiple forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including autoimmune (scleroderma) and infectious (HIV, schistosomiasis) etiologies. More than 200 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma, predominantly in Brazil, Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. Schistosomiasis causes PAH in about 6.1% of those chronically infected and is particularly associated with the species Schistosoma mansoni. Treatment for schistosomiasis-associated PAH includes antihelminthic treatment, if active infection is present (although associated with little immediate benefit to the pulmonary hypertension), and then pharmacologic treatment with targeted pulmonary vascular therapies, including phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and endothelin receptor antagonists. The pathophysiological mechanism by which this parasitic infection causes pulmonary hypertension is unknown but is unlikely to be simple mechanical obstruction of the pulmonary vasculature by parasite eggs. Preexisting hepatosplenic disease due to Schistosoma infection is likely important because of portopulmonary hypertension and/or because it allows egg embolization to the lung by portocaval shunts. Potential immune signaling originating in the periegg granulomas causing the pulmonary vascular disease includes the cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-13, and transforming growth factor β. Modulating these pathways may be possible targets for future therapy of schistosomiasis-associated PAH specifically, and study of this disease may provide novel insights into other inflammatory causes of PAH. PMID:25621148

  13. Three-dimensional volume analysis of vasculature in engineered tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YousefHussien, Mohammed; Garvin, Kelley; Dalecki, Diane; Saber, Eli; Helguera, María.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional textural and volumetric image analysis holds great potential in understanding the image data produced by multi-photon microscopy. In this paper, an algorithm that quantitatively analyzes the texture and the morphology of vasculature in engineered tissues is proposed. The investigated 3D artificial tissues consist of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) embedded in collagen exposed to two regimes of ultrasound standing wave fields under different pressure conditions. Textural features were evaluated using the normalized Gray-Scale Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) combined with Gray-Level Run Length Matrix (GLRLM) analysis. To minimize error resulting from any possible volume rotation and to provide a comprehensive textural analysis, an averaged version of nine GLCM and GLRLM orientations is used. To evaluate volumetric features, an automatic threshold using the gray level mean value is utilized. Results show that our analysis is able to differentiate among the exposed samples, due to morphological changes induced by the standing wave fields. Furthermore, we demonstrate that providing more textural parameters than what is currently being reported in the literature, enhances the quantitative understanding of the heterogeneity of artificial tissues.

  14. Endothelial cell metabolism in normal and diseased vasculature.

    PubMed

    Eelen, Guy; de Zeeuw, Pauline; Simons, Michael; Carmeliet, Peter

    2015-03-27

    Higher organisms rely on a closed cardiovascular circulatory system with blood vessels supplying vital nutrients and oxygen to distant tissues. Not surprisingly, vascular pathologies rank among the most life-threatening diseases. At the crux of most of these vascular pathologies are (dysfunctional) endothelial cells (ECs), the cells lining the blood vessel lumen. ECs display the remarkable capability to switch rapidly from a quiescent state to a highly migratory and proliferative state during vessel sprouting. This angiogenic switch has long been considered to be dictated by angiogenic growth factors (eg, vascular endothelial growth factor) and other signals (eg, Notch) alone, but recent findings show that it is also driven by a metabolic switch in ECs. Furthermore, these changes in metabolism may even override signals inducing vessel sprouting. Here, we review how EC metabolism differs between the normal and dysfunctional/diseased vasculature and how it relates to or affects the metabolism of other cell types contributing to the pathology. We focus on the biology of ECs in tumor blood vessel and diabetic ECs in atherosclerosis as examples of the role of endothelial metabolism in key pathological processes. Finally, current as well as unexplored EC metabolism-centric therapeutic avenues are discussed. PMID:25814684

  15. Chemokine guided angiogenesis directs coronary vasculature formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Michael R.M.; Bussmann, Jeroen; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Long; Osorio, Arthela; Burns, C. Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E.; Sucov, Henry M.; Siekmann, Arndt F.; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Interruption of coronary blood supply severely impairs heart function with often-fatal consequences for heart disease patients. However the formation and maturation of these coronary vessels is not fully understood. Here we provide a detailed analysis of coronary vessel development in zebrafish. We observe that coronary vessels form in zebrafish by angiogenic sprouting of arterial cells derived from the endocardium at the atrioventricular canal. Endothelial cells express the CXC-motif chemokine receptor Cxcr4a and migrate to vascularize the ventricle under the guidance of the myocardium-expressed ligand Cxcl12b. cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to form a vascular network, whereas ectopic expression of Cxcl12b ligand induces coronary vessel formation. Importantly, cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to undergo heart regeneration following injury. Our results suggest that chemokine-signaling has an essential role in coronary vessel formation by directing migration of endocardium-derived endothelial cells. Poorly developed vasculature in cxcr4a mutants likely underlies decreased regenerative potential in adults. PMID:26017769

  16. Modulation of the Tumor Vasculature and Oxygenation to Improve Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Siemann, Dietmar W.; Horsman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is increasingly recognized as a major factor influencing the success of therapeutic treatments and has become a key focus for cancer research. The progressive growth of a tumor results in an inability of normal tissue blood vessels to oxygenate and provide sufficient nutritional support to tumor cells. As a consequence the expanding neoplastic cell population initiates its own vascular network which is both structurally and functionally abnormal. This aberrant vasculature impacts all aspects of the tumor microenvironment including the cells, extracellular matrix, and extracellular molecules which together are essential for the initiation, progression and spread of tumor cells. The physical conditions that arise are imposing and manifold, and include elevated interstitial pressure, localized extracellular acidity, and regions of oxygen and nutrient deprivation. No less important are the functional consequences experienced by the tumor cells residing in such environments: adaptation to hypoxia, cell quiescence, modulation of transporters and critical signaling molecules, immune escape, and enhanced metastatic potential. Together these factors lead to therapeutic barriers that create a significant hindrance to the control of cancers by conventional anticancer therapies. However, the aberrant nature of the tumor microenvironments also offers unique therapeutic opportunities. Particularly interventions that seek to improve tumor physiology and alleviate tumor hypoxia will selectively impair the neoplastic cell populations residing in these environments. Ultimately, by combining such therapeutic strategies with conventional anticancer treatments it may be possible to bring cancer growth, invasion, and metastasis to a halt. PMID:26073310

  17. Optimum Topical Delivery of Adrenergic Agonists to Oral Mucosa Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Soref, Cheryl M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Identify an orotopical vehicle to deliver an α-adrenergic vasoconstrictor to submucosal vasculature that is readily palatable to cancer/bone marrow transplant patients that suppresses chemo-radiotherapy-associated oral mucositis. Methods A [3H] norepinephrine ligand binding assay was developed to quantify receptor binding in hamster oral mucosa. Vehicle components (alcohols, polyols, cellulose, PVP) were tested versus [3H] norepinephrine binding. Vehicle refinement was also done to mask phenylephrine bitter taste and achieve human subject acceptance. The optimized vehicle was tested with α-adrenergic active agents to suppress radiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. Results The ligand binding assay quantified dose- and time-dependent, saturable binding of [3H] norepinephrine. An ethanol:glycerol:propylene glycol:water (6:6:8:80) vehicle provided the best delivery and binding. Further vehicle modification (flavoring and sucralose) yielded a vehicle with excellent taste scores in humans. Addition of phenylephrine, norepinephrine or epinephrine to the optimized vehicle and painting into mouse mouths 20 min before 19 Gy irradiation conferred significant suppression of the weight loss (P < 0.001) observed in mice who received oral vehicle. Conclusion We identified a highly efficient vehicle for the topical delivery of phenylephrine to the oral mucosa of both hamster and human subjects. This will enable its testing to suppress oral mucositis in an upcoming human clinical trial. PMID:25079392

  18. Spreading Depression, Spreading Depolarizations, and the Cerebral Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Ayata, Cenk; Lauritzen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a transient wave of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization associated with massive transmembrane ionic and water shifts. It is evolutionarily conserved in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of species from locust to human. The depolarization spreads slowly at a rate of only millimeters per minute by way of grey matter contiguity, irrespective of functional or vascular divisions, and lasts up to a minute in otherwise normal tissue. As such, SD is a radically different breed of electrophysiological activity compared with everyday neural activity, such as action potentials and synaptic transmission. Seventy years after its discovery by Leão, the mechanisms of SD and its profound metabolic and hemodynamic effects are still debated. What we did learn of consequence, however, is that SD plays a central role in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases including migraine, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. An intriguing overlap among them is that they are all neurovascular disorders. Therefore, the interplay between neurons and vascular elements is critical for our understanding of the impact of this homeostatic breakdown in patients. The challenges of translating experimental data into human pathophysiology notwithstanding, this review provides a detailed account of bidirectional interactions between brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature during SD and puts this in the context of neurovascular diseases. PMID:26133935

  19. Chemokine-guided angiogenesis directs coronary vasculature formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Michael R M; Bussmann, Jeroen; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Long; Osorio, Arthela; Burns, C Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E; Sucov, Henry M; Siekmann, Arndt F; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2015-05-26

    Interruption of the coronary blood supply severely impairs heart function with often fatal consequences for patients. However, the formation and maturation of these coronary vessels is not fully understood. Here we provide a detailed analysis of coronary vessel development in zebrafish. We observe that coronary vessels form in zebrafish by angiogenic sprouting of arterial cells derived from the endocardium at the atrioventricular canal. Endothelial cells express the CXC-motif chemokine receptor Cxcr4a and migrate to vascularize the ventricle under the guidance of the myocardium-expressed ligand Cxcl12b. cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to form a vascular network, whereas ectopic expression of Cxcl12b ligand induces coronary vessel formation. Importantly, cxcr4a mutant zebrafish fail to undergo heart regeneration following injury. Our results suggest that chemokine signaling has an essential role in coronary vessel formation by directing migration of endocardium-derived endothelial cells. Poorly developed vasculature in cxcr4a mutants likely underlies decreased regenerative potential in adults. PMID:26017769

  20. Developmental regression of hyaloid vasculature is triggered by neurons.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yusuke; Yamada, Toru; Tai-Nagara, Ikue; Okabe, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Yuko; Ema, Masatsugu; Kubota, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-27

    Vascular development involves not only vascular growth, but also regression of transient or unnecessary vessels. Hyaloid vasculature is the temporary circulatory system in fetal eyes, which spontaneously degenerates when the retinal blood vessels start to grow. Failure of the hyaloid vessels to regress leads to disease in humans, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, which causes severe intraocular hemorrhage and impairs visual function. However, the mechanism underlying the endogenous program that mediates spontaneous regression of the hyaloid vessels is not well understood. In this study, we identify a robust switch triggering this program directed by neurons in mice. Marked up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) occurs in retinal neurons just after birth via distal-multipotent-mesodermal enhancer, a hemangioblast-specific enhancer of VEGFR2. Genetic deletion of neuronal VEGFR2 interrupts this program, resulting in massive hyaloid vessels that persist even during late postnatal days. This abnormality is caused by excessive VEGF proteins in the vitreous cavity as a result of impairment in the neuronal sequestration of VEGF. Collectively, our data indicate that neurons trigger transition from the fetal to the postnatal circulatory systems in the retina. PMID:27325890

  1. Endothelial cell metabolism in normal and diseased vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Eelen, Guy; de Zeeuw, Pauline; Simons, Michael; Carmeliet, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Higher organisms rely on a closed cardiovascular circulatory system with blood vessels supplying vital nutrients and oxygen to distant tissues. Not surprisingly, vascular pathologies rank among the most life-threatening diseases. At the crux of most of these vascular pathologies are (dysfunctional) endothelial cells (ECs), the cells lining the blood vessel lumen. ECs display the remarkable capability to switch rapidly from a quiescent state to a highly migratory and proliferative state during vessel sprouting. This angiogenic switch has long been considered to be dictated by angiogenic growth factors (eg vascular endothelial growth factor; VEGF) and other signals (eg Notch) alone, but recent findings show that it is also driven by a metabolic switch in ECs. Furthermore, these changes in metabolism may even override signals inducing vessel sprouting. Here, we review how EC metabolism differs between the normal and dysfunctional/diseased vasculature and how it relates to or impacts the metabolism of other cell types contributing to the pathology. We focus on the biology of ECs in tumor blood vessel and diabetic ECs in atherosclerosis as examples of the role of endothelial metabolism in key pathological processes. Finally, current as well as unexplored ‘EC metabolism’-centric therapeutic avenues are discussed. PMID:25814684

  2. Multiple variations in the pelvic vasculature - a case report.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Satheesha B; Shetty, Surekha D; Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; P, Vasanthakumar; Jetti, Raghu

    2015-02-01

    A thorough knowledge of possible variations of pelvic vasculature is very useful for surgeons, gynaecologists, radiologists, urologists and orthopaedic surgeons. We report multiple vascular variations in the left half of the pelvis of an adult male cadaver. Iliolumbar artery arose from the main trunk of the internal iliac artery. Posterior division of the internal iliac artery gave two lateral sacral arteries and a superior gluteal artery. The anterior division of the internal iliac artery gave origin to superior vesical, inferior vesical, inferior gluteal and internal pudendal arteries. The internal pudendal artery gave origin to a common trunk before leaving the pelvis. The common trunk divided into middle rectal artery and deep artery of the penis. The obturator artery took origin from the inferior epigastric artery and descended downward to the pelvis and left the pelvis by passing through the obturator foramen. Most of the other veins accompanying the arteries joined to form a plexus on the superior surface of the pelvic diaphragm. This plexus condensed to form anterior and posterior divisions of the internal iliac vein. Apart from this, the posterior part of the plexus drained directly into the common iliac vein through a large unnamed vein. PMID:25859441

  3. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  4. Multiscale modelling of the feto–placental vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A. R.; Lin, M.; Tawhai, M.; Saghian, R.; James, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The placenta provides all the nutrients required for the fetus through pregnancy. It develops dynamically, and, to avoid rejection of the fetus, there is no mixing of fetal and maternal blood; rather, the branched placental villi ‘bathe’ in blood supplied from the uterine arteries. Within the villi, the feto–placental vasculature also develops a complex branching structure in order to maximize exchange between the placental and maternal circulations. To understand the development of the placenta, we must translate functional information across spatial scales including the interaction between macro- and micro-scale haemodynamics and account for the effects of a dynamically and rapidly changing structure through the time course of pregnancy. Here, we present steps towards an anatomically based and multiscale approach to modelling the feto–placental circulation. We assess the effect of the location of cord insertion on feto–placental blood flow resistance and flow heterogeneity and show that, although cord insertion does not appear to directly influence feto–placental resistance, the heterogeneity of flow in the placenta is predicted to increase from a 19.4% coefficient of variation with central cord insertion to 23.3% when the cord is inserted 2 cm from the edge of the placenta. Model geometries with spheroidal and ellipsoidal shapes, but the same volume, showed no significant differences in flow resistance or heterogeneity, implying that normal asymmetry in shape does not affect placental efficiency. However, the size and number of small capillary vessels is predicted to have a large effect on feto–placental resistance and flow heterogeneity. Using this new model as an example, we highlight the importance of taking an integrated multi-disciplinary and multiscale approach to understand development of the placenta. PMID:25844150

  5. Caloric restriction: powerful protection for the aging heart and vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Research has shown that the majority of the cardiometabolic alterations associated with an increased risk of CVD (e.g., insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and inflammation) can be prevented, and even reversed, with the implementation of healthier diets and regular exercise. Data from animal and human studies indicate that more drastic interventions, i.e., calorie restriction with adequate nutrition (CR), may have additional beneficial effects on several metabolic and molecular factors that are modulating cardiovascular aging itself (e.g., cardiac and arterial stiffness and heart rate variability). The purpose of this article is to review the current knowledge on the effects of CR on the aging of the cardiovascular system and CVD risk in rodents, monkeys, and humans. Taken together, research shows that CR has numerous beneficial effects on the aging cardiovascular system, some of which are likely related to reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress. In the vasculature, CR appears to protect against endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness and attenuates atherogenesis by improving several cardiometabolic risk factors. In the heart, CR attenuates age-related changes in the myocardium (i.e., CR protects against fibrosis, reduces cardiomyocyte apoptosis, prevents myosin isoform shifts, etc.) and preserves or improves left ventricular diastolic function. These effects, in combination with other benefits of CR, such as protection against obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and cancer, suggest that CR may have a major beneficial effect on health span, life span, and quality of life in humans. PMID:21841020

  6. Natriuretic peptide C receptor signalling in the heart and vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Robert A; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs), including atrial, brain and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), bind two classes of cell surface receptors: the guanylyl cyclase-linked A and B receptors (NPR-A and NPR-B) and the C receptor (NPR-C). The biological effects of NPs have been mainly attributed to changes in intracellular cGMP following their binding to NPR-A and NPR-B. NPR-C does not include a guanylyl cyclase domain. It has been denoted as a clearance receptor and is thought to bind and internalize NPs for ultimate degradation. However, a substantial body of biochemical work has demonstrated the ability of NPR-C to couple to inhibitory G proteins (Gi) and cause inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and activation of phospholipase-C. Recently, novel physiological effects of NPs, mediated specifically by NPR-C, have been discovered in the heart and vasculature. We have described the ability of CNP, acting via NPR-C, to selectively inhibit L-type calcium currents in atrial and ventricular myocytes, as well as in pacemaker cells (sinoatrial node myocytes). In contrast, our studies of the electrophysiological effects of CNP on cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated an NPR-C–Gi–phospholipase-C-dependent activation of a non-selective cation current mediated by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. It is also known that CNP and BNP have important anti-proliferative effects in cardiac fibroblasts that appear to involve NPR-C. In the mammalian resistance vessels, including mesenteric and coronary arteries, CNP has been found to function as an NPR-C-dependent endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor that regulates local blood flow and systemic blood pressure by hyperpolarizing smooth muscle cells. In this review we highlight the role of NPR-C in mediating these NP effects in myocytes and fibroblasts from the heart as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:18006579

  7. Histamine-induced vasodilatation in the human forearm vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Euan A; Crowe, Jane; Cuthbert, Hayley; Jenkins, Paul J; Johnston, Neil R; Eddleston, Michael; Bateman, D Nicholas; Webb, David J

    2013-01-01

    Aim To investigate the mechanism of action of intra-arterial histamine in the human forearm vasculature. Methods Three studies were conducted to assess changes in forearm blood flow (FBF) using venous occlusion plethysmography in response to intra-brachial histamine. First, the dose–response was investigated by assessing FBF throughout a dose-escalating histamine infusion. Next, histamine was infused at a constant dose to assess acute tolerance. Finally, a four way, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted to assess FBF response to histamine in the presence of H1- and H2-receptor antagonists. Flare and itch were assessed in all studies. Results Histamine caused a dose-dependent increase in FBF, greatest with the highest dose (30 nmol min−1) infused [mean (SEM) infused arm vs. control: 26.8 (5.3) vs. 2.6 ml min−1 100 ml−1; P < 0.0001]. Dose-dependent flare and itch were demonstrated. Acute tolerance was not observed, with an increased FBF persisting throughout the infusion period. H2-receptor antagonism significantly reduced FBF (mean (95% CI) difference from placebo at 30 nmol min−1 histamine: −11.9 ml min−1 100 ml−1 (−4.0, −19.8), P < 0.0001) and flare (mean (95% CI) difference from placebo: −403.7 cm2 (−231.4, 576.0), P < 0.0001). No reduction in FBF or flare was observed in response to the H1-receptor antagonist. Itch was unaffected by the treatments. Histamine did not stimulate vascular release of tissue plasminogen activator or von Willebrand factor. Conclusion Histamine causes dose-dependent vasodilatation, flare and itch in the human forearm. H2-receptors are important in this process. Our results support further exploration of combined H1- and H2-receptor antagonist therapy in acute allergic syndromes. PMID:23488545

  8. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Boekel, V; Godoy, J M; Lamy, L A; Assuf, S; Meyer Neto, J G; Balassiano, S L; Prata, L E

    1992-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug. PMID:1339201

  9. Optical coherence tomography for longitudinal monitoring of vasculature in scars treated with laser fractionation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Peijun; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Harms, Karl-Anton; Murray, Alexandra; Rea, Suzanne; Kennedy, Brendan F; Wood, Fiona M; Sampson, David D; McLaughlin, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the first in vivo longitudinal assessment of scar vasculature in ablative fractional laser treatment using optical coherence tomography (OCT). A method based on OCT speckle decorrelation was developed to visualize and quantify the scar vasculature over the treatment period. Through reliable co-location of the imaging field of view across multiple imaging sessions, and compensation for motion artifact, the study was able to track the same scar tissue over a period of several months, and quantify changes in the vasculature area density. The results show incidences of occlusion of individual vessels 3 days after the first treatment. The subsequent responses ˜20 weeks after the initial treatment show differences between immature and mature scars. Image analysis showed a distinct decrease (25 ± 13%, mean ± standard deviation) and increase (19 ± 5%) of vasculature area density for the immature and mature scars, respectively. This study establishes the feasibility of OCT imaging for quantitative longitudinal monitoring of vasculature in scar treatment. En face optical coherence tomography vasculature images pre-treatment (top) and ˜20 weeks after the first laser treatment (bottom) of a mature burn scar. Arrows mark the same vessel pattern. PMID:26260918

  10. An imaging-based stochastic model for simulation of tumour vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Adhikarla, Vikram; Jeraj, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model which reconstructs the structure of existing vasculature using patient-specific anatomical, functional and molecular imaging as input was developed. The vessel structure is modelled according to empirical vascular parameters, such as the mean vessel branching angle. The model is calibrated such that the resultant oxygen map modelled from the simulated microvasculature stochastically matches the input oxygen map to a high degree of accuracy (R2 ≈ 1). The calibrated model was successfully applied to preclinical imaging data. Starting from the anatomical vasculature image (obtained from contrast-enhanced computed tomography), a representative map of the complete vasculature was stochastically simulated as determined by the oxygen map (obtained from hypoxia [64Cu]Cu-ATSM positron emission tomography). The simulated microscopic vasculature and the calculated oxygenation map successfully represent the imaged hypoxia distribution (R2 = 0.94). The model elicits the parameters required to simulate vasculature consistent with imaging and provides a key mathematical relationship relating the vessel volume to the tissue oxygen tension. Apart from providing an excellent framework for visualizing the imaging gap between the microscopic and macroscopic imagings, the model has the potential to be extended as a tool to study the dynamics between the tumour and the vasculature in a patient-specific manner and has an application in the simulation of anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:22971525

  11. Evaluating Peripheral Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Tara; Hsieh, Gary; Mankoff, Jennifer

    Although peripheral displays have been a domain of inquiry for over a decade now, evaluation criteria and techniques for this area are still being created. Peripheral display evaluation is an acknowledged challenge in a field setting. This chapter first describes models and methods that have been tailored specifically to evaluating peripheral displays (measuring how well they achieve their goals). Then, we present evaluation criteria used in past evaluations of peripheral displays, ranging from issues such as learnability to distraction. After explaining how these criteria have been assessed in the past, we present a case study evaluation of two e-mail peripheral displays that demonstrates the pros and cons of various evaluation techniques.

  12. [Colonic Crohn's disease complicated with peripheral neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Chaoui, F; Hellal, H; Balamane, M; Boudhane, M; Mikol, J; Masmoudi, A

    1990-01-01

    The association of Crohn's disease and peripheral neuropathy is a rare event and the pathogenic factors often implicated are vitamin B12 deficiency or metronidazole treatment. We report a case of severe axonal polyneuropathy associated with Crohn's disease and unrelated to vitamin deficiency or metronidazole treatment. This represents a very rare extra-digestive manifestation of Crohn's disease. PMID:2125951

  13. In-vivo imaging of retinal nerve fiber layer vasculature: imaging - histology comparison

    PubMed Central

    Scoles, Drew; Gray, Daniel C; Hunter, Jennifer J; Wolfe, Robert; Gee, Bernard P; Geng, Ying; Masella, Benjamin D; Libby, Richard T; Russell, Stephen; Williams, David R; Merigan, William H

    2009-01-01

    Background Although it has been suggested that alterations of nerve fiber layer vasculature may be involved in the etiology of eye diseases, including glaucoma, it has not been possible to examine this vasculature in-vivo. This report describes a novel imaging method, fluorescence adaptive optics (FAO) scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), that makes possible for the first time in-vivo imaging of this vasculature in the living macaque, comparing in-vivo and ex-vivo imaging of this vascular bed. Methods We injected sodium fluorescein intravenously in two macaque monkeys while imaging the retina with an FAO-SLO. An argon laser provided the 488 nm excitation source for fluorescence imaging. Reflectance images, obtained simultaneously with near infrared light, permitted precise surface registration of individual frames of the fluorescence imaging. In-vivo imaging was then compared to ex-vivo confocal microscopy of the same tissue. Results Superficial focus (innermost retina) at all depths within the NFL revealed a vasculature with extremely long capillaries, thin walls, little variation in caliber and parallel-linked structure oriented parallel to the NFL axons, typical of the radial peripapillary capillaries (RPCs). However, at a deeper focus beneath the NFL, (toward outer retina) the polygonal pattern typical of the ganglion cell layer (inner) and outer retinal vasculature was seen. These distinguishing patterns were also seen on histological examination of the same retinas. Furthermore, the thickness of the RPC beds and the caliber of individual RPCs determined by imaging closely matched that measured in histological sections. Conclusion This robust method demonstrates in-vivo, high-resolution, confocal imaging of the vasculature through the full thickness of the NFL in the living macaque, in precise agreement with histology. FAO provides a new tool to examine possible primary or secondary role of the nerve fiber layer vasculature in retinal vascular disorders and

  14. Trapping and dynamic manipulation with magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging of targeted microspheres mimicking metastatic cancer cells trafficking in the vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenwei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Trapping and manipulation of micro-scale objects mimicking metastatic cancer cells in a flow field have been demonstrated with magnetomotive photoacoustic (mmPA) imaging. Coupled contrast agents combining gold nanorods (15 nm × 50 nm; absorption peak around 730 nm) with 15 nm diameter magnetic nanospheres were targeted to 10 μm polystyrene beads recirculating in a 1.6 mm diameter tube mimicking a human peripheral vessel. Targeted objects were then trapped by an external magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system consisting of two disc magnets separated by 6 cm to form a polarizing field (0.04 Tesla in the tube region) to magnetize the magnetic contrast agents, and a custom designed cone magnet array with a high magnetic field gradient (about 0.044 Tesla/mm in the tube region) producing a strong trapping force to magnetized contrast agents. Results show that polystyrene beads linked to nanocomposites can be trapped at flow rates up to 12 ml/min. It is shown that unwanted background in a photoacoustic image can be significantly suppressed by changing the position of the cone magnet array with respect to the tube, thus creating coherent movement of the trapped objects. This study makes mmPA imaging very promising for differential visualization of metastatic cells trafficking in the vasculature.

  15. Vegfa signaling promotes zebrafish intestinal vasculature development through endothelial cell migration from the posterior cardinal vein.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Andrew L; Baltrunaite, Kristina; Bower, Neil I; Rossi, Andrea; Stainier, Didier Y R; Hogan, Benjamin M; Sumanas, Saulius

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying organ vascularization are not well understood. The zebrafish intestinal vasculature forms early, is easily imaged using transgenic lines and in-situ hybridization, and develops in a stereotypical pattern thus making it an excellent model for investigating mechanisms of organ specific vascularization. Here, we demonstrate that the sub-intestinal vein (SIV) and supra-intestinal artery (SIA) form by a novel mechanism from angioblasts that migrate out of the posterior cardinal vein and coalesce to form the intestinal vasculature in an anterior to posterior wave with the SIA forming after the SIV. We show that vascular endothelial growth factor aa (vegfaa) is expressed in the endoderm at the site where intestinal vessels form and therefore likely provides a guidance signal. Vegfa/Vegfr2 signaling is required for early intestinal vasculature development with mutation in vegfaa or loss of Vegfr2 homologs causing nearly complete inhibition of the formation of the intestinal vasculature. Vegfc and Vegfr3 function, however, are dispensable for intestinal vascularization. Interestingly, ubiquitous overexpression of Vegfc resulted in an overgrowth of the SIV, suggesting that Vegfc is sufficient to induce SIV development. These results argue that Vegfa signaling directs endothelial cells to migrate out of existing vasculature and coalesce to form the intestinal vessels. It is likely that a similar mechanism is utilized during vascularization of other organs. PMID:26769101

  16. Insulin Resistance and Skeletal Muscle Vasculature: Significance, Assessment and Therapeutic Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Camila; Sowers, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Overnutrition and sedentarism are closely related to the alarming incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in the Western world. Resistance to the actions of insulin is a common occurrence in conditions such as obesity, hypertension and DM2. In the skeletal muscle vasculature, insulin promotes vasodilation and its own transport across the vascular wall to reach its target tissue. Furthermore, insulin resistance (IR) in the skeletal muscle vasculature results in impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake and altered whole-body glucose homeostasis. The development of different invasive and noninvasive techniques has allowed the characterization of the actions of insulin and other vasoactive hormones in the skeletal muscle vasculature in both health and disease. Current treatment strategies for DM2 do not necessarily address the impaired effect of insulin in the vasculature. Understanding the effects of insulin and other metabolically active hormones in the vasculature should facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies targeted at the modulation of IR and improvement of whole-body glucose tolerance. PMID:25737689

  17. Anatomy and development of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature: Its role in injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sophie; Riley, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Lymphatic vessels are present throughout the entire body in all mammals and function to regulate tissue fluid balance, lipid transport and survey the immune system. Despite the presence of an extensive lymphatic plexus within the heart, until recently the importance of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature and its origins were unknown. Several studies have described the basic anatomy of the developing cardiac lymphatic vasculature and more recently the detailed development of the murine cardiac lymphatics has been documented, with important insight into their cellular sources during embryogenesis. In this review we initially describe the development of systemic lymphatic vasculature, to provide the background for a comparative description of the spatiotemporal development of the cardiac lymphatic vessels, including detail of both canonical, typically venous, and noncanonical (hemogenic endothelium) cellular sources. Subsequently, we address the response of the cardiac lymphatic network to myocardial infarction (heart attack) and the therapeutic potential of targeting cardiac lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26443964

  18. Label-free imaging of developing vasculature in zebrafish with phase variance optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Fingler, Jeff; Trinh, Le A.; Fraser, Scott E.

    2016-03-01

    A phase variance optical coherence microscope (pvOCM) has been created to visualize blood flow in the vasculature of zebrafish embryos, without using exogenous labels. The pvOCM imaging system has axial and lateral resolutions of 2 μm in tissue, and imaging depth of more than 100 μm. Imaging of 2-5 days post-fertilization zebrafish embryos identified the detailed structures of somites, spinal cord, gut and notochord based on intensity contrast. Visualization of the blood flow in the aorta, veins and intersegmental vessels was achieved with phase variance contrast. The pvOCM vasculature images were confirmed with corresponding fluorescence microscopy of a zebrafish transgene that labels the vasculature with green fluorescent protein. The pvOCM images also revealed functional information of the blood flow activities that is crucial for the study of vascular development.

  19. The vasculature of nurse cells infected with non-encapsulated Trichinella species.

    PubMed

    Khositharattanakool, Pathamet; Morakote, Nimit; Uparanukraw, Pichart

    2013-07-01

    The vasculature surrounding the nurse cells of encapsulated Trichinella spiralis has been described previously. It has been postulated the function of these vessels is to support the growth of the parasite. We describe here for the first time the vasculature surrounding the nurse cells of non-encapsulated T. pseudospiralis and T. papuae. Similar to the vasculature of uninfected muscle cells, the vessels surrounding non-encapsulated Trichinella nurse cells are dense and branched longitudinally along the long axis of the muscle cells; they also appear to be similar in diameter. The netting pattern of enlarged vessels found around T. spiralis (encapsulated) nurse cells is not present in non-encapsulated Trichinella infections. The vessels surrounding non-encapsulated Trichinella nurse cells seem to exist prior to parasite invasion of the muscle cell. PMID:24050088

  20. Dual-beam-scan Doppler optical coherence angiography for birefringence-artifact-free vasculature imaging.

    PubMed

    Makita, Shuichi; Jaillon, Franck; Yamanari, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-30

    Dual-beam-scan Doppler optical coherence angiography (DB-OCA) enables high-speed, high-sensitivity blood flow imaging. However, birefringence of biological tissues is an obstacle to vasculature imaging. Here, the influence of polarization and birefringence on DB-OCA imaging was analyzed. A DB-OCA system without birefringence artifact has been developed by introducing a Faraday rotator. The performance was confirmed in vitro using chicken muscle and in vivo using the human eye. Birefringence artifacts due to birefringent tissues were suppressed. Micro-vasculatures in the lamina cribrosa and nerve fiber layer of human eyes were visualized in vivo. High-speed and high-sensitivity micro-vasculature imaging involving birefringent tissues is available with polarization multiplexing DB-OCA. PMID:22330505

  1. Topical anaesthetic effects on skin vasculature with potential implications for laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Tollan, Clare Josephine; MacLaren, William; Mackay, Iain R

    2016-05-01

    Laser treatment of vascular lesions is affected by parameters including the diameter and depth of the vessels and flow within the vessels. Topical anaesthetics are in common use prior to laser treatment but may have effects on vessel parameters and, subsequently, the efficacy of laser treatment. Eleven patients with capillary vascular malformations were investigated for vessel diameter before and after elective application of a topical anaesthetic, Eutectic Mixture of Local Anaesthetics (EMLA) (AstraZeneca) or Ametop (S&N Health), prior to pulsed dye laser treatment. EMLA contains 2.5% lidocaine ad 2.5% prilocaine, and Ametop gel contains 4% tetracaine. Patients' capillary malformations were assessed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) (Vivascope 1500 Mavig GmbH, Munich). Six of the 11 patients recruited had EMLA topical anaesthetic, and five had Ametop. Four hundred twenty-one diameters were measured. The mean vessel diameter was 50.87 μm. Previous laser treatments undergone by each patient were noted to exclude this as a confounding variable, and no significant difference was found between topical anaesthetic groups. Statistical calculations were made using GenStat and Minitab. There is no evidence that Ametop affects mean diameter (p value is 0.361). EMLA reduces the mean diameter of vessels (p = 0.002), with a 27% reduction in post-EMLA diameter. This study demonstrates that the use of EMLA cream has a statistically significant reduction vessel diameter. As it is known that vessel diameter is important for the response of laser treatment, the use of EMLA may affect outcome. PMID:26861976

  2. Mechanics and Function of the Pulmonary Vasculature: Implications for Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Right Ventricular Function

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Steven; Scott, Devon; Hunter, Kendall; Tan, Wei; Shandas, Robin; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between cardiac function and the afterload against which the heart muscle must work to circulate blood throughout the pulmonary circulation is defined by a complex interaction between many coupled system parameters. These parameters range broadly and incorporate system effects originating primarily from three distinct locations: input power from the heart, hydraulic impedance from the large conduit pulmonary arteries, and hydraulic resistance from the more distal microcirculation. These organ systems are not independent, but rather, form a coupled system in which a change to any individual parameter affects all other system parameters. The result is a highly nonlinear system which requires not only detailed study of each specific component and the effect of disease on their specific function, but also requires study of the interconnected relationship between the microcirculation, the conduit arteries, and the heart in response to age and disease. Here, we investigate systems-level changes associated with pulmonary hypertensive disease progression in an effort to better understand this coupled relationship. PMID:23487595

  3. Observation of vasculature alternation by intense pulsed light combined with physicochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Son, Taeyoon; Kang, Heesung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-05-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) with low energy insufficient to completely destroy a vasculature was applied to rabbit ears to investigate vasculature alteration. Glycerol was combined with IPL to enhance the transfer efficacy of IPL energy. Both trans-illumination and laser speckle contrast images were obtained and analyzed after treatment. The application of IPL and glycerol combination induced vasodilation and improvement in blood flow. Moreover, such phenomenon was maintained over time. IPL may be applied to treat blood circulatory diseases by inducing vasodilation and to improve blood flow. PMID:26776941

  4. In vivo TRPC functions in the cardiopulmonary vasculature.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Alexander; Kalwa, Hermann; Fuchs, Beate; Grimminger, Friedrich; Weissmann, Norbert; Gudermann, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in the industrialized countries. The cardiovascular system includes the systemic blood circulation, the heart and the pulmonary circulation providing sufficient blood flow and oxygen to peripheral tissues and organs according to their metabolic demand. This review focuses on three major cell types of the cardiovascular system: myocytes of the heart as well as smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells from the systemic and pulmonary circulation. Ion channels initiate and regulate contraction in all three cell types, and the identification of their genes has significantly improved our knowledge of signal transduction pathways in these cells. Among the ion channels expressed in smooth muscle cells, cation channels of the TRPC family allow for the entry of Na(+) and Ca(2+). Physiological functions of TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6 and TRPC7 in the cardiovascular system, dissected by down-regulating channel activity in isolated tissues or by the analysis of gene-deficient mouse models, are reviewed. Possible functional roles and physiological regulation of TRPCs as homomeric or heteromeric channels in these cell types are discussed. Moreover, TRP channels may also be responsible for pathophysiological processes of the cardiovascular system like hypertension as well as cardiac hypertrophy and increased endothelial permeability. PMID:17433435

  5. Peripheral giant cell granuloma.

    PubMed

    Adlakha, V K; Chandna, P; Rehani, U; Rana, V; Malik, P

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma is a benign reactive lesion of gingiva. It manifests as a firm, soft, bright nodule or as a sessile or pedunculate mass. This article reports the management of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a 12-year-old boy by surgical excision. PMID:21273719

  6. Peripheral Color Demo

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A set of structured demonstrations of the vividness of peripheral color vision is provided by arrays of multicolored disks scaled with eccentricity. These demonstrations are designed to correct the widespread misconception that peripheral color vision is weak or nonexistent. PMID:27551354

  7. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  8. Interaction of isoflavones and endophyte-infected tall fescue seed extract on vasoactivity of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It was hypothesized that isoflavones may attenuate ergot alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction and possibly alleviate diminished contractility of vasculature after exposure to ergot alkaloids. The objective of this study was to determine if prior incubation of bovine mesenteric vasculature with the isof...

  9. A New Presentation and Exploration of Human Cerebral Vasculature Correlated with Surface and Sectional Neuroanatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Thirunavuukarasuu, Arumugam; Volkau, Ihar; Marchenko, Yevgen; Aminah, Bivi; Gelas, Arnaud; Huang, Su; Lee, Looi Chow; Liu, Jimin; Ng, Ting Ting; Nowinska, Natalia G.; Qian, Guoyu Yu; Puspitasari, Fiftarina; Runge, Val M.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing complexity of human body models enabled by advances in diagnostic imaging, computing, and growing knowledge calls for the development of a new generation of systems for intelligent exploration of these models. Here, we introduce a novel paradigm for the exploration of digital body models illustrating cerebral vasculature. It enables…

  10. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  11. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... P. Peripheral arterial diseases. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ... noncoronary obstructive vascular disease.In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ...

  12. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  13. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  14. Peripheral Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Back to previous page En español Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy ... blockage including peripheral artery disease or PAD Aortic aneurysms Buerger's Disease Raynaud's Phenomenon Disease of the veins ...

  15. New insights into insulin action and resistance in the vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Camila; Lastra, Guido; Sowers, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese, and another 26 million have type 2 diabetes. Decreased insulin sensitivity in cardiovascular tissue is an underlying abnormality in these individuals. Insulin metabolic signaling increases endothelial cell nitric oxide production. Impaired vascular insulin sensitivity is an early defect leading to impaired vascular relaxation. In overweight and obese persons, as well as in those with hypertension, systemic and vascular insulin resistance often occurs in conjunction with activation of the cardiovascular tissue renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). Activated angiotensin II type 1 receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor signaling promote the development of vascular insulin resistance and impaired endothelial nitric oxide–mediated relaxation. Research in this area has implicated excessive serine phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation of the docking protein insulin receptor substrate and enhanced signaling through hybrid insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) receptor as important mechanisms underlying RAAS impediment of downstream vascular insulin metabolic signaling. This review will present recent evidence supporting the notion that RAAS signaling represents a potential pathway for the development of vascular insulin resistance and impaired endothelial-mediated vasodilation. PMID:24650277

  16. Permanent Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The health risks and side effects of fluoroquinolone use include the risk of tendon rupture and myasthenia gravis exacerbation, and on August 15, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration updated its warning to include the risk of permanent peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of fluoroquinolone-induced peripheral neuropathy in a patient treated for clinically diagnosed urinary tract infection with ciprofloxacin antibiotic. PMID:26425618

  17. Nf1 Loss and Ras Hyperactivation in Oligodendrocytes Induce NOS-Driven Defects in Myelin and Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Debra A.; Rizvi, Tilat A.; Titus-Mitchell, Haley; Oberst, Rachel; Ciraolo, Georgianne M.; Vorhees, Charles V.; Robinson, Andrew P.; Miller, Stephen D.; Cancelas, Jose A.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Ratner, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Costello syndrome Rasopathy have behavioral deficits. In NF1 patients, these may correlate with white matter enlargement and aberrant myelin. To model these features, we induced Nf1 loss or HRas hyperactivation in mouse oligodendrocytes. Enlarged brain white matter tracts correlated with myelin decompaction, downregulation of claudin-11, and mislocalization of connexin-32. Surprisingly, non-cell-autonomous defects in perivascular astrocytes and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) developed, implicating a soluble mediator. Nitric oxide (NO) can disrupt tight junctions and gap junctions, and NO and NO synthases (NOS1–NOS3) were upregulated in mutant white matter. Treating mice with the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine corrected cellular phenotypes. CNP-HRasG12V mice also displayed locomotor hyperactivity, which could be rescued by antioxidant treatment. We conclude that Nf1/Ras regulates oligodendrocyte NOS and that dysregulated NO signaling in oligodendrocytes can alter the surrounding vasculature. The data suggest that anti-oxidants may improve some behavioral deficits in Rasopathy patients. PMID:24035394

  18. Peripheral Tissue Homing Receptor Control of Naïve, Effector, and Memory CD8 T Cell Localization in Lymphoid and Non-Lymphoid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Peske, J. David; Engelhard, Victor Henry

    2013-01-01

    T cell activation induces homing receptors that bind ligands on peripheral tissue vasculature, programing movement to sites of infection and injury. There are three major types of CD8 effector T cells based on homing receptor expression, which arise in distinct lymphoid organs. Recent publications indicate that naïve, effector, and memory T cell migration is more complex than once thought; while many effectors enter peripheral tissues, some re-enter lymph nodes (LN), and contain central memory precursors. LN re-entry can depend on CD62L or peripheral tissue homing receptors. Memory T cells in LN tend to express the same homing receptors as their forebears, but often are CD62Lneg. Homing receptors also control CD8 T cell tumor entry. Tumor vasculature has low levels of many peripheral tissue homing receptor ligands, but portions of it resemble high endothelial venules (HEV), enabling naïve T cell entry, activation, and subsequent effector activity. This vasculature is associated with positive prognoses in humans, suggesting it may sustain ongoing anti-tumor responses. These findings reveal new roles for homing receptors expressed by naïve, effector, and memory CD8 T cells in controlling entry into lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. PMID:23966998

  19. Peripheral tissue homing receptor control of naïve, effector, and memory CD8 T cell localization in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, C Colin; Peske, J David; Engelhard, Victor Henry

    2013-01-01

    T cell activation induces homing receptors that bind ligands on peripheral tissue vasculature, programing movement to sites of infection and injury. There are three major types of CD8 effector T cells based on homing receptor expression, which arise in distinct lymphoid organs. Recent publications indicate that naïve, effector, and memory T cell migration is more complex than once thought; while many effectors enter peripheral tissues, some re-enter lymph nodes (LN), and contain central memory precursors. LN re-entry can depend on CD62L or peripheral tissue homing receptors. Memory T cells in LN tend to express the same homing receptors as their forebears, but often are CD62Lneg. Homing receptors also control CD8 T cell tumor entry. Tumor vasculature has low levels of many peripheral tissue homing receptor ligands, but portions of it resemble high endothelial venules (HEV), enabling naïve T cell entry, activation, and subsequent effector activity. This vasculature is associated with positive prognoses in humans, suggesting it may sustain ongoing anti-tumor responses. These findings reveal new roles for homing receptors expressed by naïve, effector, and memory CD8 T cells in controlling entry into lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. PMID:23966998

  20. Fusion Guidance in Endovascular Peripheral Artery Interventions: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, Anna M. Haan, Michiel W. de Graaf, Rick de Zwam, Willem H. van; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Nelemans, Patricia J.; Wildberger, Joachim E. Das, Marco

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of endovascular guidance by means of live fluoroscopy fusion with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA).MethodsFusion guidance was evaluated in 20 endovascular peripheral artery interventions in 17 patients. Fifteen patients had received preinterventional diagnostic MRA and two patients had undergone CTA. Time for fluoroscopy with MRA/CTA coregistration was recorded. Feasibility of fusion guidance was evaluated according to the following criteria: for every procedure the executing interventional radiologists recorded whether 3D road-mapping provided added value (yes vs. no) and whether PTA and/or stenting could be performed relying on the fusion road-map without need for diagnostic contrast-enhanced angiogram series (CEAS) (yes vs. no). Precision of the fusion road-map was evaluated by recording maximum differences between the position of the vasculature on the virtual CTA/MRA images and conventional angiography.ResultsAverage time needed for image coregistration was 5 ± 2 min. Three-dimensional road-map added value was experienced in 15 procedures in 12 patients. In half of the patients (8/17), intervention was performed relying on the fusion road-map only, without diagnostic CEAS. In two patients, MRA roadmap showed a false-positive lesion. Excluding three patients with inordinate movements, mean difference in position of vasculature on angiography and MRA/CTA road-map was 1.86 ± 0.95 mm, implying that approximately 95 % of differences were between 0 and 3.72 mm (2 ± 1.96 standard deviation).ConclusionsFluoroscopy with MRA/CTA fusion guidance for peripheral artery interventions is feasible. By reducing the number of CEAS, this technology may contribute to enhance procedural safety.

  1. [A peripheral osteoma].

    PubMed

    Mizbah, K; Soehardi, A; Maal, T J J; Weijs, W L J; Merkx, M A W; Barkhuysen, R

    2012-02-01

    A 43-year-old man appeared with a painless, asymptomatic swelling on the left side of his neck, which had existed for years and had slowly been progressing. After surgical removal, it became clear that it had to do with a peripheral osteoma. This is a benign lesion with a low incidence. Generally, complete surgical removal leads to cure, although recurrence is possible. A peripheral osteoma is mostly located in the mandible, although peripheral osteomata in the frontal or maxillary sinus have been described. The aetiology is unknown. Trauma in the patient's history has been described on occasion. The presence of multiple osteomata in the jawbones is characteristic of Gardner's syndrome. PMID:22428273

  2. In Vivo Tumor Vasculature Targeting of CuS@MSN Based Theranostic Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Actively targeted theranostic nanomedicine may be the key for future personalized cancer management. Although numerous types of theranostic nanoparticles have been developed in the past decade for cancer treatment, challenges still exist in the engineering of biocompatible theranostic nanoparticles with highly specific in vivo tumor targeting capabilities. Here, we report the design, synthesis, surface engineering, and in vivo active vasculature targeting of a new category of theranostic nanoparticle for future cancer management. Water-soluble photothermally sensitive copper sulfide nanoparticles were encapsulated in biocompatible mesoporous silica shells, followed by multistep surface engineering to form the final theranostic nanoparticles. Systematic in vitro targeting, an in vivo long-term toxicity study, photothermal ablation evaluation, in vivo vasculature targeted imaging, biodistribution and histology studies were performed to fully explore the potential of as-developed new theranostic nanoparticles. PMID:25843647

  3. In Vivo Tumor Vasculature Targeting of CuS@MSN Based Theranostic Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Goel, Shreya; Graves, Stephen A; Orbay, Hakan; Ehlerding, Emily B; Shi, Sixiang; Theuer, Charles P; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    Actively targeted theranostic nanomedicine may be the key for future personalized cancer management. Although numerous types of theranostic nanoparticles have been developed in the past decade for cancer treatment, challenges still exist in the engineering of biocompatible theranostic nanoparticles with highly specific in vivo tumor targeting capabilities. Here, we report the design, synthesis, surface engineering, and in vivo active vasculature targeting of a new category of theranostic nanoparticle for future cancer management. Water-soluble photothermally sensitive copper sulfide nanoparticles were encapsulated in biocompatible mesoporous silica shells, followed by multistep surface engineering to form the final theranostic nanoparticles. Systematic in vitro targeting, an in vivo long-term toxicity study, photothermal ablation evaluation, in vivo vasculature targeted imaging, biodistribution and histology studies were performed to fully explore the potential of as-developed new theranostic nanoparticles. PMID:25843647

  4. A model for gas and nutrient exchange in the chorionic vasculature system of the mouse placenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbod, Parisa; Sled, John

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop an analytical model for the oxygen and nutrient transport from the umbilical cord to the small villous capillaries. The nutrient and carbon dioxide removal from the fetal cotyledons in the mouse placental system has also been considered. This model describes the mass transfer between the fetal and the maternal red blood cells in the chorionic arterial vasculature system. The model reveals the detail fetal vasculature system and its geometry and the precise mechanisms of mass transfer through the placenta. The dimensions of the villous capillaries, the total length of the villous trees, the total villi surface area, and the total resistance to mass transport in the fetal villous trees has also been defined. This is the first effort to explain the reason why there are at least 7 lobules in the mouse placenta from the fluid dynamics point of view.

  5. Peptides as targeting probes against tumor vasculature for diagnosis and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tumor vasculature expresses a distinct set of molecule signatures on the endothelial cell surface different from the resting blood vessels of other organs and tissues in the body. This makes them an attractive target for cancer therapy and molecular imaging. The current technology using the in vivo phage display biopanning allows us to quickly isolate and identify peptides potentially homing to various tumor blood vessels. Tumor-homing peptides in conjugation with chemotherapeutic drugs or imaging contrast have been extensively tested in various preclinical and clinical studies. These tumor-homing peptides have valuable potential as targeting probes for tumor molecular imaging and drug delivery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances about the applications of tumor-homing peptides selected by in vivo phage display library screening against tumor vasculature. We also introduce the characteristics of the latest discovered tumor-penetrating peptides in their potential clinical applications. PMID:23046982

  6. Cancer cells remodel themselves and vasculature to overcome the endothelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Anitha K; Lu, Jianrong

    2016-10-01

    Metastasis refers to the spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to distant organs mostly via the bloodstream. During the metastatic process, cancer cells invade blood vessels to enter circulation, and later exit the vasculature at a distant site. Endothelial cells that line blood vessels normally serve as a barrier to the movement of cells into or out of the blood. It is thus critical to understand how metastatic cancer cells overcome the endothelial barrier. Epithelial cancer cells acquire increased motility and invasiveness through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which enables them to move toward vasculature. Cancer cells also express a variety of adhesion molecules that allow them to attach to vascular endothelium. Finally, cancer cells secrete or induce growth factors and cytokines to actively prompt vascular hyperpermeability that compromises endothelial barrier function and facilitates transmigration of cancer cells through the vascular wall. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying metastatic dissemination may help develop new anti-metastasis therapeutics. PMID:25449784

  7. Painful Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Marchettini, P; Lacerenza, M; Mauri, E; Marangoni, C

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases affecting peripheral nerves. The causes are multiple: hereditary, metabolic, infectious, inflammatory, toxic, traumatic. The temporal profile includes acute, subacute and chronic conditions. The majority of peripheral neuropathies cause mainly muscle weakness and sensory loss, positive sensory symptoms and sometimes pain. When pain is present, however, it is usually extremely intense and among the most disabling symptoms for the patients. In addition, the neurological origin of the pain is often missed and patients receive inadequate or delayed specific treatment. Independently of the disease causing the peripheral nerve injury, pain originating from axonal pathology or ganglionopathy privileges neuropathies affecting smaller fibres, a clinical observation that points towards abnormal activity within nociceptive afferents as a main generator of pain. Natural activation of blood vessels or perineurial nociceptive network by pathology also causes intense pain. Pain of this kind, i.e. nerve trunk pain, is among the heralding symptoms of inflammatory or ischemic mononeuropathy and for its intensity represents itself a medical emergency. Neuropathic pain quality rekindles the psychophysical experience of peripheral nerves intraneural microstimulation i.e. a combination of large and small fibres sensation temporally distorted compared to physiological perception evoked by natural stimuli. Pins and needles, burning, cramping mixed with numbness, and tingling are the wording most used by patients. Nociceptive pain instead is most often described as aching, deep and dull. Good command of peripheral nerve anatomy and pathophysiology allows timely recognition of the different pain components and targeted treatment, selected according to intensity, type and temporal profile of the pain. PMID:18615140

  8. Sensitivity of CFD based hemodynamic results in rabbit aneurysm models to idealizations in surrounding vasculature.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zijing; Kallmes, David F; Durka, Michael J; Ding, Yonghong; Lewis, Debra; Kadirvel, Ramanathan; Robertson, Anne M

    2010-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies provide a valuable tool for evaluating the role of hemodynamics in vascular diseases such as cerebral aneurysms and atherosclerosis. However, such models necessarily only include isolated segments of the vasculature. In this work, we evaluate the influence of geometric approximations in vascular anatomy on hemodynamics in elastase induced saccular aneurysms in rabbits. One representative high aspect ratio (AR-height/neck width) aneurysm and one low AR aneurysm were created at the origin of the right common carotid artery in two New Zealand white rabbits. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the aneurysm and surrounding arteries were created using 3D rotational angiographic data. Five models with varying extents of neighboring vasculature were created for both the high and low AR cases. A reference model included the aneurysm sac, left common carotid artery (LCCA), aortic arch, and downstream trifurcation/quadrification. Three-dimensional, pulsatile CFD studies were performed and streamlines, wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index, and cross sectional velocity were compared between the models. The influence of the vascular domain on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics varied between the low and high AR cases. For the high AR case, even a simple model including only the aneurysm, a small section of neighboring vasculature, and simple extensions captured the main features of the steamline and WSS distribution predicted by the reference model. However, the WSS distribution in the low AR case was more strongly influenced by the extent of vasculature. In particular, it was necessary to include the downstream quadrification and upstream LCCA to obtain good predictions of WSS. The findings in this work demonstrate the accuracy of CFD results can be compromised if insufficient neighboring vessels are included in studies of hemodynamics in elastase induced rabbit aneurysms. Consideration of aspect ratio, hemodynamic

  9. Sensitivity of CFD Based Hemodynamic Results in Rabbit Aneurysm Models to Idealizations in Surrounding Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zijing; Kallmes, David F.; Durka, Michael J.; Ding, Yonghong; Lewis, Debra; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies provide a valuable tool for evaluating the role of hemodynamics in vascular diseases such as cerebral aneurysms and atherosclerosis. However, such models necessarily only include isolated segments of the vasculature. In this work, we evaluate the influence of geometric approximations in vascular anatomy on hemodynamics in elastase induced saccular aneurysms in rabbits. One representative high aspect ratio (AR—height/neck width) aneurysm and one low AR aneurysm were created at the origin of the right common carotid artery in two New Zealand white rabbits. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the aneurysm and surrounding arteries were created using 3D rotational angiographic data. Five models with varying extents of neighboring vasculature were created for both the high and low AR cases. A reference model included the aneurysm sac, left common carotid artery (LCCA), aortic arch, and downstream trifurcation/quadrification. Three-dimensional, pulsatile CFD studies were performed and streamlines, wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index, and cross sectional velocity were compared between the models. The influence of the vascular domain on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics varied between the low and high AR cases. For the high AR case, even a simple model including only the aneurysm, a small section of neighboring vasculature, and simple extensions captured the main features of the steamline and WSS distribution predicted by the reference model. However, the WSS distribution in the low AR case was more strongly influenced by the extent of vasculature. In particular, it was necessary to include the downstream quadrification and upstream LCCA to obtain good predictions of WSS. The findings in this work demonstrate the accuracy of CFD results can be compromised if insufficient neighboring vessels are included in studies of hemodynamics in elastase induced rabbit aneurysms. Consideration of aspect ratio, hemodynamic

  10. AECHL-1, a novel triterpenoid, targets tumor neo-vasculature and impairs the endothelial cell cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Aparajita; Sawant, Mithila A; Lavhale, Manish S; Krishnapati, Lakshmi-Surekha; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Sitasawad, Sandhya L

    2015-07-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is characterized by abnormal vessel morphology leading to erratic and insufficient delivery of chemotherapeutics and oxygen, making the tumor core not only highly hypoxic but also unresponsive toward treatment. Such hypoxic conditions promote tumor aggressiveness, leading to the establishment of metastatic disease. Most anti-angiogenic treatments aim toward the destruction of tumor vasculature, which proves countereffective by further increasing its aggressive nature. Hence, developing drugs which target or regulate these processes might lead to a better delivery of chemotherapeutics resulting in tumor shrinkage. Plant-derived natural compounds having a bioactive ingredient, especially triterpenoids, have been known to possess anticancer properties. AECHL-1, a recently isolated novel triterpenoid with proven anticancer potential, is seemingly noncytotoxic toward HEK 293 and HUVECs. Also, cytotoxicity was absent during in vivo studies involving intraperitoneal injections with 5 µg/kg body weight AECHL-1 on SCID mice. When used at subtoxic doses, it was found to be effective in suppression of neo-vessel formation as demonstrated in the chick chorioallantoic membrane, rat aortic rings, Matrigel plugs and xenograft tumors implanted in SCID mice. Tumor vasculature from AECHL-1-treated mice showed greater mural cell coverage and relatively normalized architecture. Investigations into the molecular mechanisms responsible for these observations revealed an effect on the actin cytoskeleton of stimulated HUVECs as well as the VEGFR2-mediated MAPK pathway. AECHL-1 could effectively distinguish between stimulated and nonstimulated endothelial cells. AECHL-1 could also downregulate HIF-1α expression and VEGF secretion under hypoxic conditions, thus reducing the fears of unnecessarily aggravating tumor metastasis as a result of anti-angiogenic therapy. Results obtained from the aforementioned studies make it clear that though AECHL-1 shows promise in

  11. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  12. Reconstruction and representation of caudal vasculature of zebrafish embryo from confocal scanning laser fluorescence microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Cheng, Shuk Han; Chan, Po K; Ip, Horace H S

    2005-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction from a series of sections is an important technique in medical imaging, particularly for visualization of blood vessels from angiography. Here, we present a framework for automatic segmentation and registration of different kind of blood vessels from 2-day-old zebrafish embryos. Series of optical sections were acquired from confocal microscopy with the blood vessels labeled by fluorescent microbeads (0.02 microm) injected into blood stream of 2-day-old zebrafish embryos. Blood vessels were extracted and their morphological parameters, including length and diameter, were calculated. At the same time, individual blood vessels were registered automatically. Vasculature was represented by attributed vessel represent graph (AVRG), which contained morphological data and connectivity of every blood vessel. Using AVRG to represent a vasculature made the comparison between vasculatures of different embryos more easy. Visualization, as well as quantification, of reconstructed 3D model of AVRG was presented in an interactive interface. The framework was implemented by Visual C++ as Windows-based program. PMID:16263106

  13. Retinal Vasculature of Adult Zebrafish: In Vivo Imaging Using Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Brent A.; Xie, Jing; Yuan, Alex; Kaul, Charles; Hollyfield, Joe G.; Anand-Apte, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 3 decades the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become an important biomedical research species. As their use continues to grow additional techniques and tools will be required to keep pace with ongoing research using this species. In this paper we describe a novel method for in vivo imaging of the retinal vasculature in adult animals using a commercially available confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). With this instrumentation, we demonstrate the ability to distinguish diverse vascular phenotypes in different transgenic GFP lines. In addition this technology allows repeated visualization of the vasculature in individual zebrafish over time to document vascular leakage progression and recovery induced by intraocular delivery of proteins that induce vascular permeability. SLO of the retinal vasculature was found to be highly informative, providing images of high contrast and resolution that were capable of resolving individual vascular endothelial cells. Finally, the procedures required to acquire SLO images from zebrafish are non-invasive, simple to perform and can be achieved with low animal mortality, allowing repeated imaging of individual fish. PMID:25447564

  14. Assessment of variability in cerebral vasculature for neuro-anatomical surgery planning in rodent brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangarajan, J. R.; Van Kuyck, K.; Himmelreich, U.; Nuttin, B.; Maes, F.; Suetens, P.

    2011-03-01

    Clinical and pre-clinical studies show that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of targeted brain regions by neurosurgical techniques ameliorate psychiatric disorder such as anorexia nervosa. Neurosurgical interventions in preclinical rodent brain are mostly accomplished manually with a 2D atlas. Considering both the large number of animals subjected to stereotactic surgical experiments and the associated imaging cost, feasibility of sophisticated pre-operative imaging based surgical path planning and/or robotic guidance is limited. Here, we spatially normalize vasculature information and assess the intra-strain variability in cerebral vasculature for a neurosurgery planning. By co-registering and subsequently building a probabilistic vasculature template in a standard space, we evaluate the risk of a user defined electrode trajectory damaging a blood vessel on its path. The use of such a method may not only be confined to DBS therapy in small animals, but also could be readily applicable to a wide range of stereotactic small animal surgeries like targeted injection of contrast agents and cell labeling applications.

  15. Endocrine vasculatures are preferable targets of an antitumor ineffective low dose of anti-VEGF therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Yang, Yunlong; Hosaka, Kayoko; Huang, Guichun; Zang, Jingwu; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yun; Samani, Nilesh J; Cao, Yihai

    2016-04-12

    Anti-VEGF-based antiangiogenic drugs are designed to block tumor angiogenesis for treatment of cancer patients. However, anti-VEGF drugs produce off-tumor target effects on multiple tissues and organs and cause broad adverse effects. Here, we show that vasculatures in endocrine organs were more sensitive to anti-VEGF treatment than tumor vasculatures. In thyroid, adrenal glands, and pancreatic islets, systemic treatment with low doses of an anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody caused marked vascular regression, whereas tumor vessels remained unaffected. Additionally, a low dose of VEGF blockade significantly inhibited the formation of thyroid vascular fenestrae, leaving tumor vascular structures unchanged. Along with vascular structural changes, the low dose of VEGF blockade inhibited vascular perfusion and permeability in thyroid, but not in tumors. Prolonged treatment with the low-dose VEGF blockade caused hypertension and significantly decreased circulating levels of thyroid hormone free-T3 and -T4, leading to functional impairment of thyroid. These findings show that the fenestrated microvasculatures in endocrine organs are more sensitive than tumor vasculatures in response to systemic anti-VEGF drugs. Thus, our data support the notion that clinically nonbeneficial treatments with anti-VEGF drugs could potentially cause adverse effects. PMID:27035988

  16. Selective targeting of bioengineered platelets to prostate cancer vasculature: new paradigm for therapeutic modalities.

    PubMed

    Montecinos, Viviana P; Morales, Claudio H; Fischer, Thomas H; Burns, Sarah; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Godoy, Alejandro S; Smith, Gary J

    2015-07-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) provides palliation for most patients with advanced prostate cancer (CaP); however, greater than 80% subsequently fail ADT. ADT has been indicated to induce an acute but transient destabilization of the prostate vasculature in animal models and humans. Human re-hydrated lyophilized platelets (hRL-P) were investigated as a prototype for therapeutic agents designed to target selectively the tumour-associated vasculature in CaP. The ability of hRL-P to bind the perturbed endothelial cells was tested using thrombin- and ADP-activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), as well as primary xenografts of human prostate tissue undergoing acute vascular involution in response to ADT. hRL-P adhered to activated HUVEC in a dose-responsive manner. Systemically administered hRL-P, and hRL-P loaded with super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, selectively targeted the ADT-damaged human microvasculature in primary xenografts of human prostate tissue. This study demonstrated that hRL-P pre-loaded with chemo-therapeutics or nanoparticles could provide a new paradigm for therapeutic modalities to prevent the rebound/increase in prostate vasculature after ADT, inhibiting the transition to castration-recurrent growth. PMID:25736582

  17. Barriers of the peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Sirkku; Alanne, Maria; Peltonen, Juha

    2013-01-01

    This review introduces the traditionally defined anatomic compartments of the peripheral nerves based on light and electron microscopic topography and then explores the cellular and the most recent molecular basis of the different barrier functions operative in peripheral nerves. We also elucidate where, and how, the homeostasis of the normal human peripheral nerve is controlled in situ and how claudin-containing tight junctions contribute to the barriers of peripheral nerve. Also, the human timeline of the development of the barriers of the peripheral nerve is depicted. Finally, potential future therapeutic modalities interfering with the barriers of the peripheral nerve are discussed. PMID:24665400

  18. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Paul; Calcutt, Nigel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been implicated in numerous diseases of the nervous system. The pathogenesis of two increasingly common disorders of the peripheral nervous system, namely neuropathic pain and diabetic polyneuropathy, has been associated with aberrant Ca2+ channel expression and function. Here we review the current state of knowledge regarding the role of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and associated mitochondrial dysfunction in painful and diabetic neuropathies. The central impact of both alterations of Ca2+ signalling at the plasma membrane and also intracellular Ca2+ handling on sensory neuron function is discussed and related to abnormal endoplasmic reticulum performance. We also present new data highlighting sub-optimal axonal Ca 2+ signalling in diabetic neuropathy and discuss the putative role for this abnormality in the induction of axonal degeneration in peripheral neuropathies. The accumulating evidence implicating Ca2+ dysregulation with both painful and degenerative neuropathies, along with recent advances in understanding of regional variations in Ca2+ channel and pump structures, makes modulation of neuronal Ca2+ handling an increasingly viable approach for therapeutic interventions against the painful and degenerative aspects of many peripheral neuropathies. PMID:20034667

  19. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  20. Peripheral neuropathies 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Assal, J.P.; Liniger, C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present results and experience in sixteen specific disciplines related to the study of nerve physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment. Twenty-two different peripheral neuropathies are presented, and different models related to health care strategies are discussed. The authors report on Inflammatory and autoimmune neuropathies and Genetic neuropathies.

  1. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François

    2013-07-15

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent K{sub M} 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥ 2.5 μM, ≥ 2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake V{sub max}. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes). - Highlights: • Quinacrine is concentrated in acidic organelles via V-ATPase-mediated ion

  2. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  3. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  4. Impaired Nitric Oxide Mediated Vasodilation In The Peripheral Circulation In The R6/2 Mouse Model Of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kane, Andrew D; Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A; Morton, A Jennifer; Giussani, Dino A

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the Huntington's disease (HD) extends beyond the nervous system to other sites, including the cardiovascular system. Further, the cardiovascular pathology pre-dates neurological decline, however the mechanisms involved remain unclear. We investigated in the R6/2 mouse model of HD nitric oxide (NO) dependent and independent endothelial mechanisms. Femoral artery reactivity was determined by wire myography in wild type (WT) and R6/2 mice at 12 and 16 weeks of adulthood. WT mice showed increased endothelial relaxation between 12 and 16 weeks (Rmax: 72 ± 7% vs. 97 ± 13%, P < 0.05). In contrast, R6/2 mice showed enhanced endothelial relaxation already by 12 weeks (Rmax at 12w: 72 ± 7% vs. 94 ± 5%, WT vs. R6/2, P < 0.05) that declined by 16 weeks compared with WT mice (Rmax at 16w: 97 ± 13% vs. 68 ± 7%, WT vs. R6/2, P < 0.05). In WT mice, the increase in femoral relaxation between 12 and 16 weeks was due to enhanced NO dependent mechanisms. By 16 weeks of adult age, the R6/2 mouse developed overt endothelial dysfunction due to an inability to increase NO dependent vasodilation. The data add to the growing literature of non-neural manifestations of HD and implicate NO depletion as a key mechanism underlying the HD pathophysiology in the peripheral vasculature. PMID:27181166

  5. Immunotherapy in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Léger, Jean-Marc; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Muntean, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been investigated in a small subset of peripheral neuropathies, including an acute one, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 3 chronic forms: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and neuropathy associated with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein. Several experimental studies and clinical data are strongly suggestive of an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Either cell-mediated mechanisms or antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin, or nodal antigens are considered to act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Immunomodulatory treatments used in these neuropathies aim to act at various steps of this pathogenic process. However, there are many phenotypic variants and, consequently, there is a significant difference in the response to immunotherapy between these neuropathies, as well as a need to improve our knowledge and long-term management of chronic forms. PMID:26602549

  6. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  7. [Ganglia of peripheral nerves].

    PubMed

    Tatagiba, M; Penkert, G; Samii, M

    1993-01-01

    The authors present two different types of ganglion affecting the peripheral nerves: extraneural and intraneural ganglion. Compression of peripheral nerves by articular ganglions is well known. The surgical management involves the complete removal of the lesion with preservation of most nerve fascicles. Intraneural ganglion is an uncommon lesion which affects the nerve diffusely. The nerve fascicles are usually intimately involved between the cysts, making complete removal of all cysts impossible. There is no agreement about the best surgical management to be applied in these cases. Two possibilities are available: opening of the epineural sheath lengthwise and pressing out the lesion; or resection of the affected part of the nerve and performing a nerve reconstruction. While in case of extraneural ganglion the postoperative clinical evolution is very favourable, only long follow up studies will reveal in case of intraneural ganglion the best surgical approach. PMID:8128785

  8. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010. Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review. We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 70 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents, bypass surgery, cilostazol, exercise, pentoxifylline, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), prostaglandins, smoking cessation, and statins. PMID:21477401

  9. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009. (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 59 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents; bypass surgery; cilostazol; exercise; pentoxifylline; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA); prostaglandins; smoking cessation; and statins. PMID:19454099

  10. Gold nanoparticle induced vasculature damage in radiotherapy: Comparing protons, megavoltage photons, and kilovoltage photons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuting Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan; McMahon, Stephen J.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage for proton, megavoltage (MV) photon, and kilovoltage (kV) photon irradiation. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using tool for particle simulation (TOPAS) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity up to 20 μm from the GNPs. The spatial dose distribution from GNPs was used as an input to calculate the dose deposited to the blood vessels. GNP induced vasculature damage was evaluated for three particle sources (a clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beam, a 6 MV photon beam, and two kV photon beams). For each particle source, various depths in tissue, GNP sizes (2, 10, and 20 nm diameter), and vessel diameters (8, 14, and 20 μm) were investigated. Two GNP distributions in lumen were considered, either homogeneously distributed in the vessel or attached to the inner wall of the vessel. Doses of 30 Gy and 2 Gy were considered, representing typical in vivo enhancement studies and conventional clinical fractionation, respectively. Results: These simulations showed that for 20 Au-mg/g GNP blood concentration homogeneously distributed in the vessel, the additional dose at the inner vascular wall encircling the lumen was 43% of the prescribed dose at the depth of treatment for the 250 kVp photon source, 1% for the 6 MV photon source, and 0.1% for the proton beam. For kV photons, GNPs caused 15% more dose in the vascular wall for 150 kVp source than for 250 kVp. For 6 MV photons, GNPs caused 0.2% more dose in the vascular wall at 20 cm depth in water as compared to at depth of maximum dose (Dmax). For proton therapy, GNPs caused the same dose in the vascular wall for all depths across the spread out Bragg peak with 12.7 cm range and 7 cm modulation. For the same weight of GNPs in the vessel, 2 nm diameter GNPs caused three times more damage to the vessel than 20 nm diameter GNPs. When the GNPs were attached

  11. Gold nanoparticle induced vasculature damage in radiotherapy: Comparing protons, megavoltage photons, and kilovoltage photons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuting; Paganetti, Harald; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schuemann, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage for proton, megavoltage (MV) photon, and kilovoltage (kV) photon irradiation. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using tool for particle simulation (TOPAS) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity up to 20 μm from the GNPs. The spatial dose distribution from GNPs was used as an input to calculate the dose deposited to the blood vessels. GNP induced vasculature damage was evaluated for three particle sources (a clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beam, a 6 MV photon beam, and two kV photon beams). For each particle source, various depths in tissue, GNP sizes (2, 10, and 20 nm diameter), and vessel diameters (8, 14, and 20 μm) were investigated. Two GNP distributions in lumen were considered, either homogeneously distributed in the vessel or attached to the inner wall of the vessel. Doses of 30 Gy and 2 Gy were considered, representing typical in vivo enhancement studies and conventional clinical fractionation, respectively. Results: These simulations showed that for 20 Au-mg/g GNP blood concentration homogeneously distributed in the vessel, the additional dose at the inner vascular wall encircling the lumen was 43% of the prescribed dose at the depth of treatment for the 250 kVp photon source, 1% for the 6 MV photon source, and 0.1% for the proton beam. For kV photons, GNPs caused 15% more dose in the vascular wall for 150 kVp source than for 250 kVp. For 6 MV photons, GNPs caused 0.2% more dose in the vascular wall at 20 cm depth in water as compared to at depth of maximum dose (Dmax). For proton therapy, GNPs caused the same dose in the vascular wall for all depths across the spread out Bragg peak with 12.7 cm range and 7 cm modulation. For the same weight of GNPs in the vessel, 2 nm diameter GNPs caused three times more damage to the vessel than 20 nm diameter GNPs. When the GNPs were attached

  12. WE-G-BRE-04: Gold Nanoparticle Induced Vasculature Damage for Proton Therapy: Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate the gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage in a proton beam. We compared the results using a clinical proton beam, 6MV photon beam and two kilovoltage photon beams. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity to GNPs up to 20μm distance. The spatial dose distribution was used as an input to calculate the additional dose deposited to the blood vessels. For this study, GNP induced vasculature damage is evaluated for three particle sources (proton beam, MV photon beam and kV photon beam), various treatment depths for each particle source, various GNP uptakes and three different vessel diameters (8μm, 14μm and 20μm). Results: The result shows that for kV photon, GNPs induce more dose in the vessel wall for 150kVp photon source than 250kVp. For proton therapy, GNPs cause more dose in the vessel wall at shallower treatment depths. For 6MV photons, GNPs induce more dose in the vessel wall at deeper treatment depths. For the same GNP concentration and prescribed dose, the additional dose at the inner vessel wall is 30% more than the prescribed dose for the kVp photon source, 15% more for the proton source and only 2% more for the 6MV photon source. In addition, the dose from GNPs deceases sharper for proton therapy than kVp photon therapy as the distance from the vessel inner wall increases. Conclusion: We show in this study that GNPs can potentially be used to enhance radiation therapy by causing vasculature damage using clinical proton beams. The GNP induced damage for proton therapy is less than for the kVp photon source but significantly larger than for the clinical MV photon source.

  13. Altered reactivity of resistance vasculature contributes to hypertension in elastin insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Russell H.; Kozel, Beth A.; Dietrich, Hans H.; Blumer, Kendall J.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Elastin (Eln) insufficiency in mice and humans is associated with hypertension and altered structure and mechanical properties of large arteries. However, it is not known to what extent functional or structural changes in resistance arteries contribute to the elevated blood pressure that is characteristic of Eln insufficiency. Here, we investigated how Eln insufficiency affects the structure and function of the resistance vasculature. A functional profile of resistance vasculature in Eln+/− mice was generated by assessing small mesenteric artery (MA) contractile and vasodilatory responses to vasoactive agents. We found that Eln haploinsufficiency had a modest effect on phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction, whereas ANG II-evoked vasoconstriction was markedly increased. Blockade of ANG II type 2 receptors with PD-123319 or modulation of Rho kinase activity with the inhibitor Y-27632 attenuated the augmented vasoconstriction, whereas acute Y-27632 administration normalized blood pressure in Eln+/− mice. Sodium nitroprusside- and isoproterenol-induced vasodilatation were normal, whereas ACh-induced vasodilatation was severely impaired in Eln+/− MAs. Histologically, the number of smooth muscle layers did not change in Eln+/− MAs; however, an additional discontinuous layer of Eln appeared between the smooth muscle layers that was absent in wild-type arteries. We conclude that high blood pressure arising from Eln insufficiency is due partly to permanent changes in vascular tone as a result of increased sensitivity of the resistance vasculature to circulating ANG II and to impaired vasodilatory mechanisms arising from endothelial dysfunction characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Eln insufficiency causes augmented ANG II-induced vasoconstriction in part through a novel mechanism that facilitates contraction evoked by ANG II type 2 receptors and altered G protein signaling. PMID:24414067

  14. Fibroblast growth factor-2 facilitates rapid anastomosis formation between bioengineered human vascular networks and living vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Many common diseases involve the injury, loss, or death of organ tissues. For these patients, organ transplantation is often the only viable solution. Nonetheless, organ transplantation is seriously limited by the relative scarcity of living and non-living donors, a situation that is worsening with aging of the world population. Tissue Engineering (TE) is a research discipline in regenerative medicine that aims to generate tissues in the laboratory that can replace diseased and damaged tissues in patients. Crucially, engineered tissues must have a vascular network that guarantees adequate nutrient supply, gas exchange, and elimination of waste products. Therefore, the search for clinically relevant sources of vasculogenic cells and the subsequent development of methods to achieve rapid vascularization is of utmost importance. We and others have previously shown that human blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have the required vasculogenic capacity to form functional vascular networks in vivo. These studies demonstrated that, in the presence of an appropriate source of perivascular cells, ECFCs can self-assemble into microvascular networks and connect to the host vasculature, a process that takes approximately 7 days in vivo. The prospect is to incorporate these vascular networks into future engineered tissues. However, engineered tissues must have a functional vasculature immediately after implantation in order to preserve viability and function. Thus, it is critical to further develop strategies for rapid formation of perfused vascular network in vivo. Here, we describe a methodology to deliver ECFCs and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice in the presence of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). This approach significantly reduces the time needed to achieve functional anastomoses between bioengineered human blood vessels and the host vasculature. This methodology includes (1) isolation

  15. Metabolism and bioenergetics in the right ventricle and pulmonary vasculature in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Stephen L.; Fang, Yong-Hu; Ryan, John J.; Piao, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a syndrome in which pulmonary vascular cross sectional area and compliance are reduced by vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling, and inflammation. Vascular remodeling results in part from increased proliferation and impaired apoptosis of vascular cells. The resulting increase in afterload promotes right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure. Recently identified mitochondrial-metabolic abnormalities in PAH, notably pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-mediated inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), result in aerobic glycolysis in both the lung vasculature and RV. This glycolytic shift has diagnostic importance since it is detectable early in experimental PAH by increased lung and RV uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose on positron emission tomography. The metabolic shift also has pathophysiologic and therapeutic relevance. In RV myocytes, the glycolytic switch reduces contractility while in the vasculature it renders cells hyperproliferative and apoptosis-resistant. Reactivation of PDH can be achieved directly by PDK inhibition (using dichloroacetate), or indirectly via activating the Randle cycle, using inhibitors of fatty acid oxidation (FAO), trimetazidine and ranolazine. In experimental PAH and RVH, PDK inhibition increases glucose oxidation, enhances RV function, regresses pulmonary vascular disease by reducing proliferation and enhancing apoptosis, and restores cardiac repolarization. FAO inhibition increases RV glucose oxidation and RV function in experimental RVH. The trigger for metabolic remodeling in the RV and lung differ. In the RV, metabolic remodeling is likely triggered by ischemia (due to microvascular rarefaction and/or reduced coronary perfusion pressure). In the vasculature, metabolic changes result from redox-mediated activation of transcription factors, including hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, as a consequence of epigenetic silencing of SOD2 and/or changes in mitochondrial fission/fusion. Randomized

  16. Variation in the Obturator Vasculature During Routine Anatomy Dissection of a Cadaver

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Vishwajit; Singh, Seema; Sirohi, Neerja; Baruhee, Divya

    2016-01-01

    The obturator artery normally originates from the internal iliac artery while the obturator vein drains into the internal iliac vein. During a routine gross anatomy dissection class for undergraduate students at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India, in 2016, a rare unilateral variation in the obturator vasculature was found in a female cadaver of approximately 55 years of age. In this case, the left obturator artery originated from the superior gluteal artery and the left obturator vein drained into the external iliac vein. Knowledge of such variations is necessary during hernia procedures, ligation of the internal iliac artery and muscle graft surgeries. PMID:27606118

  17. Variation in the Obturator Vasculature During Routine Anatomy Dissection of a Cadaver.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Vishwajit; Singh, Seema; Sirohi, Neerja; Baruhee, Divya

    2016-08-01

    The obturator artery normally originates from the internal iliac artery while the obturator vein drains into the internal iliac vein. During a routine gross anatomy dissection class for undergraduate students at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India, in 2016, a rare unilateral variation in the obturator vasculature was found in a female cadaver of approximately 55 years of age. In this case, the left obturator artery originated from the superior gluteal artery and the left obturator vein drained into the external iliac vein. Knowledge of such variations is necessary during hernia procedures, ligation of the internal iliac artery and muscle graft surgeries. PMID:27606118

  18. An alternative tool for intraoperative assessment of renal vasculature after revascularization of a transplanted kidney.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tokihiko; Solly, Mizrahi; Kita, Junji; Shimoda, Mitsugi; Kubota, Keiichi

    2010-06-01

    Intraoperative assessment of flow in the renal artery and vein after reconstruction is a crucial matter in kidney transplantation. Conventional Doppler ultrasound detects blood flow only in a limited area. The authors report a newly developed device that noninvasively visualizes the condition of perfusion of an entire allograft at one time from any angle and also clearly detects the state of anastomosis of the renal vessels. This near-infrared camera system provides the opportunity for the intraoperative assessment of the vasculature of renal allografts. PMID:20409513

  19. [Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kubiatowski, Tomasz; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Mocarska, Agnieszka; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-11-01

    Modern cancer therapy prolongs patients life but commonly increases incidence of treatment-related complications. One of such adverse effect is a neurotoxicity, which usually manifestates as peripheral neuropathies (CIPN), characterised by various sensory (tingling, numbness, pain), motor (foot and hands drop, fastening buttons difficulties) and autonomic (constipation, arythmia) abnormalities as well as pain. Despite of intensive epidemiological and clinical studies, standardized diagnostic criteria and methods of the neuropathy prevention and treatment have not been fully established. The most commonly used form of treatment is symptomatic therapy, including anticonvulsant and antidepressant drugs. Proper education of patients and their families of symptoms and neuropathy consequences is desirable to reduce anxiety and stress. PMID:24575651

  20. 3D Light-Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy of Cranial Neurons and Vasculature during Zebrafish Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ok Kyu; Kwak, Jina; Jung, Yoo Jung; Kim, Young Ho; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Hwang, Byung Joon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Kee, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Precise 3D spatial mapping of cells and their connections within living tissues is required to fully understand developmental processes and neural activities. Zebrafish embryos are relatively small and optically transparent, making them the vertebrate model of choice for live in vivo imaging. However, embryonic brains cannot be imaged in their entirety by confocal or two-photon microscopy due to limitations in optical range and scanning speed. Here, we use light-sheet fluorescence microscopy to overcome these limitations and image the entire head of live transgenic zebrafish embryos. We simultaneously imaged cranial neurons and blood vessels during embryogenesis, generating comprehensive 3D maps that provide insight into the coordinated morphogenesis of the nervous system and vasculature during early development. In addition, blood cells circulating through the entire head, vagal and cardiac vasculature were also visualized at high resolution in a 3D movie. These data provide the foundation for the construction of a complete 4D atlas of zebrafish embryogenesis and neural activity. PMID:26429501

  1. The cadaveric perfusion and angiography as a teaching tool: imaging the intracranial vasculature in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Turkoglu, Erhan; Seckin, Hakan; Gurer, Bora; Ahmed, Azam; Uluc, Kutluay; Pulfer, Kari; Arat, Anıl; Niemann, David; Baskaya, Mustafa K

    2014-12-01

    Background and Study Aim To enhance the visualization of the intracranial vasculature of cadavers under gross examination with a combination of imaging modalities. Material and Methods A total of 20 cadaver heads were used to test two different perfusion techniques. First, fixed cadaver heads were perfused with water; second, fresh cadavers were perfused with saline and 10% formalin. Subsequently, brains were removed and fixed. The compounds used were silicone rubber, silicone rubber mixed with powdered barium sulfate, and silicone rubber mixed with tantalum dioxide prepared by the first perfusion technique and gelatin mixed with liquid barium prepared with the second technique. Conventional X-ray imaging, computed tomography (CT), dynamic computed tomography (dCT), and postprocessing three-dimensional (3D) images were used to evaluate all the heads. Results Gelatinized barium was better visualized when compared with tantalum dioxide in conventional X-ray images. The blood vessels injected with either tantalum dioxide or gelatinized barium demonstrated a higher enhancement than the surrounding soft tissues with CT or dCT. The quality of the 3D reconstruction of the intracranial vasculature was significantly better in the CT images obtained from the gelatinized barium group. Conclusions Radiologic examinations of the heads injected with gelatinized barium facilitates the 3D understanding of cerebrovascular anatomy as an important tool for neuroanatomy training. PMID:25452903

  2. The Cadaveric Perfusion and Angiography as a Teaching Tool: Imaging the Intracranial Vasculature in Cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Turkoglu, Erhan; Seckin, Hakan; Gurer, Bora; Ahmed, Azam; Uluc, Kutluay; Pulfer, Kari; Arat, Anıl; Niemann, David; Baskaya, Mustafa K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Study Aim To enhance the visualization of the intracranial vasculature of cadavers under gross examination with a combination of imaging modalities. Material and Methods A total of 20 cadaver heads were used to test two different perfusion techniques. First, fixed cadaver heads were perfused with water; second, fresh cadavers were perfused with saline and 10% formalin. Subsequently, brains were removed and fixed. The compounds used were silicone rubber, silicone rubber mixed with powdered barium sulfate, and silicone rubber mixed with tantalum dioxide prepared by the first perfusion technique and gelatin mixed with liquid barium prepared with the second technique. Conventional X-ray imaging, computed tomography (CT), dynamic computed tomography (dCT), and postprocessing three-dimensional (3D) images were used to evaluate all the heads. Results Gelatinized barium was better visualized when compared with tantalum dioxide in conventional X-ray images. The blood vessels injected with either tantalum dioxide or gelatinized barium demonstrated a higher enhancement than the surrounding soft tissues with CT or dCT. The quality of the 3D reconstruction of the intracranial vasculature was significantly better in the CT images obtained from the gelatinized barium group. Conclusions Radiologic examinations of the heads injected with gelatinized barium facilitates the 3D understanding of cerebrovascular anatomy as an important tool for neuroanatomy training. PMID:25452903

  3. Modelling the Role of the Coronary Vasculature During External Field Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Martin J.; Boyle, Patrick M.; Plank, Gernot; Welsh, Donald G.; Vigmond, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    The exact mechanisms by which defibrillation shocks excite cardiac tissue far from both the electrodes and heart surfaces require elucidation. Bidomain theory explains this phenomena through the existence of intramural virtual electrodes (VEs), caused by discontinuities in myocardial tissue structure. In this study, we assess the modelling components essential in constructing a finite element cardiac tissue model including blood vessels from high resolution MR data and investigate the specific role played by coronary vasculature in VE formation, which currently remains largely unknown. We use a novel method for assigning histologically-based fibre architecture around intramural structures and include an experimentally-derived vessel lumen wall conductance within the model. Shock-tissue interaction in the presence of vessels was assessed through comparison with a simplified model lacking intramural structures. Results indicate that VEs form around blood vessels for shocks > 8 V/cm. The magnitude of induced polarisations is attenuated by realistic representation of fibre negotiation around vessel cavities, as well as the insulating effects of the vessel lumen wall. Furthermore, VEs formed around large sub-epicardial vessels reduce epicardial polarisation levels. In conclusion, we have found that coronary vasculature acts as an important substrate for VE formation, which may help interpretation of optical mapping data. PMID:20542762

  4. Vasculature segmentation using parallel multi-hypothesis template tracking on heterogeneous platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong Ping; Howes, Lee

    2013-02-01

    We present a parallel multi-hypothesis template tracking algorithm on heterogeneous platforms using a layered dispatch programming model. The contributions of this work are: an architecture-specific optimised solution for vasculature structure enhancement, an approach to segment the vascular lumen network from volumetric CTA images and a layered dispatch programming model to free the developers from hand-crafting mappings to particularly constrained execution domains on high throughput architecture. This abstraction is demonstrated through a vasculature segmentation application and can also be applied in other real-world applications. Current GPGPU programming models define a grouping concept which may lead to poorly scoped lo­ cal/ shared memory regions and an inconvenient approach to projecting complicated iterations spaces. To improve on this situation, we propose a simpler and more flexible programming model that leads to easier computation projections and hence a more convenient mapping of the same algorithm to a wide range of architectures. We first present an optimised image enhancement solution step- by-step, then solve a separable nonlinear least squares problem using a parallel Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for template matching, and perform the energy efficiency analysis and performance comparison on a variety of platforms, including multi-core CPUs, discrete GPUs and APUs. We propose and discuss the efficiency of a layered-dispatch programming abstraction for mapping algorithms onto heterogeneous architectures.

  5. Effects of CXC chemokines on neutrophil activation and sequestration in hepatic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Bajt, M L; Farhood, A; Jaeschke, H

    2001-11-01

    The initiating step of neutrophil-induced cytotoxicity in the liver is the recruitment of these phagocytes into sinusoids. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy of systemic exposure with individual inflammatory mediators on neutrophil activation and sequestration in the hepatic vasculature of C3Heb/FeJ mice as assessed by flow cytometry and histochemistry, respectively. The CXC chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2; 20 microg/kg) induced a time-dependent upregulation of Mac-1 (318% at 4 h) and shedding of L-selectin (41% at 4 h). MIP-2 treatment caused a temporary increase of sinusoidal neutrophil accumulation at 0.5 h [97 +/- 6 polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)/50 high-power fields (HPF)], which declined to baseline (8 +/- 2) at 4 h. The CXC chemokine KC was largely ineffective in activating neutrophils or recruiting them into the liver. Cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1alpha) and cobra venom factor substantially increased Mac-1 expression and L-selectin shedding on neutrophils and caused stable sinusoidal neutrophil accumulation (170-220 PMN/50 HPF). Only cytokines induced venular neutrophil margination. Thus CXC chemokines in circulation are less effective than cytokines or complement in activation of neutrophils and their recruitment into the hepatic vasculature in vivo. PMID:11668027

  6. Automatic anatomical labeling of the complete cerebral vasculature in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Ghanavati, Sahar; Lerch, Jason P; Sled, John G

    2014-07-15

    Study of cerebral vascular structure broadens our understanding of underlying variations, such as pathologies that can lead to cerebrovascular disorders. The development of high resolution 3D imaging modalities has provided us with the raw material to study the blood vessels in small animals such as mice. However, the high complexity and 3D nature of the cerebral vasculature make comparison and analysis of the vessels difficult, time-consuming and laborious. Here we present a framework for automated segmentation and recognition of the cerebral vessels in high resolution 3D images that addresses this need. The vasculature is segmented by following vessel center lines starting from automatically generated seeds and the vascular structure is represented as a graph. Each vessel segment is represented as an edge in the graph and has local features such as length, diameter, and direction, and relational features representing the connectivity of the vessel segments. Using these features, each edge in the graph is automatically labeled with its anatomical name using a stochastic relaxation algorithm. We have validated our method on micro-CT images of C57Bl/6J mice. A leave-one-out test performed on the labeled data set demonstrated the recognition rate for all vessels including major named vessels and their minor branches to be >75%. This automatic segmentation and recognition methods facilitate the comparison of blood vessels in large populations of subjects and allow us to study cerebrovascular variations. PMID:24680868

  7. On the way to subcellular imaging of mechanotransduction in the developing vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Irina V.; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Lane, Mary E.; Dickinson, Mary E.

    2007-05-01

    Endothelial cells that comprise vessels and line the heart are known to respond to mechanical forces imparted by fluid flow. It is also known that blood flow is required for vascular remodeling and that abnormal heart contractions lead to the failure of the vasculature to remodel properly. Although there is considerable evidence to indicate that flow is necessary, little is known about how mechanical signals are transduced in endothelial cells in the embryo. This project is focused on understanding the role mechanical forces play in the development of the cardiovascular system using recently generated FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) reporter that can detect real-time Src-kinase activity in cells using fluorescence microscopy. Src kinase regulates integrin-cytoskeleton interactions that are essential for mechanotransduction, and its activity is upregulated in cultured endothelial cells exposed to flow. Experiments reported here were focused on testing potential feasibility of the proposed technique to sense Src changes in vivo. Successful implementation of this project will reveal previously unknown signaling events involved in the mechanism of vascular remodeling and their relation to the blood flow, thus providing a unique tool for in vivo sub-cellular imaging of mechanotransduction in the vasculature and other organs.

  8. Diverse roles of the vasculature within the neural stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joshua S; Hirschi, Karen K

    2010-01-01

    An interdependent relationship between the vascular and nervous systems begins during the earliest stages of development and persists through the mammalian lifespan. Accordingly, the process of adult neurogenesis involves the coordinated response of both systems to maintain a specialized microenvironment (niche) that tips the scale towards maintenance or regeneration, as needed. Understanding the nature and regulation of this balance will provide a foundation on which the potential for molecular-and stem cell-based therapies can be developed to treat prevalent CNS diseases and disorders. The vasculature is cited as a prominent feature within the adult subventricular zone and subgranular zone, known adult neural stem cell niches, helping to retain neural stem and progenitor cell potential. The vascular compartment within the neural stem cell niche has the unique opportunity to not only regulate neural stem and progenitor cells through direct contact with, and paracrine signaling from, endothelial and mural cells that make up blood vessels, but also integrates systemic signals into the local microenvironment via distribution of soluble factors from blood circulation to regulate stem cell niche behavior. Understanding the intricate role that the vasculature plays to influence neural stem cells in the context of niche regulation will help to bridge the gap from bench to bedside for the development of regeneration-based therapies for the CNS. PMID:19903006

  9. Renal oxygenation: preglomerular vasculature is an unlikely contributor to renal oxygen shunting.

    PubMed

    Olgac, Ufuk; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2015-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the plausibility of preglomerular arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting in the kidney. To this end, we have developed a segment-wise three-dimensional computational model that takes into account transport processes in arteries, veins, cortical tissue, and capillaries. Our model suggests that the amount of preglomerular oxygen shunting is negligible. Consequently, it is improbable that preglomerular shunting contributes to the hypothesized regulation of renal oxygenation. Cortical tissue oxygenation is more likely determined by the interplay between oxygen supply, either from the preglomerular vasculature or from capillaries, and oxygen consumption. We show that reported differences in permeability to oxygen between perfused and unperfused tissue may be explained by what we refer to as advection-facilitated diffusion. We further show that the preglomerular vasculature is the primary source of oxygen for the tissue when cortical consumption is high or renal arterial blood is highly oxygenated, i.e., under hyperoxemic conditions. Conversely, when oxygen demand in the tissue is decreased, or under hypoxemic conditions, oxygen is supplied predominantly by capillaries. PMID:25503734

  10. Generation of a functional liver tissue mimic using adipose stromal vascular fraction cell-derived vasculatures

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, S. S.; Maijub, J. G.; Krishnan, L.; Ramakrishnan, V. M.; Clayton, L. R.; Williams, S. K.; Hoying, J. B.; Boyd, N. L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in cell implantation therapies is to promote integration of the microcirculation between the implanted cells and the host. We used adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells to vascularize a human liver cell (HepG2) implant. We hypothesized that the SVF cells would form a functional microcirculation via vascular assembly and inosculation with the host vasculature. Initially, we assessed the extent and character of neovasculatures formed by freshly isolated and cultured SVF cells and found that freshly isolated cells have a higher vascularization potential. Generation of a 3D implant containing fresh SVF and HepG2 cells formed a tissue in which HepG2 cells were entwined with a network of microvessels. Implanted HepG2 cells sequestered labeled LDL delivered by systemic intravascular injection only in SVF-vascularized implants demonstrating that SVF cell-derived vasculatures can effectively integrate with host vessels and interface with parenchymal cells to form a functional tissue mimic. PMID:23828203

  11. Deficiency for endoglin in tumor vasculature weakens the endothelial barrier to metastatic dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Anderberg, Charlotte; Cunha, Sara I.; Zhai, Zhenhua; Cortez, Eliane; Pardali, Evangelia; Johnson, Jill R.; Franco, Marcela; Páez-Ribes, Marta; Cordiner, Ross; Fuxe, Jonas; Johansson, Bengt R.; Goumans, Marie-José; Casanovas, Oriol; ten Dijke, Peter; Arthur, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Therapy-induced resistance remains a significant hurdle to achieve long-lasting responses and cures in cancer patients. We investigated the long-term consequences of genetically impaired angiogenesis by engineering multiple tumor models deprived of endoglin, a co-receptor for TGF-β in endothelial cells actively engaged in angiogenesis. Tumors from endoglin-deficient mice adapted to the weakened angiogenic response, and refractoriness to diminished endoglin signaling was accompanied by increased metastatic capability. Mechanistic studies in multiple mouse models of cancer revealed that deficiency for endoglin resulted in a tumor vasculature that displayed hallmarks of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process of previously unknown significance in cancer biology, but shown by us to be associated with a reduced capacity of the vasculature to avert tumor cell intra- and extravasation. Nevertheless, tumors deprived of endoglin exhibited a delayed onset of resistance to anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents, illustrating the therapeutic utility of combinatorial targeting of multiple angiogenic pathways for the treatment of cancer. PMID:23401487

  12. Cosmos 1887: morphology, histochemistry, and vasculature of the growing rat tibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S. B.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Durnova, G. N.; Kaplansky, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    Light microscopy, electron microscopy, and enzyme histochemistry were used to study the effects of spaceflight on metaphyseal and cortical bone of the rat tibia. Cortical cross-sectional area and perimeter were not altered by a 12.5-day spaceflight in 3-month-old male rats. The endosteal osteoblast population and the vasculature near the periosteal surface in flight rats compared with ground controls showed more pronounced changes in cortical bone than in metaphyseal bone. The osteoblasts demonstrated greater numbers of transitional Golgi vesicles, possibly caused by a decreased cellular metabolic energy source, but no difference in the large Golgi saccules or the cell membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase activity. The periosteal vasculature in the diaphysis of flight rats often showed lipid accumulations within the lumen of the vessels, occasional degeneration of the vascular wall, and degeneration of osteocytes adjacent to vessels containing intraluminal deposits. These changes were not found in the metaphyseal region of flight animals. The focal vascular changes may be due to ischemia of bone or a developing fragility of the vessel walls as a result of spaceflight.

  13. Mapping the Extracellular and Membrane Proteome Associated with the Vasculature and the Stroma in the Embryo*

    PubMed Central

    Soulet, Fabienne; Kilarski, Witold W.; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Herbert, John M. J.; Sacewicz, Izabela; Mouton-Barbosa, Emmanuelle; Bicknell, Roy; Lalor, Patricia; Monsarrat, Bernard; Bikfalvi, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In order to map the extracellular or membrane proteome associated with the vasculature and the stroma in an embryonic organism in vivo, we developed a biotinylation technique for chicken embryo and combined it with mass spectrometry and bioinformatic analysis. We also applied this procedure to implanted tumors growing on the chorioallantoic membrane or after the induction of granulation tissue. Membrane and extracellular matrix proteins were the most abundant components identified. Relative quantitative analysis revealed differential protein expression patterns in several tissues. Through a bioinformatic approach, we determined endothelial cell protein expression signatures, which allowed us to identify several proteins not yet reported to be associated with endothelial cells or the vasculature. This is the first study reported so far that applies in vivo biotinylation, in combination with robust label-free quantitative proteomics approaches and bioinformatic analysis, to an embryonic organism. It also provides the first description of the vascular and matrix proteome of the embryo that might constitute the starting point for further developments. PMID:23674615

  14. The role of RNA interference in the developmental separation of blood and lymphatic vasculature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dicer is an RNase III enzyme that cleaves double stranded RNA and generates functional interfering RNAs that act as important regulators of gene and protein expression. Dicer plays an essential role during mouse development because the deletion of the dicer gene leads to embryonic death. In addition, dicer-dependent interfering RNAs regulate postnatal angiogenesis. However, the role of dicer is not yet fully elucidated during vascular development. Methods In order to explore the functional roles of the RNA interference in vascular biology, we developed a new constitutive Cre/loxP-mediated inactivation of dicer in tie2 expressing cells. Results We show that cell-specific inactivation of dicer in Tie2 expressing cells does not perturb early blood vessel development and patterning. Tie2-Cre; dicerfl/fl mutant embryos do not show any blood vascular defects until embryonic day (E)12.5, a time at which hemorrhages and edema appear. Then, midgestational lethality occurs at E14.5 in mutant embryos. The developing lymphatic vessels of dicer-mutant embryos are filled with circulating red blood cells, revealing an impaired separation of blood and lymphatic vasculature. Conclusion Thus, these results show that RNA interference perturbs neither vasculogenesis and developmental angiogenesis, nor lymphatic specification from venous endothelial cells but actually provides evidence for an epigenetic control of separation of blood and lymphatic vasculature. PMID:24690185

  15. Characterization of an Isolated Kidney's Vasculature for Use in Bio-Thermal Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Allison H.; Parker, Dennis L.; Moellmer, Jeff; Roemer, Robert B.; Clifford, Sarah

    2007-05-01

    Accurate bio-thermal modeling requires site-specific modeling of discrete vascular anatomy. Presented herewith are several steps that have been developed to describe the vessel network of isolated canine and bovine kidneys. These perfused, isolated kidneys provide an environment to repeatedly test and improve acquisition methods to visualize the vascular anatomy, as well as providing a method to experimentally validate discrete vasculature thermal models. The organs are preserved using a previously developed methodology that keeps the vasculature intact, allowing for the organ to be perfused. It also allows for the repeated fixation and re-hydration of the same organ, permitting the comparison of various methods and models. The organ extraction, alcohol preservation, and perfusion of the organ are described. The vessel locations were obtained through a high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) technique. Sequential improvements of both the experimental setup used for this acquisition, as well as MR sequence development are presented. The improvements in MR acquisition and experimental setup improved the number of vessels seen in both the raw data and segmented images by 50%. An automatic vessel centerline extraction algorithm describes both vessel location and genealogy. Centerline descriptions also allows for vessel diameter and flow rate determination, providing valuable input parameters for the discrete vascular thermal model. Characterized vessels networks of both canine and bovine kidneys are presented. While these tools have been developed in an ex vivo environment, all steps can be applied to in vivo applications.

  16. VEGF165b in the developing vasculatures of the fetal human eye

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Takayuki; McLeod, D. Scott; Edwards, Malia M.; Merges, Carol; Sen, Tanusree; Sinha, Debasish; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    VEGF165b is an anti-angiogenic form of VEGF165 produced by alternative splicing. The localization of pro-angiogenic VEGF165 and anti-angiogenic VEGF165b was investigated during development of the vasculatures in fetal human eyes from 7 to 21 weeks gestation (WG). The fetal vasculature of vitreous, which includes tunica vasculosa lentis (TVL), had moderate VEGF165 immunoreactivity at 7WG and very little VEGF165b. Both forms were elevated at 12WG. VEGF165 then decreased around 17WG when the TVL regresses but VEGF165b remained elevated. In choroid, VEGF165 was present in forming choriocapillaris (CC) and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) at 7WG while VEGF165b was present in CC and mesenchymal precursors within the choroidal stroma. By 21WG, both forms were elevated in RPE and choroidal blood vessels but VEGF165b was apical and VEGF165 basal in RPE. Diffuse VEGF165 immunoreactivity was prominent in 12WG innermost retina where blood vessels will form while VEGF165b was present in most CXCR4+ progenitors in the inner neuroblastic layer and migrating angioblasts in the putative nerve fiber layer. By 21WG, VEGF165 was present in nerve fibers and VEGF165b in inner Muller cell process. The localization of VEGF165b was distinctly different from VEGF165 both spatially and temporally and it was often associated with nucleus in progenitors. PMID:22275161

  17. Tumor endothelial marker 1–specific DNA vaccination targets tumor vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Facciponte, John G.; Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Li, Chunsheng; Wang, Liping; Nair, Gautham; Sehgal, Sandy; Raj, Arjun; Matthaiou, Efthymia; Coukos, George; Facciabene, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1; also known as endosialin or CD248) is a protein found on tumor vasculature and in tumor stroma. Here, we tested whether TEM1 has potential as a therapeutic target for cancer immunotherapy by immunizing immunocompetent mice with Tem1 cDNA fused to the minimal domain of the C fragment of tetanus toxoid (referred to herein as Tem1-TT vaccine). Tem1-TT vaccination elicited CD8+ and/or CD4+ T cell responses against immunodominant TEM1 protein sequences. Prophylactic immunization of animals with Tem1-TT prevented or delayed tumor formation in several murine tumor models. Therapeutic vaccination of tumor-bearing mice reduced tumor vascularity, increased infiltration of CD3+ T cells into the tumor, and controlled progression of established tumors. Tem1-TT vaccination also elicited CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses against murine tumor-specific antigens. Effective Tem1-TT vaccination did not affect angiogenesis-dependent physiological processes, including wound healing and reproduction. Based on these data and the widespread expression of TEM1 on the vasculature of different tumor types, we conclude that targeting TEM1 has therapeutic potential in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24642465

  18. Peripheral neuropathies during biologic therapies.

    PubMed

    Yagita, Masato; Hamano, Toshiaki; Hatachi, Saori; Fujita, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies should be recognized as the adverse effects of biological agents, especially anti-TNF agents. However, no solid clinical databases for biological agent-associated peripheral neuropathies (BAPN) have been established in Japan. Here we report two cases of peripheral neuropathy associated with anti-TNF agents. One was peroneal motor neuropathy. The other case was chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. In addition, we summarize the previous reports on BAPN and discuss their prevalence rate, pathogenesis and management. PMID:24313920

  19. Noise-immune complex correlation for vasculature imaging based on standard and Jones-matrix optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Hong, Young-Joo; Li, En; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    A new optical coherence angiography (OCA) method, called correlation mapping OCA (cmOCA), is presented by using the SNR-corrected complex correlation. An SNR-correction theory for the complex correlation calculation is presented. The method also integrates a motion-artifact-removal method for the sample motion induced decorrelation artifact. The theory is further extended to compute more reliable correlation by using multi- channel OCT systems, such as Jones-matrix OCT. The high contrast vasculature imaging of in vivo human posterior eye has been obtained. Composite imaging of cmOCA and degree of polarization uniformity indicates abnormalities of vasculature and pigmented tissues simultaneously.

  20. The use of microangiography in detecting aberrant vasculature in zebrafish embryos exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S H; Chan, P K; Wu, R S

    2001-03-01

    Embryonic vascular patterns in zebrafish (Danio rerio) could be visualised by confocal microscopy coupled with microinjected fluorescent microbeads. This microangiographic technique was adopted here, for the first time, to study the effects of cadmium on cardiovascular development in zebrafish embryos. Zebrafish embryos were incubated in culture medium containing 100 microM cadmium from 5 h post fertilisation (hpf) to 48 hpf. At 48 hpf, embryos were examined for viability and occurrence of malformations. The 100 microM cadmium caused 32.21 +/- 3.65% mortality and 20.33 +/- 4.04% visible malformations in surviving embryos. In the remaining embryos with no visible signs of malformations, further assessments for less obvious abnormalities were performed. Assessments on craniofacial development were made by digital measurements on areas of brains and eyes. Cardiac development was assessed by immunostaining the heart with the antibody MF20 specific for myosin heavy chain. Body lengths of the embryos were also measured. Embryonic development of brains, eyes, hearts and body lengths of visibly healthy embryos in the cadmium treatment group showed no significant difference from the controls. Embryonic vasculature of these visibly healthy embryos was then studied by microinjecting fluorescent microbeads of diameter 0.02 microm into the circulation. All the cadmium treated embryos showed localised vascular defects in the dorsal aortae, segmental and cranial vessels while none of the control embryos showed any aberrant patterns in the networking of the vasculature. Improved image analyses on the anterior regions revealed that cadmium treated embryos had markedly less complex networks of cranial vessels with fewer vessels perfusing the craniofacial regions. The number of branch points in the vascular network was counted. In untreated embryos, there were 135.6 +/- 51 branches in the vasculature in entire body. In the cadmium treated embryos, there were 64.5+/-31 branches. The

  1. Analysis of Choroidal Morphology and Vasculature in Healthy Eyes Using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Branchini, Lauren A; Adhi, Mehreen; Regatieri, Caio V; Nandakumar, Namrata; Liu, Jonathan J; Laver, Nora; Fujimoto, James G; Duker, Jay S

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the morphology and vasculature of the choroid in healthy eyes using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Design Cross-sectional retrospective review. Participants Forty-two healthy subjects (42 eyes), with no ocular disease who underwent high-definition scanning with Cirrus HD-OCT at the New England Eye Center, Boston, Massachusetts between November 2009 and September 2010. Methods The SD-OCT images were evaluated for morphological features of the choroid, including the shape of the choroid-scleral border, location of the thickest point of choroid and regions of focal choroidal thinning. Total choroidal thickness and large choroidal vessel layer thickness were measured by two independent observers experienced in analyzing OCT images using the Cirrus linear measurement tool at the fovea, 750μm nasal and temporal to the fovea. Custom software was used to calculate the ratio of choroidal stroma to the choroidal vessel lumen. Main Outcome Measures Qualitative assessment of the choroidal morphology, quantitative analysis of choroidal vasculature and use of a novel automated software to determine the ratio of choroidal stromal area to the area of choroidal vessel lumen. Results The 42 subjects had a mean age of 51.6 years. All subjects (100%) had a “bowl” or convex shape to the choroid-sclera junction and the thickest point of the choroid was under the fovea in 88.0% of the subjects. The mean choroidal thickness was 256.8±75.8μm, thickness of the large choroidal vessel layer was 204.3±65.9μm and that of medium choroidal vessel layer/choriocapillaris layer was 52.9±20.6μm beneath the fovea. The ratio of large choroidal vessel layer thickness to the total choroidal thickness beneath the fovea was 0.7±0.06. The software generated ratio of choroidal stromal area to the choroidal vessel lumen area to be 0.27±0.08, suggesting that choroidal vessel lumen forms a greater proportion of the choroid than choroidal stroma in

  2. Peripherally Silylated Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kenichi; Fujimoto, Keisuke; Yorimitsu, Hideki; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2015-09-21

    Silylation of peripherally lithiated porphyrins with silyl electrophiles has realized the first synthesis of a series of directly silyl-substituted porphyrins. The meso-silyl group underwent facile protodesilylation, whereas the β-silyl group was entirely compatible with standard work-up and purification on silica gel. The meso-silyl group caused larger substituent effects to the porphyrin compared with the β-silyl group. Silylation of β-lithiated porphyrins with 1,2-dichlorodisilane furnished β-to-β disilane-bridged porphyrin dimers. A doubly β-to-β disilane-bridged Ni(II)-porphyrin dimer was also synthesized from a β,β-dilithiated Ni(II)-porphyrin and characterized by X-ray crystallographic analysis to take a steplike structure favorable for interporphyrinic interaction. Denickelation of β-silylporphyrins was achieved upon treatment with a 4-tolylmagnesium bromide to yield the corresponding freebase porphyrins. PMID:26356498

  3. Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Pierre R; Chardon, Jodi Warman; Massie, Rami

    2015-09-20

    Peripheral nervous system axons and myelin have unique potential protein, proteolipid, and ganglioside antigenic determinants. Despite the existence of a blood-nerve barrier, both humoral and cellular immunity can be directed against peripheral axons and myelin. Molecular mimicry may be triggered at the systemic level, as was best demonstrated in the case of bacterial oligosaccharides. The classification of immune neuropathy has been expanded to take into account specific syndromes that share unique clinical, electrophysiological, prognostic and serological features. Guillain-Barré syndrome encompasses a classical syndrome of acute demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and many variants: axonal motor and sensory, axonal motor, Miller-Fisher, autonomic, and sensory. Similarly, chronic immune neuropathy is composed of classic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and variants characterized as multifocal (motor or sensorimotor), sensory, distal symmetric, and syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathy. Among putative biomarkers, myelin associated glycoprotein and several anti-ganglioside autoantibodies have shown statistically significant associations with specific neuropathic syndromes. Currently, the strongest biomarker associations are those linking Miller-Fisher syndrome with anti-GQ1b, multifocal motor neuropathy with anti-GM1, and distal acquired symmetric neuropathy with anti-MAG antibodies. Many other autoantibody associations have been proposed, but presently lack sufficient specificity and sensitivity to qualify as biomarkers. This field of research has contributed to the antigenic characterization of motor and sensory functional systems, as well as helping to define immune neuropathic syndromes with widely different clinical presentation, prognosis and response to therapy. Serologic biomarkers are likely to become even more relevant with the advent of new targeted forms of immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25748038

  4. Anti-platelet agents augment cisplatin nanoparticle cytotoxicity by enhancing tumor vasculature permeability and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ambarish; Sarangi, Sasmit; Chien, Kelly; Sengupta, Poulomi; Papa, Anne-Laure; Basu, Sudipta; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2014-11-01

    Tumor vasculature is critically dependent on platelet mediated hemostasis and disruption of the same can augment delivery of nano-formulation based chemotherapeutic agents which depend on enhanced permeability and retention for tumor penetration. Here, we evaluated the role of Clopidogrel, a well-known inhibitor of platelet aggregation, in potentiating the tumor cytotoxicity of cisplatin nano-formulation in a murine breast cancer model. In vivo studies in murine syngeneic 4T1 breast cancer model showed a significant greater penetration of macromolecular fluorescent nanoparticles after clopidogrel pretreatment. Compared to self-assembling cisplatin nanoparticles (SACNs), combination therapy with clopidogrel and SACN was associated with a 4 fold greater delivery of cisplatin to tumor tissue and a greater reduction in tumor growth as well as higher survival rate. Clopidogrel enhances therapeutic efficiency of novel cisplatin based nano-formulations agents by increasing tumor drug delivery and can be used as a potential targeting agent for novel nano-formulation based chemotherapeutics.

  5. Automated Protein Localization of Blood Brain Barrier Vasculature in Brightfield IHC Images.

    PubMed

    Soans, Rajath E; Lim, Diane C; Keenan, Brendan T; Pack, Allan I; Shackleford, James A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an objective method for localization of proteins in blood brain barrier (BBB) vasculature using standard immunohistochemistry (IHC) techniques and bright-field microscopy. Images from the hippocampal region at the BBB are acquired using bright-field microscopy and subjected to our segmentation pipeline which is designed to automatically identify and segment microvessels containing the protein glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Gabor filtering and k-means clustering are employed to isolate potential vascular structures within cryosectioned slabs of the hippocampus, which are subsequently subjected to feature extraction followed by classification via decision forest. The false positive rate (FPR) of microvessel classification is characterized using synthetic and non-synthetic IHC image data for image entropies ranging between 3 and 8 bits. The average FPR for synthetic and non-synthetic IHC image data was found to be 5.48% and 5.04%, respectively. PMID:26828723

  6. Automated Protein Localization of Blood Brain Barrier Vasculature in Brightfield IHC Images

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Brendan T.; Pack, Allan I.; Shackleford, James A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an objective method for localization of proteins in blood brain barrier (BBB) vasculature using standard immunohistochemistry (IHC) techniques and bright-field microscopy. Images from the hippocampal region at the BBB are acquired using bright-field microscopy and subjected to our segmentation pipeline which is designed to automatically identify and segment microvessels containing the protein glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Gabor filtering and k-means clustering are employed to isolate potential vascular structures within cryosectioned slabs of the hippocampus, which are subsequently subjected to feature extraction followed by classification via decision forest. The false positive rate (FPR) of microvessel classification is characterized using synthetic and non-synthetic IHC image data for image entropies ranging between 3 and 8 bits. The average FPR for synthetic and non-synthetic IHC image data was found to be 5.48% and 5.04%, respectively. PMID:26828723

  7. Cerebral aneurysms: relations between geometry, hemodynamics and aneurysm location in the cerebral vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passerini, Tiziano; Veneziani, Alessandro; Sangalli, Laura; Secchi, Piercesare; Vantini, Simone

    2010-11-01

    In cerebral blood circulation, the interplay of arterial geometrical features and flow dynamics is thought to play a significant role in the development of aneurysms. In the framework of the Aneurisk project, patient-specific morphology reconstructions were conducted with the open-source software VMTK (www.vmtk.org) on a set of computational angiography images provided by Ospedale Niguarda (Milano, Italy). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed with a software based on the library LifeV (www.lifev.org). The joint statistical analysis of geometries and simulations highlights the possible association of certain spatial patterns of radius, curvature and shear load along the Internal Carotid Artery (ICA) with the presence, position and previous event of rupture of an aneurysm in the entire cerebral vasculature. Moreover, some possible landmarks are identified to be monitored for the assessment of a Potential Rupture Risk Index.

  8. 3D-printed fluidic networks as vasculature for engineered tissue.

    PubMed

    Kinstlinger, Ian S; Miller, Jordan S

    2016-05-24

    Fabrication of vascular networks within engineered tissue remains one of the greatest challenges facing the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering. Historically, the structural complexity of vascular networks has limited their fabrication in tissues engineered in vitro. Recently, however, key advances have been made in constructing fluidic networks within biomaterials, suggesting a strategy for fabricating the architecture of the vasculature. These techniques build on emerging technologies within the microfluidics community as well as on 3D printing. The freeform fabrication capabilities of 3D printing are allowing investigators to fabricate fluidic networks with complex architecture inside biomaterial matrices. In this review, we examine the most exciting 3D printing-based techniques in this area. We also discuss opportunities for using these techniques to address open questions in vascular biology and biophysics, as well as for engineering therapeutic tissue substitutes in vitro. PMID:27173478

  9. Molecular mechanisms of NET formation and degradation revealed by intravital imaging in the liver vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Jenne, Craig N.; Surewaard, Bas G. J.; Thanabalasuriar, Ajitha; Lee, Woo-Yong; Sanz, Maria-Jesus; Mowen, Kerri; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of DNA decorated with histones and proteases trap and kill bacteria but also injure host tissue. Here we show that during a bloodstream infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, the majority of bacteria are sequestered immediately by hepatic Kupffer cells, resulting in transient increases in liver enzymes, focal ischaemic areas and a robust neutrophil infiltration into the liver. The neutrophils release NETs into the liver vasculature, which remain anchored to the vascular wall via von Willebrand factor and reveal significant neutrophil elastase (NE) proteolytic activity. Importantly, DNase although very effective at DNA removal, and somewhat effective at inhibiting NE proteolytic activity, fails to remove the majority of histones from the vessel wall and only partly reduces injury. By contrast, inhibition of NET production as modelled by PAD4-deficiency, or prevention of NET formation and proteolytic activity as modelled in NE−/− mice prevent collateral host tissue damage. PMID:25809117

  10. [Tumor vasculature as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Döme, Balázs; Magyar, Melinda

    2008-09-01

    Despite developments in conventional (chemo)radiotherapy and surgery, survival of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients remains poor. Treatments with targeted molecular drugs offer novel therapeutic strategies. Bevacizumab, a recombinant anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody, is the antiangiogenic drug at the most advanced stage of development in the therapy of NSCLC. However, a number of questions and future challenges relating to the use of bevacizumab in NSCLC remain. Furthermore, novel agents targeting the pre-existing NSCLC vasculature (i.e. vascular disrupting agents, VDAs) or multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitors have emerged as unique drug classes delivering promising results in several preclinical and clinical studies. Herein, we review the most recent data using these novel targeted agents either alone or in combination with chemotherapy in NSCLC. PMID:18845495