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Sample records for peripheral venous thrombosis

  1. Venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wolberg, Alisa S; Rosendaal, Frits R; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Jaffer, Iqbal H; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Baglin, Trevor; Mackman, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) encompasses deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism. VTE is the leading cause of lost disability-adjusted life years and the third leading cause of cardiovascular death in the world. DVT leads to post-thrombotic syndrome, whereas pulmonary embolism can cause chronic pulmonary hypertension, both of which reduce quality of life. Genetic and acquired risk factors for thrombosis include non-O blood groups, factor V Leiden mutation, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy, advanced age, surgery, hospitalization and long-haul travel. A combination of blood stasis, plasma hypercoagulability and endothelial dysfunction is thought to trigger thrombosis, which starts most often in the valve pockets of large veins. Animal studies have revealed pathogenic roles for leukocytes, platelets, tissue factor-positive microvesicles, neutrophil extracellular traps and factors XI and XII. Diagnosis of VTE requires testing and exclusion of other pathologies, and typically involves laboratory measures (such as D-dimer) and diagnostic imaging. VTE is treated with anticoagulants and occasionally with thrombolytics to prevent thrombus extension and to reduce thrombus size. Anticoagulants are also used to reduce recurrence. New therapies with improved safety profiles are needed to prevent and treat venous thrombosis. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/8ZyCuY. PMID:27189130

  2. Perioperative heparin prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Spebar, M.J.; Collins, G.J. Jr.; Rich, N.M.; Kang, I.Y.; Clagett, G.P.; Salander, J.M.

    1981-12-01

    Perioperative low dose heparin was administered to 24 patients who were compared with 19 control patients undergoing peripheral vascular surgical procedures. This prophylactic measure was ineffective in reducing the incidence of subclinical, postoperative deep venous thrombosis, as indicated by iodine-125 fibrinogen scanning. The data suggest that patients undergoing vascular surgery will not benefit from the routine application of this prophylactic regimen.

  3. Deep venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep venous thrombosis is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part ... M, et al. Executive Summary: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis. 9th ed. American College of Chest ...

  4. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal ischemia is a serious complication of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Some or all of the intestine dies because of ... Brandt LJ, Feuerstadt P. Instestinal ischemia. In: Feldman M, ... Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 9th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  5. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the tissues surrounding the veins, and include: Appendicitis Cancer Diverticulitis Liver disease with cirrhosis Pancreatitis Patients ... Mesenteric venous thrombosis. Mayo Clin Proc Read More Appendicitis Blood clots Cirrhosis Diverticulitis Small intestinal ischemia and ...

  6. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  7. Pathophysiology of venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Myers, D D

    2015-03-01

    In this chapter, an overview of some of the prominent risk factors that contribute to the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis will be discussed. In 1856, Dr Rudolf Virchow developed the concept outlining the genesis of intravascular thrombosis. Dr Virchow hypothesized that circulatory stasis due to interrupted blood flow, changes in the blood leading to blood coagulation, and irritation or damage to the vascular endothelium would initiate acute venous thrombus generation. Presently, it is known that these above-mentioned risk factors are influenced by increasing age, gender, and obesity. The current chapter will focus on recent preclinical and clinical investigations that will give the reader insight into the prothrombotic mechanisms that lead to acute venous thrombosis. PMID:25729062

  8. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  9. Travel and venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Alexander S; Goghlan, Douglas C

    2002-09-01

    Debate continues about whether and to what extent travel predisposes to venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE). Almost certainly, the strength of any association was greatly exaggerated in recent press reports. Conclusions from case-control studies vary, with some finding no excess of recent travel among patients with venous thromboembolism and others reporting a two-four fold excess. The strongest evidence that prolonged air travel predisposes to thrombosis comes from the travel history of people who present with PE immediately after landing. Two independent analyses suggest that the risk of early embolism increases exponentially with travel times beyond 6 hours and may reach 1:200,000 passengers traveling for more than 12 hours. The most likely explanation is venous stasis in the legs from prolonged sitting, and there is evidence (preliminary and controversial) that elastic support stockings may prevent deep vein thrombosis in people who travel long-distances. There is an urgent need for more and better studies to define the absolute hazard from travel-related thrombosis and the personal risk factors that may contribute. Without these, it is difficult to give a balanced account to people who intend to travel or to consider definitive prevention trials. Case reports suggest that in most cases, travel-related thrombosis has affected people who were also at risk because of previous thrombosis, recent injury, or other predispositions. This makes it sensible to target such "at risk" people with advice about hazards and precautions, at least until formal study validates some other approach. PMID:12172438

  10. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  11. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  12. Cerebral venous thrombosis in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Goyal, Rajeev; Nihal, Lalit; Reddy, Rajasekhar

    2013-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis has been reported to show hyper coagulation leading to peripheral and rarely central thrombosis. A 35-year-old female was admitted with chief complaints of increased frequency of bloody diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss for 2 months. The patient was diagnosed to have ulcerative colitis after sigmoidoscopy and biopsy and she was started on treatment. Two days later, the patient developed headache and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain showed cerebral venous thrombosis with venous infarcts. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated. PMID:23546367

  13. Central venous catheters: incidence and predictive factors of venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Mary; Desai, Amishi; Pasupneti, Shravani; Kress, John; Funaki, Brian; Watson, Sydeaka; Herlitz, Jean; Hines, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Central venous catheter access in an acute setting can be a challenge given underlying disease and risk for venous thrombosis. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are commonly placed but limit sites for fistula creation in patients with chronic renal failure (CKD). The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of venous thrombosis from small bore internal jugular (SBIJ) and PICC line placement. This investigation identifies populations of patients who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC and highlights the importance of peripheral vein preservation in patients with renal failure. Materials and methods: A venous Doppler ultrasound was performed at the time of SBIJ insertion and removal to evaluate for thrombosis in the internal jugular vein. Data was collected pre- and post-intervention to ascertain if increased vein preservation knowledge amongst the healthcare team led to less use of PICCs. Demographic factors were collected in the SBIJ and PICC groups and risk factor analysis was completed. Results: 1,122 subjects had PICC placement and 23 had SBIJ placement. The incidence of thrombosis in the PICC group was 10%. One patient with an SBIJ had evidence of central vein thrombosis when the catheter was removed. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated a history of transplant, and the indication of total parenteral nutrition was associated with thrombosis (p < 0.001). The decrease in PICCs placed in patients with CKD 6 months before and after intervention was significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: There are subsets of patients with high risk for thrombosis who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC. PMID:25997503

  14. Venous thrombosis - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be necessary after surgery, cancer, and estrogen therapy. ... thrombosis of the legs is diagnosed by ultrasound. Treatment usually involves medication to thin the blood and dissolve the thrombosis. Two common medications are heparin and coumadin. If ...

  15. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  16. Imaging of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, F

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a potentially life-threatening emergency. The wide ranging of clinical symptoms makes the use of imaging in "slices" even more important for diagnosis. Both CT and MRI are used to diagnose the occlusion of a venous sinus, but MRI is superior to CT for detecting a clot in the cortical or deep veins. CT can show the hyperintense clot spontaneously and CT angiography the intraluminal defect. MRI also detects this thrombus, whose signal varies over time: in the acute phase, it is hypointense in T2*, whilst T1 and T2 can appear falsely reassuring; in the subacute phase, it is hyperintense on all sequences (T1, T2, FLAIR, T2*, diffusion). MRI easily shows the ischemic damage, even hemorrhagic, in the cerebral parenchyma in cases of CVT. Finally, imaging may reveal pathology at the origin of the CVT, such as a fracture of the skull, infection, tumor, dural fistula, or intracranial hypotension. PMID:25465119

  17. ASSESSMENT OF VENOUS THROMBOSIS IN ANIMAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    SP, Grover; CE, Evans; AS, Patel; B, Modarai; P, Saha; A, Smith

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and common complications, including pulmonary embolism and post thrombotic syndrome, represent a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Experimental models of venous thrombosis have provided considerable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate thrombus formation and subsequent resolution. Here we critically appraise the ex vivo and in vivo techniques used to assess venous thrombosis in these models. Particular attention is paid to imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, micro computed tomography and high frequency ultrasound that facilitate longitudinal assessment of thrombus size and composition. PMID:26681755

  18. Stent Placement on Fresh Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schuermann, Karl

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report on the efficacy of fixing fresh venous thrombus to the venous wall by stent placement. Methods: Seven patients underwent stenting to treat acute venous thrombosis. In two patients, the hemodialysis fistula was thrombosed with the thrombus extending into the brachial veins. In three patients, the hemodialysis fistula was patent but massive swelling of the ipsilateral arm was caused by proximal venous thrombosis. Two patients presented with iliac venous thrombosis within stented pelvic veins. Stent placement was preceded by other mechanical thrombectomy methods in all cases. Results: Attachment of thrombus to the venous wall was successful in all cases treated. Acute rethrombosis did not occur. Follow-up patency in dialysis patients was 7.2 {+-} 2.1 months. One patient had rethrombosis of the dialysis graft 3 months after primary treatment. Three patients developed restenosis within a mean period of 7.7 months. One shunt remained patent for 10 months with no event of reobstruction during follow-up. In both patients with iliac stent placement, the vein remained patent over a follow-up period of 8 and 12 months respectively. Conclusion: Stenting fresh venous thrombus can achieve immediate venous patency. It may be used as an alternative approach when all other percutaneous methods fail. Frequent restenosis within stented veins limits its use to very selected cases.

  19. Risk factors associated with catheter-related upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in patients with peripherally inserted central venous catheters: a prospective observational cohort study: part 2.

    PubMed

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Clemence, Bonnie J

    2014-01-01

    This is the second part of a 2-part series that reports on the results of a prospective observational cohort study designed to examine risk factors associated with symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Part 1, published in the May/June 2014 issue of the Journal of Infusion Nursing, provided an extensive review and critique of the literature regarding risk factors associated with catheter-related UEDVT and identified 28 suspected risk factors. A study was undertaken to examine each of the risk factors among 203 acute care patients with PICCs, 13 of whom experienced a UEDVT, yielding an incidence of 6.4%. The most common reason for admission was infection (33.5%), and the primary reason for insertion of the PICC was venous access (58.6%). Hypertension (P = .022) and obesity (P = .008), defined as a body mass index ≥30, were associated with UEDVT. The clinical symptoms of edema (P < .001) and a 3-cm or more increase in arm circumference (P < .001) in the PICC arm after PICC placement were associated with UEDVT. All other variables were not statistically significant. The results suggest that patients who are obese and hypertensive may be at greater risk for the development of UEDVT and that the physical finding of edema and increased arm circumference in the PICC arm are possibly suggestive of UEDVT. PMID:24983259

  20. Nonclinical aspects of venous thrombosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Struble, Evi; Harrouk, Wafa; DeFelice, Albert; Tesfamariam, Belay

    2015-09-01

    Pregnancy is a hypercoagulable state which carries an excess risk of maternal venous thrombosis. Endothelial injury, alterations in blood flow and activation of the coagulation pathway are proposed to contribute to the hypercoagulability. The risk for thrombosis may be accentuated by certain drugs and device implants that directly or indirectly affect the coagulation pathway. To help ensure that these interventions do not result in adverse maternal or fetal outcomes during pregnancy, gravid experimental animals can be exposed to such treatments at various stages of gestation and over a dosage range that would identify hazards and inform risk assessment. Circulating soluble biomarkers can also be evaluated for enhancing the assessment of any increased risk of venous thrombosis during pregnancy. In addition to traditional in vivo animal testing, efforts are under way to incorporate reliable non-animal methods in the assessment of embryofetal toxicity and thrombogenic effects. This review summarizes hemostatic balance during pregnancy in animal species, embryofetal development, biomarkers of venous thrombosis, and alterations caused by drug-induced venous thrombosis. PMID:26404176

  1. The Incidence of Peripheral Catheter-Related Thrombosis in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Banks, Jennifer; Abraham, Breanna; Capati, Gian; Pretorius, Casper

    2016-01-01

    Background. Central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters are well established risk factors for upper limb deep vein thrombosis. There is limited literature on the thrombosis rates in patients with peripheral catheters. A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the incidence of peripheral catheter-related thrombosis in surgical patients. Methods. Patients deemed high risk for venous thrombosis with a peripheral catheter were considered eligible for the study. An ultrasound was performed on enrolment into the study and at discharge from hospital. Participants were reviewed twice a day for clinical features of upper limb deep vein thrombosis during their admission and followed up at 30 days. Results. 54 patients were included in the study. The incidence of deep vein thrombosis and superficial venous thrombosis was 1.8% and 9.2%, respectively. All cases of venous thrombosis were asymptomatic. Risk factor analysis was limited by the low incidence of thrombosis. Conclusion. This study revealed a low incidence of deep vein thrombosis in surgical patients with peripheral catheters (1.8%). The study was underpowered; therefore the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis is unable to be established. Future studies with larger sample sizes are required to determine the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis. PMID:26904283

  2. Management of catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Liem, Timothy K; Moneta, Gregory L

    2016-07-01

    Central venous catheters or peripherally inserted central catheters are major risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT). The body and quality of literature evaluating catheter-associated (CA) UEDVT have increased, yet strong evidence on screening, diagnosis, prevention, and optimal treatment is limited. We herein review the current evidence of CA UEDVT that can be applied clinically. Principally, we review the anatomy and definition of CA UEDVT, identification of risk factors, utility of duplex ultrasound as the preferred diagnostic modality, preventive strategies, and an algorithm for management of CA UEDVT. PMID:27318061

  3. Intracranial venous thrombosis complicating oral contraception

    PubMed Central

    Dindar, F.; Platts, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Four days after the onset of a severe headache a 22-year-old woman who had been taking oral contraceptives for less than three weeks had a convulsion, followed by right hemiparesis. Other focal neurologic signs and evidence of raised intracranial pressure appeared, and she became comatose on the seventh day. A left craniotomy revealed extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. She died the next day. On postmortem examination extensive thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus and draining cerebral veins, and multiple areas of cerebral hemorrhage and hemorrhagic infarction were seen. Some of the superficial cerebral veins showed focal necrosis of their walls, and the lateral lacunae of the superior sagittal sinus contained proliferating endothelial cells. The adrenal veins were also thrombosed. The significance of these findings is discussed. The literature on cerebrovascular complications of oral contraception, particularly cerebral venous thrombosis, is reviewed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4413961

  4. [Cerebral venous thrombosis during tuberculous meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Guenifi, W; Boukhrissa, H; Gasmi, A; Rais, M; Ouyahia, A; Hachani, A; Diab, N; Mechakra, S; Lacheheb, A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare disease characterized by its clinical polymorphism and multiplicity of risk factors. Infections represent less than 10% of etiologies. Tuberculosis is not a common etiology, only a few observations are published in the literature. Between January 2005 and March 2015, 61 patients were hospitalized for neuro-meningeal tuberculosis. Among them, three young women had presented one or more cerebral venous sinus thromboses. No clinical feature was observed in these patients; vascular localizations were varied: sagittal sinus (2 cases), lateral sinus (2 cases) and transverse sinus (1 case). With anticoagulant and antituberculosis drugs, the outcome was favorable in all cases. During neuro-meningeal tuberculosis, the existence of consciousness disorders or neurological focal signs is not always the translation of encephalitis, hydrocephalus, tuberculoma or ischemic stroke; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be the cause and therefore should be sought. PMID:27090100

  5. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Meppiel, Elodie; Crassard, Isabelle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; de Guibert, Sophie; Terriou, Louis; Chabriat, Hugues; Socié, Gérard; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired disorder of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by hemolytic anemia, marrow failure, and a high incidence of life-threatening venous thrombosis. Cerebral venous system is the second most frequent location of thrombosis after hepatic veins. However, data about PNH-related cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are very scarce because of the rarity of both the disorders. We report a French study about PNH patients with CVT. Patients were recruited retrospectively, from the Société Française d’Hématologie (SFH) registry of 465 patients with PNH; the Lariboisière registry of 399 patients with CVT; and a direct contact with 26 French Hematology Units. We review cases reported since 1938 in the English and French language literature. We then compared patients of our series with cases from the literature, with non-PNH-related CVT cases from Lariboisière registry, and with PNH patients without CVT from SFH registry. Fifteen patients were included between 1990 and 2012. Most patients were women (12/15) and half of them presented associated hormonal venous thrombosis risk factors. Three patients had concomitant hepatic vein thrombosis. CVT was the first manifestation of PNH in 4 patients. No major difference in CVT characteristics was found compared with non-PNH-related CVT cases, except for a younger age at diagnosis in PNH patients (P < 0.001). All patients were treated with anticoagulation therapy. One death occurred in acute stage. All surviving patients were independent 1 year after. Median survival time was 9 years. Recurrent thrombosis rate was 50% at 6 years, occurring in patients that did not have bone marrow transplantation or eculizumab therapy. Cases of death were mainly related to hepatic vein thrombosis. Prognosis of CVT was good in our series. However, these patients have a poor long-term prognosis due to PNH disease by itself. PNH treatment should be proposed as soon as possible to

  6. [Diagnosis and treatment of venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Hach-Wunderle, V

    2005-11-01

    In the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis in ambulatory patients, the recommended initial steps are assessment of clinical probability (CP) and a sensitive D-dimer test. With a low CP and negative D-dimer, thrombosis can be ruled out. All other constellations require further investigation with imaging techniques. Compression ultrasonography is the first-line investigation. Low-molecular weight heparin is the treatment of choice for uncomplicated venous thrombosis. Secondary prophylaxis with a vitamin K antagonist is introduced in parallel as quickly as possible. The duration of treatment depends on the exposure and predisposing factors, weighing carefully the risk of recurrence on the one hand against the risk of bleeding on the other. If there are contraindications to anticoagulation with heparins or coumarins, various other anticoagulant drugs are available. PMID:16395485

  7. Role of Tissue Factor in Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Manly, David A.; Boles, Jeremiah; Mackman, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, the mechanisms by which clots are formed in the deep veins have not been determined. Tissue factor (TF) is the primary initiator of the coagulation cascade and is essential for hemostasis. Under pathological conditions, TF is released into the circulation on small-membrane vesicles termed microparticles (MPs). Recent studies suggest that elevated levels of MPTF may trigger thrombosis. This review provides an overview of the role of TF in VTE. PMID:20690821

  8. Cerebral venous thrombosis revealing an ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Taous, Abdellah; Berri, Maha Aït; Lamsiah, Taoufik; Zainoun, Brahim; Ziadi, Tarik; Rouimi, Abdelhadi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has been reported as an uncommon and devastating complication of ulcerative colitis (UC), with an annual incidence varying between 0,5 to 6,7%. It is suspected to be a consequence of the hypercoagulable state occurring during disease relapse. We report a case of 22-year-old female patient presenting with CVT revealing an UC. Our case raises the awareness among health professionals about the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as a rare etiology of CVT, and signifies the importance of considering antithrombotic prophylaxis in all hospitalised IBD patients, especially those with active disease. PMID:27279947

  9. Risk factors associated with catheter-related upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in patients with peripherally inserted central venous catheters: literature review: part 1.

    PubMed

    Clemence, Bonnie J; Maneval, Rhonda E

    2014-01-01

    This is part 1 of a 2-part series of articles that report on the results of a prospective observational cohort study designed to examine the risk factors associated with symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters. This article provides an extensive review and critique of the literature that serves to explicate what is currently known about risk factors associated with catheter-related UEDVT. Risk factors such as anticoagulant use, cancer, infection, hypertension, catheter tip placement, and catheter size were identified most frequently in the literature as being associated with UEDVT development. Other risk factors--such as obesity, smoking history, surgery, and presence of pain or edema--were examined in a limited number of studies and lacked consistent evidence of their impact on UEDVT development. The subsequent study that evolved from the review of the literature investigates the relationship between identified risk factors and UEDVT development. PMID:24694512

  10. In the Clinic. Deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Spandorfer, John; Galanis, Taki

    2015-05-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of deep venous thrombosis, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25939012

  11. [The diagnostic scores for deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Junod, A

    2015-08-26

    Seven diagnostic scores for the deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of lower limbs are analyzed and compared. Two features make this exer- cise difficult: the problem of distal DVT and of their proximal extension and the status of patients, whether out- or in-patients. The most popular score is the Wells score (1997), modi- fied in 2003. It includes one subjective ele- ment based on clinical judgment. The Primary Care score 12005), less known, has similar pro- perties, but uses only objective data. The pre- sent trend is to associate clinical scores with the dosage of D-Dimers to rule out with a good sensitivity the probability of TVP. For the upper limb DVT, the Constans score (2008) is available, which can also be coupled with D-Dimers testing (Kleinjan). PMID:26502582

  12. [Ambulatory treatment of deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Metz, D; Hezard, N; Brasselet, C

    2001-11-01

    Conventional treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) has been based, until recently, on non-fractionated heparin by continuous intravenous infusion in hospital until effective anticoagulation could be obtained by oral anticoagulants introduced early. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) seems to be as effective and has a better bio-availability, which means that there are fewer adverse effects. This usage has logically led to the increase in the possibilities of treatment of DVT at home. However, certain precautions are necessary, especially the evaluation of the individual patient's risk with this strategy. This requires multidisciplinary collaboration and the respect of strict rules (precise diagnostic objective, hospital admission at the slightest doubt of pulmonary embolism) to demonstrate the value of ambulatory LMWH therapy which would improve patient comfort and allow early mobilisation. PMID:11794978

  13. Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis with a vaginal contraceptive ring.

    PubMed

    Eilbert, Wesley; Hecht, Benjamin; Zuiderveld, Loren

    2014-07-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring. PMID:25035742

  14. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as the initial presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuji; Takeda, Hidetaka; Furuya, Daisuke; Nagoya, Harumitsu; Deguchi, Ichiro; Fukuoka, Takuya; Tanahashi, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is very rare. We present a woman with thrombosis of the superior sagittal, straight, transverse and sigmoid sinuses who presented with SAH in the right temporal sulcus and bilateral cerebellar sulci. Brain perfusion CT demonstrated a delay of the mean transit time and high cerebral blood volume around the right posterior temporal lobe and cerebellum. These findings were compatible with venous congestion and they suggest the possibility that extension of the dural sinus thrombosis into the superficial veins caused localized venous hypertension with dilatation of the thin, fragile-walled cortical veins which eventually ruptured into the subarachnoid space. PMID:20190485

  15. Seizure in Pregnancy Following Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Farzi, Farnoush; Abdollahzadeh, Mehrsima; Faraji, Roya; Chavoushi, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Seizure involves less than 1% of pregnancies; however it is associated with increased maternal and fetal complications. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare, but potentially life-threatening cause of seizure during pregnancy, presenting primarily as seizure in 12% - 31.9% of cases. Pregnancy and puerperium are known as the risk factors of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Case Presentation: Here is presented a case of seizure after delivery by cesarean section in an otherwise healthy woman. The final diagnosis was cerebral venous sinus thrombosis probably due to hypercoagulable state in pregnancy. Conclusions: If seizure occurs during the peripartum period, along with providing complete cardiovascular and respiratory support, advanced diagnostic measures are needed and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis should be considered as a possible diagnosis. PMID:26161329

  16. Imaging Diagnosis of Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, S.; Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) is a broad term that includes Budd-Chiari syndrome and occlusion of veins that constitute the portal venous system. Due to the common risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of these clinically distinct disorders, concurrent involvement of two different regions is quite common. In acute and subacute SVT, the symptoms may overlap with a variety of other abdominal emergencies while in chronic SVT, the extent of portal hypertension and its attendant complications determine the clinical course. As a result, clinical diagnosis is often difficult and is frequently reliant on imaging. Tremendous improvements in vascular imaging in recent years have ensured that this once rare entity is being increasingly detected. Treatment of acute SVT requires immediate anticoagulation. Transcatheter thrombolysis or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is used in the event of clinical deterioration. In cases with peritonitis, immediate laparotomy and bowel resection may be required for irreversible bowel ischemia. In chronic SVT, the underlying cause should be identified and treated. The imaging manifestations of the clinical syndromes resulting from SVT are comprehensively discussed here along with a brief review of the relevant clinical features and therapeutic approach. PMID:26600801

  17. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding

    PubMed Central

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic–clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully. PMID:23389726

  18. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully. PMID:23389726

  19. Percutaneous transhepatic thrombectomy and pharmacologic thrombolysis of mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Choi, Lorraine; Lin, Peter H; Dardik, Alan; Eraso, Andrea; Lumsden, Alan B

    2007-01-01

    Mesenteric venous occlusion is a rare yet highly morbid condition that is traditionally treated with anticoagulation while surgery serves as the last resort. Percutaneous intervention provides an effective option with relatively low mortality and morbidity. We herein describe use of transhepatic percutaneous thrombectomy and pharmacologic thrombolysis in treating two cases of symptomatic mesenteric venous thrombosis. These cases underscore the fact that transhepatic thrombectomy and thrombolysis are a highly effective strategy for treating acute symptomatic mesenteric venous thrombosis. Several percutaneous techniques are also reviewed. PMID:17382054

  20. Computer-assisted venous thrombosis volume quantification.

    PubMed

    Puentes, John; Dhibi, Mounir; Bressollette, Luc; Guias, Bruno; Solaiman, Basel

    2009-03-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) volume assessment, by verifying its risk of progression when anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapies are prescribed, is often necessary to screen life-threatening complications. Commonly, VT volume estimation is done by manual delineation of few contours in the ultrasound (US) image sequence, assuming that the VT has a regular shape and constant radius, thus producing significant errors. This paper presents and evaluates a comprehensive functional approach based on the combination of robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contours to calculate VT volume in a more accurate manner when applied to freehand 2-D US image sequences. Robust anisotropic filtering reduces image speckle noise without generating incoherent edge discontinuities. Prior knowledge of the VT shape allows initializing the deformable contour, which is then guided by the noise-filtering outcome. Segmented contours are subsequently used to calculate VT volume. The proposed approach is integrated into a system prototype compatible with existing clinical US machines that additionally tracks the acquired images 3-D position and provides a dense Delaunay triangulation required for volume calculation. A predefined robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contour parameter set enhances the system usability. Experimental results pertinence is assessed by comparison with manual and tetrahedron-based volume computations, using images acquired by two medical experts of eight plastic phantoms and eight in vitro VTs, whose independently measured volume is the reference ground truth. Results show a mean difference between 16 and 35 mm(3) for volumes that vary from 655 to 2826 mm(3). Two in vivo VT volumes are also calculated to illustrate how this approach could be applied in clinical conditions when the real value is unknown. Comparative results for the two experts differ from 1.2% to 10.08% of the smallest estimated value when the image acquisition cadences are similar. PMID

  1. Air pollution and venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Qing-Yun; Cheng, Zhi-Peng; Hu, Bei; Liu, Jing-Di; Hu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. However, the effect of air pollution on venous thrombotic disorders is uncertain. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between air pollution and venous thrombosis. PubMed, Embase, EBM Reviews, Healthstar, Global Health, Nursing Database, and Web of Science were searched for citations on air pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulate matters) and venous thrombosis. Using a random-effects model, overall risk estimates were derived for each increment of 10 μg/m3 of pollutant concentration. Of the 485 in-depth reviewed studies, 8 citations, involving approximately 700,000 events, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the main air pollutants analyzed were not associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis (OR = 1.005, 95% CI = 0.998–1.012 for PM2.5; OR = 0.995, 95% CI = 0.984–1.007 for PM10; OR = 1.006, 95% CI = 0.994–1.019 for NO2). Based on exposure period and thrombosis location, additional subgroup analyses provided results comparable with those of the overall analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias. Therefore, this meta analysis does not suggest the possible role of air pollution as risk factor for venous thrombosis in general population. PMID:27600652

  2. Air pollution and venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Qing-Yun; Cheng, Zhi-Peng; Hu, Bei; Liu, Jing-Di; Hu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. However, the effect of air pollution on venous thrombotic disorders is uncertain. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between air pollution and venous thrombosis. PubMed, Embase, EBM Reviews, Healthstar, Global Health, Nursing Database, and Web of Science were searched for citations on air pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulate matters) and venous thrombosis. Using a random-effects model, overall risk estimates were derived for each increment of 10 μg/m(3) of pollutant concentration. Of the 485 in-depth reviewed studies, 8 citations, involving approximately 700,000 events, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the main air pollutants analyzed were not associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis (OR = 1.005, 95% CI = 0.998-1.012 for PM2.5; OR = 0.995, 95% CI = 0.984-1.007 for PM10; OR = 1.006, 95% CI = 0.994-1.019 for NO2). Based on exposure period and thrombosis location, additional subgroup analyses provided results comparable with those of the overall analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias. Therefore, this meta analysis does not suggest the possible role of air pollution as risk factor for venous thrombosis in general population. PMID:27600652

  3. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Fardin; Didgar, Farshid; Talaie-Zanjani, Afsoon; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient's history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control. PMID:24250168

  4. Thrombolytic Therapy Using Urokinase for Management of Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jung Tack; Min, Sun Young; Kim, Jae Il; Choi, Pyong Wha; Heo, Tae Gil; Lee, Myung Soo; Kim, Chul-Nam; Kim, Hong-Yong; Yi, Seong Yoon; Lee, Hye Ran; Roh, Young-Nam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The management of central venous catheters (CVCs) and catheter thrombosis vary among centers, and the efficacy of the methods of management of catheter thrombosis in CVCs is rarely reported. We investigated the efficacy of bedside thrombolysis with urokinase for the management of catheter thrombosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who had undergone CVC insertion by a single surgeon in a single center between April 2012 and June 2014. We used a protocol for the management of CVCs and when catheter thrombosis was confirmed, 5,000 U urokinase was infused into the catheter. Results: A total of 137 CVCs were inserted in 126 patients. The most common catheter-related complication was thrombosis (12, 8.8%) followed by infection (8, 5.8%). Nine of the 12 patients (75%) with catheter thrombosis were recanalized successfully with urokinase. The rate of CVC recanalization was higher in the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) group (87.5%) than the chemoport group (50%). Reintervention for catheter-related thrombosis was needed in only 2.2% of patients when thrombolytic therapy using urokinase was applied. Age <60 years (P=0.035), PICC group (P=0.037) and location of the catheter tip above the superior vena cava (P=0.044) were confirmed as independent risk factors for catheter thrombosis. Conclusion: Thrombolysis therapy using urokinase could successfully manage CVC thrombosis. Reintervention was rarely needed when a protocol using urokinase was applied for the management of CVC thromboses. PMID:26217634

  5. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as presenting feature of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ennaifer, R; Moussa, A; Mouelhi, L; Salem, M; Bouzaidi, S; Debbeche, R; Trabelsi, S; Najjar, T

    2009-01-01

    Thrombosis is a well recognized complication of inflammatory bowel disease that occurs in 1.3 to 6.4% of patients, however, cerebral vascular involvement is unusual. We present the case of a 16-year-old female in whom cerebral venous thrombosis was the presenting symptom of an active ulcerative pancolitis. Thrombophilia screen (plasma levels of proteins C and S, antithrombin, antibeta2-glycoprotein, lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies, activated protein C resistance, homocystein level antinuclear antibodies) was negative. The patient was successfully treated with anticoagulant therapy, phenobarbital and sulfasalazine. Cerebral venous thrombosis is an exceptional presenting feature of ulcerative colitis. Disease activity may play a major role in the occurrence of thrombosis. PMID:19902870

  6. Deep venous thrombosis and atypical antipsychotics: three cases report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Deep venous Thrombosis is a serious, possible life threatening event which is often ignored in psychiatric Settings. Purpose In this paper three cases of deep venous Thrombosis (DVT) following the use of olanzapine and risperidone are presented. Methods The data of Three patients was collected from hospital records. Results The patients were in good general physical health and had no personal or familial history of DVT. The patients were not overweight (BMI < 25) but they suffered from DVT after initiating risperidone and olanzapine. Conclusion Risk of DVT exists in patients under treatment with atypical antipsychotics in spite of no pre existing risk factor. PMID:23351722

  7. The Emerging Role of NETs in Venous Thrombosis and Immunothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Andrew S.; Obi, Andrea T.; Diaz, Jose A.; Henke, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT), a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has recently been linked to neutrophil activation and release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) via a process called NETosis. The use of various in vivo thrombosis models and genetically modified mice has more precisely defined the exact role of NETosis in the pathogenesis of VT. Translational large animal VT models and human studies have confirmed the presence of NETs in pathologic VT. Activation of neutrophils, with subsequent NETosis, has also been linked to acute infection. This innate immune response, while effective for bacterial clearance from the host by formation of an intravascular bactericidal “net,” also triggers thrombosis. Intravascular thrombosis related to such innate immune mechanisms has been coined immunothrombosis. Dysregulated immunothrombosis has been proposed as a mechanism of pathologic micro- and macrovascular thrombosis in sepsis and autoimmune disease. In this focused review, we will address the dual role of NETs in the pathogenesis of VT and immunothrombosis. PMID:27446071

  8. Chronic portomesenteic venous thrombosis complicated by a high flow arteriovenous malformation presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Plotnik, Adam N; Hebroni, Frank; McWilliams, Justin

    2016-02-01

    Portomesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition. The presenting symptoms of chronic portomesenteric venous thrombosis are often non-specific but may present with variceal bleeding. We present the first reported case of chronic portomesenteric venous thrombosis causing a high flow arteriovenous malformation that resulted in extensive gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25871943

  9. Hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting with multiple organ infiltration and deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Su-jun; Wei, Wei; Chen, Jiang-tao; Tan, Ye-hui; Yu, Cheng-bao; Litzow, Mark Robert; Liu, Qiu-ju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) can be fatal, particularly when eosinophils infiltrate vital organs and/or if extensive thrombosis develops. However there are no standard recommendations for the use of anticoagulant therapy of HES in the setting of thrombosis. Methods: We herein present a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with marked peripheral eosinophilia with symptoms of multi-organ infiltration and extensive deep venous thrombosis (DVT). In this case, evaluation was carried out before the diagnosis was established, and timely standard-dose corticosteroids combined with a new oral anticoagulant (NOAC) therapy were carried out. Results: These measures resulted in a rapid response and long-term disease control. Conclusion: Although there are no data to support which anticoagulant is preferred in this setting, this case indicates that the new oral anticoagulants may play an important role in the treatment of thrombosis in HES. PMID:27583887

  10. Endovascular treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis: Contemporary multicenter experience

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Lopes, Demetrius K; Binning, Mandy J; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Liebman, Kenneth M; Arthur, Adam S; Doss, Vinodh T; Levy, Elad I

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy of cerebral venous thrombosis using modern approaches to intracranial recanalization, such as stent retrievers and aspiration thrombectomy, is not well described. We performed a retrospective review of data for consecutive patients with venous sinus thrombosis who underwent endovascular treatment between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2013 at participating institutions. We identified a total of 13 patients with a diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis. The most frequently utilized type of endovascular intervention was the Penumbra aspiration system (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA) (nine cases), followed by local infusion of tissue plasminogen activator (bolus and/or drip in six cases) and stent retrievers (Solitaire FR (Covidien, Irvine, California, USA) in three cases and Trevo (Stryker, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA) in one case). Overall, multimodality treatment (two or more different types of devices or approaches) was performed in 62% of cases. Follow-up data were available for 11 patients; of those, five had a favorable clinical outcome (defined as modified Rankin Scale score of 0–2) and three patients died. Various endovascular approaches are utilized in current clinical practice. A multimodal approach to endovascular therapy for the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis resulted in partial or complete restoration of flow in all cases, yet the mortality rate of 27% indicates the need for improvement in recanalization strategies for this disorder. PMID:26055685

  11. Venous Thrombosis in Handsewn vs. Coupled Venous Anastomoses in 857 Consecutive Breast Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Anita R; Mehrara, Babak J; Pusic, Andrea L; Cordeiro, Peter G; Matros, Evan; McCarthy, Colleen M; Disa, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Background The Anastomotic Coupling Device has demonstrated safety and efficacy; however, the coupler has never been compared directly to handsewn venous anastomoses exclusively in breast reconstruction. We hypothesized that rates of venous thrombosis would be lower using the coupler versus handsewn anastomoses in free flap breast reconstruction. Methods We performed a retrospective review utilizing clinic records, hospital records, and operative reports for 857 consecutive breast free flaps at a single institution from 1997-2012. Data was collected on reconstruction type, recipient vessels, timing, laterality, preoperative radiation, chemotherapy, venous thrombosis, and flap outcome. We compared rates of venous thrombosis between handsewn and coupled anastomoses for breast free flaps. Chi square test was used to calculate statistical significance. Results A total of 857 consecutive free flaps were performed for breast reconstruction in 647 patients over 16 years. The venous anastomosis was handsewn in 303 flaps, and the anastomotic coupler was used in 554 flaps. The rate of venous thrombosis requiring anastomotic revision in the handsewn group was 0.04% (12/303), compared to 0.01% in the coupled group (8/554; p=0.02). Conclusion The anastomotic coupler was more effective in preventing venous thrombosis than handsewn anastomoses in our series. While our study demonstrates improved patency rates using the venous coupler in breast reconstruction, we were unable to definitively separate this finding from potential confounding variables due to the low rates of thrombosis in both groups. Our data is consistent with current literature, which suggests that the coupler is a safe and effective alternative to hand sutured anastomoses. PMID:26372685

  12. Cerebral venous thrombosis after ventriculoperitoneal shunting: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Teppei; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Aoki, Tsukasa; Ikeda, Go; Shiigai, Masanari; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS) is a simple procedure, but there are several potential complications. We describe the first reported case of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) after VPS. A 69-year-old man suffering from normal pressure hydrocephalus underwent left VPS. Two months later he developed CVT and cerebral venous hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the thrombus formation just adjacent to the shunt tube. One possible cause is compression of the cortical vein after brain shift and/or tension of the cortical vein due to intracranial hypotension. A protein C deficiency was also detected. Surgeons should be aware that cerebral venous thrombosis can occur after VPS. PMID:24257484

  13. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis after Ventriculoperitoneal Shunting: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    MATSUBARA, Teppei; AYUZAWA, Satoshi; AOKI, Tsukasa; IKEDA, Go; SHIIGAI, Masanari; MATSUMURA, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS) is a simple procedure, but there are several potential complications. We describe the first reported case of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) after VPS. A 69-year-old man suffering from normal pressure hydrocephalus underwent left VPS. Two months later he developed CVT and cerebral venous hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the thrombus formation just adjacent to the shunt tube. One possible cause is compression of the cortical vein after brain shift and/or tension of the cortical vein due to intracranial hypotension (IH). A protein C deficiency was also detected. Surgeons should be aware that cerebral venous thrombosis can occur after VPS. PMID:24257484

  14. Venous thrombosis in rare or unusual sites: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Antonio; Treleani, Martina; Bonamigo, Emanuela; Tasinato, Valentina; Girolami, Bruno

    2014-02-01

    Venous thrombosis usually involves the veins of the limbs, most frequently the leg veins. All other venous districts may sometimes be affected by the thrombotic process. Sometimes, the thrombotic occlusion of the veins of a given region show typical signs and symptoms. In other cases, the picture may not be clear and a high degree of clinical suspicion is needed for a correct approach to patient diagnosis and management. Thrombosis of retinal and jugular veins, right heart thrombosis including thrombosis of coronary sinus and thrombosis of the azygos system may be included in this group. In addition, thromboses of umbilical, renal, ovarian, spermatic, and iliac veins also require attention. Finally, the dorsal veins of the penis may also be affected by thrombotic events. The main clinical features of these thromboses are reviewed herein with suggestions for a correct diagnostic approach. The importance of sonography and of other imaging techniques is emphasized. A prompt diagnosis is of paramount importance as most of these thromboses in rare or unusual sites may still cause severe systemic complications (pulmonary embolism, sepsis, and heart failure). PMID:24347377

  15. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Feher, Gergely; Illes, Zsolt; Komoly, Samuel; Hargroves, David

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been extensively studied in patients with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and non-valvular atrial fibrillation. The aim of our work was to review the available evidence for NOACs in the treatment of CVT. Based on our literature search there is insufficient evidence to support the use of NOACs in CVT, although case series with rivaroxaban and dabigatran have showed promising results. PMID:25994451

  16. [Venous thrombosis associated with central venous catheter use in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Iglesias Rey, Leticia; Fernández Pérez, Isaura; Barbagelata López, Cristina; Rivera Gallego, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters for various applications (administration of chemotherapy, blood products and others) in patients with cancer is increasingly frequent. The association between thrombosis and catheter use has been fully established but aspects such as its causes, diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment have not. We describe a case of thrombosis in a patient with cancer treated with chemotherapy who carried a central venous catheter. We also perform a review of the risk factors, the role of the prophylaxis and the treatment. PMID:25771092

  17. Intraventricular hemorrhage caused by intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo; Song, Shuijiang; Ouyang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) may occur as an isolated event from primary ventricular bleeding or as a complication of brain hemorrhage from another etiology. It is associated with high mortality and morbidity. The underlying risk factors include hypertension and aneurysms, among others. However, not all the exact etiologies are known. In this study, a case of a 24-year-old man who suffered from a headache and a decline in memory has been reported. A brain computed tomography scan suggested the diagnosis of spontaneous intraventricular hemorrhage. However, brain magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance venography, and other tests eventually confirmed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be one of the causes of intraventricular hemorrhage and should be considered for unexplained intraventricular hemorrhage. PMID:27428184

  18. Intraventricular hemorrhage caused by intracranial venous sinus thrombosis: Case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Song, Shuijiang; Ouyang, Zhiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) may occur as an isolated event from primary ventricular bleeding or as a complication of brain hemorrhage from another etiology. It is associated with high mortality and morbidity. The underlying risk factors include hypertension and aneurysms, among others. However, not all the exact etiologies are known. In this study, a case of a 24-year-old man who suffered from a headache and a decline in memory has been reported. A brain computed tomography scan suggested the diagnosis of spontaneous intraventricular hemorrhage. However, brain magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance venography, and other tests eventually confirmed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be one of the causes of intraventricular hemorrhage and should be considered for unexplained intraventricular hemorrhage. PMID:27428184

  19. Cerebral venous thrombosis in a patient with acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Morkhandikar, S; Priyamvada, P S; Srinivas, B H; Parameswaran, S

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis of the cerebral venous sinuses (CVT) is described in nephrotic syndrome. A 13-year-old girl was admitted with acute post-infectious glomerulonephritis (APIGN). Subsequently she developed recurrent seizures with focal neurological deficits. On evaluation, she was found to have CVT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of CVT in APIGN. Identifying this complication is imperative, as timely diagnosis and treatment could be lifesaving. PMID:27194837

  20. Cerebral venous thrombosis associated with micro-abscesses: case report.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Wataru; Fujita, Keishi; Onuma, Kuniyuki; Kamezaki, Takao; Sakashita, Shingo; Sugita, Shintarou

    2013-01-01

    We present a case that is most likely Lemierre's syndrome. A 19-year-old man presented to us with -common-cold-like symptoms, which he had had for 2 days, such as slight fever, general malaise, anorexia, sore throat, and headache. Eight days after the onset of these symptoms, he died of brain herniation due to cerebral venous thrombosis associated with micro-abscesses detected in pathological examination. PMID:23564158

  1. Innovative technique: Distal venous cannulation for salvaging free flap venous thrombosis by heparinised saline irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, G. D. S.; Mohanty, Devidutta; Jain, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Successful free tissue transfer depends on a multitude of factors, and adequate drainage of venous blood is one of the most critical part of successful free tissue transfers. Material and Methods: We report 6 cases of microvascular free flaps used for covering various defects, which developed venous congestion, that were salvaged with heparinised saline irrigation through the distal end of the congested vein by the help of an intravenous cannula. The irrigation was continued for 5 days. Results: All the flaps were successfully salvaged. Conclusion: This method has potential applications in situations for successful salvage of free tissue transfer particularly due to venous thrombosis. PMID:25991887

  2. Peripheral Venous Access Ports: Outcomes Analysis in 109 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bodner, Leonard J.; Nosher, John L.; Patel, Kaushik M.; Siegel, Randall L.; Biswal, Rajiv; Gribbin, Christopher E.; Tokarz, Robert

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective outcomes analysis of central venous catheters with peripheral venous access ports, with comparison to published data.Methods: One hundred and twelve central venous catheters with peripherally placed access ports were placed under sonographic guidance in 109 patients over a 4-year period. Ports were placed for the administration of chemotherapy, hyperalimentation, long-term antibiotic therapy, gamma-globulin therapy, and frequent blood sampling. A vein in the upper arm was accessed in each case and the catheter was passed to the superior vena cava or right atrium. Povidone iodine skin preparation was used in the first 65 port insertions. A combination of Iodophor solution and povidone iodine solution was used in the last 47 port insertions. Forty patients received low-dose (1 mg) warfarin sodium beginning the day after port insertion. Three patients received higher doses of warfarin sodium for preexistent venous thrombosis. Catheter performance and complications were assessed and compared with published data.Results: Access into the basilic or brachial veins was obtained in all cases. Ports remained functional for a total of 28,936 patient days. The port functioned in 50% of patients until completion of therapy, or the patient's expiration. Ports were removed prior to completion of therapy in 18% of patients. Eleven patients (9.9% of ports placed) suffered an infectious complication (0.38 per thousand catheter-days)-in nine, at the port implantation site, in two along the catheter. In all 11 instances the port was removed. Port pocket infection in the early postoperative period occurred in three patients (4.7%) receiving a Betadine prep vs two patients (4.2%) receiving a standard O.R. prep. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.9). Venous thrombosis occurred in three patients (6.8%) receiving warfarin sodium and in two patients (3%) not receiving warfarin sodium. This difference was not statistically significant

  3. A Case of Stroke due to Pulmonary Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Belok, Samuel; Parikh, Leslie; Robertson, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but potentially lethal disease. It most commonly occurs as a complication of malignancy, post-lung surgery or atrial fibrillation. Thrombi are typically detected using a variety of imaging modalities including transesophageal echo, CT-scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or pulmonary angiography. Treatment consists of anticoagulation. Here we report a case of a middle-aged male with systolic left ventricular dysfunction who presented with a stroke due to embolization from a pulmonary vein thrombus diagnosed on CT scan. Etiology of the thrombosis was felt to be secondary to severe systolic dysfunction. Based upon this case report, we believe that pulmonary venous embolism should be considered as a cause of cryptogenic stroke in patients with a significantly reduced cardiac systolic function. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-02.asp, free with no login]. PMID:26827087

  4. To what extent might deep venous thrombosis and chronic venous insufficiency share a common etiology?

    PubMed

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, P S

    2009-08-01

    According to the valve cusp hypoxia hypothesis (VCHH), deep venous thrombosis is caused by sustained non-pulsatile (streamline) venous blood flow. This leads to hypoxemia in the valve pockets; hypoxic injury to the inner (parietalis) endothelium of the cusp leaflets activates the elk-1/egr-1 pathway, leading to leukocyte and platelet swarming at the site of injury and, potentially, blood coagulation. Here, we propose an extension of the VCHH to account for chronic venous insufficiency. First, should the foregoing events not proceed to frank thrombogenesis, the valves may nevertheless be chronically injured and become incompetent. Serial incompetence in lower limb valves may then generate ''passive'' venous hypertension. Second, should ostial valve thrombosis obstruct venous return from muscles via tributaries draining into the femoral vein, as Virchow illustrated, ''active'' venous hypertension may supervene: muscle contraction would force the blood in the vessels behind the blocked ostial valves to re-route. Passive or active venous hypertension opposes return flow, leading to luminal hypoxemia and vein wall distension, which in turn may impair vasa venarum perfusion; the resulting mural endothelial hypoxia would lead to leukocyte invasion of the wall and remodelling of the media. We propose that varicose veins result if gross active hypertension stretches the valve ''rings'', rendering attached valves incompetent caudad to obstructed sites, replacing normal centripetal flow in perforating veins with centrifugal flow and over-distending those vessels. We also discuss how hypoxemia-related venous/capillary wall lesions may lead to accumulation of leukocytes, progressive blockage of capillary blood flow, lipodermosclerosis and skin ulceration. PMID:19648868

  5. Caring for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in children

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Mubashira; Wasay, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in children is increasingly recognized as diagnostic tools and clinical awareness has improved. It is a multifactorial disease where prothrombotic risk factors and predisposing clinical conditions usually in combination constitute the underlying etiology. Clinical features range from headache, seizures to comatose state. Although symptomatic treatment involving control of infections, seizures and intracranial hypertension is uniform, use of anticoagulation and local thrombolytic therapy is still controversial. Morbidity and mortality can be significant and long-term neurological sequelae include developmental delay, sensorimotor and visual deficits and epilepsy. PMID:21887032

  6. Fasciitis-panniculitis syndrome simulating deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Melina; Dias, Júlia; Queiroz, Aristides; Santiago, Mittermayer

    2007-05-01

    Fasciitis-panniculitis syndrome (FPS) is a condition characterized by inflammation of the subcutaneous cellular tissue, the aponeurosis and, eventually, the muscles. A 49-year-old female who was previously diagnosed as having retroperitoneal fibrosis presented recurrent episodes of intermittent inflammation of her limbs that simulated deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Biopsy revealed panniculitis with involvement of the fascia, characterizing FPS. Clinical improvement was achieved after corticosteroid therapy. Prompt recognition of FPS is important in order to avoid inadequate therapeutic measures since FPS can clinically simulate infectious or vascular diseases. PMID:17449400

  7. Mesenteric venous thrombosis associated with oral contraceptives: a case report.

    PubMed

    Milne, P Y; Thomas, R J

    1976-05-01

    Small-bowel infarction resulting from mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but life-threatening complication to which young women taking oral contraceptives are liable. The patient characteristically presents with an "acute abdomen" after a variable prodromal period of vague abdominal pain. The correct diagnosis can be made from the macroscopic appearance at laparotomy, provided the surgeon is alert to the condition. An accurate diagnosis is important, as anticoagulation measures must be instituted early to counter the commonly associated thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:1067070

  8. Detection of deep venous thrombosis by indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alonzo, W.A. Jr.; Alavi, A.

    1986-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte ((/sup 111/In)WBC) scintigraphy has been used successfully for detection of inflammation. Occasionally, noninflammatory collections of white blood cells such as hematomas or hemorrhage have been localized. We report a case in which unsuspected femoral deep venous thrombosis was diagnosed on an (/sup 111/In)WBC leukocyte scan performed for detection of osteomyelitis. Readers are advised to avoid interpreting all vascular (/sup 111/In)WBC localization as necessarily infectious. This may be of particular significance in patients with vascular grafts.

  9. Technetium-99m red blood cell venography in upper extremity deep venous thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, A.M.; Turbiner, E.H.

    1987-06-01

    The efficacy of Tc-99m RBC venography has been demonstrated with respect to the study of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. A case is presented where Tc-99m RBC venography was used to study the upper as well as lower extremities in a patient with upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) who was found to have pulmonary embolism.

  10. Technetium-99m red blood cell venography in upper extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, A M; Turbiner, E H

    1987-06-01

    The efficacy of Tc-99m RBC venography has been demonstrated with respect to the study of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. A case is presented where Tc-99m RBC venography was used to study the upper as well as lower extremities in a patient with upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) who was found to have pulmonary embolism. PMID:3595023

  11. Cerebral venous thrombosis following spinal surgery in a patient with Factor V Leiden mutation.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Baran; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Akakın, Akın; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Konya, Deniz

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a devastating event leading to high mortality and morbidity rates. We present a case of cerebral venous thrombosis that occurred following spinal surgery in a patient with Factor V Leiden mutation and G1691A heterozygosity. Possible prevention and treatment strategies have been discussed. PMID:26414646

  12. Unusual Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Patient with Ulcerative Colitis in Remission.

    PubMed

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Dalai, Siba Prasad; Panda, Sameer; Hui, Pankaj Kumar; Nayak, Sachidananda

    2016-05-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis along with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and arterial thrombosis have occasionally been reported as a complication in the active phase of UC being attributed to its pro-thrombotic state. This paper depicts a 38-year-old female with a history of UC in remission who developed sudden onset headache, blurring of vision and seizures. Subsequent diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis was made with MRI venography and treated with low molecular weight heparin with complete resolution of symptoms. The highlights of this case underscore the importance of evaluating cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as a cause of acute onset neurological deterioration in a setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It also emphasizes on the hypothesis that the risk of venous thrombosis or other hypercoagulable states have no direct relationship with the disease activity or flare-up. PMID:27437291

  13. Unusual Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Patient with Ulcerative Colitis in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Panda, Sameer; Hui, Pankaj Kumar; Nayak, Sachidananda

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis along with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and arterial thrombosis have occasionally been reported as a complication in the active phase of UC being attributed to its pro-thrombotic state. This paper depicts a 38-year-old female with a history of UC in remission who developed sudden onset headache, blurring of vision and seizures. Subsequent diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis was made with MRI venography and treated with low molecular weight heparin with complete resolution of symptoms. The highlights of this case underscore the importance of evaluating cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as a cause of acute onset neurological deterioration in a setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It also emphasizes on the hypothesis that the risk of venous thrombosis or other hypercoagulable states have no direct relationship with the disease activity or flare-up. PMID:27437291

  14. Cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis associated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin injection and oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiangyong; Bhatt, Archit; Aburashed, Rany; Burton, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    Although patients of cerebral sinus thrombosis after intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been previously reported; reports of cerebral venous thrombosis secondary to subcutaneous injection of immunoglobulin (SIG) in conjunction with oral contraceptives are nonexistent in the current literature. We describe here a patient of cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis occurring after the combination of SIG and oral contraceptive use. Furthermore, we shall explore proper clinical precautions for someone who receives IG therapy, especially in conjunction with the use of oral contraceptives. PMID:21915646

  15. Successful endovascular management of venous sinus thrombosis complicating trans-labyrinthine removal of vestibular schwanomma.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Nauman F; Ray, Abhishek; Singer, Justin; Nord, Ryan; Sunshine, Jeffrey; Megerian, Cliff A; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Semaan, Maroun T

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare complication of surgical treatment of vestibular schwanomma. We present a rare case of extensive venous sinus thrombosis after trans-labyrinthine approach that was refractory to systemic anti-coagulation. Mechanical aspiration thrombectomy was utilized to re-canalize the venous sinuses and resulted in successful resolution of neurological symptoms. Indications of utilizing endovascular approaches are discussed that will enable skull base surgeons to address this uncommon yet potentially fatal complication. PMID:27045766

  16. Antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: a case series and a review.

    PubMed

    Shlebak, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral venous sinus system is a rare site for venous thrombosis except in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. We describe three patients presenting with cerebral venous thrombosis in association with other thrombotic sites in two patients and as an only site in one patient. Antiphospholipid syndrome has varied clinical manifestations but the defining feature is the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. In this report we will review the clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria and the management of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:26424813

  17. Distance of the internal central venous catheter tip from the right atrium is positively correlated with central venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Samra, Navdeep S; Gifford, Karen Mathiesen; Roller, Robert; Wolfe, Bruce M; Owings, John T

    2016-06-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with occlusive, infectious, and thrombotic complications. The aim of this study was to determine if internal CVC tip position was correlated with subsequent complications. This was an institutional review board approved single-center retrospective review of 169 consecutive patients who underwent placement of 203 semipermanent CVCs. Using post-placement chest X-rays, a de novo scale of internal catheter tip position was developed. Major complications were recorded. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine if catheter tip position predicted subsequent complications. There were 78 men and 91 women with a mean age of 48 ± 11 years. There were 21 catheter tips placed in the subclavian/innominate veins, 32 in the upper superior vena cava, 113 in the atriocaval junction, and 37 in the right atrium. There were 83 complications occurring in 61 (36.1 %) patients, including sepsis in 40 (23.7 %), venous thrombosis in 18 (10.7 %), catheter occlusion in 16 (9.5 %), internal catheter repositioning in 6 (3.6 %), pneumothorax in 2 (1.2 %), and death in 1 (0.6 %). An internal catheter tip position peripheral to the atriocaval junction resulted in a catheter that was more likely to undergo internal repositioning (p < 0.001) and venous thrombosis (p < 0.001). Patients with femoral catheters were more likely to develop sepsis (45 %) than patients whose catheters were inserted through the upper extremity veins (18 %) (p < 0.01). In conclusion, to reduce catheter-associated morbidity and potentially mortality, the internal catheter tip should be positioned at the atriocaval junction or within the right atrium and femoral insertion sites should be avoided whenever possible. PMID:27112774

  18. Lessons from French National Guidelines on the treatment of venous thrombosis and central venous catheter thrombosis in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Farge, Dominique; Durant, Cecile; Villiers, Stéphane; Long, Anne; Mahr, Alfred; Marty, Michel; Debourdeau, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Increased prevalence of Venous thromboembolism (VTE), as defined by deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), central venous catheter (CVC) related thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (PE) in cancer patients has become a major therapeutic issue. Considering the epidemiology and each national recommendations on the treatment of VTE in cancer patients, we analysed guidelines implementation in clinical practice. Thrombosis is the second-leading cause of death in cancer patients and cancer is a major risk factor of VTE, due to activation of coagulation, use of long-term CVC, the thrombogenic effects of chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic drugs. Three pivotal trials (CANTHANOX, LITE and CLOT) and several meta-analysis led to recommend the long term (3 to 6 months) use of LMWH during for treating VTE in cancer patients with a high level of evidence. The Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the French "Institut National du Cancer" (INCa), the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCCP) have published specific guidelines for health care providers regarding the prevention and treatment of cancer-associated VTE. Critical appraisal of these guidelines, difficulties in implementation of prophylaxis regimen, tolerance and cost effectiveness of long term use of LMWH may account for large heterogenity in daily clinical practice. Homogenization of these guidelines in international consensus using an adapted independent methodological approach followed by educational and active implementation strategies at each national level would be very valuable to improve the care of VTE in cancer patients. PMID:20433988

  19. Oral contraceptives and venous thrombosis: end of the debate?

    PubMed

    Skouby, S O

    1998-06-01

    During the more than 30-year history of oral contraceptives, clinicians have received several official warnings issued by regulating agencies on cardiovascular risks. These have affected not only gynecological practice, but also generated research activities resulting in the refined third-generation products marketed in the 1970s. The alert sent out by the UK Committee on Safety of Medicines (CSM), October 1995, on increased risk of deep venous thrombosis during use of these compounds was, therefore, very much unexpected. The statements were referring to unpublished data and, thus, indicated new and highly alarming findings. However, during the following months, although four epidemiological studies reported a 2-4 fold relative increase compared with the second-generation oral contraceptives. This relative increase means, looking at absolute risks, an excess of 1-2 cases of deep venous thrombosis per 10,000 oral contraceptive users per year. In the academic discussions following the primary publication of the four papers, the possibility of confounding factors and bias was strongly emphasized and follow-up studies together with re-analysis of the original studies have not generated evidence for the suspicion of the increased risk with third-generation oral contraceptives. In contrast, a decreasing tendency was demonstrated for more serious events such myocardial infarction. Also, the biological plausibility for increased risk of deep venous thrombosis with third-generation products is lacking, although one study has pointed to a change in the natural anticoagulatory mechanism. Obviously, the authorities have a right to react on suspicion, but the psychological and social effects of the abrupt stopping of oral contraceptive use should not be ignored, and the public understanding of scientific results is manipulated by the mass media. Following confirmed evidence from both epidemiological and biological studies, with full acknowledgement of the contraceptive and non

  20. Subarachnoid haemorrhage as the initial manifestation of cortical venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Sahu, Ritesh; Lalla, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal rupture is the commonest cause of non-traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). SAH can rarely be the manifestation of cortical venous thrombosis (CVT). CVT is potentially lethal but treatable disorder with positive outcome if timely treatment is instituted. The site of bleeding is mainly on convexities and sulcus with sparing of basal cisterns in SAH related to CVT. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment, in spite of SAH complicated by CVT. In this submission, the author highlighted a case of SAH presented as initial manifestation of CVT in an elderly woman. Early therapy with anticoagulation led to complete clinical and radiological recovery in a short duration of 2 weeks. Thus, diagnosis of CVT should be kept in mind in unusual presentation of SAH. PMID:22914236

  1. [Takayasu arteritis and cerebral venous thrombosis: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Mingo, E; Riofrío Cabeza, S; Villa Albuger, T; Velasco Blanco, M J

    2014-01-01

    Palpitations, paresthesias and anxiety are very common reasons of consultation in primary care. We report the case of a 40 year-old Caucasian woman who came to the clinic due to these symptoms, and was finally diagnosed with Takayasu arteritis. Later, she had an episode of headache, as the initial manifestation of cerebral venous thrombosis. Takayasu arteritis is a systemic vasculitis affecting medium and large arteries, mainly leacausing stenosis of the aorta and its branches. It most frequently affects Asian women, being much rarer in Europe. The primary care doctor plays a key role in the initial diagnosis and monitoring of patients with rare diseases, such as Takayasu arteritis, and must be a basic support for the patient and family, providing information and advice, and contributing with his work to reduce the vulnerability of this group. PMID:24468302

  2. Acute subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Hanish; Chaudhary, Ashwani; Mahajan, Anuj; Paul, Birinder

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare type of stroke primarily affecting young women. Diagnosis is generally delayed or overlooked due to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms. Subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is very rare. We report a case of 40-year-old female with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis who presented to us with an acute subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage besides venous infarct. Management of such patients is complicated due to the rarity of the condition and contraindication for the use of anticoagulation. We conducted a thorough literature search through PubMed and could find only nine cases of spontaneous subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27057237

  3. Noninvasive detection of deep venous thrombosis. A critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    George, J E; Berry, R E

    1990-02-01

    The problems associated with deep venous thrombosis are well established. Correct diagnosis cannot be made by clinical examination; therefore, an objective test for accurate assessment becomes necessary. Contrast venography is recognized as the gold standard examination. However, the disadvantages of venography including radiation, dye exposure, and cost are also well recognized. These disadvantages have led to the development of the noninvasive studies. To evaluate Duplex B-mode ultrasound, Doppler, and air plethysmography, a retrospective review of patients referred to the vascular laboratory for evaluation of deep venous thrombosis was performed. From June 1984 until June 1987, 1,870 patients were examined in the laboratory. Forty eight of these patients underwent all three noninvasive tests as well as contrast venography. There were 16 men and 32 women with a mean age of 60. A total of 50 limbs was examined in these patients. The noninvasive tests had the following sensitivities as compared with venography: Doppler 71 per cent, air plethysmography 71 per cent, and Duplex B-mode ultrasound 95 per cent. These results were statistically significant at P less than 0.05. The specificities for Doppler, air plethysmography, and Duplex B-mode ultrasound were 90 per cent, 83 per cent, and 100 per cent, respectively. These results were also statistically significant at P less than 0.02. Based on these findings, we conclude that Duplex B-mode ultrasound is a superior noninvasive examination as compared with air plethysmography or Doppler, and is a reliable, economical, and efficient substitute for contrast venography. PMID:2407163

  4. Anticoagulation and delayed bowel resection in the management of mesenteric venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Chun, Jae Min; Huh, Seung

    2013-01-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is potentially lethal because it can result in mesenteric ischemia and, ultimately, bowel infarction requiring surgical intervention. Systemic anticoagulation for the prevention of thrombus propagation is a well-recognized treatment modality and the current mainstay therapy for patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. However, the decision between prompt surgical exploration vs conservative treatment with anticoagulation is somewhat difficult in patients with suspected bowel ischemia. Here we describe a patient with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis who presented with bowel ischemia and was treated with anticoagulation and delayed short-segment bowel resection. PMID:23946612

  5. Fibrinogen and red blood cells in venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Maria M.; Walton, Bethany L.; Byrnes, James R.; Wolberg, Alisa S.

    2014-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively termed venous thromboembolism (VTE), affect over 1 million Americans each year. VTE is triggered by inflammation and blood stasis leading to the formation of thrombi rich in fibrin and red blood cells (RBCs). However, little is known about mechanisms regulating fibrin and RBC incorporation into venous thrombi, or how these components mediate thrombus size or resolution. Both elevated circulating fibrinogen (hyperfibrinogenemia) and abnormal fibrin(ogen) structure and function, including increased fibrin network density and resistance to fibrinolysis, have been observed in plasmas from patients with VTE. Abnormalities in RBC number and/or function have also been associated with VTE risk. RBC contributions to VTE are thought to stem from their effects on blood viscosity and margination of platelets to the vessel wall. More recent studies suggest RBCs also express phosphatidylserine, support thrombin generation, and decrease fibrinolysis. RBC interactions with fibrin(ogen) and cells, including platelets and endothelial cells, may also promote thrombus formation. The contributions of fibrin(ogen) and RBCs to the pathophysiology of VTE warrants further investigation. PMID:24759140

  6. Value of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width on Emergency Department Admission in Patients With Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Buonocore, Ruggero; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2016-02-15

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) was found to be a useful parameter in a variety of cardiovascular and thrombotic disorders. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective case-control study to establish whether an association exists between RDW and venous thrombosis. The study population consisted of 431 consecutive patients who received a diagnosis of venous thrombosis in the emergency department (ED), thus including cases of superficial venous thrombosis, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and/or pulmonary embolism (PE). The control population consisted of 967 matched outpatients who underwent routine laboratory testing. The RDW values were found to be significantly increased in patients with venous thrombosis compared to controls, with an incremental trend of values from patients with superficial thrombosis, isolate DVT, to PE. Increased RDW values were an independent risk factor for isolate DVT and PE, displaying a relative risk that was greater in patients with provoked DVT and PE that in those with unprovoked thrombosis after multiple adjustment for age, gender, hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular volume. Interestingly, RDW also exhibited a significant diagnostic performance at ED admission, displaying an area under the curve of 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.62 to 0.68; p <0.001) for all cases of venous thrombosis, 0.63 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.68; p <0.001) for isolate DVT, and 0.70 (95% CI 0.65 to 0.75; p <0.001) for PE. The results of this study suggest that increased RDW not only is associated with venous thrombosis but may also increase the efficiency of baseline risk assessment of patients with suspected venous thrombosis on ED admission. PMID:26718227

  7. Assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using T2*-weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Fatemeh; Faeghi, Fariborz; Ghorbani, Askar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of gradient echo (GRE) sequences in the detection and characterization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis compared to conventional magnetic resonance sequences. Methods: A total of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) were evaluated using different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The MRI sequences included T1-weighted spin echo (SE) imaging, T*2-weighted turbo SE (TSE), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T*2-weighted conventional GRE, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). MR venography (MRV) images were obtained as the golden standard. Results: Venous sinus thrombosis was best detectable in T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences in all patients except in one case. Venous thrombosis was undetectable in DWI. T*2-weighted GRE sequences were superior to T*2-weighted TSE, T1-weighted SE, and FLAIR. Enhanced MRV was successful in displaying the location of thrombosis. Conclusion: T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences are probably the best method for the assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The mentioned method is non-invasive; therefore, it can be employed in the clinical evaluation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27326365

  8. Management of acute portomesenteric venous thrombosis induced by protein S deficiency: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao-Yu; Ho, Cheng-Maw; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Lee, Po-Huang

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary protein S deficiency is a risk factor which may predispose patients to venous thrombosis. Deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities can result in painful congestion, while the presence of mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) can cause abdominal emergencies. We herein report a protein S-deficient patient presenting with acute portomesenteric venous thrombosis. Early management using anticoagulant therapy was initially successful. However, the subsequent bowel stricture resulting from the ischemic insult was further managed with a surgical bypass. The patient was kept on long-term thrombophylaxis. The treatment strategy for MVT with bowel ischemia has evolved from aggressive portomesenteric thrombectomy with resection of the involved bowel, to conservative anticoagulation to recanalize thrombotic mesenteric veins with bowel preservation. Surgical intervention is reserved for transmural necrosis or bowel perforation. The perioperative thrombophylaxis of inherited thrombophilic patients is also important for preventing further thromboembolic events. PMID:22484987

  9. Venous Thrombosis and Cancer: from Mouse Models to Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Y.; Geddings, J. E.; Ay, C.; Mackman, N.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients have a ~4 fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared with the general population and this is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review summarizes our current knowledge of VTE and cancer from mouse models to clinical studies. Notably, risk of VTE varies depending on the type and stage of cancer. For instance, pancreatic and brain cancer patients have a higher risk of VTE than breast and prostate cancer patients. Moreover, patients with metastatic disease have a higher risk than those with localized tumors. Tumor-derived procoagulant factors and growth factors may directly and indirectly enhance VTE. For example, increased levels of circulating tumor-derived, tissue factor-positive microvesicles may trigger VTE. In a mouse model of ovarian cancer, tumor-derived IL-6 and hepatic thrombopoietin has been linked to increased platelet production and thrombosis. In addition, mouse models of mammary and lung cancer showed that tumor-derived granulocyte colony-stimulating factor causes neutrophilia and activation of neutrophils. Activated neutrophils can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that enhance thrombosis. Cell-free DNA in the blood derived from cancer cells, NETs and treatment with cytotoxic drugs can activate the clotting cascade. These studies suggest that there are multiple mechanisms for VTE in patients with different types of cancer. Preventing and treating VTE in cancer patients is challenging; the current recommendations are to use low molecular weight heparin. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may allow the development of new therapies to safely prevent VTE in cancer patients. PMID:25988873

  10. Migraine-like headache in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Funda Uysal; Tellioglu, Serdar; Koc, Rabia Soylu; Leventoglu, Alev

    2015-01-01

    A 20-year-old female, university student presented with severe, throbbing, unilateral headache, nausea and vomiting that started 2 days ago. The pain was aggravated with physical activity and she had photophobia. She had been taking contraceptive pills due to polycystic ovary for 3 months. Cranial computed tomography was uninformative and she was considered to have the first attack of migraine. She did not benefit from triptan treatment and as the duration of pain exceeded 72 h further imaging was done. Cranial MRI and MR venography revealed a central filling defect and lack of flow in the left sigmoid sinus caused by venous sinus thrombosis. In search for precipitating factors besides the use of contraceptive pills, plasma protein C activity was found to be depressed (42%, normal 70-140%), homocystein was minimally elevated (12.7 μmol/L, normal 0-12 μmol/L) and anti-cardiolipin IgM antibody was close to the upper limit. PMID:25666780

  11. Model-based reconstructive elasticity imaging of deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Aglyamov, Salavat; Skovoroda, Andrei R; Rubin, Jonathan M; O'Donnell, Matthew; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2004-05-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and its sequela, pulmonary embolism, is a significant clinical problem. Once detected, DVT treatment is based on the age of the clot. There are no good noninvasive methods, however, to determine clot age. Previously, we demonstrated that imaging internal mechanical strains can identify and possibly age thrombus in a deep vein. In this study the deformation geometry for DVT elasticity imaging and its effect on Young's modulus estimates is addressed. A model-based reconstruction method is presented to estimate elasticity in which the clot-containing vessel is modeled as a layered cylinder. Compared to an unconstrained approach in reconstructive elasticity imaging, the proposed model-based approach has several advantages: only one component of the strain tensor is used; the minimization procedure is very fast; the method is highly efficient because an analytic solution of the forward elastic problem is used; and the method is not very sensitive to the details of the external load pattern--a characteristic that is important for free-hand, external, surface-applied deformation. The approach was tested theoretically using a numerical model, and experimentally on both tissue-like phantoms and an animal model of DVT. Results suggest that elasticity reconstruction may prove to be a practical adjunct to triplex scanning to detect, diagnose, and stage DVT. PMID:15217230

  12. Clavicular fracture and upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Peivandi, Mohammad Taghi; Nazemian, Zohreh

    2011-03-01

    Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is considered an uncommon clinical event with considerable potential for morbidity. This article presents a case of upper-extremity DVT following a clavicular fracture. A 25-year-old man presented with pain and distortion of the left midclavicular area after falling on his left shoulder during martial arts practice. Following physical examination and radiography, he was diagnosed with a simple displaced clavicle fracture at the middle third. The patient had no previous surgery or medical problem, and did not smoke. No family history of blood clotting disorders were present and neurovascular examination appeared normal on the symmetric contralateral side. A figure-of-8 bandage was applied to support the arm and the patient was discharged. One week later, he returned with swelling and severe pain in his left arm. On examination, a DVT was suspected and the figure-of-8 brace was removed. A Doppler ultrasonography was performed and the presence of a thrombus extending from the brachial axillary veins to the distal subclavian vein with no flow in that segment was revealed. The patient was placed in a sling instead of a figure-of-8 bandage to immobilize the arm, while anticoagulation therapy with enoxaparin was started (1 mg/kg every 12 hours, 80 mg subcutaneous daily for 3 months). The swelling was reduced after 5 days. At 2-week follow-up, the patient had no pain and the swelling had completely disappeared. PMID:21410116

  13. Inherited prothrombotic risk factors and cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hillier, C E; Collins, P W; Bowen, D J; Bowley, S; Wiles, C M

    1998-10-01

    Fifteen patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were ascertained retrospectively. Their case notes were reviewed, and stored or new blood was assayed for factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, prothrombin gene mutation 20201A, and 5,10 methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation. A clinical risk factor was identified in 13 patients--the oral contraceptive pill (5), puerperium (1), HRT (1), mastoiditis (1), dehydration (1), lumbar puncture and myelography (1), carcinoma (1), lupus anticoagulant (2). In addition, two patients had the FVL mutation and five (one of whom also had the FVL mutation) were homozygous for the MTHFR mutation. The latter showed a higher than expected frequency compared to 300 healthy controls from South Wales (OR 3.15.95% Cl 1.01-9.83). No patient had the prothrombin 20201A mutation. Two patients died and three had a monocular visual deficit following anticoagulation (13) or thrombolytic (2) treatment, but there was no association between the presence of a primary prothrombotic risk factor and outcome. These results confirm the importance of investigating patients for both clinical predisposing factors and primary prothrombotic states. PMID:10024925

  14. Combined Arterial and Venous Thrombosis in Ulcerative Colitis- A Rare Vascular Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpreet; Dewan, Richa; Anuradha, S; Singla, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Combined arterial and venous thrombosis in patients with ulcerative colitis is a rare extra vascular manifestation, which motivated the current report. Increased coagulability is a recognised feature of ulcerative colitis with frequency increasing during flares. We report the case of a 42-year-old lady who was a diagnosed case of ulcerative colitis, currently in remission. She presented with swelling followed by discolouration of left lower limb which later was diagnosed as deep venous thrombosis combined with femoral and popliteal artery thrombosis. This led to wet gangrene of the limb, sepsis, septic shock and death despite aggressive management with heparin infusion, ionotropes, and parenteral antibiotics therapy. PMID:27190869

  15. The causes of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis in the children with cranial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Wei; Jia, Ge; Li, Na; Jia, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and to explore its possible reasons in children patients who received neurosurgery operation. Clinical data of 4958 cases children patients with lower-extremity DVT and without the thrombosis after the neurosurgery operation from 2010 January to 2014 December in department of neurosurgery of Tian Tan hospital were collected and analyzed. 18 cases children were diagnosed with lower-extremity DVT. All of them had invasive operation of lower-extremity deep venous catheterization. The mainly primary diseases of thrombosis children were craniopharyngioma. They have longer operation time compared with those without thrombosis (P<0.05). Therefore, the causes of DVT in neurosurgical children involve not only deep venous catheter-related but also neurological primary disease and operation time. PMID:26885175

  16. Recurrent deep venous thrombosis in an HIV-positive and injecting drug user woman.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Vitorino Modesto; Teles, Ludmila Thommen; Leão, Carlos Eduardo Silva; Lopes, Jânio Wagner Pinheiro; Fastudo, Custodio Abel; Lima, Regina Lucas Machada

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent deep venous thrombosis in a 44-year-old woman, intravenous drug user and HIV-infected, who injected cocaine in the groins and veins of the dorsum of the feet. She suffered several episodes of deep venous thrombosis and soft-tissue infections in the lower limbs. Images of Doppler ultrasound scan revealed thrombosis in the right popliteal vein with partial recanalization and calcified thrombi in the territory of the right femoral vein. After use of heparin and oral anticoagulation, her clinical evolution was uneventful, and she was asymptomatic at the occasion of the hospital discharge. This report calls for better awareness about injections in the groins and superficial femoral veins, which are part of the deep venous system. Thrombosis related to HIV infection is highlighted. PMID:22529454

  17. Deep venous thrombosis caused by congenital absence of inferior vena cava, combined with hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sang Seob; Kim, Ji Il; Kim, Kee Hwan; Sung, Gi Young; Lee, Do Sang; Kim, Jeong Soo; Moon, In Sung; Lim, Keun Woo; Koh, Young Bok

    2004-01-01

    We present a case of suprarenal and infrarenal absence of the inferior vena cava, combined with hyperhomocysteinemia in a 39-year-old woman who presented with symptoms of deep venous thrombosis. The patient also had a homozygous mutation of C677T methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. Deep vein thrombosis has a multifactorial etiology involving both genetic and acquired factors. Absence of the inferior vena cava is a rare congenital anomaly, but recently it was confirmed as an important risk factor for the development of deep vein thrombosis, especially in young persons. Hypercoagulability due to hyperhomocysteinemia with a tendency toward venous stasis, mediated by congenital absence of the inferior vena cava is thought to have caused deep vein thrombosis in our patient. To our knowledge, this association has not yet been reported. The clinical features and prognosis of the entity are discussed. PMID:15043024

  18. BK Nephritis and Venous Thrombosis in Renal Transplant Recipient Detected by 111In Leukocyte Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pucar, Darko; Klein, Kandace; Corley, James; Williams, Hadyn T

    2015-07-01

    Three months after deceased donor kidney transplant, a patient who presented with proteinuric renal dysfunction and fever of undetermined origin was found to have BK viruria by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. An ¹¹¹In leukocyte scan showed increased renal transplant uptake consistent with nephritis and linear uptake in the knee. Venous duplex ultrasound revealed acute occlusive thrombosis in the superficial right lesser saphenous vein in the area of increased radiolabeled leukocyte uptake. This ¹¹¹In leukocyte scan performed for fever of undetermined origin demonstrated findings of BK nephritis in a renal transplant patient and associated acute venous thrombosis related to leukocyte colonization. PMID:26018698

  19. Peripheral Insertion of a Central Venous Access Device Under Fluoroscopic Guidance Using a Peripherally Accessed System (PAS) Port in the Forearm

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Yasuhiro; Morita, Sojiro; Morita, Yoshitaka; Awatani, Toshihide; Takasaki, Motohiro; Horimi, Tadashi; Ozawa, Zen

    1998-05-15

    Purpose: We describe the technique, efficacy, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a peripherally accessed system (PAS) port via the forearm. Methods: Beginning in July 1994, 105 central venous access devices were implanted in 104 patients for the long-term infusion of antibiotics or antineoplasmic agents, blood products, or parenteral nutrition. The devices was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance with real-time venography from a peripheral route. Results: All ports were successfully implanted. There were no procedure-related complications. No thrombosis or local infection was observed; however, in six patients catheter-related phlebitis occurred. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a PAS port via the forearm is safe and efficacious, and injection of contrast medium through a peripheral IV catheter before introduction of the catheter helps to avoid catheter-related phlebitis.

  20. Factors That Influence Perforator Thrombosis and Predict Healing Perforator Sclerotherapy for Venous Ulceration Without Axial Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Kiguchi, Misaki M.; Hager, Eric S.; Winger, Daniel G.; Hirsch, Stanley A.; Chaer, Rabih A.; Dillavou, Ellen D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Refluxing perforators contribute to venous ulceration. We sought to describe patient characteristics and procedural factors that (1) impact rates of incompetent perforator vein (IPV) thrombosis with ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy (UGS) and (2) impact the healing of venous ulcers (CEAP 6) without axial reflux. METHODS Retrospective review of UGS of IPV injections from 1/2010–11/2012 identified 73 treated venous ulcers in 62 patients. Patients had no other superficial/axial reflux and were treated with standard wound care and compression. Ultrasound was used to screen for refluxing perforators near ulcer(s), and these were injected with sodium tetradecyl sulfate or polidocanol foam and assessed for thrombosis at 2 weeks. Demographic data, comorbidities, treatment details and outcomes were analyzed. Univariate and multivariable modeling was performed to determine covariates predicting IPV thrombosis and ulcer healing. RESULTS 62 patients with active ulcers for an average of 28 months with compression therapy prior to perforator treatment had an average age of 57.1 years, were 55% male, 36% had a history of DVT and 30% had deep venous reflux. 32 patients (52%) healed ulcers, while 30 patients (48%) had non-healed ulcer(s) in mean follow-up of 30.2 months. Ulcers were treated with 189 injections, with average thrombosis rate of 54%. Of 73 ulcers, 43 ulcers healed (59%), and 30 ulcers did not heal (41%). Patients that healed ulcers had an IPV thrombosis rate of 69 % vs. 38% in patients who did not heal (P<.001). Multivariate models demonstrated male gender and warfarin use negatively predicted thrombosis of IPVs (P=.03, P=.01). Multivariate model for ulcer healing found complete IPV thrombosis was a positive predictor (P=.02), while large initial ulcer area was a negative predictor (P=.08). Increased age was associated with fewer ulcer recurrences (P=.05). Hypertension and increased follow-up time predicted increased ulcer recurrences (P=.04, P=.02). Calf

  1. Pancreas Transplant Venous Thrombosis: Role of Endovascular Interventions for Graft Salvage

    SciTech Connect

    Stockland, Andrew H.; Willingham, Darrin L.; Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo; Grewal, Hani P.; McKinney, J. Mark; Hughes, Christopher B.; Walser, Eric M.

    2009-03-15

    Venous thrombosis of pancreas transplant allografts often leads to graft loss. We evaluated the efficacy of emergent endovascular techniques to salvage thrombosed pancreatic allografts in a series of six patients. Of the 76 pancreas transplants performed between 2002 and 2006, six patients were diagnosed with venous thrombosis on MRI between 2 and 28 days posttransplant (mean, 9 days). Five patients were systemic-enteric (donor portal vein anastomosis to recipient iliac vein) and one patient was portal-enteric (donor portal vein anastomosis to recipient superior mesenteric vein). Conventional venography confirmed the diagnosis of venous thrombosis in all patients. One patient was treated with catheter-directed venous thrombolysis and balloon thrombectomy. Another patient was treated with rheolytic thrombectomy alone. The remaining four patients were treated with a combination of these mechanical and thrombolytic techniques. Completion venography revealed >50% clot reduction and resumption of venous drainage in all patients. One patient required additional intervention 16 days later for recurrent thrombosis. Two patients required metal stent placement for anastomotic stenoses or kinks. One patient required pancreatectomy 36 h after attempted salvage secondary to a major hemorrhage and graft necrosis. Two patients recovered pancreatic function initially but lost graft function at 8 and 14 months, respectively, from severe chronic rejection. Patient survival was 100%, long-term graft survival was 50%, rethrombosis rate was 16.6%, and graft loss from rejection was 33%. In conclusion, early recognition and treatment of venous thrombosis after pancreas transplantation has acceptable morbidity and no mortality using short-term endovascular pharmacomechanical therapy.

  2. Cerebral arterial occlusion and intracranial venous thrombosis in a woman taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed Central

    Montón, F.; Rebollo, M.; Quintana, F.; Berciano, J.

    1984-01-01

    Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus are reported in a 30-year-old woman taking oral contraceptives (OC). The coexistence of arterial and venous cerebral pathology as a complication of OC use has only been previously reported in one case. The pathogenesis of this rare association is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6462985

  3. Differentiating the headache of cerebral venous thrombosis from post-dural puncture: A headache for anaesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Sherfudeen, Khaja Mohideen; Ramasamy, Gurumoorthi; Kaliannan, Senthil Kumar; Dammalapati, Pavan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare complication of lumbar puncture. Occasionally, the clinical picture of CVT may mimic post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) resulting in delayed diagnosis. A case of PDPH progressing to CVT is presented and the pathophysiology, diagnostic challenges and management options discussed in this article. PMID:27212724

  4. Acute venous thrombosis of a renal transplant: early detection with color Doppler sonography.

    PubMed

    Danse, E; Malaise, J; Mourad, M; Cosyns, J P

    2009-01-01

    The observation of a recent case of an acute venous thrombosis of a renal transplant is the opportunity to review and present the role of color Doppler sonography for the early detection of such a severe and uncommon complication. PMID:19534237

  5. Association between thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor gene polymorphisms and venous thrombosis risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ma, He; Lu, Lili; Sun, Guixiang; Liu, Dang; Zhou, Yunti; Tong, Yue; Lu, Zhaojun

    2016-06-01

    Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) is an important antifibrinolytic factor that has been shown in increased concentrations to be associated with an increased risk for venous thrombosis. However, the effect of TAFI gene polymorphisms on the risk of venous thrombosis remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the association of three single nucleotide polymorphisms: 505G>A (rs3742264), 1040 C>T (rs1926447) and -438G>A (rs2146881) with venous thrombosis risk using a meta-analysis. A systematic literature search for eligible studies published before 20 January 2015 was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, WanFang database and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. We assessed the possible association by pooled odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval. A total of 14 independent case-control studies including 2970 cases and 3049 controls were enrolled in the final meta-analysis. A significant reduction of venous thrombosis risk in the 505G>A polymorphism was observed under allele comparison, homozygote comparison and recessive models, but opposite results were seen in Asians. Likewise, there was a significant decreased susceptibility to venous thrombosis in the 1040C>T polymorphism in homozygote comparison and recessive models. In the subgroup analysis, the nonvenous thromboembolism disease group showed a significantly increased venous thrombosis risk. Pooled estimates did not show evidence of association between -438G>A and venous thrombosis risk in any genetic model. This meta-analysis suggested that although the -438G>T polymorphism is not correlated with venous thrombosis risk in all models, a trend toward reduced risk still could be observed. The A allele and AA genotype of 505G>A in whites and the TT genotype of 1040C>T were significantly associated with a decreased risk of venous thrombosis, except in the non-venous thromboembolism group. PMID:26656901

  6. The complete recanalization of PICC-related venous thrombosis in cancer patients: A series of case reports.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zuo-Ping; Liu, Xing-Jing; Zou, Bin-Xin; Wang, Li-Gen; Zhou, Tao

    2013-08-01

    In this study, cancer patients with venous thrombosis associated with the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) underwent complete recanalization by the administration of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS), which vary from heparin or urokinase in that they do not have the same risks associated with thrombolysis, including bleeding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study concerning the treatment of cancers with PNS to be reported in the literature. Three cancer patients aged 30-50 years old, two females and one male, were subjected to chemotherapy. On the first day of chemotherapy, a PICC was inserted into the right basilic vein with its tip in the superior vena cava. On the third day of chemotherapy, pain, swelling and skin flushing started. In the following days, particularly days 10-13, a Doppler ultrasound examination confirmed a long thrombus along the PICC line in the axillary vein and brachial veins in each patient. The patients rejected the insertion of an inferior vena cava filter, and neither heparin nor urokinase were administered due to contra-indications. An injection of PNS (200 mg) was administered every day. On days 20-28 of chemotherapy, the thrombus in the axillary and brachial veins disappeared in the three patients. It was concluded that PNS promote blood circulation, which prevents blood stasis and reduces the toxicity of cisplatin. The results suggest that PNS are a feasible and effective treatment option for many types of cancer, but have a broader clinical impact on cancer patients with PICC-related venous thrombosis. Therefore, this study is an original case report of particular interest to cancer patients with PICC-related venous thrombosis. PMID:24137199

  7. Prevalence and isotype distribution of antiphospholipid antibodies in unselected Chilean patients with venous and arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Iván; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcón, Marcelo; Vásquez, Marcela; Pinochet, Carmen; Vélez, María T; Sandoval, Jorge; Icaza, Gloria; Pierangeli, Silvia

    2004-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are a heterogeneous family of antibodies associated with thrombotic events and other complications. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of aPL in a group of Chilean patients with thrombosis. Two hundred and twenty-six patients with venous and arterial thrombosis and 95 healthy controls were studied. Anticardiolipin (aCL), anti-beta(2 )glycoprotein I (anti-beta(2)GPI), and antiprothrombin (aPT) antibodies were determined. Eighty-eight out of 226 (38.9%) patients with thrombosis had some type of aPL. Fifty-seven patients (25.2%) were positive for aCL, 31 (13.7%) for aPT, and 14 (6.2%) for anti-beta(2)GPI antibodies. Twelve patients (5.3%) were positive for more than one aPL. IgG, IgM and IgA isotypes were observed in aCL, anti-beta(2)GPI, and aPT antibodies. Twenty-six out of 92 (28.3%) patients with venous thrombosis and 31/134 (23.1%) patients with arterial thrombosis were positive for aCL antibodies. With regard to the control group (4/95=4.2%), the odd ratios (OR) were 5.2 (1.3-19.8; p0.01) and 5.7 (1.6-22.3; p0.01), respectively. Additionally, we observed statistically significant OR with aPT and anti-beta(2)GPI antibodies; in the first, with venous and arterial thrombosis, and in the second, only with arterial thrombosis. Our results show a significant prevalence of aPL, predominantly aCL and aPT antibodies, in patients with thrombosis. Additionally, aCL and aPT antibodies appear to be a risk factor for venous and arterial thrombosis, and anti-beta(2)GPI antibodies appear to be a risk factor for arterial thrombosis. PMID:15045627

  8. Endovascular Thrombolysis Using Monteplase for Non-chronic Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Yoshimatsu, Rika Tanaka, Osamu Miura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of endovascular thrombolysis using monteplase for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Between December 2005 and October 2009, at our institution nine endovascular thrombolysis treatments with monteplase were performed for symptomatic DVT in eight patients (6 women, 2 men; mean age, 56 (range, 15-80) years). In all, systemic anticoagulation administered by the peripheral intravenous route with heparin and/or thrombolysis with urokinase followed by anticoagulation with orally administered warfarin had been performed, and subsequently six endovascular treatments without monteplase were administered. However, DVT persisted, and endovascular treatments with monteplase were tried. In six (67%) of the nine procedures, DVT completely or almost completely disappeared after endovascular thrombolysis with monteplase. Mean dose of monteplase used was 2,170,000 IU. There was only one procedure-related complication. In one patient, just after thrombolysis with monteplase, bleeding at the puncture site and gingival bleeding occurred. Bleeding was stopped by manual astriction only. Endovascular thrombolysis with monteplase may be an effective treatment for DVT, even in cases resistant to traditional systemic anticoagulation and thrombolysis and endovascular procedures without monteplase.

  9. Clinicoepidemiological profile of cerebral venous thrombosis in Algarve, Portugal: A retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Rodrigues, Fátima; Carneiro, Patricia; Macedo, Ana; Ferreira, Fátima; Basílio, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a very uncommon disorder with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. There are few studies describing the clinical and epidemiological profile of CVT in peripheral or rural areas. Over the last decades, the frequency in which this disease is diagnosed has increased due to greater awareness and availability of noninvasive diagnostic techniques. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based retrospective case review of adult (≥15 years) patients with CVT between 2001 and 2012 is described. 31 patients with confirmed imagiological diagnosis of CVT were included. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using R version 2.15.2. Incidence rate was computed as number of new cases by time. Confidence interval (CI) was set at 95% and P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The average annual incidence was 0.84 (CI: 0.58–1.18) to 0.73 (CI: 0.5–1.02) per 100 000 cases for adult population. There were 23 (74%) women and 8 (26%) men. Predominant initial manifestations were headache, followed by altered mental status and seizures. Median diagnostic delay from onset of illness was 8 days. All patients were treated with unfractionated heparin or low-molecular heparin followed by warfarin. Complete recovery occurred in the majority of cases 22 (78.6%) but two patients died during hospitalization. Conclusions: Albeit with some particularities, the epidemiology and clinical manifestations we found are comparable to what has been reported in western studies. PMID:26752915

  10. A case of hereditary protein S deficiency presenting with cerebral sinus venous thrombosis and deep vein thrombosis at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Nair, Velu; Mohapatro, A K; Sreedhar, M; Indrajeet, I K; Tewari, A K; Anand, A C; Mathew, O P

    2008-01-01

    A 35-year-old healthy male with no history of any past medical illness developed severe headache, vomiting and drowsiness while at high altitude (4,572 m) in the eastern Himalayan ranges. He was evacuated to a tertiary-care hospital where he was diagnosed to have cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) on magnetic resonance imaging, with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of his right popliteo-femoral vein on color Doppler study. Investigation for thrombophilia revealed protein S (PS) deficiency in this patient. Family screening revealed low levels of PS in two elder brothers. One brother had a history of 'stroke in young' at the age of 20 years with the other being asymptomatic. This established the hereditary nature of PS deficiency. We are not aware of any previously published report on hereditary PS deficiency combined with CSVT and DVT occurring at high altitude. However, 1 case of protein C deficiency with CSVT has been reported previously. PMID:18434709

  11. Complement Activation in Arterial and Venous Thrombosis is Mediated by Plasmin.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jonathan H; Walton, Bethany L; Aleman, Maria M; O'Byrne, Alice M; Lei, Victor; Harrasser, Micaela; Foley, Kimberley A; Wolberg, Alisa S; Conway, Edward M

    2016-03-01

    Thrombus formation leading to vaso-occlusive events is a major cause of death, and involves complex interactions between coagulation, fibrinolytic and innate immune systems. Leukocyte recruitment is a key step, mediated partly by chemotactic complement activation factors C3a and C5a. However, mechanisms mediating C3a/C5a generation during thrombosis have not been studied. In a murine venous thrombosis model, levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes poorly correlated with C3a and C5a, excluding a central role for thrombin in C3a/C5a production. However, clot weight strongly correlated with C5a, suggesting processes triggered during thrombosis promote C5a generation. Since thrombosis elicits fibrinolysis, we hypothesized that plasmin activates C5 during thrombosis. In vitro, the catalytic efficiency of plasmin-mediated C5a generation greatly exceeded that of thrombin or factor Xa, but was similar to the recognized complement C5 convertases. Plasmin-activated C5 yielded a functional membrane attack complex (MAC). In an arterial thrombosis model, plasminogen activator administration increased C5a levels. Overall, these findings suggest plasmin bridges thrombosis and the immune response by liberating C5a and inducing MAC assembly. These new insights may lead to the development of strategies to limit thrombus formation and/or enhance resolution. PMID:27077125

  12. Complement Activation in Arterial and Venous Thrombosis is Mediated by Plasmin

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Jonathan H.; Walton, Bethany L.; Aleman, Maria M.; O'Byrne, Alice M.; Lei, Victor; Harrasser, Micaela; Foley, Kimberley A.; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Conway, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombus formation leading to vaso-occlusive events is a major cause of death, and involves complex interactions between coagulation, fibrinolytic and innate immune systems. Leukocyte recruitment is a key step, mediated partly by chemotactic complement activation factors C3a and C5a. However, mechanisms mediating C3a/C5a generation during thrombosis have not been studied. In a murine venous thrombosis model, levels of thrombin–antithrombin complexes poorly correlated with C3a and C5a, excluding a central role for thrombin in C3a/C5a production. However, clot weight strongly correlated with C5a, suggesting processes triggered during thrombosis promote C5a generation. Since thrombosis elicits fibrinolysis, we hypothesized that plasmin activates C5 during thrombosis. In vitro, the catalytic efficiency of plasmin-mediated C5a generation greatly exceeded that of thrombin or factor Xa, but was similar to the recognized complement C5 convertases. Plasmin-activated C5 yielded a functional membrane attack complex (MAC). In an arterial thrombosis model, plasminogen activator administration increased C5a levels. Overall, these findings suggest plasmin bridges thrombosis and the immune response by liberating C5a and inducing MAC assembly. These new insights may lead to the development of strategies to limit thrombus formation and/or enhance resolution. PMID:27077125

  13. Cerebral venous thrombosis in young adult with familial protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Franciele M; Silva, Caroline Ribeiro da; Borém, Michelle G; Miranda-Vilela, Ana L

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary thrombophilia is the inherited predisposition to venous or, occasionally, arterial thrombosis. In most cases, it is because of changes related to physiological coagulation inhibitors or mutations in genes of coagulation factors. Protein S, a vitamin K-dependent plasma glycoprotein, is a natural anticoagulant and its deficiency is associated with familial venous thrombosis. We present a case study that brings together two rare diseases, cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and familial protein S deficiency, in a 21-year-old male patient with a positive family history of thrombosis. He developed a headache of moderate intensity lasting 30 days, followed by bizarre movements, which culminated in the patient's death. This report discusses the importance of family history for the diagnosis of hereditary thrombophilia, as well as the request for brain imaging for diagnosis of CVT for an early appropriate intervention, and the importance of specialized medical guidance for family members, who must receive medical advice to prevent another fatal episode in a family member. PMID:25304012

  14. [Case of cerebral venous thrombosis caused by MPO-ANCA associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu; Fujimori, Juichi; Yoshida, Shun; Kaneko, Kimihiko; Kodera, Takao

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 72-year-old woman presenting MPO-ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis and venous thrombosis. Five years prior, positive MPO-ANCA and renal dysfunction had been indicated. At that time, oral steroids and tacrolimus were given to treat systemic vasculitis. During the course of the disease, she repeated otitis media. Saddle nose appeared. She was suspected of having localized type granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). She was hospitalized because of consciousness disturbance and was diagnosed as having MPO-ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymenigitis and venous thrombosis. Brain MRI detected thick dura mater with abnormal enhancement, predominantly on the right cerebral hemisphere, and tentorium cerebella partially along with the cerebral sulci. MRI revealed vasogenic brain edema lesions in the right occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes and cytotoxic edema lesions in the right parietal lobe and centrum semiovale. MR venography revealed stenosis of the venous sinus including confluence of sinuses, straight sinus, and right transverse sinus. Subsequent treatment with corticosteroids, an immunosuppressant, and an anticoagulant led to recovery. No patient with MPO-ANCA-associated hypertrophic pachymenigitis and venous thrombosis that developed alternation of consciousness has ever been reported. This is therefore regarded as a rare case. PMID:25342019

  15. Factor VIIa-antithrombin complexes in patients with arterial and venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Spiezia, Luca; Rossetto, Valeria; Campello, Elena; Gavasso, Sabrina; Woodhams, Barry; Tormene, Daniela; Simioni, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    Antithrombin (AT), in the presence of heparin, is able to inhibit the catalytic activity of factor VIIa bound to tissue factor (TF) on cell surfaces. The clinical meaning of FVIIa-AT complexes plasma levels is unknown. It was the objective of this study to evaluate FVIIa-AT complexes in subjects with thrombosis. Factor VIIa-AT complexes plasma levels in 154 patients consecutively referred to our Department with arterial or venous thrombosis and in a group of 154 healthy subjects, were measured. Moreover, FVIIa-AT complexes were determined in: i) n = 53 subjects belonging to 10 families with inherited factor VII deficiency; ii) n = 58 subjects belonging to seven families with AT deficiency; iii) n = 49 patients undergoing oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT). Factor VIIa-AT levels were determined by a specific ELISA kit (R&D, Diagnostica Stago, Gennevilliers, France). Factor VIIa-AT complexes mean plasma levels were lower in patients with either acute arterial (136 +/- 40 pM) or venous (142 +/- 53 pM) thrombosis than subjects with previous thrombosis (arterial 164 +/- 33 pM and venous 172 +/- 61 pM, respectively) and than healthy controls (156 +/- 63 pM). Differences between acute and previous thrombosis, were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Subjects with inherited and acquired (under OAT) factor VII deficiency had statistically significant lower FVIIa-AT complexes plasma levels (80 +/- 23 pM and 55 +/- 22 pM, respectively) than controls (150 +/- 51 pM, p < 0.0001 and 156 +/- 63 pM, p < 0.00001, respectively). Factor VIIa-AT complexes are positively correlated with plasma factor VII/VIIa levels. Further investigations are needed to verify the possible role of higher FVIIa-AT complex plasma levels in predicting hypercoagulable states and thrombosis. PMID:20431847

  16. Endovascular Treatment Options in the Management of Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sheraz; Uberoi, Raman

    2009-09-15

    Lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Systemic anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of conventional treatment instituted by most physicians for the management of DVT. This has proven efficacy in the prevention of thrombus extension and reduction in the incidence of pulmonary embolism and rethrombosis. Unfortunately, especially in patients with severe and extensive iliofemoral DVT, standard treatment may not be entirely adequate. This is because a considerable proportion of these patients eventually develops postthrombotic syndrome. This is characterized by chronic extremity pain and trophic skin changes, edema, ulceration, and venous claudication. Recent interest in endovascular technologies has led to the development of an assortment of minimally invasive, catheter-based strategies to deal with venous thrombus. These comprise catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices, adjuvant venous angioplasty and stenting, and inferior vena cava filters. This article reviews these technologies and discusses their current role as percutaneous treatment strategies for venous thrombotic conditions.

  17. Deep venous thrombosis: The valve cusp hypoxia thesis and its incompatibility with modern orthodoxy.

    PubMed

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    The valve cusp hypoxia thesis (VCHT) of the aetiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was adumbrated in this journal in 1977 and fully articulated in 2008, the original hypothesis having been strongly corroborated by experiments published in 1981 and 1984. It presents a unitary account of the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis and embolism that is rooted in the pathophysiological tradition of Hunter, Virchow, Lister, Welch and Aschoff, a tradition traceable back to Harvey. In this paper we summarise the thesis in its mature form, consider its compatibility with recent advances in the DVT field, and ask why it has not yet been assimilated into the mainstream literature, which during the past half century has been dominated by a haematology-orientated 'consensus model'. We identify and discuss seven ways in which the VCHT is incompatible with these mainstream beliefs about the aetiology of venous thrombosis, drawing attention to: (1) the spurious nature of 'Virchow's triad'; (2) the crucial differences between 'venous thrombus' and 'clot'; the facts that (3) venous thrombi form in the valve pockets (VVPs), (4) DVT is not a primarily haematological condition, (5) the so-called 'thrombophilias' are not thrombogenic per se; (6) the conflict between the single unitary aetiology of DVT and the tacit assumption that the condition is 'multicausal'; (7) the inability of anticoagulants to prevent the initiation of venous thrombogenesis, though they do prevent the growth of thrombi to clinically significant size. In discussing point (7), we show that the VCHT indicates new approaches to mechanical prophylaxis against DVT. These approaches are then formulated as experimentally testable hypotheses, and we suggest methods for testing them preclinically using animal trials. PMID:26804599

  18. Venous thrombosis following intravenous injection of household bleach.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, S H; Ahmadi, S; Vahdati, S S; Moghaddam, H H

    2012-06-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is used extensively as a disinfectant or bleaching agent. Most studies describe ingestion or inhalation route of this product with rare complication and fatalities. Despite global daily exposures, data about bleach injection is limited. Here we report intentional infusion of 20 mL, sodium hypochlorite 5% diluted in 500 mL normal saline 1.5 h prior admission. Clinical manifestation included local pain and edema. There were no laboratory abnormalities in the patient. Doppler sonography revealed thrombosis in superficial (antecubital and basilic) veins. Limb elevation, warm compress, and ibuprofen relived pain and edema after 3 days. PMID:22297700

  19. Popliteal cysts and deep venous thrombosis: Tc-99m red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohn, G.O.; Brand, C.A.; Ada, A.; Wong, C.

    1985-04-01

    Thirty-four patients who clinically were suspected of having deep venous thrombosis (DVT) underwent Tc-99m red blood cell (RBC) venography followed by contrast venography. The sensitivity (88%) and specificity (94%) of Tc-99m RBC venography of DVT confirmed findings of previous studies. Twenty-four patients who had proved popliteal cysts and swollen calves also were examined using Tc-99m RBC venography. Large cysts showed lack of DVT features, photon deficient cold areas in the popliteal fossa, and diversion of venous flow around the photon deficient area. These features were seen in 25% of the study population (six patients), and assisted in the distinction between the two conditions.

  20. Homonymous hemianopia from infarction of the optic tract and lateral geniculate nucleus in deep cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Grabe, Hilary M; Bapuraj, J Rajiv; Wesolowski, Jeffrey R; Parmar, Hemant; Trobe, Jonathan D

    2012-03-01

    A 20-year-old man developed right homonymous hemianopia, hemiparesis, and hemisensory loss from deep cerebral venous thrombosis in the setting of high altitude. Approximately 3 months later, brain MRI showed encephalomalacia of the left optic tract and lateral geniculate nucleus, as well as signal abnormalities of the internal capsule and posterolateral thalamus. Homonymous hemianopia has previously been described in 1 case after deep cerebral venous thrombosis but without detailed neuroimaging features. PMID:22330851

  1. Risk factors for central venous catheter-related thrombosis in children: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Agarwal, Arnav; Tassone, Maria Cristina; Shahjahan, Nadia; Walton, Mark; Chan, Anthony; Mondal, Tapas

    2016-06-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) placement is associated with increased risk of thrombosis in the paediatric population, particularly in relation to the type of catheter and the manner of its insertion. Here, we investigate risk factors associated with CVC-related thrombosis in children, with particular emphasis on positioning of the catheter tip. Patients aged 0-18 who underwent at least one CVC placement from 2008 to 2013 at a single centre with a subsequent follow-up echocardiogram were included for a total of 104 patients and 147 lines. Data on clinical and catheter-related risk factors were collected from patient charts. Statistical analysis using Pearson's χ tests, independent samples t-test, and odds ratios were used to assess potential risk factors for thrombosis. Neither insertion site (subclavian vein or otherwise), left- vs. right-sided insertion, nor catheter type were significant risk factors for thrombosis. There were no thrombotic events reported at the superior vena cava (SVC)-right atrium junction and no significant differences in thrombotic risk with initial tip placement in the SVC-right atrium junction vs. the SVC, right atrium, or inferior vena cava. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was a major clinical risk factor for thrombosis. Tip movement was common and may have been an important factor in the development of CVC-related thrombi. Prospective studies can yield insight into the role of follow-up imaging in the prevention of catheter-related thrombosis in children. PMID:26977751

  2. A rare presentation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis associated with tubercular meningitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh; Patil, Tushar B; Tiwari, Navin

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis may manifest as meningitis, meningoencephalitis, tuberculoma, tubercular abscess, stroke due to tuberculous vasculitis and tuberculous encephalopathy. Occasionally, tubercular meningitis (TBM) can predispose to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). We report a young man, who developed CVST as a complication of TBM. Worsening of pre-existing headache, impairment of consciousness and seizures should raise suspicion of CVST in any patient with CNS infection. Early diagnosis and appropriate clinical management are important for good outcome. PMID:23917359

  3. Presumed Pulmonary Embolism Following Power-Pulse Spray Thrombectomy of Upper Extremity Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jason; Georgiades, Christos S.; Hong, Kelvin; Kim, Hyun S.

    2006-08-15

    To achieve more effective thrombolysis in a shorter treatment time, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy has been increasingly used in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The power-pulse spray is a new technique to combine chemical and rheolytic effects on clots. We present a case of presumed pulmonary embolism following power-pulse spray treatment for upper extremity DVT which necessitated resuscitation and intubation. The power-pulse spray technique should be used with caution when treating DVT.

  4. A rare presentation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis associated with tubercular meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh; Patil, Tushar B; Tiwari, Navin

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis may manifest as meningitis, meningoencephalitis, tuberculoma, tubercular abscess, stroke due to tuberculous vasculitis and tuberculous encephalopathy. Occasionally, tubercular meningitis (TBM) can predispose to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). We report a young man, who developed CVST as a complication of TBM. Worsening of pre-existing headache, impairment of consciousness and seizures should raise suspicion of CVST in any patient with CNS infection. Early diagnosis and appropriate clinical management are important for good outcome. PMID:23917359

  5. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Poudyal, Bishesh Sharma; Sedain, Gopal; Mahmud, Khandokar Imran; Acharya, Niranja

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare type of hemolytic anemia, frequently associated with thrombophilia. PNH may rarely present with CVT. Approximately, one-third of the patients with CVT develop cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we present a rare combination of CVT presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage in a patient with PNH. High index of suspicion is needed to avoid misdiagnosis. Patient was successfully managed with anticoagulation therapy. PMID:27076714

  6. From portal to splanchnic venous thrombosis: What surgeons should bear in mind

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Quirino; Spoletini, Gabriele; Pinheiro, Rafael S; Melandro, Fabio; Guglielmo, Nicola; Lerut, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to review the evolution of surgical management of portal (PVT) and splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT) in the context of liver transplantation over the last 5 decades. PVT is more commonly managed by endovenous thrombectomy, while SVT requires more complex technical expedients. Several surgical techniques have been proposed, such as extensive eversion thrombectomy, anastomosis to collateral veins, reno-portal anastomosis, cavo-portal hemi-transposition, portal arterialization and combined liver-intestinal transplantation. In order to achieve satisfactory outcomes, careful planning of the surgical strategy is mandatory. The excellent results that are obtained nowadays confirm that, even extended, splanchnic thrombosis is no longer an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation. Patients with advanced portal thrombosis may preferentially be referred to specialized centres, in which complex vascular approaches and even multivisceral transplantation are performed. PMID:25232448

  7. Catheter-directed thrombolysis in the treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J J; Zhang, Z H; Shan, Z; Wang, W J; Li, X X; Wang, S M; Li, Y-X; Cheng, G-S

    2014-01-01

    We performed a meta-analysis for systematic evaluation of the status quo of catheter thrombolysis for the treatment of acute lower limb deep vein thrombosis in China. We searched the China Biomedical bibliographic database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Weipu full-text electronic journals, Wanfang full-text database, and Medline (1990 through June 2011) for clinical randomized controlled trials of catheter-directed thrombolysis and superficial venous thrombolysis to compare their efficacies for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis. The results were analyzed by using the Cochrane-recommended RevMan 4.2 software package, and the odds ratio (OR) was used as the combined measure of efficacy. The search retrieved 8 randomized controlled trials, and meta-analysis using the total rate of effective treatment as the clinical observation index found that the combined OR for the catheter thrombolysis group versus the superficial venous thrombolysis group was significant (P < 0.01; OR = 11.78; 95% confidence interval = 6.99-19.87). In conclusion, the meta-analysis indicated that catheter thrombolysis was more effective than superficial venous thrombolysis for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis in the lower limb in Chinese individuals. However, the included trials were only of medium quality, so more rational and scientific clinical trials are needed to validate this conclusion. PMID:25078578

  8. Prevention of deep venous thrombosis in patients with acute spinal cord injuries: use of rotating treatment tables

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.M.; Gonzalez, M.; Gentili, A.; Eismont, F.; Green, B.A.

    1987-05-01

    A randomized clinical trial of 15 patients with acute spinal cord injuries was performed to test the hypothesis that rotating treatment tables prevent deep venous thrombosis in this population. Four of 5 control (nonrotated) patients developed distal and proximal thrombi, assessed by /sup 125/I fibrinogen leg scans and impedance plethysmography. In comparison, only 1 of 10 treated (rotated) patients developed both distal and proximal thrombosis. These results suggest but do not prove that rotating treatment tables prevent the development of proximal deep venous thrombosis in spinal cord-injured patients. Larger clinical trials are needed to confirm this heretofore undocumented benefit of rotating treatment tables.

  9. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients with Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Delomez, Maxence; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Willoteaux, Serge; Bauchart, Jean-Jacques; D'Othee, Bertrand Janne; Asseman, Philippe; Perez, Nessim; Thery, Claude

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To report our experience with mechanical thrombectomy in proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT).Methods: Eighteen patients with a mean ({+-} SD) age of 37.6 {+-} 16.1 years who presented with DVT in the iliac and femoral vein (n = 3), inferior vena cava (n = 5), or inferior vena cava and iliac vein (n = 10), were treated with the Amplatz Thrombectomy Device after insertion of a temporary caval filter.Results: Successful recanalization was achieved in 15 of 18 patients (83%). Overall, the percentage of thrombus removed was 66 {+-} 29%: 73 {+-} 30% at caval level and 55 {+-} 36% at iliofemoral level. Complementary interventions (seven patients) were balloon angioplasty (n = 2), angioplasty and stenting (n = 2), thrombo-aspiration alone (n = 1), thrombo-aspiration, balloon angioplasty, and permanent filter (n = 1), and permanent filter alone (n = 1). There was one in-hospital death. Follow-up was obtained at a mean of 29.6 months; three patients had died (two cancers, one myocardial infarction); 10 had no or minimal sequelae; one had post-phlebitic limb.Conclusion: Mechanical thrombectomy is a potential therapeutic option in patients presenting with proximal DVT.

  10. FXIIa inhibitor rHA-Infestin-4: Safe thromboprotection in experimental venous, arterial and foreign surface-induced thrombosis.

    PubMed

    May, Frauke; Krupka, Jennifer; Fries, Marion; Thielmann, Ina; Pragst, Ingo; Weimer, Thomas; Panousis, Con; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stoll, Guido; Dickneite, Gerhard; Schulte, Stefan; Nolte, Marc W

    2016-06-01

    Haemostasis including blood coagulation is initiated upon vessel wall injury and indispensable to limit excessive blood loss. However, unregulated pathological coagulation may lead to vessel occlusion, causing thrombotic disorders, most notably myocardial infarction and stroke. Furthermore, blood exposure to foreign surfaces activates the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. Hence, various clinical scenarios, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, require robust anticoagulation consequently leading to an increased bleeding risk. This study aimed to further assess the antithrombotic efficacy of the activated factor XII (FXIIa) inhibitor, rHA-Infestin-4, in several thrombosis models. In mice, rHA-Infestin-4 decreased occlusion rates in the mechanically-induced arterial (Folt's) and the FeCl3 -induced venous thrombosis model. rHA-Infestin-4 also protected from FeCl3 -induced arterial thrombosis and from stasis-prompted venous thrombosis in rabbits. Furthermore, rHA-Infestin-4 prevented occlusion in the arterio-venous shunt model in mice and rabbits where thrombosis was induced via a foreign surface. In contrast to heparin, the haemostatic capacity in rabbits was unaffected by rHA-Infestin-4. Using rodent and non-rodent species, our data demonstrate that the FXIIa inhibitor rHA-Infestin-4 decreased arterial, venous and foreign surface-induced thrombosis without affecting physiological haemostasis. Hence, we provide further evidence that targeting FXIIa represents a potent yet safe antithrombotic treatment approach, especially in foreign surface-triggered thrombosis. PMID:27018425

  11. The assessment of proinflammatory cytokines in the patients with the history of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Farnaz; Ghorbani, Askar; Fatehi, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence is accumulating that venous thromboembolism is not limited to coagulation system and immune system seems to be involved in formation and resolution of thrombus. Some studies have demonstrated the role of inflammatory factors in deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of limbs; however, there has not been such study in the patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). The purpose of this study was to evaluate inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the patients with the history of CVST. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 20 patients with the first episode of CVST and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. The patients were seen only after anticoagulant treatment had been discontinued for at least 3 months. IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α levels, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured in two groups. Results: The median age of patients was 37.0 [interquartile range (IQR) = 31.75-42.75] and in control group was 42.0 (IQR = 38.0-40.6) (P = 0.18). In patients group, 14 (70%) were females and in control group, also, 14 (70%) subjects were female (P = 0.01). It is significant that the level of IL-6 was significantly higher in the control group [patients: median: 9.75, IQR: 8.98-10.65; controls: median: 11.45, IQR: 10.28-13.10; P = 0.01]; however, the ESR level was higher in the patients. On the subject of IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α, no significant difference was detected. Conclusion: We did not find higher concentrations of inflammatory ILs in the patients with the history of CVST that is contradictory with some findings in venous thrombosis of the extremities; however, the studies with larger sample size may be required. PMID:27326361

  12. [Multiple myeloma and venous thrombosis. Which thromboprophylaxis should be given?].

    PubMed

    de Moreuil, C; Ianotto, J-C; Eveillard, J-R; Carrier, M; Delluc, A

    2016-07-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cells dyscrasia that mainly affects patients older than 65 years. These patients are at a higher risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) because of cancer status, intrinsic risk factors, and exposure to prothrombotic therapies. The risk for VTE appears higher during the first months of myeloma treatment and decreases over time. Exposure to immunomodulatory drugs (IMIDs) such as thalidomide or lenalidomide in association with high doses of dexamethasone or anthracyclin-based chemotherapy is associated with a four-fold increased risk for VTE. Low-dose aspirin, preventive-dose of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or vitamin K antagonists were tested for primary prevention of VTE in myeloma patients receiving chemotherapy. The International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) suggests stratifying VTE risk to decide which patients should receive VTE prevention. Then, the IMWG suggests giving low-dose aspirin to low VTE risk patients and LMWH or vitamin K antagonists to patients at high risk for VTE. For daily practice, it seems reasonable to start preventive doses of LMWH for 3 to 6 months in ambulatory myeloma patients receiving combined therapy with IMID and in all myeloma patients admitted to hospital. PMID:26833146

  13. Associations of the β-Fibrinogen Hae III and Factor XIII Val34Leu Gene Variants with Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, Mary; Cornell, Alexandra; Folsom, Aaron R.; Wang, Lu; Tsai, Michael Y.; Polak, Joseph; Tang, Zhonghua

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The factor XIII Val34Leu (100 G→T) and β-fibrinogen Hae III (-455 G→A) gene variants have been associated with reduced risk of venous thrombosis, but not in all studies. Methods We investigated the associations of these polymorphisms with risk of venous thrombosis in a prospective, population-based study of 21,680 men and women aged 45–100 years at enrollment. Factor XIII 100 G/T and β-fibrinogen -455 G/A were analyzed on stored DNA from 511 thrombosis cases and 1028 control subjects without thrombosis during follow up. Results The β-fibrinogen A allele was present in 24.4% of cases and 32.3% of controls. Compared to GG subjects, the age, race, and sex adjusted odds ratio (OR) of venous thrombosis was 0.77 (95% CI 0.59–0.99) for GA subjects, and 0.60 (95% CI 0.31–1.16) for AA subjects. The adjusted OR of thrombosis associated with factor XIII 100 G/T was 1.01 (95% CI 0.81–1.26) for GT subjects and 0.45 (95% CI 0.44–1.19) for TT subjects, compared to GG. For both genotypes, ORs of thrombosis were similar in whites and non-whites, although there were no non-white fibrinogen AA cases. β-Fibrinogen -455GA or AA attenuated the thrombosis risk associated with obesity (from 2.14 to 1.25) and factor V Leiden (from 3.89 to 2.36). Conclusions β-fibrinogen -455 G/A, but not factor XIII 100 G/T, was associated with a lower risk of venous thrombosis in this general population sample. β-Fibrinogen -455A may attenuate the increased thrombosis risk associated with obesity or factor V Leiden. PMID:17582472

  14. Incidence of Deep Venous Thrombosis After Tibial Tubercle Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Miho J.; Munch, Jacqueline L.; Slater, Alissa J.; Nguyen, Joseph T.; Shubin Stein, Beth E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) is performed in a predominantly young and often female population due to the prevalence of patellofemoral disorders in this group. While considered a procedure that falls within the realm of sports surgeries, the procedure can carry significant morbidity, including infection, fracture, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The incidence of postoperative DVT in this population has not been described in the literature, although it has been mentioned anecdotally, and current guidelines do not address the issue of DVT prophylaxis in postoperative TTO patients. Purpose: To describe the incidence of DVT after TTO and identify any predisposing factors. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Subjects who had undergone TTO by the senior author from 2002 to 2013 were identified, and a retrospective chart review was performed. Those who presented with symptomatic DVT confirmed with ultrasonography were reported. Demographic data, as well as potential risk factors such as body mass index, family history of bleeding/clotting disorders, duration of the nonweightbearing period, total tourniquet time, use of contraceptive medication, smoking status, and use of anticoagulants, were collected from the chart and analyzed for correlation with development of DVT. Results: A total of 156 patients were included in this study. Six patients were found to have developed symptomatic DVT during the first 6 weeks after surgery. The mean age at the time of surgery in the DVT group was 34.94 ± 6.57 years, compared with 26.26 ± 10.20 years in the non-DVT group (P = .04). Due to the small number of patients with positive findings, there was no statistically significant correlation between the development of DVT and factors such as nonweightbearing duration, tourniquet time, or the use of contraceptives. Conclusion: The incidence of postoperative DVT in arthroscopic and sports procedures has been thought to be low. This case series reported

  15. Superficial Dorsal Vein Injury/Thrombosis Presenting as False Penile Fracture Requiring Dorsal Venous Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Arash; Hakky, Tariq S; Martinez, Daniel; Parker, Justin; Carrion, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Conditions mimicking penile fracture are extremely rare and have been seldom described. Aim To describe a patient with false penile fracture who presented with superficial dorsal vein injury/thrombosis managed with ligation. Methods A 33-year-old male presented with penile swelling and ecchymosis after intercourse. A penile ultrasound demonstrated a thrombosed superficial dorsal vein but also questionable fracture of the tunica albuginea. As the thrombus was expanding, he was emergently taken to the operating room for exploration and required only dorsal venous ligation. Results Postoperatively, patient's Sexual Health Inventory for Men score was 23, and he had no issues with erections or sexual intercourse. Conclusion Early exploration of patients with suspected penile fracture provides excellent results with maintenance of erectile function. Also, in the setting of dorsal vein thrombosis, ligation preserves the integrity of the penile tissues and avoids unnecessary complications from conservative management. Rafiei A, Hakky TS, Martinez D, Parker J, and Carrion R. Superficial dorsal vein injury/thrombosis presenting as false penile fracture requiring dorsal venous ligation. PMID:25548650

  16. Role of Catheter-directed Thrombolysis in Management of Iliofemoral Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, James X; Sudheendra, Deepak; Stavropoulos, S William; Nadolski, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The treatment for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is challenging, as the use of anticoagulation alone can be insufficient for restoring venous patency and thus lead to prolongation of acute symptoms and an increased risk of chronic complications, including venous insufficiency and postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). In these cases, earlier and more complete thrombus removal can ameliorate acute symptoms and reduce long-term sequelae. Endovascular therapies involving the use of pharmacologic, mechanical, and combined pharmacomechanical modalities have been developed to achieve these goals. The most frequently used of these techniques, catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), involves the infusion of a thrombolytic agent through a multiple-side-hole catheter placed within the thrombosed vein to achieve high local doses and thereby break down the clot while minimizing systemic thrombolytic agent exposure. Randomized controlled trial results have indicated decreased PTS rates and improved venous patency rates in patients treated with CDT compared with these rates in patients treated with anticoagulation. The use of newer pharmacomechanical techniques, as compared with conventional CDT, reduces procedural times and thrombolytic agent doses and is the subject of ongoing investigations. Endovascular thrombus removal techniques offer a means to improve venous valvular function and decrease the risk of debilitating long-term complications such as PTS and are a promising option for treating patients with iliofemoral DVT. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618329

  17. Infant death due to air embolism from peripheral venous infusion.

    PubMed

    Sowell, Matthew W; Lovelady, Cari L; Brogdon, B G; Wecht, Cyril H

    2007-01-01

    An otherwise healthy male infant was brought to the hospital because the mother suspected superficial infection at the operative site 5 days after an inguinal hernia repair. He was admitted to the pediatric unit overnight to be evaluated by his surgeon the next morning. When a venous infusion of maintenance fluids was started, the patient immediately went into cardio-respiratory arrest and was pronounced dead after resuscitation efforts failed. Subsequently, air collections were found in both venous and arterial circulations, including the splenoportal system. Detailed review of the clinical presentation and course, laboratory results, radiological, and pathological findings, along with a review of pertinent literature provides an explanation for the death by air embolism. Apparent inconsistent findings both radiographically and at autopsy are resolved. The mechanism of distribution of air to both systemic and splenoportal circulation is discussed. We believe this to be only the eighth case reported in English-language literature of infantile death from peripheral venous infusion. In all age groups, we find only six other cases in the English-language literature of gas found concomitantly in both the systemic and portal venous systems. PMID:17209934

  18. A Rare Occurrence of Simultaneous Venous and Arterial Thromboembolic Events – Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Thromboembolism as Initial Presentation in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kutiyal, Aditya S.; Dharmshaktu, Pramila; Kataria, Babita; Garg, Abhilasha

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute myeloid leukemia has been attributed to various factors, including hereditary, radiation, drugs, and certain occupational exposures. The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolism events is well established. Here, we present a case of a 70-year-old Indian man who had presented with arterial and venous thrombosis, and the patient was later diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In our case, the patient presented with right lower limb deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism four months prior to the diagnosis of APL. Although thromboembolic event subsequent to the diagnosis of malignancy, and especially during the chemotherapy has been widely reported, this prior presentation with simultaneous occurrence of both venous and arterial thromboembolism has rarely been reported. We take this opportunity to state the significance of a complete medical evaluation in cases of recurrent or unusual thrombotic events. PMID:26949347

  19. [Case of straight sinus venous thrombosis presenting as depression and disorientation due to bilateral thalamic lesions].

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Yoshihiko; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Senda, Miho; Tamura, Naotoshi; Araki, Nobuo; Tanahashi, Norio; Shimazu, Kunio

    2006-09-01

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of progressive inactivity and mild disturbance of consciousness which appeared two weeks ago. Brain CT revealed symmetric hypointensity of bilateral thalamus, and the lesion appeared hyperintensity on T2 weighted MRI image. He was first considered as immune-mediated cerebritis, and steroid pulse therapy was applied, but the clinical features were not improved. The diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis was established, when MR venography (MRV) showed severe stenosis in straight sinus. Consciousness was improved after the start of anticoagulation therapy, but mild dementia was remained as a sequela. MRV was useful to distinguish straight sinus thrombosis from cerebritis in this case. PMID:17260809

  20. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-ran

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Material/Methods Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. Results The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). Conclusions Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  1. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-Ran

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. RESULTS The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  2. [Cerebral venous thrombosis and subdural haematoma: complications of spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Fabricius, J; Klotz, J M; Hofmann, E; Behr, R; Neumann-Haefelin, T

    2012-10-01

    We report on the case of a spontaneous intracranial hypotension with subdural hygroma, as well as cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), both known complications of intracranial hypotension. The 45-year-old patient was subsequently treated - according to current guidelines for CVT - with anticoagulation, but developed subdural haematoma (SDH), which required neurosurgical treatment. Our case highlights the complex pathophysiological sequelae of intracranial hypotension, as well as the occasionally difficult treatment decisions. Subdural hygroma probably predisposes patients to SDH during anticoagulation. Thus, the potential benefit of anticoagulation needs to be weighed against the risk of SDH on an individual basis. PMID:23033205

  3. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with ophthalmic manifestations in 18-year-olds on oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeffrey J; Hassoun, Ameer; Elmalem, Valerie I

    2014-08-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare and potentially life-threatening cause of stroke. In the past few decades, the incidence and patient demographics have changed because of many factors, including the widespread use of oral contraceptives, improved detection of prothrombotic conditions, and advancement of imaging technology. The presentation of CVST is varied and can include ocular signs and symptoms. We present 2 cases of oral contraceptive-induced CVST in 18-year-old women, whose main presenting findings were ophthalmologic. PMID:24803635

  4. Does the Progestogen Used in Combined Hormonal Contraception Affect Venous Thrombosis Risk?

    PubMed

    Han, Leo; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2015-12-01

    Combined hormonal contraceptives (CHCs) use a combination of estrogen and progestogen to provide contraception. The most important risk of using CHCs is venous thromboembolism (VTE). It is unclear whether the type of progestogen used in a method augments that risk. Although the evidence supporting an increase in thrombosis risk is not conclusive, neither is the evidence supporting the benefit of newer progestogens in terms of tolerability or continuation. The benefits of CHCs outweigh the risks and the absolute risk of VTE remains small. A balanced discussion of potential risks and benefits of particular CHC formulations is warranted during contraception counseling. PMID:26598309

  5. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Migraine-Like Headache and the Trigeminovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Fábio A.; Sória, Marília Grando; Rizelio, Vanessa; Kowacs, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis- (CVT-) associated headache is considered a secondary headache, commonly presenting as intracranial hypertension headache in association with seizures and/or neurological signs. However, it can occasionally mimic migraine. We report a patient presenting with a migraine-like, CVT-related headache refractory to several medications but intravenous dihydroergotamine (DHE). The response to DHE, which is considered to be an antimigraine medication, in addition to the neurovascular nature of migraine, points out to a probable similarity between CVT-headache and migraine. Based on experimental studies, we discuss this similarity and hypothesize a trigeminovascular role in the genesis of CVT-associated headache. PMID:26989532

  6. Superficial femoral artery stent fracture that led to perforation, hematoma and deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lewitton, Steve; Babaev, Anvar

    2008-09-01

    We describe the case of a 70-year old male with total occlusion of the left superficial femoral artery (SFA) treated with percutaneous implantation of a self-expanding nitinol stent. The patient's course post-stent implantation was complicated by the development of stent fracture with SFA perforation and a large, compressive intramuscular hematoma with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The patient returned to the catheterization laboratory where the fracture and perforation were successfully treated by the deployment of another stent across the fracture site. The DVT was initially treated with an inferior vena cava filter until anticoagulation could safely be instituted. PMID:18762680

  7. Mesenteric venous thrombosis with bowel infarction and hyperhomocysteinemia due to homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T genotype.

    PubMed

    Hotoleanu, Cristina; Andercou, Octavian; Andercou, Aurel

    2008-01-01

    The case of a 30-year-old man with bowel infarction due to mesenteric venous thrombosis and multiple risk factors, including mild hyperhomocysteinemia due to methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism and recent abdominal surgery, is reported. His clinical manifestation consisted of persistent abdominal pain; complementary examinations showed nonspecific findings such as leukocytosis and dilated loops of the bowel. The diagnosis of mesenteric venous thrombosis with bowel infarction was made during laparotomy and confirmed by anatomopathologic examination. He underwent segmental resection associated with lifelong anticoagulant therapy and vitamin B supplementation with a favorable course. PMID:19000982

  8. Successful Treatment and Secondary Prevention of Venous Thrombosis Secondary to Behçet Disease with Rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Catherine; Hermans, Cedric

    2016-01-01

    We here present the successful initial treatment and secondary prophylaxis of superficial venous thrombosis secondary to Behçet's disease by a novel anticoagulant drug, rivaroxaban (Xarelto®). To our knowledge, this is the first case of using an oral direct inhibitor of FXa in this setting. Our findings are promising; the outcome was favourable without any adverse effect noted. We propose that the patients with Behçet's disease and venous thrombosis might benefit from the advantages of the new anticoagulant drug. PMID:27437154

  9. Hyperhomocysteinemia and other thrombophilic risk factors in 26 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Boncoraglio, G; Carriero, M R; Chiapparini, L; Ciceri, E; Ciusani, E; Erbetta, A; Parati, E A

    2004-06-01

    Despite the continuous description of new conditions pre-disposing for cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), no apparent cause is found in about 30% of cases. Hyperhomocysteinemia (hyper-Hcy) is an established risk factor for deep venous thrombosis and stroke but has not been clearly associated with increased risk of CVT. We assessed the prevalence of hyper-Hcy and other thrombophilic risk factors in a population of 26 consecutive patients with non-pyogenic CVT, by review of a prospectively maintained database. The prevalences of hyper-Hcy and prothrombin G20210A, factor V G1691A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutations in these patients were compared with those in 100 healthy controls and 100 patients with cerebroarterial disease. The prevalence of hyper-Hcy was greater in patients with CVT (10/26, 38.5%) than healthy controls (13/100; OR 4.18, 95% CI 1.58-11.16) and comparable with that in patients with cerebroarterial disease (42/100). No significant differences were found in the prevalences of prothrombin or MTHFR mutation. No factor V mutation was found. Our findings indicate that hyper-Hcy is associated with an increased risk of CVT. Additional prospective cohort studies on large series of patients are required to clarify the time relationship between hyper-Hcy and the thrombotic event. PMID:15171737

  10. Coincidental cerebral venous thrombosis and subarachnoid haemorrhage related to ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Claudia; Baumgartner, Annette; Mader, Irina; Rijntjes, Michel; Meckel, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are rare cerebrovascular pathologies. Here, we report the extremely rare coincidental presentation of both entities and discuss the likely relationship in aetiology and their optimal management. A female patient presented with headache and progressive neurological deficits. Cranial computed tomography and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed dural venous sinus thrombosis, left-sided frontal and parietal infarcts, and left middle and anterior cerebral artery stenosis. In addition, left hemispheric subarachnoid haemosiderosis was seen on MRI. Following standard anticoagulation therapy for CVT, she represented with acute SAH. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and left middle cerebral artery/anterior cerebral artery vasospasms that were responsive to intra-arterial nimodipine. The latter were already present on the previous MRI, and had most likely prevented the detection of the aneurysm initially. The aneurysm was successfully coil embolised, and the patient improved clinically. Despite this case being an extremely rare coincidence, a ruptured aneurysm should be excluded in the presence of CVT and non-sulcal SAH. A careful consideration of treatment of both pathologies is required, since anticoagulation may have a potentially negative impact on aneurysmal bleeding. PMID:27188326

  11. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the patient with multiple sclerosis associated with congenital antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Yuhei; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Shimoe, Yutaka; Niimi, Hideki; Kitajima, Isao; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-04-28

    We report the case of a 25-year-old man with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had severe headache and unconsciousness. He suffered from optic neuritis that had started at age 6. From the age of 12 years, he had suffered from multiple sclerosis (MS) cerebral lesions that relapsed three times over for 5 years. At age 25, he showed a new lesion in the cerebellar cortex, suggesting an exacerbation of the MS. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings the next day showed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. His laboratory findings showed low antithrombin activity. Genetic analysis revealed a single-base substitution (C>T) at the codon 359 (Arg to STOP) in the 5th exon portion of the antithrombin gene, heterozygote. In the literature review, 17 cases of multiple sclerosis associated with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, which occurred after the lumbar puncture and the treatment with high-dose methylpredonisolone in 11 of these cases. In our case, antithrombin deficiency, hyperhomocystinemia, infection, and lumbar puncture were suggested as the risk factors. PMID:27010094

  12. Role of platelets, neutrophils, and factor XII in spontaneous venous thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Heestermans, Marco; Salloum-Asfar, Salam; Salvatori, Daniela; Laghmani, El Houari; Luken, Brenda M.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Korporaal, Suzanne J.; Wagenaar, Gerry T. M.; Reitsma, Pieter H.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, platelets, neutrophils, and factor XII (FXII) have been implicated as important players in the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis. Their role became evident in mouse models in which surgical handling was used to provoke thrombosis. Inhibiting anticoagulation in mice by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Serpinc1 and Proc also results in a thrombotic phenotype, which is spontaneous (no additional triggers) and reproducibly results in clots in the large veins of the head and fibrin deposition in the liver. This thrombotic phenotype is fatal but can be fully rescued by thrombin inhibition. The mouse model was used in this study to investigate the role of platelets, neutrophils, and FXII. After administration of siRNAs targeting Serpinc1 and Proc, antibody-mediated depletion of platelets fully abrogated the clinical features as well as microscopic aspects in the head. This was corroborated by strongly reduced fibrin deposition in the liver. Whereas neutrophils were abundant in siRNA-triggered thrombotic lesions, antibody-mediated depletion of circulating Ly6G-positive neutrophils did not affect onset, severity, or thrombus morphology. In addition, absence of circulating neutrophils did not affect quantitative liver fibrin deposition. Remarkably, siRNA-mediated depletion of plasma FXII accelerated the onset of the clinical phenotype; mice were affected with more severe thrombotic lesions. To summarize, in this study, onset and severity of the thrombotic phenotype are dependent on the presence of platelets but not circulating neutrophils. Unexpectedly, FXII has a protective effect. This study challenges the proposed roles of neutrophils and FXII in venous thrombosis pathophysiology. PMID:26932804

  13. Role of platelets, neutrophils, and factor XII in spontaneous venous thrombosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Heestermans, Marco; Salloum-Asfar, Salam; Salvatori, Daniela; Laghmani, El Houari; Luken, Brenda M; Zeerleder, Sacha S; Spronk, Henri M H; Korporaal, Suzanne J; Wagenaar, Gerry T M; Reitsma, Pieter H; van Vlijmen, Bart J M

    2016-05-26

    Recently, platelets, neutrophils, and factor XII (FXII) have been implicated as important players in the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis. Their role became evident in mouse models in which surgical handling was used to provoke thrombosis. Inhibiting anticoagulation in mice by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Serpinc1 and Proc also results in a thrombotic phenotype, which is spontaneous (no additional triggers) and reproducibly results in clots in the large veins of the head and fibrin deposition in the liver. This thrombotic phenotype is fatal but can be fully rescued by thrombin inhibition. The mouse model was used in this study to investigate the role of platelets, neutrophils, and FXII. After administration of siRNAs targeting Serpinc1 and Proc, antibody-mediated depletion of platelets fully abrogated the clinical features as well as microscopic aspects in the head. This was corroborated by strongly reduced fibrin deposition in the liver. Whereas neutrophils were abundant in siRNA-triggered thrombotic lesions, antibody-mediated depletion of circulating Ly6G-positive neutrophils did not affect onset, severity, or thrombus morphology. In addition, absence of circulating neutrophils did not affect quantitative liver fibrin deposition. Remarkably, siRNA-mediated depletion of plasma FXII accelerated the onset of the clinical phenotype; mice were affected with more severe thrombotic lesions. To summarize, in this study, onset and severity of the thrombotic phenotype are dependent on the presence of platelets but not circulating neutrophils. Unexpectedly, FXII has a protective effect. This study challenges the proposed roles of neutrophils and FXII in venous thrombosis pathophysiology. PMID:26932804

  14. Placement of a Retrievable Guenther Tulip Filter in the Superior Vena Cava for Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nadkarni, Sanjay; Macdonald, Sumaira; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2002-12-15

    A retrievable Guenther Tulip caval filter(William Cook, Europe) was successfully placed and retrieved in the superior vena cava for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman. Bilateral subclavian and internal jugular venous thromboses thought secondary to placement of multiple central venous catheters were present. There have been reports of the use of permanent Greenfield filters and a single case report of a temporary filter in the superior vena cava. As far as we are aware this is the first reported placement and successful retrieval of a filter in these circumstances.

  15. Iliocaval Stenosis and Iliac Venous Thrombosis in Retroperitoneal Fibrosis: Percutaneous Treatment by Use of Hydrodynamic Thrombectomy and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wendt, Georg; Neuerburg, Joerg; Schuermann, Karl

    1996-11-15

    A case of bilateral iliac stenosis and caval stenosis due to retroperitoneal fibrosis was treated by caval stenting and iliac balloon angioplasty, but was complicated by subsequent iliac thrombosis. Venous thrombectomy was successfully achieved by hydrodynamic thrombectomy, and iliac patency was stabilized by bilateral stent insertion.

  16. Endovascular management of porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis developing after trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepak; Lopera, Jorge Enrique; Goei, Anthony D

    2013-09-01

    Porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis following a trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. We present a case of endovascular management of one such case treated pharmacomechanically with catheter-directed mesenteric thrombolysis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation without long-term successful outcome. PMID:23475546

  17. Pregnancy-related venous thrombosis: comparison between spontaneous and ART conception in an Italian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Villani, Michela; Dentali, Francesco; Colaizzo, Donatella; Tiscia, Giovanni Luca; Vergura, Patrizia; Petruccelli, Tiziana; Petruzzelli, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Margaglione, Maurizio; Grandone, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate in an Italian cohort the incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in pregnancies after assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Setting Thrombosis and Haemostasis Unit at I.R.C.C.S. ‘Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza’, S. Giovanni Rotondo. Participants A prospective cohort of 998 women advised to undergo ART was referred by local fertility clinics from April 2002 to July 2011. Follow-up information was obtained during the check-up and/or by phone interviews. In a cohort of women who consecutively gave birth (n=3339) after spontaneous conception in our Institution, information on the diagnoses of pregnancy-related venous thromboses was obtained by linkage to a patient administrative register. Primary and secondary outcome measures We calculated the incidence of VTE and superficial venous thrombosis in successful ART cycles and compared it with that of the general population conceiving spontaneously. Results Overall, 684 ART cycles were carried out by 234 women, who achieved a clinical pregnancy; in case of more than one successful cycle, only the first pregnancy was considered. Three vein thromboses (two VTE and one superficial vein thrombosis) were recorded. An antithrombotic prophylaxis with LMWH alone or combined with low-dose aspirin was prescribed in 23/234 (9.8%) women. In the reference cohort of 3339 women, a total of 11 vein thromboses were observed: six VTE and five SVT. The two-tailed Fisher exact test showed a trend towards statistical significance (p: 0.06, OR: 3.9, 95% CI 0.87 to 15.3). After the exclusion of superficial thromboses in both the groups, we found that the incidence of VTE in our population of women who had undergone ART was 2/234 pregnancies (8.5 ‰), whereas that in our reference population was 6/3339 (1.8 ‰) (p: 0.09). Conclusions Our data show a slightly higher incidence of vein thromboses in pregnancies after ART than in those after natural conception. PMID:26443651

  18. Peripherally Placed Totally Implantable Venous-access Port Systems of the Forearm: Clinical Experience in 763 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goltz, Jan P. Scholl, Anne; Ritter, Christian O.; Wittenberg, Guenther; Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph

    2010-12-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneously placed totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) of the forearm. Between January 2006 and October 2008, peripheral TIVAPs were implanted in 763 consecutive patients by ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. All catheters were implanted under local anesthesia and were tunneled subcutaneously. Indication, technical success, and complications were retrospectively analyzed according to Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) criteria. Presence of antibiotic prophylaxis, periprocedurally administered drugs (e.g., sedation), and laboratory results at the time of implantation were analyzed. Maintenance during the service interval was evaluated. In total, 327,499 catheter-days were analyzed. Technical success rate was 99.3%. Reasons for initial failure of implantation were either unexpected thrombosis of the subclavian vein, expanding tumor mass of the mediastinum, or failure of peripheral venous access due to fragile vessels. Mean follow-up was 430 days. There were 115 complications observed (15.1%, 0.03 per 100 catheter-days), of which 33 (4.3%) were classified as early (within 30 days from implantation) and 82 (10.7%) as late. Catheter-related venous thrombosis was found in 65 (8.5%) of 763 (0.02 per 100 catheter-days) TIVAPs. Infections were observed in 41 (5.4%) of 763 (0.01 per 100 catheter-days) devices. Other complications observed included dislocation of the catheter tip (0.8%), occlusion (0.1%), or rupture (0.1%) of the port catheter. Dislocated catheters were corrected during a second interventional procedure. In conclusion, implantation of percutaneously placed peripheral TIVAPs shows a high technical success rate and low risk of early complications when ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance are used. Late complications are observed three times as often as early complications.

  19. Cerebral venous thrombosis associated with thyrotoxicosis, the use of desmopressin and elevated factor VIII/von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Waqar; Aljerdi, Salman; Decker, Barbara; Cushman, Mary; Hamill, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon disorder associated with diverse processes. We report a patient who, while receiving desmopressin and contraceptive pills (OCP), developed straight sinus thrombosis. Clinical assessment and laboratory investigations revealed untreated hyperthyroidism and a hypercoagulable state, characterised by high levels of von Willebrand factor, factor VIII coagulant activity and IgM cardiolipin antibody. The clinical picture improved with anticoagulation, treatment of hyperthyroidism and discontinuation of OCP and desmopressin. To the best of our knowledge, the association between the use of oral desmopressin and CVT has not been described. The multiple risk factors present in our case were probably additive in increasing the risk of CVT. Although this case represents a rare occurrence, practitioners should be alerted to the possible associations of desmopressin, oral contraceptives and Graves' disease with venous thrombosis. PMID:27503942

  20. Value of serial platelet indices measurements for the prediction of pulmonary embolism in patients with deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Sevuk, Utkan; Bahadir, Mehmet Veysi; Altindag, Rojhat; Baysal, Erkan; Yaylak, Baris; Ay, Nurettin; Ayaz, Firat; Demirtas, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, no validated biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity have been established for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). There is a need to develop simple and reliable noninvasive tests that can accurately identify patients with PE, even in small hospitals or clinics. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) for predicting occurrence of PE in patients with DVT. Methods Records of acute DVT patients were reviewed retrospectively. Group 1 consisted of 50 patients with acute DVT and group 2 consisted of 50 patients with acute DVT who developed PE during follow-up. The control group consisted of patients with uncomplicated primary varicose veins of the lower limbs. Venous peripheral blood samples for measurement of MPV, PDW, and platelet count were drawn on admission, before the treatment, and at the time of PE diagnosis. Results MPV and PDW levels at the time of PE diagnosis were higher in group 2 than group 1 (P<0.001 and P=0.026, respectively). Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed that a 5.2% increase in admission PDW during follow-up provided 70% sensitivity and 82% specificity (area under the curve, 0.80), and a 6.6% increase in admission MPV during follow-up provided 74% sensitivity and 83% specificity (area under the curve, 0.84) for prediction of PE occurrence in patients with DVT. PDW and MPV levels at the time of PE diagnosis were found to be independent risk factors for the occurrence of PE in patients with DVT. Conclusion Serial measurements of MPV and PDW, and percent change in MPV and PDW appears to be a useful marker for predicting occurrence of acute PE in patients with a first episode of acute proximal DVT. PMID:26316769

  1. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results. PMID:27062173

  2. The efficacy of intermittent pneumatic compression in the prevention of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sadaghianloo, Nirvana; Dardik, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) has been used to prevent lower extremity deep venous thrombosis for more than 30 years and is a popular choice for prophylaxis among both physicians and patients because of its efficacy and reduced risk of bleeding compared with pharmacologic prophylaxis. However, the efficacy of IPC may depend on the clinical situation as well as on several variables associated with the devices. To determine the efficacy of IPC, recent guidelines and literature were reviewed. IPC is efficacious as a sole prophylactic agent in low- or moderate-risk surgical patients and in patients with high risk of bleeding with pharmacologic prophylaxis. In high-risk surgical and medical patients, IPC is recommended as a synergistic tool in combination with pharmacologic agents, if pharmacologic agents are not contraindicated. No specific compression modality proved its superiority, although newer portable battery-powered devices seem to allow better patient compliance and satisfaction. PMID:26993875

  3. Portomesenteric venous thrombosis after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: A case report and a call for prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parveen; John, Suviraj J; Kalhan, Sudhir; Bindal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative portomesenteric venous thrombosis (PMVT) is being increasingly reported after bariatric surgery. It is variable and often a nonspecific presentation along with its potential for life-threatening and life-altering outcomes makes it imperative that it is prevented, detected early and treated optimally. We report the case of a 50-year-old morbidly obese man undergoing a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy who developed symptomatic PMVT two weeks postsurgery, which was successfully treated by anticoagulant therapy. We provide postulates to the etiopathological mechanism for this thrombotic entity. The growing recognition that obesity and bariatric surgery create a procoagulant state regionally and systemically provides impetus for designing the ideal protocol for PMVT prophylaxis, which could be more common than currently believed. We support the early screening for PMVT in the postbariatric surgical patient with unexplainable or intractable abdominal symptoms. The role of routine surveillance and the ideal duration of post-PMVT anticoagulation is yet to be elucidated. PMID:26622121

  4. The Role of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Deep Venous Thrombosis: Advanced Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Gerard J.

    2011-06-15

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is often managed with a health care pathway that funnels patients to anticoagulation therapy alone. This 'usual treatment' is designed to stop propagation and embolisation of venous thrombus but not remove it. Surgical thrombectomy was once the only option in severe cases in which limbs were threatened, but thrombus removal is no longer restricted to emergency cases. Interventional radiologists are now using advanced endovascular techniques to achieve thrombus removal in a minimally invasive manner in a very short treatment time, thereby quickly restoring patency, relieving acute symptoms, and potentially limiting the subsequent development of postthrombotic syndrome when followed with anticoagulation and compression regimens. This article provides an overview of the interventions available for treating DVT. One of the newer 'single-session' techniques is isolated pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, which is described here in detail with supporting cases.

  5. Controversies in venous thromboembolism: the unique case of isolated distal deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Porfidia, Angelo; Carnicelli, Annamaria; Bonadia, Nicola; Pola, Roberto; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents the third leading cause of cardiovascular mortality, and it is the main cause of preventable mortality in hospitalized patients. Among VTE, there is the unique case of isolated distal deep vein thrombosis (IDDVT), which still lacks an agreement in terms of optimal therapeutic strategy. Although most IDDVTs are self-limiting and associated with a very low risk of embolic complications, still not all IDDVTs can be safely identified as stable. Lack of strong scientific evidence, fear of thromboembolic complications, and risk of bleeding upon initiation of anticoagulant treatment result in very heterogeneous therapeutic strategies among physicians. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the literature, highlight the many controversial issues regarding IDDVTs, and call for a consensus of experts aimed to shed new light on the gray areas of IDDVT management and therapy. PMID:27126683

  6. Early pregnancy cerebral venous thrombosis and status epilepticus treated with levetiracetam and lacosamide throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ylikotila, Pauli; Ketola, Raimo A; Timonen, Susanna; Malm, Heli; Ruuskanen, Jori O

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke, accounting to less than 1% of all strokes. We describe a pregnant woman with a massive CVT in early pregnancy, complicated by status epilepticus. The mother was treated with levetiracetam, lacosamide, and enoxaparin throughout pregnancy. A male infant was born on pregnancy week 36, weighing 2.2kg. Both levetiracetam and and lacosamide were present in cord blood in levels similar to those in maternal blood. The infant was partially breast-fed and experienced poor feeding and sleepiness, starting to resolve after two first weeks. Milk samples were drawn 5 days after the delivery and a blood sample from the infant 3 days later. Lacosamide level in milk was low, resulting in an estimated relative infant dose of 1.8% of the maternal weight-adjusted daily dose in a fully breast-fed infant. This is the first case describing lacosamide use during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:26187779

  7. Splenectomy Causes 10-Fold Increased Risk of Portal Venous System Thrombosis in Liver Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xingshun; Han, Guohong; Ye, Chun; Zhang, Yongguo; Dai, Junna; Peng, Ying; Deng, Han; Li, Jing; Hou, Feifei; Ning, Zheng; Zhao, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xintong; Wang, Ran; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Portal venous system thrombosis (PVST) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis. We conducted a retrospective study to comprehensively analyze the prevalence and risk factors of PVST in liver cirrhosis. Material/Methods All cirrhotic patients without malignancy admitted between June 2012 and December 2013 were eligible if they underwent contrast-enhanced CT or MRI scans. Independent predictors of PVST in liver cirrhosis were calculated in multivariate analyses. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the severity of PVST (any PVST, main portal vein [MPV] thrombosis >50%, and clinically significant PVST) and splenectomy. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were reported. Results Overall, 113 cirrhotic patients were enrolled. The prevalence of PVST was 16.8% (19/113). Splenectomy (any PVST: OR=11.494, 95%CI=2.152–61.395; MPV thrombosis >50%: OR=29.987, 95%CI=3.247–276.949; clinically significant PVST: OR=40.415, 95%CI=3.895–419.295) and higher hemoglobin (any PVST: OR=0.974, 95%CI=0.953–0.996; MPV thrombosis >50%: OR=0.936, 95%CI=0.895–0.980; clinically significant PVST: OR=0.935, 95%CI=0.891–0.982) were the independent predictors of PVST. The prevalence of PVST was 13.3% (14/105) after excluding splenectomy. Higher hemoglobin was the only independent predictor of MPV thrombosis >50% (OR=0.952, 95%CI=0.909–0.997). No independent predictors of any PVST or clinically significant PVST were identified in multivariate analyses. Additionally, PVST patients who underwent splenectomy had a significantly higher proportion of clinically significant PVST but lower MELD score than those who did not undergo splenectomy. In all analyses, the in-hospital mortality was not significantly different between cirrhotic patient with and without PVST. Conclusions Splenectomy may increase by at least 10-fold the risk of PVST in liver cirrhosis independent of severity of liver dysfunction. PMID:27432511

  8. Emergency Department Management of Suspected Calf-Vein Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Diagnostic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Levi; Lawrence, Matthew; Speicher, Matthew; Frumkin, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Unilateral leg swelling with suspicion of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common emergency department (ED) presentation. Proximal DVT (thrombus in the popliteal or femoral veins) can usually be diagnosed and treated at the initial ED encounter. When proximal DVT has been ruled out, isolated calf-vein deep venous thrombosis (IC-DVT) often remains a consideration. The current standard for the diagnosis of IC-DVT is whole-leg vascular duplex ultrasonography (WLUS), a test that is unavailable in many hospitals outside normal business hours. When WLUS is not available from the ED, recommendations for managing suspected IC-DVT vary. The objectives of the study is to use current evidence and recommendations to (1) propose a diagnostic algorithm for IC-DVT when definitive testing (WLUS) is unavailable; and (2) summarize the controversy surrounding IC-DVT treatment. Discussion The Figure combines D-dimer testing with serial CUS or a single deferred FLUS for the diagnosis of IC-DVT. Such an algorithm has the potential to safely direct the management of suspected IC-DVT when definitive testing is unavailable. Whether or not to treat diagnosed IC-DVT remains widely debated and awaiting further evidence. Conclusion When IC-DVT is not ruled out in the ED, the suggested algorithm, although not prospectively validated by a controlled study, offers an approach to diagnosis that is consistent with current data and recommendations. When IC-DVT is diagnosed, current references suggest that a decision between anticoagulation and continued follow-up outpatient testing can be based on shared decision-making. The risks of proximal progression and life-threatening embolization should be balanced against the generally more benign natural history of such thrombi, and an individual patient’s risk factors for both thrombus propagation and complications of anticoagulation. PMID:27429688

  9. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Iran: Cumulative Data, Shortcomings and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Borhani Haghighi, Afshin; Ashjazadeh, Nahid; Safari, Anahid; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a frequent cause of cerebrovascular disease in Iran. Objectives In this study, we report cumulative data of published Iranian studies in a systematic manner with critically appraisal and presenting future directions. Materials and Methods The authors systematically searched the ISI web of knowledge, Pubmed, Scopus, EBESCO and iranmedex for keywords attributed to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The methodological and demographic characteristics, etiology, site of involvement and clinical manifestations of the patients with CVST were investigated. Results Seven eligible series with 465 patients were found. Age of the patients were between 29.5-43.8 in these series. The ratio of Female to male was 2.79. The Mortality rate was 11.4%. Oral contraceptive pills the single most common risk factor in the all series(40-71% of female patients). Headache(80-97%), sensori/motor deficits(39-64%) and seizure(20-62%) were the most common clinical presentations. Hemorrhagic transformation was seen in 11-58% of the patients. All included studies have substantial shortcomings. Majority of the studies were retrospective and only one study was population based. Despite the ethnic heterogeneity in Iran, none of these studies reported ethnic information. Detailed methodology was missing in all studies. The extent of investigation for hematologicalor neoplastic disorders was not clear methods. Only one study reported a subgroup with multifactorialetiology. Neither Barthel index nor modified Rankin scale were reported in any studies. The mortality was reported only in the three studies. The analysis of prognostic factors was not done in any study. Conclusions To overcome theses hortcomings, more well-structured epidemiologic studies should be conducted in Iran as a CVST-raising country. PMID:23483618

  10. Evaluation of cerebral venous thrombosis secondary to oral contraceptive use in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Hasan H; Varol, Sefer; Akıl, Eşref; Acar, Abdullah; Demir, Caner F

    2015-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the clinical patterns, additional risk factors, treatment and outcome of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) related to adolescent oral contraceptive pill (OCP) usage. We evaluated 22 patients with CVT related to OCPs admitted to Firat and Dicle University Hospitals from January 2008 to January 2013. We assessed the clinical features, risk factors, imaging results and prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance were the preferred procedures for the diagnosis of CVT. MRI revealed parenchymal lesions in 11 (50 %) patients, and the remaining patients had normal MRIs. The sinuses most frequently affected by thrombosis were the superior sagittal sinus and the transverse sinus. The additional risk factors identified for CVT were antiphospholipid syndrome, protein C deficiency, protein C and S deficiency, factor V Leiden associated with heterozygous antithrombin III deficiency, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and prothrombin gene mutations. CVT may be overlooked in adolescents because it is more common among middle-aged and elderly adults. CVT should be suspected in the presence of neurological symptoms in adolescents, especially in those using OCPs. PMID:25092566

  11. Preventive effect of a novel diosgenin derivative on arterial and venous thrombosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huajie; Wei, Zeliang; Xin, Guang; Ji, Chengjie; Wen, Li; Xia, Qing; Niu, Hai; Huang, Wen

    2016-07-15

    Current therapy for blood vessel thrombosis has the risk of leading to gastrointestinal bleeding and thrombocytopenia. We previously reported that a new derivative of diosgenin, compound 5, had significant anti-inflammatory activity superior to that of aspirin, prolonged bleeding time, and inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo efficacy and safety of compound 5 using the ferric chloride (FeCl3)-induced arterial and venous thrombosis models in rats as well as its toxicity in mice. Compared with the control rats, those treated with compound 5 showed significantly less adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation and a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time mediated by the specific regulation of factor VIII. Furthermore, compound 5 significantly reduced the average length and weight of thrombi in both arteries and veins. These findings were similar to those of aspirin at the same dose. The safety evaluation revealed a much lower risk of bleeding and lesser gastric mucosal damage with compound 5 than with the same dose of aspirin. An oral dose of up to 575.5mg/kg showed no toxicity in mice. In conclusion, consistent with our in vitro findings, compound 5 exhibited an in vivo antithrombotic activity that was comparable to aspirin mainly by reducing platelet aggregation and regulating factor VIII, but with fewer side effects. PMID:27217000

  12. Management of Venous Thromboembolisms: Part I. The Consensus for Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang-Ling; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Lee, Cheng-Han; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lin, Pao-Yen; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chiu, Kuan-Ming; Huang, Chien-Lung; Lee, Chung-Yi; Lin, Yen-Hung; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Yeh, Hung-I; Chiang, Chern-En; Lin, Shing-Jong; Yeh, San-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a potentially catastrophic condition because thrombosis, left untreated, can result in detrimental pulmonary embolism. Yet in the absence of thrombosis, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding. In the existing literature, knowledge about the epidemiology of DVT is primarily based on investigations among Caucasian populations. There has been little information available about the epidemiology of DVT in Taiwan, and it is generally believed that DVT is less common in Asian patients than in Caucasian patients. However, DVT is a multifactorial disease that represents the interaction between genetic and environmental factors, and the majority of patients with incident DVT have either inherited thrombophilia or acquired risk factors. Furthermore, DVT is often overlooked. Although symptomatic DVT commonly presents with lower extremity pain, swelling and tenderness, diagnosing DVT is a clinical challenge for physicians. Such a diagnosis of DVT requires a timely systematic assessment, including the use of the Wells score and a D-dimer test to exclude low-risk patients, and imaging modalities to confirm DVT. Compression ultrasound with high sensitivity and specificity is the front-line imaging modality in the diagnostic process for patients with suspected DVT in addition to conventional invasive contrast venography. Most patients require anticoagulation therapy, which typically consists of parenteral heparin bridged to a vitamin K antagonist, with variable duration. The development of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants has revolutionized the landscape of venous thromboembolism treatment, with 4 agents available,including rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban, and edoxaban. Presently, all 4 drugs have finished their large phase III clinical trial programs and come to the clinical uses in North America and Europe. It is encouraging to note that the published data to date regarding Asian patients indicates that such new therapies are safe and

  13. The Angiotensin Infusion Test and Peripheral Venous Renin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Silah, J. G.; Strong, C. G.; Nowaczynski, W.; Genest, J.

    1967-01-01

    Forty hypertensive patients were studied to examine the assumption that the angiotensin pressor dose reflects endogenous renin activity. Peripheral renin activity was assayed by the method of Boucher et al.4 Sensitivity to the infusion of synthetic angiotensin II was determined as suggested by Kaplan and Silah.1 Sixteen patients with essential hypertension with normal renal angiography required 3.8 ng. angiotensin/kg./min. to raise the diastolic pressure 20 mm. Hg. All but one were sensitive to angiotensin infusion of less than 5 ng./kg./min. Renin activity was normal in all except in one sensitive subject. Angiotensin infusion response and mean renin activity in 13 patients with essential hypertension with abnormal renal angiography were similar to that of the first group. The pressor dose in 11 renovascular hypertensives was 9.8 ng./kg./min. All but three had elevated plasma renin activity. Our results suggest that: (1) the angiotensin infusion test is suitable for differentiating patients with true renovascular hypertension from those with essential hypertension with or without associated renal artery disease; (2) the angiotensin pressor dose correlates with the level of peripheral venous renin activity (p < 0.01). PMID:4290836

  14. The angiotensin infusion test and peripheral venous renin activity.

    PubMed

    Silah, J G; Strong, C G; Nowaczynski, W; Genest, J

    1967-05-27

    Forty hypertensive patients were studied to examine the assumption that the angiotensin pressor dose reflects endogenous renin activity. Peripheral renin activity was assayed by the method of Boucher et al.(4) Sensitivity to the infusion of synthetic angiotensin II was determined as suggested by Kaplan and Silah.(1)Sixteen patients with essential hypertension with normal renal angiography required 3.8 ng. angiotensin/kg./min. to raise the diastolic pressure 20 mm. Hg. All but one were sensitive to angiotensin infusion of less than 5 ng./kg./min. Renin activity was normal in all except in one sensitive subject. Angiotensin infusion response and mean renin activity in 13 patients with essential hypertension with abnormal renal angiography were similar to that of the first group. The pressor dose in 11 renovascular hypertensives was 9.8 ng./kg./min. All but three had elevated plasma renin activity.OUR RESULTS SUGGEST THAT: (1) the angiotensin infusion test is suitable for differentiating patients with true renovascular hypertension from those with essential hypertension with or without associated renal artery disease; (2) the angiotensin pressor dose correlates with the level of peripheral venous renin activity (p < 0.01). PMID:4290836

  15. CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER-RELATED THROMBOSIS AND THROMBOPROPHYLAXIS IN CHILDREN: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, E.; Sharathkumar, A.; Glover, J.; Faustino, E. V. S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVES In preparation for a pediatric randomized controlled trial on thromboprophylaxis, we determined the frequency of catheter-related thrombosis in children. We also systematically reviewed the pediatric trials on thromboprophylaxis to evaluate its efficacy and to identify possible pitfalls in the conduct of these trials. PATIENTS/METHODS We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials for articles published until December 2013. We included cohort studies and trials on patients 0–18 years old with central venous catheter actively surveilled for thrombosis with radiologic imaging. We estimated the pooled frequency of thrombosis and the pooled risk ratio (RR) with thromboprophylaxis using random effects model. RESULTS Of 2,651 articles identified, we analyzed 37 articles with 3,128 patients. The pooled frequency of thrombosis was 0.20 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.16–0.24). Of 10 trials, we did not find evidence that heparin-bonded catheter (RR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.01–7.68), unfractionated heparin (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.57–1.51), low molecular weight heparin (RR: 1.13; 95% CI: 0.51–2.50), warfarin (RR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.34–2.17), antithrombin concentrate (RR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.38–1.55) and nitroglycerin (RR: 1.53; 95% CI: 0.57–4.10) reduced the risk for thrombosis. Most of the trials were either not powered for thrombosis or powered to detect large, likely unachievable, reductions in thrombosis. Missing data on thrombosis also limited these trials. CONCLUSIONS Catheter-related thrombosis is common in children. An adequately powered multicenter trial that can detect a modest, clinically significant, reduction in thrombosis is critically needed. Missing outcome data should be minimized in this trial. PMID:24801495

  16. Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolus after ovarian hyperstimulation.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Anne Catherine Miller; McLean, Anna Warszawa; Ahari, Jalil

    2016-01-01

    A healthy female presented with upper extremity (UE) swelling of several days duration. Admission laboratories were normal except for an elevated D-dimer. An UE ultrasound with Doppler revealed a thrombus in the right subclavian vein. A subsequent chest CT angiogram further characterised the subclavian vein thrombus and also identified a pulmonary embolus. A thorough history and laboratory evaluation showed that her only risk factors were long-time contraceptive pills and a recent cycle of ovarian hyperstimulation (OH) 7 weeks prior to presentation. Anticoagulation treatment was started and the patient's remaining outpatient work-up was negative for all other hereditary causes. A complete anatomic work-up showed bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). A review of the literature on the occurrence of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis suggests that these usually occur in the presence of a predisposing factor, including catheters, indwelling devices and active malignancies. OH has been shown to precipitate venous thromboembolism events; however, the diagnosis of bilateral TOS as a predisposing risk factor has not been described in a patient who had recently undergone recent OH and in one who was not actively pregnant. PMID:27530880

  17. Prolonged clot lysis time increases the risk of a first but not recurrent venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Karasu, Alev; Baglin, Trevor P; Luddington, Roger; Baglin, Caroline A; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid

    2016-03-01

    The role of the fibrinolytic system in the development of venous thrombosis (VT) is unclear. We studied the risk of first and recurrent VT associated with reduced fibrinolysis, as measured by clot lysis time (CLT). We also studied the relationship between CLT and thrombin generation to determine if any relationship between CLT and VT was affected by thrombin generation. Analyses were performed in the Thrombophilia Hypercoagulability Environmental risk for Venous Thromboembolism Study, a two-centre population-based case-control study, including 579 patients and 338 controls, with patients followed from the event to determine incidence of recurrent VT. Hypofibrinolysis was associated with a 1·8-fold increased risk of a first VT [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·2-2·7]. Adjustment for sex, age, study location and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) did not change the result. The risk of VT was 2·9-fold increased when the 90th percentiles of prolonged CLT and high ETP were combined, with the highest risk for unprovoked first events (Odds Ratio = 4·2, 95% CI 1·3-13·5). In the follow-up study the Hazard Ratio for a recurrent VT associated with hypofibrinolysis was 1·5 (95% CI 0·9-2·6). A weak dose response effect was observed in relation to prolongation of CLT and recurrent VT. Although hypofibrinolysis constitutes a risk factor for a first VT, an association with recurrence is, at best, weak. PMID:26773756

  18. Prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following stroke: a systematic review of published articles.

    PubMed

    André, C; de Freitas, G R; Fukujima, M M

    2007-01-01

    We performed a systematic review of the literature on venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis following cerebral infarct (CI) and haemorrhagic stroke. MEDLINE, Cochrane, LILACS and SciELO databases were scanned, and the Abstracts from Brazilian, American and European Neurology and Stroke Congresses were scrutinized for clinical trials. Moreover, the reference lists of articles and reviews were searched. A pooled analysis of two large studies with aspirin was made. Both unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparins/heparinoids (LMWH) are partially effective for VTE prophylaxis after CI, and should be routinely used in patients with motor deficit and reduced mobility and no contraindications. Reduction of deep venous thrombosis is better established than the effect over pulmonary embolism or mortality. Some evidence points to a greater efficacy of LMWH. The available evidence does not support the use of mechanical methods or dextran. Aspirin may have a mild protective effect. Low-dose Warfarin might be useful in the rehabilitation setting. Strict recommendations cannot be made in patients with haemorrhagic stroke but intermittent pneumatic compression merits further study. There are important limitations of current VTE preventive strategies following stroke. Additional studies on the combination of methods after CI and of low doses of anticoagulants following cerebral haemorrhage are urgently needed. PMID:17222109

  19. Roles of the Oxidative Stress and ADMA in the Development of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekim, Meral; Sekeroglu, M. Ramazan; Balahoroglu, Ragıp; Ozkol, Halil; Ekim, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism has multifactorial origin and occurs in the context of complex interactions between environmental and genetic predisposing factors. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the physiopathology of venous thrombosis. Current study examined the role of oxidative stress and asymmetric dimethylarginine in the development of DVT with the parameters such as serum malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase, ADMA, homocysteine, folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 levels. Serum MDA levels were found significantly (P < 0.005) high in patients with DVT compared with control group. Additionally, serum B6 levels were found significantly (P < 0.009) low in patients with DVT compared with healthy volunteers. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of the other parameters (P > 0.05). This study showed that patients with DVT have increased oxidative stress compared with the healthy volunteers whereas there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of serum ADMA levels. Thus serum ADMA levels seemed to be not related with development of DVT. PMID:24818025

  20. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  1. Embolization during treatment of deep venous thrombosis: incidence, importance, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Santiago; Comerota, Anthony J

    2011-06-01

    The standard of care for the treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is anticoagulation, which often prevents the formation of new thrombus and reduces the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) but fails to eliminate the clot burden. Patients who have thrombus remaining in their deep venous system despite therapeutic anticoagulation are at high risk for developing symptoms of the postthrombotic syndrome, a debilitating condition that adversely affects their quality of life. Strategies of thrombus removal for acute DVT, such as operative thrombectomy, catheter-directed thrombolysis, and pharmacomechanical techniques, are designed to avoid postthrombotic morbidity by restoring patency to the deep veins, but there is concern that these techniques may result in fragmentation of clot and pulmonary embolization. Careful patient evaluation before treatment is essential for preventing complications and often reveals asymptomatic pulmonary emboli in as many as 50% of patients. Nonobstructive or free-floating thrombus in the vena cava is a risk factor for procedure-related embolization and is frequently an indication for the use of vena caval filtration. A review of the literature on acute DVT treated by anticoagulation alone or with strategies of thrombus removal reveals that pulmonary embolization is an infrequent occurrence. Treatment with anticoagulation alone, however, increases the risk of patients developing symptoms of the postthrombotic syndrome, whereas thrombus removal strategies reduce postthrombotic morbidity without increasing the risk of embolization. PMID:21550507

  2. Active Ankle Movements Prevent Formation of Lower-Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis After Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Guan, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Rui; Li, Bin; Ning, Bo; Su, Wei; Sun, Tao; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to assess the preventive value of active ankle movements in the formation of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), attempting to develop a new method for rehabilitation nursing after orthopedic surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS We randomly assigned 193 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the lower limbs into a case group (n=96) and a control group (n=97). The control group received routine nursing while the case group performed active ankle movements in addition to receiving routine nursing. Maximum venous outflow (MVO), maximum venous capacity (MVC), and blood rheology were measured and the incidence of DVT was recorded. RESULTS On the 11th and 14th days of the experiment, the case group had significantly higher MVO and MVC than the control group (all P<0.05). The whole-blood viscosity at high shear rate and the plasma viscosity were significantly lower in the case group than in the control group on the 14th day (both P<0.05). During the experiment, a significantly higher overall DVT incidence was recorded in the control group (8 with asymptomatic DVT) compared with the case group (1 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.034). During follow-up, the case group presented a significantly lower DVT incidence (1 with symptomatic DVT and 4 with asymptomatic DVT) than in the control group (5 with symptomatic DVT and 10 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.031). CONCLUSIONS Through increasing MVO and MVC and reducing blood rheology, active ankle movements may prevent the formation of lower-extremity DVT after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27600467

  3. An instrument for measuring health-related quality of life in patients with Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT): development and validation of Deep Venous Thrombosis Quality of Life (DVTQOL) questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hedner, Ewa; Carlsson, Jonas; Kulich, Károly R; Stigendal, Lennart; Ingelgård, Anders; Wiklund, Ingela

    2004-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated patient-reported outcomes in connection with a primary event of deep venous thrombosis, partly due to a lack of disease-specific measures. The aim here was to develop a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQL) measure, the deep venous thrombosis quality of life questionnaire (DVTQOL), for patients with recent exposition and treatment of proximal deep venous thrombosis. Methods A total of 121 consecutive outpatients (50 % males; mean age 61.2 ± 14 years) treated with warfarin (Waran®) for symptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis were included in the study. Patients completed the SF-36, EQ-5D and the pilot version of the DVTQOL. Results Items having: high ceiling and floor effect, items with lower factor loadings than 0.50 and items loading in several factors were removed from the pilot version of DVTQOL. In addition, overlapping and redundant items identified by the Rasch analysis were excluded. The final DVTQOL questionnaire consists of 29 items composing six dimensions depicting problems with: emotional distress; symptoms (e.g. pain, swollen ankles, cramp, bruising); limitation in physical activity; hassle with coagulation monitoring; sleep disturbance; and dietary problems. The internal consistency reliability was high (alpha value ranged from 0.79 to 0.93). The relevant domains of the SF-36 and EQ-5D significantly correlated with DVTQOL, thereby confirming its construct validity. Conclusions The DVTQOL is a short and user-friendly instrument with good reliability and validity. Its test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change in clinical trials, however, must be explored. PMID:15214965

  4. Peripherally inserted central venous catheter safety in burn care: a single-center retrospective cohort review.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ryan E; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Bolourani, Siavash; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    The use of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line for central venous access in thermally injured patients has increased in recent years despite a lack of evidence regarding safety in this patient population. A recent survey of invasive catheter practices among 44 burn centers in the United States found that 37% of burn units use PICC lines as part of their treatment protocol. The goal of this study was to compare PICC-associated complication rates with the existing literature in both the critical care and burn settings. The methodology involved is a single institution retrospective cohort review of patients who received a PICC line during admission to a regional burn unit between 2008 and 2013. Fifty-three patients were identified with a total of seventy-three PICC lines. The primary outcome measurement for this study was indication for PICC line discontinuation. The most common reason for PICC line discontinuation was that the line was no longer indicated (45.2%). Four cases of symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (5.5%) and three cases of central line-associated bloodstream infection (4.3%, 2.72 infections per 1000 line days) were identified. PICC lines were in situ an average of 15 days (range 1 to 49 days). We suggest that PICC line-associated complication rates are similar to those published in the critical care literature. Though these rates are higher than those published in the burn literature, they are similar to central venous catheter-associated complication rates. While PICC lines can be a useful resource in the treatment of the thermally injured patient, they are associated with significant and potentially fatal risks. PMID:25501778

  5. A retrospective analysis of trabectedin infusion by peripherally inserted central venous catheters: a multicentric Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Martella, Francesca; Salutari, Vanda; Marchetti, Claudia; Pisano, Carmela; Di Napoli, Marilena; Pietta, Francesca; Centineo, Dina; Caringella, Anna M; Musella, Angela; Fioretto, Luisa

    2015-10-01

    The European Medicines Agency strongly recommends administration of trabectedin through a central venous catheter (CVC) to minimize the risk of extravasation. However, CVCs place patients at risk of catheter-related complications and have a significant budgetary impact for oncology departments. The most frequently used CVCs are subcutaneously implanted PORT-chamber catheters (PORTs); peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are relatively new. We reviewed data of trabectedin-treated patients to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of the use of PORTs and PICCs in six Italian centres. Data on 102 trabectedin-treated patients (20 with sarcoma, 80 with ovarian cancer and two with cervical cancer) were evaluated. Forty-five patients received trabectedin by a PICC, inserted by trained nurses using an ultrasound-guided technique at the bedside, whereas 57 patients received trabectedin infusion by a PORT, requiring a day surgery procedure in the hospital by a surgeon. Device dislocation and infections were reported in four patients, equally distributed between PORT or PICC users. Thrombosis occurred in a single patient with a PORT. Complications requiring devices removal were not reported during any of the 509 cycles of therapy (median 5; range 1-20). PICC misplacement or early malfunctions were not reported during trabectedin infusion. The cost-efficiency ratio favours PORT over PICC only when the device is used for more than 1 year. Our data suggest that trabectedin infusion by PICC is safe and well accepted, with a preferable cost-efficiency ratio compared with PORT in patients requiring short-term use of the device (≤1 year). PMID:26241804

  6. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with subdural haematoma as first presentation for systemic lupus erythematosus with negative antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Alboudi, Ayman; Sarathchandran, Pournamy; Alrukn, Suhail; Al Madani, Abubaker

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 30-year-old woman, without any previous comorbidities presenting with acute onset headache, altered sensorium and unsteadiness of gait. Neurological evaluation revealed a drowsy patient with papilloedema, bilateral lateral rectus palsy, generalised hyper-reflexia and up going plantar responses. Urgent imaging performed showed extensive cortical venous sinus thrombosis. Workup for secondary causes of cortical venous sinus thrombosis revealed very high titres of antinuclear antibody and anti-dsDNA, but negative antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA). In hospital she started developing other complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Urine evaluation revealed proteinuria and granular casts suggestive of glomerulonephritis. Cardiac evaluation revealed moderate pericardial effusion. We have discussed neurolupus as initial presentation of SLE and the rare occurrence of major neurovascular complications without secondary APLA syndrome. PMID:25080548

  7. Diagnostic Value of D-Dimer’s Serum Level in Iranian Patients with Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashami, Leila; Rakhshan, Vahid; Karimian, Hoda; Moghaddasi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a long-term debilitating vascular brain disease with high morbidity and mortality. It may be associated with rise in D-dimer level. The aim of this study was to examine this potential association and identify the critical D-dimer cut-off level corresponding to increase the risk of CVT. This case-control study was conducted on two groups of patients with and without CVT attending the Rasool Akram Hospital (Iran) during 2014 and 2015. D-dimer levels were measured by the rapid sensitive D-dimer assay. Data were analyzed by Spearman’s correlation coefficient test, independent-samples t-test, backward-selection multiple linear regression and multiple binary logistic regression analyses. Sensitivity-specificity tests were used to detect D-dimer cut-off for CVT. Differences between the D-dimer levels of the case and control groups were significant (P<0.001). It showed that each level of increase in the number of symptoms could increase the risk of thrombosis occurrence for about 3.5 times. All symptom types except for headache were associated with D-dimer level, while headache has negative association with D-dimer level. D-dimer cut-off point for CVT diagnosis was estimated at 350 ng/mg. We concluded that D-dimer serum level significantly rises in CVT patients. A rounded cut-off point of 350 ng/mg can be used as a diagnostic criterion for CVT prediction. PMID:27441064

  8. Effects of Analgesic Use on Inflammation and Hematology in a Murine Model of Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hish, Gerald A; Diaz, Jose A; Hawley, Angela E; Myers, Daniel D; Lester, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Surgical animal models are crucial in studies investigating the pathogenesis of this disease and evaluating VT therapies. Because inflammation is critical to both the development and resolution of VT, analgesic medications have the potential to adversely affect multiple parameters of interest in VT research. The objective of this study was to determine how several common analgesics affect key variables in a murine ligation model of deep vein thrombosis. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to receive either local (bupivacaine) or systemic parenteral analgesia (buprenorphine, tramadol, or carprofen) or 0.9% NaCl (control). All mice underwent laparotomy and ligation of the inferior vena cava, and treatment was continued until euthanasia at 6 or 48 h after surgery. Analysis of harvested tissues and blood included: hematology, thrombus weight, serum and vein-wall cytokines (IL1β, IL6, IL10, TNFα), soluble P-selectin, and vein-wall leukocyte infiltration. Compared with 0.9% NaCl, all of the analgesics affected multiple parameters important to VT research. Carprofen and tramadol affected the most parameters and should not be used in murine models of VT. Although they affected fewer parameters, a single dose of bupivacaine increased thrombus weight at 6 h, and buprenorphine was associated with reduced vein wall macrophages at 48 h. Although we cannot recommend the use of any of the evaluated analgesic dosages in this mouse model of VT, buprenorphine merits additional investigation to ensure the highest level of laboratory animal care and welfare. PMID:25255071

  9. [How to provide practical treatment for ambulatory patients with deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Achkar, A; Samama, M M

    1999-02-01

    Much interest has been focused on low molecular weight heparins (LMWH), light weight fragments of standard heparin, for the management of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) without pulmonary embolism (PE). LMWHs offer several advantages: predictable anticoagulant activity, better bioavailability, longer half-life, better patient and caretaker comfort, safety and efficacy at least comparable to continuous intravenous heparin. Ambulatory treatment is quite attractive and a large number of patients with DVT are now being managed as outpatients. There are however certain precautions which must be taken to avoid unsatisfactory anticoagulation and subsequent consequences which have nevertheless been shown to be exceptional in well-designed and well-conducted trials excluding patients with high risk for hemorrhage and based on attentive medical control. The purpose of this review is to propose clear and simple protocols for everyday practice aimed at a global diagnostic and therapeutic management of venous thromboembolism. The review of the literature draws attention to the need for confirmation of the clinical suspicion of DVT, practical application of the anticoagulant treatment, and the importance of the etiology search in order to avoid missing a congenital or acquired state of thrombophilia or an occult cancer revealed by DVT. Half of all cases of thrombosis are caused by these two etiologies. In addition, with the development of noninvasive methods for diagnosing DVT, the efficacy of clear therapeutic regimens and the simplification of coagulation tests warrant outpatient management in many cases of DVT in compliance with certain rules of good clinical practice: confirmation of the diagnosis and regular treatment controls. An essential element is the close collaboration between the patient, the physician, the nursing staff, the laboratory and the pharmacist. PMID:10192039

  10. Evolving Treatments for Arterial and Venous Thrombosis: Role of the Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Chan, Noel C; Eikelboom, John W; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-29

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represent a major advance in oral anticoagulant therapy and have replaced the vitamin K antagonists as the preferred treatment for many indications. By simplifying long-term anticoagulant therapy and improving its safety, the DOACs have the potential to reduce the global burden of thrombosis. Postmarketing studies suggest that the favorable results achieved with DOACs in the randomized controlled trials can be readily translated into practice, but highlight the need for appropriate patient, drug and dose selection, and careful follow-up. Leveraging on their success to date, ongoing studies are assessing the utility of DOACs for the prevention of thrombosis in patients with embolic stroke of unknown source, heart failure, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, and cancer. The purpose of this article is to (1) review the pharmacology of the DOACs, (2) describe the advantages of the DOACs over vitamin K antagonists, (3) summarize the experience with the DOACs in established indications, (4) highlight current challenges and limitations, (5) highlight potential new indications; and (6) identify future directions for anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27126650

  11. [Venous thrombosis of the lower limbs and pulmonary embolism after desmopressin: a coincidence or a pathogenetic role?].

    PubMed

    Pentimone, F; Del Corso, L

    The authors describe a case of venous thrombosis of the legs, complicated by pulmonary embolism, in a 71 year-old man, following desmopressin therapy for hypothalamic diabetes insipidus. They suggest a role of desmopressin in stimulating the release of Von Willebrand's factor (VWF) from endothelial cells. VWF facilitates platelet adhesion by forming a bridge between platelet membrane and vascular subendothelium, followed by development of a large thrombus. PMID:1837767

  12. A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin to prevent deep venous thrombosis after elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Steve; Waddell, James P.; Cardella, Piera; Morton, Jane

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a short course of low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin) in the prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after elective total hip replacement. Design A prospective cohort study. Follow-up was a minimum of 3 months. Setting An acute-care hospital with a large-volume practice of elective total joint replacement. Patients A prospective group of 150 patients who required primary total hip arthroplasty and a historic control group of 150 patients. All patients were treated with compression stockings, indomethacin and early mobilization. The treatment group received low-molecular-weight heparin, 30 mg every 12 hours for 5 days postoperatively; the control group received no specific anticoagulant therapy. Interventions Total hip replacement. Doppler venography on postoperative day 5 and 2 to 5 days later if required. Main outcome measures Presence or absence of deep venous thrombosis. Wound hemorrhage, transfusion rate, number of units of blood transfused and changes in the hemoglobin level. Results The incidence of proximal deep venous thrombosis (popliteal vein to common iliac vein) was 0% in the treatment group versus 4% in the control group. There was no difference in bleeding or number of transfusions required. There was, however, a significant (p = 0.005) drop in hemoglobin level in the treatment group. Conclusions A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin provides effective protection against proximal deep venous thrombosis without significantly increasing the risk to the patient. The treatment is compatible with early patient discharge and the pharmacologic prevention of heterotopic ossification after total joint replacement. PMID:9126125

  13. Asymptomatic deep venous thrombosis in the calf: accuracy and limitations of ultrasonography as a screening test after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vanninen, R; Manninen, H; Soimakallio, S; Katila, T; Suomalainen, O

    1993-03-01

    Patients who have recently undergone total knee arthroplasty are at high risk of developing deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the calf. The clinical diagnosis of DVT is difficult in these patients owing to recent operation. A combination of compression ultrasonography (US) and colour flow imaging was used as a screening method of asymptomatic DVT in 51 patients who had undergone total knee replacement surgery. Both limbs were examined by US from the common femoral vein to the ankle approximately 7 days after operation and the results were compared with bilateral venography. 12 patients (24%) developed infrapopliteal DVT on the operated side, in two cases the thrombosis extended to the lower part of popliteal vein. One patient had bilateral thrombosis. US showed sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 96% and overall accuracy of 93%. US seems to be a useful screening method for DVT after knee replacement operation. PMID:8472111

  14. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis in the Upper Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Vik, Anders; Holme, Pal Andre; Singh, Kulbir; Dorenberg, Eric; Nordhus, Kare Christian; Kumar, Satish; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2009-09-15

    Traditional anticoagulant treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the upper extremities (UEDVT) is associated with a relatively high incidence of postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for UEDVT would provide efficient thrombolysis with less subsequent PTS than during traditional anticoagulation. Primary efficacy, complications, and long-term results after CDT are reported in a retrospective cohort (2002-2007) of patients (n = 30) with DVT in the upper extremities. PTS was assessed by a modified Villalta scale. UEDVT was unprovoked in 11 (37%) cases and effort related in 9 (30%) cases. The median duration of symptoms prior to CDT was 7.0 days (range, 1-30); median duration of thrombolysis treatment, 70 h (range, 24-264 h); and the median amount of rt-PA infused during CDT, 52 mg (range, 19-225 mg). Major bleeding was registered in three (9%) patients, and CDT was stopped prematurely in three patients due to local hematoma. No intracerebral bleeding, clinical pulmonary embolism, or deaths occurred during treatment. Grade II (>50%) or III (>90%) lysis was present in 29 patients (97%) at the end of CDT. Bleeding complications increased by each day of delay from the debut of symptoms to the start of treatment (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.42). At follow-up (n = 29; median, 21 months; range, 5-58 months), 11 (38%) patients had occluded veins, whereas 18 (62%) had patent veins. However, stenosis of varying severity was present in eight of those with a patent vein. No patients had severe PTS, whereas six (21%) experienced mild PTS. In conclusion, our retrospective cohort study of patients with UEDVT showed that treatment restored venous drainage, with a subsequent low frequency of mild PTS at follow-up. Early intervention with CDT prevented bleeding complications.

  15. Heparin Resistance and Anticoagulation Failure in a Challenging Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    King, Adam B; O'Duffy, Anne E; Kumar, Avinash B

    2016-07-01

    We report a challenging case of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (multiple etiologic factors) that was complicated by heparin resistance secondary to suspected antithrombin III (ATIII) deficiency. A 20-year-old female previously healthy and currently 8 weeks pregnant presented with worsening headaches, nausea, and decreasing Glasgow Coma Scale/Score (GCS), necessitating mechanical ventilatory support. Imaging showed extensive clots in multiple cerebral venous sinuses including the superior sagittal sinus, transverse, sigmoid, jugular veins, and the straight sinus. She was started on systemic anticoagulation and underwent mechanical clot removal and catheter-directed endovascular thrombolysis with limited success. Complicating the intensive care unit care was the development of heparin resistance, with an inability to reach the target partial thomboplastin time (PTT) of 60 to 80 seconds. At her peak heparin dose, she was receiving >35 000 units/24 h, and her PTT was subtherapeutic at <50 seconds. Deficiency of ATIII was suspected as a possible etiology of her heparin resistance. Fresh frozen plasma was administered for ATIII level repletion. Given her high thrombogenic risk and challenges with conventional anticoagulation regimens, we transitioned to argatroban for systemic anticoagulation. Heparin produces its major anticoagulant effect by inactivating thrombin and factor X through an AT-dependent mechanism. For inhibition of thrombin, heparin must bind to both the coagulation enzyme and the AT. A deficiency of AT leads to a hypercoagulable state and decreased efficacy of heparin that places patients at high risk of thromboembolism. Heparin resistance, especially in the setting of critical illness, should raise the index of suspicion for AT deficiency. Argatroban is an alternate agent for systemic anticoagulation in the setting of heparin resistance. PMID:27366296

  16. Clinical features and risk factor analysis for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in Chinese neurosurgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fuyou; Shashikiran, Tagilapalli; Chen, Xi; Yang, Lei; Liu, Xianzhi; Song, Laijun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality of neurosurgical patients; however, no data regarding lower extremity DVT in postoperative Chinese neurosurgical patients have been reported. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 to December 2013, 196 patients without preoperative DVT who underwent neurosurgical operations were evaluated by color Doppler ultrasonography and D-dimer level measurements on the 3rd, 7th, and 14th days after surgery. Follow-up clinical data were recorded to determine the incidence of lower extremity DVT in postoperative neurosurgical patients and to analyze related clinical features. First, a single factor analysis, Chi-square test, was used to select statistically significant factors. Then, a multivariate analysis, binary logistic regression analysis, was used to determine risk factors for lower extremity DVT in postoperative neurosurgical patients. Results: Lower extremity DVT occurred in 61 patients, and the incidence of DVT was 31.1% in the enrolled Chinese neurosurgical patients. The common symptoms of DVT were limb swelling and lower extremity pain as well as increased soft tissue tension. The common sites of venous involvement were the calf muscle and peroneal and posterior tibial veins. The single factor analysis showed statistically significant differences in DVT risk factors, including age, hypertension, smoking status, operation time, a bedridden or paralyzed state, the presence of a tumor, postoperative dehydration, and glucocorticoid treatment, between the two groups (P < 0.05). The binary logistic regression analysis showed that an age greater than 50 years, hypertension, a bedridden or paralyzed state, the presence of a tumor, and postoperative dehydration were risk factors for lower extremity DVT in postoperative neurosurgical patients. Conclusions: Lower extremity DVT was a common complication following craniotomy in the enrolled Chinese neurosurgical patients. Multiple

  17. Monocytes, neutrophils, and platelets cooperate to initiate and propagate venous thrombosis in mice in vivo

    PubMed Central

    von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Stark, Konstantin; Steinhart, Alexander; Chandraratne, Sue; Konrad, Ildiko; Lorenz, Michael; Khandoga, Alexander; Tirniceriu, Anca; Coletti, Raffaele; Köllnberger, Maria; Byrne, Robert A.; Laitinen, Iina; Walch, Axel; Brill, Alexander; Pfeiler, Susanne; Manukyan, Davit; Braun, Siegmund; Lange, Philipp; Riegger, Julia; Ware, Jerry; Eckart, Annekathrin; Haidari, Selgai; Rudelius, Martina; Schulz, Christian; Echtler, Katrin; Brinkmann, Volker; Schwaiger, Markus; Preissner, Klaus T.; Wagner, Denisa D.; Mackman, Nigel; Engelmann, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major cause of cardiovascular death. The sequence of events that promote DVT remains obscure, largely as a result of the lack of an appropriate rodent model. We describe a novel mouse model of DVT which reproduces a frequent trigger and resembles the time course, histological features, and clinical presentation of DVT in humans. We demonstrate by intravital two-photon and epifluorescence microscopy that blood monocytes and neutrophils crawling along and adhering to the venous endothelium provide the initiating stimulus for DVT development. Using conditional mutants and bone marrow chimeras, we show that intravascular activation of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation via tissue factor (TF) derived from myeloid leukocytes causes the extensive intraluminal fibrin formation characteristic of DVT. We demonstrate that thrombus-resident neutrophils are indispensable for subsequent DVT propagation by binding factor XII (FXII) and by supporting its activation through the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Correspondingly, neutropenia, genetic ablation of FXII, or disintegration of NETs each confers protection against DVT amplification. Platelets associate with innate immune cells via glycoprotein Ibα and contribute to DVT progression by promoting leukocyte recruitment and stimulating neutrophil-dependent coagulation. Hence, we identified a cross talk between monocytes, neutrophils, and platelets responsible for the initiation and amplification of DVT and for inducing its unique clinical features. PMID:22451716

  18. The influence of meteorological variables on the development of deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Helen K; Simpson, A John; Murchison, John T

    2009-10-01

    The influence of weather on deep venous thrombosis (DVT) incidence remains controversial. We aimed to characterize the temporal association between DVT and meteorological variables including atmospheric pressure. Data relating to hospital admissions with DVT in Scotland were collected retrospectively for a 20 year period for which corresponding meteorological recordings were available. Weather variables were calculated as weighted daily averages to adjust for variations in population density. Seasonal variation in DVT and short-term effects of weather variables on the relative risk of developing DVT were assess using Poisson regression modelling. The models allowed for the identification of lag periods between variation in the weather and DVT presentation. A total of 37,336 cases of DVT were recorded. There was significant seasonal variation in DVT with a winter peak. Seasonal variation in wind speed and temperature were significantly associated with seasonal variation in DVT. When studying more immediate meteorological influences, low atmospheric pressure, high wind speed and high rainfall were significantly associated with an increased risk of DVT approximately 9-10 days later. The effect was most strikingly demonstrated for atmospheric pressure, every 10 millibar decrease in pressure being associated with a 2.1% increase in relative risk of DVT. Alterations in weather have a small but significant impact upon the incidence of DVT. DVT is particularly associated with reduction in atmospheric pressure giving weight to the hypothesis that reduced cabin pressure in long haul flights contributes to DVT. These findings have implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of DVT. PMID:19806252

  19. Headache as the only neurological sign of cerebral venous thrombosis: a series of 17 cases

    PubMed Central

    Cumurciuc, R; Crassard, I; Sarov, M; Valade, D; Bousser, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Headache is the most frequent symptom in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), and usually the first. However, it has rarely been reported as the only symptom of CVT. Objectives: To study the characteristics of patients in whom headache was the only presentation of CVT in the absence of intracranial hypertension, subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), meningitis, or other intracranial lesion. Methods: From a prospective study of 123 consecutive patients with CVT only those with isolated headache and normal brain computed tomography (CT) scan and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination were included in the present study. All patients underwent an extensive systematic aetiological work-up and were given intravenous heparin followed by oral anticoagulants. A detailed description of the headache was obtained. Results: Headache was only sign of CVT in 17 patients. The lateral sinus was the most frequently involved sinus (n = 15). Onset of headache was progressive in 11, acute in 3, and thunderclap in 3 patients. Once established, the headache was continuous in 15, diffuse in four and unilateral in 13, usually ipsilateral to the occluded lateral sinus. No specific risk factor or cause was found. All had a favourable evolution. Conclusion: The pathogenesis of isolated headache in CVT in the absence of intracranial hypertension, SAH, meningitis or intracerebral lesion is unknown but may involve changes in the walls of the occluded sinus. Hence MRI/MRV should be used to look for signs of CVT in all patients with recent headache (progressive or thunderclap) even when the CT scan and CSF examination are normal. PMID:16024884

  20. Use of single-slice thick slab phase-contrast angiography for the diagnosis of dural venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Adams, W M; Laitt, R D; Beards, S C; Kassner, A; Jackson, A

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of single-slice phase-contrast angiography (SSPCA) as a rapid technique for the investigation of suspected dural venous sinus occlusion. Images were obtained on 25 normal volunteers to document the accuracy of SSPCA in the demonstration of slow flow states. Normal volunteers were imaged using sagittal and coronal SSPCA (slice thickness 13 cm, matrix 256 x 256, TR 14 ms, TE 7 ms, flip angle 20 degrees, peak velocity encoding rate 30 cm/s). Sinus patency and flow rate were confirmed by measurement of flow in the superior sagittal and transverse sinuses using quantified single-slice phase difference images. Imaging was performed in 50 patients undergoing routine brain scans in order to determine the optimal slice orientation for clinical use. Twenty-one patients with suspected dural venous sinus thrombosis were also investigated with SSPCA and the diagnosis confirmed by one or more alternative imaging techniques. Imaging time was 29 s per acquisition and image quality was good in all cases. Variations in dural sinus patency and flow in normal volunteers were accurately predicted by SSPCA (kappa = 0.92). Use of a single angulated slice (130 mm thick, para-sagittal image angled 30 degrees towards coronal and 30 degrees towards transverse) provided sufficient separation of right- and left-sided venous structures to allow use of a single projection. The presence and extent of sinus occlusions in 14 patients and the absence of thrombosis in 7 were accurately identified by SSPCA. Sensitivity and specificity in this limited study were both 100%. The SSPCA technique takes less than 30 s and provides a reliable and rapid technique for the diagnosis of dural venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:10525876

  1. Safety assessment of anticoagulation therapy in patients with hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Riasi, Hamid Reza; Noureddine, Ali; Masoudinezhad, Shahram; Yazdani, Siamak; Mirzae, Mohammad Mousavi; Razavi, Atena Sharifi; Ghandehari, Kosar

    2013-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation therapy is a routine treatment in patients with hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). However, fear of hemorrhagic complications and deterioration course following anticoagulation often disturbs the responsible physician. Methods This was a Prospective observational study on consecutive CVT patients with hemorrhagic venous infarction or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) admitted in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran, during 2006-2012. The diagnosis of CVT in suspected cases was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance venography (MRI/MRV), and computerized tomography (CT) angiography following established diagnostic criteria. Demographic data, clinical manifestations from onset to end of the observation period, location of thrombus, location and size of infarction and hemorrhage, and clinical course during treatment were recorded. Choice of the treatment was left to the opinion of the treating physician. Clinical course during 1 week of treatment was assessed based on the baseline modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Three or more points decrease or increase of modified NIHSS after 1 week of treatment was considered as improvement or deterioration courses, respectively. Other clinical courses were categorized as stabilization course. Results 102 hemorrhagic CVT patients (80 females, 22 males) with mean age of 38.6 ± 8 years were prospectively investigated. Of the 102 hemorrhagic CVT patients in the acute phase, 52 patients (50.9%) were anticoagulated with adjusted dose intravenous heparin infusion and 50 cases (49.1%) received subcutaneous enoxaparin 1mg/Kg twice daily. Decreased consciousness had a significant effect on the clinical course of the patients (X2 = 9.493, df = 2, P = 0.009). Presence of SAH had no significant effect on the clinical course of our anticoagulated hemorrhagic CVT cases (X2 = 0.304, df = 2, P = 0.914). Extension of Infarction in more than two thirds of a hemisphere

  2. Rates of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolus After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Campbell, Kirk A.; Fillingham, Yale A.; Harris, Joshua D.; Gupta, Anil K.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease is thought to be an uncommon but serious problem after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Rates of VTE after ACL reconstruction are not well documented. Objective: To determine the rates of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and symptomatic pulmonary emboli (PE) after ACL reconstruction. Data Sources: Five publicly available databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Scopus, Embase, and CINAHL Complete) were utilized. Study Selection: All studies that screened patients for DVT and reported rates of DVT and PE after ACL reconstruction were eligible for inclusion. Level 5 evidence, cadaver, biomechanical, and basic science studies; studies reporting only multiligament reconstruction outcomes; studies where rates of DVT and PE could not be separated out from patients undergoing other types of arthroscopic knee procedures; and classification studies were excluded. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Data Extraction: All study, subject, and surgical data were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results: Six studies met the inclusion criteria, with a mean Modified Colman Methodology Score of 30 ± 8.22. A total of 692 patients (488 men [70.5%]; mean age, 31.6 ± 2.82 years; mean follow-up, 7 ± 18.4 months) underwent ACL reconstruction using either semitendinosus-gracilis autograft (77.6%), bone–patellar tendon–bone (BTB) autograft (22%), or allograft (0.4%). No patient received postoperative pharmacological anticoagulation. Fifty-eight patients (8.4%) had a DVT (81% below knee and 19% above knee), while only 1 patient (0.2%) had a symptomatic PE. When reported, 27% of DVT episodes were symptomatic. Conclusion: The rate of DVT after ACL reconstruction in patients who did not receive postoperative pharmacological anticoagulation is 8.4%, while the rate of symptomatic PE is 0.2%. Of the DVT episodes that occurred, 73% were asymptomatic. PMID:26131305

  3. Derivation of a risk assessment model for hospital-acquired venous thrombosis: the NAVAL score.

    PubMed

    de Bastos, Marcos; Barreto, Sandhi M; Caiafa, Jackson S; Boguchi, Tânia; Silva, José Luiz Padilha; Rezende, Suely M

    2016-05-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) is a preventable cause of death in hospitalized patients. The main strategy to decrease VT incidence is timely thromboprophylaxis in at-risk patients. We sought to evaluate the reliability of risk assessment model (RAM) data, the incremental usefulness of additional variables and the modelling of an adjusted score (the NAVAL score). We used the RAM proposed by Caprini for initial assessment. A 5 % systematic sample of data was independently reviewed for reliability. We evaluated the incremental usefulness of six variables for VT during the score modelling by logistic regression. We then assessed the NAVAL score for calibration, reclassification and discrimination performances. We observed 11,091 patients with 37 (0.3 %) VT events. Using the Caprini RAM, high-risk and moderate-risk patients were respectively associated with a 17.4 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 6.1-49.9) and 4.2 (95 % CI 1.6-11.0) increased VT risk compared with low-risk patients. Four independent variables were selected for the NAVAL score: "Age", "Admission clinic", "History of previous VT event" and "History of thrombophilia". The area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve for the NAVAL score was 0.72 (95 % CI 0.63-0.81). The Net Reclassification Index (NRI) for the NAVAL score compared with the Caprini RAM was -0.1 (95 % CI -0.3 to 0.1; p = 0.28). We conclude that the NAVAL score is a simplified tool for the stratification of VT risk in hospitalized patients. With only four variables, it demonstrated good performance and discrimination, but requires external validation before clinical application. We also confirm that the Caprini RAM can effectively stratify VT risk in hospitalized patients in our population. PMID:26446587

  4. Impact of Provoking Risk Factors on the Prognosis of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jae; Noh, Sang-Mi; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Jong S.; Kwon, Sun U.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Little is known about the relationships between provoking risk factors, prognosis, and optimal duration of anticoagulation in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), especially in Asians. We aimed to investigate whether the prognosis and required duration of anticoagulation in CVT patients differ according to the provoking risk factors. Methods Prospectively recorded data from a tertiary medical center in South Korea were retrospectively reviewed. CVTs were categorized into three groups: unprovoked, those with possibly resolved provoking factors (PR), and those with persistent provoking factors (PP). The baseline characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of patients in these three groups were analyzed. Results From 2000 to 2015, 61 patients presented with CVT: 19 (31.1%) unprovoked, 11 (18.0%) with PR, and 31 (50.9%) with PP. The patients in our cohort had a slight female predominance and lower frequency of oral contraceptive use compared to Western cohorts. Median follow-up and duration of anticoagulation were 35 and 8 months, respectively. Despite the similarities in baseline characteristics, deaths (n=3; P=0.256) and recurrences (n=7; P=0.020) were observed only in the PP group. The median intervals to death and recurrence were 9 and 13 months, respectively. Death was associated with underlying disease activity, not with CVT progression. Recurrences in the PP group were associated with lack of anticoagulation (P=0.012). Conclusions Although the prognosis of CVT is generally benign in Koreans, recurrence and death were observed in patients with persistent risk factors, suggesting their need for long-term treatment with anticoagulants. PMID:27165266

  5. Prevalence of inherited prothrombotic abnormalities and central venous catheter-related thrombosis in haematopoietic stem cell transplants recipients.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, A; Ben Romdhane, N; Kriaa, A; Chelli, M; Torjman, L; Ladeb, S; Ben Othman, T; Lakhal, A; Guermazi, S; Ben Hassen, A; Ladeb, F; Ben Abdeladhim, A

    2005-11-01

    In this prospective study, we assessed the incidence of central venous catheter (CVC)-related thrombosis in haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. We determined the contribution of inherited prothrombotic abnormalities in blood coagulation to CVC-related thrombosis in these patients. The study was conducted between May 2002 and September 2004. CVCs were externalized, nontunneled, polyurethane double lumen catheters. Before catheter insertion, laboratory prothrombotic markers included factor V Leiden, the prothrombin gene Gly20210A mutation, plasma antithrombin levels, and protein C and S activity. All patients were systematically examined by ultrasonography just before, or <24 h after, catheter removal, and in case of clinical signs of thrombosis. A total of 171 patients were included during the 28-month study period. Five (2.9%) and three (1.7%) patients had evidence of protein C and protein S deficiency, respectively. Only one patient had an antithrombin deficiency (0.6%). In total, 10 patients (5.8%) were heterozygous for the factor V Leiden mutation, and one patient had heterozygous prothrombin G20210A mutation (0.6%). We observed a CVC-related thrombosis in 13 patients (7.6%). Thrombosis was diagnosed in four out of 20 patients (20%) with a inherited prothrombotic abnormality compared to nine of 151 patients (6%) who did not have a thrombophilic marker (relative risk 3.3 CI 95% 1.1-9.9). Our results suggest that inherited prothrombotic abnormalities contribute substantially to CVC-related thrombosis in HSCT recipients. In view of physicians' reluctance to prescribe prophylactic anticoagulant treatment in these patients, a priori determination of inherited prothrombotic abnormalities may form a basis to guide these treatment decisions. PMID:16151418

  6. Peripheral venous hypertension after the creation of arteriovenous fistula for haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bachleda, Petr; Kojecký, Zdenek; Utíkal, Petr; Drác, Petr; Herman, Jirí; Zadrazil, Josef

    2004-07-01

    The function of an arteriovenous (av) fistula for haemodialysis may be complicated by manifestation of peripheral venous hypertension, which results from the arterial blood flow through the venous system into the periphery of the upper extremity. Its development is most typically caused by a proximal forearm av-fistula, as, in addition to the desirable arterialisation of the subcutaneous venous system of the arm, arterialisation of the venous system of the forearm and the hand may occur and possibly promote the development of venous hypertension, which may in the extreme result in gangrene of the fingers. Awareness of these problems as well as of the necessity of their surgical solution is essential for doctors dealing with haemodialysis. PMID:15523553

  7. Deep venous thrombosis and inferior vena cava agenesis causing double crush sciatic neuropathy in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kara, Murat; Ozçakar, Levent; Eken, Güneş; Ozen, Gülsen; Kiraz, Sedat

    2008-12-01

    We report here the case of a 18-year-old young man with Behçet's disease who had suffered deep venous thrombosis of the right femoral and popliteal veins. Consequently, right sciatic nerve injury, drop foot and tightness of the achilles tendon also ensued. The clinical scenario was further challenged by demonstration of the agenetic inferior vena cava and epidural vein dilatations compressing the lumbar nerve roots. To the best notice of the authors, this is the first patient encompassing all these complications in the literature concerning Behçet's disease. PMID:18848486

  8. Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis in Venous Aneurysm following Closure of the Chronic Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistulae of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Orrapin, Saranat; Arworn, Supapong; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) commonly results from an unrecognized vascular injury. In this report, there were two cases of chronic traumatic AVF of the legs with a long history of stab (case 1) and shotgun wounds (case 2). Both cases presented with varicose veins together with hyperpigmentation around the ankle of the affected leg. Angiograms showed a single large AVF in case 1, whereas, in case 2, there was a single large AVF together with multiple small AVFs. In both cases large venous aneurysm was found next to a large AVF. An open surgical AVF closure for the large AVF was performed in case 1 successfully, but patient developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in a large venous aneurysm. In the second case, in order to prevent DVT, only closure of the large AVF was performed, which preserved arterial flow into the venous aneurysm. Case 2 did not have acute DVT. This report raised the concern about acute DVTs in venous aneurysms following the closure of chronic traumatic AVF in terms of prevention. Also chronic traumatic AVF is commonly due to misdiagnosis in the initial treatment, so complete and serial physical examinations in penetrating vascular injury patients are of paramount importance. PMID:27293948

  9. Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis in Venous Aneurysm following Closure of the Chronic Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistulae of the Lower Extremities.

    PubMed

    Orrapin, Saranat; Arworn, Supapong; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) commonly results from an unrecognized vascular injury. In this report, there were two cases of chronic traumatic AVF of the legs with a long history of stab (case 1) and shotgun wounds (case 2). Both cases presented with varicose veins together with hyperpigmentation around the ankle of the affected leg. Angiograms showed a single large AVF in case 1, whereas, in case 2, there was a single large AVF together with multiple small AVFs. In both cases large venous aneurysm was found next to a large AVF. An open surgical AVF closure for the large AVF was performed in case 1 successfully, but patient developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in a large venous aneurysm. In the second case, in order to prevent DVT, only closure of the large AVF was performed, which preserved arterial flow into the venous aneurysm. Case 2 did not have acute DVT. This report raised the concern about acute DVTs in venous aneurysms following the closure of chronic traumatic AVF in terms of prevention. Also chronic traumatic AVF is commonly due to misdiagnosis in the initial treatment, so complete and serial physical examinations in penetrating vascular injury patients are of paramount importance. PMID:27293948

  10. Cerebral venous thrombosis associated with homozygous factor V Leiden mutation in a 15-year-old girl of Tunisian origin.

    PubMed

    Salem-Berrabah, Olfa Ben; Fekih-Mrissa, Nejiba; Laayouni, Samy; Gritli, Nasreddine; Mrissa, Ridha

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare disease. It has numerous and complex etiologies. Inherited or acquired prothrombotic states play a key role in the development of this disease, such as factor V G1691A mutation (FV Leiden). A 15-year-old girl presented to the Department of Neurology with a complaint of severe headache with visual blurring. The diagnosis of CVT was not initially suspected because of the patient's condition on presentation. An MRI showed thrombosis in the superior sagittal sinus, confirming venous stroke. Anticardiolipin and antiphospholipid antibodies were assessed. In addition, inherited prothrombotic defects, such as protein C, protein S, and antithrombin deficiencies, and genetic mutations for FV Leiden, prothrombin gene G20210A (FII G20210A), and methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T (MTHFR C677T) were studied. All results were unremarkable except for the unique homozygous FV Leiden mutation, which likely contributed to this prothrombotic situation. This study highlights the fact that FV Leiden may play a significant role in the onset of CVT in young patients. PMID:22048515

  11. Detection of lower limb deep venous thrombosis in asymptomatic high risk patients using a new radiolabelled thrombus specific agent

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, S.P.; Rahman, T.; Boyd S.J.

    1995-05-01

    Deep venous thrombosis is a serious consequence of major orthopaedic surgery and non invasive screening with either venous ultrasound or impedance plethysmography is unreliable for detecting or excluding DVT in this group. A new method of thrombus detection has been devised using Tc-99m labelled inhibited recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. The accuracy of scanning with this new radiopharmaceutical in asymptomatic high risk patients was evaluated using venography as the gold standard. 36 consecutive asymptomatic high risk patients (17 total hip, 19 total knee replacements) underwent both a contrast venogram on the operated leg and scintigraphic scan 7 days following operation. Scintigraphic imaging was performed at 4 hours post injection. For the purpose of this analysis, each venogram was divided into a proximal and a distal segment. Venograms were interpreted as being positive, negative or uninterpretable in each segment. Similar analysis of the scintigraphic scans was performed except that all segments were considered to be of diagnostic quality. 57 segments were able to be analysed. Of the 13 thrombosed segments (1 proximal, 12 calf), 12 had positive scans; in the 44 non thrombosed segments, 40 had negative scans. Thus in detecting lower limb thrombosis, scanning had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 91%. Scintigraphic scanning with this new radiopharmaceutical permits accurate detection of thrombus in high risk patients.

  12. Can the results of treatment of deep venous thrombosis be improved by combining surgical thrombectomy with regional fibrinolysis?

    PubMed

    Nachbur, B B; Beck, E A; Senn, A

    1980-01-01

    A new mode of treatment of extensive acute and subacute deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities is introduced. For this purpose the beneficial effects of surgical thrombectomy and of thrombolysis with streptokinase are combined during the course of a single surgical intervention. Rapid-flow regional perfusion is the vehicle used for administration of streptokinase and probably represents the third arm of this therapeutic approach by adding a hemodynamic wash-out effect. Because the thrombolytic agent is rinsed out of the circuit at the end of regional perfusion the usual side effects and contra-indications of this drug are avoided. Early and late results of this treatment are assessed clinically and with repeat venograms in a group of 9 patients. Highly satisfactory results were obtained in 6 patients with complete anatomical and functional restoration of deep veins along their entire length in three cases. It is felt that continued use of this method is warranted and that the results of treatment of deep venous thrombosis can thus be improved. PMID:6993494

  13. Chronic venous ulceration of leg associated with peripheral arterial disease: an underappreciated entity in developing country.

    PubMed

    Nag, Falguni; De, Abhishek; Hazra, Avijit; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Surana, Trupti V

    2014-10-01

    Chronic venous ulcer can often be associated with asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which usually remains undiagnosed adding significantly to the morbidity of these patients. The Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) is suggested for PAD evaluation. Many PAD studies were conducted in western countries, but there is a scarcity of data on the prevalence of PAD in clinical venous ulcer patient in developing countries. We conducted a study in a tertiary care hospital of eastern part of India to find out the prevalence of PAD in venous ulcer patients, and also to find the sensitivity of ABPI as a diagnostic tool in these patients. We evaluated clinically diagnosed patients with venous ulcer using ABPI and Colour Doppler study for the presence of PAD. Possible associations such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, hypertension and atherosclerosis were studied. All results were analysed using the software Statistica version 6. PAD was present in 23 (27·71%) patients. Older age, longer duration, smoking, high BMI and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with PAD. A very strong level of agreement was found between venous Doppler and ABPI. Assessment for the presence of PAD is important in all clinically diagnosed venous ulcer patients. ABPI being a simple, non-invasive outpatient department (OPD)-based procedure, can be routinely used in cases of venous ulcer to find out the hidden cases of PAD even in developing countries. PMID:23170845

  14. Angioarchitectural changes in subacute cerebral venous thrombosis. A synchrotron-based micro- and nano-CT study.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Erwin; Yeniguen, Mesut; Kreisel, Melanie; Kampschulte, Marian; Doenges, Simone; Sedding, Daniel; Ritman, Erik L; Gerriets, Tibo; Langheinrich, Alexander C

    2011-02-01

    It is well known that recanalization of thrombosed cerebral sinuses occurs early but without marked influence on the long-term outcome and on final venous infarct volume on magnetic resonance imaging. To better understand the possible microvascular mechanisms behind these clinical observations, we evaluated the sequels of subacute superior sagittal sinus (SSS) thrombosis in rats using micro- and nano-CT imaging of the same specimen to provide large volume and high resolution CT image data respectively. SSS thrombosis was induced in 11 animals which were euthanized after 6h (n=4) or 6 weeks (n=7). Eight sham-operated rats served as controls. After infusion of contrast into the vasculature of the brains, these were isolated and scanned using micro-, nano-, and synchrotron-based micro-CT ((8 μm³), (900 nm)³, and (1.9 μm³) voxel sizes). The cross-sectional area of the superior sagittal sinus, microvessels and cortical veins were quantified. Tissue sections were stained against VEGF antigen. Immunohistochemistry was confirmed using quantitative rtPCR. SSS thrombosis led to a congestion of the bridging veins after 6h. After 6 weeks, a network of small vessels surrounding the occluded SSS was present with concurrent return towards the diameter of the draining bridging veins of controls. This microvascular network connected to cortical veins as demonstrated by nano- and synchrotron-based micro-CT. Also the volume fraction and number of cortical veins increased significantly. Immunohistochemistry in the region of the microsvascular network demonstrated a strong immunoreactivity against VEGF, confirmed by rtPCR. The sequel of subacute SSS thrombosis induced a network of microvessels ("venogenesis") draining the bridging veins. Also the volume fraction of cortical veins increased significantly. PMID:20974267

  15. Angioarchitectural Changes in Subacute Cerebral Venous Thrombosis. A Synchrotron-based Micro- and Nano-CT Study

    SciTech Connect

    E Stolz; M Yeniguen; M Kreisel; M Kampschulte; S Doenges; D Sedding; E Ritman; T Gerriets; A Langheinrich

    2011-12-31

    It is well known that recanalization of thrombosed cerebral sinuses occurs early but without marked influence on the long-term outcome and on final venous infarct volume on magnetic resonance imaging. To better understand the possible microvascular mechanisms behind these clinical observations, we evaluated the sequels of subacute superior sagittal sinus (SSS) thrombosis in rats using micro- and nano-CT imaging of the same specimen to provide large volume and high resolution CT image data respectively. SSS thrombosis was induced in 11 animals which were euthanized after 6 h (n = 4) or 6 weeks (n = 7). Eight sham-operated rats served as controls. After infusion of contrast into the vasculature of the brains, these were isolated and scanned using micro-, nano-, and synchrotron-based micro-CT ((8 {mu}m{sup 3}), (900 nm){sup 3}, and (1.9 {mu}m{sup 3}) voxel sizes). The cross-sectional area of the superior sagittal sinus, microvessels and cortical veins were quantified. Tissue sections were stained against VEGF antigen. Immunohistochemistry was confirmed using quantitative rtPCR. SSS thrombosis led to a congestion of the bridging veins after 6 h. After 6 weeks, a network of small vessels surrounding the occluded SSS was present with concurrent return towards the diameter of the draining bridging veins of controls. This microvascular network connected to cortical veins as demonstrated by nano- and synchrotron-based micro-CT. Also the volume fraction and number of cortical veins increased significantly. Immunohistochemistry in the region of the microsvascular network demonstrated a strong immunoreactivity against VEGF, confirmed by rtPCR. The sequel of subacute SSS thrombosis induced a network of microvessels ('venogenesis') draining the bridging veins. Also the volume fraction of cortical veins increased significantly.

  16. Management of cerebral venous thrombosis in a patient with Lane-Hamilton syndrome and coeliac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcification syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grover, Patrick J; Jayaram, Raja; Madder, Hilary

    2010-12-01

    We describe a case of cerebral venous thrombosis presenting in a patient with Lane-Hamilton syndrome and coeliac disease epilepsy cerebral calcification syndrome. This is a first reported occurrence of this combination. Delayed anticoagulation with early external ventricular drain insertion for life-threatening raised intracranial pressure resulted in a successful outcome. PMID:21070152

  17. Peripheral venous distension elicits a blood pressure raising reflex in young and middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Evan L; Brian, Michael S; Coyle, Dana E; Edwards, David G; Stocker, Sean D; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2016-06-01

    Distension of peripheral veins in humans elicits a pressor and sympathoexcitatory response that is mediated through group III/IV skeletal muscle afferents. There is some evidence that autonomic reflexes mediated by these sensory fibers are blunted with increasing age, yet to date the venous distension reflex has only been studied in young adults. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the venous distension reflex would be attenuated in middle-aged compared with young adults. Nineteen young (14 men/5 women, 25 ± 1 yr) and 13 middle-aged (9 men/4 women, 50 ± 2 yr) healthy normotensive participants underwent venous distension via saline infusion through a retrograde intravenous catheter in an antecubital vein during limb occlusion. Beat-by-beat blood pressure, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and model flow-derived cardiac output (Q), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were recorded throughout the trial. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased during the venous distension in both young (baseline 83 ± 2, peak 94 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05) and middle-aged adults (baseline 88 ± 2, peak 103 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05). MSNA also increased in both groups [young: baseline 886 ± 143, peak 1,961 ± 242 arbitrary units (AU)/min; middle-aged: baseline 1,164 ± 225, peak 2,515 ± 404 AU/min; both P < 0.05]. TPR (P < 0.001), but not Q (P = 0.76), increased during the trial. However, the observed increases in blood pressure, MSNA, and TPR were similar between young and middle-aged adults. Additionally, no correlation was found between age and the response to venous distension (all P > 0.05). These findings suggest that peripheral venous distension elicits a pressor and sympathetic response in middle-aged adults similar to the response observed in young adults. PMID:27053648

  18. Cerebral venous thrombosis complicated by hemorrhagic infarction secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunting.

    PubMed

    Son, Won-Soo; Park, Jaechan

    2010-10-01

    While a delayed intracerebral hemorrhage at the site of a ventricular catheter has occasionally been reported in literature, a delayed hemorrhage caused by venous infarction secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunting has not been previously reported. In the present case, a 68-year-old woman underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting through a frontal burr hole, and developed a hemorrhagic transformation of venous infarction on the second postoperative day. This massive venous infarction was caused by bipolar coagulation and occlusion of a large paramedian cortical vein in association with atresia of the rostral superior sagittal sinus. Thus, to eliminate the risk of postoperative venous infarction, technical precautions to avoid damaging surface vessels in a burr hole are required under loupe magnification in ventriculoperitoneal shunting. PMID:21113365

  19. Power-Pulse Thrombolysis and Stent Recanalization for Acute Post-Liver Transplant Iliocaval Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baccin, Carlos E.; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2008-07-15

    Postoperative inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis is a potentially lethal complication in a liver transplant recipient. We report the case of a 57-year-old liver transplant recipient, who developed acute, postoperative, markedly symptomatic complete IVC, ilial-femoral-caval, and left renal vein thrombosis. After treatment with power-pulse tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis, thrombectomy, and stent placement, the IVC and iliac veins were successfully recanalized. At 2.5-year imaging and laboratory follow-up, the IVC, iliac, and renal veins remained patent and graft function was preserved.

  20. Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava associated with deep venous thrombosis and a partial Protein C deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tribe, Howard; Borgstein, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava is rare but it is being increasingly diagnosed by cross-sectional imaging techniques. Patients are usually asymptomatic with abnormalities detected incidentally. An 11 year old boy presented with a 10 day history of fever, vomiting and abdominal pain, which progressed to his back and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging, computerised tomography and Doppler ultrasonography showed the absence of a suprarenal inferior vena cava with bilateral superficial femoral vein thrombi extending cranially to the end of the aberrant inferior vena cava. Haematological testing revealed a partial Protein C deficiency. The presenting clinical picture in this case is unique within the English literature and highlights that deep venous thrombosis associated with inferior vena cava dysgenesis may not present with typical symptoms in children. Early use of advanced imaging modalities would expedite diagnosis and subsequent treatment. PMID:24421930

  1. The effect of the use of ultrasound in the success of peripheral venous catheterisation.

    PubMed

    İsmailoğlu, Elif Günay; Zaybak, Ayten; Akarca, Funda Karbek; Kıyan, Selahattin

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterisation in patients where difficulty was experienced in peripheral venous catheterisation. The study was conducted in the emergency department at a university hospital in İzmir Turkey. After obtaining institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 60 patients with a history or suspicion of difficult cannulation were enrolled with 30 patients in traditional and 30 in ultrasound group. In the ultrasound group, peripheral intravenous catheterisation was performed using a portable ultrasound device with 13.5 MHz ultrasound probe and 20 gauge intravenous catheter. The success rate of peripheral venous catheterisation was 30% in the control group and 70% in the treatment group. The success rate was significantly higher among the treatment group. The mean intensity of felt pain was 6.00 ± 1.98 in the control group and 4.77 ± 1.74 in the treatment group. The mean intensity of felt pain was significantly lower in the treatment group. The state of chronic disease affected the success rate in patients in the treatment group. PMID:25175514

  2. Effort thrombosis: effective treatment with vascular stent after unrelieved venous stenosis following a surgical release procedure.

    PubMed

    Cohen, G S; Braunstein, L; Ball, D S; Domeracki, F

    1996-01-01

    Acute symptomatic effort thrombosis in a 33-year-old male necessitated an aggressive approach consisting of thrombolysis, angioplasty, and surgical thoracic outlet release. The patient required postoperative placement of a Wallstent and was placed on anticoagulation. He has remained symptom free for the past 10 months, both clinically and sonographically. PMID:8653744

  3. Testosterone therapy, thrombophilia, and hospitalization for deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary embolus, an exploratory, hypothesis-generating study.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Friedman, Joel; Hafeez, Ahsan; Hassan, Atif; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Our hypothesis was that testosterone therapy (TT) interacts with previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis, leading to hospitalization for deep venous thrombosis (DVT)-pulmonary emboli (PE). We determined the prevalence of DVT-PE associated with TT 147 men hospitalized in the last 12 months for DVT-PE. Of the 147 men, 2 (1.4%) had TT before and at the time of their DVT-PE. Neither had risk factors for thrombosis. Neither smoked. Case #1 (intramuscular T 50mg/week) had 2 PE, 6 and 24 months after starting TT. DVT-PE in case #2 (T gel 100mg/day) occurred 24 months after starting T. Both men were found to have previously undiagnosed familial thrombophilia (protein S deficiency, homocysteinemia, high Factor VIII). In case #2, on 100mg T gel/day, serum estradiol was high, 51 pg/ml (upper normal limit 42.6 pg/ml). At least 1.4% of men hospitalized for DVT-PE were on TT and had previously undiagnosed thrombophilia, suggesting a thrombotic interaction between exogenous T and thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Given the increasing use of TT, our preliminary findings should facilitate design of a much-needed, multi-center, prospective study of pro-thrombotic interactions between T therapy and thrombophilia for subsequent thrombotic events including DVT-PE. PMID:25648660

  4. Contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis in a porcine model of acute peripheral arterial thrombosis and prevention of anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Nederhoed, Johanna H; Slikkerveer, Jeroen; Meyer, Klaas W; Wisselink, Willem; Musters, René J P; Yeung, Kak K

    2014-03-01

    Acute peripheral arterial thrombosis can be threatening to life and limb. Dissolution of the thrombus local catheter-directed intra-arterial infusion of fibrinolytic agents such as urokinase is the standard therapy for thrombosis; however, this method is time-intensive, and amputation of the affected limb is still needed in 10-30% of cases. Furthermore, thrombolytic therapy carries the risk of bleeding complications. The use of small gas-filled bubbles, or ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), in combination with ultrasound has been investigated as an improved thrombolytic therapy in acute coronary and cerebral arterial thrombosis. The authors describe a porcine model of acute peripheral arterial occlusion to test contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis approaches that combine ultrasound, UCAs and fibrinolytic agents and recommend a strategy for preventing severe allergic reactions to UCAs in the pigs. PMID:24552914

  5. Gunther Tulip Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement During Treatment for Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Kato, Takeharu; Iida, Shigeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gunther tulip retrievable vena cava filter (GTF) implantation to prevent pulmonary embolism during intravenously administered thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy and interventional radiological therapy for occlusive or nonocclusive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremity. Methods. We evaluated placement of 55 GTFs in 42 patients with lower extremity DVT who had undergone various treatments including those utilizing techniques of interventional radiology. Results. Worsening of pulmonary embolism in patients with existing pulmonary embolism or in those without pulmonary embolism at the time of GTF insertion was avoided in all patients. All attempts at implantation of the GTF were safely accomplished. Perforation and migration experienced by one patient was the only complication. Mean period of treatment for DVT under protection from pulmonary embolism by the GTF was 12.7 {+-} 8.3 days (mean {+-} SD, range 4-37 days). We attempted retrieval of GTFs in 18 patients in whom the venous thrombus had disappeared after therapy, and retrieval in one of these 18 cases failed. GTFs were left in the vena cava in 24 patients for permanent use when the DVT was refractory to treatment. Conclusion. The ability of the GTF to protect against pulmonary embolism during treatment of DVT was demonstrated. Safety in both placement and retrieval was clarified. Because replacement with a permanent filter was not required, use of the GTF was convenient when further protection from complicated pulmonary embolism was necessary.

  6. Two cases of central venous catheter-related thrombosis in living liver donors: how can the risk be minimized?

    PubMed

    Hata, Taigo; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kojiro; Kim, Byeoknyeon; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ogawa, Hayato; Arikawa, Takashi; Nagai, Shunji; Kamei, Hideya; Nakamura, Taro; Edamoto, Yoshihiro; Kiuchi, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    A central venous catheter (CVC) is commonly used for intraoperative management by anesthetists and surgeons during major operations, including donor operations for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), in which donor safety is of utmost importance. Reasons for use of CVC for donors include measurement of central venous pressure and drug infusion when necessary. A potentially serious complication of a major operation is pulmonary thromboembolism. We report two cases of LDLT donors complicated by catheter related thrombosis (CRT) of the jugular vein, who were eventually discharged without long-term complications. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of CRT among LDLT donor population. In this report, in order to minimize the risks related to CRT in LDLT donors, we propose thorough screening for thrombophilic disorders, use of a silicone or polyurethane double-lumen CVC as thin as possible, placement of the tip of the CVC at the superior vena cava via the right jugular vein using ultrasonography as a guide for puncture, and removal of the catheter at the end of the operation based on our experience of CRT among LDLT donors. PMID:19191817

  7. Subclavian central venous catheter-related thrombosis in trauma patients: incidence, risk factors and influence of polyurethane type

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) related to a central venous catheter varies considerably in ICUs depending on the population included. The aim of this study was to determine subclavian central venous catheter (SCVC)-related DVT risk factors in severely traumatized patients with regard to two kinds of polyurethane catheters. Methods Critically ill trauma patients needing a SCVC for their usual care were prospectively included in an observational study. Depending on the month of inclusion, patients received one of the two available products in the emergency unit: either an aromatic polyurethane SCVC or an aliphatic polyurethane SCVC. Patients were screened weekly by ultrasound for SCVC-related DVT. Potential risk factors were collected, including history-related, trauma-related and SCVC-related characteristics. Results A total of 186 patients were included with a median Injury Severity Sore of 30 and a high rate of severe brain injuries (21% of high intracranial pressure). Incidence of SCVC-related DVT was 37% (95% confidence interval: 26 to 40) in patients or 20/1,000 catheter-days. SCVC-related DVT occurred within 8 days in 65% of cases. There was no significant difference in DVT rates between the aromatic polyurethane and aliphatic polyurethane SCVC groups (38% vs. 36%). SCVC-related DVT independent risk factors were age >30 years, intracranial hypertension, massive transfusion (>10 packed red blood cell units), SCVC tip position in the internal jugular or in the innominate vein, and ipsilateral jugular catheter. Conclusion SCVC-related DVT concerned one-third of these severely traumatized patients and was mostly clinically silent. Incidence did not depend on the type of polyurethane but was related to age >30 years, intracranial hypertension or misplacement of the SCVC. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of routine screening in these patients in whom thromboprophylaxis may be hazardous. PMID:23718723

  8. A case-series study of cerebral venous thrombosis in women using short course oral contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Khomand, Payam; Hassanzadeh, Kambiz

    2016-01-01

    Background: We report a case series of cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT) in women who used oral contraceptive pill (OCP) in the Muslims Ramadan and fasting month. Methods: This study was a retrospective case series of 9 patients with diagnosis of CVT, who admitted in the neurology ward of Tohid Hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, in July-August 2014-2015. Results: Patients had no history of thrombosis before. They were treated with oral contraceptive more than 1 month to be able to fast during Ramadan. They did not have other possible risk factors for CVT. A headache was the most common in 9/9 patients (100%) followed by vomiting and vertigo. Conclusion: We found that high rate of CVT in female population during Ramadan indicates that it needs be considered as a specific risk factor and should be considered by healthcare system. PMID:27326364

  9. Immunoscintigraphic detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities by means of human antifibrin monoclonal antibodies labeled with sup 111 In

    SciTech Connect

    Lusiani, L.; Zanco, P.; Visona, A.; Breggion, G.; Pagnan, A.; Ferlin, G. )

    1989-07-01

    A new monoclonal antibody specific for the beta-chain of human fibrin (C22A) and labeled with 111In has been obtained and successfully used in rabbits and dogs for the in vivo detection of venous thrombosis. Studies in humans are currently ongoing. In order to assess the diagnostic value of 111In-antifibrin for the detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, the authors investigated 25 consecutive patients. Ten patients had clinical and instrumental (contrast phlebography and duplex scanning) evidence of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 3 had a long-standing DVT with relapsing episodes of swelling and pain, 5 had superficial venous thrombosis, and the remaining 7 had no signs of thrombosis at all. Twenty patients were being treated with heparin. All patients received 111In-antifibrin at the dose of 74 MBq IV and were scanned with a large field of view gamma camera coupled with a high-energy, parallel-hole collimator at 30 minutes and three, six, and twenty-four hours postinjection. Only the persistence of an abnormal uptake at twenty-four hours confirmed by two observers at visual inspection was considered as positive. A positive result was obtained in 9 of 10 DVT patients (90% sensitivity) and in all SVT patients. The single DVT patient with a negative 111In-antifibrin test had the longest interval between scintigraphy and onset of symptoms (fifty-five days). Thus, the age of thrombi represented a substantial limitation for the test. A false-positive result was obtained in a single SVT patient, in whom also a deep involvement, unconfirmed by phlebography, was suspected (91.6% specificity).

  10. Optoacoustic monitoring of central and peripheral venous oxygenation during simulated hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Kinsky, Michael; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Khan, Muzna N.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Circulatory shock may be fatal unless promptly recognized and treated. The most commonly used indicators of shock (hypotension and tachycardia) lack sensitivity and specificity. In the initial stages of shock, the body compensates by reducing blood flow to the peripheral (skin, muscle, etc.) circulation in order to preserve vital organ (brain, heart, liver) perfusion. Characteristically, this can be observed by a greater reduction in peripheral venous oxygenation (for instance, the axillary vein) compared to central venous oxygenation (the internal jugular vein). While invasive measurements of oxygenation are accurate, they lack practicality and are not without complications. We have developed a novel optoacoustic system that noninvasively determines oxygenation in specific veins. In order to test this application, we used lower body negative pressure (LBNP) system, which simulates hemorrhage by exerting a variable amount of suction on the lower body, thereby reducing the volume of blood available for central circulation. Restoration of normal blood flow occurs promptly upon cessation of LBNP. Using two optoacoustic probes, guided by ultrasound imaging, we simultaneously monitored oxygenation in the axillary and internal jugular veins (IJV). LBNP began at -20 mmHg, thereafter was reduced in a step-wise fashion (up to 30 min). The optoacoustically measured axillary oxygenation decreased with LBNP, whereas IJV oxygenation remained relatively constant. These results indicate that our optoacoustic system may provide safe and rapid measurement of peripheral and central venous oxygenation and diagnosis of shock with high specificity and sensitivity.

  11. Behcet's disease without oral ulcers presenting with erythema nodosum and deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ajmani, Sajal; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    We present a young male with recurrent erythema nodosum and recent deep vein thrombosis with scrotal ulcers but no oral ulcers. He was diagnosed as having Behcet's disease (BD) and subsequently responded to immunosuppressants and anticoagulation. This case highlights that up to 2% patients with BD may not have oral ulcers. Timely institution of therapy in our patient resulted in a favorable outcome. PMID:26220926

  12. Improving patient safety during insertion of peripheral venous catheters: an observational intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Günter; Reise, Gesche; James, Claudia; Gittelbauer, Kirsten; Gosch, Jutta; Alpers, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Peripheral venous catheters are frequently used in hospitalized patients but increase the risk of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Evidence-based guidelines describe specific steps that are known to reduce infection risk. However, the degree of guideline implementation in clinical practice is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the use of specific steps for insertion of peripheral venous catheters in clinical practice and to implement a multimodal intervention aimed at improving both compliance and the optimum order of the steps. Methods: The study was conducted at University Hospital Hamburg. An optimum procedure for inserting a peripheral venous catheter was defined based on three evidence-based guidelines (WHO, CDC, RKI) including five steps with 1A or 1B level of evidence: hand disinfection before patient contact, skin antisepsis of the puncture site, no palpation of treated puncture site, hand disinfection before aseptic procedure, and sterile dressing on the puncture site. A research nurse observed and recorded procedures for peripheral venous catheter insertion for healthcare workers in four different departments (endoscopy, central emergency admissions, pediatrics, and dermatology). A multimodal intervention with 5 elements was established (teaching session, dummy training, e-learning tool, tablet and poster, and direct feedback), followed by a second observation period. During the last observation week, participants evaluated the intervention. Results: In the control period, 207 insertions were observed, and 202 in the intervention period. Compliance improved significantly for four of five steps (e.g., from 11.6% to 57.9% for hand disinfection before patient contact; p<0.001, chi-square test). Compliance with skin antisepsis of the puncture site was high before and after intervention (99.5% before and 99.0% after). Performance of specific steps in the correct order also improved (e.g., from 7.7% to 68.6% when three of five steps

  13. Peripheral venous blood oxygen saturation can be non-invasively estimated using photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Khan, Musabbir; Pretty, Christopher G; Amies, Alexander C; Elliott, Rodney B; Suhaimi, Fatanah M; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of peripheral venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) is currently performed using invasive catheters or direct blood draw. The purpose of this study was to non-invasively determine SvO2 using a variation of pulse oximetry techniques. Artificial respiration-like modulations applied to the peripheral vascular system were used to infer regional SvO2 using photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors. To achieve this modulation, an artificial pulse generating system (APG) was developed to generate controlled, superficial perturbations on the finger using a pneumatic digit cuff. These low pressure and low frequency modulations affect blood volumes in veins to a much greater extent than arteries due to significant arterial-venous compliance differences. Ten healthy human volunteers were recruited for proof-ofconcept testing. The APG was set at a modulation frequency of 0.2 Hz (12 bpm) and 45-50 mmHg compression pressure. Initial analysis showed that induced blood volume changes in the venous compartment could be detected by PPG. Estimated arterial oxygen saturation (97% [IQR=96.1%-97.4%]) matches published values (95%-99%). Estimated venous oxygen saturation (93.2% [IQR=91.-93.9%]) agrees with reported ranges (92%-95%) measured in peripheral regions. The median difference between the two saturations was 3.6%, while the difference between paired measurements in each subject was statistically significant (p=0.002). These results demonstrate the feasibility of this method for real-time, low cost, non-invasive estimation of SvO2. Further validation of this method is warranted. PMID:26737758

  14. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism following prolonged air travel. Coach class thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Arfvidsson, B; Eklof, B; Kistner, R L; Masuda, E M; Sato, D T

    2000-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in legs and lungs is a potentially life-threatening condition. The incidence of VTE associated with air travel is still unknown, but it may have increased. Most travelers who develop symptoms do so within 24 hours after their flight takes off. Predisposing risk factors may be divided into patient-related and cabin-related factors, both of which are described. It is emphasized that better information and better inflight precautions can minimize these risk factors. PMID:10806562

  15. Diagnostic methods for deep vein thrombosis: venous Doppler examination, phleborheography, iodine-125 fibrinogen uptake, and phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Comerota, A.J.; White, J.V.; Katz, M.L.

    1985-10-08

    Since clinical diagnosis of DVT is often inaccurate, it has become accepted that an objective means of diagnosing clot in the deep venous system becomes critically important in the management of these patients. The venous Doppler examination monitors the velocity of blood flowing through a particular vein. Doppler probes in the 5 to 10 mHz range are routinely used. Respiratory variation is a normal finding due to a diminished flow signal during inspiration, followed by a progressive increase in flow signal during expiration. Characteristics of the spontaneous flow signals are the most important part of interpreting the venous Doppler examination. In addition, the response to distal or proximal compression (augmentation) adds important information to the interpretation; however, the response during any augmentation maneuver depends on the rapidity of compression, the force of compression, the quantity of blood in the veins at the time of compression, and the distance between the Doppler probe and the compression point. Phleborheography is a six-channel volumetric plethysmographic technique that monitors volume changes in the lower extremities associated with respiration and foot and calf compression.

  16. Treatment of High-risk Venous Thrombosis Patients Using Low-dose Intraclot Injections of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Regional Anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Richard; Butman, John A.; Lonser, Russell R.; Sherry, Richard M.; Pandalai, Prakash K.; Horne, McDonald K.; Lozier, Jay N.

    2013-01-01

    Seven patients with venous thrombosis and contraindications to traditional thrombolytic therapy, consisting of recent intracranial surgery, recent pineal or retroperitoneal hemorrhage, active genitourinary or gastrointestinal bleeding, epidural procedures, and impending surgery, were successfully treated with a modified thrombolytic regimen. To improve safety, prolonged continuous infusions of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was eliminated in favor of once-daily low-dose intraclot injections of tPA to minimize the amount and duration of tPA in the systemic circulation, and low-therapeutic or regional anticoagulation was used to reduce anticoagulant risks. These modifications may allow thrombolytic treatment for selected patients with severe venous thrombosis who are deemed to be at high risk. PMID:23273695

  17. A Prospective Study of the Clinical Profile, Outcome and Evaluation of D-dimer in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Dharanipragada, Subrahmanyam; Basu, Debdatta; Ananthakrishnan, Ramesh; Surendiran, Deepanjali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (CVT) is a well known disease with diverse clinical presentation and causes. With advances in neuroimaging and changing lifestyles, the clinical profile and causes of CVT are changing. D-dimer has been studied in early diagnosis of CVT with variable results. This prospective study was carried out to assess the clinical profile of CVT and role of D-dimer in diagnosis of CVT. Aim To study various aspects of CVT and role of D-dimer. Materials and Methods The study period was September 2012 to July 2014 and included 80 imaging proven patients of CVT. We also included 39 controls for assessing D-dimer. Data was collected according to a preformed format. D-dimer was assessed by a rapid semi-quantitative latex agglutination assay. Discharged patients were followed up to six months. Results Of the total 44 were women and 36 were men (F: M=1.2:1). The mean age of the patients was 29.5±9.68 years. Most common clinical features were headache 77 (96.25%), papilloedema (67.5%) and seizures 51 (63.75%). Pregnancy was the most common cause of CVT. Superior sagittal and transverse sinuses were the most common sinuses to be affected. The sensitivity and specificity of D-dimer for diagnosing CVT was 84.62% and 80% respectively. The risk factors for poor prognosis were altered sensorium, presence of sepsis, increased sinus involvement and deep sinus thrombosis. Conclusion CVT affects both sexes equally. Puerperium still contributes to majority of the cases. Iron deficiency anaemia needs to be evaluated as a contributing factor for incidence of CVT. D-dimer is not useful in puerperal female with CVT. Positive D-dimer will strengthen the suspicion of CVT in patients with acute headache followed by a neurological deficit. PMID:27504325

  18. [Successful delivery following subcutaneous heparin administration in a 7-weeks pregnant patient suffering from cerebral venous thrombosis due to secondary protein S deficiency].

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroaki; Naruse, Satoshi; Koike, Tadashi; Okuizumi, Yuzuru; Fujita, Nobuya; Nagai, Hiroko

    2006-03-01

    A 25-year-old, 7-weeks pregnant woman was admitted to the Nagaoka Red Cross Hospital in a state of confusion, following fever, headache and vomiting. Brain CT and MRI showed swelling in the bilateral thalami, basal ganglia and splenium of corpus callosum, and thrombosis of the internal cerebral veins and straight sinus. Initial treatment by intravenous heparin and glycerol was successful, and she regained her consciousness, leaving antegrade amnesia and childish character change. Her free protein S antigen was 32% (normal 60-127) and subsequently rose to 70% after delivery. She was diagnosed as having secondary protein S deficiency associated with pregnancy. Because warfarin can be teratogenic, subcutaneous heparin injection was prescribed in order to prevent thrombosis and the patient subsequently had a successful delivery. This was the first case in Japanese of successful delivery after subcutaneous heparin treatment in a patient with cerebral venous thrombosis. PMID:16642938

  19. Non-invasive measurement of peripheral venous oxygen saturation using a new venous oximetry method: evaluation during bypass in heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Echiadis, A S; Crabtree, V P; Bence, J; Hadjinikolaou, L; Alexiou, C; Spyt, T J; Hu, S

    2007-08-01

    Monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO(2)) is currently performed using invasive fibre-optic catheters. This procedure is not without risk as complications may arise from catheterization. This paper describes an alternative, non-invasive method of monitoring peripheral venous oxygen saturation (SxvO(2)) which, although it cannot replace pulmonary artery catheters, can serve as an adjunct/early warning indicator of when there is an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. The technique requires the generation of an artificial venous pulse at the finger, thereby causing modulation of the venous blood volume within the digit. The blood volume changes are monitored using an optical sensor. Just as pulse oximetry utilizes the natural arterial pulse to perform a spectrophotometric analysis of the peripheral blood in order to estimate the arterial blood oxygen saturation, the proposed venous oximetry technique uses the artificially generated venous pulse to estimate SxvO(2). A prototype device was tested in a pilot study with patients undergoing heart surgery. Data from this study support the notion that the method is capable of tracking haemodynamic changes and suggests the technique is worthy of further development and evaluation. PMID:17664681

  20. mTORC1 promotes aging-related venous thrombosis in mice via elevation of platelet volume and activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Zhou, Xuan; Fan, Xiaorong; Xiao, Min; Yang, Dinghua; Liang, Bo; Dai, Meng; Shan, Lanlan; Lu, Jingbo; Lin, Zhiqi; Liu, Rong; Liu, Jun; Wang, Liping; Zhong, Mei; Jiang, Yu; Bai, Xiaochun

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with an increased incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE), resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Platelet hyperactivation is linked to aging-related VTE. However, the mechanisms through which aging enhances platelet activation and susceptibility to VTE are poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is essential for aging-related platelet hyperactivation and VTE. mTORC1 was hyperactivated in platelets and megakaryocytes (MKs) from aged mice, accompanied by elevated mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet activation. Inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin led to a significant reduction in susceptibility to experimental deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in aged mice (P < .01). To ascertain the specific role of platelet mTORC1 activation in DVT, we generated mice with conditional ablation of the mTORC1-specific component gene Raptor in MKs and platelets (Raptor knockout). These mice developed markedly smaller and lighter thrombi, compared with wild-type littermates (P < .01) in experimental DVT. Mechanistically, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production with aging induced activation of mTORC1 in MKs and platelets, which, in turn, enhanced bone marrow MK size, MPV, and platelet activation to promote aging-related VTE. ROS scavenger administration induced a significant decrease (P < .05) in MK size, MPV, and platelet activation in aged mice. Our findings collectively demonstrate that mTORC1 contributes to enhanced venous thrombotic susceptibility in aged mice via elevation of platelet size and activation. PMID:27288518

  1. Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Leg, Associated with Agenesis of the Infrarenal Inferior Vena Cava and Hypoplastic Left Kidney (KILT Syndrome) in a 14-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Bami, Sakshi; Vazquez, Yarelis; Chorny, Valeriy; Amodio, John

    2015-01-01

    Agenesis of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is a rare anomaly which can be identified as incidental finding or can be associated with iliofemoral vein thrombosis. IVC agenesis has a known association with renal anomalies which are mainly confined to the right kidney. We describe a case of a 14-year-old male who presented with left leg swelling and pain. Ultrasonography confirmed the presence of left leg deep vein thrombosis (DVT). No underlying hematologic risk factors were identified. A CT scan was obtained which demonstrated absent infrarenal IVC and extensive thrombosis in the left deep venous system and development of collateral venous flow into the azygous/hemiazygous system, with extension of thrombus into paraspinal collaterals. An additional finding in the patient was an atrophic left kidney and stenosis of an accessory left renal artery. Agenesis of the IVC should be considered in a young patient presenting with lower extremity DVT, especially in patients with no risk factors for thrombosis. As agenesis of the IVC cannot be corrected, one should be aware that there is a lifelong risk of lower extremity DVT. PMID:25685585

  2. Increased Levels of NF-kB-Dependent Markers in Cancer-Associated Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Bevelacqua, Valentina; Polesel, Jerry; Taborelli, Martina; Guarneri, Claudio; Fenga, Concettina; Umezawa, Kazou; Libra, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies highlight the role of inflammatory markers in thrombosis as well as in cancer. However, their combined role in cancer-associated deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and the molecular mechanisms, involved in its pathophysiology, needs further investigations. In the present study, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1β), matrix metalloproteases-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue factor (TF), fibrinogen and soluble P-selectin, were analyzed in plasma and in monocyte samples from 385 cancer patients, of whom 64 were concomitantly affected by DVT (+). All these markers were higher in cancer patients DVT+ than in those DVT-. Accordingly, significantly higher NF-kB activity was observed in cancer patients DVT+ than DVT-. Significant correlation between data obtained in plasma and monocyte samples was observed. NF-kB inhibition was associated with decreased levels of all molecules in both cancer DVT+ and DVT-. To further demonstrate the involvement of NF-kB activation by the above mentioned molecules, we treated monocyte derived from healthy donors with a pool of sera from cancer patients with and without DVT. These set of experiments further suggest the significant role played by some molecules, regulated by NF-kB, and detected in cancer patients with DVT. Our data support the notion that NF-kB may be considered as a therapeutic target for cancer patients, especially those complicated by DVT. Treatment with NF-kB inhibitors may represent a possible strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of DVT in cancer patients. PMID:26192925

  3. Increased Levels of NF-kB-Dependent Markers in Cancer-Associated Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Malaponte, Grazia; Signorelli, Salvatore S; Bevelacqua, Valentina; Polesel, Jerry; Taborelli, Martina; Guarneri, Claudio; Fenga, Concettina; Umezawa, Kazou; Libra, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies highlight the role of inflammatory markers in thrombosis as well as in cancer. However, their combined role in cancer-associated deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and the molecular mechanisms, involved in its pathophysiology, needs further investigations. In the present study, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1β), matrix metalloproteases-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue factor (TF), fibrinogen and soluble P-selectin, were analyzed in plasma and in monocyte samples from 385 cancer patients, of whom 64 were concomitantly affected by DVT (+). All these markers were higher in cancer patients DVT+ than in those DVT-. Accordingly, significantly higher NF-kB activity was observed in cancer patients DVT+ than DVT-. Significant correlation between data obtained in plasma and monocyte samples was observed. NF-kB inhibition was associated with decreased levels of all molecules in both cancer DVT+ and DVT-. To further demonstrate the involvement of NF-kB activation by the above mentioned molecules, we treated monocyte derived from healthy donors with a pool of sera from cancer patients with and without DVT. These set of experiments further suggest the significant role played by some molecules, regulated by NF-kB, and detected in cancer patients with DVT. Our data support the notion that NF-kB may be considered as a therapeutic target for cancer patients, especially those complicated by DVT. Treatment with NF-kB inhibitors may represent a possible strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of DVT in cancer patients. PMID:26192925

  4. Association of vWA and TPOX Polymorphisms with Venous Thrombosis in Mexican Mestizos

    PubMed Central

    Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Santana, Carla; Noris, Gino; Camacho-Mejorado, Rafael; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C.; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S.; Hernández-Juárez, Jesús; Magaña, Jonathan J.; Gómez, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a multifactorial disorder and, worldwide, the most important cause of morbidity and mortality. Genetic factors play a critical role in its aetiology. Microsatellites are the most important source of human genetic variation having more phenotypic effect than many single nucleotide polymorphisms. Hence, we evaluate a possible relationship between VTE and the genetic variants in von Willebrand factor, human alpha fibrinogen, and human thyroid peroxidase microsatellites to identify possible diagnostic markers. Methods. Genotypes were obtained from 177 patients with VTE and 531 nonrelated individuals using validated genotyping methods. The allelic frequencies were compared; Bayesian methods were used to correct population stratification to avoid spurious associations. Results. The vWA-18, TPOX-9, and TPOX-12 alleles were significantly associated with VTE. Moreover, subjects bearing the combination vWA-18/TPOX-12 loci exhibited doubled risk for VTE (95% CI = 1.02–3.64), whereas the combination vWA-18/TPOX-9 showed an OR = 10 (95% CI = 4.93–21.49). Conclusions. The vWA and TPOX microsatellites are good candidate biomarkers in venous thromboembolism diseases and could help to elucidate their origins. Additionally, these polymorphisms could become useful markers for genetic studies of VTE in the Mexican population; however, further studies should be done owing that this data only show preliminary evidence. PMID:25250329

  5. [Recanalization of lower-limb deep veins as an index of efficacy of treatment for acute venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Sapelkin, S V; Boldin, B V; Leont'ev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A

    2016-01-01

    The authors analysed the results of examination and treatment of a total of 102 patients presenting with iliofemoral venous thrombosis. During treatment, ultrasonographic duplex scanning was used to determine the localization of the proximal margin of thrombotic masses, the time of appearing of the first signs of recanalization, its degree at various levels of the deep venous system, as well as alteration in velocity of the venous blood flow in the deep veins of the lower limbs. The dynamics of clinical symptoms was assessed by the visual analogue scale. Clinical and instrumental examination was performed on day 10, and then 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the beginning of treatment. The patients were subdivided into three groups. Group One comprised 38 patients receiving therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaprin) followed by switching to indirect anticoagulants (warfarin) combined with venotonics (original highly-purified diosmin 600 mg once daily). Group Two was composed of 33 patients receiving rivaroxaban at a dose of 15 mg twice daily for 3 weeks, followed by 20 mg once daily. Group Tree patients (n=31) were also given rivaroxaban according to the above-described standard regimen but in combination with venotonics (original highly-purified diosmin 600 mg once daily). The obtained findings showed that prescribing rivaroxaban to patients from the first day of the disease made it possible to considerably improve and accelerate the processes of restoration of patency of deep veins of lower extremities as compared with the patients taking vitamin K antagonists (warfarin). In patients receiving rivaroxaban, there were no cases of residual thrombotic occlusions of the major veins, and recanalization in three fourths of patients was assessed as good and in the remaining third as moderate. In the warfarin group, occlusion in the iliac veins was noted to persist persisted in 13% of patients, with good recanalization observed only in half of the patients. Addition

  6. [Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis associated with hyperhomocysteinemia due to combined deficiencies of folate and vitamin B12].

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Yuhei; Neshige, Shuichiro; Takemaru, Makoto; Shiga, Yuji; Takeshima, Shinichi; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of convulsive seizures. Radiological examinations revealed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the anterior part of the superior sagittal sinus. He had marked hyperhomocysteinemia (93.5 nmol/ml) due to combined deficiencies of folate and vitamin B12. He was T/T homozygous for methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism. He received a supplement therapy of vitamins. First, he was administered folate orally. After 3 months, the serum level of homocysteine decreased to 22.6 nmol/ml (an 86% reduction), but was still above the normal level. Next, an additional supplement therapy of vitamin B12 lowered the homocysteine level to normal (12.3 nmol/ml) after 4 months. These results showed that the increase of homocysteine levels in this patient was mainly caused by the deficiency of folate. Additionally, acquired risk factors like vitamin deficiencies increased the level of serum homocysteine to almost 100 nmol/ml. PMID:26797484

  7. Association study of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C mutation with cerebral venous thrombosis risk in an Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Ghaznavi; Zahra, Soheili; Shahram, Samiei; Soltanpour, Mohammad Soleiman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon condition characterized by severe clinical manifestations and high mortality rate. There is limited data on the role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) A1298C mutation as a risk factor for CVT development in Iranians. Aim: The aim was to investigate a possible association between fasting plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels, MTHFR A1298C mutation, and CVT in Iranian population. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 50 patients with a diagnosis of CVT (20–63 years old) and 75 healthy subjects (18–65 years old) as control. Genotyping of the MTHFR A1298C mutation and Hcy measurement was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique and enzyme immunoassay method, respectively. Results: Fasting plasma total Hcy levels were significantly higher in CVT patients than controls (P = 0.015). No significant differences were observed in the MTHFR A1298C genotypes frequency between CVT patients and controls (P > 0.05). The frequency of the 1298C allele was 36% and 37.5% in CVT patients and controls, respectively and did not differ significantly between the two groups (P = 0.16). Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that MTHFR A1298Cmutation is not a significant risk factor for CVT. PMID:26539365

  8. Prothrombin Gene G20210A Mutation in Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis Patients with Poor Response to Warfarin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Attia, F.M; Mikhailidis, D.P; Reffat, S.A

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The pathogenesis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) involves an interaction between hereditary and acquired factors. Prothrombin gene mutation is one of the hereditary risk factors. We evaluated the frequency of the prothrombin gene mutation in patients with DVT and its relation to oral warfarin anticoagulant therapy response. Methods: Prothrombin gene mutation was looked for in 40 DVT patients with poor response to warfarin. The results were compared with 40 DVT patients with a normal response to warfarin and 30 healthy blood donors. Blood samples were also assessed for protein C, protein S, anti-thrombin III and anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) levels. Results: Prothrombin gene mutation was found in normal and poor DVT responders (6/40 and 13/40, respectively; p = NS) as well as in healthy controls (1/30). Patients with recurrent DVT or a family history of DVT were significantly (p<0.0001) more likely to have the prothrombin mutation than other DVT patients. Non prothrombin abnormalities (protein C, anti-thrombin III and ACA) were more common in poor responders than controls (p<0.0037) as were ACA (p<0.034). Conclusions: Prothrombin gene mutation is present in several DVT patients, especially those with recurrent DVT or a family history of DVT. This mutation may contribute to a poor response to warfarin. PMID:19920886

  9. A Hematological Menace: Multiple Venous Thrombosis Complicated by Acquired Factor VIII Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Robin; Dominguez, Luis W.; Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Badin, Simon; Wasserman, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: Acquired Factor VIII Deficiency Symptoms: Abdominal hematoma • DVT • life threatening bleeding Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Life saving medical therapy Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) classically presents with spontaneous bleeding of mucosal sites, GI tract, and sub-cutaneous tissues, often leading to large hematomas and ecchymosis. Among documented cases, 50% are idiopathic and few have been associated with trauma or surgery. We present a case of life-threatening bleeding caused by AHA, following trauma and complicated by multiple venous thrombi. Case Report: A 21-year-old man presented with multiple injuries secondary to trauma leading to extensive life-saving surgery. Two weeks post-operatively, he developed multiple deep venous thrombi and was started on anticoagulation. Twenty-four days post-operatively, he started bleeding from multiple mucosal sites and developed an abdominal hematoma. Anticoagulation was stopped, with administration of fresh frozen plasma and vitamin K. Diagnosis of AHA was made based on low factor VIII level and presence of factor VIII inhibitors after an appropriate battery of tests ruled out other possible diagnoses. He was started on steroids and recombinant factor VIIa, leading to immediate improvement. Once stable, Rituximab infusions resulted in decreasing factor VIII inhibitor levels, with gradual normalization of PTT. Conclusions: AHA remains a diagnostic challenge because of its rarity, leading to delay in diagnosis and causing significant morbidity and mortality. Elevated PTT relative to PT/INR is a strong clue which should be followed by mixing studies. Very few cases have been associated with surgery or trauma and relatively few large, controlled trials have compared different treatment modalities for AHA. Growing evidence supports anti-CD20 (Rituximab) as an effective treatment option, as in this case. PMID:27040655

  10. Prevention of central venous line-related thrombosis by continuous infusion of low-dose unfractionated heparin, in patients with haemato-oncological disease. A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, Abderrahman; Ben Othman, Tarek; Kammoun, Leïla; Chelli, Mouna; Romdhane, Neïla Ben; Kriaa, Azza; Ladeb, Saloua; Torjman, Lamia; Lakhal, Amel; Achour, Wafa; Ben Hassen, Assia; Hsaïri, Mohamed; Ladeb, Fethi; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2004-09-01

    We have conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate the role of low-dose unfractionated heparin prophylaxis in preventing central venous line-related thrombosis in patients with haemato-oncological disease. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either prophylactic intravenous unfractionated heparin (continuous infusion of 100 IU/kg/daily) or 50 ml/daily of normal saline solution as a continuous infusion. CVLs were externalized, non tunneled, double lumen catheters. All CVLs were placed percutaneously by the same physician in the subclavian vein. Upper limb veins were systematically examined by ultrasonography just before, or <24 hours after, catheter removal, and in case of clinical signs of thrombosis. One hundred and twenty-eight CVLs were inserted. Catheter-related thrombosis occurred in 1.5% of the catheters inserted in patients of the heparin group, and in 12.6% in the control group (p = 0.03). No other risk factors were found for the development of catheter-related thrombosis. Two and three patients experienced severe bleeding in the heparin group, and in the control group, respectively (p = 0.18). There were no other side-effects clearly ascribable to the use of unfractionated heparin. This is the first prospective, randomized study, which shows that low-dose of unfractionated heparin is safe and effective to prevent catheter-related thrombosis in patients with haemato-oncological disease. PMID:15351864

  11. Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal venous tumor thrombosis: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kichang; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is dismal (approximately 2-4 mo), and PVTT is reportedly found in 10%-40% of HCC patients at diagnosis. According to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) Staging System (which is the most widely adopted HCC management guideline), sorafenib is the standard of care for advanced HCC (i.e., BCLC stage C) and the presence of PVTT is included in this category. However, sorafenib treatment only marginally prolongs patient survival and, notably, its therapeutic efficacy is reduced in patients with PVTT. In this context, there have been diverse efforts to develop alternatives to current standard systemic chemotherapies or combination treatment options. To date, many studies on transarterial chemoembolization, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, hepatic arterial chemotherapy, and transarterial radioembolization report better overall survival than sorafenib therapy alone, but their outcomes need to be verified in future prospective, randomized controlled studies in order to be incorporated into current treatment guidelines. Additionally, combination strategies have been applied to treat HCC patients with PVTT, with the hope that the possible synergistic actions among different treatment modalities would provide promising results. This narrative review describes the current status of the management options for HCC with PVTT, with a focus on overall survival. PMID:26755886

  12. Cerebral venous thrombosis in post-lumbar puncture intracranial hypotension: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kate, Mahesh P.

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of presentation of intracranial hypotension is clinically perplexing. We report a case of 31-year-old post-partum woman who underwent an uneventful caesarean section under spinal anesthesia. From the second day of surgery she developed postural headache, the headache lost its postural character after few days. She then developed seizures and ataxic hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features of severe intracranial hypotension in the brain and the spinal cord, and magnetic resonance venography showed cortical vein and partial superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Prothrombotic (etiological) work-up showed Protein C and S deficiency. She responded to anticoagulation therapy and recovered completely. On review of literature two distinct groups could be identified obstetric and non-obstetric. The non-obstetric group included patients who underwent diagnostic lumbar puncture, intrathecal injection of medications and epidural anesthesia for non-obstetric surgeries. Poor outcome and mortality was noted in non-obstetric group, while obstetric group had an excellent recovery. PMID:24627803

  13. Young's modulus reconstruction for elasticity imaging of deep venous thrombosis: animal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Xie, Hua; Kim, Kang; Rubin, Jonathan M.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wakefield, T. W.; Myers, D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2004-04-01

    Recently, it was suggested that ultrasound elasticity imaging can be used to age deep vein thrombosis (DVT) since blood clot hardness changes with fibrin content. The main components of ultrasound elasticity imaging are deformation of the object, speckle or internal boundary tracking and evaluation of tissue motion, measurement of strain tensor components, and reconstruction of the spatial distribution of elastic modulus using strain images. In this paper, we investigate a technique for Young's modulus reconstruction to quantify ultrasound elasticity imaging of DVT. In-vivo strain imaging experiments were performed using Sprague-Dawley rats with surgically induced clots in the inferior vena cavas (IVC). In this model, the clot matures from acute to chronic in less than 10 days. Therefore, nearly every 24 hours the strain imaging experiments were performed to reveal temporal transformation of the clot. The measured displacement and strain images were then converted into maps of elasticity using model-based elasticity reconstruction where the blood clot within an occluded vein was approximated as a layered elastic cylinder surrounded by incompressible tissue. Results of this study demonstrate that Young's modulus gradually increases with clot maturity and can be used to differentiate clots providing a desperately needed clinical tool of DVT staging.

  14. Compartment syndrome as a complication of ileofemoral deep venous thrombosis:a case presentation.

    PubMed

    Lamborn, David R; Schranz, Craig

    2014-02-01

    A 22-year-old morbidly obese, nonpregnant woman presented with left ileofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) presenting as low back pain and bilateral, left greater than right, leg swelling and pain for 2 days. While on heparin, she developed compartment syndrome in her left leg and had evidence of dead muscle tissue at the time of fasciotomy. Three options exist for treatment of ileofemoral DVT: catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), CDT plus pharmacomechanical thrombolysis or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, and surgical thrombectomy. Catheter-directed thrombolysis alone or in conjunction with pharmacomechanical thrombolysis in patients with low risk of bleeding has shown significant lysis of occlusion in 79% of patients with ileofemoral DVT with relatively low complication rates. Surgical thrombectomy and fasciotomy have not proven to be as effective but are appropriate alternatives if CDT is not available. Standard anticoagulation alone is likely not a sufficient treatment for ileofemoral DVT. Other therapies including CDT, CDT plus pharmacomechanical thrombolysis or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, or surgical thrombectomy to address lysis of the clot should be attempted first or in conjunction with anticoagulation for appropriate patients. Catheter-directed thrombolysis with or without pharmacomechanical thrombolysis is the preferred initial treatment. PMID:24091199

  15. Chronic diarrhea, eosinophilic ascites, acute pancreatitis and deep venous thrombosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Javid Bhat, Khalid; Bhat, Sanjay; Dutt, Kalyan; Gupta, Sakul; Jeelani Samoon, Hamaad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is rare and is characterized by recurrent eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract and chronic diarrhea. In this report we present a case of EG with acute pancreatitis and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Case presentation: A 30 years old male was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of epigastric pain, vomitting and swelling of his left limb for the past six days. He was also having diarrhea for the last several months. He had been evaluated for chronic diarrhea and ascites before he sought the current consultation. Duplex color doppler of left limb showed DVT of distal calf vein. Contrast enhanced CT imaging of abdomen revealed thickening of duodenum, proximal jejunal wall and presence of ascites. Duodenal biopsy showed normal villous pattern with mild inflammation and eosinophilic infiltration. The constellation of clinical presentation, hypereosinophilia, CT and biopsy findings all is in consistence to EG. The patient was treated with prednisolone 20 mg/day for four weeks and tapered slowly. Acute pancreatitis was managed conservatively while DVT was treated with heparin and oral anticoagulants. The patient’s diarrhea settled and ascites resolved completely. At follow up, the absolute eosinophil count was 300/μl and the patient was doing well. Conclusion: This case report emphasizes that one should consider these rare disorders during the differential diagnosis of unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms in the presence of hypereosinophilia. PMID:25202449

  16. Effects of Preoperative Glycyrrhizin Infusion for the Prevention of Venous Thrombosis on the Tissue Expression of Antithrombin in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Kira, Yukimi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Using a thrombus model prepared by ligation of the inferior vena cava (IVC), the influences of the glycoside, glycyrrhizin, on plasma antithrombin levels and antithrombin mRNA expression levels in the liver and IVC with the inhibition of venous thrombosis were investigated. Materials and Methods: The rat IVC was exposed and ligated for 24 h immediately after the intravenous administration of 300 mg/kg glycyrrhizin. Among antithrombotic drugs, the Xa inhibitor, fondaparinux sodium, was used as a control drug. Results: The mean thrombus weight was significantly smaller in the glycyrrhizin-treated group (18.3 mg) than in the saline-treated group (34.3 mg). In contrast, the inhibition of thrombosis was not observed in the fondaparinux-treated group. Antithrombin mRNA expression levels in the liver were significantly higher in the ligated groups than in the baseline control group. The mean plasma antithrombin level was significantly lower in the glycyrrhizin group (96.6%) than in the saline group (114.4%), but was not significantly different from that in the baseline control group (102.4%). Conclusion: The pretreatment with glycyrrhizin inhibited venous thrombosis, and antithrombin mRNA expression levels in the liver and IVC as well as plasma antithrombin levels were significantly lower than those in the saline group. PMID:27375802

  17. Use of Percutaneous Aspiration Thrombectomy vs. Anticoagulation Therapy to Treat Acute Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis: 1-year Follow-up Results of a Randomised, Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Volkan; Gulcu, Aytac; Akay, Emrah; Capar, Ahmet E.; Gencpinar, Tugra; Kucuk, Banu; Karabay, Ozalp; Goktay, A. Yigit

    2014-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) followed by standard anticoagulant therapy, with anticoagulation therapy alone, for the treatment of acute proximal lower extremity deep vein thrombosis.MethodsIn this randomised, prospective study, 42 patients with acute proximal iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis documented via Doppler ultrasound examination, were separated into an interventional treatment group (16 males, 5 females, average age 51 years) and a medical treatment group (13 males, 8 females, average age 59 years). In the interventional group, PAT with large-lumen 9-F diameter catheterisation was applied, after initiation of standard anticoagulant therapy. Balloon angioplasty (n 19) and stent implementation (n: 14) were used to treat patients with residual stenosis (>50 %) after PAT. Prophylactic IVC filters were placed in two patients. The thrombus clearance status of the venous system was evaluated by venography. In both the medical and interventional groups, venous patency rates and clinical symptom scores were evaluated at months 1, 3, and 12 after treatment.ResultsDeep venous systems became totally cleared of thrombi in 12 patients treated with PAT. The venous patency rates in month 12 were 57.1 and 4.76 % in the interventional and medical treatment groups, respectively. A statistically significant improvement was observed in clinical symptom scores of the interventional group (PAT) with or without stenting (4.23 ± 0.51 before treatment; 0.81 ± 0.92 at month 12) compared with the medical treatment group (4.00 ± 0.63 before treatment; 2.43 ± 0.67 at month 12). During follow-up, four patients in the medical treatment and one in the interventional group developed pulmonary embolisms.ConclusionsFor treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis, PAT with or without stenting is superior to anticoagulant therapy alone in terms of both ensuring venous patency and improving clinical

  18. The incidence of deep venous thrombosis in high-risk Indian neurosurgical patients: Need for early chemoprophylaxis?

    PubMed Central

    George, Ajith John; Nair, Shalini; Karthic, Jayanthi Chinnaiya; Joseph, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is thought to be less common in Asians than in Caucasian population. The incidence of DVT in high-risk groups, especially the neurosurgical (NS) patients, has not been well studied. This leaves no firm basis for the start of early prophylactic anticoagulation within first 5 postoperative days in Indian NS patients. This is a prospective observational study to determine the early occurrence of DVT in the NS patients. Patients and Methods: We screened 137 consecutive high-risk NS patients based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. The femoral veins were screened using Doppler ultrasound on day 1, 3, and 5 of admission into the NS Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at tertiary center from South India. Results: Among 2887 admissions to NICU 147 patients met inclusion criteria. One hundred thirty seven were screened for DVT. There was a 4.3% (6/137) incidence of DVT with none of the six patients having signs or symptoms of pulmonary embolism. Among the risk factors studied, there was a significant association with femoral catheterization and a probable association with weakness/paraparesis/paraplegia. The mortality in the study group was 10.8% with none attributable to DVT or pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: There is a low incidence of DVT among the high risk neurosurgical population evaluated within the first 5 days of admission to NICU, limiting the need for early chemical thrombo-prophylaxis in these patients. With strict protocols for mechanical prophylaxis with passive leg exercise, early mobilization and serial femoral Doppler screening, heparin anticoagulation can be restricted within the first 5 days of ICU admission in high risk patients. PMID:27555696

  19. Portomesenteric venous thrombosis as a rare cause of acute abdomen in a young patient: What should be the process of diagnosis and management?

    PubMed Central

    İnan, Mehmet; Sarıoğlu, Tansel; Serhat, Tülay Hakkı

    2013-01-01

    This report aimed to discuss indications for radiological evaluation, laboratory investigation for thrombophilic risk factors, and the duration of anticoagulation therapy in porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis, based on a young patient who presented with acute abdomen and ascites. We investigated the acquired and genetic thrombophilic risk factors and the diagnostic process. Abdominal CT and Doppler US were found to be useful radiological tools in both diagnosis and follow-up of portomesenteric thrombosis. The investigated thrombophilic factors, PT G20210A, MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C, were positive for heterozygous mutations and high levels of lupus anticoagulant and factor VIII were detected. Rapid ascites resolution and an improvement in abdominal pain after meals were observed following anticoagulation. Follow-up examination after six months showed that the portomesenteric thrombosis had completely resolved. Evaluation by CT is recommended for patients with acute abdomen and ascites, especially if ultrasonography failed to show any specific pathology. Several acquired or genetic thrombophilic factors were identified in a patient in whom local precipitating factors were absent. For patients with genetic thrombophilic risk factors and thrombosis at an uncommon site in the body, lifelong treatment with anticoagulants is recommended. PMID:25931853

  20. Late onset brachial artery thrombosis and total temporary peripheral neuropathy in a child with humerus supracondylar fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ege, Tolga; Türkkan, Selim; Günay, Celalettin; Külahçı, Yalçın; Kürklü, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric supracondylar fractures of the humerus are generally associated with neurovascular complications due to the deformity and sharp nature of bone fragments. When treated inadequately, these injuries may result in catastrophic complications, such as Volkmann's contracture and amputation. To our knowledge, late onset brachial arterial thrombosis and total temporary peripheral neuropathy after surgery of pediatric supracondylar fracture in the setting of normal preoperative vascular examination has not been reported yet. In this study, a 2-year and 6- month-old girl, who had delayed brachial arterial thrombosis after a displaced humerus supracondylar fracture surgery treated with embolectomy, was reported. Total lesion of median, ulnar and radial nerves completely resolved four months after surgery. Close neurovascular monitoring on the postoperative phase especially in severely displaced supracondylar fractures is strongly emphasized even in the setting of well-perfused hand. PMID:25779718

  1. Preoperative color duplex echographical venous mapping before autologous fat graft for calf augmentation: a case report of superficial vein thrombosis and prevalence of intersaphenic anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Fraccalvieri, Marco; Contessa, Luigi; Salomone, Marco; Zingarelli, Enrico Maria; Bruschi, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    Autologous fat grafting for calf augmentation is considered an easy and safe technique. Only few cases of potential complications have been described in literature; among them, vein thrombosis was never reported. We report a case of superficial vein thrombosis of the intersaphenic anastomosis after fat graft for calf symmetrization in club-foot syndrome. A color duplex echographical study showed that such intersaphenic anastomoses are present in all patients, but they have an ectatic diameter in 70% of patients with great saphenous vein insufficiency and in 50% of patients without insufficiency. The plastic surgeon should be aware of the presence and topography of such anatomical variations before performing the procedure. Moreover, a preoperative color duplex echographical venous mapping may help the surgeon in avoiding the trauma on vein variants and subsequent complications. PMID:23528632

  2. Analysis of Risk Factors for Lower-limb Deep Venous Thrombosis in Old Patients after Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Jiang, Xu; Wu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common complication of arthroplasty in old patients. We analyzed risk factors for lower-limb DVT after arthroplasty in patients aged over 70 years to determine controllable risk factors. Methods: This was a retrospective study of 1,025 patients aged >70 years treated with knee arthroplasty at our hospital between January 2009 and December 2013. Of 1,025 patients, 175 had postoperative lower-limb DVT. We compared medical history, body mass index (BMI), ambulatory blood pressure, preoperative and postoperative fasting blood glucose (FBG), preoperative blood total cholesterol, triglyceride, high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and preoperative homocysteine (Hcy) between thrombus and non-thrombus groups. B-mode ultrasonography was used to detect lower-limb DVT before the operation and 7 days after the operation in all patients. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors for DVT. Results: Incidence of diabetes (P = 0.014), BMI (P = 0.003), preoperative FBG (P = 0.004), postoperative FBG (P = 0.012), and preoperative Hcy (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the thrombus group. A significantly greater proportion of patients in the non-thrombus group had early postoperative activity (P < 0.001) and used a foot pump (P < 0.001). Operative duration was significantly longer in the thrombus group (P = 0.012). Within the thrombus group, significantly more patients had bilateral than unilateral knee arthroplasty (P < 0.01). Multivariate logistic analysis revealed BMI, preoperative Hcy, postoperative FBG, long operative duration, bilateral knee arthroplasty, and time to the activity after the operation to be predictive factors of DVT. At 6-month follow-up of the thrombus group, 4.7% of patients had pulmonary embolism and 18.8% had recurrent DVT; there were no deaths. Conclusions: Obesity, inactivity after operation, elevated preoperative Hcy and postoperative FBG, long operative duration, and

  3. Current Practice of Pharmacological Thromboprophylaxis for Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Children: A Survey of Pediatric Hemostasis and Thrombosis Experts in North America.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Sherif M; Rychlik, Karen; Sharathkumar, Anjali A

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological thromboprophylaxis (pTP) is the most effective intervention to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalized adults. High-quality studies investigating the role of pTP in children are lacking. The aim of this study is to understand pediatric hematologists' current practices of pTP prescription and to explore their opinion about universal adoption of pTP for high-risk hospitalized children. An electronic survey was sent to members of Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society of North America. The response rate was 47.3% (53/112). VTE was perceived as a major hospital acquired complication by all and 96% (51/53) prescribed pTP in select cases. Majority would consider prescribing pTP for personal history of thrombosis, inheritance of severe thrombophilic conditions, and teen age. The majority of respondents (55%, 29/53) were either not in support of or uncertain about the universal adoption of pTP policy for high-risk hospitalized children. In total, 62% of respondents (33/53) did not support the use of pTP for central venous lines. Respondents reported on the presence of pharmacological (32%, 17/53) and mechanical (45%, 24/53) thromboprophylaxis policies at their institutions. Pediatric hematologists considered pTP a useful intervention to prevent VTE and prescribed pTP in select cases. Universal adoption of pTP was not supported. Wide variability in clinical practice was observed. PMID:26925711

  4. Massive splenic infarction and splenic venous thrombosis observed in a patient with acute splenic syndrome of sickle cell traits on contrast-enhanced thin-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takana Yamakawa; Matsuda, Izuru; Hagiwara, Kazuchika; Takayanagi, Tomoko; Hagiwara, Akifumi

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of splenic infarction in a patient with sickle cell traits (SCT), focusing on the computed tomography (CT) findings. The patient was an African-American man in his twenties with no past medical history who experienced sudden left upper quadrant pain while climbing a mountain (over 3000 m above sea level). Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT revealed massive non-segmental splenic infarction accompanied with nodule-like preserved splenic tissue. The region of splenic infarction did not coincide with the arterial vascular territory and differed from the features of infarction caused by large arterial embolism. In addition, thrombotic occlusion of the distal splenic vein was depicted on plain and contrast-enhanced thin-slice CT images. Early-phase contrast-enhanced images also showed inhomogeneous enhancement of the hepatic parenchyma. The patient's symptoms improved with conservative therapy. A hemoglobin electrophoresis test confirmed the diagnosis of SCT. SCT is usually asymptomatic, but hypoxic environments may induce acute splenic syndrome, which is commonly manifested as splenic infarction. We observed splenic venous thrombosis and inhomogeneous hepatic parenchymal enhancement in addition to a huge splenic infarction in our patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the specific imaging findings, particularly splenic venous thrombosis and inhomogeneous hepatic parenchymal enhancement, of acute splenic syndrome in a patient with previously undiagnosed SCT. These findings demonstrate the pathophysiology of SCT, and may help with the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:27251735

  5. The use of indium-111 labeled platelet scanning for the detection of asymptomatic deep venous thrombosis in a high risk population

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.S.; Rae, J.L.; Ryan, N.L.; Edwards, C.; Fortune, W.P.; Lewis, R.J.; Reba, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Five hundred indium-111 labeled platelet imaging studies (387 donor and 113 autologous) were performed postoperatively in 473 patients who had undergone total hip replacement, total knee replacement, or internal fixation of a hip fracture to detect occult deep venous thrombosis. All patients had been anticoagulated prophylactically with aspirin, warfarin sodium (Coumadin), or dextran. Thirty-four possible cases of proximal deep venous thrombosis were identified in 28 asymptomatic patients. To verify the scan results, 31 venograms were performed in 25 patients (three refused). In 21 of 31 cases, totally occlusive thrombi were detected; in 5 cases, partially occlusive thrombi were detected; in 5 cases, no thrombus was seen. No patient who had a negative scan nor any patient who had a verified positive scan (and received appropriate heparin therapy) subsequently developed symptoms or signs of pulmonary embolism. One hundred forty-one indium study patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography/impedance plethysmography (Doppler/IPG) as a comparative non-invasive technique. In 137 cases, the results of the indium study and Doppler/IPG studies were congruent. The indium study had no false negative results that were detected by Doppler/IPG. No patient had any clinically evident toxicity. These results suggest that indium-111 labeled platelet scanning is a safe, noninvasive means for identifying DVT in high risk patients.

  6. Heparin prophylaxis for deep venous thrombosis in a patient with multiple injuries: an evidence-based approach to a clinical problem

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Andrew B.; Garber, Brian; Dervin, Geoffrey; Howard, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate a clinical decision-making process by which to determine if heparin prophylaxis for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is appropriate in a specific patient with multiple injuries. Data sources A Medline search of the literature. Search terms included trauma, heparin, deep venous thrombosis, thrombophlebitis, phlebitis, and trauma. Study selection Eleven studies were selected from 789 publications using published criteria. Incidence, risk and potential for prophylaxis were established through a structured review process. Data extraction After the structured review, a small number of studies were available for the consideration of incidence (2), natural history (4) and prophylactic therapy (2). Data synthesis The incidence of DVT in a patient with such multiple injuries is significant (58%–63%). The resulting risk of pulmonary embolism was 4.3% with an associated 20% death rate. Prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin is associated with a statistically and clinically significant risk reduction for DVT when compared with unfractionated heparin and untreated controls. Conclusions Few of the multiple available studies concerning trauma, DVT and pulmonary embolism meet reasonable standards to establish clinical validity. Available guidelines for literature evaluation allow surgeons to select relevant articles for consideration. Patients with multiple trauma appear to be at significant risk for DVT. The death rate associated with subsequent pulmonary embolism is significant. There is reasonably good evidence to suggest that low molecular weight heparin will reduce this likelihood without a significant risk of treatment complications. PMID:12174986

  7. The effect of a thigh tourniquet on the incidence of deep venous thrombosis after operations on the fore part of the foot

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.A.; Mass, D.P.; Zarins, C.K.; Bidani, N.; Gudas, C.J.; Metz, C.E.

    1982-02-01

    A prospective randomized clinical study was performed to determine whether use of a thigh tourniquet influences the incidence of deep venous thrombosis. The lower limbs of patients who were scheduled for elective surgery on the fore part of the foot were randomized and assigned to one of three treatment categories: Group I, no tourniquet; Group II, exsanguination by an Esmarch bandage before tourniquet application; and Group III, exsanguination by elevation of the extremity prior to application of a tourniquet. The 117 limbs of seventy-one patients included in this study were evaluated preoperatively and twenty-four and seventy-two hours postoperatively with 125I-labeled fibrinogen, and preoperatively and seventy-two hours postoperatively with Doppler ultrasound studies and phleborheography. The findings in all of the Doppler ultrasound studies and all of the phleborheograms were normal. Two of the 125I-fibrinogen studies were positive, but subsequent contrast venography revealed that these were false-positive findings. We therefore concluded that the use of a thigh tourniquet does not increase the risk of deep venous thrombosis in patients who have had an operation on the fore part of the foot.

  8. Diagnosis of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism - position paper of the Working Group in Women's Health of the Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (GTH).

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Bauersachs, Rupert; Rott, Hannelore; Halimeh, Susan; Zotz, Rainer; Gerhardt, Andrea; Boddenberg-Pätzold, Barbara; Toth, Bettina; Scholz, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy and the postpartum period are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Over the past decade, new diagnostic algorithms have been established, combining clinical probability, laboratory testing and imaging studies for the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in the non-pregnant population. However, there is no such generally accepted algorithm for the diagnosis of pregnancy-associated VTE. Studies establishing clinical prediction rules have excluded pregnant women, and prediction scores currently in use have not been prospectively validated in pregnancy or during the postpartum period. D-dimers physiologically increase throughout pregnancy and peak at delivery, so a negative D-dimer test result, based on the reference values of non-pregnant subjects, becomes unlikely in the second and third trimesters. Imaging studies therefore play a major role in confirming suspected DVT or PE in pregnant women. Major concerns have been raised against radiologic imaging because of foetal radiation exposure, and doubts about the diagnostic value of ultrasound techniques in attempting to exclude isolated iliac vein thrombosis grow stronger as pregnancy progresses. As members of the Working Group in Women's Health of the Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (GTH), we summarise evidence from the available literature and aim to establish a more uniform strategy for diagnosing pregnancy-associated VTE. PMID:27058795

  9. Venous thrombosis - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. ... URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  10. Use of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter as a Conduit for Central Venous Access Across Thrombosed Great Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Guntur Ramkumar, Prasad Chakraverty, Sam Zealley, Ian

    2010-02-15

    This report describes a technique of inserting an implantable venous access port (portacath) through a thrombosed and occluded vein employing a pre-existing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) as the route of access. The PICC was used as a conduit for venous access in a way that has not been described previously in the literature. This procedure was performed in a young patient with cystic fibrosis in an effort to prevent the use of his virgin contralateral veins, which might be used in the future.

  11. Frequency of Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients With Chronic Venous Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Matic, Milan; Matic, Aleksandra; Djuran, Verica; Gajinov, Zorica; Prcic, Sonja; Golusin, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is estimated that about 15% (10% - 30% in most of the studies) of the total adult population has some aspects of the Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI). Frequency of the Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) in the adult population is 3% - 4%. Studies dealing with etiopathogenesis of leg ulcers show that between 10% and 18% of all ulcers are of mixed, arterial-venous origin. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to find out if there is a higher frequency of PAD among CVI patients in comparison with the control group, as well as to discover some common risk factors for CVI and PAD. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at the dermatovenereological clinic, clinical center of Vojvodina, Serbia. A total of 162 examinees were included. All patients were examined for the existence of CVI and staged according to CEAP (Clinical, etiology, anatomy and patophysiology) classification. In this way, 3 groups were formed: Patients with the mild forms of CVI (stage 1 - 4 by CEAP classification), 57 patients; patients with the severe forms of CVI (stage 5 and 6 by CEAP classification), 55 patients; control group (no CVI), 50 patients. Also, the Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) was assessed in all subjects, and its value of ≤ 0.9 was set as criteria for diagnosis of PAD. The same sample was divided according to the presence of PAD into two groups. The most important risk factors for CVI and PAD were identified for each patient through complete examination, medical record and appropriate questionnaire. Results: Our results showed that the risk factors for CVI were high Body Mass Index (BMI), hypertension, predominantly standing position during work and positive family history for CVI. In the same sample it was found that 28 (17.28%) patients had PAD. Relevant risk factors for PAD in the present study were: high BMI, hypertension, diabetes and a positive family history for PAD. Comparison of frequency of PAD among patients

  12. Risk Factors for Deep Venous Thrombosis Following Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery: An Analysis of 56,000 patients

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Paul S.; White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A.; Greenberg, Sarah E.; VanHouten, Jacob P.; Avilucea, Frank R.; Obremskey, William T.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are recognized as major causes of morbidity and mortality in orthopaedic trauma patients. Despite the high incidence of these complications following orthopaedic trauma, there is a paucity of literature investigating the clinical risk factors for DVT in this specific population. As our healthcare system increasingly emphasizes quality measures, it is critical for orthopaedic surgeons to understand the clinical factors that increase the risk of DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Objectives: Utilizing the ACS-NSQIP database, we sought to determine the incidence and identify independent risk factors for DVT following orthopaedic trauma. Patients and Methods: Using current procedural terminology (CPT) codes for orthopaedic trauma procedures, we identified a prospective cohort of patients from the 2006 to 2013 ACS-NSQIP database. Using Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests where appropriate, patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative factors were compared between patients who developed a DVT within 30 days of surgery and those who did not. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and identify independent risk factors for DVT. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: 56,299 orthopaedic trauma patients were included in the analysis, of which 473 (0.84%) developed a DVT within 30 days. In univariate analysis, twenty-five variables were significantly associated with the development of a DVT, including age (P < 0.0001), BMI (P = 0.037), diabetes (P = 0.01), ASA score (P < 0.0001) and anatomic region injured (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified several independent risk factors for development of a DVT including use of a ventilator (OR = 43.67, P = 0.039), ascites (OR = 41.61, P = 0.0038), steroid use (OR = 4.00, P < 0.001), and alcohol use (OR = 2.98, P = 0.0370). Compared to patients with upper extremity trauma, those with lower

  13. Association between Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Insertion Site and Complication Rates in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Rani A; Swarnam, Kamala; Vayalthrikkovil, Sakeer; Yee, Wendy; Soraisham, Amuchou S

    2016-08-01

    Objective To examine whether there is an association between peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) insertion site and complication rates among preterm infants. Design We performed a retrospective analysis of the first PICCs placed in preterm infants in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit between January 2006 and December 2010. The PICC-related complications resulting in catheter removal were compared based on site of insertion. Results Of the 827 PICCs, 593 (72%) were inserted in upper extremity. Lower extremity PICC group infants had higher illness severity (SNAP-II) score and more likely to be inserted later as compared with the upper extremity group. There was no significant difference in the total PICC-related complications between upper and lower extremity PICCs (31.3 vs. 26%; p > 0.05). Logistic regression analysis after adjusting for gestational age, day of line insertion, and SNAP-II score revealed that upper extremity PICCs were associated with increased risk of line infiltration (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-4.29) but not the total PICC complication (aOR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.91-1.83). Conclusion There is no difference in total PICC-related complication between upper and lower extremity PICCs; however, the PICC-related mechanical complications vary depending on the site of insertion in preterm infants. PMID:27057766

  14. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You were treated for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). This is a condition in which a blood clot forms in a vein that is not on ... especially if it gets worse upon taking a deep breath in You cough up blood

  15. D-dimer is not elevated in asymptomatic high altitude climbers after descent to 5340 m: the Mount Everest Deep Venous Thrombosis Study (Ev-DVT).

    PubMed

    Zafren, Ken; Feldman, Joanne; Becker, Robert J; Williams, Sarah R; Weiss, Eric A; Deloughery, Tom

    2011-01-01

    We performed this study to determine the prevalence of elevated D-dimer, a marker for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), in asymptomatic high altitude climbers. On-site personnel enrolled a convenience sample of climbers at Mt. Everest Base Camp (Nepal), elevation 5340 m (17,500 ft), during a single spring climbing season. Subjects were enrolled after descent to base camp from higher elevation. The subjects completed a questionnaire to evaluate their risk factors for DVT. We then performed a D-dimer test in asymptomatic individuals. If the D-dimer test was negative, DVT was considered ruled out. Ultrasound was available to perform lower-extremity compression ultrasounds to evaluate for DVT in case the D-dimer was positive. We enrolled 76 high altitude climbers. None had a positive D-dimer test. The absence of positive D-dimer tests suggests a low prevalence of DVT in asymptomatic high altitude climbers. PMID:21962065

  16. Mechanical thrombectomy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis employing a novel combination of Angiojet and Penumbra ACE aspiration catheters: the Triaxial Angiojet technique.

    PubMed

    Bress, Aaron; Hurst, Robert; Pukenas, Bryan; Smith, Michelle; Kung, David

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can be life threatening. A previously healthy woman in her early forties on oral contraceptives presented with global CVST and rapid clinical deterioration. A novel 'Triaxial Angiojet technique' (KSAW Shuttle [Cook Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA], 5 MAX ACE [Penumbra Inc., Alameda, CA, USA], and Angiojet [Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA]) was employed to gain access into the superior sagittal sinus. The 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter was shortened prior to placing a 4 Fr Angiojet catheter through it. This resulted in markedly improved recanalization with good anterograde flow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 2 and discharged neurologically intact on postoperative day 10. We report the first case of placing an Angiojet catheter through a larger Penumbra reperfusion catheter when access through a tortuous sigmoid and transverse sinus could not be obtained with a 6 Fr support catheter. PMID:27052259

  17. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  18. Travelers' thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Raymond V; Hudson, Martin F

    2014-02-01

    The suggestion that venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with air travel has for several decades been the subject of both "media hype" and extensive debate in the medical literature. As emotion and anecdote is often a feature in this debate, it is therefore necessary to separate evidence from anecdote. "Travelers' thrombosis" is a more appropriate term because the evidence suggests that any form of travel involving immobility lasting more than 4 h can predispose to thrombosis. There is no unique factor in the air travel cabin environment that has been shown to have any effect on the coagulation cascade. Prevention of thrombosis in any form of travel, including air travel, requires being aware of the issue and making an adequate risk assessment together with appropriate prophylactic measures. PMID:24597166

  19. Extensive Deep Venous Thrombosis Resulting from Anterior Lumbar Spine Surgery in a Patient with Iliac Vein Compression Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Deepak; Mikhael, Mark M.; Shapiro, Gary S.; Farrell, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Although May-Thurner syndrome or iliac vein compression syndrome is covered in the vascular literature, it remains absent from the orthopedic and neurosurgery literature and has not been previously reported to occur in concordance with spine surgery. We review the salient points of disease presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods A 33-year-old woman was followed postoperatively via clinical and radiographic findings. Her presentation, operative treatment, postoperative extensive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) formation, and management are described. Results We present a unique case of a healthy 33-year-old woman who developed an extensive left iliac vein DVT after anterior lumbar spine fusion. Although she had multiple risk factors for thrombosis, the size of the thrombus was atypical. A subsequent venogram showed compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery, consistent with May-Thurner syndrome. Conclusions May-Thurner syndrome or iliac vein compression syndrome is a rare diagnosis that is absent from the spine literature. The condition can predispose patients to extensive iliac vein DVT. The contributing anatomy and subsequent clot often require catheter-directed thrombolysis and stenting to achieve a favorable outcome. PMID:26225289

  20. [Treatment and prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis with low molecular weight heparins (meta-analysis of clinical trials)].

    PubMed

    Valiukiene, Laimute; Naudziūnas, Albinas; Unikauskas, Alvydas

    2003-01-01

    Deep-vein thrombosis is a relevant problem of today's medicine, because the risk to fall ill with this pathology is 2-5%; it increases in senior age. Direct and indirect acting thrombin inhibitors are used for treatment and prevention of vein thrombosis. Though great efficiency and safety of new anticoagulants (especially factor Xa inhibitors) were proven in clinical studies, unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparins are still most widely used in clinical practice. Low molecular weight heparins are obtained by depolymerizing heparin: its molecular weight is being decreased to 3-7 kDa, or 18-20 monosaccharides. Low molecular weight heparins strongly inhibit Xa coagulation factor and faintly - IIa, that's why their anti-Xa/anti-IIa proportion is >1 (unfractionated heparin = 1); enoxaparine and nadroparine show up the highest proportion. The low weight of these heparins determines good pharmacodynamic characteristics: excellent assimilation from subcutaneous layer, long circulation in plasma, infrequent side effects. Due to these characteristics they are convenient, safe and economically worth using (used by subcutaneous injections, prescribed only 1-2 times per day, coagulation control not required, possibility for patient to be treated at home); therefore low molecular weight heparins are more and more often used in treatment of deep-vein thrombosis and also in primary and secondary prevention. They are one of the most efficacious contemporary anticoagulants, which allow to decrease the deep-vein thrombosis treatment and prevention costs. This article presents literature review about low molecular weight heparins, their appliance in treatment and prophylaxis of deep-vein thrombosis. PMID:12738903

  1. The Retrograde Transvenous Push-Through Method: A Novel Treatment of Peripheral Arteriovenous Malformations with Dominant Venous Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, Walter A. Müller-Wille, René Teusch, Veronika I.; Dudeck, Oliver; Cahill, Anne M.; Alomari, Ahmad I.; Uller, Wibke

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel retrograde transvenous embolization technique of peripheral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) using Onyx.Materials and MethodsWe conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent transvenous retrograde Onyx embolization of peripheral AVMs with dominant venous outflow over a 29-month period. The embolization is aimed at retrograde filling of the nidus after building a solid plug in the dominant venous outflow (push-through). Classification, clinical signs, technical aspects, clinical and technical success rates, and complications were recorded. Short-term outcome was assessed.Results11 Symptomatic patients (8 female; mean age 31.4 years) were treated at our Vascular Anomalies Center with this method between January 2012 and May 2014. The AVMs were located on the upper extremity (n = 3), pelvis (n = 2), buttock (n = 2), and lower extremity (n = 4). Retrograde embolization was successfully carried out after preparatory transarterial-flow reduction in eight cases (73 %) and venous-flow reduction with Amplatzer Vascular Plugs in four cases (36 %). Complete devascularization (n = 10; 91 %) or 95 % devascularization (n = 1; 9 %) led to complete resolution (n = 8; 73 %) or improvement of clinical symptoms (n = 3; 27 %). One minor complication occurred (pain and swelling). During a mean follow-up time of 8 months, one clinically asymptomatic recurrence of AVM was detected.ConclusionInitial results suggest that retrograde transvenous Onyx embolization of peripheral AVMs with dominant venous outflow is a safe and effective novel technique with a low complication rate.

  2. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, W W

    1977-01-01

    This review of the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism includes estimates of incidence and prevalence of venous thrombosis and its sequelae, a discussion geographical, annual and seasonal variations and data concerning possible risk factors. Selection of patients at increased risk for development of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism for specific diagnostic screening or for prophylactic therapy with low-dose heparin may be a more effective approach to lowering morbidity and mortality from this disease. PMID:329779

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) in the Treatment of Venous Symptomatic Chronic Portal Thrombosis in Non-cirrhotic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Jose I. Elorz, Mariana; Vivas, Isabel; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Bastarrika, Gorka; Benito, Alberto

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To present a series of cases of non-cirrhotic patients with symptomatic massive portal thrombosis treated by percutaneous techniques. All patients underwent a TIPS procedure in order to maintain the patency of the portal vein by facilitating the outflow. Methods: A total of six patients were treated for thrombosis of the main portal vein (6/6); the main right and left branches (3/6) and the splenic vein (5/6) and superior mesenteric vein (6/6). Two patients had a pancreatic malignancy; one patient with an orthotopic liver transplant had been surgically treated for a pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients had idiopathic thrombocytosis, and in the remaining patient no cause for the portal thrombosis was identified. During the initial procedure in each patient one or more approaches were tried: transhepatic (5/6), transileocolic (1/6), trans-splenic (1/6) or transjugular (1/6). In all cases the procedure was completed with a TIPS with either ultrasound guidance (3/6), 'gun-shot' technique (2/6) or fluoroscopic guidance (1/6).Results: No complications were observed during the procedures. One patient had a repeat episode of variceal bleeding at 30 months, one patient remained asymptomatic and was lost to follow-up at 24 months, two patients were successfully treated surgically (cephalic duodenopancreatectomy) and are alive at 4 and 36 months. One patient remains asymptomatic (without new episodes of abdominal pain) at 16 months of follow-up. One patient died because of tumor progression at 10 months. Conclusion: Percutaneous techniques for portal recanalization are an interesting alternative even in non-acute thrombosis. Once flow has been restored in the portal vein TIPS may be necessary to obtain an adequate outflow, hence facilitating and maintaining the portal flow.

  4. Sinus thrombectomy for purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis utilizing a novel combination of the Trevo stent retriever and the Penumbra ACE aspiration catheter: the stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique.

    PubMed

    Mascitelli, Justin R; Pain, Margaret; Zarzour, Hekmat K; Baxter, Peter; Ghatan, Saadi; Mocco, J

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare but life threatening. We present a case of a 17-year-old woman with sinusitis who deteriorated over the course of 12 days from subdural empyema and global purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The patient was managed with surgery and mechanical thrombectomy utilizing a novel 'stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique', in which a Trevo stent retriever (Stryker) was anchored in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) while a 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter (Penumbra) was passed back and forth from the SSS to the sigmoid sinus with resultant dramatic improvement in venous outflow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 3 and was discharged with minimal lower extremity weakness on postoperative day 11. This is the first report using the Trevo stent retriever for sinus thrombosis. It is important to keep these rare complications in mind when evaluating patients with oral and facial infections. PMID:26002667

  5. Sinus thrombectomy for purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis utilizing a novel combination of the Trevo stent retriever and the Penumbra ACE aspiration catheter: the stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique.

    PubMed

    Mascitelli, Justin R; Pain, Margaret; Zarzour, Hekmat K; Baxter, Peter; Ghatan, Saadi; Mocco, J

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare but life threatening. We present a case of a 17-year-old woman with sinusitis who deteriorated over the course of 12 days from subdural empyema and global purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The patient was managed with surgery and mechanical thrombectomy utilizing a novel 'stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique', in which a Trevo stent retriever (Stryker) was anchored in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) while a 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter (Penumbra) was passed back and forth from the SSS to the sigmoid sinus with resultant dramatic improvement in venous outflow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 3 and was discharged with minimal lower extremity weakness on postoperative day 11. This is the first report using the Trevo stent retriever for sinus thrombosis. It is important to keep these rare complications in mind when evaluating patients with oral and facial infections. PMID:26019186

  6. Polymeric Nanoparticles of Enoxaparin as a Delivery System: In Vivo Evaluation in Normal Rats and in a Venous Thrombosis Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Pazzini, Carla; Marcato, Priscyla D; Prado, Lucas Bessa; Alessio, Aline Morandi; Höehr, Nelci Fenalt; Montalvão, Silmara; Paixão, Devanira; Durán, Nelson; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce Maria

    2015-07-01

    Enoxaparin is an anticoagulant widely used in the treatment and prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The subcutaneous route of administration, sometimes in repeated doses during 24 hours, represents a limitation to its use. Thus, the development of a product that can be administered either subcutaneously, in a smaller number of applications becomes a major challenge, with interesting clinical applications. The use of a system for sustained release of drugs can help to meet that goal, by protecting and enabling a gradual released of the agent. This study consisted of the evaluation of in vivo anticoagulant and antithrombotic activity of biodegradable nanoparticles of poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) with enoxaparin after subcutaneous injection. The nanoparticles were prepared by the method of double emulsion (w/o/w) and solvent evaporation. Subcutaneous enoxaparin encapsulated in PCL nanoparticles (1000 IU/kg) showed a sustained release in vivo for up to 12 hours (Cmax 0.62 IU/mL) a significantly longer period (P < 0.01) when compared to free enoxaparin (1000 IU/Kg) that disappeared after 9 hours (Cmax 1.50 IU/mL), however with lower anti-Xa activity. The antithrombotic action of enoxaparin-nanoparticles was tested in a DVT model by stasis in rats. There were virtually no formation of venous thrombosis in any of the rats that received enoxaparin encapsulated in nanoparticles (0.03 mg), with a significant difference when compared to groups that received saline (17.2 mg, P < 0.001) and free enoxaparin (2.87 mg, P = 0.001). In summary, enoxaparin-encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles showed a sustained release for a greater period than that of enoxaparin, and with excellent antithrombotic action. These results corroborate the promising use of pharmacological nanoparticles in clinical practice. PMID:26373044

  7. Role of IVC Filters in Endovenous Therapy for Deep Venous Thrombosis: The FILTER-PEVI (Filter Implantation to Lower Thromboembolic Risk in Percutaneous Endovenous Intervention) Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, Mohsen; Bay, Curt; Skrocki, Laura; Lawson, David; Mazdeh, Shahnaz

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the necessity of and recommend indications for inferior vena cava (IVC) filter implantation during percutaneous endovenous intervention (PEVI) for deep venous thrombosis (DVT).BackgroundPEVI has emerged as a powerful tool in the management of acute proximal DVT. Instrumentation of extensive fresh thrombus is potentially associated with iatrogenic pulmonary embolism (PE). The true frequency of this complication has not been studied in a randomized fashion. We evaluated IVC filter implantation during PEVI for DVT. Methods: A total of 141 patients with symptomatic proximal DVT undergoing PEVI for symptomatic DVT were randomized to receive an IVC filter (70 patients) or no filter (71 patients; control group). The anticoagulation and PEVI regimen were similar between the two groups. Patients with development of symptoms suggestive of PE underwent objective testing for PE. Results: PE developed in 1 of the 14 symptomatic patients in the filter group and 8 of the 22 patients in the control group (P = 0.048). There was no mortality in any group. Three patients (4.2%) in the control group had transient hemodynamic instability necessitating resuscitory efforts. Predictors of iatrogenic PE were found to be PE at admission; involvement of two or more adjacent venous segments with acute thrombus; inflammatory form of DVT (severe erythema, edema, pain, and induration); and vein diameter of {>=}7 mm with preserved architecture. Conclusions: IVC filter implantation during PEVI reduces the risk of iatrogenic PE by eightfold without a mortality benefit. A selective approach may be exercised in filter implantation during PEVI.

  8. Long-term Outcome of Peripherally Implanted Venous Access Ports in the Forearm in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klösges, Laura Meyer, Carsten Boschewitz, Jack Andersson, Magnus; Rudlowski, Christian; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the long-term outcome of peripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm at our institution in a female patient collective.MethodsBetween June 2002 and May 2011, a total of 293 female patients with an underlying malignancy had 299 forearm ports implanted in our interventional radiology suite. The mean age of the cohort was 55 ± 12 years (range 26–81 years). The majority of women suffered from breast (59.5 %) or ovarian cancer (28.1 %). Complications were classified as infectious complications, thrombotic and nonthrombotic catheter dysfunction (dislocation of the catheter or port chamber, fracture with/without embolization or kinking of the catheter, port occlusion), and others.ResultsWe analyzed a total of 90,276 catheter days in 248 port systems (47 patients were lost to follow-up). The mean device service interval was 364 days per catheter (range 8–2,132, median 223 days, CI 311–415, SD 404). Sixty-seven early (≤30 days from implantation) or late complications (>30 days) occurred during the observation period (0.74/1,000 catheter days). Common complications were port infection (0.18/1,000 days), thrombotic dysfunction (0.12/1,000 days), and skin dehiscence (0.12/1,000 days). Nonthrombotic dysfunction occurred in a total of 21 cases (0.23/1,000 days) and seemed to cumulate on the venous catheter entry site on the distal upper arm.ConclusionPeripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm are a safe alternative to chest or upper-arm ports in female oncology patients. Special attention should be paid to signs of skin dehiscence and nonthrombotic dysfunction, especially when used for long-term treatment.

  9. Impact of lower body negative pressure induced hypovolemia on peripheral venous pressure waveform parameters in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Alian, Aymen A; Galante, Nicholas J; Stachenfeld, Nina S; Silverman, David G; Shelley, Kirk H

    2014-07-01

    Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) creates a reversible hypovolemia by sequestrating blood volume in the lower extremities. This study sought to examine the impact of central hypovolemia on peripheral venous pressure (PVP) waveforms in spontaneously breathing subjects. With IRB approval, 11 healthy subjects underwent progressive LBNP (baseline, -30, -75, and -90 mmHg or until the subject became symptomatic). Each was monitored for heart rate (HR), finger arterial blood pressure (BP), a chest respiratory band and PVP waveforms which are generated from a transduced upper extremity intravenous site. The first subject was excluded from PVP analysis because of technical errors in collecting the venous pressure waveform. PVP waveforms were analyzed to determine venous pulse pressure, mean venous pressure, pulse width, maximum and minimum slope (time domain analysis) together with cardiac and respiratory modulations (frequency domain analysis). No changes of significance were found in the arterial BP values at -30 mmHg LBNP, while there were significant reductions in the PVP waveforms time domain parameters (except for 50% width of the respiration induced modulations) together with modulation of the PVP waveform at the cardiac frequency but not at the respiratory frequency. As the LBNP progressed, arterial systolic BP, mean BP and pulse pressure, PVP parameters and PVP cardiac modulation decreased significantly, while diastolic BP and HR increased significantly. Changes in hemodynamic and PVP waveform parameters reached a maximum during the symptomatic phase. During the recovery phase, there was a significant reduction in HR together with a significant increase in HR variability, mean PVP and PVP cardiac modulation. Thus, in response to mild hypovolemia induced by LBNP, changes in cardiac modulation and other PVP waveform parameters identified hypovolemia before detectable hemodynamic changes. PMID:24901895

  10. Technetium-99m-RBC venography in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremity: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pinson, A G; Becker, D M; Philbrick, J T; Parekh, J S

    1991-12-01

    We systematically reviewed the six articles from the English-language medical literature, since 1979, which compared 99mTc-RBC venography with contrast venography for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremity. The studies were generally small in size and poorly compliant with methodologic standards for diagnostic test research. There was considerable variation in both how the 99mTc-RBC venograms were performed and how they were interpreted. Sufficient clinical information on the patients was not provided. Although the overall sensitivities and specificities were high with a mean sensitivity of 0.89 and a mean specificity of 0.84, the small numbers of patients resulted in wide 95% confidence intervals. For distal disease, with only a total of 14 patients studied, the 95% confidence intervals were particularly broad. Although 99mTc-RBC venography is a promising technique, future studies with larger numbers of patients and closer adherence to methodologic standards are required. PMID:1836023

  11. Cost-effectiveness of the bird's nest filter for preventing pulmonary embolism among patients with malignant brain tumors and deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Chau, Quan; Cantor, Scott B; Caramel, Elenir; Hicks, Marshall; Kurtin, Danna; Grover, Tejpal; Elting, Linda S

    2003-12-01

    Patients with malignant brain tumors and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities are at high risk of developing pulmonary embolism (PE). We developed a Markov model to compare the cost-effectiveness of two strategies to prevent PE in such patients: intra-vena-caval bird's nest filter (BNF) with anticoagulation versus anticoagulation alone. Using the benchmark of 50,000 US dollars per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), BNF was not cost-effective in this population as it reduced the rate of PE at an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 198,852 dollars per QALY gained. However, after adjusting the model to reflect the 5-year mortality rate of hypothetical breast cancer patients, BNF was more effective and less expensive than anticoagulation alone. BNF was effective in reducing the rate of PE but was not cost-effective for patients with brain tumors. BNF could be cost-effective for patients with longer life expectancies. PMID:13680322

  12. Reversible diencephalic dysfunction as presentation of deep cerebral venous thrombosis due to hyperhomocysteinemia and protein S deficiency: Documentation of a case

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kaukab Maqbool; Kumar, Dheeraj

    2013-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with global headache, vomiting and abnormal behavior after cross-country run at high altitude. There was no seizure, loss of consciousness, fever or head injury. He was conscious, abulic and uncooperative with normal vitals. There was no focal neurological deficit. Non contrast computed tomography scan of head was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain showed venous infarct in bilateral thalami, left basal ganglia and periventricular white matter. Magnetic resonance venography revealed thrombosis involving internal cerebral veins, septal veins, thalamostriate veins, vein of Galen and proximal portion of straight sinus. His condition steadily improved on low molecular weight heparin bridged with oral anticoagulation for one year. At two months, serum homocysteine was 31.51 μmol/l (5.46-16.2 μmol/l) and protein S was 49.00% (77-143.00%). He received methylcobalamin, pyridoxine and folic acid. After 16 months, he was asymptomatic with partially recanalized deep cerebral veins and serum homocysteine falling to 16.50 μmol/l (5.46-16.2 μmol/l). PMID:23914104

  13. The efficacy and safety of low-molecular-weight heparin and unfractionated heparin in the treatment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Afshari, Daryoush; Moradian, Nasrin; Nasiri, Freshteh; Razazian, Nazanin; Bostani, Arash; Sariaslani, Payam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and safety of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin (UFH) in the treatment of patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), and to provide an appropriate treatment option in these patients. Method: This is a randomized double blind clinical trial conducted between December 2013 and December 2014. The subjects were selected among patients referred to Neurology Department, Imam Reza Hospital; affiliated to Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Fifty-two cases of CVST were included in this study and randomly divided into 2 groups. Twenty-six cases received LMWH and the other 26 cases received UFH. The primary outcomes include hospital mortality rate and neurologic deficits as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The secondary end point was disability as measured by the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS). Results: We observed the rate of mortality and neurological deficits and disability based on NIHSS, and the MRS did not differ between the 2 groups. Conclusion: The efficacy of LMWH and UFH in reduction of neurologic deficit and functional disability in patients with CVST are similar. PMID:26492115

  14. Factor V Leiden, factor V Cambridge, factor II GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Saadatnia, Mohammad; Salehi, Mansour; Movahedian, Ahmad; Shariat, Seyed Ziaeddin Samsam; Salari, Mehri; Tajmirriahi, Marzieh; Asadimobarakeh, Elham; Salehi, Rasoul; Amini, Gilda; Ebrahimi, Homa; Kheradmand, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Factor V G1691A (FV Leiden), FII GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutations are the most common genetic risk factors for thromboembolism in the Western countries. However, there is rare data in Iran about cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of common genetic thrombophilic factors in CVST patients. Materials and Methods: Forty consequently CVST patients from two University Hospital in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences aged more than 15 years from January 2009 to January 2011 were recruited. In parallel, 51 healthy subjects with the same age and race from similar population selected as controls. FV Leiden, FII GA20210, MTHFR C677T, and FV Cambridge gene mutations by polymerase chain reaction technique were evaluated in case and control groups. Results: FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge gene mutations had very low prevalence in both case (5%, 2%, 0%) and control (2.5%, 0%, 0%) and were not found any significant difference between groups. MTHFR C677T mutations was in 22 (55%) of patients in case group and 18 (35.5%) of control group (P = 0.09). Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge were low. Laboratory investigations of these mutations as a routine test for all patients with CVST may not be cost benefit. PMID:26600830

  15. Venous thrombosis with both heterozygous factor V Leiden (R507Q) and factor II (G20210A) mutations.

    PubMed

    Bhaijee, Feriyl; Jordan, Brenda; Pepper, Dominique J; Leacock, Rodney; Rock, William A

    2012-01-01

    Both hereditary and acquired factors increase the risk of venous thromboembolism, thus the clinical management of affected patients involves evaluation of genetic factors that predispose to hypercoagulability. Factor V Leiden (R507Q) and factor II (prothrombin) mutation (G20210A) are the two most common inherited hypercoagulability disorders among populations of European origin. Both factor V Leiden and factor II mutation (G20210A) represent gain-of-function mutations: factor V Leiden causes resistance to activated protein C, and factor II mutation (G20210A) results in higher levels of plasma prothrombin. Herein, we present an uncommon case of combined factor V Leiden mutation (R507Q) and factor II mutation (G20210A), and discuss the prevalence and features of each entity, as well as their role in the clinical management of affected patients. PMID:23330508

  16. Prevention of venous thrombosis in long-haul flights with Flite Tabs: the LONFLIT-FLITE randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Belcaro, G; Nicolaides, A N; Ricci, A; Geroulakos, G; Ippolito, E; Brandolini, R; Vinciguerra, G; Dugall, M; Griffin, M; Ruffini, I; Acerbi, G; Corsi, M; Riordan, N H; Stuard, S; Bavera, P; Di Renzo, A; Kenyon, J; Errichi, B M

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the development of edema, and superficial and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis with an oral profibrinolytic agent (Flite Tabs, 150 mg pinokinase, Aidan, Tempe, AZ, USA) in long-haul flights (7-8 hours), in high-risk subjects. A group of 300 subjects was included; 76 were excluded for several problems including concomitant treatments; 204 were randomized into 2 groups (active treatment or placebo) to evaluate the effects of prophylaxis with Flite Tabs. An exercise program was used in both groups. The femoral, popliteal, tibial, and superficial veins were scanned with ultrasound before and within 90 minutes after flights. Of the included subjects, 92 of 103 controls and 94 of 101 treated subjects completed the study. Dropouts were due to connection problems. Age, gender, and risk distribution were comparable in the groups. In the treatment group, no DVT was observed. In the control group, 5 subjects (5.4%) had a DVT and there were 2 superficial thromboses (7 events in 92 subjects; 7.6%). At inclusion, edema was comparable in the 2 groups. After flights there was an increase in score in controls (+12%) in comparison with a decrease (-15%) in the Flite Tabs group (the difference in variation was statistically significant). Intention-to-treat analysis for thrombotic events shows 18 failures in controls (11 lost to follow-up + 7 thrombotic events) of 92 subjects (19.6%) in comparison with 7 failures (of 94 subjects, equivalent to 7.4%) in the treatment group (p < 0.05). Events were asymptomatic. In conclusion, Flite Tabs were effective in reducing thrombotic events and in controlling edema in high-risk subjects in long flights. PMID:14565628

  17. Prevention of venous thromboembolism, 2nd edition: Korean Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bang, Soo-Mee; Jang, Moon Ju; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Yhim, Ho-Young; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Nam, Seung-Hyun; Hwang, Hun Gyu; Bae, Sung Hwa; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Kim, Yang-Ki; Kim, Inho; Choi, Won-Il; Jung, Chul Won; Park, Nan Hee; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Park, Byung-Joo; Oh, Doyeun; Korean Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis

    2014-02-01

    In 2010, we proposed the first Korean Guidelines for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE). It was applicable to Korean patients, by modifying the contents of the second edition of the Japanese guidelines for the prevention of VTE and the 8th edition of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. From 2007 to 2011, we conducted a nationwide study regarding the incidence of VTE after major surgery using the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) database. In addition, we have considered the 9th edition of the ACCP Evidenced-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines, published in 2012. It emphasized the importance of clinically relevant events as opposed to asymptomatic outcomes with preferences for both thrombotic and bleeding outcomes. Thus, in the development of the new Korean guidelines, three major points were addressed: 1) the new guidelines stratify patients into 4 risk groups (very low, low, moderate, and high) according to the actual incidence of symptomatic VTE from the HIRA databases; 2) the recommended optimal VTE prophylaxis for each group was modified according to condition-specific thrombotic and bleeding risks; 3) guidelines are intended for general information only, are not medical advice, and do not replace professional medical care and/or physician advice. PMID:24550640

  18. Genetic Determinants of Thrombin Generation and Their Relation to Venous Thrombosis: Results from the GAIT-2 Project

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Fernandez, Laura; Ziyatdinov, Andrey; Carrasco, Marina; Millon, Juan Antonio; Martinez-Perez, Angel; Vilalta, Noelia; Brunel, Helena; Font, Montserrat; Hamsten, Anders; Souto, Juan Carlos; Soria, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common disease where known genetic risk factors explain only a small portion of the genetic variance. Then, the analysis of intermediate phenotypes, such as thrombin generation assay, can be used to identify novel genetic risk factors that contribute to VTE. Objectives To investigate the genetic basis of distinct quantitative phenotypes of thrombin generation and its relationship to the risk of VTE. Patients/Methods Lag time, thrombin peak and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) were measured in the families of the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia 2 (GAIT-2) Project. This sample consisted of 935 individuals in 35 extended families selected through a proband with idiopathic thrombophilia. We performed also genome wide association studies (GWAS) with thrombin generation phenotypes. Results The results showed that 67% of the variation in the risk of VTE is attributable to genetic factors. The heritabilities of lag time, thrombin peak and ETP were 49%, 54% and 52%, respectively. More importantly, we demonstrated also the existence of positive genetic correlations between thrombin peak or ETP and the risk of VTE. Moreover, the major genetic determinant of thrombin generation was the F2 gene. However, other suggestive signals were observed. Conclusions The thrombin generation phenotypes are strongly genetically determined. The thrombin peak and ETP are significantly genetically correlated with the risk of VTE. In addition, F2 was identified as a major determinant of thrombin generation. We reported suggestive signals that might increase our knowledge to explain the variability of this important phenotype. Validation and functional studies are required to confirm GWAS results. PMID:26784699

  19. Are Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models Reporting the Right C(max)? Central Venous Versus Peripheral Sampling Site.

    PubMed

    Musther, Helen; Gill, Katherine L; Chetty, Manoranjenni; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Rowland, Malcolm; Jamei, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can over-predict maximum plasma concentrations (C(max)) following intravenous administration. A proposed explanation is that invariably PBPK models report the concentration in the central venous compartment, rather than the site where the samples are drawn. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate potential corrective models based on anatomy and physiology governing the blood supply at the site of sampling and incorporate them into a PBPK platform. Four models were developed and scrutinised for their corrective potential. All assumed the peripheral sampling site concentration could be described by contributions from surrounding tissues and utilised tissue-specific concentration-time profiles reported from the full-PBPK model within the Simcyp Simulator. Predicted concentrations for the peripheral site were compared to the observed C(max). The models results were compared to clinical data for 15 studies over seven compounds (alprazolam, imipramine, metoprolol, midazolam, omeprazole, rosiglitazone and theophylline). The final model utilised tissue concentrations from adipose, skin, muscle and a contribution from artery. Predicted C(max) values considering the central venous compartment can over-predict the observed values up to 10-fold whereas the new sampling site predictions were within 2-fold of observed values. The model was particularly relevant for studies where traditional PBPK models over-predict early time point concentrations. A successful corrective model for C(max) prediction has been developed, subject to further validation. These models can be enrolled as built-up modules into PBPK platforms and potentially account for factors that may affect the initial mixing of the blood at the site of sampling. PMID:26100012

  20. Treatment of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism - position paper from the Working Group in Women's Health of the Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (GTH).

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Scholz, Ute; Rott, Hannelore; Halimeh, Susan; Zotz, Rainer; Gerhardt, Andrea; Toth, Bettina; Bauersachs, Rupert

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of maternal morbidity during pregnancy and the postpartum period. However, because there is a lack of adequate study data, management strategies for pregnancy-associated VTE must be deduced from observational stu-dies and extrapolated from recommendations for non-pregnant patients. In this review, the members of the Working Group in Women's Health of the Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (GTH) have summarised the evidence that is currently available in the literature to provide a practical approach for treating pregnancy-associated VTE. Because heparins do not cross the placenta, weight-adjusted therapeutic-dose low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is the anticoagulant treatment of choice in cases of acute VTE during pregnancy. No differences between once and twice daily LMWH dosing regimens have been reported, but twice daily dosing seems to be advisable, at least peripartally. It remains unclear whether determining dose adjustments according to factor Xa activities during pregnancy provides any benefit. Management of delivery deserves attention and mainly depends on the time interval between the diagnosis of VTE and the expected delivery date. In particular, if VTE manifests at term, delivery should be attended by an experienced multidisciplinary team. In lactating women, an overlapping switch from LMWH to warfarin is possible. Anticoagulation should be continued for at least 6 weeks postpartum or for a minimum period of 3 months. Although recommendations are provided for the treatment of pregnancy-associated VTE, there is an urgent need for well-designed prospective studies that compare different management strategies and define the optimal duration and intensity of anticoagulant treatment. PMID:27058796

  1. Acute Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis: Transcatheter Thrombolysis and Aspiration Thrombectomy Therapy by Combined Route of Superior Mesenteric Vein and Artery in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuofei Liu, Baochen Ding, Weiwei He, Changsheng Wu, Xingjiang Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy by combined route of superior mesenteric vein and artery (SMV+SMA) for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT).MethodsThis retrospective study reviewed eight ASMVT patients with transcatheter direct thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy via SMV and indirect thrombolysis via SMA during a period of 14 months. The demographics, etiology, risk factors, therapeutic effect, complications, mortality, and follow-up of the study population were assessed. Anatomic and imaging classification of location and extent of thrombus at diagnosis and degree of thrombus lysis were described.ResultsTechnical success was achieved with substantial improvement in symptoms and thrombus resolution after thrombolytic therapy in all patients. The local urokinase infusion by SMA and SMV was performed for 5–7 (6.13 ± 0.83) and 7–15 (12 ± 2.51) days. Anticoagulation was performed catheter-directed and then orally throughout hospitalization and after discharge. Four patients required delayed localized bowel resection after thrombolytic therapy with no death. Thrombolytic therapy was not interrupted despite minor bleeding at the puncture site in two patients and sepsis in another two postoperatively. Nearly complete removal of thrombus was demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT scan and portography before discharge. Patients were discharged in 10–27 (19.25 ± 4.89) days after admission. No recurrence developed during the follow-up of 10–13 (12.13 ± 0.99) months.ConclusionsCatheter-directed thrombolytic and aspiration therapy via SMV+SMA is beneficial for ASMVT in avoiding patient death, efficient resolving thrombus, rapid improving symptoms, reversing extensive intestinal ischemia, averting bowel resection, or localizing infarcted bowel segment and preventing short bowel syndrome.

  2. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-677 and MTHFR-1298) genotypes and haplotypes and plasma homocysteine levels in patients with occlusive artery disease and deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Spiroski, Igor; Kedev, Sashko; Antov, Slobodan; Arsov, Todor; Krstevska, Marija; Dzhekova-Stojkova, Sloboda; Bosilkova, Gordana; Kostovska, Stojanka; Trajkov, Dejan; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Strezova, Ana; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Spiroski, Mirko

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to investigate different genotypes and haplotypes of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-677, -1298) and plasma concentration of total homocysteine (tHcy) in Macedonian patients with occlusive artery disease (OAD) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Investigated groups consists of 80 healthy, 74 patients with OAD, and 63 patients with DVT. Plasma tHcy was measured with Microplate Enzyme Immunoassay. Identification of MTHFR genotypes and haplotypes was done with CVD StripAssay. The probability level (P-value) was evaluated by the Student's t-test. Plasma concentration of tHcy in CC and CT genotypes of MTHFR C677T was significantly increased in patients with OAD and in patients with DVT. Plasma concentration of tHcy in AC genotype of MTHFR A1298C was increased in patients with OAD and in patients with DVT. Plasma concentration of tHcy was significantly increased in AA genotype of patients with OAD, but not in patients with DVT. We found a significant increase of plasma tHcy in patients with OAD in comparison with healthy respondents for normal:heterozygote (CC:AC), heterozygote:normal (CT:AA), and heterozygote:heterozygote (CT:AC) haplotypes. Plasma concentration of tHcy in patients with DVT in comparison with healthy respondents was significantly increased for normal:normal (CC:AA), normal heterozygote (CC:AC), and heterozygote:heterozygote (CT:AC) haplotypes. We conclude that MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1289C genotypes and haplotypes are connected with tHcy plasma levels in Macedonian patients with OAD and DVT. PMID:18800176

  3. Case Report: Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Clemence, Bonnie J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a greater risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Patients admitted to the hospital with IBD flares often require insertion of long-term venous access devices, such as peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), to provide access for medications, blood draws, fluid management, and nutrition. PICCs have been associated with an increased risk for upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. In this case study analysis, 2 patients with IBD and PICCs who developed VTE are examined. The case report includes a thorough discussion of medical history, symptomology, PICC insertion, and events leading to VTE development. A review of acquired risk factors for IBD patients and a comparison of risk factors that predisposed each to VTE are explored. These cases highlight the need for nurses and physicians to heighten surveillance and engage in proactive strategies to prevent VTE in this population of patients. PMID:27074991

  4. Blood Samples of Peripheral Venous Catheter or The Usual Way: Do Infusion Fluid Alters the Biochemical Test Results?

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeganzadeh, Mahboobeh; Yazdankhahfard, Mohammadreza; Farzaneh, Mohammadreza; Mirzaei, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most blood tests require venous blood samples. Puncturing the vein also causes pain, infection, or damage to the blood, and lymph flow, or long-term healing. This study aimed to determine and compare the biochemical laboratory value of the blood samples that were provided through: peripheral vein infusion (PVI) receiving continuous intravenous fluid; and the usual method of blood sampling. Methods: This is an interventional, quasi-experimental, and controlled study. The selected study sample included 60 patients, who were hospitalized during 2014, in the Internal Medicine, part of Martyrs of Persian Gulf, teaching hospital at Bushehr. Three blood samples were taken from each patient that were provided through PVI line (5 ml blood collected at beginning of IVC and then another 5 cc), and another case was prepared by common blood sampling (control). All the samples were analyzed in terms of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine using SPSS Ver.19 software, by paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the amount of sodium and potassium in the first blood samples taken from the intravenous infusion line and vein puncture. However, no significant differences were found among the biochemical amount in the second blood samples taken from the intravenous infusion line and vein puncture. Conclusions: We can use blood samples taken from peripheral intravenous infusion lines after 5cc discarding from the first part of the sample for measuring the value of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine.

  5. Subacute methotrexate neurotoxicity and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in a 12-year-old with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism: homocysteine-mediated methotrexate neurotoxicity via direct endothelial injury.

    PubMed

    Mahadeo, Kris M; Dhall, Girish; Panigrahy, Ashok; Lastra, Carlos; Ettinger, Lawrence J

    2010-02-01

    From as early as the 1970s methotrexate has been associated with disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy and other neurotoxic sequelae. Yet, a clear mechanism for methotrexate-induced neurotoxicity has not been established. The authors describe the case of a 12-year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation, who developed subacute methotrexate-induced toxicity and cerebral venous thrombosis after receiving intrathecal methotrexate. The role of homocysteine as a possible mediator in methotrexate-induced neurotoxicity via direct endothelial injury is discussed. PMID:20121554

  6. Venous occlusive diseases in women.

    PubMed

    Ozsvath, Kathleen J; Moore, Colleen J

    2013-04-01

    Women have a high incidence of chronic venous disease. Venous occlusive disease can lead to significant morbidity and even death. Factors such as genetics, medications, and diseases can play a role in the development of venous thrombosis. In women, pregnancy can lead to a hypercoagulable state and a greater risk of venous complication. Awareness and education will be very important in the future to help identify those patients at risk. PMID:23522718

  7. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Glueck, Charles J.; Lee, Kevin; Prince, Marloe; Jetty, Vybhav; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: When exogenous testosterone or treatments to elevate testosterone (human chorionic gonadotropin [HCG] or Clomid) are prescribed for men who have antecedent thrombophilia, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism often occur and may recur despite adequate anticoagulation if testosterone therapy is continued. Case Presentation: A 55-year-old white male was referred to us because of 4 thrombotic events, 3 despite adequate anticoagulation over a 5-year period. We assessed interactions between thrombophilia, exogenous testosterone therapy, and recurrent thrombosis. In 2009, despite low-normal serum testosterone 334 ng/dL (lower normal limit [LNL] 300 ng/dL), he was given testosterone (TT) cypionate (50 mg/week) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG; 500 units/week) for presumed hypogonadism. Ten months later, with supranormal serum T (1385 ng/dL, upper normal limit [UNL] 827 ng/dL) and estradiol (E2) 45 pg/mL (UNL 41 pg/mL), he had a pulmonary embolus (PE) and was then anticoagulated for 2 years (enoxaparin, then warfarin). Four years later, on TT-HCG, he had his first deep venous thrombosis (DVT). TT was stopped and HCG continued; he was anticoagulated (enoxaparin, then warfarin, then apixaban, then fondaparinux). One year after his first DVT, on HCG, still on fondaparinux, he had a second DVT (5/315), was anticoagulated (enoxaparin + warfarin), with a Greenfield filter placed, but 8 days later had a second PE. Thrombophilia testing revealed the lupus anticoagulant. After stopping HCG, and maintained on warfarin, he has been free of further DVT-PE for 9 months. Conclusion: When DVT-PE occur on TT or HCG, in the presence of thrombophilia, TT-HCG should be stopped, lest DVT-PE reoccur despite concurrent anticoagulation. PMID:27536705

  8. A systematic review of patient-related risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Perera, Marlon; Pretorius, Casper

    2015-10-01

    To identify patient-related risk factors for venous thrombosis in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) or peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). We performed a systematic review of the literature assessing patient-related risk factors for thrombosis related to CVC or PICC. The databases PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane library were searched for observational studies pertaining to patient-related risk factors for CVC and PICC-related thrombosis. The initial search through PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane library yielded 516 results. After 71 duplicates were removed, 445 articles were assessed for eligibility based on title and abstract. Four hundred and eleven articles were then excluded and 33 full text articles were manually assessed for eligibility. Eight articles were eliminated as they did not contain content relevant to the review. Twenty-five studies were then selected to assess 20 risk factors. There were no consistent significant associations for catheter-related thrombosis across the twenty-five studies. Multiple studies identified age, malignancy, diabetes, obesity, chemotherapy, thrombophilia and a history of thrombosis as significant risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis. Inconsistent findings among studies make it difficult to establish which patient-related risk factors are associated with catheter-related thrombosis. Future studies could include larger sample sizes and more cases of catheter-related thrombosis to produce more significant results. Identification of patient-related risk factors could lead to early recognition of upper limb deep vein thrombosis in patients with catheters, thereby preventing complications. PMID:25680892

  9. Heparin for clearance of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in newborns: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Balaminut, Talita; Venturini, Danielle; da Silva, Valéria Costa Evangelista; Rossetto, Edilaine Giovanini; Zani, Adriana Valongo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of two concentrations of heparin to clear the lumen of in vitro clotted neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Methods: This is an in vitro, experimental quantitative study of 76 neonatal 2.0-Fr PICCs coagulated in vitro. The catheters were divided into two groups of 38 PICCs each. In both groups an infusion of low molecular weight heparin was administered with a dose of 25IU/mL for Group 1 and 50IU/mL for Group 2. The negative pressure technique was applied to the catheters of both groups at 5, 15 and 30min and at 4h to test their permeability. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to verify the outcome of the groups according to time intervals. Results: The comparison between both groups in the first 5min showed that more catheters from Group 2 were cleared compared to Group 1 (57.9 vs. 21.1%, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that less time was needed to clear catheters treated with 50IU/mL of heparin (p<0.001). Conclusions: The use of low molecular weight heparin at a concentration of 50IU/mL was more effective in restoring the permeability of neonatal PICCs occluded in vitro by a clot, and the use of this concentration is within the safety margin indicated by scientific literature. PMID:26116325

  10. [Peripheral venous catheterization: influence of catheter composition on the occurrence of thrombophlebitis].

    PubMed

    Jacquot, C; Fauvage, B; Bru, J P; Croize, J; Calop, J

    1989-01-01

    Infusion thrombophlebitis is a common troublesome complication of intravenous therapy. This study compared peripheral intravenous Teflon and Vialon catheters. The incidence of phlebitis, bacterial adherence and mechanical resistance (distortion) were assessed on 170 catheters, 85 of each type. The Vialon catheter resulted in less phlebitis than the Teflon one (18 vs. 35; p less than 0.01). During the period 49 to 72 h after the insertion of the catheter, the risk of phlebitis in the Teflon group was twice that in the Vialon group. The study of bacterial adherence using a semi-quantitative culture method demonstrated that 9.0% of the catheters were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (5.7% Vialon group vs. 12.5% Teflon group). The Teflon catheters were much more distorted than vialon catheters: 1.7% vs. 55.7% in the macroscopic study; 1.75% vs. 8.2% in the microscopic study. As Vialon softens at body temperature, it would seem likely that it generates a lesser degree of endothelial injury, explaining the lower rate of phlebitis with Vialon catheters. PMID:2633660

  11. Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications in Children Receiving Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT).

    PubMed

    Kovacich, Amanda; Tamma, Pranita D; Advani, Sonali; Popoola, Victor O; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Gosey, Leslie; Milstone, Aaron M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify the frequency of and risk factors associated with complications necessitating removal of the peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in patients receiving outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) and to determine the appropriateness of OPAT in children with OPAT-related complications. METHODS A retrospective cohort of children who had a PICC inserted at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013, and were discharged from the hospital on OPAT was assembled. RESULTS A total of 1,465 PICCs were used to provide antibiotic therapy for 955 children after hospital discharge. Among these, 117 PICCs (8%) required removal due to a complication (4.6 of 1,000 catheter days). Children discharged to a long-term care facility were at increased risk of adverse PICC events (incidence risk ratio [IRR], 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.79-6.17). For children receiving OPAT, age of the child (adjusted IRR [aIRR], 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), noncentral PICC tip location (aIRR, 2.82; 95% CI, 1.66-4.82), and public insurance (aIRR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10-2.40) were associated with adverse PICC events. In addition, 34 patients (32%) with adverse events may not have required intravenous antibiotics at the time of hospital discharge. CONCLUSIONS Of children discharged with PICCs on OPAT during the study period, 8% developed a complication necessitating PICC removal. Children discharged to a long-term care facility had an increased rate of complication compared with children who were discharged home. With improved education regarding appropriate duration of antibiotic therapy and situations in which early conversion to enteral therapy should be considered, PICC-related complications may have been avoided in 32% of children. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):420-424. PMID:26961677

  12. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis can affect any venous circulation. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep-vein thrombosis of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, pulmonary embolism. VTE is a fairly common disease, particularly in older age, and is associated with reduced survival, substantial health-care costs, and a high rate of recurrence. VTE is a complex (multifactorial) disease, involving interactions between acquired or inherited predispositions to thrombosis and various risk factors. Major risk factors for incident VTE include hospitalization for surgery or acute illness, active cancer, neurological disease with leg paresis, nursing-home confinement, trauma or fracture, superficial vein thrombosis, and—in women—pregnancy and puerperium, oral contraception, and hormone therapy. Although independent risk factors for incident VTE and predictors of VTE recurrence have been identified, and effective primary and secondary prophylaxis is available, the occurrence of VTE seems to be fairly constant, or even increasing. PMID:26076949

  13. Two Serious Complications of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Indicating the Need to Formalize Training for Placing Central Venous Vascular Access Devices.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Volker; Feenstra, Nico

    2016-02-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters are being used in increasing numbers. Common (thrombosis, infection, phlebitis, malfunction, or disconnection) and rare complications (pericardial tamponade) have been well explored. We describe 2 serious complications that resolved without sequelae. Both complications occurred in the context of limited provider competence. We conclude that vascular access is more than "just" placing a catheter; it can have serious clinical impact and has evolved into a specialist skill. With increasing use of intravascular catheters, the need for a formalized training becomes urgent. PMID:26517231

  14. Evaluation of effects of thymidylate synthase and excision repair cross-complementing 1 polymorphisms on chemotherapy outcome in patients with gastrointestinal tumors using peripheral venous blood

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, KAIDA; SHEN, YAN; ZHANG, FENGQI; WANG, SHANSHAN; WEI, XIAO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1) polymorphisms on chemotherapeutic efficacy in patients with gastrointestinal tumors using peripheral venous blood. Preoperative peripheral venous blood and tumor tissue samples of 43 patients with gastric cancer and the peripheral venous blood samples of 76 patients with cancer who underwent chemotherapy were studied. The 3R/3R and 2R/2R or 2R/3R genotypes of TYMS were identified in 72.09 and 27.91%, respectively (P<0.01), of untreated patients, and the C/C and T/T or C/T genotypes of ERCC1 were present in 81.39 and 18.61%, respectively (P<0.01), of patients. The 3R/3R and 2R/2R or 2R/3R genotypes of TYMS were identified in 65.79 and 34.21%, respectively, of chemotherapy-treated patients. The overall response rates (ORRs) for the two aforementioned genotypes were 18.00 and 57.69%, respectively (P<0.01), and those for the C/C and T/T or C/T genotypes of ERCC1 were 63.16 and 36.84%, respectively. The ORRs were 47.91 and 3.57%, respectively (P<0.01). In conclusion, peripheral blood samples may be used to replace tumor tissue for detecting TYMS and ERCC1 polymorphisms, and may be used to evaluate the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil and platinum drugs. PMID:27123139

  15. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  16. The Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC) initiative: A summary and review of peripherally inserted central catheter and venous catheter appropriate use.

    PubMed

    Woller, Scott C; Stevens, Scott M; Evans, R Scott

    2016-04-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are being selected for venous access more frequently today than ever before. Often the choice of a PICC, when compared with other vascular access devices (VADs), is attractive because of perceived safety, availability, and ease of insertion. However, complications associated with PICCs exist, and there is a paucity of evidence to guide clinician choice for PICC selection and valid use. An international panel with expertise in the arena of venous access and populations associated with these devices was convened to clarify approaches for the optimal use of PICCs and VADs. Here we present for the busy hospital-based practitioner the methodology, key outcomes, and recommendations of the Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC) panelists for the appropriate use of VADs. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:306-310. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26662622

  17. The impact of high-frequency magnetic stimulation of peripheral nerves: muscle hardness, venous blood flow, and motor function of upper extremity in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Okudera, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Sato, Mineyoshi; Chida, Satoaki; Hatakeyama, Kazutoshi; Watanabe, Motoyuki; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of high-frequency peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation on the upper limb function. Twenty-five healthy adults (16 men and 9 women) participated in this study. The radial nerve of the non-dominant hand was stimulated by high-frequency magnetic stimulation device. A total of 600 impulses were applied at a frequency of 20 Hz and intensity of 1.2 resting motor threshold (rMT). At three time points (before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation), muscle hardness of the extensor digitorum muscle on the stimulated side was measured using a mechanical tissue hardness meter and a shear wave imaging device, cephalic venous blood flow on the stimulated side was measured using an ultrasound system, and the Box and Block test (BBT) was performed. Mechanical tissue hardness results did not show any significant differences between before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation. Measurements via shear wave imaging showed that muscle hardness significantly decreased both immediately and 15 min after stimulation compared to before stimulation (P < 0.05). Peripheral venous blood flow and BBT score significantly increased both immediately and 15 min after stimulation compared to before stimulation (P < 0.01). High-frequency peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation can achieve effects similar to electrical stimulation in a less invasive manner, and may therefore become an important element in next-generation rehabilitation. PMID:25876657

  18. Cerebral thrombosis and myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Artoni, Andrea; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Martinelli, Ida

    2014-11-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are acquired clonal disorders characterized by the proliferation of bone marrow myeloid cells. Different somatic mutations have been recently associated with MPN, the most common being JAK-2 V617F. Among MPN, polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia are particularly associated with an increased risk to develop thrombotic complications, either arterial or venous. Cerebrovascular events (stroke and transient ischemic attacks) are prevalent, accounting for approximately two-thirds of all events. Also cerebral vein thrombosis can complicate MPN and can be the first manifestation of the disease. Risk factors for thrombosis in patients with MPN are related or unrelated to the disease. Among the former there are cellular risk factors, such as increased white blood cell counts, vascular cell activation, endothelial dysfunction, and plasmatic risk factors, such as increased plasma viscosity, reduced levels of protein S, increased thrombin generation. The latter include increased age and previous thrombotic events. In addition, common cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity) contribute to the pathogenesis of arterial events, whereas circumstantial risk factors (particularly oral contraceptive use and pregnancy/puerperium) to that of venous events. Primary prevention of arterial thrombosis with antiplatelet therapy is warranted in the majority of patients with MPN, whereas primary prevention of venous thrombosis is limited to anticoagulant prophylaxis during high-risk situations. Secondary prevention includes long-term antiplatelet therapy for arterial and short- or long-term anticoagulant therapy for venous thrombosis, depending on the risk factors present at the first event. PMID:25217248

  19. Heparin Saline Versus Normal Saline for Flushing and Locking Peripheral Venous Catheters in Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Ming-Guang; Luo, Ou; He, Liu; Li, Jia-Xin; Tang, Yun-Jing; Luo, Yan-Li; Zhou, Min; Tang, Li; Zhang, Zong-Xia; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A prospective randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial to compare the effectiveness and safety of heparin saline (HS) to those of normal saline (NS) as flushing and locking solutions for peripheral venous catheter (PVC) in decompensated liver cirrhosis (DLC) patients. Patients with DLC at our institution between April 2012 and March 2013 were enrolled after obtaining informed consent. The patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups: the NS group received preservative-free 0.9% sodium chloride as the flushing and locking solution, while the HS group received HS (50 U/mL). PVC-related events and the duration of PVC maintenance were compared between the 2 groups. Moreover, the preinfusion and postinfusion levels of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and platelet (PLT) were also compared. A total of 32 and 36 DLC patients in the NS (125 PVCs) and HS (65 PVCs) groups, respectively, were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, including gender, age, Child–Pugh grade, PVC type and administration of anticoagulant, and irritant agents, were comparable between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). The maintenance times of the HS and NS groups were 80.27 ± 26.47 and 84.19 ± 29.32 hours, respectively (P = 0.397). Removal of PVC for abnormal reasons occurred in 30.7% and 22.4% of patients in the HS and NS groups (P = 0.208). The PVC occlusion rates were 6.2% and 5.6% in the HS and NS groups, respectively (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.31–3.92). The PT, APTT, and PLT levels were comparable between the 2 groups both before and after infusion (P > 0.05). Incremental analyses showed that Child–Pugh grade C might be a risk factor for the suppression of PLT in the HS group. We consider NS to be as effective as and safer than conventional HS for flushing and locking PVC in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients. PMID:26252305

  20. Serum Procalcitonin and Peripheral Venous Lactate for Predicting Dengue Shock and/or Organ Failure: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Thanachartwet, Vipa; Desakorn, Varunee; Sahassananda, Duangjai; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Oer-areemitr, Nittha; Osothsomboon, Sathaporn; Surabotsophon, Manoon; Wattanathum, Anan

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently, there are no biomarkers that can predict the incidence of dengue shock and/or organ failure, although the early identification of risk factors is important in determining appropriate management to reduce mortality. Therefore, we sought to determine the factors associated with dengue shock and/or organ failure and to evaluate the prognostic value of serum procalcitonin (PCT) and peripheral venous lactate (PVL) levels as biomarkers of dengue shock and/or organ failure. Methodology/Principal Findings A prospective observational study was conducted among adults hospitalized for confirmed viral dengue infection at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Bangkok, Thailand between October 2013 and July 2015. Data, including baseline characteristics, clinical parameters, laboratory findings, serum PCT and PVL levels, management, and outcomes, were recorded on pre-defined case report forms. Of 160 patients with dengue, 128 (80.0%) patients had dengue without shock or organ failure, whereas 32 (20.0%) patients developed dengue with shock and/or organ failure. Using a stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis, PCT ≥0.7 ng/mL (odds ratio [OR]: 4.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60–14.45; p = 0.005) and PVL ≥2.5 mmol/L (OR: 27.99, 95% CI: 8.47–92.53; p <0.001) were independently associated with dengue shock and/or organ failure. A combination of PCT ≥0.7 ng/mL and PVL ≥2.5 mmol/L provided good prognostic value for predicting dengue shock and/or organ failure, with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.83 (95% CI: 0.74–0.92), a sensitivity of 81.2% (95% CI: 63.6–92.8%), and a specificity of 84.4% (95% CI: 76.9–90.2%). Dengue shock patients with non-clearance of PCT and PVL expired during hospitalization. Conclusions/Significance PCT ≥0.7 ng/mL and PVL ≥2.5 mmol/L were independently associated with dengue shock and/or organ failure. The combination of PCT and PVL levels could be used as prognostic

  1. Adipokines and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Katrin; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2011-12-01

    1. Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. An increased body mass index (BMI) is associated with venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke and stent thrombosis after percutaneous interventions. Studies in mouse models of obesity and induced arterial or venous thrombosis have provided insights into the mechanisms involved. 2. In addition to elevated circulating levels of fibrinogen, factor VII and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, changes in platelet biology and function may underlie the increased (athero) thrombotic risk in obesity. These include elevated platelet counts, an increase in mean platelet volume, an increased platelet aggregatory response to agonists and a reversible resistance to the anti-aggregatory effects of nitric oxide and prostacyclin I(2) . 3. Specific adipokines mediate the prothrombotic state in obesity. Of these, leptin enhances both arterial and venous thrombosis by promoting platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation. Leptin also induces tissue factor expression by human neutrophils and other cells. C-Reactive protein enhances the formation of monocyte-platelet aggregates and also promotes P-selectin expression and platelet adhesion to endothelial cells. Further, the adipose tissue is a significant source of tissue factor and PAI-1. Conversely, the circulating levels of adiponectin, a hormone that exerts vasculoprotective, anti-atherosclerotic and antithrombotic effects, are reduced in obese individuals. 4. A better understanding of the interactions of the adipose tissue with circulating and vascular cells and the dissection of the mechanisms linking adipokines to arterial and venous thrombosis may identify obese individuals at particularly high cardiovascular risk and indicate promising vasculoprotective and therapeutic targets. PMID:21848866

  2. Solitaire FR device for treatment of dural sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Pukenas, Bryan Anthony; Kumar, Monisha; Stiefel, Michael; Smith, Michelle; Hurst, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis is a rare and potentially devastating disease. Several predisposing factors exist, including oral contraceptive therapy and colitis. First-line therapy consists of systemic anticoagulation. If first-line therapies fail, more aggressive endovascular therapies may be performed. We report our initial experience with the Solitaire FR device for treatment of refractory symptomatic dural venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:23257943

  3. Effect of Ultrasound-Guided Placement of Difficult-to-Place Peripheral Venous Catheters: A Prospective Study of a Training Program for Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Partovi-Deilami, Kohyar; Nielsen, Jesper K; Moller, Ann M; Nesheim, Sara-Sophie S; Jorgensen, Vibeke L

    2016-04-01

    Patients with difficult intravenous access (DIVA) often experience discomfort because of failed attempts to place peripheral venous catheters (PVCs); however, ultrasound guidance may improve this problem with catheter placement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of ultrasound when operated by nurse anesthetists for these patients. This prospective observational study with a pre/post design focused on inpatients with DIVA referred for PVC placement, a service provided by nurse anesthetists in most Scandinavian hospitals. The rate of success, procedure time, number of skin punctures, discomfort, catheter size, location, and incidence of central venous catheter placement are reported before and after implementation of a training program and a mobile service using ultrasound to place difficult-to-place PVCs. The success rate increased from 0% (0 of 33 patients) to 83% (58 of 70 patients) with ultrasound. Procedure time was reduced from 20 to 10 minutes, discomfort was unchanged, and the median number of skin punctures decreased from 3 to 2. The incidence of central venous catheter placement dropped from 34% to 7%. Implementation of a training program and a mobile service in which nurse anesthetists performed ultrasound-guided PVC placement improved the success rate and quality of care in patients with DIVA. PMID:27311149

  4. Discovering the barriers to spread the usage of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in the neonatal intensive care units: A qualitative research

    PubMed Central

    Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Mahdavi-Lenji, Zahra; Hasanpour, Marzieh; Sadeghnia, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Background: By increasing the survival of immature newborns, intravenous access methods, used to provide intravenous therapy, became more important. More attention has been recently paid on peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns, although it is yet unknown in Iran. In this study, we tried to discover the barriers to spread the usage of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) in the neonatal intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive explorative qualitative research, conducted from December 2011 to April 2012 with purposeful sampling and snowball method, participants were selected from nurses and residents of neonatology and neonatal specialists working in Alzahra, Shahid Beheshty, and Amin hospitals, until data saturation occurred. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis proposed by Broun and Clarke in 2006. Results: Data analysis yielded 175 initial codes, 12 sub-themes, and 3 main themes. The main themes included barriers related to procedure and maintenance, barriers related to persons providing care, and barriers related to management and planning. Conclusions: One of the major problems in premature newborns during hospitalization is long-term and safe intravascular access; therefore, more use of PICC is needed. A complete planning is also needed to eliminate barriers and to provide required catheters. Educating the personnel is also necessary. PMID:24403919

  5. Cuff-occluded rate of rise of peripheral venous pressure: a new, highly sensitive technique for monitoring blood volume status during hemorrhage and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, W M; Snyder, C L; Porter, J; Saltzman, D A; Chen, S; Leonard, A S

    1987-03-01

    We investigated the cuff-occluded rate of rise of peripheral venous pressure (CORRP)--a new, nearly noninvasive peripheral hemodynamic monitoring parameter--in dogs subjected to hemorrhage and resuscitation. Twelve adult mongrel dogs under general anesthesia were subjected to hemorrhage of 30% of their estimated total blood volume (TBV) for 30 minutes; after this time the extracted blood was reinfused. Arterial pressure (AP), central venous pressure (CVP), pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), cardiac output (CO), pulmonary venous pressure (PWP), heart rate, and CORRP were continuously monitored. A "clinically significant change" (CSC) in CORRP and CO was defined as a change that exceeded two standard deviations from the mean of five baseline measurements made before the onset of hemorrhage, whereas a CSC in PWP or CVP was conservatively defined as a change that exceeded 2 mm Hg from the average of five baseline measurements, and a CSC in PAP and AP was defined as a change that exceeded 3 mm Hg and 5 mm Hg, respectively from the average of the baseline measurements. There was no consistent change in heart rate during hemorrhage. Thus defined, a CSC in CORRP occurred after an average extraction of 9.2% +/- 4.7% TBV, whereas a CSC was not seen until an average loss of 16.5% +/- 8.1% TBV for AP, 21% +/- 13% TBV for PWP, 15.5% +/- 7% TBV for PAP, and 35% +/- 3% TBV for CVP. These average blood losses are all significantly different from the average blood loss required to effect a CSC in CORRP. The blood loss required to effect a CSC in CO averaged 9.7% +/- 6%. We conclude that in these anesthetized dogs, CORRP detected blood loss earlier than other commonly used hemodynamic parameters, including several invasive parameters such as CVP, PAP, and PWP; CORRP and CO were equivalent in their ability to detect early stages of blood loss. PMID:3824158

  6. Prophylaxis of Venous Thrombosis in Neurocritical Care Patients: An Evidence-Based Guideline: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, Paul; Bautista, Cynthia; Jichici, Draga; Burns, Joseph; Chhangani, Sanjeev; DeFilippis, Michele; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Kim, Keri; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Mack, William; Meyer, Kim

    2016-02-01

    The risk of death from venous thromboembolism (VTE) is high in intensive care unit patients with neurological diagnoses. This is due to an increased risk of venous stasis secondary to paralysis as well as an increased prevalence of underlying pathologies that cause endothelial activation and create an increased risk of embolus formation. In many of these diseases, there is an associated risk from bleeding because of standard VTE prophylaxis. There is a paucity of prospective studies examining different VTE prophylaxis strategies in the neurologically ill. The lack of a solid evidentiary base has posed challenges for the establishment of consistent and evidence-based clinical practice standards. In response to this need for guidance, the Neurocritical Care Society set out to develop and evidence-based guideline using GRADE to safely reduce VTE and its associated complications. PMID:26646118

  7. Advances in our understanding of mechanisms of venous thrombus resolution.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Johanna; Sharma, Smriti; Lang, Irene M

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, venous thrombosis has been seen as the consequence of a regulated cascade of proteolytic steps leading to the polymerization of fibrinogen and fibrin crosslinking that is facilitated by platelets. A new view of thrombosis is providing a more integrated concept, with components of the vascular wall contributing to the vascular remodeling of thrombosis. Angiogenesis and inflammation are two key mechanisms that safeguard venous thrombus resolution and restitution of vascular patency after thrombosis. Disturbance of these processes leads to thrombus persistence and has potentially severe consequences for affected patients. Examples for clinical conditions associated with recurrent or persisting venous thrombosis are post-thrombotic syndrome or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Recently, studies using animal models of venous thrombosis have contributed to a better understanding of thrombus non-resolution that will eventually lead to modification of current treatment concepts. For example, recent data suggest that innate immunity is involved in the modification of thrombosis. PMID:26629617

  8. Venous sinus occlusive disease: MR findings

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, W.T.C.; Simonson, T.M.; Tali, E.T.; Fisher, D.J. ); Wang, A.M. ); Koci, T.M. ); Simon, J.H. ); Jinkins, J.R. ); Tsai, Fong )

    1994-02-01

    To study MR patterns of venous sinus occlusive disease and to relate them to the underlying pathophysiology by comparing the appearance and pathophysiologic features of venous sinus occlusive disease with those of arterial ischemic disease. The clinical data and MR examinations of 26 patients with venous sinus occlusive disease were retrospectively reviewed with special attention to mass effect, hemorrhage, and T2-weighted image abnormalities as well as to abnormal parenchymal, venous, or arterial enhancement after intravenous gadopentetate dimeglumine administration. Follow-up studies when available were evaluated for atrophy, infraction, chronic mass effect, and hemorrhage. Mass effect was present in 25 of 26 patients. Eleven of the 26 had mass effect without abnormal signal on T2-weighted images. Fifteen patients had abnormal signal on T2-weighted images, but this was much less extensive than the degree of brain swelling in all cases. No patient showed abnormal parenchymal or arterial enhancement. Abnormal venous enhancement was seen in 10 of 13 patients who had contrast-enhanced studies. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage was seen in nine patients with high signal on T2-weighted images predominantly peripheral to the hematoma in eight. Three overall MR patterns were observed in acute sinus thrombosis: (1) mass effect without associated abnormal signal on T2-weighted images, (2) mass effect with associated abnormal signal on T2-weighted images and/or ventricular dilatation that may be reversible, and (3) intraparenchymal hematoma with surrounding edema. MR findings of venus sinus occlusive disease are different from those of arterial ischemia and may reflect different underlying pathophysiology. In venous sinus occlusive disease, the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (vasogenic edema and abnormal parenchymal enhancement) does not always occur, and brain swelling can persist up to 2 years with or without abnormal signal on T2-weighted images. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Simultaneous acute deep vein thrombosis and acute brucellosis. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Andaç, Şeyda; Kalender, Mehmet; Yıldırım, Onur; İmre, Ayfer

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease common in developing countries. Vascular complications, including arterial and venous, associated with Brucella infection have rarely been reported. A case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) developing after a diagnosis of acute brucellosis in a young milkman is presented. A 26-year-old man presented with pain in the right leg. The patient's medical history included a diagnosis of brucellosis in our hospital where he had presented with complaints of weakness and fever. Peripheral venous Doppler ultrasound showed DVT, and the patient was treated with anticoagulants. The patient was discharged with warfarin therapy and anti-brucellosis treatment. Although rare, some infectious agents may cause vascular pathologies. Patients presenting with symptoms of DVT or similar vascular pathologies should be assessed for infectious agents, particularly in those coming from Brucella-endemic areas. PMID:27516795

  10. Simultaneous acute deep vein thrombosis and acute brucellosis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Salihi, Salih; Andaç, Şeyda; Kalender, Mehmet; Yıldırım, Onur; İmre, Ayfer

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease common in developing countries. Vascular complications, including arterial and venous, associated with Brucella infection have rarely been reported. A case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) developing after a diagnosis of acute brucellosis in a young milkman is presented. A 26-year-old man presented with pain in the right leg. The patient's medical history included a diagnosis of brucellosis in our hospital where he had presented with complaints of weakness and fever. Peripheral venous Doppler ultrasound showed DVT, and the patient was treated with anticoagulants. The patient was discharged with warfarin therapy and anti-brucellosis treatment. Although rare, some infectious agents may cause vascular pathologies. Patients presenting with symptoms of DVT or similar vascular pathologies should be assessed for infectious agents, particularly in those coming from Brucella-endemic areas. PMID:27516795

  11. Epidural Venous Plexus Engorgement: What Lies Beneath?

    PubMed Central

    Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim

    2015-01-01

    Epidural venous plexus engorgement may occur due to several conditions that prevent the normal venous circulation. Inferior vena cava agenesis is a very rare cause of epidural venous enlargement. We present a case with a very thin inferior vena cava and left iliac vein agenesis who presented with back pain due to epidural vein engorgement and lacked other venous problems such as deep vein thrombosis. PMID:25722912

  12. Testosterone, thrombophilia, thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Friedman, Joel; Hafeez, Ahsan; Hassan, Atif; Wang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    We assessed previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis in 11 testosterone (T)-taking men, five of whom developed deep venous thrombosis (DVT), four pulmonary embolism, one spinal cord infarction, and one osteonecrosis 3.5 months (median) after starting T gel (50-160 mg/day) or T intramuscular (50-250 mg/week). In the order of referral because of thrombosis after starting T, thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis was studied in 11 men, and, separately, in two control groups without thrombosis - 44 healthy normal male controls and 39 healthy men taking T. Nine men had DVT or DVT-pulmonary embolism after 3.5 months (median) on T, one spinal cord infarction after 5 days on T, and one had osteonecrosis (knee and then hip osteonecrosis after 6 and 18 months on T). Four of the 11 men (36%) had high factor VIII (≥150%) vs. one of 42 (2%) controls (P = 0.005), and vs. one of 25 (4%) T-controls, (P = 0.023). Of the 11 men, two (18%) had factor V Leiden heterozygosity vs. none of 44 controls, (P = 0.04) and vs. none of 39 T-controls(P = 0.045). Of the 11 men, three had 4G4G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 homozygosity, one prothrombin G20210A heterozygosity, one low protein S, and one high factor XI. When T was continued, second DVT-pulmonary embolism recurred in three of 11 men despite adequate anticoagulation. T interacts with thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis leading to thrombosis. Men sustaining DVT-pulmonary embolism-osteonecrosis on T should be studied for thrombophilia. Continuation of T in thrombophilic men appears to be contraindicated because of recurrent thrombosis despite adequate anticoagulation. Before starting T, to prevent T-associated thrombosis, we recommend measures of factor V Leiden, factor VIII, and the prothrombin gene. PMID:24732175

  13. Evaluating the Use of a Negative D-Dimer and Modified Low Wells Score in Excluding above Knee Deep Venous Thrombosis in an Outpatient Population, Assessing Need for Diagnostic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Anshul; Prabhudesai, Shirish; Mcclinton, David; MacCallum, Peter; Platton, Sean; Friedman, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Aims. Colour doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) is widely used in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT); however, the number of scans positive for above knee DVT is low. The present study evaluates the reliability of the D-dimer test combined with a clinical probability score (Wells score) in ruling out an above knee DVT and identifying patients who do not need a CDUS. Materials and Method. This study is a retrospective audit and reaudit of a total of 816 outpatients presenting with suspected lower limb DVT from March 2009 to March 2010 and from September 2011 to February 2012. Following the initial audit, a revised clinical diagnostic pathway was implemented. Results. In our initial audit, seven patients (4.9%) with a negative D-dimer and a low Wells score had a DVT. On review, all seven had a risk factor identified that was not included in the Wells score. No patient with negative D-dimer and low Wells score with no extra clinical risk factor had a DVT on CDUS (negative predictive value 100%). A reaudit confirmed adherence to our revised clinical diagnostic pathway. Conclusions. A negative D-dimer together with a low Wells score and no risk factors effectively excludes a lower limb DVT and an ultrasound is unnecessary in these patients. PMID:24967296

  14. Coronary Sinus Biomarker Sampling Compared to Peripheral Venous Blood for Predicting Outcomes In Patients with Severe Heart Failure Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: The BIOCRT Study

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Januzzi, James L.; Szymonifka, Jackie; Thai, Wai-ee; Wai, Bryan; Lavender, Zachary; Sharma, Umesh; Sandoval, Ryan M.; Grunau, Zachary S.; Basnet, Sandeep; Babatunde, Adefolakemi; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Min, James K.; Singh, Jagmeet P.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant minority of patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) remain non-responsive to this intervention. Objective To determine whether coronary sinus (CS) or baseline peripheral venous (PV) levels of established and emerging heart failure (HF) biomarkers are predictive of CRT outcomes. Methods In 73 patients (age 68±12; 83% male; ejection fraction 27 7%) with CS and PV blood drawn simultaneously at the time of CRT implantation, we measured amino-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), galectin-3 (gal-3), and soluble (s)ST2 levels. NT-proBNP concentrations>2000 pg/mL, gal-3>25.9 ng/mL, and sST2>35 ng/mL were considered positive, based on established PV cutpoints for identifying “high risk” individuals with HF. CRT response was adjudicated by HF Clinical Composite Score. Major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was defined as the composite endpoint of death, cardiac transplant, left ventricular assist device, and HF hospitalization at 2 years. Results NT-proBNP concentrations were 20% higher in the CS than periphery, while gal-3 and sST2 were 10% higher in periphery than CS (all p<0.001). There were 45% CRT non-responders at 6 months and 22% MACE. Triple positive CS values yielded the highest specificity of 95% for predicting CRT non-response. Consistently, CS strategies identified patients at higher risk for developing MACE, with over 11-fold adjusted increase for triple positive CS patients compared to triple negative patients (all p≤0.04). PV strategies were not predictive of MACE. Conclusions Our findings suggest that coronary sinus sampling of HF biomarkers may be better than peripheral venous blood levels for predicting CRT outcomes. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25014756

  15. Venous thromboembolism in cancer patients: risk assessment, prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Tukaye, Deepali N; Brink, Heidi; Baliga, Ragavendra

    2016-03-01

    Thrombosis and thromboembolic events contribute to significant morbidity in cancer patients. Venous thrombosis embolism (which includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) accounts for a large percentage of thromboembolic events. Appropriate identification of cancer patients at high risk for venous thromboembolism and management of thromboembolic event is crucial in improving the quality of care for cancer patients. However, thromboembolism in cancer patients is a complex problem and the management has to be tailored to each individual. The focus of this review is to understand the complex pathology, physiology and risk factors that drive the process of venous thrombosis and embolism in cancer patients and the current guidelines in management. PMID:26919091

  16. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and dural arteriovenous fistula in a 75-year-old man primarily presenting with repeated transient visual obscurations.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Matsuno, Hiromasa; Omoto, Shusaku; Sakuta, Kenichi; Terasawa, Yuka; Iguchi, Yasuyuki

    2016-04-28

    A 75-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of repeated transient visual obscurations of greying vision. The transient visual obscurations were caused by rotating his neck or the Valsalva manoeuver, and they recovered in about 30 seconds. A few weeks later, pulsatile tinnitus of the right ear and a dull headache developed. Both ocular fundi showed papilledema, and there was significant intracranial hypertension on cerebrospinal fluid examination. He was diagnosed as having right sigmoid sinus thrombosis and a dural arteriovenous fistula with a rapid arteriovenous shunt from the right ascending pharyngeal artery and the right occipital artery to the right transverse sinus. Anticoagulant therapy was started, and coil embolization was performed. The transient visual obscurations, headache, and tinnitus improved dramatically after the procedure. We hypothesized that the transient visual obscurations were triggered by rotating the neck or performing the Valsalva manoeuver as they both increase the pressure of cerebrospinal fluid, inducing transient optic nerve ischemia and visual obscurations under mild intracranial hypertension. Transient visual obscurations are an important initial symptom of intracranial hypertension. PMID:27010097

  17. Contraception-related deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a 17-Year-old girl heterozygous for factor V leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutation, MTHFR C677T and homozygous for PAI-1 mutation: report of a family with multiple genetic risk factors and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lenicek Krleza, Jasna; Jakovljevic, Gordana; Bronic, Ana; Coen Herak, Désirée; Bonevski, Aleksandra; Stepan-Giljevic, Jasminka; Roic, Goran

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old girl who suddenly woke up with localized pain in the left groin and the inability to twist her leg. After comprehensive physician and laboratory examinations, deep venous thrombosis with consequent pulmonary embolism was ascertained. She had not experienced any recent trauma, but she had started to take oral contraceptives 6 months prior to the onset of the symptoms. Her parents and sisters had been asymptomatic throughout their lives, but the family history revealed a few thromboembolic accidents. Using DNA analysis, heterozygosity for factor V Leiden, prothrombin gene mutation G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T, as well as the homozygous 4G/4G genotype in the plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 were identified in our patient. Subsequently, DNA analysis was performed in all living family members, and multiple factors associated with thrombophilia were discovered. Our case confirms the multifactorial cause of thromboembolic events and emphasizes the importance of oral contraceptive use in the onset of venous thrombosis, especially in teenage females. In addition, this case indicates that teenage females with a family history of thrombosis who are making choices about contraception could most likely benefit from advanced thrombophilia testing. PMID:20664190

  18. Subacute myelopathy caused by spinal venous infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, C. E.; Cumming, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A 44 year old female presented with a subacute myelopathy in association with pelvic venous thrombosis. It is inferred from the temporal relationship of these events that the patient suffered a subacute spinal venous infarction. This is discussed along with the aetiology, anatomical distribution and management of the condition. Images Figure 1 PMID:3422870

  19. Thrombosis in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Bacciedoni, Viviana; Attie, Myriam; Donato, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of thrombosis is higher among newborn infants than in any other stage of pediatric development. This fact is the consequence of labile characteristics of the neonatal hemostatic system, in addition to exposure to multiple risk factors and the wide use of vascular catheters. Venous thromboses, which mainly affect the limbs, the right atrium and renal veins, are more frequently seen than arterial thromboses. A stroke may be caused by the occlusion of the arterial flow entering the brain or by occlusion of its venous drainage system. Purpura fulminans is a very severe condition that should be treated as a medical emergency, and is secondary to severe protein C deficiency or, less frequently, protein S or antithrombin deficiency. Most thrombotic events should be managed with antithrombotic therapy, which is done with unfractionated and/or low molecular weight heparins. Purpura fulminans requires protein C replacement and/or fresh frozen plasma infusion. Thrombolytic therapy is done using tissue plasminogen activator and should only be used for life-, or limb-, or organ-threatening thrombosis. PMID:27079395

  20. Myeloproliferative neoplasms and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Barbui, Tiziano; Finazzi, Guido; Falanga, Anna

    2013-09-26

    Major causes of morbidity and mortality in myeloproliferative neoplasms are represented by arterial and venous complications, progression to myelofibrosis, and transformation to acute leukemia. The pathogenesis of thrombosis results from a complex interplay of clinical and disease-related factors. Abnormalities of blood cells arising from the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells involve not only quantitative changes but also qualitative modifications that characterize the switch of these cells from a resting to a procoagulant phenotype. According to age and previous thrombosis, patients are classified in a "high risk" or "low risk". Novel disease-related determinants such as leukocytosis and JAK2V617F mutational status and/or mutational burden are now under active investigation. In low-risk polycythemia vera patients, only phlebotomy and primary antithrombotic prophylaxis with aspirin is recommended, while in high-risk patients cytotoxic therapy is considered. Whether novel drugs targeting the constitutively active JAK2/STAT pathway will improve the management of thrombosis is a challenge for future studies. PMID:23823316

  1. Venous interventions in children.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Kamlesh; Vaidya, Sandeep

    2011-03-01

    Advanced medical treatment options have improved pediatric survival but often require invasive vascular procedures or venous access. These procedures increase the risk for thromboembolism in children, and there has been a corresponding increase in the reported incidence of deep venous thrombosis and postthrombotic syndrome in the pediatric population. Percutaneous venous interventions using catheter-directed therapy (CDT), like mechanical thrombectomy and infusion thrombolysis, have been used much less frequently in children, even though they have shown good results in adults. A multidisciplinary team including pediatric hematology, interventional radiology, and intensive care unit is suggested for management of venous thrombosis in children. Indications and contraindications for CDT in children are similar to adults. Mechanical thrombectomy and infusion thrombolysis are some of the more commonly performed treatments. CDT in children requires adapting to patient size and locally available equipment. Ultrasound guidance for access, "cork" technique, appropriate dosing of tissue plasminogen activator for infusion/pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, and simultaneous administration of heparin, plasminogen (fresh frozen plasma), and deficient coagulation factors are some of the important variations of CDT technique in children. Postprocedure monitoring is very important for successful thrombolysis. Retrievable inferior vena cava filters are increasingly being used in children as well, for prophylaxis against pulmonary embolism (PE) if there is a significant risk of PE with/without contraindications to anticoagulation. PMID:21335289

  2. Doping and thrombosis in sports.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    Historically, humans have long sought to enhance their "athletic" performance to increase body weight, aggressiveness, mental concentration and physical strength, contextually reducing fatigue, pain, and improving recovery. Although regular training is the mainstay for achieving these targets, the ancillary use of ergogenic aids has become commonplace in all sports. The demarcation between ergogenic aids and doping substances or practices is continuously challenging and mostly based on perceptions regarding the corruption of the fairness of competition and the potential side effects or adverse events arising from the use of otherwise unnecessary ergogenic substances. A kaleidoscope of side effects has been associated with the use of doping agents, including behavioral, skeletal, endocrinologic, metabolic, hemodynamic, and cardiovascular imbalances. Among the various doping substances, the most striking association with thrombotic complications has been reported for androgenic anabolic steroids (i.e., cardiomyopathy, fatal and nonfatal arrhythmias, myocardial infarction [MI], intracardiac thrombosis, stroke, venous thromboembolism [VTE], limb arterial thrombosis, branch retinal vein occlusion, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis) and blood boosting (i.e., VTE and MI, especially for epoetin and analogs). The potential thrombotic complication arising from misuse of other doping agents such as the administration of cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin, cocaine, and platelet-derived preparations is instead speculative or anecdotal at best. The present article provides an overview on the epidemiological association as well as the underlying biochemical and biological mechanisms linking the practice of doping in sports with the development of thrombosis. PMID:22198857

  3. Genome-Wide Profiling of RNA from Dried Blood Spots: Convergence with Bioinformatic Results Derived from Whole Venous Blood and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    McDade, Thomas W; M Ross, Kharah; L Fried, Ruby; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; Miller, Gregory E; Cole, Steve W

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide transcriptional profiling has emerged as a powerful tool for analyzing biological mechanisms underlying social gradients in health, but utilization in population-based studies has been hampered by logistical constraints and costs associated with venipuncture blood sampling. Dried blood spots (DBS) provide a minimally invasive, low-cost alternative to venipuncture, and in this article we evaluate how closely the substantive results from DBS transcriptional profiling correspond to those derived from parallel analyses of gold-standard venous blood samples (PAXgene whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMC]). Analyses focused on differences in gene expression between African-Americans and Caucasians in a community sample of 82 healthy adults (age 18-70 years; mean 35). Across 19,679 named gene transcripts, DBS-derived values correlated r = .85 with both PAXgene and PBMC values. Results from bioinformatics analyses of gene expression derived from DBS samples were concordant with PAXgene and PBMC samples in identifying increased Type I interferon signaling and up-regulated activity of monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells in African-Americans compared to Caucasian participants. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of DBS in field-based studies of gene expression and encourage future studies of human transcriptome dynamics in larger, more representative samples than are possible with clinic- or lab-based research designs. PMID:27337553

  4. Cancer associated thrombosis: risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Deep vein thrombosis of the leg and pulmonary embolism are frequent diseases and cancer is one of their most important risk factors. Patients with cancer also have a higher prevalence of venous thrombosis located in other parts than in the legs and/or in unusual sites including upper extremity, splanchnic or cerebral veins. Cancer also affects the risk of arterial thrombotic events particularly in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms and in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor recipients. Several risk factors need to interact to trigger thrombosis. In addition to common risk factors such as surgery, hospitalisation, infection and genetic coagulation disorders, the thrombotic risk is also driven and modified by cancer-specific factors including type, histology, and stage of the malignancy, cancer treatment and certain biomarkers. A venous thrombotic event in a cancer patient has serious consequences as the risk of recurrent thrombosis, the risk of bleeding during anticoagulation and hospitalisation rates are all increased. Survival of cancer patients with thrombosis is worse compared to that of cancer patients without thrombosis, and thrombosis is a leading direct cause of death in cancer patients. PMID:27067965

  5. Management of Symptomatic Venous Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Roberto; Rosati, Maria Sofia; Siani, Andrea; Irace, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Venous aneurysms (VAs) have been described in quite of all the major veins. They represent uncommon events but often life-threatening because of pulmonary or paradoxical embolism. We describe our twelve patients' series with acute pulmonary emboli due to venous aneurysm thrombosis. Our experience underlines the importance of a multilevel case-by-case approach and the immediate venous lower limbs duplex scan evaluation in pulmonary embolism events. Our data confirm that anticoagulant alone is not effective in preventing pulmonary embolism. We believe that all the VAs of the deep venous system of the extremities should be treated with surgery as well as symptomatic superficial venous aneurysm. A simple excision can significantly improve symptoms and prevent pulmonary embolism. PMID:22566766

  6. Management of symptomatic venous aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Roberto; Rosati, Maria Sofia; Siani, Andrea; Irace, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Venous aneurysms (VAs) have been described in quite of all the major veins. They represent uncommon events but often life-threatening because of pulmonary or paradoxical embolism. We describe our twelve patients' series with acute pulmonary emboli due to venous aneurysm thrombosis. Our experience underlines the importance of a multilevel case-by-case approach and the immediate venous lower limbs duplex scan evaluation in pulmonary embolism events. Our data confirm that anticoagulant alone is not effective in preventing pulmonary embolism. We believe that all the VAs of the deep venous system of the extremities should be treated with surgery as well as symptomatic superficial venous aneurysm. A simple excision can significantly improve symptoms and prevent pulmonary embolism. PMID:22566766

  7. Bilateral cavernous sinus and superior ophthalmic vein thrombosis in the setting of facial cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Bruce; Hise, Joseph; Philip, Joseph; Spak, Cedric; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare, potentially fatal cause of cerebral venous thrombosis. Infectious causes typically arise from the mid face, orbit, or sinonasal region. We present a case of bilateral cavernous sinus and superior ophthalmic thrombosis secondary to an extreme case of facial cellulitis. PMID:26722163

  8. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. PMID:26358306

  9. Evaluation of a percutaneously placed 27-gauge central venous catheter in neonates weighing less than 1200 grams.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K T; Sato, Y; Erenberg, A

    1990-01-01

    A percutaneous 27-gauge OD central venous catheter was inserted at 4 +/- 3 (SD) days of age and left in place for up to 2 weeks in 20 neonates with birth weights less than 1200 g and greater than 24 h of age. Parenteral nutritional solutions and medications were administered through these catheters. Twenty neonates matched for birth weight and gestational age served as paired controls. In vitro studies demonstrate that the maximum infusion rate for parenteral nutrition solutions is about 20 ml/hr. Packed red blood cells could not be infused through these catheters. In vivo results demonstrate a significant (p less than 0.05) reduction in number of peripheral iv catheters inserted during study (2 +/- 1 vs 7 +/- 4, SD) with no difference in cost per day of iv access ($79.42 +/- 113.51 vs $43.91 +/- 15.99, SD). Two-dimensional ultrasound assessment of catheter thrombosis was unsuccessful. Moreover, there was no correlation between angiographic and electron microscopic evaluation of catheter tip thrombosis. Electron microscopy of catheter tips revealed 33% with complete, partial and no occlusion, respectively, and 39% with sheath thrombosis. In summary, percutaneous insertion of a 27-gauge OD Vialon central venous catheter is a feasible alternative in providing venous access in very low birth weight infants. PMID:2112646

  10. Assessment of the peripheral microcirculation using computer-assisted venous congestion plethysmography in post-traumatic complex regional pain syndrome type I.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, M; Zaspel, J; Gradl, G; Wipfel, A; Christ, F

    2001-01-01

    In complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I), edema of the affected limb is a common finding. Therefore, the changes in macro- and microcirculatory parameters were investigated to elucidate the underlying pathophysiology. Twenty-four patients with post-traumatic CRPS-I and 25 gender- and age-matched healthy subjects were examined by means of an advanced computer-assisted venous congestion strain-gauge plethysmograph. The recording of the volume response of the forearm to a stepwise inflation of an occlusion cuff placed at the upper arm enabled the calculation of the arterial blood flow into the arm (Q(a)), the vascular compliance (C), the peripheral venous pressure (P(v)), the isovolumetric venous pressure (P(vi); = hydrostatic pressure needed to achieve net fluid filtration) and the capillary filtration capacity (CFC)--an index of microvascular permeability. The study revealed no difference in any of the parameters between the right and left hand of healthy subjects. In CRPS-I patients, however Q(a), P(v), P(vi) and CFC were significantly (p < 0.01/0.001) elevated in the affected arm (Q(a) 11.2 +/- 7.0 ml x min(-1) x 100 ml(-1), P(v) 20.2 +/- 8.1 mm Hg, P(vi) 24.7 +/- 4.2 mm Hg, CFC 0.0058 +/- 0.0015 ml x min(-1) x 100 ml(-1) x mm Hg(-1)) compared to the unaffected arm (Q(a) 4.2 +/- 2.4 ml x min(-1) x 100 ml(-1), P(v) 10.0 +/- 5.1 mm Hg, P(vi) 13.2 +/- 3.7 mm Hg, CFC 0.0038 +/- 0.0005 ml x min(-1) x 100 ml(-1) x mm Hg(-1)) and the values obtained in healthy controls (Q(a) 5.1 +/- 1.3 ml x min(-1) x 100 ml(-1), P(v) 10.4 +/- 4.3 mm Hg, P(vi) 15.7 +/- 3.3 mm Hg, CFC 0.0048 +/- 0.0012 ml x min(-1) x 100 ml(-1) x mm Hg(-1)). Whereas the values in the unaffected arm of CRPS-I patients revealed no difference in Q(a), P(v) and P(vi) but a lower CFC (p < 0.01) compared to those from healthy controls. These results suggest profound changes in both macro- and microvascular perfusion in the affected arm of CRPS-I patients. The high CFC contributes to the edema formation

  11. Update of thrombosis in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Leebeek, Frank W G

    2016-04-01

    With the introduction of thalidomide and multi-agent chemotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma around 15years ago a strongly increased risk of venous thrombosis was observed. The occurrence of venous thrombosis in multiple myeloma is not only determined by the kind of treatment, but also by several other factors, including disease specific factors, patient-specific factors, changes in pro-and anticoagulant factors and fibrinolysis. Studies showed a prevalence of up to 25% in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Therefore these patients nowadays receive prophylaxis with aspirin, low molecular weight heparin or warfarin in order to reduce the risk of venous thrombosis. It is however still debatable which patients should receive prophylaxis and what the best kind of prophylaxis is, considering both the risk of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. In recent years several new anti-myeloma agents have been developed and investigated in large clinical studies. The risk of thrombosis using these new drugs seems less than with thalidomide and lenalidomide-based regimens. In this article an update on prevention and management of thrombotic events in patients with multiple myeloma is given. PMID:27067983

  12. A Patient with Recurrent Arteriovenous Graft Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Allon, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are prone to frequent thrombosis that is superimposed on underlying hemodynamically significant stenosis, most commonly at the graft-vein anastomosis. There has been great interest in detecting AVG stenosis in a timely fashion and performing preemptive angioplasty, in the belief that this will prevent AVG thrombosis. Three surveillance methods (static dialysis venous pressure, flow monitoring, and duplex ultrasound) can detect AVG stenosis. Whereas observational studies have reported that surveillance with preemptive angioplasty substantially reduces AVG thrombosis, randomized clinical trials have failed to confirm such a benefit. There is a high frequency of early AVG restenosis after angioplasty caused by aggressive neointimal hyperplasia resulting from vascular injury. Stent grafts prevent AVG restenosis better than balloon angioplasty, but they do not prevent AVG thrombosis. Several pharmacologic interventions to prevent AVG failure have been evaluated in randomized clinical trials. Anticoagulation or aspirin plus clopidogrel do not prevent AVG thrombosis, but increase hemorrhagic events. Treatment of hyperhomocysteinemia does not prevent AVG thrombosis. Dipyridamole plus aspirin modestly decreases AVG stenosis or thrombosis. Fish oil substantially decreases the frequency of AVG stenosis and thrombosis. In patients who have exhausted all options for vascular access in the upper extremities, thigh AVGs are a superior option to tunneled internal jugular vein central vein catheters (CVCs). An immediate-use AVG is a reasonable option in patients with recurrent CVC dysfunction or infection. Tunneled femoral CVCs have much worse survival than internal jugular CVCs. PMID:25883073

  13. Venous Thrombosis Risk after Cast Immobilization of the Lower Extremity: Derivation and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Score, L-TRiP(cast), in Three Population-Based Case–Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Banne; van Adrichem, Raymond A.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Martinelli, Ida; Baglin, Trevor; Rosendaal, Frits R.; le Cessie, Saskia; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Guidelines and clinical practice vary considerably with respect to thrombosis prophylaxis during plaster cast immobilization of the lower extremity. Identifying patients at high risk for the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE) would provide a basis for considering individual thromboprophylaxis use and planning treatment studies. The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the predictive value of genetic and environmental risk factors, levels of coagulation factors, and other biomarkers for the occurrence of VTE after cast immobilization of the lower extremity and (2) to develop a clinical prediction tool for the prediction of VTE in plaster cast patients. Methods and Findings We used data from a large population-based case–control study (MEGA study, 4,446 cases with VTE, 6,118 controls without) designed to identify risk factors for a first VTE. Cases were recruited from six anticoagulation clinics in the Netherlands between 1999 and 2004; controls were their partners or individuals identified via random digit dialing. Identification of predictor variables to be included in the model was based on reported associations in the literature or on a relative risk (odds ratio) > 1.2 and p ≤ 0.25 in the univariate analysis of all participants. Using multivariate logistic regression, a full prediction model was created. In addition to the full model (all variables), a restricted model (minimum number of predictors with a maximum predictive value) and a clinical model (environmental risk factors only, no blood draw or assays required) were created. To determine the discriminatory power in patients with cast immobilization (n = 230), the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated by means of a receiver operating characteristic. Validation was performed in two other case–control studies of the etiology of VTE: (1) the THE-VTE study, a two-center, population-based case–control study (conducted in Leiden, the Netherlands, and Cambridge, United Kingdom

  14. Thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette

    2012-04-01

    Inherited deficiencies of blood coagulation factors are usually associated with lifelong bleeding tendency. In addition to Haemophilias A and B and von Willebrand disease, congenital deficiencies of such factors as fibrinogen, prothrombin (FII)), FV, FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII, and combined deficiencies occur and can lead to a diversity of clinical conditions. Paradoxically, for some of these disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency there are reports of thrombotic events, both arterial and venous. Thrombosis in hemophilia patients has a multifactorial pathogenesis and the main conditions associated with this complication are the use of long-term central venous catheters, intensive replacement therapy usually in the setting of surgical procedures, the use of bypassing agents or the coexistence of acquired or inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Regarding other rare bleeding disorders, thrombotic phenomena has been described particularly in patients with afibrinogenemia, FXI and FVII deficiency and the events can occur even in young patients, in the presence of concomitant risk factors or spontaneously. Replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past history of haemostatic challenges, family history of bleeding and thrombosis, just like the level of factor. For mild deficiencies when patients are asymptomatic the use of antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. In patients with history of thrombosis it may be helpful to perform a thrombophilia screening to exclude coexisting prothrombotic defects and for all patients it is recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:22507808

  15. Deep vein thrombosis as a rare complication of brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Ali Reza; Tayebi, Atefe; Najafi, Narges; Kasiri, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Brucellosis can involve almost any organ system and may present with a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. In this study, we present a case of deep vein thrombosis due to human brucellosis. Case Presentation: A 15- year old boy presented with acute pain and swelling in his left thigh in June 2011, when he complained of fever, chills and lower extremity pain in which he could barely walk. In family history, his older brother had brucellosis 3 weeks ago and appropriate medication was given. The tubal standard agglutination test (wright test) and 2ME test were positive (in a titer of 1/1280 and 1/640, respectively). Peripheral venous doppler ultrasound of left lower extremity showed that common iliac, femoral, external iliac, superficial and deep femoral vein and popliteal vein were enlarged and contained with echogenous clot. He was treated with rifampicin 600 mg once a day, doxycycline 100 mg twice a day (both for three months) and amikacin 500 mg twice a day (for 2 weeks) accompanied with anti-coagulant. Ten days after the onset of this treatment, thrombophlebitis was cured. The follow up of the patient showed no abnormality after approximately one year later. Conclusion: In brucellosis endemic areas, the clinicians who encounter patients with deep vein thrombosis and current history of a febrile illness, should consider the likelihood of brucellosis. PMID:24778791

  16. Transluminally Placed Endovascular Grafts for Venous Lesions in Patients on Hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, S.F. Kim, J.; Sheley, R.C.

    2003-08-15

    This report summarizes a feasibility study of transluminally placed endovascular grafts (TPEG) using pre-expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to treat venous abnormalities inpatients on hemodialysis. Seventeen patients with peripheral(n = 11) or central (n = 6) venous lesions were treated with TPEG devices. Covered Gianturco stents were used for the peripheral lesions and covered Palmaz stents were used for central lesions. Venous abnormalities included vascular rupture after balloon angioplasty or surgical thrombectomy (n = 4),stenosis associated with an aneurysm (n = 2) and occlusive disease and central stenoses not responsive to balloon angioplasty (n = 11). The mean primary patency period was 37 days. The mean secondary patency period was 215 days. At 60,180, and 360 days the primary and secondary patency rates were 40%,32%, and 32%, and 70%, 55%, and 39%, respectively. Follow-up studies have shown various outcomes of the implanted TPEG devices,which have included stenoses within the TPEG (n = 2),stenoses central to the TPEG (n = 1), stenoses peripheral to the TPEG (n = 3), acute thrombosis extending to the TPEG without a stenosis (n = 1), graft abandoned with patent TPEG (n = 6), and TPEG patent within primary patency period at last follow-up (n =4). The TPEG devices, made with pre-expanded PTFE, appear safe in the short term, do not prevent progressive dialysis access site failure, and need to be compared to PTA and endovascular stenting in a randomized prospective trial.

  17. Testosterone, thrombophilia, thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Joel; Glueck, Charles J; Prince, Marloe; Riaz, Rashid; Wang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    We screened previously undiagnosed thrombophilia (V Leiden-prothrombin mutations, Factors VIII and XI, homocysteine, and antiphospholipid antibody [APL] syndrome) in 15 men and 2 women with venous thromboembolism (VTE) or osteonecrosis 7 months (median) after starting testosterone therapy (TT), gel (30-50 mg/d), intramuscular (100-400 mg/wk), or human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) (6000 IU/wk). Thrombophilia was studied in 2 healthy control groups without thrombosis (97 normal controls, 31 subjects on TT) and in a third control group (n = 22) with VTE, not on TT. Of the 17 cases, 76% had ≥1 thrombophilia vs 19% of 97 normal controls (P < 0.0001), vs 29% of 31 TT controls (P = 0.002). Cases differed from normal controls by Factor V Leiden (12% vs 0%, P = 0.021), by high Factor VIII (>150%) (24% vs 7%, P = 0.058), by high homocysteine (29% vs 5%, P = 0.007), and from both normal and TT controls for APL syndrome (18% vs 2%, P = 0.023, vs 0%, P = 0.04). Despite adequate anticoagulation with TT continued after the first deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary embolus (DVT-PE), 1 man sustained 3 DVT-PEs 5, 8, and 11 months later and a second man had 2 DVT-PEs 1 and 2 months later. Of the 10 cases with serum T measured on TT, 6 (60%) had supranormal T (>800 ng/dL) and of 9 with estradiol measured on TT, 7 (78%) had supranormal levels (>42.6 pg/mL). TT interacts with thrombophilia leading to thrombosis. TT continuation in thrombophilic men is contraindicated because of recurrent thrombi despite anticoagulation. Screening for thrombophilia before starting TT should identify subjects at high risk for VTE with an adverse the risk to benefit ratio for TT. PMID:25639953

  18. Heparin Saline Versus Normal Saline for Flushing and Locking Peripheral Venous Catheters in Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Ming-Guang; Luo, Ou; He, Liu; Li, Jia-Xin; Tang, Yun-Jing; Luo, Yan-Li; Zhou, Min; Tang, Li; Zhang, Zong-Xia; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2015-08-01

    A prospective randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial to compare the effectiveness and safety of heparin saline (HS) to those of normal saline (NS) as flushing and locking solutions for peripheral venous catheter (PVC) in decompensated liver cirrhosis (DLC) patients.Patients with DLC at our institution between April 2012 and March 2013 were enrolled after obtaining informed consent. The patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups: the NS group received preservative-free 0.9% sodium chloride as the flushing and locking solution, while the HS group received HS (50 U/mL). PVC-related events and the duration of PVC maintenance were compared between the 2 groups. Moreover, the preinfusion and postinfusion levels of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and platelet (PLT) were also compared.A total of 32 and 36 DLC patients in the NS (125 PVCs) and HS (65 PVCs) groups, respectively, were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, including gender, age, Child-Pugh grade, PVC type and administration of anticoagulant, and irritant agents, were comparable between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). The maintenance times of the HS and NS groups were 80.27 ± 26.47 and 84.19 ± 29.32 hours, respectively (P = 0.397). Removal of PVC for abnormal reasons occurred in 30.7% and 22.4% of patients in the HS and NS groups (P = 0.208). The PVC occlusion rates were 6.2% and 5.6% in the HS and NS groups, respectively (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.31-3.92). The PT, APTT, and PLT levels were comparable between the 2 groups both before and after infusion (P > 0.05). Incremental analyses showed that Child-Pugh grade C might be a risk factor for the suppression of PLT in the HS group.We consider NS to be as effective as and safer than conventional HS for flushing and locking PVC in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients. PMID:26252305

  19. Idiopathic Bilateral External Jugular Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hindi, Zakaria; Fadel, Ehab

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: Idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis Symptoms: Face engorgement • neck swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Hematology Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Vein thrombosis is mainly determined by 3 factors, which constitute a triad called Virchow’s triad: hypercoagulability, stasis, and endothelial injury. Venous thrombosis commonly occurs in the lower extremities since most of the blood resides there and flows against gravity. The veins of the lower extremities are dependent on intact valves and fully functional leg muscles. However, in case of valvular incompetency or muscular weakness, thrombosis and blood stasis will occur as a result. In contrast, the veins of the neck, specially the jugulars, have distensible walls which allow flexibility during respiration. In addition, the blood directly flows downward towards the heart. Nevertheless, many case reports mentioned the thrombosis of internal jugular veins and external jugular veins with identified risk factors. Jugular vein thrombosis has previously been associated in the literature with a variety of medical conditions, including malignancy. Case Report: This report is of a case of idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis in a 21 year-old male construction worker of Southeast Asian origin with no previous medical history who presented with bilateral facial puffiness of gradual onset over 1 month. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography were used in the diagnosis. Further work-up showed no evidence of infection or neoplasia. The patient was eventually discharged on warfarin. The patient was assessed after 6 months and his symptoms had resolved completely. Conclusions: Bilateral idiopathic external jugular veins thrombosis is extremely rare and can be an indicator of early malignancy or hidden infection. While previous reports in the literature have associated jugular vein thrombosis with malignancy, the present

  20. Posttraumatic arteriovenous fistula and subclavian vein thrombosis: treatment by percutaneous arterial embolization and vein angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Gobin, Y P; Soulez, G; Riadh, A; Houdart, E; Herbreteau, D; Merland, J J

    1993-09-01

    A 71-year-old woman had edema and venous dilatation of her upper right limb that caused painful functional disability following a shoulder injury. Arteriograms demonstrated an arteriovenous fistula between the subclavian artery and vein associated with thrombosis of the vein at the same level. The arteriovenous fistula was found to have multiple arteriovenous communications. Because of associated distal venous thrombosis, venous drainage was retrograde through the brachial vein. The inflow arteries of the fistula were embolized and then the subclavian vein thrombosis was recanalized, dilated, and an endoluminal stent inserted. Clinical signs completely resolved. PMID:8268095

  1. Vertebral artery thrombosis: a rare presentation of primary polycythaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gul, H L; Lau, S Y M; Chan-Lam, D; Ng, J-P

    2014-01-01

    Primary polycythaemia, also known as polycythaemia vera (PV), is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) which is associated with arterial and venous thrombosis and which can contribute to significant morbidity and mortality if untreated. Arterial thrombosis accounts for a large proportion of PV-related thrombotic events which may manifest as stroke and myocardial infarction. There is an abundance of literature documenting thrombosis arising in the cerebral vasculature secondary to PV. However, vertebral artery thrombosis associated with PV has not been previously described. We present a case of vertebral artery thrombosis as the presenting manifestation of PV. This case demonstrates the importance of recognising MPNs as a cause of an unusual presentation of thrombosis. PMID:24862411

  2. Cancers predispose neutrophils to release extracellular DNA traps that contribute to cancer-associated thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Demers, Mélanie; Krause, Daniela S.; Schatzberg, Daphne; Martinod, Kimberly; Voorhees, Jaymie R.; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Scadden, David T.; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-associated thrombosis often lacks a clear etiology. However, it is linked to a poor prognosis and represents the second-leading cause of death in cancer patients. Recent studies have shown that chromatin released into blood, through the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), is procoagulant and prothrombotic. Using a murine model of chronic myelogenous leukemia, we show that malignant and nonmalignant neutrophils are more prone to NET formation. This increased sensitivity toward NET generation is also observed in mammary and lung carcinoma models, suggesting that cancers, through a systemic effect on the host, can induce an increase in peripheral blood neutrophils, which are predisposed to NET formation. In addition, in the late stages of the breast carcinoma model, NETosis occurs concomitant with the appearance of venous thrombi in the lung. Moreover, simulation of a minor systemic infection in tumor-bearing, but not control, mice results in the release of large quantities of chromatin and a prothrombotic state. The increase in neutrophil count and their priming is mediated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which accumulates in the blood of tumor-bearing mice. The prothrombotic state in cancer can be reproduced by treating mice with G-CSF combined with low-dose LPS and leads to thrombocytopenia and microthrombosis. Taken together, our results identify extracellular chromatin released through NET formation as a cause for cancer-associated thrombosis and unveil a target in the effort to decrease the incidence of thrombosis in cancer patients. PMID:22826226

  3. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  4. Left vein of Labbé thrombosis associated with ipsilateral dural sinus thrombosis: non-enhanced CT and contrast-enhanced CT (CTV) findings.

    PubMed

    Stýblo-Sramek, D I; De Temmerman, G; Verbist, B M

    2012-01-01

    A rare case of aseptic thrombosis of the left vein of Labbé in a young woman is reported. Cerebral venous thrombosis was suggested by computed tomography and confirmed after intravenous administration of contrast by computed tomography venography. The combination of the clinical setting with the findings on the non-enhanced CT may favour the diagnosis of vein of Labbé thrombosis. The diagnosis can be confirmed on computed tomography venography. PMID:23019987

  5. Air travel and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Shanthi; Yach, Derek; Alwan, Ala

    2002-01-01

    There has recently been increased publicity on the risk of venous thrombosis after long-haul flights. This paper reviews the evidence base related to the association between air travel and venous thromboembolism. The evidence consists only of case reports, clinical case-control studies and observational studies involving the use of intermediate end-points, or expert opinion. Some studies have suggested that there is no clear association, whereas others have indicated a strong relationship. On the whole it appears that there is probably a link between air travel and venous thrombosis. However, the link is likely to be weak, mainly affecting passengers with additional risk factors for venous thromboembolism. The available evidence is not adequate to allow quantification of the risk. There are insufficient scientific data on which to base specific recommendations for prevention, other than that leg exercise should be taken during travel. Further studies are urgently needed in order to identify prospectively the incidence of the condition and those at risk. PMID:12077617

  6. Mechanical methods for thrombosis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Caprini, Joseph A

    2010-12-01

    Prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains the number one preventable cause of death in hospitalized patients. The pathogenesis of thrombosis involves the triad of venous stasis, dilatation of the leg veins, and changes in coagulability of the blood. These changes can be modified by the use of intermittent pneumatic compression devices (IPC) and, to a much lesser extent, by graduated compression hose (GCS). Studies have shown the effectiveness of GCS in preventing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) compared to placebo, but there is no evidence that they reduce the incidence of pulmonary emboli (PE). No venographic data are available regarding the efficacy of GCS; however, IPC have shown excellent efficacy in several venographic studies over the past 25 years. Mechanical methods are important to use in situations where the risk of bleeding exists, thereby making the use of anticoagulants hazardous. One of the key uses for mechanical methods is in combination with anticoagulants in patients at the highest risk of developing VTE. Chest consensus guidelines assigns a 2A recommendation for the use of combination prophylaxis in the highest risk patients. Unfortunately, studies to show which type of leg compression device is optimal for DVT prevention are not available, so individual preference, ease of use, and company support are the determining factors at the present time. Finally, compliance using these devices is a major problem, and until systems have been developed to easily monitor and ensure compliance, these methods will enjoy only limited use. PMID:19850588

  7. Rock climbing-related subclavian vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Christoph; Monasterio, Erik; Schöffl, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Paget-Schroetter syndrome, also known as upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT), is a rare condition, characterised by a (sub-) total occlusion of the axillary-subclavian venous system due to thrombosis. UEDVT is the most common vascular condition among athletes so far; although the general incidence is low, this problem will become more frequent as a result of increased participation in climbing sports. The purpose of this report is to illustrate two cases in rock climbers where UEDVT developed during rock climbing or bouldering. Fortunately, both patients were diagnosed relatively early after the symptoms began, despite the ambiguity of UEDVT symptoms. This relatively unfamiliar condition may become more highly recognised as a potentially serious differential diagnosis of unspecific pain of the shoulder. Rock climbers are disposed to develop UEDVT due to frequent stress on the upper extremities during training or competition. PMID:26430234

  8. Current Status of the Application of Intracranial Venous Sinus Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kan; Yu, Tiecheng; Yuan, Yongjie; Yu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    The intracranial venous sinus is an important component of vascular disease. Many diseases involve the venous sinus and are accompanied by venous sinus stenosis (VSS), which leads to increased venous pressure and high intracranial pressure. Recent research has focused on stenting as a treatment for VSS related to these diseases. However, a systematic understanding of venous sinus stenting (VS-Stenting) is lacking. Herein, the literature on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), venous pulsatile tinnitus, sinus thrombosis, high draining venous pressure in dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and tumor-caused VSS was reviewed and analyzed to summarize experiences with VS-Stenting as a treatment. The literature review showed that satisfactory therapeutic effects can be achieved through stent angioplasty. Thus, the present study suggests that selective stent release in the venous sinus can effectively treat these diseases and provide new possibilities for treating intracranial vascular disease. PMID:26516306

  9. A 28-year-old pregnant woman with a very rare cause of jugular vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, R; van Balen, M; Blaauwgeers, J; ten Wolde, M

    2014-05-01

    During pregnancy, venous thrombosis of the distal extremities is not uncommon. However, thrombosis in the upper part of the body, such as jugular vein thrombosis, is rare. If underlying causes such as ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) or septic thrombophlebitis (Lemierre's syndrome) are excluded, a serous borderline ovary tumour (BOT) must be considered and MR imaging of the abdomen could be performed to find a primary tumour mass. PMID:24829179

  10. [Porto-hepatic thrombosis, revealing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, followed by regression induced by heparin therapy].

    PubMed

    Schmets, L; Hagège, H; Merlet, C; Zylberberg, H; Chousterman, M

    1993-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome with or without portal thrombosis occurring during paroxysmal noctural hemoglobinuria is a complication with poor prognosis. We report the case of a 17-year-old woman with a double portal and hepatic venous thrombosis revealing a paroxysmal noctural hemoglobinuria and regressive with heparin. Our case suggests that the early diagnosis of the thrombosis with ultrasonography and Doppler, and rapidly initiated anticoagulant treatment may improve the prognosis of this disease. PMID:8125229

  11. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  12. Venous insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and ankles Skin color changes around the ankles Varicose veins on the surface (superficial) Thickening and hardening of ... skin on the legs and ankles (lipodermatosclerosis) Surgery ( varicose vein stripping ) to treat chronic venous insufficiency has been ...

  13. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  14. Occurrence of thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Saez, Arlette

    2013-09-01

    Paradoxically, there are reports of thrombotic events for some rare bleeding disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency. Afibrinogenemia, factor (F) VII, or FXI deficiencies are those most commonly associated with venous or arterial thrombosis. Pathogenesis is multifactorial and the main conditions associated with this complication relate to the coexistence of inherited or acquired thrombotic risk factors linked to certain specific characteristics of the underlying defect. Patients with afibrinogenemia can develop severe, spontaneous, or recurrent thromboembolic disease. Up to 20% of congenital dysfibrinogenemia patients show predisposition to thrombosis. Thrombotic episodes, particularly deep vein thrombosis, have been reported in 3 to 4% FVII deficient patients, even those who were severely affected. These events have been reported either after infusion of plasma derived FXI concentrate or recombinant activated FVII in FXI deficient patients. So, in addition to factor level, replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past personal or family history of bleeding and thrombosis, and other prothrombotic risk factors. Treatment of thrombosis represents a challenge. For mild factor deficiencies, antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. For all patients, it is also recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:23929306

  15. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Deep Vein Thrombosis Overview What is deep vein thrombosis? Deep vein thrombosis (also called DVT) is a blood clot in a vein deep inside your body. These clots usually occur in your leg veins. While DVT is a fairly common condition, it is ...

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis? Español Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood ...

  17. Fish Intake and Venous Thromboembolism: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Diet plays an important role in modulating the risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. Several lines of evidence attest that consumption of fish and its compounds, especially omega-3 fatty acids, may be effective to decrease the cardiovascular risk. Since the pathogenesis of arterial and venous thrombosis share some common aspects, we performed a systematic review of published clinical studies that investigated the association between fish intake and venous thrombosis. An electronic search was carried out in Medline, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science using the key words "fish" OR "seafood" AND "venous thromboembolism" OR "deep vein thrombosis" OR "pulmonary embolism", with no language or date restriction. Overall, 6 studies (5 prospective and 1 case-control) were finally identified. In only 1 small case-control study, a larger intake of total fish was found to be negatively associated with the risk of venous thromboembolism. No association was found in 4 large prospective studies, whereas a positive association was observed in the remaining. No substantial difference was also noticed between intake of fatty or lean fish. Taken together, the current epidemiological evidence does not support the existence of a significant effect of total fish consumption on the risk of venous thromboembolism. PMID:25962392

  18. 2016 Expert consensus document on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of short-term peripheral venous catheter-related infections in adult.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, J A; Guembe, M; Barberán, J; de Alarcón, A; Bouza, E; Fariñas, M C; Gálvez, J; Goenaga, M A; Gutiérrez, F; Kestler, M; Llinares, P; Miró, J M; Montejo, M; Muñoz, P; Rodríguez-Creixems, M; Sousa, D; Cuenca, J; Mestres, C A

    2016-08-01

    The use of endovascular catheters is a routine practice in secondary and tertiary care level hospitals. Short peripheral catheters have been found to be associated with the risk of nosocomial bacteremia resulting in morbidity and mortality. Staphyloccus aureus is mostly associated with peripheral catheter insertion. This Consensus Document has been elaborated by a panel of experts of the Spanish Society of Cardiovascular Infections in cooperation with experts from the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, Spanish Society of Chemotherapy and Spanish Society of Thoracic-Cardiovascular Surgery and aims at define and establish the norm for management of short duration peripheral vascular catheters. The document addresses the indications for insertion, catheter maintenance and registry, diagnosis and treatment of infection, indications for removal and stresses on continuous education as a driver for quality. Implementation of this norm will allow uniformity in usage thus minimizing the risk of infection and its complications. PMID:27580009

  19. Successful Iliac Vein and Inferior Vena Cava Stenting Ameliorates Venous Claudication and Improves Venous Outflow, Calf Muscle Pump Function, and Clinical Status in Post-Thrombotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Delis, Konstantinos T.; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Wennberg, Paul W.; Rooke, Thom W.; Gloviczki, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Stent therapy has been proposed as an effective treatment of chronic iliofemoral (I-F) and inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of technically successful stenting in consecutive patients with advanced CVD (CEAP3–6 ± venous claudication) for chronic obliteration of the I-F (±IVC) trunks, on the venous hemodynamics of the limb, the walking capacity, and the clinical status of CVD. These patients had previously failed to improve with conservative treatment entailing compression and/or wound care for at least 12 months. Methods: The presence of venous claudication was assessed by ≥3 independent examiners. The CEAP clinical classification was used to determine the severity of CVD. Outflow obstruction [Outflow Fraction at 1- and 4-second (OF1 and OF4) in %], venous reflux [Venous Filling Index (VFI) in mL/100 mL/s], calf muscle pump function [Ejection Fraction (EF) in %] and hypertension [Residual Venous Fraction (RVF) in %], were examined before and after successful venous stenting in 16 patients (23 limbs), 6 females, 10 males, median age 42 years; range, 31–77 yearas, left/right limbs 14/9, using strain gauge plethysmography; 7/16 of these had thrombosis extending to the IVC. Contralateral limbs to those stented without prior I-F ± IVC thrombosis, nor infrainguinal clots on duplex, were used as control limbs (n = 9). Excluded were patients with stent occlusion or stenoses, peripheral arterial disease (ABI <1.0), symptomatic cardiac disease, unrelated causes of walking impairment, and malignancy. Preinterventional data (≤30 days) were compared with those after endovascular therapy (8.4 months; interquartile range [IQR], 3–11.8 months). Nonparametric analysis was applied. Results: Compared with the control group, limbs with I-F ± IVC thrombosis before stenting had reduced venous outflow (OF4) and calf muscle pump function (EF), worse CEAP clinical class, and increased RVF (all, P < 0

  20. [Neonatal cerebral thrombosis and deficit of factor V leiden].

    PubMed

    Moliner Calderón, E; López Bernal, E; Ginovart Galiana, G; Nadal Amat, J; Cubells Riero, J

    2000-01-01

    Background Cerebral venous thrombosis is an inusual disease in neonatal age. Increasing reports of this disorder had described since magnetic resonance angiography is used. Case report Newborn of apropriate seze for gestational age was delivered at 35 weeks of gestation. Refered a severe hipoxic-isquemic disease with multisistemic afectation. The second day of life presented disseminated intravascular coagulation with pulmonary bleeding. The third day, the infant developed seizures that required treatment with diazepam in continuous perfussion. MR angiography visualized superior sagital and transvers sinus thrombosis. Coagulation study detected factor V Leiden. Comments Frecuently venous cerebral thrombosis is presenting with lethargy and seizures. The most common vessels involved are sagital and transvers sinus. It is described in association with exogenous risk factors that increasing blood hyperviscosity and additional inhered coagulation dissorders such as defects on antihrombina III, protein C and S and activate protein C resistance. The last defect has a hight prevalence in subjects with trombosis events. PMID:11003860

  1. Thrombosis Associated with Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Luca; Gerdes, Victor E.A.; Guasti, Luigina; Squizzato, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Viral hepatitis may promote the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and, more specifically, portal vein thrombosis (PVT). In this narrative review, we summarize the clinical data and discuss the possible pathogenetic roles of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and hepatitis A, B, and C viruses (HAV, HBV, HCV) in the occurrence of VTE. CMV is the first qualified candidate to enter the list of VTE minor risk factors, and in the rare case of fulminant infection, both EBV and CMV, like any severe infection or inflammatory disease, increase risk for thrombosis. In chronic hepatitis B and C, it remains controversial whether antiphospholipid antibodies are important for thrombotic complications or merely an epiphenomenon. Retinal vein occlusion described in chronic hepatitis C is usually attributed to the treatment with interferon. Eltrombopag, used for HCV-related thrombocytopenia, has been associated with increased thrombotic risk. The imbalance between procoagulant and anticoagulant factors associated with chronic liver disease may have clinical implications. This may help to explain why these patients are not protected from clinical events such as VTE, PVT, and the progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:26357629

  2. Cancer-Associated Thrombosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Elyamany, Ghaleb; Alzahrani, Ali Mattar; Bukhary, Eman

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in patients with malignant disease. Emerging data have enhanced our understanding of cancer-associated thrombosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. In addition to VTE, arterial occlusion with stroke and anginal symptoms is relatively common among cancer patients, and is possibly related to genetic predisposition. Several risk factors for developing venous thrombosis usually coexist in cancer patients including surgery, hospital admissions and immobilization, the presence of an indwelling central catheter, chemotherapy, use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and new molecular-targeted therapies such as antiangiogenic agents. Effective prophylaxis and treatment of VTE reduced morbidity and mortality, and improved quality of life. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is preferred as an effective and safe means for prophylaxis and treatment of VTE. It has largely replaced unfractionated heparin (UFH) and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Recently, the development of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that directly inhibit factor Xa or thrombin is a milestone achievement in the prevention and treatment of VTE. This review will focus on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of cancer-associated thrombosis, risk factors, and new predictive biomarkers for VTE as well as discuss novel prevention and management regimens of VTE in cancer according to published guidelines. PMID:25520567

  3. [Current treatment of venous thrombembolism].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Ionuţ

    2013-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, considered to be different manifestations of the same disease - venous thromboembolism, have few differences regarding the anticoagulant treatment. However, there are some issues which will be discussed. The therapy objectives in patients with venous thromboembolism include: prevention of death by pulmonary embolism, relieving symptoms in the affected leg, preventing morbidity and prevention of recurrent thromboembolism or postthrombotic syndrome, or minimize symptoms of post-thrombotic syndrome. For most patients, treatment goals are achieved using appropriate anticoagulant therapy, reducing the risk of recurrence in the first three months after diagnosis from over 25% to under 4%. Using of compression socks, providing a gradient of 30-40 mmHg at the ankle for 2 years after the diagnosis, reduce the risk of postthrombotic syndrome. Thrombolysis, applied either systemic or directly by catheter, is indicated in selected cases to prevent onset of postthrombotic syndrome or remove quickly the symptoms due to high venous obstruction. Thrombolytic therapy should be continued with anticoagulant therapy to prevent recurrence of venous thromboembolism. The use of an inferior vena cava filter is indicated for prevention of death by pulmonary embolism in patients who have contraindications to anticoagulant therapy, or anticoagulant treatment that was properly administered remains inefficient. Surgical treatment is recommended in case of chronic pulmonary hypertension, due to thromboembolic disease. PMID:23781572

  4. Pycnogenol® in chronic venous insufficiency and related venous disorders.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Om P

    2014-03-01

    The present review provides an update of the biological profile of Pycnogenol in the light of its use in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and related venous disorders such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), post-thrombotic syndrome, long haul air-travel-related leg oedema, venous ulcers and acute haemorrhoids. Pycnogenol is a French maritime pine bark extract produced from the outer bark of Pinus pinaster Ait. subsp. atlantica. Its strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasodilator activities, antithrombotic effects and collagen stabilizing properties make it uniquely able to target the multi facet pathophysiology of CVI and related venous disorders. Clinical studies have shown that it can reduce oedema of the legs in CVI, reduce the incidence of deep venous thrombosis during long haul flights and enhance the healing of venous ulcers and haemorrhoidal episodes by topical application and/or oral administration. This review highlights clinical research findings on the safety, compliance and efficacy of Pycnogenol, including its use in combination products. PMID:23775628

  5. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis complicating typhoid Fever in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Okunola, P O; Ofovwe, G E; Abiodun, M T; Azunna, C P

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous) thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare life-threatening disorder in childhood that is often misdiagnosed. CSVT encompasses cavernous sinus thrombosis, lateral sinus thrombosis, and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST). We present an adolescent girl who was well until two weeks earlier when she had a throbbing frontal headache and fever with chills; she later had dyspnoea, jaundice, melena stool, multiple seizures, nuchal rigidity, and monoparesis of the right lower limb a day before admission. Urine test for Salmonella typhi Vi antigen was positive, and Widal reaction was significant. Serial cranial computerized tomography scans revealed an expanding hypodense lesion in the parafalcine region consistent with SSST or a parasagittal abscess. Inadvertent left parietal limited craniectomy confirmed SSST. She recovered completely with subsequent conservative management. Beyond neuropsychiatric complications of Typhoid fever, CSVT should be highly considered when focal neurologic deficits are present. PMID:23227403

  6. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis of Lower Limb Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pianta, Marcus J.; Thomson, Kenneth R.

    2011-02-15

    Late complications of thrombosis of the deep veins in the region between the popliteal vein termination and the confluence of the common iliac veins and inferior vena cava (suprapopliteal deep-vein thrombosis) are common and often unrecognized by those responsible for the initial management. Pharmacomechanical-assisted clearance of the thrombus at the time of first presentation provides the best opportunity for complete recovery with preservation of normal venous valve function and avoidance of recurrent deep-vein thrombosis and postthrombotic syndrome. Recent interventional radiology methods provide for rapid and complete thrombolysis even in some patients in whom thrombolysis was previously considered contraindicated. This review describes the methods, safety, and efficacy of acute interventional treatment of suprapopliteal deep-vein thrombosis.

  7. Cerebral venous infarction during a high altitude expedition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S; Chng, S M; Singh, R

    2009-08-01

    Bilateral venous infarction of the brain due to thrombosis of the deep cerebral venous system is relatively rare, accounting for approximately 3-8 percent of all cases of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). Known risk factors include the use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, puerperium, malignancy and thrombophilic states. CVT, in the setting of acute mountain sickness (AMS), has rarely been reported. We present an unusual occurrence of bilateral deep subcortical venous infarction in a previously-well, 39-year-old woman, who developed AMS during a high altitude expedition in Nepal. The possible mechanisms responsible for this unfortunate event include dehydration with resultant relative polycythaemia and raised intracranial pressure at high altitudes. CVT should be considered in mountain climbers presenting with progressive neurological deterioration that is not solely attributable to AMS. PMID:19710966

  8. Thrombosis in stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kansu, Emin

    2012-04-01

    Hemostatic changes and thrombotic events are frequent in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. Arterial and venous thromboses are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Thrombotic complications can be classified into four groups including: catheter-related thrombosis, venous thromboembolic (VTE) events, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS)/veno-occlusive disease, and transplant-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TAM). The incidence of catheter-related thrombosis is 8-20% in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and the incidence is low in syngeneic and allogeneic transplant patients. Venous duplex Doppler ultrasound, venogram, and computed tomography scan are required to visualize the venous thrombus. The treatment should be aimed at the prevention of pulmonary embolism, the avoidance of thrombus extension, and the preservation of catheter patency. Patients undergoing HSCT may have risk factors for VTE including underlying malignancy, traumatic brain injury, prolonged hospitalization, administration of conditioning regimens, and central venous catheters. Important risk factors are presence of history of VTE and graft-versus-host disease. One-year incidence of symptomatic VTE is 3.7%. SOS, also known as veno-occlusive disease, is a serious liver disease, seen in approximately 50-60% of HSCT patients. The mortality rate from the severe form of SOS is 84.3% and majority of the patients have multi-organ failure. The frequency is quite low after autologous transplantation. Risk factors for SOS include pre-existing hepatic damage, previous high-dose chemotherapy and abdominal irradiation, female gender and donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen disparity. Cyclophosphamide and busulphan are the most common agents with the highest incidence and fatal SOS. Histopathologic features of SOS include dilatation of sinusoids, necrosis of perivenular hepatocytes, and obstruction of small intrahepatic central venules by

  9. The value of combined strain gauge plethysmography and radioactive iodine fibrinogen scan of the leg in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    AbuRahma, A.F.; Lawton, W.E. Jr.; Osborne, L.

    1983-05-01

    The fallibility of the clinical diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis has led to a variety of noninvasive diagnostic methods, for example, Doppler ultrasound, plethysmography, /sup 125/I fibrinogen and radionuclide phlebography. This study was undertaken to analyze the value of combined strain gauge plethysmography and /sup 125/I fibrinogen scan of the leg in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. The study was carried out upon 368 patients with suggestive findings of venous thrombosis. Four hundred and fifty strain gauge plethysmograms were reviewed. Venograms were done upon 106 limbs and /sup 125/I fibrinogen leg scans, on 136 limbs. Of the 64 limbs with normal strain gauge plethysmograms which had venograms, 58 were normal, five had incompetent perforators and one limb had deep venous thrombosis. Of the 42 legs with abnormal strain gauge plethysmograms which had venograms, 25 had deep venous thrombosis, 15 had incompetent perforators and two were normal. Twenty-three of 24 legs having both abnormal strain gauge plethysmograms and leg scans were confirmed to have deep venous thrombosis at venography. Fourteen of 18 legs with abnormal strain gauge plethysmograms but normal scans were found to have incompetent perforators. We conclude, that the strain gauge plethysmogram is a reliable test in excluding deep venous thrombosis and, when combined with the fibrinogen leg scan, is reliable in its diagnosis.

  10. Deep venous thrombophlebitis following aortoiliac reconstructive surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, M.K.; McCabe, C.J.; Abbott, W.M.; Brewster, D.C.; Moncure, A.C.; Reidy, N.C.; Darling, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    One hundred patients undergoing elective aortic surgery were scanned prospectively for development of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The incidence of DVT in this population was 13%. Eleven patients showed only calf vein thrombosis on venography, whereas two had occlusive iliofemoral thrombus. The correlation between venous Doppler ultrasound and venography was 80%. More importantly, Doppler examination correctly identified both patients with occlusive thrombus. Fibrinogen scanning was associated with a false-positive rate of 31%. Only one patient suffered a nonfatal pulmonary embolus. Fibrinogen scanning has an unacceptably high false-positive rate; however, Doppler ultrasound will identify significant occlusive thrombus without a high false-positive rate. The low incidence of pulmonary emboli does not warrant such definitive measures as prophylactic vena caval interruption.

  11. Long-term parenteral nutrition: problems with venous access.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, A S; Gertner, D J; Wood, S; Phillips, R K; Lennard-Jones, J E

    1990-01-01

    Long-term parenteral nutrition requires central venous access, often difficult in patients who have had several central venous catheterizations. Therapy may be complicated by thrombosis and sepsis which may further compromise central access. We report five cases illustrating such difficulties and suggest that these patients be referred early to specialist centres where experienced catheter insertion and management results in a greatly reduced incidence of complications. PMID:2116522

  12. Preventing and recognizing venous thromboembolism after obstetric and gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Deedra

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a hypercoagulable disorder that is associated with two potential significant complications-deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolus (PE). During pregnancy and the postpartum period, the risk for VTE is increased. Prevention is optimal, but early detection and treatment of VTE in women after obstetric and gynecologic surgery is imperative, as DVT is often asymptomatic and, in many patients, clinical presentation only occurs after a fatal PE occurs. PMID:23957798

  13. Recently Identified Factors that Regulate Hemostasis and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Geddings, Julia E; Mackman, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    The blood coagulation cascade is essential for hemostasis but excessive activation can cause thrombosis. Importantly, recent studies have identified factors that contribute to thrombosis but not hemostasis. These include factor XII (FXII), tissue factor-positive microparticles (MPs) and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Recent studies have shown that FXII plays a role in thrombosis but not hemostasis. FXII is activated in vivo by a variety of negatively-charged polyphosphates, which include extracellular RNA, DNA and inorganic polyphosphate (PolyP) that are released during cell damage and infection. These findings have triggered the development of nucleic acid-binding polymers as a new class of anticoagulant drug. Other studies have analyzed the role of MPs in experimental thrombosis. MPs are small membrane vesicles released from activated or apoptotic cells. We and others have found that tissue factor-positive MPs enhance thrombosis in mouse models and are elevated in the plasma of pancreatic cancer patients. Finally, NETs have been shown to contribute to experimental venous thrombosis in mouse models and are present in human thrombi. NETs are composed of chromatin fibers that are released from neutrophils undergoing cell death. NETs can capture platelets and increase fibrin deposition. The recent advances in our understanding of the factors contributing to thrombosis in animal models provide new opportunities for the development of safer anticoagulant drugs. PMID:24573314

  14. A retrospective study of central venous catheters GCRI experience

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sachin A.; Shukla, Shilin N.; Talati, Shailesh S.; Parikh, Sonia K.; Bhatt, Shivani J.; Maka, Vinayak

    2013-01-01

    Background: The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) has greatly improved the quality-of-care in cancer patients, yet these catheters may cause serious infectious and thrombotic complications. The aim of this retrospective study was to study the various types of CVCs and their complications. Materials and Methods: We studied retrospectively 213 cases of CVCs in our institute with their indications, type and complications from August 2010 to July 2011. Results: A total of 213 CVCs were inserted in patients with hematological (62%) and solid organ malignancies (38%). Ninety-eight patients (46%) had peripheral inserted central catheter (PICC), 90 (42%) patients had Hickman catheters and 25 (12%) had a port. The median duration of retention of Hickman catheters was 104 days (3-365 days), for the peripherally inserted central catheters was 59 days (3-100 days) and for the port it was 280 days (45-365 days). Non-infective complications were more than infective (12% vs. 7%). The most common complication was non-infective occlusion and thrombophlebitis. In one patient with PICC thrombosis occurred in the cephalic, radial and ulnar vein and in one patient with port thrombosis occurred in the superior vena cava. Organisms were isolated in 60% (12 out of 20) of cultures. Common organisms isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 5 (42%), Staphylococcus aureus in 2 (16%), Escherichia coli in 2 (16%) and Aspergillus in 3 (25%) patients. 7 out of 12 infected patients had negative blood cultures within 7 days of antibiotic treatment, 5 patients remained positive for more than 7 days with antibiotics. In 155 patients (73%), the desired treatment protocol was completed and at present there are still 28 patients (13%) with catheters. 5 patients (2.3%) died of febrile neutropenia and septicemia with multi-organ failure. In 5 patients (2.3%), the catheters (1 Port, 1 Hickman and 3 PICC) were prematurely removed because of thrombosis. Conclusion: CVCs are better options to facilitate

  15. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a ...

  17. Neutrophil histone modification by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 is critical for deep vein thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Martinod, Kimberly; Demers, Melanie; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Wong, Siu Ling; Brill, Alexander; Gallant, Maureen; Hu, Jing; Wang, Yanming; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2013-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are major health problems associated with high mortality. Recently, DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) resulting from the release of decondensed chromatin, were found to be part of the thrombus scaffold and to promote coagulation. However, the significance of nuclear decondensation and NET generation in thrombosis is largely unknown. To address this, we adopted a stenosis model of deep vein thrombosis and analyzed venous thrombi in peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4)-deficient mice that cannot citrullinate histones, a process required for chromatin decondensation and NET formation. Intriguingly, less than 10% of PAD4−/− mice produced a thrombus 48 h after inferior vena cava stenosis whereas 90% of wild-type mice did. Neutrophils were abundantly present in thrombi formed in both groups, whereas extracellular citrullinated histones were seen only in thrombi from wild-type mice. Bone marrow chimera experiments indicated that PAD4 in hematopoietic cells was the source of the prothrombotic effect in deep vein thrombosis. Thrombosis could be rescued by infusion of wild-type neutrophils, suggesting that neutrophil PAD4 was important and sufficient. Endothelial activation and platelet aggregation were normal in PAD4−/− mice, as was hemostatic potential determined by bleeding time and platelet plug formation after venous injury. Our results show that PAD4-mediated chromatin decondensation in the neutrophil is crucial for pathological venous thrombosis and present neutrophil activation and PAD4 as potential drug targets for deep vein thrombosis. PMID:23650392

  18. Hemostatic properties of the lymph: relationships with occlusion and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2012-03-01

    Lymphatic thrombosis is a rare occurrence, and although its frequency is likely underestimated, its burden remains substantially lower than that of venous or arterial thrombosis. Current evidence suggests that despite measurable levels of fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor and other coagulation factors in the lymph, fibrin generation is substantially inhibited under physiological conditions, essentially making the lymph a hypocoagulable biological fluid. Although factor VIIa-tissue factor-catalyzed activation of factor X is possible in the lymph, fibrin generation is largely counteracted by the unavailability of cell surface anionic phospholipids such as those physiologically present on blood platelets, combined with only low levels of coagulation factors, and the strong inhibitory activity of heparin, antithrombin, and tissue factor pathway inhibitor. Enhanced fibrinolytic activity further contributes to reduce the development and growth of lymph clots. Nevertheless, lymphatic thrombosis is occasionally detected, especially in the thoracic duct, axillary, or inguinal lymphatics. Pathogenetic mechanisms are supported by the release of thromboplastin substances from the injured lymphatic endothelium accompanied by chronic obstruction of lymph flow in the presence of a hypercoagulable milieu, thereby mirroring the Virchow triad that otherwise characterizes venous thrombosis. In theory, any source of lymphatic vessel occlusion, such as internal obliteration, external compression, or increased lymphatic pressure, might predispose to localized lymphatic thrombosis. The leading pathologies that can trigger thrombosis in the lymphatic vessels include cancer (due to external compression, neoplastic obliteration of the lymphatic lumen by metastatic cells, or lymphatic dysfunction after lymph node dissection), infections (especially lymphatic filariasis or sustained by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, or Streptococcus pyogenes

  19. Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alkhouli, Mohamad; Morad, Mohammad; Narins, Craig R; Raza, Farhan; Bashir, Riyaz

    2016-04-11

    Thrombosis of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is an under-recognized entity that is associated with significant short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. In absence of a congenital anomaly, the most common cause of IVC thrombosis is the presence of an unretrieved IVC filter. Due to the substantial increase in the number of IVC filters placed in the United States and the very low filter retrieval rates, clinicians are faced with a very large population of patients at risk for developing IVC thrombosis. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of data and societal guidelines with regards to the diagnosis and management of IVC thrombosis. This paper aims to enhance the awareness of this uncommon, but morbid, condition by providing a concise, yet comprehensive, review of the etiology, diagnostic approaches, and treatment strategies in patients with IVC thrombosis. PMID:26952909

  20. Global Burden of Thrombosis: Epidemiologic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Wendelboe, Aaron M; Raskob, Gary E

    2016-04-29

    Thromboembolic conditions were estimated to account for 1 in 4 deaths worldwide in 2010 and are the leading cause of mortality. Thromboembolic conditions are divided into arterial and venous thrombotic conditions. Ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke comprise the major arterial thromboses and deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism comprise venous thromboembolism. Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for stroke and systemic arterial thromboembolism. Estimates of the global burden of disease were obtained from Global Burden of Disease Project reports, recent systematic reviews, and searching the published literature for recent studies reporting measures of incidence, burden, and disability-adjusted life-years. Estimates per 100 000 of the global incidence rate (IR) for each condition are ischemic heart disease, IR=1518.7; myocardial infarction, IR=139.3; ischemic stroke, IR=114.3; atrial fibrillation, IR=77.5 in males and 59.5 in females; and venous thromboembolism, IR=115 to 269. Mortality rates (MRs) for each condition are ischemic heart disease, MR=105.5; ischemic stroke, MR=42.3; atrial fibrillation, MR=1.7; and venous thromboembolism, MR=9.4 to 32.3. Global public awareness is substantially lower for pulmonary embolism (54%) and deep-vein thrombosis (44%) than heart attack (88%) and stroke (85%). Over time, the incidence and MRs of these conditions have improved in developed countries, but are increasing in developing countries. Public health efforts to measure disease burden and increase awareness of symptoms and risk factors need to improve, particularly in low- and middle-income regions to address this leading cause of morbidity and mortality. PMID:27126645

  1. Sagittal vein thrombosis caused by central vein catheter.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Heydar Pour, Behzad; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis, including thrombosis of cerebral veins and major dural sinuses, is an uncommon disorder in the general population. However, it has a higher frequency among patients younger than 40 years of age, patients with thrombophilia, pregnant patients or those receiving hormonal contraceptive therapy or has foreign body such as catheter in their veins or arterial system. In this case report, we described clinical and radiological findings in a patient with protein C-S deficiency and malposition of central vein catheter. PMID:25796028

  2. High dose calcitriol may reduce thrombosis in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Beer, Tomasz M; Venner, Peter M; Ryan, Christopher W; Petrylak, Daniel P; Chatta, Gurkamal; Dean Ruether, J; Chi, Kim N; Curd, John G; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2006-11-01

    The incidence of venous and arterial thrombosis in a placebo-controlled randomised trial of DN-101 (high dose calcitriol) with docetaxel versus docetaxel was compared. Of the 13 thrombotic events observed in the 250 patients enroled in this study, two occurred in DN-101 and 11 in placebo-treated patients (P = 0.01). This difference remained significant after adjustment for baseline history of thrombosis, atrial fibrillation and use of anti-thrombotic agents. In vitro and vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout mouse studies predict that nanomolar concentrations of calcitriol may act as an antithrombotic agent. We report the first clinical observation that supports this hypothesis in humans. PMID:16984385

  3. Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency: A Possible Risk Factor for Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, Lakshmi; Scaglia, Fernando; McLin, Valerie; Hertel, Paula; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Karpen, Saul; Mahoney, Donald; Yee, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common urea cycle defect. Thromboembolic complications have not heretofore been linked with this diagnosis. We describe four patients with neonatal-onset OTC deficiency who developed vascular thromboses. One patient had arterial thrombosis; the rest developed venous thromboses. Multiple pro-thrombotic risk factors were identified. Low plasma arginine levels were observed in all patients at the time of thrombosis. Arginine deficiency and the resultant nitric oxide insufficiency may contribute to thrombotic risk. Careful normalization of plasma arginine and citrulline levels and increased surveillance for thrombotic complications should be considered in patients with OTC deficiency. PMID:19343772

  4. Venous pressure in man during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, K. A.; Roecker, L.; Gauer, O. H.; Krause, R.; Wicke, H. J.; Leach, C.; Landry, R.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether the body fluid shift from the lower limbs toward the head that occurs during spaceflight leads to lasting increases of venous pressure in the upper body, venous pressure and hematocrit measurements were made on four astronauts before flight and 1 and 12 hours after recovery and compared with measurements in space. During the mission the hematocrit was elevated and the venous pressure lowered by 1 to 8 centimeters of water as compared with the preflight data. One hour after landing the hematocrit decreased, indicating a hemodilution, venous pressures were unexpectedly high, and a body weight loss of 4 to 5 percent was observed. Twelve hours later the venous pressures were the lowest recorded during the study. The fluid shift apparently takes place during the first several hours of spaceflight. Thereafter, the pressure in the peripheral veins and the central circulation is lower than that measured before flight.

  5. The Role of Platelets in Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Schindewolf, Marc; Stanford, Sophia; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Thiele, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Platelets have attracted much interest in arterial cardiovascular disease, whereas their role in VTE has received much less attention. Recent evidence suggests that platelets may play a more important role in VTE than previously anticipated. This review discusses the mechanisms that link platelets with venous thrombotic disease and their potential applications as novel risk factors for VTE. In addition, animal studies and randomized clinical trials that highlight the potential effect of antiplatelet therapy in venous thrombosis are evaluated to assess the role of platelets in VTE. The clinical significance of platelets for VTE risk assessment in specific patient cohorts and their role as a suitable therapeutic target for VTE prevention is acknowledged. The role of platelets in VTE is a promising field for future research. PMID:26926584

  6. Ovarian and Renal Vein Thrombosis: A Rare Cause of Fever Outer the Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Togan, Turhan; Turan, Hale; Cifci, Egemen; Çiftci, Ceylan

    2015-01-01

    Although there is no other underlying disease, women can sometimes experience rare and serious diseases such as ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT) and renal vein thrombosis (RVT) after giving birth. The widespread development of thrombosis is treated for the first time in this study. Stasis, coagulation factor abnormalities, and intimal damage to the venous thrombosis risk can increase during pregnancy. It was mentioned that it diagnoses an abnormality in the hypercoagulability half of women with OVT. Despite the hypercoagulant abnormality observed in pregnant women, it was very unusual that the renal vein thrombosis led to this complication. It can lead to severe complication of OVT which can even cause death. It was the first time that the renal vein and ovarian vein thrombosis were observed in the postpartum period, and there was no coagulation abnormality. It is known that the thrombus in the postpartum period can be observed with the fever of unknown origin. The problematic, but rarely observed, postpartum disease such as ovarian venous thrombosis (OVT) is generally observed in the right ovarian vein. In this disease, avoiding the resulting laparotomy heparin and intravenous antibiotics is best solution for the patient. If it is to be noted a fever for unknown reasons, that it be thrombosis. PMID:26185694

  7. Ovarian and Renal Vein Thrombosis: A Rare Cause of Fever Outer the Postpartum Period.

    PubMed

    Togan, Turhan; Turan, Hale; Cifci, Egemen; Çiftci, Ceylan

    2015-01-01

    Although there is no other underlying disease, women can sometimes experience rare and serious diseases such as ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT) and renal vein thrombosis (RVT) after giving birth. The widespread development of thrombosis is treated for the first time in this study. Stasis, coagulation factor abnormalities, and intimal damage to the venous thrombosis risk can increase during pregnancy. It was mentioned that it diagnoses an abnormality in the hypercoagulability half of women with OVT. Despite the hypercoagulant abnormality observed in pregnant women, it was very unusual that the renal vein thrombosis led to this complication. It can lead to severe complication of OVT which can even cause death. It was the first time that the renal vein and ovarian vein thrombosis were observed in the postpartum period, and there was no coagulation abnormality. It is known that the thrombus in the postpartum period can be observed with the fever of unknown origin. The problematic, but rarely observed, postpartum disease such as ovarian venous thrombosis (OVT) is generally observed in the right ovarian vein. In this disease, avoiding the resulting laparotomy heparin and intravenous antibiotics is best solution for the patient. If it is to be noted a fever for unknown reasons, that it be thrombosis. PMID:26185694

  8. Portal Vein Thrombosis in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Kaiser; Jacob, Mathew; Asthana, Sonal

    2013-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is being increasingly recognized in patients with advanced cirrhosis and in those undergoing liver transplantation. Reduced flow in the portal vein is probably responsible for clotting in the spleno-porto-mesenteric venous system. There is also increasing evidence that hypercoagulability occurs in advanced liver disease and contributes to the risk of PVT. Ultrasound based studies have reported a prevalence of PVT in 10–25% of cirrhotic patients without hepatocellular carcinoma. Partial thrombosis of the portal vein is more common and may not have pathophysiological consequences. However, there is high risk of progression of partial PVT to complete PVT that may cause exacerbation of portal hypertension and progression of liver insufficiency. It is thus, essential to accurately diagnose and stage PVT in patients waiting for transplantation and consider anticoagulation therapy. Therapy with low molecular weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists has been shown to achieve complete and partial recanalization in 33–45% and 15–35% of cases respectively. There are however, no guidelines to help determine the dose and therapeutic efficacy of anticoagulation in patients with cirrhosis. Anticoagulation therapy related bleeding is the most feared complication but it appears that the risk of variceal bleeding is more likely to be dependent on portal pressure rather than solely related to coagulation status. TIPS has also been reported to restore patency of the portal vein. Patients with complete PVT currently do not form an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation. Thrombectomy or thromboendovenectomy is possible in more than 75% of patients followed by anatomical end-to-end portal anastomosis. When patency of the portal vein and/or superior mesenteric vein is not achieved, only non-anatomical techniques (reno-portal anastomosis or cavo-portal hemitransposition) can be performed. These techniques, which do not fully reverse portal

  9. Management of superficial vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cosmi, B

    2015-07-01

    Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) is less well studied than deep vein thrombosis (DVT), because it has been considered to be a minor, self-limiting disease that is easily diagnosed on clinical grounds and that requires only symptomatic relief. The most frequently involved sites of the superficial vein system are the lower limbs, especially the saphenous veins, mostly in relation to varicosities. Lower-limb SVT shares the same risk factors as DVT; it can propagate into the deep veins, and have a complicated course with pulmonary embolism. Clinical diagnosis may not be accurate, and ultrasonography is currently indicated for both confirmation and evaluation of SVT extension. Treatment aims are symptom relief and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in relation to the thrombotic burden. SVT of the long saphenous vein within 3 cm of the saphenofemoral junction (SFJ) is considered to be equivalent to a DVT, and thus deserving of therapeutic anticoagulation. Less severe forms of lower-limb SVT not involving the SFJ have been included in randomized clinical trials of surgery, compression hosiery, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, unfractionated heparin, and low molecular weight heparins, with inconclusive results. The largest randomized clinical trial available, on 3004 patients with lower-limb SVT not involving the SFJ, showed that fondaparinux 2.5 mg once daily for 6 weeks is more effective than placebo in reducing the risk of the composite of death from any cause and symptomatic VTE (0.9% versus 5.9%). Further studies are needed to define the optimal management strategies for SVT of the lower limbs and other sites, such as the upper limbs. PMID:25903684

  10. [Thromboprophylaxis of venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takao

    2014-07-01

    Recently in Japan, venous thromboembolism (VTE) [deep vein thrombosis (DVT)/pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE)] has increased with the Westernization of eating habits and the aging of society. In the West, prophylactic guidelines have been discussed for many years, and, unfortunately, Japan falls far behind the West in this area. We developed Japanese Guidelines for VTE prophylaxis based on the 6th ACCP guidelines in 2004. The incidence of perioperative PTE in Japan has been investigated by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists since 2002. The rate of perioperative PTE was estimated to be 4.76 per 10,000 operations in 2003. As we expected, it significantly decreased after the guidelines for thromboprophylaxis were issued and the management fee for PTE prophylaxis was covered by health insurance in April 2004. However, mechanical prophylaxis is not sufficient to prevent mortality rates, and advanced prophylaxis by anticoagulants, such as low-molecular-weight heparin/Xa inhibitors along with unfractionated heparin/vitamin K antagonists will be essential. As a result of use of anticoagulants, mortality rates have been significantly decreased recently. PMID:25163326

  11. Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Jugular-Subclavian Deep Vein Thrombosis as the First Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Ceniza, Sidney; Sharon, David

    2015-01-01

    Jugular venous thrombosis infrequently could be secondary to malignancy and has seldom been reported secondary to mediastinal large B-cell lymphomas. The postulated mechanisms are mechanical compression that leads to stagnation of blood in the venous system of the neck and/or an increase in the circulating thrombogenic elements that could cause venous thromboembolism as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. We report the case of a middle aged male presenting with right sided neck pain and arm swelling secondary to ipsilateral jugular-subclavian deep vein thrombosis. Investigations revealed it to be secondary to a mediastinal mass shown on CT scan of the chest. PMID:25821628

  12. Impact of altered venous hemodynamic conditions on the formation of platelet layers in thromboemboli.

    PubMed

    Bajd, Franci; Vidmar, Jernej; Fabjan, Andrej; Blinc, Aleš; Kralj, Eduard; Bizjak, Nina; Serša, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Although it is generally believed that the structure of venous thromboemboli is a homogeneous red blood cell-fibrin clot, their structure may be heterogeneous, with non-uniformly distributed platelet layers, known as the lines of Zahn. We tested (a) whether venous thromboemboli ex vivo contained platelet layers, i.e. the lines of Zahn, and (b) whether, according to mathematical modeling, eddies can arise in the venous system, possibly contributing to platelet aggregation. The structure of venous thromboemboli ex vivo was determined by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and by immunohistochemistry (IHC). High-resolution ultrasound (US) imaging was employed to determine the popliteal vein geometry and hemodynamics in healthy subjects and in subjects with previous venous thrombosis. The US data were then used as input for numerical simulations of venous hemodynamics. MRI and IHC confirmed that 42 of 49 ex vivo venous thromboemboli were structurally heterogeneous with platelet layers. The peak venous flow velocity was higher in patients with partly recanalized deep vein thrombosis than in healthy subjects in the prone position (46±4cm/s vs. 16±3cm/s). Our numerical simulation showed that partial venous obstruction with stenosis or malfunctioning venous valves creates the conditions for eddy blood flow. Our experimental results and computer simulation confirmed that the heterogeneous structure of venous thromboemboli with twisted platelet layers may be associated with eddy flow at the sites of their formation. PMID:21962985

  13. Treatment of upper-extremity outflow thrombosis.

    PubMed

    van den Houten, Marijn Ml; van Grinsven, Regine; Pouwels, Sjaak; Yo, Lonneke Sf; van Sambeek, Marc Rhm; Teijink, Joep Aw

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 10% of all cases of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occur in the upper extremities. The most common secondary cause of upper-extremity DVT (UEDVT) is the presence of a venous catheter. Primary UEDVT is far less common and usually occurs in patients with anatomic abnormalities of the costoclavicular space causing compression of the subclavian vein, called venous thoracic outlet syndrome (VTOS). Subsequently, movement of the arm results in repetitive microtrauma to the vein and its surrounding structures causing apparent 'spontaneous' thrombosis, or Paget-Schrötter syndrome. Treatment of UEDVT aims at elimination of the thrombus, thereby relieving acute symptoms, and preventing recurrence. Initial management for all UEDVT patients consists of anticoagulant therapy. In patients with Paget-Schrötter syndrome the underlying VTOS necessitates a more aggressive management strategy. Several therapeutic options exist, including catheter-directed thrombolysis, surgical decompression through first rib resection, and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the vein. However, several controversies exist regarding their indication and timing. PMID:26916766

  14. Portal vein thrombosis with protein C-S deficiency in a non-cirrhotic patient

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Gustavo A; Morán, Segundo; Corona-Cedillo, Roberto; Brom-Valladares, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    There are several conditions that can lead to portal vein thrombosis (PVT), including including infection, malignancies, and coagulation disorders. Anew condition of interest is protein C and S deficiencies, associated with hypercoagulation and recurrent venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a non-cirrhotic 63-year-old male diagnosed with acute superior mesenteric vein thrombosis and PVT and combined deficiencies in proteins C and S, recanalized by short-term low molecular heparin plus oral warfarin therapy. PMID:25068006

  15. Consider Behcet's disease in young patients with deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Güngen, Adil Can; Çoban, Hikmet; Aydemir, Yusuf; Düzenli, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multi-systemic and chronic inflammatory vasculitis of unknown etiology characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, uveitis, arthritis, arterial aneurysms, venous thrombosis, skin lesions and GIS lesions. Although pulmonary artery aneurysms are rare, it is a critical condition due to high risk of rupture. Venous involvement of Behcet's disease primarily occurs in the lower extremities. In the presence of deep vein thrombosis(DVT) and pulmonary embolism, the mainstay of treatment in Behcet's disease is immunosuppressant therapy. Anticoagulants can be used only after initiation of immunosuppressant therapy and suppression of the disease. Anticoagulant therapy alone may lead to fatal hemoptysis. We report the case of a 24 year-old patient who presented to the emergency service with complaints of shortness of breath, general condition disorder and hemoptyhis while using warfarin for DVT and whose thoracic CT angiography showed pulmonary embolism and pulmonary artery aneurysm and diagnosed with Behcet's disease. PMID:27144118

  16. Consider Behcet's disease in young patients with deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Güngen, Adil Can; Çoban, Hikmet; Aydemir, Yusuf; Düzenli, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multi-systemic and chronic inflammatory vasculitis of unknown etiology characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, uveitis, arthritis, arterial aneurysms, venous thrombosis, skin lesions and GIS lesions. Although pulmonary artery aneurysms are rare, it is a critical condition due to high risk of rupture. Venous involvement of Behcet's disease primarily occurs in the lower extremities. In the presence of deep vein thrombosis(DVT) and pulmonary embolism, the mainstay of treatment in Behcet's disease is immunosuppressant therapy. Anticoagulants can be used only after initiation of immunosuppressant therapy and suppression of the disease. Anticoagulant therapy alone may lead to fatal hemoptysis. We report the case of a 24 year-old patient who presented to the emergency service with complaints of shortness of breath, general condition disorder and hemoptyhis while using warfarin for DVT and whose thoracic CT angiography showed pulmonary embolism and pulmonary artery aneurysm and diagnosed with Behcet's disease. PMID:27144118

  17. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  18. [Thrombosis and assisted reproductive techniques (ART)].

    PubMed

    Conard, J; Plu-Bureau, G; Horellou, M-H; Samama, M-M; Gompel, A

    2011-06-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) concern procedures designed to increase fertility of couples: artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization (IVF), either classical or after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), transfer of frozen embryos, or gamete intrafallopian transfer. Their use has greatly increased these last years. They may be associated with severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and one possible major complication is venous or arterial thrombosis. Thromboses are rare but potentially serious with important sequellae. They are mostly observed in unusual sites such as head and neck vessels and the mechanism is still unknown although hypotheses have been proposed. This review is an update of our knowledge and an attempt to consider guidelines for the prevention and treatment of ART-associated thromboses, which frequently occur when the woman is pregnant. Prevention of severe ovarian hyperstimulation by appropriate stimulation procedures, detection of women at risk of hyperstimulation and of women at high risk of thrombosis should allow reduction of the risk of thrombosis, possibly by administration of a thromboprophylaxis at a timing and dose which can be only determined by extrapolation. PMID:21333476

  19. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis of Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in a 13-Day-Old Neonate and Review of Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Jawad U.; Takemoto, Clifford M.; Casella, James F.; Streiff, Michael B.; Nwankwo, Ikechi J.; Kim, Hyun S.

    2008-07-15

    Complete inferior vena cava thrombosis (IVC) in neonates is uncommon, but may cause significant morbidity. A 13-day-old neonate suffered IVC thrombosis secondary to antithrombin III deficiency, possibly contributed to by a mutation in the methyl tetrahydrofolate reductase gene. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA, Alteplase) was used successfully to treat extensive venous thrombosis in this neonate without complications. We also review the literature on CDT for treatment of IVC thrombosis in critically ill neonates and infants.

  20. Prevention of Recurrent Thrombosis in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Different from the General Population?

    PubMed

    Legault, Kimberly Janet; Ugarte, Amaia; Crowther, Mark Andrew; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo

    2016-05-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis with or without pregnancy morbidity in the presence of autoantibodies targeting proteins that associate with membrane phospholipids, termed "antiphospholipid antibodies" (aPL). Management of arterial and venous thromboses shares some similarities with management of arterial and venous thromboses in the general population; however, there are key differences. The majority of studies addressing management of thrombotic APS focus on secondary prevention. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are typically used for secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism in APS. Optimal management of isolated arterial thrombosis, in particular ischemic stroke, in patients with APS is controversial, and proposed therapeutic options have included antiplatelet agents and VKA. Primary prophylaxis in aPL-positive patients should be an individualized decision taking into account patient-specific risks. There may be a role for adjuvant therapies such as hydroxychloroquine, vitamin D, statins, or novel therapeutics in specific patient populations. PMID:27032789

  1. Risk Factors for Thrombosis in an African Population

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Awa OT; Proulle, Valérie; Sall, Abibatou; Mbaye, Alassane; Ba, Pape Samba; Diao, Maboury; Seck, Moussa; Gadji, Macoura; Gning, Sara B; Diop, Saliou; Dièye, Tandakha ND; Faye, Blaise Félix; Thiam, Doudou; Dreyfus, Marie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known about the biological, epidemiological, and clinical risk factors for thrombosis and venous thromboembolism (VTE) among Black Africans. We undertook a study of the prevalence of VTE risk factors for thrombosis in a Senegalese population. A three-year cross-sectional and case–control study involving 105 cases and 200 controls was conducted in various hospitals in Dakar (Senegal). Our results demonstrate that oral contraception, immobilization by casts, surgery, and blood group were significantly associated with VTE occurrence. Additionally, 16 cases and 2 controls had protein S (PS) values of less than 48.4% (M-2SD), exhibiting a highly significant difference (P < 1 × 10−4). The number of cases with a low protein C (PC) level was significantly higher than the respective number of controls. Using logistic regression methods, we established a correlation between significantly associated variables and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) occurrence. Age, obesity, sickle cell disease, and PC deficiency were not significantly associated with thrombosis. In contrast, gender, PS deficiency, varicose veins, surgery, non-O blood type, and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies were significantly and independently associated with DVT. These findings are extremely useful for clinical management of patients suffering from DVT and can help to reduce the high recurrence rate observed in our study. PMID:25512718

  2. Bilateral transverse sinus thrombosis secondary to a homozygous C677T MTHFR gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Ziad M; Mahfouz, Rami; Taher, Ali; Sawaya, Raja A

    2008-09-01

    We describe the case of a previously healthy young man who presented with headache, diplopia, nausea, vomiting, and bilateral papilledema. Magnetic resonance venography of the brain revealed thrombosis of the right transverse sinus. Blood tests showed elevated homocysteine levels, and coagulation studies revealed a homozygous C677T mutation and a heterozygous A1298C mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. The patient had no other etiology for venous thrombosis. We recommend screening patients who present with sinus thrombosis for MTHFR gene mutations. PMID:18666857

  3. Deep venous reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Maleti, Oscar; Lugli, Marzia; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2015-03-01

    Surgical correction of deep venous reflux is a valuable adjunct in treatment of selected patient with lower limb venous ulcer. Deep venous obstruction and superficial reflux is must be corrected first. Sustained venous ulcer healing and reduced ambulatory venous hypertension can be achieved in patients with both primary and secondary deep venous insufficiency. When direct valve repair is possible, valvuloplasty is the best option, but when this is not feasible, other techniques can be used, including femoral vein transposition into the great saphenous vein, vein valve transplant, neovalve construction, or nonautologous artificial venous valve. PMID:26358308

  4. [Central venous lines in children: new trends].

    PubMed

    Desruennes, E

    2006-04-01

    Central venous catheterisation under two-dimensional ultrasound (US) guidance has been proved to be quicker and safer than the classical landmark method in both adults and children. In the literature US guidance with sterile dressing of the probe is the 'gold-standard'. Another way to use US is simple preoperative US location followed either by blind puncture, either by US guided puncture when difficulties are expected: small infants (<15 kg), small diameter or collapses of the vein, multiple unsuccessful attempts during blind technique. Ideal location of the tip of central venous catheters is no more controversial but can depend on age and weight. In 2002 a French agency (Afssaps) study showed that the risk of perforation and tamponade was especially high in small weight prematures with 27 gauge polyurethane catheters when tip was located in the cardiac cavities. In children and adults venous thrombosis and catheter malfunction are closely related to short catheters whose tip is above T3-T4. Excepted polyurethane catheters in small weight prematures, the best location of long-term central venous catheters tip is the superior vena cava-right auricle junction. At this time routine antithrombotic prophylaxis is not recommended for children with long-term central venous catheters. PMID:16414237

  5. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  6. Mechanisms of thrombosis, available treatments and management challenges presented by thromboangiitis obliterans.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Bahare; Ravari, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO) is a thrombotic-occlusive and an inflammatory peripheral arterial disease with unidentified aetiology. Thrombotic events can lead to limb loss in TAO patients, who are typically young male smokers of low socioeconomic status. It is still unknown whether the initial process is thrombosis or inflammation, so it is difficult to ascertain whether managing inflammation or thrombosis improves the outcome of the disease. In this review, the possible mechanisms of thrombosis in TAO are evaluated; the treatments, based on the discussed mechanisms of thrombosis in TAO, are then reviewed and the challenges and limitations associated with the management of TAO are discussed. PMID:25921644

  7. Characterizing the Risk Factors Associated With Venous Thromboembolism in Pediatric Patients After Central Venous Line Placement

    PubMed Central

    Eades, Shannan; Turiy, Yuliya

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: With the apparent increase in venous thromboembolism noted in the pediatric population, it is important to define which children are at risk for clots and to determine optimal preventative therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for venous thromboembolism in pediatric patients with central venous line placement. METHODS: This was an observational, retrospective, case-control study. Control subjects were patients aged 0 to 18 years who had a central venous line placed. Case subjects had a central line and a radiographically confirmed diagnosis of venous thromboembolism. RESULTS: A total of 150 patients were included in the study. Presence of multiple comorbidities, particularly the presence of a congenital heart defect (34.7% case vs. 14.7% control; p < 0.005), was found to put pediatric patients at increased risk for thrombosis. Additionally, the administration of parenteral nutrition through the central line (34.7% case vs. 18.7% control; p = 0.03) and location of the line increased the risk for clot formation. CONCLUSIONS: With increased awareness of central venous line–related thromboembolism, measures should be taken to reduce the number and duration of central line placements, and further studies addressing the need for thromboprophylaxis should be conducted. PMID:26472949

  8. Magnetic resonance angiography in the diagnosis of thoracic venous obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y C; Su, C T; Yang, P C; Wang, T C; Chiu, L C; Hsu, J C

    1998-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the diagnostic value of orthogonal magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and to compare the results of MRA with those of digital subtraction venography (DSV) in thoracic venous diseases. Ten normal volunteers were evaluated using two-dimensional time-of-flight MRA in three orthogonal planes to determine the image quality of each venous segment. Twelve consecutive patients suspected of having thoracic venous disease were studied with both MRA and DSV. In the normal subjects, the plane perpendicular to the target vein provided the most consistent visualization. Using three orthogonal MRA images, a diagnostic-quality image was obtained in 175 (83%) of 210 venous segments in normal volunteers. In patients with thoracic venous obstructive disease, MRA was more effective than DSV in detecting total (84 vs 54), patent (56 vs 36), stenotic (13 vs 10), and obstructive (15 vs 8) venous segments, poststenotic or postobstructive veins (15 vs 10), thrombosis of the internal jugular vein (7 vs 2), intraluminal thrombus (5 vs 3), and azygos veins (12 vs 2). Using venous segments visible on DVS (n = 54) as the standard, the sensitivity and specificity of MRA were 94% and 100%, respectively, in detecting venous patency, and 100% and 98% in detecting complete venous obstruction. In the shoulder region, the sensitivity and specificity of MRA were 93% and 100%, respectively, in detecting venous patency, and 100% and 97% in detecting venous obstruction. We conclude that MRA with three orthogonal planes can provide relatively complete and reliable venous mapping, without the need for contrast medium. PMID:9481063

  9. Intraneural Venous Malformations of the Median Nerve

    PubMed Central

    González Rodríguez, Alba; Midón Míguez, José

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformations arising from the peripheral nerve are a rare type of vascular malformation. We present the first case of an intraneural venous malformation of the median nerve to be reported in a child and review the previous two cases of median nerve compression due to a venous malformation that have been reported. These cases presented with painless masses in the volar aspect of the wrist or with symptoms suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome. Clinical suspicion should lead to the use of Doppler ultrasonography as the first-line diagnostic tool. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology can confirm the diagnosis, as phleboliths are pathognomonic of venous malformations. Surgical treatment appears to be the only modality capable of successfully controlling the growth of an intraneural malformation. Sclerotherapy and radiotherapy have never been used to treat this type of malformation. PMID:27462571

  10. Postsurgical Inflammation as a Causative Mechanism of Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Albayati, Mostafa A; Grover, Steven P; Saha, Prakash; Lwaleed, Bashir A; Modarai, Bijan; Smith, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events (VTE) including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Although the current treatment regiments such as mechanical manipulation and administration of pharmacological prophylaxis significantly reduced the incidence of postsurgical VTE, they remain a major cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pathophysiology of venous thrombosis traditionally emphasizes the series of factors that constitute Virchow triad of factors. However, inflammation can also be a part of this by giving rise to a hypercoagulable state and endothelial damage. The inflammatory response after surgery, which is initiated by a cytokine "storm" and occurs within hours of surgery, creates a prothrombotic environment that is further accentuated by several cellular processes including neutrophil extracellular traps formation, platelet activation, and the generation of tissue factor-bearing microparticles. Although such inflammatory markers are elevated in undergoing surgery, the precise mechanism by which they give rise to venous thrombosis is poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential mechanisms linking inflammation to thrombosis, and highlight strategies that may minimize surgical inflammation and reduce the incidence of postoperative VTE. PMID:26276933

  11. Predicting post-traumatic stress and health anxiety following a venous thrombotic embolism.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Paul; Patterson, Katie; Noble, Simon

    2016-05-01

    This research identified psychosocial factors associated with post-traumatic stress and health anxiety following a venous thrombotic embolism. In all, 158 participants, largely registered with a venous thrombotic embolism information website (Lifeblood: The Thrombosis Charity), completed an online survey. Post-traumatic symptom scores were linked to health threat, and not moderated by perceived control over risk for further venous thrombotic embolism. Health anxiety was associated with continuing symptoms and a negative emotional response to the venous thrombotic embolism. There is a need to intervene to reduce both short- and long-term distress in this population, ideally using a stepped-care model. PMID:25030797

  12. Living with Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Deep Vein Thrombosis NHLBI Resources Pulmonary Embolism (Health Topics) Non-NHLBI Resources Deep Vein Thrombosis (MedlinePlus) Pulmonary Embolism (MedlinePlus) Clinical Trials ...

  13. Ovarian vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Jenayah, Amel Achour; Saoudi, Sarra; Boudaya, Fethia; Bouriel, Ines; Sfar, Ezzeddine; Chelli, Dalenda

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT) is a rare cause of abdominal pain that may mimic a surgical abdomen. It is most often diagnosed during the postpartum period. In this report, we present four cases of postoperative ovarian vein thrombosis. The complications of OVT can be significant, and the diagnosis relies on a careful examination of the radiographic findings. It can occur with lower quadrant abdominal pain, especially in the setting of recent pregnancy, abdominal surgery, pelvic inflammatory disease, or malignancy. Diagnosis can be made with confidence using ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment of ovarian vein thrombosis is particularly important in the post-partum patients, with anticoagulation therapy being the current recommendation. PMID:26526119

  14. [Portal vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Seijo-Ríos, Susana; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Thrombosis of the splenoportal axis not associated with liver cirrhosis or tumoral disease is the second cause of portal hypertension in the western world. In up to 60% of cases, an underlying systemic prothrombotic disorder can be identified as an etiological factor. One third of cases are caused by local factors and the coexistence of several entities is not unusual. Therefore, an etiologic diagnosis is essential in these patients. Early anticoagulation therapy in the acute phase of thrombosis of the splenoportal axis significantly affects the probability of recanalization and consequently the prognosis of these patients. In the chronic phase of splenoportal thrombosis (or portal cavernoma), the symptoms are caused by the complications of established portal hypertension. To date, anticoagulation therapy is limited to patients in whom an underlying prothrombotic disorder has been demonstrated. PMID:19733938

  15. Recurrent coronary stent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Goethals, P; Evrard, S; Dubois, C

    2000-12-01

    A 63-year-old woman with an acute anterior myocardial infarction was treated with primary stent implantation. The absence of coronary artery stenosis and an haematocrit of 58 were indicative of a myeloproliferative disorder and the diagnosis of polycythaemia vera (Vaquez' disease) was confirmed by bone marrow aspiration. The patient had a re-infarction 8 days later. A rescue percutaneous angioplasty was performed for stent thrombosis after unsuccessful thrombolysis. A few hours after sheath removal, a femoral artery thrombosis at the puncture side needed urgent thrombectomy. Finally, a second re-infarction occurred, followed by an irreversible cardiac arrest. Stent thrombosis is a difficult-to-treat complication in patients with polycythaemia vera. If this haematologic disorder is known, primary stent implantation for acute myocardial infarction may not be the first choice in these patients. PMID:11227838

  16. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Thierry; Soltys, Remigiusz; Loarte, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community. PMID:25802795

  17. Sepsis, venous return, and teleology.

    PubMed

    McNeilly, R G

    2014-11-01

    An understanding of heart-circulation interaction is crucial to our ability to guide our patients through an episode of septic shock. Our knowledge has advanced greatly in the last one hundred years. There are, however, certain empirical phenomena that may lead us to question the wisdom of our prevailing treatment algorithm. Three extreme but iatrogenically possible haemodynamic states exist. Firstly, inappropriately low venous return; secondly, overzealous arteriolar constriction; and finally, misguided inotropy and chronotropy. Following an unsuccessful fluid challenge, it would be logical to first set the venous tone, then set the cardiac rate and contractility, and finally set the peripheral vascular resistance. It is hypothesized that a combination of dihydroergotamine, milrinone and esmolol should be superior to a combination of noradrenaline and dobutamine for surviving sepsis. PMID:25245463

  18. Implementing Thrombosis Guidelines in Cancer Patients: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Bounameaux, Henri; Brenner, Benjamin; Büller, Harry R.; Kakkar, Ajay; Pabinger, Ingrid; Streiff, Michael; Debourdeau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a frequent and serious complication in patients with cancer. It is an independent prognostic factor of death in cancer patients and the second leading cause of death, but physicians often underestimate its importance, as well as the need for adequate prevention and treatment. Management of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer requires the coordinated efforts of a wide range of clinicians, highlighting the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. However, a lack of consensus among various national and international clinical practice guidelines has contributed to knowledge and practice gaps among practitioners, and inconsistent approaches to venous thromboembolism. The 2013 international guidelines for thrombosis in cancer have sought to address these gaps by critically re-evaluating the evidence coming from clinical trials and synthesizing a number of guidelines documents. An individualized approach to prophylaxis is recommended for all patients. PMID:25386357

  19. The impact of ruxolitinib on thrombosis in patients with polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Bethany T; Vesely, Sara K; Chai-Adisaksopha, Chatree; Scott, Bart L; Crowther, Mark; Garcia, David

    2016-09-01

    The Food and Drug Administration approval of ruxolitinib for treatment of myelofibrosis and polycythemia vera has changed the management of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Yet the impact of this therapy on risk of thrombosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality among these patients, remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ruxolitinib on the risk of thrombosis among patients with polycythemia vera or myelofibrosis. Following identification of randomized controlled trials comparing ruxolitinib to standard care or placebo, rates of thrombosis, including venous and arterial thrombosis, were analyzed using fixed effects models. Rates of thrombosis were significantly lower among patients treated with ruxolitinib [risk ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.88]. Subgroup analysis of venous and arterial thrombosis demonstrated similar risk ratios, which did not reach statistical significance (risk ratio 0.46, 95% CI 0.14-1.48 and RR 0.42, 95% CI 0.18-1.01, respectively). In conclusion, our analysis suggests that JAK2 inhibition with ruxolitinib decreases the risk of arterial and/or venous thrombosis in patients with polycythemia vera or myelofibrosis. These findings will require confirmation in a prospective study. PMID:26569516

  20. Management of Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Finks, Shannon W.; Trujillo, Toby C.; Dobesh, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review clinical data on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) used in the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) as well as practical considerations when using these products. Data Sources: Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar for VTE, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and relevant drug international nonproprietary names were conducted. Additional online searches were conducted for prescribing information. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Relevant articles on dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban for the management of VTE compared with oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; published between 1966 and December 2015) were reviewed and summarized, together with information on dosing, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interactions. Data Synthesis: The DOACs have the potential to circumvent many of the disadvantages of VKAs. At a minimum, they greatly increase the available therapeutic options, thus providing a greater opportunity for clinicians to select a management option that best fits the needs of individual patients. Despite the significant advance that DOACs represent, they are not without risk and require careful consideration of a number of clinical issues to optimize safety and efficacy. Conclusions: The emergence of DOACs for the management of thromboembolic disorders represents a paradigm shift from oral VKAs. The DOACs provide similar efficacy and improved safety in selected patients as compared with VKAs. Clinicians treating VTE need to be familiar with the intricacies involved in using these agents, including the appropriate dose selection for the relevant indication, avoidance of drug-drug and drug-disease interactions, and consideration of dose adjustments in specific clinical situations, such as organ dysfunction. PMID:26917821

  1. Indications for peripheral, midline and central catheters: summary of the MAGIC recommendations.

    PubMed

    Moureau, Nancy; Chopra, Vineet

    2016-04-28

    Patients admitted to acute care frequently require intravenous access to effectively deliver medications and prescribed treatment. For patients with difficult intravenous access, those requiring multiple attempts, those who are obese, or have diabetes or other chronic conditions, determining the vascular access device (VAD) with the lowest risk that best meets the needs of the treatment plan can be confusing. Selection of a VAD should be based on specific indications for that device. In the clinical setting, requests for central venous access devices are frequently precipitated simply by failure to establish peripheral access. Selection of the most appropriate VAD is necessary to avoid the potentially serious complications of infection and/or thrombosis. An international panel of experts convened to establish a guide for indications and appropriate usage for VADs. This publication summarises the work and recommendations of the panel for the Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC). PMID:27126759

  2. Fatal bilateral lower-limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following single digit replantation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Anderson S M; Fok, Margaret W M; Fung, Boris K K

    2015-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism in hand surgery is rare. There is no report in the literature on postoperative mortality from venous thromboembolism following microsurgery in upper limbs. We report the case of a 56-year-old Chinese man who died from pulmonary embolism as a result of bilateral lower-limb deep vein thrombosis following prolonged surgery under general anaesthesia after replantation of a finger. This case raises awareness of the need for precautions against venous thromboembolism following prolonged microsurgery and identification of high-risk patients. PMID:26045073

  3. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate). This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE. PMID:27581829

  4. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... catheter is attached to a device called a port that will be under your skin. The port ...

  5. Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis following Oropharyngeal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bostanci, Asli; Turhan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Internal jugular vein thrombosis (IJVT) is a rare condition which may lead to life-threatening complications such as sepsis and pulmonary embolism. Prolonged central venous catheterization, intravenous (IV) drug use, trauma, and radiotherapy are the most frequent causes of the IJVT. IJVT that develops after the oropharyngeal infection is a quite rare situation today. In this paper, a 37-year-old woman was presented; swelling occurred on her neck after acute tonsillitis and she was diagnosed with IJVT through Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging and managed without complications. Early diagnosis and conservative treatment with broad-spectrum IV antibiotics and anticoagulant agents have a critical importance for the prevention of fatal complications. PMID:26457221

  6. Do neutrophil extracellular traps contribute to the heightened risk of thrombosis in inflammatory diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ashish N; Kazzaz, Nayef M; Knight, Jason S

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic events, both arterial and venous, are a major health concern worldwide. Further, autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome, predispose to thrombosis, and thereby push the risk for these morbid events even higher. In recent years, neutrophils have been identified as important players in both arterial and venous thrombosis. Specifically, chromatin-based structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play a key role in activating the coagulation cascade, recruiting platelets, and serving as scaffolding upon which the thrombus can be assembled. At the same time, neutrophils and NETs are emerging as important mediators of pathogenic inflammation in the aforementioned autoimmune diseases. Here, we first review the general role of NETs in thrombosis. We then posit that exaggerated NET release contributes to the prothrombotic diatheses of systemic lupus erythematosus, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:26730289

  7. Animal Model of Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sumit; Laerum, Frode; Brosstad, Frank; Kvernebo, Knut; Sakariassen, Kjell S.

    1998-07-15

    Purpose: To develop an animal model of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods: In part I of the study nine juvenile domestic pigs were used. Each external iliac vein was transluminally occluded with a balloon catheter. Thrombin was infused through a microcatheter in one leg according to one of the following protocols: (1) intraarterial (IA): 1250 U at 25 U/min in the common femoral artery (n= 3); (2) intravenous (IV): 5000 U in the popliteal vein at 500 U/min (n= 3), or at 100 U/min (n= 3). Saline was administered in the opposite leg. After the animals were killed, the mass of thrombus in the iliofemoral veins was measured. The pudendoepiploic (PEV), profunda femoris (PF), and popliteal veins (PV) were examined. Thrombosis in the tributaries of the superficial femoral vein (SFVt) was graded according to a three-point scale (0, +, ++). In part II of the study IV administration was further investigated in nine pigs using the following three regimens with 1000 U at 25 U/min serving as the control: (1) 1000 U at 100 U/min, (2) 250 U at 25 U/min, (3) 250 U at 6.25 U/min. Results: All animals survived. In part I median thrombus mass in the test limbs was 1.40 g as compared with 0.25 g in the controls (p= 0.01). PEV, PFV and PV were thrombosed in all limbs infused with thrombin. IV infusion was more effective in inducing thrombosis in both the parent veins (mass 1.32-1.78 g) and SVFt (++ in 4 of 6 legs), as compared with IA infusion (mass 0.0-1.16 g; SFVt ++ in 1 of 3 legs). In part II thrombus mass in axial veins ranged from 1.23 to 2.86 g, and showed no relationship with the dose of thrombin or the rate of infusion. Tributary thrombosis was less extensive with 250 U at 25 U/min than with the other regimens. Conclusion: Slow distal intravenous thrombin infusion in the hind legs of pigs combined with proximal venous occlusion induces thrombosis in the leg veins that closely resembles clinical DVT in distribution.

  8. Multi-channel photon migration study in visible Chinese human muscle for optical detection of deep vein thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunlong; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) always induced venous thrombosis. Most cases of venous thrombosis were induced by deep vein thrombosis (DVT), with high incidence rate of >60% in >60 years old people. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) were reported recently to be an intriguing and potential technique in detecting DVT in clinics. However, the photon transport is still unclear, which is crucial for the image reconstruction of the updated development called as NIRS-based DVT imager. Here we employed the Monte Carlo simulation software for 3D voxelized media (MCVM) and the Visible Chinese Human (VCH) model, which segmentation is finest in the world, to simulate multi-channel photon migration in calf muscle. And the image reconstruction of DVT hemodynamic distribution was achieved. This study, for the first time, provides the most realistic 3-D multichannel photon migration for NIRS study on DVT, and explored the image reconstruction for furtherly developing a NIRS-based DVT imager.

  9. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  10. Venous velocity increase with a pneumatic foot compression garment.

    PubMed

    Ilgenfritz, F M; Meier, J R

    1994-11-01

    Intermittent compression garments have been widely accepted for prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis. They have broad applicability in both elective and emergent situations. Development of a new type of garment that acts to compress the plantar plexus of the foot provides a potential method of prophylaxis for patients with contraindications to the traditional calf- or thigh-high garments. Evaluation of the ability of the foot compression garment demonstrates a statistically significant increase in peak femoral venous velocity (40.6 cm/sec) as compared with the resting state (25.9 cm/sec). This increase in femoral venous velocity is comparable to that seen with single-cell compression socks. The authors conclude that the recently introduced foot garment produces increases in peak femoral venous velocity similar to those produced by existing garments and that use of the foot compression garment may provide deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in patients who previously have not been candidates for a compression garment. PMID:7978509

  11. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Saseedharan, Sanjith; Bhargava, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    A 56-year-old female, recently (3 months) diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD), on maintenance dialysis through jugular hemodialysis lines with a preexisting nonfunctional mature AV fistula made at diagnosis of CKD, presented to the hospital for a peritoneal dialysis line. The recently inserted indwelling dialysis catheter in left internal jugular vein had no flow on hemodialysis as was the right-sided catheter which was removed a day before insertion of the left-sided line. The left-sided line was removed and a femoral hemodialysis line was cannulated for maintenance hemodialysis, and the next day, a peritoneal catheter was inserted in the operation theater. However, 3 days later, there was progressive painful swelling of the left hand and redness with minimal numbness. The radial artery pulsations were felt. There was also massive edema of forearm, arm and shoulder region on the left side. Doppler indicated a steal phenomena due to a hyperfunctioning AV fistula for which a fistula closure was done. Absence of relief of edema prompted a further computed tomography (CT) angiogram (since it was not possible to evaluate the more proximal venous segments due to edema and presence of clavicle). Ct angiogram revealed central vein thrombosis for which catheter-directed thrombolysis and venoplasty was done resulting in complete resolution of signs and symptoms. Upper extremity DVT (UEDVT) is a very less studied topic as compared to lower extremity DVT and the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities still have substantial areas that need to be studied. We present a review of the present literature including incidences, diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for this entity. Data Sources: MEDLINE, MICROMEDEX, The Cochrane database of Systematic Reviews from 1950 through March 2011. PMID:22624098

  12. [Prevalence of stenosis and thrombosis of central veins in hemodialysis after a tunneled jugular catheter].

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Vanel, T; Chazot, C; Charra, B; Terrat, J C; Hurot, J M

    2001-01-01

    Central venous stenosis (ST) and thrombosis (TB) related to catheter (KT) had been reported mostly for the subclavian vein. We performed a systematic cavographic study to evaluate the prevalence of these complications in 51 hemodialysis patients with present or previous history of tunneled internal jugular catheter. Each of them had used one or several KT (1.8 +/- 1.4 KT) for a mean 28 +/- 26 month cumulative time (i.e. 43,584 days total exposure time). Fifty percent of the KT were PermCath Quinton and 50% were Twincath (uncuffed) or CS 100 (cuffed) Medcomp. Twenty-seven had no ST (53%, group I), 24 had one or several significant ST (47%, group II) of superior Vena Cava (SVC, n = 4), inferior Vena Cava (IVC, n = 1), Brachio-cephalic Vein (BCV, n = 5) and subclavian vein (SC, n = 10), or a TB of SVC (n = 1), IVC (n = 3), BCV (n = 3), SC (n = 2). This accounts for an incidence of 0.55 ST or TB/1000 patient-days. Five of the twelve subclavian ST and TB had no history of previous subclavian catheter. Comparison between the two groups showed no differences according to age, time on dialysis, diabetes, hematocrit, CRP, cumulative time with catheter, catheter-related infections, type of catheter and anticoagulant treatment. IVC catheter tip's position is an important risk factor for TB and ST (4/6). Twelve group II patients had ST or TB-related symptoms, with a functional AV fistula in 9 cases. Eleven patients underwent repeated percutaneous angioplasty with 4 additional Wallstents and in 2 cases an AV fistula need to be closed. Central venous ST and TB after a jugular KT is extremely frequent, mostly without any symptoms. Consequences on peripheral or central vascular access, cost and poor long-term patency rate of angioplasty are of major importance. These results incite us to further reduce the catheter use in dialysis patients. PMID:11811018

  13. Splanchnic vein thrombosis in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Mallika; McVinnie, Kathryn; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2013-09-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) is one of the most important complications of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Although MPN are common causes of SVT, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this predisposition, their epidemiology and natural history are not fully understood. Studies have concentrated on the generalized prothrombotic environment generated by MPN and their relationship with abnormal blood counts, thereby furthering our knowledge of arterial and venous thrombosis in this population. In contrast, there are few studies that have specifically addressed SVT in the context of MPN. Recent research has demonstrated in patients with MPN the existence of factors increasing the risk of SVT such as the presence of the JAK2 V617F mutation and its 46/1 haplotype. Features unique to the circulating blood cells, splanchnic vasculature and surrounding micro-environment in patients with MPN have been described. There are also abnormalities in local haemodynamics, haemostatic molecules, the spleen, and splanchnic endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells. This review considers these important advances and discusses the contribution of individual anomalies that lead to the development of SVT in both the pre-neoplastic and overt stage of MPN. Clinical issues relating to epidemiology, recurrence and survival in these patients have also been reviewed and their results discussed. PMID:23855810

  14. Acute wiiitis representing as thrombosis of the inferior vena cava and left pelvic veins.

    PubMed

    Brodmann, M; Gary, T; Hafner, F; Eller, P; Deutschmann, H; Pilger, E; Seinost, G

    2015-08-01

    Deep venous thrombosis as a result of venous wall injury provoked by trauma is a common finding. It often occurs in patients with sportive overstraining, caused by over fatigue of the body structures. In 2007, the entity of "acute wiiitis" was first described in a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine. Acute wiiitis sums up all affections, mainly skeletal and muscle affections, provoked by playing Nintendo Wii, a very common and loved video-game system. Deep venous thrombosis as a consequence of Nintendo Wii has not been described so far. We present a patient with a massive free floating thrombus of the left pelvic veins originating from the gluteal veins and reaching into the inferior vena cava after playing Nintendo Wii. PMID:24681523

  15. Acute Cytomegalovirus Infection as a Cause of Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Francesca; Lissandrin, Raffaella; Mojoli, Francesco; Baldanti, Fausto; Brunetti, Enrico; Pascarella, Michela; Giordani, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Acute Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is an unusual cause of venous thromboembolism, a potentially life-threatening condition. Thrombus formation can occur at the onset of the disease or later during the recovery and may also occur in the absence of acute HCMV hepatitis. It is likely due to both vascular endothelium damage caused by HCMV and impairment of the clotting balance caused by the virus itself. Here we report on two immunocompetent women with splanchnic thrombosis that occurred during the course of acute HCMV infection. Although the prevalence of venous thrombosis in patients with acute HCMV infection is unknown, physicians should be aware of its occurrence, particularly in immunocompetent patients presenting with fever and unexplained abdominal pain. PMID:24959338

  16. Venous thromboembolism in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, S; Neff, A; Nagler, A; Savani, U; Mohty, M; Savani, B N

    2016-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an increasingly recognized problem in the post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) setting, with a lack of high-quality evidence-based data to recommend best practices. Few patients with hematologic malignancies and even fewer post-HSCT patients were included in randomized trials of VTE prophylaxis and treatment. Prior VTE, GVHD, infections and indwelling venous catheters are risk factors for thrombosis. The increasing use of post-transplant maintenance therapy with lenalidomide in patients with multiple myeloma adds to this risk after autologous HSCT. These patients are also at high risk of bleeding complications because of prolonged thrombocytopenia and managing the competing risks of bleeding and thrombosis can be challenging. This review aims to provide a practical, clinician-focused approach to the prevention and treatment of VTE in the post-HSCT setting. PMID:26691425

  17. Statins and prevention of venous thromboembolism: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Gaertner, Sébastien; Cordeanu, Eléna-Mihaela; Nouri, Salah; Mirea, Corina; Stephan, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    The pleiotropic effects of statins, beyond their cholesterol-lowering properties, are much debated. In primary prevention, several observational cohort and case-control studies appear to show that statins reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism by about 30%. In a single randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial (JUPITER), which included 17,000 patients, rosuvastatin 20mg/day reduced the risk of venous thromboembolism by 43%. However, these patients were at low risk of venous thromboembolism, and the frequency of the event was, in principle, low. In secondary prevention, several observational studies and post-hoc analyses of randomized clinical trials have suggested that statins may prevent recurrence of venous thromboembolism. However, none of these studies had enough scientific weight to form the basis of a recommendation to use statins for secondary prevention. The putative preventive effect of statins appears to be independent of plasma cholesterol concentration and could be a pharmacological property of the statin class, although a dose-effect relationship has not been demonstrated. The mechanism through which statins might prevent venous thrombosis is thought to involve their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects or perhaps a more specific action, by blocking the degradation of antithrombotic proteins. A mechanism involving the action of statins on interactions between risk factors for atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism is supported by some studies, but not all. In the absence of firm evidence, statins cannot currently be recommended for primary or secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism. PMID:26778087

  18. Central venous Access device SeCurement And Dressing Effectiveness (CASCADE) in paediatrics: protocol for pilot randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Victoria; Long, Debbie A; Williams, Tara; Hallahan, Andrew; Mihala, Gabor; Cooke, Marie; Rickard, Claire M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric central venous access devices (CVADs) are associated with a 25% incidence of failure. Securement and dressing are strategies used to reduce failure and complication; however, innovative technologies have not been evaluated for their effectiveness across device types. The primary aim of this research is to evaluate the feasibility of launching a full-scale randomised controlled efficacy trial across three CVAD types regarding CVAD securement and dressing, using predefined feasibility criteria. Methods and analysis Three feasibility randomised, controlled trials are to be undertaken at the Royal Children's Hospital and the Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. CVAD securement and dressing interventions under examination compare current practice with sutureless securement devices, integrated securement dressings and tissue adhesive. In total, 328 paediatric patients requiring a peripherally inserted central catheter (n=100); non-tunnelled CVAD (n=180) and tunnelled CVAD (n=48) to be inserted will be recruited and randomly allocated to CVAD securement and dressing products. Primary outcomes will be study feasibility measured by eligibility, recruitment, retention, attrition, missing data, parent/staff satisfaction and effect size. CVAD failure and complication (catheter-associated bloodstream infection, local infection, venous thrombosis, occlusion, dislodgement and breakage) will be compared between groups. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval to conduct the research has been obtained. All dissemination will be undertaken using the CONSORT Statement recommendations. Additionally, the results will be sent to the relevant organisations which lead CVAD focused clinical practice guidelines development. Trial registration numbers ACTRN12614001327673; ACTRN12615000977572; ACTRN12614000280606. PMID:27259529

  19. Cavernous sinus thrombosis revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Yarington, C T

    1977-01-01

    In summary, cavernous sinus thrombosis is still with us. Patients now survive the disease more often than not, and therapy and diagnosis are reasonably clear cut. An increasing array of antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been balanced by an increasing army of antibiotics. The controversy over anticoagulation has not changed since reviewed by Parsons (1967). Ancillary measures remain more of value in diagnosis than in therapy. It is a disease primarily diagnosed by physical signs and symptoms, which requires prompt treatment. In our modern age of computerization and laboratory-based medical care, cavernous sinus thrombosis demands the diagnostic skill of the clinician, whose prompt ministrations should usually yield a favourable result. PMID:331338

  20. Extraluminal lipoma with common femoral vein obstruction: a cause of chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Gasparis, Antonios P; Tsintzilonis, Stylianos; Labropoulos, Nicos

    2009-02-01

    A 49-year-old man, with a misdiagnosis of common femoral vein deep vein thrombosis presented with advanced chronic venous insufficiency. Further imaging revealed a patent common femoral vein with augmentation that was compressed by an extrinsic mass. Exploration identified a lipoma that was extravascular and was resulting in venous outflow obstruction. Excision of the lipoma resulted in clinical improvement and ulcer healing. PMID:19216966

  1. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Yogesh K; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  2. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh K.; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  3. Embryologicalic collateral venous channel on radionuclide liver/spleen study

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, R.H. Jr.; Johnson, D.G.

    1983-07-01

    Obstruction of normal venous portal blood flow generally results in collateral circulation. The obstruction may be intrinsic t the vasculature (e.g., hepatic vein thrombosis, vascular anomalies) or it may be extravascular (e.g., cirrhosis, hepatic masses) and may effect blood flow by deforming and compressing the intrahepatic or splenoportal axis vessels. A technetium-99m sulfur colloid liver/spleen study demonstrates what is thought to be a functional paraumbilical or umbilical vein in a cirrhotic patient with portal hypertension.

  4. Effort Thrombosis Presenting as Pulmonary Embolism in a Professional Baseball Pitcher

    PubMed Central

    Bushnell, Brandon D.; Anz, Adam W.; Dugger, Keith; Sakryd, Gary A.; Noonan, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Effort thrombosis, or Paget-Schroetter’s syndrome, is a rare subset of thoracic outlet syndrome in which deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity occurs as the result of repetitive overhead motion. It is occasionally associated with pulmonary embolism. This case of effort thrombosis and pulmonary embolus was in a 25-year-old major league professional baseball pitcher, in which the only presenting complaints involved dizziness and shortness of breath without complaints involving the upper extremity—usually, a hallmark of most cases of this condition. The patient successfully returned to play for 5 subsequent seasons at the major league level after multimodal treatment that included surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome. Objective: Though rare, effort thrombosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of throwing athletes with traditional extremity-focused symptoms and in cases involving pulmonary or thoracic complaints. Rapid diagnosis is a critical component of successful treatment. PMID:23015912

  5. Venous stroke and status epilepticus due to milk-induced anemia in a child.

    PubMed

    Finkel, Leslie; Piantino, Juan; Goldstein, Joshua; Wainwright, Mark S

    2015-02-01

    The risk factors for cerebral sinus venous thrombosis include dehydration, infection, and anemia. The clinical presentation in children of venous strokes associated with cerebral venous thrombosis is variable and may include seizures. Acute management should focus on the treatment of the primary cause and anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy if needed. Early recognition and targeted treatment is important because survivors are at increased risk for long-term neurologic complications. We report a case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with status epilepticus and was subsequently found to have a cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the transverse and sigmoid sinus, with venous infarction in the temporal lobe. Laboratory results were significant for a microcytic anemia caused by excessive milk intake. Although iron deficiency anemia is a common pediatric disorder, this uncommon presentation demonstrates the potential for neurologic complications secondary to anemia, as well as the need for a high index of suspicion in order to identify venous stroke as a cause in children who present to the emergency department with seizures. PMID:25513978

  6. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  7. Is JAK2V617F Mutation the Only Factor for Thrombosis in Philadelphia-Negative Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms?

    PubMed

    Uyanik, Mehmet Sevki; Baysal, Mehmet; Pamuk, Gulsum Emel; Maden, Muhammet; Akker, Mustafa; Umit, Elif Gulsum; Demir, Muzaffer; Aydogdu, Erkan

    2016-09-01

    The most common genetic disorder in Philadelphia negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms is the JAK2-V617F mutation. In the present study, we aimed to determine risk factors for thrombosis in patients with essential thrombocytosis and polycythemia vera. We screened the medical records of 101 patients. Risk factors which may predict thrombosis were recorded. Venous thrombosis (VT) before diagnosis was significantly higher in JAK2 positive patients. VT after diagnosis was similar in JAK2 positive and negative groups, and was significantly higher in elderly patients. Treatment places importance on the JAK2 mutation under unmodifiable cardiovascular risk factors such as advanced age after diagnosis. PMID:27429517

  8. Association of anti-cardiolipin antibodies with vascular thrombosis and neurological manifestation of Behçets disease.

    PubMed

    al-Dalaan, A N; al-Ballaa, S R; al-Janadi, M A; Bohlega, S; Bahabri, S

    1993-03-01

    We have studied 44 patients with Behçet's Disease (BD) to look for any correlation of arterial and venous thrombosis or central nervous system (CNS) manifestations with anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACLA). Twenty patients were positive for ACLA by MELISA method. Ten patients had IgG antibody, four had IgM and six had both IgG and IgM. Of these patients, 11 had a history of vascular thrombosis and thrombophlebitis and nine had CNS manifestations. The association of ACLA with vascular thrombosis or CNS manifestation of Behçet's disease was statistically not significant. PMID:8467608

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Thrombosis of Cerebral Veins and Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Sergey Borisovich; Bocharov, Aleksei Vasilievich; Mikeladze, Ketevan; Gasparian, Sergey Surenovich; Serova, Natalia Konstantinovna; Shakhnovich, Alexander Romanovich

    2014-01-01

    Summary Acute thrombosis of cerebral veins and sinuses (ATCVS) is a multifactorial disease with grave consequences. Because of its rare occurrence there are no proven treatment guidelines. Sixteen patients with ATCVS were treated. The final diagnosis was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography. Sinus catheterization was performed via transfemoral venous access. Treatment included mechanical manipulation of thrombi and thrombolytic therapy. A regression of clinical symptoms with a concomitant decrease of intracranial hypertension was achieved in all patients. Long-term results were studied in eight patients: none presented clinical signs of intracranial hypertension. Endovascular transvenous recanalization is an effective treatment for acute thrombosis of cerebral veins and sinuses. Along with the local thrombolysis, significant potential in the treatment of this complex pathology lies in the transvenous endovascular techniques of mechanical thrombus extraction, especially in patients with intracranial hemorrhage for whom the use of thrombolytic agents is restricted. PMID:25196622

  10. Cerebral venous angiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.; Gilmor, R.L.; Richmond, B.

    1984-04-01

    Several unusual cases of cerebral venous angiomas as well as some characteristic cases are reported. The characteristic angiographic feature is that of a collection of dilated medullary veins draining into a single large draining vein, which appears first in the early venous phase and persists into the late venous phase of the arteriogram. Computed tomography (CT) was abnormal in 12/13 cases. The draining vein was the most common abnormality identified on CT. Coronal and sagittal reconstruction may be helpful in demonstrating the draining vein. A case of large twin venous angiomas, a case of hemorrhage from a venous angioma, and a case of a venous angioma with an incidentally associated glioblastoma are presented.

  11. Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Hiroyuki; Takeshima, Toshikazu; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Heimann, Axel; Kempski, Oliver

    1998-01-01

    Sinus-vein thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a much more frequent neurological disorder than was anticipated before. We examined the pathophysiology of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) from 19 patients and a rat SSST model. We treated 19 cases with SSST who were diagnosed by angiography. The symptoms of nine patients, who suffered multiple intracerebral hemorrhage, were abrupt. In another ten patients who recovered satisfactorily, the condition progressed slowly and they were treated with heparin and urokinase. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that female, sudden onset (<24 hours) and posterior 1/3 occlusion are related to bad outcome. Experimentally, SSST was induced by ligation and slow injection of kaolin-cephalin suspension into SSS in rats. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hb Sao2) using a “scanning” technique were measured at 48 locations, and fluorescence angiography was performed before and until 90 min after SSST induction. After 48 hours the animals were sacrificed for histological studies. Decrease of rCBF and tissue Hb SO2 and brain damage were seen in group B (n = 10) with an extension of thrombosis from SSS into cortical veins. Brain injury was not observed in group A (n = 8) with SSS thrombus alone and sham-operated animals (n = 5). In conclusion, a brain with acute extension of thrombus from SSS into cortical veins becomes critical for cerebral blood supply and metabolism. CBF, tissue HbSO2 and repeated angiography can be helpful monitors for the early detection of critical conditions after SSST. As to the therapy, restraint on the ongoing thrombus is essential to protect the brain with SSST, and we encourage the use of combination therapy of heparin and urokinase as early as possible in cases without intracerebral hemorrhage. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171061

  12. Management of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Paydar, Shahram; Sabetian, Golnar; Khalili, Hosseinali; Fallahi, Javad; Tahami, Mohammad; Ziaian, Bizhan; Abbasi, Hamid Reza; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Ghahramani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PTE) are known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). DVT occurs when a thrombus (a blood clot) forms in deep veins of the body, usually in the lower extremities. It can cause swelling or leg pain, but sometimes may occur with no symptoms. Awareness of DVT is the best way to prevent the VTE. Patients with trauma are at increased risk of DVT and subsequent PE because of coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, DVT prophylaxis is essential but the VTE prophylaxis strategy is controversial for the trauma patients. The risk factors for VTE includes pelvic and lower extremity fractures, and head injury. PMID:27162921

  13. Mechanical Thrombectomy of Iliocaval Thrombosis Using a Protective Expandable Sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Tri H.; Spuentrup, Elmar; Staatz, Gundula; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Nolte-Ernsting, Claus C.A.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Haage, Patrick

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of successful percutaneous treatment of a subacute ilio-caval venous thrombosis in a 64-year-old female patient by using a novel combination of a rotatory fragmentation device (percutaneous thrombectomy device: PTD) and large wire basket (temporary Guenther basket filter) under temporary caval filter protection using an expandable sheath. Because the patient had multiple myeloma with increased risk for contrast media-induced renal failure, the therapeutic angiographic procedure was performed without iodinated contrast medium. Non-contrast-enhanced MR venography (high-resolution True FISP) confirmed the effective thrombus removal by the percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy procedure.

  14. Acute paraplegia in a preterm infant with cerebral sinovenous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, J; Tekes, A; Klein, J; Lemmon, M; Felling, R J; Chavez-Valdez, R

    2015-06-01

    We report the case of a 1-month old, 28-week gestational age infant who presented with acute paraplegia after cardiopulmonary arrest. Later imaging confirms cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) and a suspected infarction in the conus medullaris of the spinal cord. A prothrombotic state may explain the numerous areas of infarction visualized on neuroimaging. To our knowledge this is the first case report of acute and persistent paraplegia in an infant with CSVT and conus medullaris injury, which may be due to venous infarction of the spinal cord. PMID:26012477

  15. Migration of a Central Venous Catheter in a Hemodialysis Patient Resulted in Left Atrial Perforation and Thrombus Formation Requiring Open Heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kevin; Marks, Barry A; Qureshi, Anwer; Stemm, Joseph J

    2016-07-01

    Central venous catheterization is widely used in patients on hemodialysis. A rare complication associated with the clinical use of central venous catheters is perforation of the heart or major vessels. We report a case of inadvertent perforation of the left atrium and thrombosis after the placement of a hemodialysis catheter in the right internal jugular vein. In such cases, surgical removal of the central venous catheter from perforation sites in the heart and vessel walls poses anesthetic challenges because of the high risk of pneumothorax, hemorrhage, arrhythmias, thrombosis, and death. PMID:27224040

  16. "Venous congestion" as a cause of subcortical white matter T2 hypointensity on magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Jayaprakash Harsha; Parameswaran, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Subcortical T2 hypointensity is an uncommon finding seen in very limited conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Sturge-Weber syndrome, and meningitis. Some of the conditions such as moyamoya disease, severe ischemic-anoxic insults, early cortical ischemia, and infarcts are of "arterial origin." We describe two conditions in which "venous congestion" plays a major role in T2 hypointensity - cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) and dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF). The third case is a case of meningitis, showing T2 hypointensity as well, and can be explained by the "venous congestion" hypothesis. The same hypothesis can explain few of the other conditions causing subcortical T2 hypointensity. PMID:27570403

  17. Secular trends in occurrence of acute venous thromboembolism: the Worcester venous thromboembolism study (1985 to 2009)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Goldberg, Robert J.; Anderson, Frederick A.; Kiefe, Catarina I; Spencer, Frederick A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The clinical epidemiology of venous thromboembolism has changed recently due to advances in identification, prophylaxis, and treatment. We sought to describe secular trends in occurrence of venous thromboembolism among residents of the Worcester, Massachusetts, metropolitan statistical area (WMSA). METHODS Population-based methods were used to monitor trends in event rates of first-time or recurrent venous thromboembolism in 5025 WMSA residents diagnosed with acute pulmonary embolism and/or lower-extremity deep vein thrombosis during 9 annual periods between 1985 and 2009. Medical records were reviewed by abstractors and validated by clinicians. RESULTS Age- and sex-adjusted annual event rates for first-time venous thromboembolism increased from 73 (95% CI 64–82) per 100,000 in 1985/1986 to 133 (122–143) in 2009, due mostly to an increase in pulmonary embolism. The rate of recurrent venous thromboembolism decreased from 39 (32–45) in 1985/1986 to 19 (15–23) in 2003, and then increased to 35 (29–40) in 2009. There was an increasing trend in using non-invasive diagnostic testing, with about half of tests being invasive in 1985/1986 and almost all non-invasive by 2009. CONCLUSIONS Despite advances in identification, prophylaxis, and treatment between 1985 and 2009, the annual event rate of venous thromboembolism has increased and remains high. While these increases may be partially due to increased sensitivity of diagnostic methods, especially for pulmonary embolism, it may also imply that current prevention and treatment strategies are less than optimal. PMID:24813864

  18. Deep Vein Thrombosis Provoked by Inferior Vena Cava Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Raad A; Saadaldin, Mazin; Kumar, Binay; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava agenesis (IVCA) is a rare congenital anomaly that can be asymptomatic or present with vague, nonspecific symptoms, such as abdominal or lower back pain, or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Here, we present a 55-year-old male who came with painless swelling and redness of his left lower limb. On examination, swelling and redness were noted extending from the left foot to the upper thigh; it was also warm compared to his right lower limb. Venous Doppler ultrasound was done which showed DVT extending up to the common femoral vein. Subsequently, computed-tomography (CT) of the chest and abdomen was done to exclude malignancy or venous flow obstruction; it revealed congenital absence (agenesis) of the infrarenal inferior vena cava (IVC). PMID:26788400

  19. Hyperhomocysteinemia, deep vein thrombosis and vitamin B12 deficiency in a metformin-treated diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsuan-Yu; Chung, Chih-Yuan; Chang, Cheng-Shyong; Wang, Ming-Lun; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Shen, Ming-Ching

    2007-09-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may be induced by long-term use of metformin, which may in turn lead to hyperhomocysteinemia. Thus, hyperhomocysteinemia may increase the risk of vascular thrombosis in diabetic patients, when metformin is used and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation is present. We report a 65-year-old Taiwanese diabetic woman who was treated with metformin for 6 years and who had suffered from swelling of the left lower extremity for 3 months. Ascending venography confirmed the diagnosis of proximal deep vein thrombosis, while hyperhomocysteinemia, megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, and a homozygous C677T mutation of the MTHFR gene were also found. She had no identifiable venous thrombotic risk factors other than hyperhomocysteinemia, which seemed to be caused by both MTHFR C677T homozygous mutation and vitamin B12 deficiency. With the substitution of insulin injection for metformin, short-term supplement of vitamin B12, and anticoagulant therapy for the deep vein thrombosis, her anemia and hyperhomocysteinemia recovered rapidly. The deep vein thrombosis also responded well. Our findings highly suggested the role of metformin in causing vitamin B12 deficiency, which may serve as an additional risk factor for venous thrombosis in diabetic patients. Our report also highlights the need to check vitamin B12 levels during metformin treatment. PMID:17908667

  20. Stroke during induction of labour in a patient with carotid aneurysm and prior multiple venous thromboses

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sujata; Stern, Jeremy S; Williams, Bode

    2009-01-01

    A case of stroke during induction of labour in a pregnant patient at term anticoagulated for prior venous thrombosis is reported. The cause was a middle cerebral artery embolism, originating from a false dissecting aneurysm of the internal carotid artery. Investigations and causes of stroke in a pregnant patient are briefly outlined.

  1. [Management of venous thromboembolism: A 2015 update].

    PubMed

    Galanaud, J-P; Messas, E; Blanchet-Deverly, A; Quéré, I; Wahl, D; Pernod, G

    2015-11-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) constitute venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). Venous thromboembolic disease is a common, serious, and multifactorial disease, the incidence of which increases with age. Risk factors, whether transient (surgery, plaster immobilization, bed rest/hospitalization) or chronic/persistent (age, cancer, clinical or biological thrombophilia, etc.), modulate the duration of treatment. In the absence of pathognomonic clinical sign or symptom, diagnostic management relies in the evaluation of the clinical pre-test probability followed by a laboratory or an imaging testing. So far, compression ultrasound and multidetector computed tomography angiography are the best diagnostic tests to make a positive diagnosis of DVT or PE, respectively. Anticoagulants at therapeutic dose for at least 3months constitute the cornerstone of VTE management. Availability of new direct oral anticoagulants, which have recently been shown to be as effective and as safe as vitamin K antagonist in clinical trials, should facilitate ambulatory management of VTE and favour extended treatments for individuals with unprovoked VTE or VTE provoked by a chronic/persistent risk factor. PMID:26235049

  2. [Duration of anticoagulant therapy in venous thromboembolic complications].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Leontyev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A; Tolstikhin, V Yu; Khotinskiy, A A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate anticoagulant therapy is a general approach to treatment of deep vein thrombosis. However, the duration of anticoagulant therapy is not strictly specified in everyday clinical practice. The present article deals with various approaches to selecting the duration of therapy with anticoagulants based on the findings of studies, national and foreign clinical guidelines. The minimal duration of therapy for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism amounts to 3 months in accordance with the national and American recommendations. For some cohorts of patients, continuation of therapy above 3 months is considered: patients with idiopathic thrombosis (the recommended duration of therapy of not less than 6 months), patients having persisting risk factor for relapse of thrombosis on termination of the main therapeutic course, oncological patients (6 month therapy followed by assessing the risk and benefit of continuing therapy with anticoagulants). Prolonged therapy of venous thromboembolism using unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin followed by changing over to vitamin K antagonists is associated with decreased risk for thrombosis relapse approximately by 90%, however increasing the risk of haemorrhage. Currently, as an alternative, it is possible to consider administration of novel oral anticoagulants (rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban) which beside high efficacy are associated with less risk of bleeding. The route of administration, no necessity to control the INR, and the minimal number of drug and food interactions make administration of new oral anticoagulants an attractive alternative to therapy with heparins and vitamin K antagonists. PMID:27100556

  3. Venous ulcers -- self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000744.htm Venous ulcers - self-care To use the sharing features on this ... slow to heal. Alternative names Venous leg ulcers - self-care; Venous insufficiency ulcers - self-care; Stasis leg ...

  4. Venous thromboembolism in Latin America: a review and guide to diagnosis and treatment for primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ceresetto, Jose Manuel

    2016-01-01

    There are various region-specific challenges to the diagnosis and effective treatment of venous thromboembolism in Latin America. Clear guidance for physicians and patient education could improve adherence to existing guidelines. This review examines available information on the burden of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis in Latin America and the regional issues surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Potential barriers to appropriate care, as well as treatment options and limitations on their use, are discussed. Finally, an algorithmic approach to the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism in ambulatory patients is proposed and care pathways for patients with pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis are outlined for primary care providers in Latin America. PMID:26872082

  5. Venous thromboembolism in Latin America: a review and guide to diagnosis and treatment for primary care.

    PubMed

    Ceresetto, Jose Manuel

    2016-01-01

    There are various region-specific challenges to the diagnosis and effective treatment of venous thromboembolism in Latin America. Clear guidance for physicians and patient education could improve adherence to existing guidelines. This review examines available information on the burden of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis in Latin America and the regional issues surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Potential barriers to appropriate care, as well as treatment options and limitations on their use, are discussed. Finally, an algorithmic approach to the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism in ambulatory patients is proposed and care pathways for patients with pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis are outlined for primary care providers in Latin America. PMID:26872082

  6. Collagen-induced thrombosis in murine arteries and veins.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is a powerful thrombotic stimulus that functions by direct and indirect binding to various platelet receptors. A variety of collagen types are known and several (e.g., collagen Types I, III, IV) are found in vascular tissues and are exposed upon disruption of the endothelium or more extensive vessel wall rupture. Some murine models of thrombosis purport to expose collagen to initiate thrombosis, however, the nature and extent of this exposure is not clear. This study was undertaken to place a known collagen-dominated surface into the in vivo arterial or venous circulation as a method for direct study of collagen-induced thrombosis in mice. The epigastric artery was removed from donor mice and a microsuture with attached needle was knotted into one cut end. Anesthetized mice had this needle/suture/small-artery inserted into and out of a 0.5-mm length of the larger carotid artery or femoral vein, leaving the collagen-rich adventitial surface of the epigastric artery intralumenally in the larger vessel. Extensive platelet and fibrin deposition on this surface were in evidence and were quantitated with fluorescence imaging; administration of clopidogrel reduced thrombus development in both arteries and veins. A method was developed to evert the epigastric artery and disrupt the exteriorized endothelium; with the same needle/suture vessel-insertion technique, this surface stimulated significantly less thrombotic response in both arteries and veins, suggesting differential thrombogenesis based on the molecular composition of the induction factor. This new model of thrombosis offers a method for directly assessing the role of collagen-mediated thrombosis in murine arteries and veins. PMID:23063056

  7. Tunnelled Central Venous Catheter-Related Problems in the Early Phase of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Effects on Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yeral, Mahmut; Boğa, Can; Oğuzkurt, Levent; Alışkan, Hikmet Eda; Özdoğu, Hakan; Demiroğlu, Yusuf Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Haematopoietic stem cell recipients need central venous catheters (CVCs) for easy administration of intravenous fluid, medications, apheresis, or dialysis procedures. However, CVCs may lead to infectious or non-infectious complications such as thrombosis. The effect of these complications on transplantation outcome is not clear. This manuscript presents the complication rates of double-lumen tunnelled CVCs and their effect on transplantation outcome. Materials and Methods: Data from 111 consecutive patients, of whom 75 received autologous and 36 received allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, were collected retrospectively. The data were validated by the Record Inspection Group of the related JACIE-accredited transplantation centre. Results: Thrombosis developed in 2.7% of recipients (0.9 per 1000 catheter days). Catheter-related infection was identified in 14 (12.6%) patients (3.6 per 1000 catheter days). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most common causative agent. Engraftment time, rate of 100-day mortality, and development of grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease were not found to be associated with catheter-related complications. Conclusion: These results indicate that adverse events related with tunnelled CVCs are manageable and have no negative effects on transplant outcome. PMID:25805675

  8. Initial management and outcomes after superficial thrombophlebitis: The Cardiovascular Research Network Venous Thromboembolism study.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Bethany; Go, Alan S; Sung, Sue Hee; Fan, Dongjie; Fang, Margaret C

    2016-06-01

    Although superficial thrombophlebitis (SVTE) is generally considered a benign, self-limited disease, accumulating evidence suggests that it often leads to more serious forms of venous thromboembolism. We reviewed the medical charts of 329 subjects with SVTE from the Cardiovascular Research Network Venous Thromboembolism cohort study to collect information on the acute treatment of SVTE and subsequent diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis within 1 year. All participants received care within Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large, integrated healthcare delivery system. Fourteen (4.3%) subjects with SVTE received anticoagulants, 148 (45.0%) were recommended antiplatelet agents or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and in 167 (50.8%) there was no documented antithrombotic therapy. In the year after SVTE diagnosis, 19 (5.8%) patients had a subsequent diagnosis of a deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. In conclusion, clinically significant venous thrombosis within a year after SVTE was uncommon in our study despite infrequent use of antithrombotic therapy. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:432-434. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:27253585

  9. Compression and venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Stücker, M; Link, K; Reich-Schupke, S; Altmeyer, P; Doerler, M

    2013-03-01

    Compression therapy is considered to be the most important conservative treatment of venous leg ulcers. Until a few years ago, compression bandages were regarded as first-line therapy of venous leg ulcers. However, to date medical compression stockings are the first choice of treatment. With respect to compression therapy of venous leg ulcers the following statements are widely accepted: 1. Compression improves the healing of ulcers when compared with no compression; 2. Multicomponent compression systems are more effective than single-component compression systems; 3. High compression is more effective than lower compression; 4. Medical compression stockings are more effective than compression with short stretch bandages. Healed venous leg ulcers show a high relapse rate without ongoing treatment. The use of medical stockings significantly reduces the amount of recurrent ulcers. Furthermore, the relapse rate of venous leg ulcers can be significantly reduced by a combination of compression therapy and surgery of varicose veins compared with compression therapy alone. PMID:23482538

  10. [Resistance to activated protein C by mutation of the factor V gene. Most frequent blood coagulation defect in venous thromboses].

    PubMed

    Peus, D; Scharf, R E; Witt, I; Ruzicka, T

    1997-02-01

    Deep venous thromboses, in particular when recurrent, can be associated with chronic venous leg ulcers. Such complications are often seen in dermatology departments and frequently represent a therapeutic problem. Resistance to activated protein C (APCR) has recently been identified as the most frequent coagulation defect associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. In most cases, APCR is caused by a point mutation in the factor V gene which results in an impaired inactivation of activated factor V (Va). As a consequence of this, an important anti-coagulant mechanism in the physiological balance of the hemostatic system is abolished. This autosomal dominantly inherited genetic defects affects about 5% of the general population. In this article we draw attention to the existence of this recently identified, genetically determined risk factor for venous thrombosis, describe recent diagnostic developments and discuss therapeutic options. PMID:9173065

  11. The Typical Presentation Spectrum of Deep Vein Thrombosis Associated with Inferior Vena Cava Malformations

    PubMed Central

    El Lakis, Mustapha A.; Chamieh, Jad

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare and underreported. They can be a risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) as a result of inadequate venous drainage of the lower extremities through collateral circulation. The significant number of cases reported in the literature highlights their importance, warranting investigating their existence in younger individuals with idiopathic DVT of the lower extremities and pelvic veins. In this systematic review, we depict the typical presentation of IVC malformations, their management, and the management of their associated DVT. PMID:27478635

  12. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Complicated by Vascular Erosion in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, Brian P; Farrow, Kathryn N; Kim, Stan; Hunter, Catherine J

    2016-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are widely used in the pediatric population, and their use continues to grow in popularity. These catheters provide a reliable source of venous access to neonatal patients but can also be the cause of life-threatening complications. There are several well-documented complications such as infections, catheter thrombosis, vascular extravasations, and fractured catheters. However, the complication of vascular erosion into the pleural space using both small and silicone-based catheters is rarely described. After obtaining institutional review board approval, we identified 4 cases to review of PICCs complicated by vascular erosions in the past 2 years. Herein, we also review the current literature of PICC complications. Getting the catheter tip as close to the atrial-caval junction as possible and confirmation of this placement are of the utmost importance. The thick wall of the vena cava near the atrium seems to be less likely to perforate; in addition, this position provides increased volume and turbulence to help dilute the hyperosmolar fluid, which seems to also be a factor in this complication. A daily screening chest x-ray in patients with upper extremity PICCs and ongoing parenteral nutrition (PN) are not necessary at this time given the overall low rate of vascular erosion and concerns regarding excessive radiation exposure in pediatric populations. However, a low threshold for chest x-ray imaging in patients with even mild respiratory symptoms in the setting of upper extremity PN is recommended. PMID:25700180

  13. [Phlebography in chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities. Technic and value of different tests].

    PubMed

    Genevois, A; Bolot, J E; Michel, C

    1988-01-01

    Remainder of the various phlebographic procedures in chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities: peripheral phlebography, popliteal phlebography, femoral phlebography, varicography. The techniques and the informations they provide are presented for each one of these examinations. PMID:3043478

  14. New insights into the mechanisms of action of aspirin and its use in the prevention and treatment of arterial and venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Mekaj, Ymer H; Daci, Fetije T; Mekaj, Agon Y

    2015-01-01

    The antithrombotic action of aspirin has long been recognized. Aspirin inhibits platelet function through irreversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity. Until recently, aspirin has been mainly used for primary and secondary prevention of arterial antithrombotic events. The aim of this study was to review the literature with regard to the various mechanisms of the newly discovered effects of aspirin in the prevention of the initiation and development of venous thrombosis. For this purpose, we used relevant data from the latest numerous scientific studies, including review articles, original research articles, double-blinded randomized controlled trials, a prospective combined analysis, a meta-analysis of randomized trials, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, and multicenter studies. Aspirin is used in the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE), especially the prevention of recurrent VTE in patients with unprovoked VTE who were treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Numerous studies have shown that aspirin reduces the rate of recurrent VTE in patients, following cessation of VKAs or NOACs. Furthermore, low doses of aspirin are suitable for long-term therapy in patients recovering from orthopedic or other surgeries. Aspirin is indicated for the primary and secondary prevention as well as the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, including acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, peripheral artery disease, acute ischemic stroke, and transient ischemic attack (especially in atrial fibrillation or mechanical heart valves). Aspirin can prevent or treat recurrent unprovoked VTEs as well as VTEs occurring after various surgeries or in patients with malignant disease. Recent trials have suggested that the long-term use of low-dose aspirin is effective not only in the prevention and treatment of arterial thrombosis but also in the prevention and treatment of VTE. Compared with VKAs

  15. Symptomatic Central Venous Stenosis in a Hemodialysis Patient Leading to Loss of Arteriovenous Access: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tatapudi, Vasishta S.; Spinowitz, Noam; Goldfarb, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Central venous stenosis is a well-described sequel to the placement of hemodialysis catheters in the central venous system. The presence of an ipsilateral arteriovenous fistula or graft often leads to severe venous dilatation, arm edema and recurrent infections. Vascular access thrombosis, compromised blood flow and inadequate dialysis delivery are dreaded complications that eventually render the access unusable. We report the case of a 58-year-old male hemodialysis patient who developed symptomatic central venous stenosis to illustrate the problem and review the pertinent literature. This patient developed severe enlargement of upper extremity veins due to central venous stenosis. The symptoms were refractory to multiple endovascular interventions and eventually necessitated ligation of his arteriovenous fistula. Central venous stenosis remains a pervasive problem despite advances in our understanding of its etiology and recognition of the enormity of its consequences. Due to the lack of effective therapeutic options, prevention is better than cure. PMID:24803921

  16. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish antithrombin III triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombosis, revealing insight into function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Kretz, Colin A.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Richter, Catherine E.; Tsao, Philip; Vo, Andy H.; Huarng, Michael C.; Rode, Thomas; Hu, Zhilian; Mehra, Rohit; Olson, Steven T.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic blood clotting is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, underlying deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Genetic predisposition to thrombosis is still poorly understood, and we hypothesize that there are many additional risk alleles and modifying factors remaining to be discovered. Mammalian models have contributed to our understanding of thrombosis, but are low throughput and costly. We have turned to the zebrafish, a tool for high-throughput genetic analysis. Using zinc finger nucleases, we show that disruption of the zebrafish antithrombin III (at3) locus results in spontaneous venous thrombosis in larvae. Although homozygous mutants survive into early adulthood, they eventually succumb to massive intracardiac thrombosis. Characterization of null fish revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation in larvae secondary to unopposed thrombin activity and fibrinogen consumption, which could be rescued by both human and zebrafish at3 complementary DNAs. Mutation of the human AT3-reactive center loop abolished the ability to rescue, but the heparin-binding site was dispensable. These results demonstrate overall conservation of AT3 function in zebrafish, but reveal developmental variances in the ability to tolerate excessive clot formation. The accessibility of early zebrafish development will provide unique methods for dissection of the underlying mechanisms of thrombosis. PMID:24782510

  17. [Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)].

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Simon, J

    2009-10-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is an important and frequent disease for dermatologists, phlebologists and general practitioners. There are various hypotheses for the ethiopathology in CVI, e. g. hormone receptors and impairments concerning the venous contraction or relaxation of the vessel wall and the venous valves might play an important role. At the moment, colour doppler-duplex sonography seems to be the diagnostic method of choice. Modern therapeutic options include compression systems alone or in combination with topical or systemic treatment including minimal invasive methods like endovenous laser or radiofrequency obliteration or foam sclerotherapy. PMID:19826982

  18. Management of subclavian-axillary vein thrombosis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hicken, Gary J.; Ameli, F. Michael

    1998-01-01

    Objective To study, by literature review, the management of subclavian-axillary vein thrombosis (SAVT) and to make recommendations. Data sources The MEDLINE database and cross-referenced articles. Study selection Key words subclavian-axillary vein thrombosis, venous thrombosis, Paget–Schroetter syndrome, anticoagulation, and thrombolysis were used to extract articles related to SAVT. Data extraction Independent extraction of articles by 2 observers. Data synthesis Although numerous studies are available in the literature, they vary widely in their patient selection, treatment methods, follow-up and conclusions. As such, the management of patients with SAVT remains controversial. Conclusions Anticoagulation remains the initial treatment of choice for acute SAVT although there is definitely a role for thrombolysis and surgery in selected cases. Surgical intervention should be reserved for patients in whom there is a specific indication. Since chronic symptoms depend largely on the etiology of the disease, treatment should be tailored to address the causative factors. A multicentre, prospective study is necessary to evaluate the optimum management strategies for patients with SAVT. PMID:9492744

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Venous Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of acute and chronic iliac vein occlusions has proven to be safe and effective. Recanalization of chronic occlusions with balloon angioplasty and stenting can re-establish normal venous flow in the iliac veins and the IVC and relieve symptoms in the majority of treated patients. CDT with recanalization and stenting of underlying chronically obstructed iliofemoral segments is becoming the treatment of choice for patients with acute iliofemoral thrombosis, as anticoagulation and compression therapy alone are not satisfactory in preventing PTS. The new treatment modalities offer stimulating options for a patient group that is not adequately treated, neither by medical nor open surgical therapy. The substantial effort and additional costs of endovascular treatment appear to be justified by the encouraging mid-term results both for patients with acute and chronic occlusive iliofemoral disease. However, multi-center randomized prospective studies are required to further validate the role of these techniques. PMID:23555345

  20. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases resistance to venous return in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.W.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C.

    1987-05-01

    To examine mechanisms by which administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) decreases venous return, the authors compared the hemodynamic effects of ANP furosemide (FU), and hexamethonium (HEX) with those of vehicle (VE) in anesthetized rats. Compared with VE, ANP reduced mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and cardiac index and increased calculated resistance to venous return. /sup 141/Ce-labeled microspheres were used to determine cardiac output. Mean circulatory filling pressure, distribution of blood flow between splanchnic organs and skeletal muscles, and total peripheral resistance remained unchanged. FU increased urine output similar to that of ANP, yet produced no hemodynamic changes, dissociating diuresis, and decreased cardiac output. HEX lowered arterial pressure through a reduction in total peripheral resistance without altering cardiac output or resistance to venous return. The results confirm previous findings that ANP decreases cardiac output through a reduction in venous return and suggest that this results partly from increased resistance to venous return and not from venodilation or distribution of blood flow.