Sample records for periscopes

  1. 30. DETAIL OF PERISCOPE SHOWING EYEPIECE AND FINE FOCUS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. DETAIL OF PERISCOPE SHOWING EYEPIECE AND FINE FOCUS ON LEFT; CONTROL HANDLES IN CENTER; WHEEL FOR ROTATING PERISCOPE AT BOTTOM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. 29. VIEW OF 1959 KOLLMORGEN BUNKER PERISCOPE LOCATED IN NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW OF 1959 KOLLMORGEN BUNKER PERISCOPE LOCATED IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM. NOTE SCHRADER VALVE ABOVE HANDLE ON RIGHT SIDE OF PERISCOPE. MONITOR LABELED '1-FLAMEBUCKET' IN BACKGROUND TO LEFT OF PERISCOPE. DIGITAL COUNTDOWN AND HOLD CLOCKS IMMEDIATELY ABOVE MONITOR. ANOTHER DIGITAL COUNTDOWN CLOCK AND THE MILITARY TIME CLOCK ON NORTH WALL BENEATH THE MONITOR. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. Periscope: Looking into learning in best-practices physics classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherr, Rachel; Goertzen, Renee Michelle

    2015-04-01

    Periscope is a set of instructional materials designed to support university physics instructors - including teaching assistants, learning assistants, and faculty - in learning to notice and interpret classroom events the way an accomplished teacher does. Periscope is organized into short lessons that highlight significant questions in the teaching and learning of physics, such as ``How do I bring out students' physics ideas?'' and ``Does it matter if students are unhappy in my class?'' Lessons are centered on captioned video episodes of introductory physics students in best-practices classrooms. By watching and discussing authentic teaching events, instructors enrich their experience with noticing and interpreting student behavior and practice applying lessons learned about teaching to actual teaching situations. Periscope also gives instructors a view of other institutions' transformed courses, which can support and expand the instructors' vision of their own instructional improvement and support the transfer of course developments among faculty. Periscope materials are free to educators.

  4. 8. NORTH PART OF ROOF, WITH PERISCOPES ALSO SHOWING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NORTH PART OF ROOF, WITH PERISCOPES ALSO SHOWING WEST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 4. DETAIL SHOWING PERISCOPE AND SHIELDED WINDOWS ON EAST SIDE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL SHOWING PERISCOPE AND SHIELDED WINDOWS ON EAST SIDE, NORTH PART. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. 11. CONTROL ROOM INTERIOR, SHOWING SEVERAL PERISCOPES. Looking north along ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. CONTROL ROOM INTERIOR, SHOWING SEVERAL PERISCOPES. Looking north along west wall. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 32. DETAIL OF PRESSURE GAUGE INSTALLED ON BUNKER PERISCOPE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. DETAIL OF PRESSURE GAUGE INSTALLED ON BUNKER PERISCOPE IN 1991 - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. Development of the Endo-Periscope.

    PubMed

    2001-11-01

    The indirect method of observing and manipulating impairs the depth perception and eye-hand coordination of a laparoscopic surgeon. Important factors that impair depth perception are absence of shadows in endoscopic camera pictures and a restricted ability to observe organs from different sides. One important factor that impairs eye-hand coordination is the unnatural endoscopic line-of-sight, which results in a misorientation between the surgeon's hand movements and the instrument movements on the screen. In order to solve these problems, a new type of steerable endoscope was developed by close cooperation between the Delft University of Technology and the Tokyo Institute of Technology. The endoscope, called Endo-Periscope, is designed for use in combination with a miniature camera on the tip. Shadows are introduced by a light source on the shaft. The steerable tip, which can move in six degrees of freedom (DoF), can be used to observe anatomic structures from the side and to eliminate misorientations. The steerable tip is controlled by the handgrip via a spatial parallelogram mechanism. The handgrip contains an arrow that points always in the direction of the camera's line-of-sight. This provides intuitive control of the tip, showing how the camera is oriented in the abdominal cavity. The tip contains a new kind of spring that enables the tip to bend over 180° within a very small bending radius. We have applied for two international patents to cover the construction of the Endo-Periscope and the spring in the tip. PMID:16754035

  9. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  10. Mobile Interaction with Remote Worlds: The Acoustic Periscope

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Justinian Rosca; Sandra Sudarsky; Radu Balan; Dorin Comaniciu

    2001-01-01

    Strictly speaking, a periscope is an optical device that allows one to view and navigate the external environment. The acoustic peri- scope is a metaphor for mobile interaction that transparently ex- ploits audio\\/speech to navigate and provide an unobstructed scene in a real or virtual world. We aim at both true mobility - no strings or devices should be attached

  11. Submarine periscope thermal imaging: its evolution in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, George R.

    1996-06-01

    The first submarine periscope to carry a thermal imaging sensor started sea trials in 1978. As a leading EO company and the sole supplier of periscopes to the Royal Navy since 1917, Pilkington Optronics (Barr & Stroud) has led the evolution of this technology in the UK. As is often the case, the evolutionary path has been IR detector technology- led. The first operational periscope TI system (1981) used a serial/parallel array of first generation photoconductive detectors operating in the LWIR (8 - 12 micrometer) waveband. The advent of SPRITE detectors in the 1980s opened the way to greatly improved performance within a reduced space volume, culminating in 1993 with the entry into fleet service of the SPRITE-based IR028 modular system for Vanguard, the new class of RN ballistic submarines. Today, second generation focal plane array detectors, along with the concept of the non-hull penetrating optronics mast, are ready to revolutionize periscope TI. The Pilkington Optronics CM10 Optronics Mast, presently under development, has been bid for the next class of RN submarines, Trafalgar Batch 2. CM10 exists in two versions, allowing the user to choose the operational waveband most suited to his operational needs. The sensor in the LWIR version is the PO high definition thermal imager (HDTI), which makes optimum use of SPRITEs to achieve very high performance within a compact space. The MWIR version features dual-band (TV plus 3 - 5 micrometer) optics viewing through a single pressure window; the TI sensor is based on a microscanned CMT FPA, yielding high spatial resolution and thermal sensitivity with small aperture optics.

  12. Periscope: Looking into learning in best-practices physics classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherr, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    Periscope is a set of materials to support university instructors in observing, discussing, and reflecting on best practices in university instruction. Periscope is organized into short ``video workshops,'' each introducing a significant topic in the teaching and learning of physics, such as formative assessment or cooperative learning. The workshops are appropriate for university professors, two-year college faculty, graduate student teaching assistants, and undergraduate learning assistants. Key topics in teaching and learning are introduced through captioned video episodes of introductory physics students in the classroom, chosen to prompt collaborative discussion. Video episodes from exemplary sites (including the University of Maryland, University of Colorado - Boulder, Harvard University, and Florida International University) showcase a variety of research-tested instructional formats such as Peer Instruction and Tutorials in Introductory Physics. Discussion questions prompt participants who view the episode to reflect on their pedagogical beliefs, on their own practice, and on the results of physics education research. Periscope materials may be flexibly adapted for settings ranging from brief introductory sessions to all-day workshops or weekly meetings.

  13. Symmetric periscope for concentric beam configuration in an ultra-high precision laser interferometric beam launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Lawrence L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An optical component especially suited for common path heterodyne interferometry comprises a symmetric dual-periscope configuration. Each periscope is substantially identical to the other with regard to certain design aspects. The resulting design is an optical component that is highly stable with variations in temperature and angular deviations.

  14. IET control building (TAN620). remains of periscope connections and control ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET control building (TAN-620). remains of periscope connections and control console at far west wall of control room. facing westerly. INEEL negative no. HD-21-2-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. 31. DETAIL OF MANUFACTURER'S PLATE ON BUNKER PERISCOPE IN SLC3W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. DETAIL OF MANUFACTURER'S PLATE ON BUNKER PERISCOPE IN SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. NIF Periscope Wall Modal Study Comparison of Results for 2 FEA Models with 2 Modal Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Eli, M W; Gerhard, M A; Lee, C L; Sommer, S C; Woehrle, T G

    2000-10-26

    This report summarizes experimentally and numerically determined modal properties for one of the reinforced concrete end walls of the NIF Periscope Support Structure in Laser Bay 1. Two methods were used to determine these modal properties: (1) Computational finite-element analyses (modal extraction process); and (2) Experimental modal analysis based on measured test data. This report also includes experimentally determined modal properties for a prototype LM3/Polarizer line-replaceable unit (LRU) and a prototype PEPC LRU. Two important parameters, used during the design phase, are validated through testing [ref 1]. These parameters are the natural frequencies and modal damping (of the system in question) for the first several global modes of vibration. Experimental modal testing provides these modal values, along with the corresponding mode shapes. Another important parameter, the input excitation (expected during normal operation of the NIF laser system) [ref 1], can be verified by performing a series of ambient vibration measurements in the vicinity of the particular system (or subsystem) of interest. The topic of ambient input excitation will be covered in a separate report. Due to the large mass of the Periscope Pedestal, it is difficult to excite the entire series of Periscope Pedestal Walls all at once. It was decided that the experimental modal tests would be performed on just one Periscope End Wall in Laser Bay 1. Experimental modal properties for the Periscope End Wall have been used to validate and update the FE analyses. Results from the analyses and modal tests support the conclusion that the Periscope Pedestal will not exceed the stability budget, which is described in reference 1. The results of the modal tests for the Periscope End Wall in Laser Bay 1 have provided examples of modal properties that can be derived from future modal tests of the entire Periscope Assembly (excluding the LRU's). This next series of larger modal tests can be performed after the support structure for the Periscope Assembly has been completed. There are five optical elements in the Periscope Assembly: PEPC; Polarizer; LM3; LM2; and the Periscope Light Source. All of these optical elements have stability requirements except for the PEPC. During the Title II Design phase, two prototypes of the LM3/Polarizer LRU were used in two different series of modal tests [ref 2,3]. A similar series of modal tests were conducted on a prototype of the PEPC LRU. The results of the modal tests were used to verify the modal properties assumed for use in the corresponding finite-element analyses.

  17. Periscope-camera system for visible and infrared imaging diagnostics on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Dimock, D.L.; Hayes, S.; Long, D.; Lowrence, J.L.; Mastrocola, V.; Renda, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Young, K.M.

    1985-05-01

    An optical diagnostic consisting of a periscope which relays images of the torus interior to an array of cameras is used on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to view plasma discharge phenomena and inspect vacuum vessel internal structures in both visible and near-infrared wavelength regions. Three periscopes view through 20-cm-diameter fused-silica windows which are spaced around the torus midplane to provide a viewing coverage of approximately 75% of the vacuum vessel internal surface area. The periscopes have f/8 optics and motor-driven controls for focusing, magnification selection (5/sup 0/, 20/sup 0/, and 60/sup 0/ field of view), elevation and azimuth setting, mast rotation, filter selection, iris aperture, and viewing port selection. The four viewing ports on each periscope are equipped with multiple imaging devices which include: (1) an inspection eyepiece, (2) standard (RCA TC2900) and fast (RETICON) framing rate television cameras, (3) a PtSi CCD infrared imaging camera, (4) a 35 mm Nikon F3 still camera, or (5) a 16 mm Locam II movie camera with variable framing up to 500 fps. Operation of the periscope-camera system is controlled either locally or remotely through a computer-CAMAC interface. A description of the equipment and examples of its application are presented.

  18. Endovascular aneurysm repair using the periscope graft technique for thoracic aortic anastomotic pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Kenichi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Shinya

    2013-04-01

    Replacement of an artificial graft in a redo lateral thoracotomy is extremely difficult with a high risk of lung injury. Endovascular intervention may be an ideal option in such conditions, as in the following case. A 75-year old man with a history of coronary artery bypass graft surgery developed a proximal anastomotic pseudoaneurysm 1 year after undergoing artificial proximal descending aorta replacement surgery. Thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair was performed successfully using the periscope graft technique to preserve the flow into the left subclavian artery from the distal side of the aortic stent graft. Since the patient had coronary artery bypass grafting, debranching of the left subclavian artery was considered too risky. Using the periscope graft technique, the pseudoaneurysm was successfully repaired preserving the left subclavian artery patency, thus obviating a side-to-side subclavian artery crossover bypass. PMID:23257472

  19. Personalized and contextualized information in self-management systems for chronically ill patients (PERISCOPE)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Laverman; J. H. M. Schonk; P. J. M. van der Boog; M. A. Neerincx

    2010-01-01

    Motivation -- It is becoming necessary to seriously consider self-management in the treatment of chronically ill patients. A number of self-management applications have already been developed, but an explicit theoretical model is lacking. The PERISCOPE-project aims to provide (1) a conceptual framework for self-management systems aimed at lifestyle changes, (2) guidelines for implementing personalization and contextualization to enhance self-management skills

  20. PPPL3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation

    E-print Network

    PPPL­3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC­426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation Applications using Reflective Optics S. S. Medley Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P. O. Box­tritium operation, refractive optical components exposed to neutron and gamma radiation can be subject

  1. PPPL-3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC-426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation

    E-print Network

    PPPL-3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC-426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation Applications using Reflective Optics S. S. Medley Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P. O. Box-tritium operation, refractive optical components exposed to neutron and gamma radiation can be subject

  2. Representing distributed cognition in complex systems: how a submarine returns to periscope depth.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Neville A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) method as a means of modelling distributed cognition in systems. The method comprises three network models (i.e. task, social and information) and their combination. This method was applied to the interactions between the sound room and control room in a submarine, following the activities of returning the submarine to periscope depth. This paper demonstrates three main developments in EAST. First, building the network models directly, without reference to the intervening methods. Second, the application of analysis metrics to all three networks. Third, the combination of the aforementioned networks in different ways to gain a broader understanding of the distributed cognition. Analyses have shown that EAST can be used to gain both qualitative and quantitative insights into distributed cognition. Future research should focus on the analyses of network resilience and modelling alternative versions of a system. PMID:23510256

  3. Endovascular Treatment of a Symptomatic Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Chimney and Periscope Techniques for Total Visceral and Renal Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Cariati, Maurizio, E-mail: cariati.maurizio@sancarlo.mi.it [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Sciences (Italy); Mingazzini, Pietro; Dallatana, Raffaello [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy); Rossi, Umberto G. [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Sciences (Italy); Settembrini, Alberto [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Università degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Santuari, Davide [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy)

    2013-05-02

    Conventional endovascular therapy of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with involving visceral and renal arteries is limited by the absence of a landing zone for the aortic endograft. Solutions have been proposed to overcome the problem of no landing zone; however, most of them are not feasible in urgent and high-risk patients. We describe a case that was successfully treated by total endovascular technique with a two-by-two chimney-and-periscope approach in a patient with acute symptomatic type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with supra-anastomotic aneurysm formation involving the renal and visceral arteries and a pseduaneurismatic sac localized in the left ileopsoas muscle.

  4. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Brechtel, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.brechtel@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Ketelsen, Dominik [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Endisch, Andrea [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany); Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  5. Discover Jacksonville | Ultimate Jaguars | First Coast Fugitives | Internet Directory | Jax2Go Wireless Water's Edge magazine | H for Health magazine | Jax Air News | Mayport Mirror | Kings Bay Periscope | Ultimate Yellow Pages

    E-print Network

    Richardson, Martin C.

    Wireless Water's Edge magazine | H for Health magazine | Jax Air News | Mayport Mirror | Kings Bay BRICK HOME Extraordinary 3Br, 2Ba, bri... MOVE TODAY! Luxury awaits you with 4BR, 3BA, 268... HOME READY

  6. Innovative optronics for the new PUMA tank

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Fritze; M. Münzberg; H. Schlemmer

    2010-01-01

    The new PUMA tank is equipped with a fully stabilized 360° periscope. The thermal imager in the periscope is identical to the imager in the gunner sight. All optronic images of the cameras can be fed on every electronic display within the tank. The thermal imagers operate with a long wave 384x288 MCT starring focal plane array. The high quantum

  7. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EARTH MOUND. NOTE THE RECTANGULAR OPENINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EARTH MOUND. NOTE THE RECTANGULAR OPENINGS USED FOR OBSERVATION EQUIPMENT AND PERISCOPE TOPS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Weston, Ken

    , math and language arts. Inquiry 8: Binoculars, Periscopes, and Kaleidoscopes There is information and kaleidoscopes. Information on how to make some of these optical instruments is included. Inquiry 9: 3D Images

  9. 3. VIEW OF ESCAPE TUNNEL IN NORTH FACE OF LAUNCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF ESCAPE TUNNEL IN NORTH FACE OF LAUNCH OPERATIONS BUILDING. BUNKER PERISCOPE VISIBLE ABOVE RIGHT CORNER OF TUNNEL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. Experimental evaluation of achromatic phase shifters for mid-infrared starlight suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gappinger, Robert O.; Diaz, Rosemary T.; Ksendzov, Alexander; Lawson, Peter R.; Lay, Oliver P.; Liewer, Kurt M.; Loya, Frank M.; Martin, Stefan R.; Serabyn, Eugene; Wallace, James K.

    2009-02-01

    Phase shifters are a key component of nulling interferometry, one of the potential routes to enabling the measurement of faint exoplanet spectra. Here, three different achromatic phase shifters are evaluated experimentally in the mid-infrared, where such nulling interferometers may someday operate. The methods evaluated include the use of dispersive glasses, a through-focus field inversion, and field reversals on reflection from antisymmetric flat-mirror periscopes. All three approaches yielded deep, broadband, mid-infrared nulls, but the deepest broadband nulls were obtained with the periscope architecture. In the periscope system, average null depths of 4×10-5 were obtained with a 25% bandwidth, and 2×10-5>/SUP> with a 20% bandwidth, at a central wavelength of 9.5 ?m. The best short term nulls at 20% bandwidth were approximately 9×10-6, in line with error budget predictions and the limits of the current generation of hardware.

  11. 25. VIEW OF ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR NORTHEAST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR NORTHEAST CORNER OF SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM. CONSOLE INCLUDES TELEVISION CONTROL, FACILITIES, AND VEHICLE (MISSILE) POWER PANELS. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT IN BACKGROUND: MILITARY-TIME CLOCK, BASE OF BUNKER PERISCOPE, AND STAIRS TO ESCAPE TUNNEL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. MARCH/APRil 2010 www.tufts.edu/hr/index

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    or sexual orientation. Diversity in the workplace is the recognition and full utilization of everyone Colleagues, This issue of Periscope is dedicated to diver- sity at Tufts. Diversity is one of our core val- ues; as President Bacow has said, "A great university must embrace diversity in every possible

  13. 1990 waste tank inspection program

    SciTech Connect

    McNatt, F.G.

    1990-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Tank conditions are evaluated by inspection using periscopes, still photography, and video systems for visual imagery. Inspections made in 1990 are the subject of this report.

  14. 1990 waste tank inspection program

    SciTech Connect

    McNatt, F.G.

    1990-12-31

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Tank conditions are evaluated by inspection using periscopes, still photography, and video systems for visual imagery. Inspections made in 1990 are the subject of this report.

  15. IET control building (TAN620). control room. facing north. control consoles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET control building (TAN-620). control room. facing north. control consoles have been removed. Openings in floor were communication and control conduits. Periscope controls at center left (see also HAER No. ID-33-E-20). INEEL negative no. HD-21-3-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. IET. Construction view of control building (TAN620). Camera facing east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Construction view of control building (TAN-620). Camera facing east, towards west wall of control building. Structure at left shows progress forming the personnel tunnel that will connect control building to coupling station. Note two round openings for periscopes near ladder at right. Date: August 20, 1954. INEEL negative no. 11709 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. 3. EAST SIDE FROM ATOP TUNNEL, SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAST SIDE FROM ATOP TUNNEL, SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS AND PERISCOPE FACING TO TEST STAND 1-3. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. DETAIL VIEW OF THE WEST INTERIOR WALL OF THE EXTREME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THE WEST INTERIOR WALL OF THE EXTREME NORTH (CONTROL) TANK. NOTE THE TWO PERISCOPES IN THE UPPER PART OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. ALSO NOTE THE CONTROL PANEL IN THE MIDDLE OF THE PHOTO, THIS WAS USED TO CONTROL THE REMOTE 'FIRE-EX' WATER NOZZLES. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. Los AlamosLos Alamos NATIONAL LABORATORYNATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Maqueda, Ricardo J. "Ricky"

    imaging * IR periscope in Section A * View from top down * Mid IR range: 3-5 µm * Standard video or 12-bit in TFTR Clips can be seen through the WWW at: http://wsx.lanl.gov/ricky/disrupt.htm · Moving, coherent

  20. 2. VIEW OF WEST FACE OF LAUNCH OPERATIONS BUILDING. BUNKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF WEST FACE OF LAUNCH OPERATIONS BUILDING. BUNKER PERISCOPE VISIBLE ON NORTH END OF ROOF. ESCAPE TUNNEL AND CABLE SHED VISIBLE ON NORTH FACE. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  1. 4. VIEW OF CABLE SHED AND CABLE TRAY EMANATING FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF CABLE SHED AND CABLE TRAY EMANATING FROM NORTH FACE OF LAUNCH OPERATIONS BUILDING. TOPS OF BUNKER PERISCOPE AND FLAGPOLE ON ROOF OF LAUNCH OPERATIONS BUILDING IN BACKGROUND - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. C-III flow measurements with a coherence imaging spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, T. R.; Allen, S. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Howard, J. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-10-15

    This work describes a coherence imaging spectrometer capable of making spatially resolved CIII flow measurements in the DIII-D lower divertor. The spectrometer exploits a periscope view of the plasma to produce line-of-sight averaged velocity measurements of CIII. From these chord averaged flow measurements, a 2D poloidal cross section of the CIII flow is tomographically reconstructed. Details of the diagnostic setup, acquired data, and data analysis will be presented, along with prospects for future applications.

  3. Understanding theUnderstanding the Market of MetroMarket of Metro

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Understanding theUnderstanding the Market of MetroMarket of Metro Transit'sTransit's Ridership-Geneidy University of Minnesota #12;#12;#12;Understanding theUnderstanding the Market of MetroMarket of Metro Transit in 2001 by Periscope (Metro Transit) #12;0.700.01-0.12-0.020.11-0.03How long have you used our bus service

  4. A model for the submarine depthkeeping team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, J. R.; Best, J. F.; Bozzi, P. J.; Kleinman, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The most difficult task the depthkeeping team must face occurs during periscope-depth operations during which they may be required to maintain a submarine several hundred feet long within a foot of ordered depth and within one-half degree of ordered pitch. The difficulty is compounded by the facts that wave generated forces are extremely high, depth and pitch signals are very noisy and submarine speed is such that overall dynamics are slow. A mathematical simulation of the depthkeeping team based on the optimal control models is described. A solution of the optimal team control problem with an output control restriction (limited display to each controller) is presented.

  5. Design considerations, tooling, and equipment for remote in-service inspection of radioactive piping and pressure-vessel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swannack, D.L.; Schmoker, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes results obtained in use of remotely-operated nondestructive testing (NDT) equipment for inspection of reactor-system components. Experience obtained in operating the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has provided a basis for field verification of remote NDT equipment designs and has suggested development improvements. Remote Viewing and data gathering systems used include periscopes, borescopes, fiberscopes, hybrid borescopes/fiberscopes, and closed circuit television. A summary of design consideration for inspection equipment and power plant design is presented to achieve improved equipment operation and reduction of plant maintenance downtime.

  6. A survey of ATL-compatible radiometer antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, A. W.

    1975-01-01

    A survey was made of antennas suitable for remote sensing of the earth's surface, in particular the world ocean, by means of microwave radiometers operating in the 1 to 26 GHz frequency region and carried on board the shuttle-launched advanced technology laboratory. Array antennas are found to be unattractive and unsuited to the task. Reflectors, including Cassegrain and offset types, as well as horn-reflectors are possible candidates but all have shortcomings which impair the accuracy of measurement. Horns of the corrugated type have excellent electrical characteristics. Although they are physically very large and will require development of suitable deployment mechanisms, they appear to be valid candidates for the task. The evolution of the periscope antenna is outlined, and it is shown to possess nearly ideal electrical characteristics for the intended application. Its only shortcoming is that the feed horn creates aperture blocking; there is no blocking due to struts or any other source. The periscope antenna is recommended for ATL radiometry.

  7. Transverse Pupil Shifts for Adaptive Optics Non-Common Path Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.

    2011-01-01

    A simple new way of obtaining absolute wavefront measurements with a laboratory Fizeau interferometer was recently devised. In that case, the observed wavefront map is the difference of two cavity surfaces, those of the mirror under test and of an unknown reference surface on the Fizeau s transmission flat. The absolute surface of each can be determined by applying standard wavefront reconstruction techniques to two grids of absolute surface height differences of the mirror under test, obtained from pairs of measurements made with slight transverse shifts in X and Y. Adaptive optics systems typically provide an actuated periscope between wavefront sensor (WFS) and commonmode optics, used for lateral registration of deformable mirror (DM) to WFS. This periscope permits independent adjustment of either pupil or focal spot incident on the WFS. It would be used to give the required lateral pupil motion between common and non-common segments, analogous to the lateral shifts of the two phase contributions in the lab Fizeau. The technique is based on a completely new approach to calibration of phase. It offers unusual flexibility with regard to the transverse spatial frequency scales probed, and will give results quite quickly, making use of no auxiliary equipment other than that built into the adaptive optics system. The new technique may be applied to provide novel calibration information about other optical systems in which the beam may be shifted transversely in a controlled way.

  8. Examination of the first irradiated LOFT fuel module

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.A.; Olsen, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    The first Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) center fuel module was nondestructively examined in order to assess any changes after power range testing and three large-break loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs). The examination consisted of evaluation of LOCE measurement data; measurement of withdrawal forces during removal of the module from the reactor; poolside examination of the exposed fuel module surfaces, using an underwater periscope, 35-mm camera, and closed circuit television; and poolside measurements of the rod-to-rod spacing, using a Sulo probe. The performance of the equipment is assessed from the results of the examination. Color standards are required for underwater color photography, and fuel rod deflection must be considered in evaluting rod-to-rod spaces.

  9. Overview of Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Carling; Gurpreet Singh

    1999-04-26

    The objectives of this paper are to describe the ongoing projects in diesel engine combustion research at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to detail recent experimental results. The approach we are employing is to assemble experimental hardware that mimic realistic engine geometries while enabling optical access. For example, we are using multi-cylinder engine heads or one-cylinder versions of production heads mated to one-cylinder engine blocks. Optical access is then obtained through a periscope in an exhaust valve, quartz windows in the piston crown, windows in spacer plates just below the head, or quartz cylinder liners. We have three diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, and a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative diesel fuels.

  10. Optical system design, analysis, and production for advanced technology systems; Proceedings of the Meeting, Innsbruck, Austria, Apr. 15-17, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Robert E. (editor); Rogers, Philip J. (editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference considers topics in the fields of optical systems design software, the design and analysis of optical systems, illustrative cases of advanced optical system design, the integration of optical designs into greater systems, and optical fabrication and testing techniques. Attention is given to an extended range diffraction-based merit function for lens design optimization, an assessment of technologies for stray light control and evaluation, the automated characterization of IR systems' spatial resolution, a spectrum of design techniques based on aberration theory, a three-field IR telescope, a large aperture zoom lens for 16-mm motion picture cameras, and the use of concave holographic gratings as monochomators. Also discussed are the use of aspherics in optical systems, glass choice procedures for periscope design, the fabrication and testing of unconventional optics, low mass mirrors for large optics, and the diamond grinding of optical surfaces on aspheric lens molds.

  11. High-resolution, continuous field-of-view (FOV), non-rotating imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance L. (Inventor); Stirbl, Robert C. (Inventor); Aghazarian, Hrand (Inventor); Padgett, Curtis W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A high resolution CMOS imaging system especially suitable for use in a periscope head. The imaging system includes a sensor head for scene acquisition, and a control apparatus inclusive of distributed processors and software for device-control, data handling, and display. The sensor head encloses a combination of wide field-of-view CMOS imagers and narrow field-of-view CMOS imagers. Each bank of imagers is controlled by a dedicated processing module in order to handle information flow and image analysis of the outputs of the camera system. The imaging system also includes automated or manually controlled display system and software for providing an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) that displays a full 360-degree field of view and allows the user or automated ATR system to select regions for higher resolution inspection.

  12. Submarine imaging systems: developing improved capabilities and technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duryea, David M.; Lindstrom, Carl E.; Sayegh, Riad

    2008-04-01

    The US Navy sumbmarine Imaging and Electronic Warfare Program Office, NAVSEA PMS435, is constantly pursuing new technologies and enhanced capabilities in order to allow the submarine fleet to meet quick reaction mission requirements, anticipated future threats and to provide for improvements in overall situational awareness. NAVSEA PMS 435 is actively pursuing the development of applicable technologies and capabilities in the following areas: Periscope Headwindow Watershedding, Mid-Wave Infrared, Low Cost Expendable Imaging Sensors (LCES), Auto Detection and Tracking (ADAT), Auto Target Recognition (ATR), 360 Degree Imaging Systems, and Image Stitching Algorithms. This presentation provides a status of where NAVSEA PMS 435 is in regard to the development of these technologies and provides an opportunity to share ideas as to how they might be more effectively developed by leveraging information and other resources available in other government agencies, commercial partners and academia.

  13. Opto-mechanical designs for two special-purpose objective lens assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Paul R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Key features of the optomechanical designs for two high-performance objective-lens assemblies of similar focal lengths and relative apertures, but significantly different configurations and applications are discussed. The first lens is a 25.4-cm EFL, f/1.5 catadioptric lens designed for a + or - 2.8-degree field and intended for use with a detector array in a spaceborne star mapper. The second example is a 22.8-cm EFL, f/1.5 refractor covering a + or - 10-degree field, intended for distant target observation in an airborne low-light-level visual periscope and featuring an integral laser channel for target designation and ranging. The logic behind critical materials choices and the techniques applied in mounting the optics in their mechanical surrounds are described.

  14. Postoperative pulmonary complications updating.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Carreira, S; le Saché, F; Raux, M

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are a major contributor to the overall risk of surgery. PPCs affect the length of hospital stay and are associated with a higher in-hospital mortality. PPCs are even the leading cause of death either in cardiothoracic surgery but also in non-cardiothoracic surgery. Thus, reliable PPCs risk stratification tools are the key issue of clinical decision making in the perioperative period. When the risk is clearly identified related to the patient according the ARISCAT score and/or the type of surgery (mainly thoracic and abdominal), low-cost preemptive interventions improve outcomes and new strategies can be developed to prevent this risk. The EuSOS, PERISCOPE and IMPROVE studies demonstrated this care optimization by risk identification first, then risk stratification and new care (multifaceted) strategies implementation allowing a decrease in PPCs mortality by optimizing the clinical path of the patient and the care resources. PMID:25168300

  15. Hemispherical Field-of-View Above-Water Surface Imager for Submarines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Farr, William H.; Dannecker, John D.

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses solutions to the problem of submarines having to rise above water to detect airplanes in the general vicinity. Two solutions are provided, in which a sensor is located just under the water surface, and at a few to tens of meter depth under the water surface. The first option is a Fish Eye Lens (FEL) digital-camera combination, situated just under the water surface that will have near-full- hemisphere (360 azimuth and 90 elevation) field of view for detecting objects on the water surface. This sensor can provide a three-dimensional picture of the airspace both in the marine and in the land environment. The FEL is coupled to a camera and can continuously look at the entire sky above it. The camera can have an Active Pixel Sensor (APS) focal plane array that allows logic circuitry to be built directly in the sensor. The logic circuitry allows data processing to occur on the sensor head without the need for any other external electronics. In the second option, a single-photon sensitive (photon counting) detector-array is used at depth, without the need for any optics in front of it, since at this location, optical signals are scattered and arrive at a wide (tens of degrees) range of angles. Beam scattering through clouds and seawater effectively negates optical imaging at depths below a few meters under cloudy or turbulent conditions. Under those conditions, maximum collection efficiency can be achieved by using a non-imaging photon-counting detector behind narrowband filters. In either case, signals from these sensors may be fused and correlated or decorrelated with other sensor data to get an accurate picture of the object(s) above the submarine. These devices can complement traditional submarine periscopes that have a limited field of view in the elevation direction. Also, these techniques circumvent the need for exposing the entire submarine or its periscopes to the outside environment.

  16. Enhancements of remote sensing for vehicle emissions in tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, G.A.; Zhang, Y.; McLaren, S.E.; Guenther, P.L.; Beaton, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    The University of Denver in cooperation with the Desert Research Institute, U.S. EPA, and General Motors Corporation have successfully adapted the University of Denver's remote sensing system for vehicle exhaust to the measurement of vehicle emissions in a tunnel environment. Two studies conducted at the Fort McHenry Tunnel in Baltimore, MD and the Tuscarora Mountain Tunnel located west of Harrisburg, PA on the Pennsylvania Turnpike are described. The difficulties associated with remote sensing in a tunnel environment have led to a number of improvements in the remote sensing technology. Due to logistics and restrictions on placement of equipment in the Fort McHenry tunnel, a prototype periscope system was employed to optimize the height of the remote sensor's infrared beam path relative to vehicle exhaust plumes. At the Tuscarora Tunnel, first-time measurements of dual lane traffic were conducted using a single source and detector and two cameras for vehicle identification. This precluded the normal practice of directing traffic into a single lane which can alter normal driving patterns.

  17. Near infrared spectroscopy of the divertor region in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Furno, I.; Wurden, G.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M. S. E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2004-10-01

    A new system for near infrared spectroscopic measurements (1.2-2.6 {mu}m) is designed for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. These measurements will provide a new window into understanding the physics of detached and/or high radiating plasmas. The system, located on top of the Alcator C-Mod concrete igloo, will view a 30x30 cm{sup 2} region of the lower divertor by means of a re-entrant 5 m long ZnSe based periscope. A McPherson 218 spectrometer will disperse the light that will then be detected by a thermoelectrically cooled InGaAs, 256-element linear image sensor. The signals from each pixel will be digitized by a 16-bit, 333 kHz analog/digital board and then transmitted over optical link to a personal computer (PC) located in Alcator C-Mod control room. The PC will remotely control the system and store the data in the MDSplus database.

  18. Impact of WWI on Relativity and Other Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2015-04-01

    Custom calls WWII the physicists' war (radar, nuclear bombs, rockets) and WWI the chemists' war (nitrogen fixation and synthetic fuels as well as poison gases). In fact both wars affected all of science profoundly. For us, hostilities began with the capture of Erwin Freundlich's German eclipse expedition to the Crrimea in August 1914. Curioiusly they had gone there to measure deflection of starlight be the sun at the half-of-GR level predicted earlier by Einstein. The end came in 1919 with the founding of the IAU (Central Powers strictly excluded; indeed Germany did not join until after WWII) and the Eddington-Dyson-Crommelin eclipse expedition that did record the deflection. In between were many deaths (Moseley and Karl Schwarzschild perhaps best know), turning of observatory optical shops to making binoculars, periscopes, etc, and twisting of careers (including probably the origin of the Hubble-Shapley enmity, when the former volunteered and the latter went directly to a job at Mt. Wilson; Lemaitre is another interesting case). There will be a small prize for the first person to identify the gentleman who refereed my second thesis paper, who served the full four years, partly in the trenches, on the German side.

  19. Development of imaging bolometers for magnetic fusion reactors (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Byron J.; Parchamy, Homaira; Ashikawa, Naoko [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kawashima, Hisato; Konoshima, Shigeru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Kostryukov, Artem Yu.; Miroshnikov, Igor V. [St. Petersburg State Technical University, St. Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Seo, Dongcheol [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Omori, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    Imaging bolometers utilize an infrared (IR) video camera to measure the change in temperature of a thin foil exposed to the plasma radiation, thereby avoiding the risks of conventional resistive bolometers related to electric cabling and vacuum feedthroughs in a reactor environment. A prototype of the IR imaging video bolometer (IRVB) has been installed and operated on the JT-60U tokamak demonstrating its applicability to a reactor environment and its ability to provide two-dimensional measurements of the radiation emissivity in a poloidal cross section. In this paper we review this development and present the first results of an upgraded version of this IRVB on JT-60U. This upgrade utilizes a state-of-the-art IR camera (FLIR/Indigo Phoenix-InSb) (3-5 {mu}m, 256x360 pixels, 345 Hz, 11 mK) mounted in a neutron/gamma/magnetic shield behind a 3.6 m IR periscope consisting of CaF{sub 2} optics and an aluminum mirror. The IRVB foil is 7 cmx9 cmx5 {mu}m tantalum. A noise equivalent power density of 300 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} is achieved with 40x24 channels and a time response of 10 ms or 23 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} for 16x12 channels and a time response of 33 ms, which is 30 times better than the previous version of the IRVB on JT-60U.

  20. Industrial and scientific applications of holographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Vera M.

    1997-05-01

    The primary mission of the Holography Laboratory organized at the Opto-Physical Research Institute (YNIIOFI, Moscow, Russia) in 1966 was application of holography techniques in metrology [1]. The following basic tasks have been successfully accomplished [2-4]: (i) theoretical analysis of sources of measurement errors; (ii) development and batch production of optical holographic devices and reference instruments for their legal certification; (iii) development of methods and means for processing measurement data; specifically, the Radon transformation is applied for calculation of spatial distribution of refractive index in transparent objects; (iv) a method and device for stroboscopic measuring of 3D reconstructed images by a "periscope" technique; (v) utilization of holographic tomography and laser interferometry; (vi) instrumentation for microwave and ultrasonic holographometry, correlation-based techniques for rejection of imperfect products and for analysis ofpulsed signals. The developed holographic instrumentation has found widespread application at various scientific and industrial enterprises in the former Soviet Union and Eastern European countries. This report represents only a small selection of the total body of work accomplished in the laboratory.

  1. ATTICA family of thermal cameras in submarine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuerbitz, Gunther; Fritze, Joerg; Hoefft, Jens-Rainer; Ruf, Berthold

    2001-10-01

    Optronics Mast Systems (US: Photonics Mast Systems) are electro-optical devices which enable a submarine crew to observe the scenery above water during dive. Unlike classical submarine periscopes they are non-hull-penetrating and therefore have no direct viewing capability. Typically they have electro-optical cameras both for the visual and for an IR spectral band with panoramic view and a stabilized line of sight. They can optionally be equipped with laser range- finders, antennas, etc. The brand name ATTICA (Advanced Two- dimensional Thermal Imager with CMOS-Array) characterizes a family of thermal cameras using focal-plane-array (FPA) detectors which can be tailored to a variety of requirements. The modular design of the ATTICA components allows the use of various detectors (InSb, CMT 3...5 ?m , CMT 7...11 ?m ) for specific applications. By means of a microscanner ATTICA cameras achieve full standard TV resolution using detectors with only 288 X 384 (US:240 X 320) detector elements. A typical requirement for Optronics-Mast Systems is a Quick- Look-Around capability. For FPA cameras this implies the need for a 'descan' module which can be incorporated in the ATTICA cameras without complications.

  2. Visual Target Tracking in the Presence of Unknown Observer Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Stephen; Lu, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Much attention has been given to the visual tracking problem due to its obvious uses in military surveillance. However, visual tracking is complicated by the presence of motion of the observer in addition to the target motion, especially when the image changes caused by the observer motion are large compared to those caused by the target motion. Techniques for estimating the motion of the observer based on image registration techniques and Kalman filtering are presented and simulated. With the effects of the observer motion removed, an additional phase is implemented to track individual targets. This tracking method is demonstrated on an image stream from a buoy-mounted or periscope-mounted camera, where large inter-frame displacements are present due to the wave action on the camera. This system has been shown to be effective at tracking and predicting the global position of a planar vehicle (boat) being observed from a single, out-of-plane camera. Finally, the tracking system has been extended to a multi-target scenario.

  3. Polarization Insights for Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-print Network

    R. R. J. Antonucci

    2001-03-02

    Optical spectropolarimetry and broadband polarimetry in other wavebands has been a key to understanding many diverse aspects of AGN. In some cases polarization is due to synchrotron radiation, and in other cases it's due to scattering. Recognition of relativistically beamed optical synchrotron emission by polarization was vital for understanding blazars (BL Lacs and Optically Violently Variable quasars), both physically and geometrically. Radio polarimetry of quiescent AGN is equally important, again for both purposes. Scattering polarization was central to the Unified Model for Seyferts, Radio Galaxies and (high ionization) Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies. It provides a periscope for viewing AGN from other directions. Finally, if we could understand its message, polarization would also provide major insights regarding the nature of the AGN "Featureless Continuum" and Broad (emission) Line Region. I point out that high ionization ULIRGs have all the exact right properties to be called Quasar 2s. Mid-IR observations generally don't penetrate to the nucleus, greatly reducing their ability to diagnose the energy source. In particular, LINER ULIRGs aren't necessarily starburst-dominated, as has been claimed.

  4. Beryllium Use in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-12-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) began operation in 1967. It makes use of a unique serpentine fuel core design and a beryllium reflector. Reactor control is achieved with rotating beryllium cylinders to which have been fastened plates of hafnium. Over time, the beryllium develops rather high helium content because of nuclear transmutations and begins to swell. The beryllium must be replaced at nominally 10-year intervals. Determination of when the replacement is made is by visual observation using a periscope to examine the beryllium surface for cracking and swelling. Disposition of the irradiated beryllium was once accomplished in the INL’s Radioactive Waste Management Complex, but that is no longer possible. Among contributing reasons are high levels of specific radioactive contaminants including transuranics. The INL is presently considering disposition pathways for this irradiated beryllium, but presently is storing it in the canal adjacent to the reactor. Numerous issues are associated with this situation including (1) Is there a need for ultra-low uranium material? (2) Is there a need to recover tritium from irradiated beryllium either because this is a strategic material resource or in preparation for disposal? (3) Is there a need to remove activation and fission products from irradiated beryllium? (4) Will there be enough material available to meet requirements for research reactors (fission and fusion)? In this paper will be discussed the present status of considerations on these issues.

  5. LG wargaming tool for effect-based operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vladimir; McCrabb, Maris

    2002-07-01

    The LG-WGT approach to EBO may be summarized as follows. 1) Causes and Effects will be defined as game state properties. 2) LG algorithms will automatically generate strategies to attain desired effects. The strategies will be generated through LG Zones. LG will model effects as properties of the game pieces and relations among the pieces and the board. 3) The overall Engagement Theater will be modeled as LG hypergame, that is several concurrent abstract board games (ABG) linked together via inter-linking mappings (ILM). LG will represent indirect effects in a related game linked with the game of interest via several ILMs. With LG-WGT, a commander will observe the entire operation as an omnipresent ghost with a virtual camera. He/she would be able to view the operation from the cockcpit of a fighter flying on a SEAD mission, from the cabin of an amphibious vehicle, through the periscope of an attack submarine, or from a virtual AWACS flying over the entire battlefield. Even a normally invisible element, like damages to adversarial infrastructure or political changes, will be made visible in virtual reality together with the chain of events causing this effect. The LG-WGT will provide explanation for all the decisions made employing probabilities of kill, integrated probabilities of survival, threshold for retreat, etc.

  6. Summary of AXAF calibration requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, E.

    1993-01-01

    The following summarizes requirements on the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) and HRMA/SI calibration. The lists of calibration measurements assume that the HRMA meets the CTT requirement that the XRCF test environment shall have not more than a 10 percent effect on the encircled energy in 1 arcsec and that it can be calibrated to 1 percent. This implies that the offloading scheme has been implemented in the HRMA. It should be remembered that there are additional calibrations needed for: aspect system; tracking; gyros; other parts of the PCAS; spacecraft timing and checks on timing accuracy for all SIs after integration in the spacecraft; ficucial lights and periscope; alignments; optical metrology data: lengths and diameters with errors on mirror elements and optical interferometer data on surface figure; and throughput and imaging stability test: an end-to-end test that can be used after the XRCF to verify that the x-ray throughput and imaging quality have not been degraded. The tables presented give a summary of the integration times for HRMA and HRMA/SI calibration.

  7. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P.; Park, Y.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.

    1999-03-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the US processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive US processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Johns Manville Corporation targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. With Combustion Technology Inc., they are developing silicide-based periscope sight tubes for the direct observation of glass melts. With Accutru International Corporation, they are developing silicide-based protective sheaths for self-verifying temperature sensors which may be used in glass furnaces and other industrial applications. The progress made on the program in this period is summarized.

  8. Optical multiple access intersatellite links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, M. A.; Matthews, N. F.; Robson, D.

    1988-03-01

    The feasibility of an optical implementation of a multiple access medium data rate data relay service on the timescale of Euro-DRS was assessed. The service requirements for the feasibility study are based on the service which, in existing or planned systems, is implemented at S band. The system should communicate simultaneously with up to 8 LEO users in orbits of radii up to 7400 km providing 8 independently agile links. On each link, it should communicate at up to 2Mb/sec, at bit error rates of 10 to the minus 6th power in the return direction (LEO to GEO). A design concept for the GEO central node was produced. Mass and power estimates were evaluated and a preliminary spacecraft accommodation study performed. The system weighs 130 kg and has a power consumption of 300 W. The optical subsystem occupies a 75 x 75 x 30 cm volume on the top floor of the spacecraft. A number of trade-offs were identified and performed in reaching the final system configuration. The system should have 1 telescope system per user, a periscope mirror configuration for coarse pointing, a single telescope for both transmit and receive, and the use of both 0.8 micron for the LEO-GEO link and 1.3 micron for GEO-LEO.

  9. Relative abundances of methane- and sulfur-oxidizing symbionts in gills of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafranski, Kamil M.; Piquet, Bérénice; Shillito, Bruce; Lallier, François H.; Duperron, Sébastien

    2015-07-01

    The deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus dominates hydrothermal vent fauna in the Azores region. The gills of this species house methane- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria that fulfill most of the mussel's nutritional requirements. Previous studies suggested that the ratio between methane- and sulfur-oxidizers could vary in response to the availability of electron donors in their environment, and this flexibility is considered a key factor in explaining the ecological success of the species. However, previous studies were based on non-isobaric recovery of specimens, with experiments at atmospheric pressure which may have induced artifacts. This study investigates the effect of pressure-related stress during recovery and experimentation on the relative abundances of bacterial symbionts. Mussel specimens were recovered for the first time using the pressure-maintaining device PERISCOP. Specimens were subsequently transferred into pressurized vessels and exposed to various chemical conditions. Using optimized fluorescence in situ hybridization-based approaches, relative abundance of symbionts were measured. Our results show that the recovery method (isobaric versus non-isobaric) does not influence the abundances of bacterial symbionts. Significant differences occur among specimens sampled from two contrasting sites. Exposure of mussels from the deeper site to sulfide and bicarbonate, and to bicarbonate alone, both resulted in a rapid and significant increase in the relative abundance of sulfur-oxidizers. Results reported herein are congruent with those from previous reports investigating mussels originating from shallow sites and kept at ambient pressure. Isobaric recovery and maintenance allowed us to perform in vivo experiments in specimens from a deeper site that could not be maintained alive at ambient pressure, and will greatly improve the chances of identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the dialogue between bathymodioline hosts and symbionts.

  10. Extinction measurements for optical band gap determination of soot in a series of nitrogen-diluted ethylene/air non-premixed flames.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Erin M; Miller, J Houston

    2015-01-28

    Visible light extinction was measured in a series of nitrogen-diluted, ethylene/air, non-premixed flames and this data was used to determine the optical band gap, OBG, as a function of flame position. Collimated light from a supercontinuum source is telescopically expanded and refocused to match the f- number of a dispersing monochromator. The dispersed light is split into a power metering channel and a channel that is periscoped and focused into the flame. The transmitted light is then recollimated and focussed onto a silicon photodiode detector. After tomographic reconstruction of the radial extinction field, the OBG was derived from the near-edge absorption feature using Tauc/Davis-Mott analysis. A slight evolution in OBG was observed throughout all flame systems with a consistent range of OBG observed between approximately 1.85 eV and 2.35 eV. Averaging over all positions the mean OBG was approximately 2.09 eV for all flame systems. Comparing these results to previously published computational results relating calculated HOMO-LUMO gaps for a variety of D2h PAH molecules to the number of aromatic rings in the structure, showed that the observed optical band gap is consistent with a PAH of about 14 rings or a conjugation length of 0.97 nm. This work provides experimental support to the model of soot formation where the transition from chemical to physical growth starts at a modest molecular size; about the size of circumpyrene. PMID:25502966

  11. Buoyancy is the primary source of generating bodyroll in front-crawl swimming.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Toshimasa

    2004-05-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the contribution of the turning effect of buoyant force for generating bodyroll and its relationship with the subjects' variability in swimming speed at distance pace and sub-maximal sprinting pace. The performances of front crawl swimming performed by 11 skilled swimmers were recorded with two panning periscopes for three-dimensional analysis. The bodyroll (BR) exhibited by each of the 11 male competitive swimmers was determined for every given instant as the time-integral of the conceptual angular velocity of the entire body about the long-axis, which was computed from the angular momentum and the moment of inertia of entire body. The part of BR generated by the buoyancy torque (BR(BT)) was determined from the moment of inertia of the entire body and the double time-integral of the buoyancy torque. The mean value for the peak-to-peak amplitude of the buoyancy torque was 15 Nm at distance pace and 19 Nm at sub-maximum sprinting speed. The contribution of buoyancy to BR was significantly greater ( P < 0.01) than that of the hydrodynamic forces. The individual swimming speed at sub-maximal sprinting pace was positively correlated ( P < 0.04) with the contribution of buoyancy to BR. These results showed that the skilled swimmers used buoyant force as the primary source of generating BR, and that faster swimmers used buoyant force more effectively to generate BR than slower swimmers. Based on the results and subsequent theoretical analysis, possible patterns of arm-BR coordination that may increase the effectiveness of using buoyant force for BR are discussed. PMID:15046989

  12. Nest Site Selection by Kentish Plover Suggests a Trade-Off between Nest-Crypsis and Predator Detection Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Serrano, Miguel Ángel; López-López, Pascual

    2014-01-01

    Predation is one of the main causes of adult mortality and breeding failure for ground-nesting birds. Micro-habitat structure around nests plays a critical role in minimizing predation risk. Plovers nest in sites with little vegetation cover to maximize the incubating adult visibility, but many studies suggest a trade-off between nest-crypsis and predator detection strategies. However, this trade-off has not been explored in detail because methods used so far do not allow estimating the visibility with regards to critical factors such as slope or plant permeability to vision. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Kentish plovers select exposed sites according to a predator detection strategy, and the hypothesis that more concealed nests survive longer according to a crypsis strategy. To this end, we obtained an accurate estimation of the incubating adult's field of vision through a custom built inverted periscope. Our results showed that plovers selected nest sites with higher visibility than control points randomly selected with regards to humans and dogs, although nests located in sites with higher vegetation cover survived longer. In addition, the flushing distance (i.e., the distance at which incubating adults leave the nest when they detect a potential predator) decreased with vegetation cover. Consequently, the advantages of concealing the nest were limited by the ability to detect predators, thus indirectly supporting the existence of the trade-off between crypsis and predator detection. Finally, human disturbance also constrained nest choice, forcing plovers to move to inland sites that were less suitable because of higher vegetation cover, and modulated flushing behavior, since plovers that were habituated to humans left their nests closer to potential predators. This constraint on the width of suitable breeding habitat is particularly relevant for the conservation of Kentish Plover in sand beaches, especially under the current context of coastal regression and increase of recreational activities. PMID:25208045

  13. The off-axis viewing device: a rifle-mounted sighting system for search and engagement from covered positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Brady, Christopher

    2007-04-01

    Soldiers involved in urban operations are at a higher risk of receiving a bullet or fragment wound to the head or face compared to other parts of their body. One reason for this vulnerability is the need for the soldier to expose their head when looking and shooting from behind cover. Research conducted by DSTO Australia, using weapon-mounted cameras, has validated the concept of off-axis shooting but has emphasized the requirement for a system that closely integrates with both the soldier and his weapon. A system was required that would not adversely effect the usability, utility or accuracy of the weapon. Several Concept Demonstrators were developed over a two-year period and the result of this development is the Off-Axis Viewing Device (OAVD). The OAVD is an un-powered sighting attachment that integrates with a red dot reflex sight and enables the soldier to scan for and engage targets from a position of cover. The image from the weapon's scope is transmitted through the OAVD's periscopic mirror system to the soldier. Mounted directly behind the sight, the OAVD can also be swiveled to a redundant position on the side of the weapon to allow normal on-axis use of the sight. The OAVD can be rotated back into place behind the sight with one hand, or removed and stored in the soldier's webbing. In May 2004, a rapid acquisition program was initiated to develop the concept to an in-service capability and the OAVD is currently being deployed with the Australian Defence Force.

  14. A geodetic laser radar rangefinder with 10(exp -7) resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, Y.; Takeichi, M.; Warashima, Y.; Takeshima, A.; Ogawa, I.; Ichie, K.; Schiller, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel geodetic laser radar rangefinder (GLRR) unit utilizing a pair of synchronized 10-psec streak camera systems was developed for displacement measurements of the earth's plates. In order to achieve minimum computing error and assure extremely high spatial resolution, an optical pulse registration clock was developed and used to register a fiducial mark on the time scale of the system. Conventional optical rangefinders have been limited to a relative resolution of 10(exp -6) even for short distances. The system to be reported on today has the capability of measuring a 50km range with an accuracy of 4mm corresponding to a relative resolution of 10(exp -7). With a gain of greater than 3 x 10(exp 3), the system has the capability of detecting extremely weak signals on the order of photon counting. This combined with temporal gating makes daytime measurements comparable in signal-to-noise ratio to nighttime viewing. This is useful for measuring faint signals returning over a range of several tens of kilometers. The present ranging system was designed to observe the mutual displacement of geodetic plates and was employed to measure the boundary between the Philippine and Asian geodetic plates that pass beneath the Suruga Bay near Hamamatsu City, Japan. The system has been in operation for over 3 years. In addition, the system has the ability of producing and detecting optical ranging pulses of several wavelengths simultaneously, making this a complete multicolor system. The basic GLRR system consists of a frequency stabilizing crystal, optical clock, YAG laser, KDP doubling crystal, DK*P tripling crystal, two matched streak cameras (A and B), a control computer, and an output/input periscope system.

  15. RoboLab and virtual environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.

    1994-01-01

    A useful adjunct to the manned space station would be a self-contained free-flying laboratory (RoboLab). This laboratory would have a robot operated under telepresence from the space station or ground. Long duration experiments aboard RoboLab could be performed by astronauts or scientists using telepresence to operate equipment and perform experiments. Operating the lab by telepresence would eliminate the need for life support such as food, water and air. The robot would be capable of motion in three dimensions, have binocular vision TV cameras, and two arms with manipulators to simulate hands. The robot would move along a two-dimensional grid and have a rotating, telescoping periscope section for extension in the third dimension. The remote operator would wear a virtual reality type headset to allow the superposition of computer displays over the real-time video of the lab. The operators would wear exoskeleton type arms to facilitate the movement of objects and equipment operation. The combination of video displays, motion, and the exoskeleton arms would provide a high degree of telepresence, especially for novice users such as scientists doing short-term experiments. The RoboLab could be resupplied and samples removed on other space shuttle flights. A self-contained RoboLab module would be designed to fit within the cargo bay of the space shuttle. Different modules could be designed for specific applications, i.e., crystal-growing, medicine, life sciences, chemistry, etc. This paper describes a RoboLab simulation using virtual reality (VR). VR provides an ideal simulation of telepresence before the actual robot and laboratory modules are constructed. The easy simulation of different telepresence designs will produce a highly optimum design before construction rather than the more expensive and time consuming hardware changes afterwards.

  16. Synthesis and Design of Silicide Intermetallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Vaidya, R.U.; Park, Y.

    1999-05-14

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the US processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive US processing industries. The program presently has a number of industrial connections, including a CRADA with Johns Manville Corporation targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. With the Exotherm Corporation, they are developing advanced silicide powders for the fabrication of silicide materials with tailored and improved properties for industrial applications. In October 1998, the authors initiated a new activity funded by DOE/OIT on ``Molybdenum Disilicide Composites for Glass Processing Sensors''. With Accutru International Corporation, they are developing silicide-based protective sheaths for self-verifying temperature sensors which may be used in glass furnaces and other industrial applications. With Combustion Technology Inc., they are developing silicide-based periscope sight tubes for the direct observation of glass melts.

  17. Occurrence of increased arterial stiffness in a cohort of adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus when compared to normoglycemic controls.

    PubMed

    George, Belinda; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Ayyar, Vageesh; Mathew, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among patients with type 1 diabetes is underestimated. This study was conducted to assess the cardiovascular risk by comparing arterial stiffness in type 1 diabetes with that of controls. Thirty-one type 1 diabetes patients and 31 age- and gender-matched controls were included. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) was measured using Periscope, a noninvasive device. The ba-PWV was found to be significantly elevated among the patients with diabetes (1177.09 ± 180.1 cm/s) when compared with the controls (1057.99 ± 95.8 cm/s) (P = .003). The ba-PWV showed positive correlation with age (r = .43, P = .014), heart rate (r = .49, P = .005), blood pressure (r = .65, P < .001), and LDL (r = .46, P = .008) among patients with diabetes. Linear regression analysis revealed that diabetes, age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and BMI were independently associated with ba-PWV (R (2) = .589). On subdividing the diabetes cohort into quintiles for LDL and SBP, a substantial increase in ba-PWV was seen at LDL > 102 mg/dl (1187.8 cm/s to 1364.9 cm/s, P = .09) and SBP > 130 mmHg (1176.1 cm/s to 1369.4 cm/s, P = .03). Arterial stiffness as assessed by ba-PWV is significantly increased among patients with type 1 diabetes compared to healthy controls, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Early screening for arterial stiffness using a cheap and effective method among patients with SBP > 130 mmHg and LDL > 102 mg/dl may help identify those with heightened cardiovascular risk. PMID:25231115

  18. Investigating the possibility of a monitoring fast ion diagnostic for ITERa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, R.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Orsitto, F. P.; Tugarinov, S.

    2008-10-01

    In burning plasma fusion devices, fast ion transport plays a central role in the performances of the machines. Moreover the losses of energetic particles might cause severe damages on plasma facing components. Therefore real time measurements of fast ion transport would provide valuable information for safe and reliable plasma operations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of a monitoring system based on active charge exchange recombination spectroscopy making use of the 0.5MeV/amu ITER heating neutral beams for detecting fast He+24 (alphas) particles in ITER plasmas. There are two time scales relevant to fast ion dynamics: the first is the slowing down time of the distribution function which is of the order of 1s, and the second is the time scale of burstlike transport events such as collective Alfvén mode excitations, which—for typical ITER plasma parameters—can be as low as 0.2-1ms. To detect such fast events a broadband high-throughput spectrometer is needed, while for the reconstruction of the alpha velocity distribution function a higher resolution spectrometer and longer integration time are necessary. To monitor a spatial redistribution of fast particles due to the propagation of the instability, it is proposed to use a limited number of spatial channels, looking at the charge exchange HeII spectra induced by the heating beams, whose energy matches the slowing down energies of fast particles. The proposal is to share the motional stark effect periscope on equatorial port 3 [A. Malaquias et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3393 (2004)] adding additional fibers and suitable instruments. A signal to noise ratio of 5 could be achieved with a spatial resolution of a /15 and a time resolution of 5ms, in a broad spectral band of 100Å, corresponding to the spectral broadening of the line emitted by alpha particles with energies ?E ?1.5MeV. Fast H and D ion populations created by heating neutral beam or ion cyclotron resonance heating are expected to produce significantly lower charge exchange signal levels and can only be monitored on substantially longer time scales as it is expected because of the strong energy difference with respect to the heating neutral beam and the consequently low charge exchange cross sections.

  19. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zeeland, M. A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Pace, D. C.; Allen, S. L.; Chen, X.; Evans, T. E.; García-Muñoz, M.; Hanson, J. M.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lao, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Moyer, R. A.; Nazikian, R.; Orlov, D. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Wingen, A.

    2015-07-01

    Measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotating n=2 magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied n=3 RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied n=3 fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii ? >0.7 , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in n=3 RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion {{\\text{D}}?} (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the n=3 fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50?ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile was allowed to recover. The role of resonances between fast ion drift motion and the applied 3D fields in the context of selectively targeting regions of fast ion phase space is also discussed.

  20. Detection of ethene and other hydrocarbons in gas turbine engine exhaust using non-intrusive FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigone, Giovanni M.; Welch, Michael A.; Hilton, Moira; Miller, Michael N.; Wilson, Christopher W.

    2003-04-01

    As part of the EU funded project AEROJET2, a number of gas turbine engine tests were performed in different facilities around Europe. At Farnborough, UK a Spey engine was used to test a suite of prototype optically based instrumentation designed to measure exhaust gas emissions without using extractive probe systems. In addition to the AEROJET 2 prototype instrumentation, a Bruker Equinox 55 Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was used to obtain infrared spectra of the exhaust plume both in emission and absorption mode. The Bruker FTIR spectrometer was fitted with a periscope system so that different lines of sight could be monitored in the plume in a vertical plane 25 cm downstream from the nozzle exit and 20 cm upstream of the center line of sight of the AEROJET 2 prototype instrumentation. DERA (now QinetiQ) provided exhaust gas analysis data for different engine running conditions using samples extracted from the plume with an intrusive probe. The probe sampled along a horizontal plane across the centerline of the engine 45 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. The Bruker spectrometer used both InSb (indium antimonide) and MCT (mercury-cadmium-telluride) detectors to maximize the sensitivity across the IR range 600-4000 cm-1. Typically, CO2 and H2O IR signatures dominate the observed spectra of the plume. However, the engine tests showed that at low power engine conditions spectral features associated with CO around 2147 cm-1 and with hydrocarbons could be observed at around 3000 cm-1. In particular the presence of ethene (C2H2) was detected from observation of its characteristic in and out of plane vibration mode at 949 cm-1. At high engine powers the presence of NO was detected at 1900.3 cm-1. Species concentrations were calculated using a slab model for each line of sight compared against reference spectra. The engine plume was assumed to be symmetric about the centerline. On this basis, data from the extractive sampling gas analysis that had been obtained by traversing the probe across a horizontal plane through the centerline could be compared with non-intrusive measurements made by scanning vertically. Adjustments have been made to account for the 20 cm downstream offset in measurement planes of the probe and the spectrometer behind the nozzle exit.

  1. To compare the effect of Telmisartan with Metoprolol on arterial stiffness in hypertension: Prospective randomized parallel group trial

    PubMed Central

    Sumbria, Minakshi; Negi, Prakash C.; Sahai, Ashok K.; Kaundal, Purshotam K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension is often complicated by increased arterial stiffness and is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcome. Beta blockers and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are commonly used antihypertensive agents. The effect of beta blockers and ARBs on arterial stiffness has not been compared adequately. The aim of the present study is to compare the effect of telmisartan with metoprolol on arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients in prospective open label randomized parallel group intervention study. Methods 100 patients of hypertension, not on any antihypertensive agents, were enrolled after obtaining informed consent. Baseline recording of data related to demographics, CV risk factors, anthropometry and BP were made. Arterial stiffness was measured noninvasively by recording pulse wave velocity (PWV) using periscope (Genesis medical system). Left ventricular (LV) mass was measured using 2D guided M-mode echocardiography. Blood sugar, renal function, lipids and uric acid estimations were done in fasting state. Patients were randomized to receive metoprolol and telmisartan using stratified randomization technique. Dose of the study drugs were titrated to achieve target BP of <140/90 mmHg. Data related to PWV, BP, anthropometry and blood biochemistry was repeated after 6 months of treatment with study drugs. Results Telmisartan resulted in significantly greater reduction in arterial stiffness index (ASI) in left and right lower limb arterial bed (39.9 ± 11.7 vs. 46.8 ± 17.0 m/s, p < 0.02) and (36.4 ± 9.6 vs. 44.86 ± 15.1 m/s, p < 0.002) respectively and systolic blood pressure (SBP) (?4.9 mmHg with 95% C.I. of ?8.0–1.7 mmHg, p < 0.003) compared to metoprolol. Reduction in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in telmisartan and metoprolol groups was not different statistically (?1.0 mmHg with 95% C.I. of ?3.3–1.2 mmHg, p < 0.3). The change in LV mass was not significantly different between the study groups (135.5 ± 37.6 vs. 143.2 ± 41.5, p < 0.3). PMID:25173199

  2. Measuring parameters of large-aperture crystals used for generating optical harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, J M; English, R E, Jr; Hibbard, R L; Michie, R B; Norton, M A; Perfect, S A; Summers, M D; Wegner, P J

    1999-02-23

    The purpose of this project was to develop tools for understanding the influence of crystal quality and crystal mounting on harmonic-generation efficiency at high irradiance. Measuring the homogeneity of crystals interferometrically, making detailed physics calculations of conversion efficiency, performing finite- element modeling of mounted crystals, and designing a new optical metrology tool were key elements in obtaining that understanding. For this work, we used the following frequency-tripling scheme: type I second- harmonic generation followed by type II sum-frequency mixing of the residual fundamental and the second harmonic light. The doubler was potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), and the tripler was deuterated KDP (KD*P). With this scheme, near-infrared light (1053 nm) can be frequency tripled (to 351 nm) at high efficiency (theoretically >90%) for high irradiance (>3 GW/cm²). Spatial variations in the birefringence of the large crystals studied here (37 to 41 cm square by about 1 cm thick) imply that the ideal phase-matching orientation of the crystal with respect to the incident laser beam varies across the crystal. We have shown that phase-measuring interferometry can be used to measure these spatial variations. We observed transmitted wavefront differences between orthogonally polarized interferograms of {lambda}/50 to {lambda}/100, which correspond to index variations of order 10-6. On some plates that we measured, the standard deviation of angular errors is 22-23 µrad; this corresponds to a 1% reduction in efficiency. Because these conversion crystals are relatively thin, their surfaces are not flat (deviate by k2.5 urn from flat). A crystal is mounted against a precision-machined surface that supports the crystal on four edges. This mounting surface is not flat either (deviates by +2.5 µm from flat). A retaining flange presses a compliant element against the crystal. The load thus applied near the edges of the crystal surface holds it in place. We performed detailed finite-element modeling to predict the resulting shape of the mounted crystal. The prediction agreed with measurements of mounted crystals. We computed the physics of the frequency-conversion process to better quantify the effects on efficiency of variation in the crystal? s axis, changes in the shape of the crystal, and mounting-induced stress. We were able to accurately predict the frequency-conversion performance of 37-cm square crystals on Beamlet, a one-beam scientific prototype of the NIF laser architecture, using interferometric measurements of the mounted crystals and the model. In a 2{omega} measurement campaign, the model predicted 64.9% conversion efficiency; 64.1% was observed. When detuned by 640 µrad, the model and measurement agreement is even better (both were 10.4%). Finally, we completed the design and initial testing of a new optical metrology tool to measure the spatial variation of frequency conversion. This system employs a high-power subaperture beam from a commercial laser oscillator and rod amplifier. The beam interrogates the crystal? s aperture by moving the crystal horizontally on a translation stage and translating the laser beam vertically on an optical periscope. Precision alignment is maintained by means of a full-aperture reference mirror, a precision-machined surface on the crystal mount, and autocollimators (the goal for angular errors is 10 µrad). The autocollimators track the mounting angle of the crystal and the direction of the laser beam with respect to the reference mirror. The conversion efficiency can be directly measured by recording l{omega}, 2{omega}, 3{omega} energy levels during the scan and by rocking (i.e., tilting) the crystal mount over an angular range.

  3. Coronal Holes At Microwaves As Based On Observations With The RATAN-600 Radiotelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovik, V. N.; Medar, V. G.

    1999-10-01

    The multiwavelength radio observations of the coronal holes (CH) have been carried out on the RATAN-600 radiotelescope at microwaves during the last minimum of solar activity (1995-1996). These data are compared with those obtained by the same method on RATAN-600 during the previous period of low solar activity in 1984-1985. The southern sector of the RATAN-600 radio telescope in combination with a plane periscopic mirror was used. The total intensity and circularly polarized component of the solar radio emission have been recorded daily simultaneously at 30-40 wavelengths in the range of 2-30 cm using the Panoramic Analyser of Spectra (Bogod, V.M., et al., 1992, Proceedings of IAU Colloquim N.141, p.79). The radio telescope provided resolution of 17" x 13' at 2.0 cm. We considered 9 equatorial isolated coronal holes which were observed during several solar rotations (according to He I 10830 AA data). 1. The contrasts of brightness temperature of CH against the quiet Sun in 1995-96 are turned to be lower than those in the previous cycle. But the absolute values of brightness temperature of CH and their spectra in the range of 2-30 cm are the same for two periods. 2. The coronal holes in 1995-1996 had the different dependence of their effective radio sizes on the wavelength in the range of 8-30 cm. The most coronal holes at previous activity minimum showed the increase of the radio size with wavelength increasing in the range of 8-32 cm. At the last minimum two coronal holes had the constant radio sizes in the range of 8-30 cm, and one CH showed the decrease of the radio size with wavelength increasing. The different relations between sizes of EUV, SXR and microwave images of coronal holes has been found also. 3. The coincidence of calculated and observed limb effects detected with RATAN-600 during the rise of one coronal hole (March, 1996) confirmed the validity of the empirical homogeneous models of CH and quiet Sun atmospheres constructed on the base of RATAN-600 data obtained in the previous minimum. 4. At first time the circular polarized emission associated with the isolated equatorial coronal hole (CMPs - 13.10.96, 9.11.96) has been registered in the range of 9-30 cm. The degree of polarisation was 0.2-3%. In the framework of bremsstrahlung mechanism of radio emission it means that the magnetic field strength (longitudinal component) in CH is of 2-10 G at the level of upper chromosphere - low corona (Borovik, V.N., Medar,V.G., Korzhavin A.N., 1999. Pisma v Astron.Zh.,25, N 1, 1-9, in russ.) 5. The examples of the different effects of the presence of neighbouring active regions on the radio characteristics of CH are given. 6. The small scale structures at microwaves in the quiet Sun and in coronal holes are considered. We thank the Yohkoh/SXT Team and the SOHO/EIT