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1

Periscope  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners construct a device that allows them to look over ledges or around corners. Use this activity to introduce learners to concepts related to optics, mirrors and how submarines use periscopes to see above water. Note: this activity requires the use of a saw, not included in the cost of materials.

Workshop, Watsonville E.

2011-01-01

2

Telescoping Periscope  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore the many uses of periscopes and how this simple device was designed and is used in many applications. Learners work in teams to design and build their own working periscope out of everyday materials. They design their periscope, build and test it, evaluate their designs, and share observations.

Ieee

2014-01-28

3

Up Periscope!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity provides instructions for building a mirrored tube--a smaller and simpler version of a submarine's periscope--that lets you see around corners and over walls. Get a hands-on lesson about how light reflects and how to use that reflection to extend your vision.

Murphy, Pat; Klages, Ellen; Shore, Linda

1998-01-01

4

Periscope For Viewing Weld Penetration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Periscope enables viewing of weld joint from inside cylindrical duct to determine when weld penetration occurs. Supplies steady stream of inert gas to shield joint. Device used to calibrate and evaluate techniques for sensing weld penetration.

Gordon, Stephen S.; Marman, Jonathan M.

1988-01-01

5

How does it work? Binoculars, periscopes, and kaleidoscopes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource explains how binoculars, periscopes and kaleidoscopes work. The learner will discover these instruments share similarities. Instructions are included for making a periscope and a kaleidoscope.

Laboratory, Florida S.

1999-01-01

6

29. VIEW OF 1959 KOLLMORGEN BUNKER PERISCOPE LOCATED IN NORTHEAST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. VIEW OF 1959 KOLLMORGEN BUNKER PERISCOPE LOCATED IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM. NOTE SCHRADER VALVE ABOVE HANDLE ON RIGHT SIDE OF PERISCOPE. MONITOR LABELED '1-FLAMEBUCKET' IN BACKGROUND TO LEFT OF PERISCOPE. DIGITAL COUNTDOWN AND HOLD CLOCKS IMMEDIATELY ABOVE MONITOR. ANOTHER DIGITAL COUNTDOWN CLOCK AND THE MILITARY TIME CLOCK ON NORTH WALL BENEATH THE MONITOR. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

7

32. DETAIL OF PRESSURE GAUGE INSTALLED ON BUNKER PERISCOPE IN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

32. DETAIL OF PRESSURE GAUGE INSTALLED ON BUNKER PERISCOPE IN 1991 - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

8

PERISCOPE: An Online-Based Distributed Performance Analysis Tool  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents PERISCOPE - an online distributed performance analysis tool that searches for a wide range of performance bottlenecks in parallel applications. It consists of a set of agents that capture and analyze application and hardware-related properties in an autonomous fashion. The paper focuses on the Periscope design, the different search methodologies, and the steps involved to do an online performance analysis. A new graphical user-friendly interface based on Eclipse is introduced. Through the use of this new easy-to-use graphical interface, remote execution, selection of the type of analysis, and the inspection of the found properties can be performed in an intuitive and easy way. In addition, a real-world application, namely, the GENE code, a grand challenge problem of plasma physics is analyzed using Periscope. The results are illustrated in terms of found properties and scalability issues.

Benedict, Shajulin; Petkov, Ventsislav; Gerndt, Michael

9

Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

2008-01-01

10

IET. Periscope shielding and installation details. Shows range of scanning ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

IET. Periscope shielding and installation details. Shows range of scanning head, removable concrete cap, concrete shielding. Ralph M. Parsons 902-4-ANP-620-A 324. Date: February 1954. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL Index code no. 035-0620-00-693-106909 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

11

Periscope-camera system for visible and infrared imaging diagnostics on TFTR  

SciTech Connect

An optical diagnostic consisting of a periscope which relays images of the torus interior to an array of cameras is used on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to view plasma discharge phenomena and inspect vacuum vessel internal structures in both visible and near-infrared wavelength regions. Three periscopes view through 20-cm-diameter fused-silica windows which are spaced around the torus midplane to provide a viewing coverage of approximately 75% of the vacuum vessel internal surface area. The periscopes have f/8 optics and motor-driven controls for focusing, magnification selection (5/sup 0/, 20/sup 0/, and 60/sup 0/ field of view), elevation and azimuth setting, mast rotation, filter selection, iris aperture, and viewing port selection. The four viewing ports on each periscope are equipped with multiple imaging devices which include: (1) an inspection eyepiece, (2) standard (RCA TC2900) and fast (RETICON) framing rate television cameras, (3) a PtSi CCD infrared imaging camera, (4) a 35 mm Nikon F3 still camera, or (5) a 16 mm Locam II movie camera with variable framing up to 500 fps. Operation of the periscope-camera system is controlled either locally or remotely through a computer-CAMAC interface. A description of the equipment and examples of its application are presented.

Medley, S.S.; Dimock, D.L.; Hayes, S.; Long, D.; Lowrence, J.L.; Mastrocola, V.; Renda, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Young, K.M.

1985-05-01

12

Research on data communication method in periscope semi-physical training simulation system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data communication plays a very important role in the hardware in the loop simulation system. The system architecture of periscope semi-physical simulation system is proposed at first. Then the data communication method based on FINS between PLC and PC is introduced, the user's interaction of scene is achieved by PLC. The communication based on TCP between 2D chart console and scene simulation system is also introduced. The 6-DOF motion model and the scene simulation system is connected by TCP, and a DR method is introduced in solving the data amount problem. The test shows that the simulation system has no error package and no missing in a simulation circle. And can meet the requirements of training, also shows good performance in reliability and real-time.

Xiao, Jianbo; Hu, Dabin

2013-03-01

13

Improved signal to noise ratio and sensitivity of an infrared imaging video bolometer on large helical device by using an infrared periscope.  

PubMed

An Infrared imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) diagnostic is currently being used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for studying the localization of radiation structures near the magnetic island and helical divertor X-points during plasma detachment and for 3D tomography. This research demands high signal to noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity to improve the temporal resolution for studying the evolution of radiation structures during plasma detachment and a wide IRVB field of view (FoV) for tomography. Introduction of an infrared periscope allows achievement of a higher SNR and higher sensitivity, which in turn, permits a twofold improvement in the temporal resolution of the diagnostic. Higher SNR along with wide FoV is achieved simultaneously by reducing the separation of the IRVB detector (metal foil) from the bolometer's aperture and the LHD plasma. Altering the distances to meet the aforesaid requirements results in an increased separation between the foil and the IR camera. This leads to a degradation of the diagnostic performance in terms of its sensitivity by 1.5-fold. Using an infrared periscope to image the IRVB foil results in a 7.5-fold increase in the number of IR camera pixels imaging the foil. This improves the IRVB sensitivity which depends on the square root of the number of IR camera pixels being averaged per bolometer channel. Despite the slower f-number (f/# = 1.35) and reduced transmission (?0 = 89%, due to an increased number of lens elements) for the periscope, the diagnostic with an infrared periscope operational on LHD has improved in terms of sensitivity and SNR by a factor of 1.4 and 4.5, respectively, as compared to the original diagnostic without a periscope (i.e., IRVB foil being directly imaged by the IR camera through conventional optics). The bolometer's field of view has also increased by two times. The paper discusses these improvements in apt details. PMID:25085127

Pandya, Shwetang N; Peterson, Byron J; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Sano, Ryuichi; Enokuchi, Akito; Takeyama, Norihide

2014-07-01

14

How a submarine returns to periscope depth: analysing complex socio-technical systems using Cognitive Work Analysis.  

PubMed

This paper presents the application of Cognitive Work Analysis to the description of the functions, situations, activities, decisions, strategies, and competencies of a Trafalgar class submarine when performing the function of returning to periscope depth. All five phases of Cognitive Work Analysis are presented, namely: Work Domain Analysis, Control Task Analysis, Strategies Analysis, Social Organisation and Cooperation Analysis, and Worker Competencies Analysis. Complex socio-technical systems are difficult to analyse but Cognitive Work Analysis offers an integrated way of analysing complex systems with the core of functional means-ends analysis underlying all of the other representations. The joined-up analysis offers a coherent framework for understanding how socio-technical systems work. Data were collected through observation and interviews at different sites across the UK. The resultant representations present a statement of how the work domain and current activities are configured in this complex socio-technical system. This is intended to provide a baseline, from which all future conceptions of the domain may be compared. The strength of the analysis is in the multiple representations from which the constraints acting on the work may be analysed. Future research needs to challenge the assumptions behind these constraints in order to develop new ways of working. PMID:23702259

Stanton, Neville A; Bessell, Kevin

2014-01-01

15

Spotting Code Optimizations in Data-Parallel Pipelines through PeriSCOPE  

Microsoft Academic Search

To minimize the amount of data-shuffling I\\/O that occurs between the pipeline stages of a distributed data parallel program, its procedural code must be optimized with full awareness of the pipeline that it executes in. Unfortunately, neither pipeline optimizers nor traditional compilers examine both the pipeline and procedural code of a data-parallel program so programmers must either hand-optimize their program

Zhenyu Guo; Xuepeng Fan; Rishan Chen; Jiaxing Zhang; Hucheng Zhou; Sean McDirmid; Chang Liu; Wei Lin; Jingren Zhou; Lidong Zhou

2012-01-01

16

Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization  

SciTech Connect

PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

Brechtel, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.brechtel@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Ketelsen, Dominik [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Endisch, Andrea [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany); Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany)

2012-04-15

17

PPPL3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation  

E-print Network

Radiation Applications using Reflective Optics S. S. Medley Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P. O. Box radiation environment of future D­T devices such as ITER. Under contract to the Princeton Plasma Physics­tritium operation, refractive optical components exposed to neutron and gamma radiation can be subject

18

PPPL-3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC-426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation  

E-print Network

Radiation Applications using Reflective Optics S. S. Medley Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P. O. Box radiation environment of future D-T devices such as ITER. Under contract to the Princeton Plasma Physics-tritium operation, refractive optical components exposed to neutron and gamma radiation can be subject

19

Optical imaging systems for ceramic melters  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic melters are being developed for immobilizing radioactive wastes in a glass matrix. Periscopic video viewers have been designed to monitor both the melting process and the process of pouring the molten glass into stainless steel canisters. Because of the thermal and nuclear radiation and the chemical environment, all of the processes are performed within a cell having shield walls 1.219 m thick. Periscopes are used to relay an image to a video camera located outside the cell. The periscopes, constructed using radiation-stabilized glasses, are expected to survive the thermal and nuclear radiation environment much better than would a video camera placed inside the cell.

Brenden, B.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dhingra, H.S. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., NY (United States)] [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., NY (United States)

1995-12-31

20

VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EARTH MOUND. NOTE THE RECTANGULAR OPENINGS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EARTH MOUND. NOTE THE RECTANGULAR OPENINGS USED FOR OBSERVATION EQUIPMENT AND PERISCOPE TOPS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

21

Experimental evaluation of achromatic phase shifters for mid-infrared starlight suppression.  

PubMed

Phase shifters are a key component of nulling interferometry, one of the potential routes to enabling the measurement of faint exoplanet spectra. Here, three different achromatic phase shifters are evaluated experimentally in the mid-infrared, where such nulling interferometers may someday operate. The methods evaluated include the use of dispersive glasses, a through-focus field inversion, and field reversals on reflection from antisymmetric flat-mirror periscopes. All three approaches yielded deep, broadband, mid-infrared nulls, but the deepest broadband nulls were obtained with the periscope architecture. In the periscope system, average null depths of 4x10(-5) were obtained with a 25% bandwidth, and 2x10(-5) with a 20% bandwidth, at a central wavelength of 9.5 mum. The best short term nulls at 20% bandwidth were approximately 9x10(-6), in line with error budget predictions and the limits of the current generation of hardware. PMID:19209197

Gappinger, Robert O; Diaz, Rosemary T; Ksendzov, Alexander; Lawson, Peter R; Lay, Oliver P; Liewer, Kurt M; Loya, Frank M; Martin, Stefan R; Serabyn, Eugene; Wallace, James K

2009-02-10

22

Optics design of the divertor infrared television of KSTARa)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The divertor Infrared television (IR TV) system for monitoring the temperature of a divertor and localized hot spots will be installed on the upper port of the N-port in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). The cassette of KSTAR makes a periscope inevitable for the divertor IR TV. In this article, 4 design concepts for the periscope were examined, and the design based on Keplerian was shown to have better stabilities in alignment and the vibration. The final optics design based on an f-theta lens, Keplerian, and telecentric lens was derived.

Oh, S.; Lee, K.; Lee, H. H.; Wi, H. M.; Kim, Y. S.; Kang, C. S.

2014-11-01

23

SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK INTRODUCTION  

E-print Network

, math and language arts. Inquiry 8: Binoculars, Periscopes, and Kaleidoscopes There is information and kaleidoscopes. Information on how to make some of these optical instruments is included. Inquiry 9: 3D Images be made of seashells, oatmeal boxes, film canisters, soda cans or any size box. Even cars and rooms

Weston, Ken

24

The effect of eliminating binocular and peripheral monocular visual cues upon airplane pilot performance in landing  

Microsoft Academic Search

6 instruments pilots were tested for accuracy of landing under conditions in which the outside visual field was presented on a small, flat surface without direct, outside visibility. Safe approaches and landings were made by all pilots in all conditions, but the average error for landings varied under the 3 conditions (periscope, vision reducing goggles, unrestricted outside visibility).

Stanley N. Roscoe

1948-01-01

25

1990 waste tank inspection program  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Tank conditions are evaluated by inspection using periscopes, still photography, and video systems for visual imagery. Inspections made in 1990 are the subject of this report.

McNatt, F.G.

1990-01-01

26

1990 waste tank inspection program  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Tank conditions are evaluated by inspection using periscopes, still photography, and video systems for visual imagery. Inspections made in 1990 are the subject of this report.

McNatt, F.G.

1990-12-31

27

Optical Probe/Camera Objective Having Large Focusing Range  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design of an optical probe/camera objective having good image quality over an extended focusing range is described. Bearing some resemblance to a periscope, it simultaneously provides an image to both vidicon tube and photographic film. The entire system is used in the production of television commercials where a certain type of special effects may be required.

Powell, I.

1983-02-01

28

Development of optical components for in-vessel viewing systems used for fusion experimental reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical components including imagefiber, periscope, glass, reflecting mirror and adhesive for lens are essential elements of in-vessel viewing system use for fusion experimental reactor and extensive of gamma irradiation tests have been conducted. These components were irradiated in the range of 1 MGy - 100 MGy under the average exposure dose rate of 1 X 106 R/h. As a result, the observation limit of the imagefiber specially fabricated for radiation hard is obtained to be 12 MGy at a illuminance of 8500 lx. Deterioration of transmissivity of three kinds of glass (alkaline barium glass, lead glass and synthetic quartz glass) is small compared with standard glass for commercial periscope. A periscope which was made of these glasses is visible even after 20 MGy at 8500 lx and in case of the standard periscope, the observation limit is 1 kGy at 8500 lx. Decrease in the reflectance on chromium nitride coated reflecting mirror is extremely small than aluminum coated and platinum coated mirrors at accumulated dose of 100 MGy. Two types of adhesive made of polyester resin and epoxy resin became discolored and exfoliated after 50 MGy.

Obara, Kenjiro; Kakudate, Satoshi; Oka, Kiyoshi; Tada, Eisuke; Morita, Yosuke; Seki, Masahiro

1994-12-01

29

DETAIL VIEW OF THE WEST INTERIOR WALL OF THE EXTREME ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

DETAIL VIEW OF THE WEST INTERIOR WALL OF THE EXTREME NORTH (CONTROL) TANK. NOTE THE TWO PERISCOPES IN THE UPPER PART OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. ALSO NOTE THE CONTROL PANEL IN THE MIDDLE OF THE PHOTO, THIS WAS USED TO CONTROL THE REMOTE 'FIRE-EX' WATER NOZZLES. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

30

Photocopy of drawing located at National Archives, San Bruno, California ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing located at National Archives, San Bruno, California (Navy # 680-A-2). Part of ground floor, optical shop and roof periscope testing tower; 1936. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Machine Shop, California Avenue, southwest corner of California Avenue & Thirteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

31

Modelling of a captive unmanned aerial system teledetecting oil pollution on sea surface  

E-print Network

Modelling of a captive unmanned aerial system teledetecting oil pollution on sea surface F. Muttin propose a captive Unmanned Aerial System, UAS acting like a periscope over a ship or supply vessel equilibrium prediction, under wind primary influence. Keywords: Unmanned aerial system, umbilical, oil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

32

25. VIEW OF ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR NORTHEAST CORNER OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

25. VIEW OF ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR NORTHEAST CORNER OF SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM. CONSOLE INCLUDES TELEVISION CONTROL, FACILITIES, AND VEHICLE (MISSILE) POWER PANELS. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT IN BACKGROUND: MILITARY-TIME CLOCK, BASE OF BUNKER PERISCOPE, AND STAIRS TO ESCAPE TUNNEL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

33

Development of optical components for in-vessel viewing systems used for fusion experimental reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optical components including imagefiber, periscope, glass, reflecting mirror and adhesive for lens are essential elements of in-vessel viewing system use for fusion experimental reactor and extensive of gamma irradiation tests have been conducted. These components were irradiated in the range of 1 MGy - 100 MGy under the average exposure dose rate of 1 X 106 R\\/h. As a result,

Kenjiro Obara; Satoshi Kakudate; Kiyoshi Oka; Eisuke Tada; Yosuke Morita; Masahiro Seki

1994-01-01

34

MAY/JUNE 2011 www.tufts.edu/hr/index  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES MAY/JUNE 2011 www.tufts.edu/hr/index periscopeperiscope Continued electronic technol- ogy (see the March-April Periscope for an article on the new Tufts web- site to bring the Tufts' com- munity closer together. In the recent Excellence at Work surveys conducted in each

Dennett, Daniel

35

Using wavelet transforms for improving the conditional sampling results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We combine two innovative techniques namely the wavelet transform and the conditional sampling in order to identify coherent moving structures existing in low frequency density fluctuations. The experiments are conducted for continuous, ArII plasma column immersed in 1KG magnetic field. The fluctuation measurements are obtained using laser induced fluorescence. Induced fluorescence signals are collected through two optical periscopes having mobility along the field lines inside the plasma chamber. The wavelet transform is initiated for filtering purposes, since the induced fluorescence signal is obscured by fluctuations due to photon statistics. Using the wavelet transform on the reference probe signal ease our search for conditions. We mark the indices for the samples satisfying the forced condition, and return to raw signal collected from the moving periscope in order to apply the conditional sampling technique.

Uzun, Ilker; Skiff, Frederick

2006-10-01

36

IET. Coupling station (TAN620), plans and sections. Concrete shielding walls ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

IET. Coupling station (TAN-620), plans and sections. Concrete shielding walls and boron surface treatment. Elevation shows two floor levels, position of periscopes, and stairways. Ralph M. Parsons 902-4-ANP-602-A 325. Date: February 1954. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 035-0620-00-693-106910 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

37

Establishment Of System Design Requirements Of The DIVAD Visual Fire Control Optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The develoment of the specified optical system parameters is followed from initial constraints, recuirements, and scenarios. The process includes consulting with the optical designers, to keep the design practical and performing analyses, to define the system configuration, such as amortioning apertures and spectral bands. The fire control system consists, of two sighting systems, a search sensor called the Squad Leader's, Periscope and a tracking system with integral laser rangefinder called. the. Gunner's Sight. Both systems are stabilized and have a night vision capability.

Felts, Loren D.

1982-05-01

38

Streambank plants vital to water quality  

SciTech Connect

Studies of plants suitable for stabilizing streambanks are described. Sediments caused by soil erosion in Northern California's mountain meadows clog drinking water reservoirs, reduce fish populations, and block hydroelectric dams. Studies of the effect of seasonal climate change on root growth, photosynthesis, and water use of willows and grasses using a below-ground periscope and portable photosynthesis are described. In addition, studies to evaluate the seasonal effect of livestock grazing are in progress.

Sherman, H.

1989-08-01

39

C-III flow measurements with a coherence imaging spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

This work describes a coherence imaging spectrometer capable of making spatially resolved CIII flow measurements in the DIII-D lower divertor. The spectrometer exploits a periscope view of the plasma to produce line-of-sight averaged velocity measurements of CIII. From these chord averaged flow measurements, a 2D poloidal cross section of the CIII flow is tomographically reconstructed. Details of the diagnostic setup, acquired data, and data analysis will be presented, along with prospects for future applications.

Weber, T. R.; Allen, S. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Howard, J. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2012-10-15

40

Solar eclipse observation: some simple devices.  

PubMed

The terrestrial solar irradiance is evaluated in view of the energy absorbed by the retina and the blue light hazard. The evaluated irradiance is compared with the known safety standard, to determine the safety requirement of solar eclipse observation devices. Simple devices are then proposed. The first is a folded pinhole camera, giving a magnified sun image from a relatively small box. The second is a pinhole projector, used to display the image in a large room, while the third is a compact multimirror periscope enabling one to see the sun sharper than with a pinhole camera. PMID:20555865

Handojo, A

1989-10-15

41

A model for the submarine depthkeeping team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The most difficult task the depthkeeping team must face occurs during periscope-depth operations during which they may be required to maintain a submarine several hundred feet long within a foot of ordered depth and within one-half degree of ordered pitch. The difficulty is compounded by the facts that wave generated forces are extremely high, depth and pitch signals are very noisy and submarine speed is such that overall dynamics are slow. A mathematical simulation of the depthkeeping team based on the optimal control models is described. A solution of the optimal team control problem with an output control restriction (limited display to each controller) is presented.

Ware, J. R.; Best, J. F.; Bozzi, P. J.; Kleinman, D. W.

1981-01-01

42

Design considerations, tooling, and equipment for remote in-service inspection of radioactive piping and pressure-vessel systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes results obtained in use of remotely-operated nondestructive testing (NDT) equipment for inspection of reactor-system components. Experience obtained in operating the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has provided a basis for field verification of remote NDT equipment designs and has suggested development improvements. Remote Viewing and data gathering systems used include periscopes, borescopes, fiberscopes, hybrid borescopes/fiberscopes, and closed circuit television. A summary of design consideration for inspection equipment and power plant design is presented to achieve improved equipment operation and reduction of plant maintenance downtime.

Swannack, D.L.; Schmoker, D.S.

1983-01-01

43

Transverse Pupil Shifts for Adaptive Optics Non-Common Path Calibration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simple new way of obtaining absolute wavefront measurements with a laboratory Fizeau interferometer was recently devised. In that case, the observed wavefront map is the difference of two cavity surfaces, those of the mirror under test and of an unknown reference surface on the Fizeau s transmission flat. The absolute surface of each can be determined by applying standard wavefront reconstruction techniques to two grids of absolute surface height differences of the mirror under test, obtained from pairs of measurements made with slight transverse shifts in X and Y. Adaptive optics systems typically provide an actuated periscope between wavefront sensor (WFS) and commonmode optics, used for lateral registration of deformable mirror (DM) to WFS. This periscope permits independent adjustment of either pupil or focal spot incident on the WFS. It would be used to give the required lateral pupil motion between common and non-common segments, analogous to the lateral shifts of the two phase contributions in the lab Fizeau. The technique is based on a completely new approach to calibration of phase. It offers unusual flexibility with regard to the transverse spatial frequency scales probed, and will give results quite quickly, making use of no auxiliary equipment other than that built into the adaptive optics system. The new technique may be applied to provide novel calibration information about other optical systems in which the beam may be shifted transversely in a controlled way.

Bloemhof, Eric E.

2011-01-01

44

A survey of ATL-compatible radiometer antennas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A survey was made of antennas suitable for remote sensing of the earth's surface, in particular the world ocean, by means of microwave radiometers operating in the 1 to 26 GHz frequency region and carried on board the shuttle-launched advanced technology laboratory. Array antennas are found to be unattractive and unsuited to the task. Reflectors, including Cassegrain and offset types, as well as horn-reflectors are possible candidates but all have shortcomings which impair the accuracy of measurement. Horns of the corrugated type have excellent electrical characteristics. Although they are physically very large and will require development of suitable deployment mechanisms, they appear to be valid candidates for the task. The evolution of the periscope antenna is outlined, and it is shown to possess nearly ideal electrical characteristics for the intended application. Its only shortcoming is that the feed horn creates aperture blocking; there is no blocking due to struts or any other source. The periscope antenna is recommended for ATL radiometry.

Love, A. W.

1975-01-01

45

Examination of the first irradiated LOFT fuel module  

SciTech Connect

The first Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) center fuel module was nondestructively examined in order to assess any changes after power range testing and three large-break loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs). The examination consisted of evaluation of LOCE measurement data; measurement of withdrawal forces during removal of the module from the reactor; poolside examination of the exposed fuel module surfaces, using an underwater periscope, 35-mm camera, and closed circuit television; and poolside measurements of the rod-to-rod spacing, using a Sulo probe. The performance of the equipment is assessed from the results of the examination. Color standards are required for underwater color photography, and fuel rod deflection must be considered in evaluting rod-to-rod spaces.

Cook, J.A.; Olsen, C.S.

1981-01-01

46

Nonlinear Interactions in Drift Wave Spectrum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wave-wave interaction measurements for drift wave spectrum are performed in a linearly magnetized device by using Laser Induced Fluorescence(LIF). These experiments are performed by using inductively coupled plasma source producing the ArII plasma immersed in 1KG magnetic field along the axis of the cylindrical vessel. For every parallel ion particle velocity component of the distribution function, LIF is carried by pumping ArII metastables with a CW tunable dye laser. The collection of the signal by using two movable periscopes directed to PMTs allows us to determine the amplitude fluctuations along spatial variations. After the digitization of LIF data, cross and auto spectral components can be calculated. By using the power spectrum and the bispectrum measurements, we can model the interaction, and estimate the nonlinear transfer functions and the interaction coefficients.

Uzun, Ilker; Skiff, Frederick

2004-11-01

47

Magnify It!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students will learn that there are limits to what the eye can see and that a magnifying glass can help extend those limits. Students may have been exposed to optical technology such as glasses, magnifying lenses, or even periscopes, microscopes, and telescopes. This lesson aims to channel the inventive energy of students to increase their awareness and purposeful use of tools. They will view objects of various sizes from several viewing distances to discover that their visual field is limited. Students will record what they see and will compare their observations with classmates in an open, nonjudgmental forum. They will have the opportunity to speculate about and experiment freely with magnifying glasses and will also conduct more structured experiments.

48

Physical activity and play in kindergarten age children.  

PubMed

PERISCOPE project assesses factors promoting or preventing obesity development in early age. A specific aim is to assess preschool children's physical activity habits in three different European countries. PERISCOPE has been implemented in 1094 children attending kindergartens in Denmark, Italy and Poland. The parents' and children's physical activity habits and attitudes assessed by a questionnaire filled by the parents. Overweight and obesity assessed by Cole's BMI cut-off points. Statistical analysis performed by ?(2) test and the test of proportion. Denmark shows the lowest rate (14.6 %) of overweight, followed by Poland (17.1%), while Italy shows the highest (21.2 %) (p < 0.0001). The Polish families show the highest rate of walking from home to kindergarten and back, followed by the Italians and, lastly, the Danish ones (p < 0.001). Almost all the Danish and Polish children, but only the 50.1 % of the Italians play outside (p < 0.001). During the weekdays, 34.9 % of Polish children, 22.2 % of Italians and 19.8 % of the Danish play outside more than one hour a day (p < 0.0001). During the weekend, 91.1 % of Polish children, 86.7 % of Danish children, but only 54.4 % of Italians play outside more than one hour (p < 0.0001). 53.5 % of Danish children, 31.9 % of Polish children, and 18.2 % of Italian ones practice sport (p < 0.0001). Danish children are the most active, the Polish are in the middle and the Italians are the least active. The difference in infrastructures (safety of walking streets, access to playgrounds/parks, etc.) can play an important role, in addition to cultural and social family characteristics, to the development of overweight. PMID:21923297

Caroli, Margherita; Malecka-Tendera, Ewa; Epifani, Susi; Rollo, Rodolfo; Sansolios, Sanne; Matusik, Pawel; Mikkelsen, Bent E

2011-10-01

49

Hemispherical Field-of-View Above-Water Surface Imager for Submarines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A document discusses solutions to the problem of submarines having to rise above water to detect airplanes in the general vicinity. Two solutions are provided, in which a sensor is located just under the water surface, and at a few to tens of meter depth under the water surface. The first option is a Fish Eye Lens (FEL) digital-camera combination, situated just under the water surface that will have near-full- hemisphere (360 azimuth and 90 elevation) field of view for detecting objects on the water surface. This sensor can provide a three-dimensional picture of the airspace both in the marine and in the land environment. The FEL is coupled to a camera and can continuously look at the entire sky above it. The camera can have an Active Pixel Sensor (APS) focal plane array that allows logic circuitry to be built directly in the sensor. The logic circuitry allows data processing to occur on the sensor head without the need for any other external electronics. In the second option, a single-photon sensitive (photon counting) detector-array is used at depth, without the need for any optics in front of it, since at this location, optical signals are scattered and arrive at a wide (tens of degrees) range of angles. Beam scattering through clouds and seawater effectively negates optical imaging at depths below a few meters under cloudy or turbulent conditions. Under those conditions, maximum collection efficiency can be achieved by using a non-imaging photon-counting detector behind narrowband filters. In either case, signals from these sensors may be fused and correlated or decorrelated with other sensor data to get an accurate picture of the object(s) above the submarine. These devices can complement traditional submarine periscopes that have a limited field of view in the elevation direction. Also, these techniques circumvent the need for exposing the entire submarine or its periscopes to the outside environment.

Hemmati, Hamid; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Farr, William H.; Dannecker, John D.

2012-01-01

50

LG wargaming tool for effect-based operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The LG-WGT approach to EBO may be summarized as follows. 1) Causes and Effects will be defined as game state properties. 2) LG algorithms will automatically generate strategies to attain desired effects. The strategies will be generated through LG Zones. LG will model effects as properties of the game pieces and relations among the pieces and the board. 3) The overall Engagement Theater will be modeled as LG hypergame, that is several concurrent abstract board games (ABG) linked together via inter-linking mappings (ILM). LG will represent indirect effects in a related game linked with the game of interest via several ILMs. With LG-WGT, a commander will observe the entire operation as an omnipresent ghost with a virtual camera. He/she would be able to view the operation from the cockcpit of a fighter flying on a SEAD mission, from the cabin of an amphibious vehicle, through the periscope of an attack submarine, or from a virtual AWACS flying over the entire battlefield. Even a normally invisible element, like damages to adversarial infrastructure or political changes, will be made visible in virtual reality together with the chain of events causing this effect. The LG-WGT will provide explanation for all the decisions made employing probabilities of kill, integrated probabilities of survival, threshold for retreat, etc.

Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vladimir; McCrabb, Maris

2002-07-01

51

A multi-wavelength LIF detection system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present preliminary results from a new pair of 16 channel photon-counting LIF detection systems designed for measurements of ion phase-space fluctuations using laser-induced fluorescence in an magnetized singly-ionized Argon plasma column. Conventional LIF detection systems use narrow-bandwidth interference filters to block background light. These filters have limitations in that they are normally limited to a single wavelength and must be of large diameter to work efficiently with light from a low f-number light-collection first-optic. Especially for experiments observing fluorescence on multiple transitions (or where fluorescence may be spread out over several decay paths) it is useful to be able to observe multiple transitions in the light from each light collection system. We describe a system consisting of two movable light-collecting periscopes where the collected light is expanded to 10 cm diameter beams which are analyzed by means of diffraction gratings and imaged onto 16 element photomuliplier tubes. In each of the channels the pulses are discriminated and counted with an adjustable dwell time. Because the light collection system is imaging, the multiple elements can be used to resolve multiple spatial points or multiple spectral lines.

Skiff, Fred; Drake, Dereth; Good, Tim

2011-11-01

52

Feasibility of a self-nulling beam combiner using no external phase inverter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space-based nulling interferometers will play a major role in the search for exoplanets, as both NASA and ESA plan missions for the near future. Current architectures produce the requisite broadband ? phase shift in one arm of each nulling telescope pair by means of a system of "field flip" optics that may involve one of a number of sophisticated technologies (periscope, phase plates, through-focus, or other). The two beams, of equal intensity but conjugate phase, are then combined, perhaps in a modified Mach-Zehnder (MMZ) or similar beam combiner of high configurational symmetry. A novel approach has recently been proposed, however, in which the achromatic ? phase shift is supplied by two applications of the innate ?/2 phase shift between transmitted and reflected beams in a beam splitter. This simply requires using the traditionally bright output port of the MMZ as a nulled port; adaptive nulling can be used to ease the tolerances on matching the moduli of reflection and transmission coefficients. The rather substantial systems benefit that accrues is that the external phase shifting ("field flipping") optics may be entirely eliminated. Here, I discuss the feasibility of this "self-nulling" beam combiner scheme.

Bloemhof, E. E.

2005-08-01

53

Development of imaging bolometers for magnetic fusion reactors (invited)  

SciTech Connect

Imaging bolometers utilize an infrared (IR) video camera to measure the change in temperature of a thin foil exposed to the plasma radiation, thereby avoiding the risks of conventional resistive bolometers related to electric cabling and vacuum feedthroughs in a reactor environment. A prototype of the IR imaging video bolometer (IRVB) has been installed and operated on the JT-60U tokamak demonstrating its applicability to a reactor environment and its ability to provide two-dimensional measurements of the radiation emissivity in a poloidal cross section. In this paper we review this development and present the first results of an upgraded version of this IRVB on JT-60U. This upgrade utilizes a state-of-the-art IR camera (FLIR/Indigo Phoenix-InSb) (3-5 {mu}m, 256x360 pixels, 345 Hz, 11 mK) mounted in a neutron/gamma/magnetic shield behind a 3.6 m IR periscope consisting of CaF{sub 2} optics and an aluminum mirror. The IRVB foil is 7 cmx9 cmx5 {mu}m tantalum. A noise equivalent power density of 300 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} is achieved with 40x24 channels and a time response of 10 ms or 23 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} for 16x12 channels and a time response of 33 ms, which is 30 times better than the previous version of the IRVB on JT-60U.

Peterson, Byron J.; Parchamy, Homaira; Ashikawa, Naoko [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kawashima, Hisato; Konoshima, Shigeru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Kostryukov, Artem Yu.; Miroshnikov, Igor V. [St. Petersburg State Technical University, St. Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Seo, Dongcheol [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Omori, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2008-10-15

54

Quasicoherent Nonlinear Interactions in Ion Density Fluctuations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using Laser Induced Fluorescence(LIF) diagnostics, we present the phase-space resolved measurement of ion density fluctuations in a linearly magnetized device. These experiments are conducted in singly ionized ArII plasma, which is created by an inductively coupled plasma source, immersed in 1KG magnetic field along the axis of a cylindrical chamber. Cross and auto spectral estimates are calculated after the digitization of LIF signals collected from two independent periscopes having axially aligned mobility. The cross-power spectrum has a distinctive, broad peak near the drift wave frequency(&*circ;) that can be dissected into two components; the one having a long wavelength consistent with drift wave theory, and the other, which we call the `kinetic component,' with a shorter correlation length and ion particle velocity dependence. Bispectrum and bicoherence calculations, on the other hand, suggest a quasicoherent nonlinear interaction between the kinetic and the fluid components. As the neutral pressure and thus the ion-neutral collision frequency increase, we observe a certain threshold where the kinetic component vanishes from the cross-power spectrum. Meanwhile, in bicoherence calculations, the nonlinear coupling of &*circ; to its sub-harmonics is taken over by another nonlinear interaction that is between &*circ; and its second harmonic. We propose an explanation for these changes in the spectra and bispectra.

Uzun, Ilker

2005-10-01

55

Opto-mechanical devices for the Antares automatic beam alignment system  

SciTech Connect

Antares is a 24-beam CO/sub 2/ laser system for controlled fusion research, under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Rapid automatic alignment of this system is required prior to each experimental shot. Unique opto-mechanical alignment devices, which have been developed specifically for this automatic alignment system, are discussed. A variable focus alignment telescope views point light sources. A beam expander/spatial filter processes both a visible Krypton Ion and a 10.6 ..mu..m CO/sub 2/ alignment laser. The periscope/carousel device provides the means by which the alignment telescope can sequentially view each of twelve optical trains in each power amplifier. The polyhedron alignment device projects a point-light source for both centering and pointing alignment at the polyhedron mirror. The rotating wedge alignment device provides a sequencing point-light source and also compensates for dispersion between visible and 10.6 ..mu..m radiation. The back reflector flip in remotely positions point-light sources at the back reflector mirrors. A light source box illuminates optic fibers with high intensity white light which is distributed to the various point-light sources in the system.

Swann, T.; Combs, C.; Witt, J.

1981-01-01

56

Evolution of design concepts for remotely maintainable equipment racks  

SciTech Connect

Equipment racks have been used to support process equipment in radioactive facilities for many years. Improvements in the design of these racks have evolved relatively slowly primarily as a result of limitations in the capabilities of maintenance equipment; that is, tasks could only be approached from above using bridge cranes with viewing primarily through periscopes. In recent years, however, technological advances have been made by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in bridge-mounted servomanipulators with onboard auxiliary hoists and television viewing systems. These advances permit full cell coverage by the manipulator arms which, in turn, allow maintenance tasks to be approached horizontally as well as from above. Maintainable equipment items can be stacked vertically on a rack because total overhead access is less important and maintenance tasks that would not have been attempted in the past can now be performed. These advances permit greater flexibility in the design and cell layout of the racks and lead to concepts that could significantly increase the availability of a facility. The evolution of rack design and a description of the alternative concepts based on present maintenance systems capabilities are presented in this paper. 13 refs., 11 figs.

Peishel, F.L.; Mouring, R.W.; Schrock, S.L.

1986-01-01

57

Development of imaging bolometers for magnetic fusion reactors (invited).  

PubMed

Imaging bolometers utilize an infrared (IR) video camera to measure the change in temperature of a thin foil exposed to the plasma radiation, thereby avoiding the risks of conventional resistive bolometers related to electric cabling and vacuum feedthroughs in a reactor environment. A prototype of the IR imaging video bolometer (IRVB) has been installed and operated on the JT-60U tokamak demonstrating its applicability to a reactor environment and its ability to provide two-dimensional measurements of the radiation emissivity in a poloidal cross section. In this paper we review this development and present the first results of an upgraded version of this IRVB on JT-60U. This upgrade utilizes a state-of-the-art IR camera (FLIR/Indigo Phoenix-InSb) (3-5 microm, 256 x 360 pixels, 345 Hz, 11 mK) mounted in a neutron/gamma/magnetic shield behind a 3.6 m IR periscope consisting of CaF(2) optics and an aluminum mirror. The IRVB foil is 7 cm x 9 cm x 5 microm tantalum. A noise equivalent power density of 300 microW/cm(2) is achieved with 40 x 24 channels and a time response of 10 ms or 23 microW/cm(2) for 16 x 12 channels and a time response of 33 ms, which is 30 times better than the previous version of the IRVB on JT-60U. PMID:19044463

Peterson, Byron J; Parchamy, Homaira; Ashikawa, Naoko; Kawashima, Hisato; Konoshima, Shigeru; Kostryukov, Artem Yu; Miroshnikov, Igor V; Seo, Dongcheol; Omori, T

2008-10-01

58

Laboratory testbeds for broadband x-ray interferometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA's Strategic Plan for Space Sciences currently envisions a mission capable of resolving the event horizons of supermassive black holes, with imaging-spectroscopy capabilities at angular resolutions better than 0.1 microarcsecond. To achieve this goal, the Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), a broadband X-ray interferometer, is currently under study. Ground-based proof-of-concept efforts include experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of X-ray interferometry with simple optics. We describe here recent advances in laboratory testbeds, at the University of Colorado and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, that essentially replicate Young's double-slit experiment at X-ray energies. A typical apparatus employs four flat mirrors arranged in periscope pairs, with each pair illuminated at grazing incidence by a slit. We discuss the salient features of these experiments, technical hurdles such as metrology and line-of-sight issues, the successful detection of fringes at wavelengths as short as the Al Kalpha line at 8.35 Angstroms, and future upgrades of our facilities.

Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gendreau, Keith C.; Cash, Webster C.; Shipley, Ann F.; Queen, Steven Z.

2004-10-01

59

History of remote operations and robotics in nuclear facilities. Robotics and Intelligent Systems Program  

SciTech Connect

The field of remote technology is continuing to evolve to support man`s efforts to perform tasks in hostile environments. Remote technology has roots which reach into the early history of man. Fireplace pokers, blacksmith`s tongs, and periscopes are examples of the beginnings of remote technology. The technology which we recognize today has evolved over the last 45-plus years to support human operations in hostile environments such as nuclear fission and fusion, space, underwater, hazardous chemical, and hazardous manufacturing. The four major categories of approach to remote technology have been (1) protective clothing and equipment for direct human entry, (2) extended reach tools using distance for safety, (3) telemanipulators with barriers for safety, and (4) teleoperators incorporating mobility with distance and/or barriers for safety. The government and commercial nuclear industry has driven the development of the majority of the actual teleoperator hardware available today. This hardware has been developed due to the unsatisfactory performance of the protective-clothing approach in many hostile applications. Systems which have been developed include crane/impact wrench systems, unilateral power manipulators, mechanical master/slaves, and servomanipulators. Work for space applications has been primarily research oriented with few successful space applications, although the shuttle`s remote manipulator system has been successful. In the last decade, underwater applications have moved forward significantly, with the offshore oil industry and military applications providing the primary impetus. This document consists of viewgraphs and subtitled figures.

Herndon, J.N.

1992-05-01

60

History of remote operations and robotics in nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

The field of remote technology is continuing to evolve to support man's efforts to perform tasks in hostile environments. Remote technology has roots which reach into the early history of man. Fireplace pokers, blacksmith's tongs, and periscopes are examples of the beginnings of remote technology. The technology which we recognize today has evolved over the last 45-plus years to support human operations in hostile environments such as nuclear fission and fusion, space, underwater, hazardous chemical, and hazardous manufacturing. The four major categories of approach to remote technology have been (1) protective clothing and equipment for direct human entry, (2) extended reach tools using distance for safety, (3) telemanipulators with barriers for safety, and (4) teleoperators incorporating mobility with distance and/or barriers for safety. The government and commercial nuclear industry has driven the development of the majority of the actual teleoperator hardware available today. This hardware has been developed due to the unsatisfactory performance of the protective-clothing approach in many hostile applications. Systems which have been developed include crane/impact wrench systems, unilateral power manipulators, mechanical master/slaves, and servomanipulators. Work for space applications has been primarily research oriented with few successful space applications, although the shuttle's remote manipulator system has been successful. In the last decade, underwater applications have moved forward significantly, with the offshore oil industry and military applications providing the primary impetus. This document consists of viewgraphs and subtitled figures.

Herndon, J.N.

1992-01-01

61

Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the US processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive US processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Johns Manville Corporation targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. With Combustion Technology Inc., they are developing silicide-based periscope sight tubes for the direct observation of glass melts. With Accutru International Corporation, they are developing silicide-based protective sheaths for self-verifying temperature sensors which may be used in glass furnaces and other industrial applications. The progress made on the program in this period is summarized.

Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P.; Park, Y.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.

1999-03-01

62

Beryllium Use in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) began operation in 1967. It makes use of a unique serpentine fuel core design and a beryllium reflector. Reactor control is achieved with rotating beryllium cylinders to which have been fastened plates of hafnium. Over time, the beryllium develops rather high helium content because of nuclear transmutations and begins to swell. The beryllium must be replaced at nominally 10-year intervals. Determination of when the replacement is made is by visual observation using a periscope to examine the beryllium surface for cracking and swelling. Disposition of the irradiated beryllium was once accomplished in the INL’s Radioactive Waste Management Complex, but that is no longer possible. Among contributing reasons are high levels of specific radioactive contaminants including transuranics. The INL is presently considering disposition pathways for this irradiated beryllium, but presently is storing it in the canal adjacent to the reactor. Numerous issues are associated with this situation including (1) Is there a need for ultra-low uranium material? (2) Is there a need to recover tritium from irradiated beryllium either because this is a strategic material resource or in preparation for disposal? (3) Is there a need to remove activation and fission products from irradiated beryllium? (4) Will there be enough material available to meet requirements for research reactors (fission and fusion)? In this paper will be discussed the present status of considerations on these issues.

Glen R. Longhurst

2007-12-01

63

Nest Site Selection by Kentish Plover Suggests a Trade-Off between Nest-Crypsis and Predator Detection Strategies  

PubMed Central

Predation is one of the main causes of adult mortality and breeding failure for ground-nesting birds. Micro-habitat structure around nests plays a critical role in minimizing predation risk. Plovers nest in sites with little vegetation cover to maximize the incubating adult visibility, but many studies suggest a trade-off between nest-crypsis and predator detection strategies. However, this trade-off has not been explored in detail because methods used so far do not allow estimating the visibility with regards to critical factors such as slope or plant permeability to vision. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Kentish plovers select exposed sites according to a predator detection strategy, and the hypothesis that more concealed nests survive longer according to a crypsis strategy. To this end, we obtained an accurate estimation of the incubating adult's field of vision through a custom built inverted periscope. Our results showed that plovers selected nest sites with higher visibility than control points randomly selected with regards to humans and dogs, although nests located in sites with higher vegetation cover survived longer. In addition, the flushing distance (i.e., the distance at which incubating adults leave the nest when they detect a potential predator) decreased with vegetation cover. Consequently, the advantages of concealing the nest were limited by the ability to detect predators, thus indirectly supporting the existence of the trade-off between crypsis and predator detection. Finally, human disturbance also constrained nest choice, forcing plovers to move to inland sites that were less suitable because of higher vegetation cover, and modulated flushing behavior, since plovers that were habituated to humans left their nests closer to potential predators. This constraint on the width of suitable breeding habitat is particularly relevant for the conservation of Kentish Plover in sand beaches, especially under the current context of coastal regression and increase of recreational activities. PMID:25208045

Gomez-Serrano, Miguel Angel; Lopez-Lopez, Pascual

2014-01-01

64

A geodetic laser radar rangefinder with 10(exp -7) resolution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel geodetic laser radar rangefinder (GLRR) unit utilizing a pair of synchronized 10-psec streak camera systems was developed for displacement measurements of the earth's plates. In order to achieve minimum computing error and assure extremely high spatial resolution, an optical pulse registration clock was developed and used to register a fiducial mark on the time scale of the system. Conventional optical rangefinders have been limited to a relative resolution of 10(exp -6) even for short distances. The system to be reported on today has the capability of measuring a 50km range with an accuracy of 4mm corresponding to a relative resolution of 10(exp -7). With a gain of greater than 3 x 10(exp 3), the system has the capability of detecting extremely weak signals on the order of photon counting. This combined with temporal gating makes daytime measurements comparable in signal-to-noise ratio to nighttime viewing. This is useful for measuring faint signals returning over a range of several tens of kilometers. The present ranging system was designed to observe the mutual displacement of geodetic plates and was employed to measure the boundary between the Philippine and Asian geodetic plates that pass beneath the Suruga Bay near Hamamatsu City, Japan. The system has been in operation for over 3 years. In addition, the system has the ability of producing and detecting optical ranging pulses of several wavelengths simultaneously, making this a complete multicolor system. The basic GLRR system consists of a frequency stabilizing crystal, optical clock, YAG laser, KDP doubling crystal, DK*P tripling crystal, two matched streak cameras (A and B), a control computer, and an output/input periscope system.

Mizushima, Y.; Takeichi, M.; Warashima, Y.; Takeshima, A.; Ogawa, I.; Ichie, K.; Schiller, N. H.

1992-01-01

65

The off-axis viewing device: a rifle-mounted sighting system for search and engagement from covered positions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soldiers involved in urban operations are at a higher risk of receiving a bullet or fragment wound to the head or face compared to other parts of their body. One reason for this vulnerability is the need for the soldier to expose their head when looking and shooting from behind cover. Research conducted by DSTO Australia, using weapon-mounted cameras, has validated the concept of off-axis shooting but has emphasized the requirement for a system that closely integrates with both the soldier and his weapon. A system was required that would not adversely effect the usability, utility or accuracy of the weapon. Several Concept Demonstrators were developed over a two-year period and the result of this development is the Off-Axis Viewing Device (OAVD). The OAVD is an un-powered sighting attachment that integrates with a red dot reflex sight and enables the soldier to scan for and engage targets from a position of cover. The image from the weapon's scope is transmitted through the OAVD's periscopic mirror system to the soldier. Mounted directly behind the sight, the OAVD can also be swiveled to a redundant position on the side of the weapon to allow normal on-axis use of the sight. The OAVD can be rotated back into place behind the sight with one hand, or removed and stored in the soldier's webbing. In May 2004, a rapid acquisition program was initiated to develop the concept to an in-service capability and the OAVD is currently being deployed with the Australian Defence Force.

Chapman, Thomas; Brady, Christopher

2007-04-01

66

Formation, Simulation and Restoration of Hypertelescopes Images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article first provides a historical and detailed introduction to the image formation models for diluted pupils array and their densified versions called hypertelescopes. We propose in particular an original derivation showing that densification using a periscopic setting like in Michelson's 20 - foot interferometer, or using inverted Galilean telescopes are fully equivalent. After a review based on previous reference studies (Tallon & Tallon-Bosc 1992; Labeyrie 1996; Aime 2008 and Aime et al. 2012), the introductory part ends with a tutorial section for simulating optical interferometric images produced by cophased arrays. We illustrate in details how the optical image formation model can be used to simulate hypertelescopes images, including sampling issues and their effects on the observed images. In a second part of the article, we address the issue of restoring hypertelescope images and present numerical illustrations obtained for classical (constrained Maximum Likelihood) methods. We also provide a detailed survey of more recent deconvolution methods based on sparse representations and of their spread in interferometric image reconstruction. The last part of the article is dedicated to two original and numerical studies. The first study shows by Monte Carlo simulations that the restoration quality achieved by constrained ML methods applied to photon limited images obtained from a diluted array on a square grid, or from a densified array (without spectral aliasing) on a grid, are essentially equivalent. The second study shows that it is possible to recover in hypertelescopes images quasi point sources that are not only far outside the clean field, but also superimposed on the replicas of other objects. This is true at least for the considered pupil array and in the limit of vanishing noise.

Mary, D.; Aime, C.; Carlotti, A.

2013-03-01

67

Thiazolidinediones: effects on the development and progression of type 2 diabetes and associated vascular complications.  

PubMed

In addition to reducing hyperglycaemia, the metabolic actions of TZDs (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone) in theory might improve the prognosis of patients with type 2 diabetes. However, it appears from recent data that pioglitazone and rosiglitazone have different cardiovascular risk profiles. The scope of this paper is to examine the benefits and risks of pioglitazone and rosiglitazone. Three large clinical studies (DREAM, and ADOPT with rosiglitazone; PROactive with pioglitazone) have recently been reported. A lower annual rate of decline of ss-cell function observed with rosiglitazone in the ADOPT study, compared with metformin and glyburide (glibenclamide), along with a reduced progression to insulin use seen with pioglitazone in the PROactive study, provides evidence that TZDs are effective in treating progressive hyperglycaemia. In PROactive, although the primary endpoint was not met, pioglitazone was associated with a reduction in a secondary composite endpoint of clinical cardiovascular events in high-risk patients with existing macrovascular disease who were already receiving other glycaemic and cardiovascular medications. Further evidence supporting an anti-atherogenic effect of pioglitazone was gained from the PERISCOPE study of carotid intima-media thickness. Recent controversy concerning a possible increased risk of myocardial infarction associated with rosiglitazone has fuelled uncertainty about the risk-benefit profile of this agent. In 2008, an update of an American Diabetes Association-European Association for the Study of Diabetes consensus statement on initiation and adjustment of therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes advised clinicians against using rosiglitazone. Skeletal fractures have recently emerged as a side effect of both TZDs. Available data suggest that cardiovascular benefits observed with pioglitazone might not be a class effect of TZDs. PMID:19219860

Krentz, Andrew

2009-02-01

68

A historical perspective of remote operations and robotics in nuclear facilities. Robotics and Intelligent Systems Program  

SciTech Connect

The field of remote technology is continuing to evolve to support man`s efforts to perform tasks in hostile environments. The technology which we recognize today as remote technology has evolved over the last 45 years to support human operations in hostile environments such as nuclear fission and fusion, space, underwater, hazardous chemical, and hazardous manufacturing. The four major categories of approach to remote technology have been (1) protective clothing and equipment for direct human entry, (2) extended reach tools using distance for safety, (3) telemanipulators with barriers for safety, and (4) teleoperators incorporating mobility with distance and/or barriers for safety. The government and commercial nuclear industry has driven the development of the majority of the actual teleoperator hardware available today. This hardware has been developed largely due to the unsatisfactory performance of the protective-clothing approach in many hostile applications. Manipulation systems which have been developed include crane/impact wrench systems, unilateral power manipulators, mechanical master/slaves, and servomanipulators. Viewing systems have included periscopes, shield windows, and television systems. Experience over the past 45 years indicates that maintenance system flexibility is essential to typical repair tasks because they are usually not repetitive, structured, or planned. Fully remote design (manipulation, task provisions, remote tooling, and facility synergy) is essential to work task efficiency. Work for space applications has been primarily research oriented with relatively few successful space applications, although the shuttle`s remote manipulator system has been quite successful. In the last decade, underwater applications have moved forward significantly, with the offshore oil industry and military applications providing the primary impetus.

Herndon, J.N.

1992-12-31

69

Investigating the possibility of a monitoring fast ion diagnostic for ITERa)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In burning plasma fusion devices, fast ion transport plays a central role in the performances of the machines. Moreover the losses of energetic particles might cause severe damages on plasma facing components. Therefore real time measurements of fast ion transport would provide valuable information for safe and reliable plasma operations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of a monitoring system based on active charge exchange recombination spectroscopy making use of the 0.5MeV/amu ITER heating neutral beams for detecting fast He+24 (alphas) particles in ITER plasmas. There are two time scales relevant to fast ion dynamics: the first is the slowing down time of the distribution function which is of the order of 1s, and the second is the time scale of burstlike transport events such as collective Alfvén mode excitations, which—for typical ITER plasma parameters—can be as low as 0.2-1ms. To detect such fast events a broadband high-throughput spectrometer is needed, while for the reconstruction of the alpha velocity distribution function a higher resolution spectrometer and longer integration time are necessary. To monitor a spatial redistribution of fast particles due to the propagation of the instability, it is proposed to use a limited number of spatial channels, looking at the charge exchange HeII spectra induced by the heating beams, whose energy matches the slowing down energies of fast particles. The proposal is to share the motional stark effect periscope on equatorial port 3 [A. Malaquias et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3393 (2004)] adding additional fibers and suitable instruments. A signal to noise ratio of 5 could be achieved with a spatial resolution of a /15 and a time resolution of 5ms, in a broad spectral band of 100Ĺ, corresponding to the spectral broadening of the line emitted by alpha particles with energies ?E ?1.5MeV. Fast H and D ion populations created by heating neutral beam or ion cyclotron resonance heating are expected to produce significantly lower charge exchange signal levels and can only be monitored on substantially longer time scales as it is expected because of the strong energy difference with respect to the heating neutral beam and the consequently low charge exchange cross sections.

De Angelis, R.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Orsitto, F. P.; Tugarinov, S.

2008-10-01

70

Obituary: Cornell H. Mayer, 1921-2005  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cornell (Connie) H. Mayer, a pioneer of radio astronomy, died on 19 November 2005 of congestive heart failure at his home in Mt. Vernon, Virginia. He was eighty-three. Cornell Mayer was born in Ossian, Iowa on 10 December 1921. After graduating from the University of Iowa in 1943, he joined the Navy during World War II and was stationed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, DC. There he assisted Fred T. Haddock in the development of the first radar antenna inside a submarine periscope. This device has been credited with shortening the war in the Pacific because of the number of Japanese ships that were sunk with its aid. With Haddock, Connie also discovered centimeter-wave radio bursts from the sun coincident with solar flares. They made the first detection of thermal radio emission from the Orion nebula and other galactic HII regions. They also detected extragalactic objects and thus initiated the important field of centimeter-wave astronomy. Their observations were made with a 50-foot parabolic reflector on a gun mount located on the roof of one of the NRL buildings. This telescope had the world's highest radio resolving power for many years. With Haddock's departure to the University of Michigan in 1956 to create a new radio observatory there, Connie became head of a group in the Radio Astronomy Branch at NRL, where he remained until his retirement in 1980. Much of his work involved the measurement of planetary temperatures by analysis of radio emissions. By making technical innovations in instrumentation--such as replacing disc choppers with a ferrite switch to compare the sky and reference load, or using argon gas tubes for calibration--Connie greatly improved the performance of his equipment. This resulted in the discovery of an astonishing, 600oC surface temperature of Venus, which contradicted the widespread notion that Venus was similar to the Earth and potentially habitable. In spite of the extraordinarily careful and systematic way that the observations were carried out and analyzed, many remained skeptical about the result and its interpretation in terms of a massive greenhouse effect, until the Mariner-II spacecraft fly-by in 1962, which put all such doubts to rest. Connie and his group continued to make radio observations of other planets and discovered a non-thermal centimeter wavelength emission from Jupiter. This led directly to work done at Caltech that demonstrated the existence of Van Allen-like belts around the planet. Being a superb engineer, Connie firmly believed that technology led to scientific discovery. Like others, he was preoccupied with the improvement of the sensitivity of radio astronomy receivers, and applied physics to new designs. In 1959, Connie collaborated with Charles Townes and his students at Columbia in the first application of the maser to astronomy. When Townes received the 1964 Nobel Prize for the invention of the maser, he asserted that Connie's desire to improve receiver sensitivity was influential in his work and shared a portion of his prize money with him. Connie's greatest contribution was in the study of non-thermal radio sources at very short wavelengths. Non-thermal sources were recognized by the fact that their flux density decreases with increasing frequency. If the emission mechanism were synchrotron radiation (as theorized in 1950), then the radiation should be linearly polarized up to a theoretical maximum of 70 percent. In 1949, John Bolton had identified a discrete radio source with the Crab Nebula optical counterpart. The optical radiation was known to contain a diffuse component with a featureless spectrum. The Russian astrophysicist Joseph Shklovsky boldly hypothesized that both the optical and radio emissions were due to the synchrotron mechanism. This implied that the optical radiation would be polarized, and Soviet scientists found it so in 1954. Soon after, the radio source Virgo A was matched with the peculiar galaxy M87, whose spectrally featureless optical jet was found to be polarized in 1956. Thus the crucial evidence in support of

Radhakrishnan, Venkataraman

2006-12-01