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1

Toward a permanent lunar settlement in the coming decade: the Columbus Project  

SciTech Connect

The motivation for creating a permanent lunar settlement is sketched, and reasons for doing so in the coming decade are put forward. A basic plan to accomplish this is outlined, along technical and programmatic axes. It is concluded that founding a lunar settlement on the five hundredth anniversary of the Columbus landing - a Columbus Project - could be executed as a volunteer-intensive American enterprise requiring roughly six thousand man-years of skilled endeavor and a total Governmental contribution of the order of a half-billion dollars. 8 figs.

Hyde, R.A.; Ishikawa, M.Y.; Wood, L.L.

1985-11-19

2

Steps toward lunar settlement  

SciTech Connect

The costs of transporting people and material to low-earth-orbit (LEO), and thence to the lunar surface, will constrain the pace and pattern of lunar development. Beginning as a spartan ''base camp'' completely supplied from Earth, a lunar science-and-resource-development facility could grow in size, amenities, and capability to the point that passenger transport becomes a major expense. At such a stage, some employees of the facility might be given the opportunity to become permanent residents; and at that point, lunar settlement will have begun. We assume growth rates of facilities and staff contained by the annual delivery of 900 tons to LEO. During the base camp era, about 100 tons would be delivered annually to the lunar surface. Within six years, the facility could grow to a collection of 25 modules, housing a staff of about 16 with each member of the staff serving a six-month tour on a staggered schedule. At the end of this first phase, oxygen produced from lunar ilmenite and delivered to lunar orbit for use as propellant would allow annual lunar-bound cargos of about 200 tons. Production from lunar materials of heat shields for aerobraking would enable economical delivery of lunar oxygen to LEO and, therefore, could raise lunar-bound cargoes to about 450 tons. Accumulatin of production capabilities would eventually allow use of lunar construction materials, to build farms and increase per capita living and working space. Once closed-loop environmental systems are in place, transport costs are dominated by staff rotation and the facility is limited to a maximum staff size of about 300. Further expansion requires that some staff become permanent residents.

Jones, E.M.

1988-01-01

3

Lunar Limb Observatory: An Incremental Plan for the Utilization, Exploration, and Settlement of the Moon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper proposes a comprehensive incremental program, Lunar Limb Observatory (LLO), for a return to the Moon, beginning with robotic missions and ending with a permanent lunar settlement. Several recent technological developments make such a program bo...

P. D. Lowman

1996-01-01

4

Lunar Limb Observatory: An Incremental Plan for the Utilization, Exploration, and Settlement of the Moon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper proposes a comprehensive incremental program, Lunar Limb Observatory (LLO), for a return to the Moon, beginning with robotic missions and ending with a permanent lunar settlement. Several recent technological developments make such a program both affordable and scientifically valuable: robotic telescopes, the Internet, light-weight telescopes, shared- autonomy/predictive graphics telerobotic devices, and optical interferometry systems. Reasons for focussing new NASA programs on the Moon include public interest, Moon-based astronomy, renewed lunar exploration, lunar resources (especially helium-3), technological stimulus, accessibility of the Moon (compared to any planet), and dispersal of the human species to counter predictable natural catastrophes, asteroidal or cometary impacts in particular. The proposed Lunar Limb Observatory would be located in the crater Riccioli, with auxiliary robotic telescopes in M. Smythii and at the North and South Poles. The first phase of the program, after site certification, would be a series of 5 Delta-launched telerobotic missions to Riccioli (or Grimaldi if Riccioli proves unsuitable), emplacing robotic telescopes and carrying out surface exploration. The next phase would be 7 Delta-launched telerobotic missions to M. Smythii (2 missions), the South Pole (3 missions), and the North Pole (2 missions), emplacing robotic telescopes to provide continuous all-sky coverage. Lunar base establishment would begin with two unmanned Shuttle/Fitan-Centaur missions to Riccioli, for shelter emplacement, followed by the first manned return, also using the Shuttle/Fitan-Centaur mode. The main LLO at Riccioli would then be permanently or periodically inhabited, for surface exploration, telerobotic rover and telescope operation and maintenance, and support of Earth-based student projects. The LLO would evolve into a permanent human settlement, serving, among other functions, as a test area and staging base for the exploration, settlement, and terraforming of Mars.

Lowman, Paul. D., Jr.

1996-01-01

5

Lunar base as a precursor to Mars exploration and settlement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A well planned program of human exploration of the moon is suggested which would provide a base for increasing human capabilities and experience to levels required for Mars exploration. A strategy intended for immediate Mars exploration and settlement is considered to incur serious programmatic risks from current lack of knowledge on human performance on long-duration deep space missions and lack of experience in designing human space systems. The lunar program provides an opportunity to build up space capability in an evolutionary way and to broaden the participation of the educational system in the space exploration.

Mendell, Wendell W.

1991-01-01

6

Lessons learned studying design issues for lunar and Mars settlements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a study of lunar and Mars settlement concepts, an analysis was made of fundamental design assumptions in five technical areas against a model list of occupational and environmental health concerns. The technical areas included the proposed science projects to be supported, habitat and construction issues, closed ecosystem issues, the "MMM" issues (mining, material processing, and manufacturing), and the human elements of physiology, behavior, and mission approach. Four major lessons were learned. First it is possible to relate public health concerns to complex technological development in a proactive design mode, which has the potential for long-term cost savings. Second, it became very apparent that prior to committing any nation or international group to spending the billions to start and complete a lunar settlement, over the next century, that a significantly different approach must be taken from those previously proposed, to solve the closed ecosystem and "MMM" problems. Third, it also appears that the health concerns and technology issues to be addressed for human exploration into space are fundamentally those to be solved for human habitation of the Earth (as a closed ecosystem) in the 21st century. Finally, it is proposed that ecosystem design modeling must develop new tools, based on probabilistic models as a step up from closed circuit models.

Litton, C. E.

1997-01-01

7

Lessons learned studying design issues for lunar and Mars settlements.  

PubMed

In a study of lunar and Mars settlement concepts, an analysis was made of fundamental design assumptions in five technical areas against a model list of occupational and environmental health concerns. The technical areas included the proposed science projects to be supported, habitat and construction issues, closed ecosystem issues, the "MMM" issues (mining, material processing, and manufacturing), and the human elements of physiology, behavior, and mission approach. Four major lessons were learned. First it is possible to relate public health concerns to complex technological development in a proactive design mode, which has the potential for long-term cost savings. Second, it became very apparent that prior to committing any nation or international group to spending the billions to start and complete a lunar settlement, over the next century, that a significantly different approach must be taken from those previously proposed, to solve the closed ecosystem and "MMM" problems. Third, it also appears that the health concerns and technology issues to be addressed for human exploration into space are fundamentally those to be solved for human habitation of the Earth (as a closed ecosystem) in the 21st century. Finally, it is proposed that ecosystem design modeling must develop new tools, based on probabilistic models as a step up from closed circuit models. PMID:11542289

Litton, C E

1997-01-01

8

Patterns of lunar settlement and early recruitment in Caribbean reef fishes at Panamá  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lunar patterns of settlement of 15 Caribbean reef fishes were assessed from daily collections of newly arrived fishes from each of two small (A=63 and B=28 m2) patch reefs at Punta de San Blas (Panamá) during two consecutive 2 yr periods (1984, 1985 and 1986, 1987). In 12 species settlement was lunar-cyclic, with a broad peak of activity around the

D. R. Robertson

1992-01-01

9

Three Alternatives for the Acquisition of an Initial Lunar Installation: Lunar Laboratory, Temporary Lunar Base, Permanent Lunar Base  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The exploration of the Moon began with the APOLLO Program in 1969. The first phase ended in 1972 with the 6th landing of a two man crew. An attempt of President George H. Bush in 1989 to revive this program failed due to drastic changes in the geopolitical environment prevaling in the aftermath of the dissolution of the Soviet Union. However, the exploration and utilization of lunar resources is likely to continue. This will be possible as soon as the state of the planet permits an adequate priority for this enterprise, provided that viable plans are available to enter the next phase of lunar exploration. This paper presents three such program options: A Permanent Lunar Base, a Temporary Lunar Base, and a Temporary Lunar Laboratory , the latter solely for research purposes. These programs have an optional life cycle of 30 or 10 years and a crew of 50 to 100 people, respectively. Life cycle program costs of the se Lunar installation options range between 25 and 50 B, and can double if they are including the cost of the logistic system. However, average annual program cost do not exceed 3 B, a level that indicates that programs of this type and size are affordable.

Koelle, H. H.

10

Strategies for a permanent lunar base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three objectives are stated for activities at a proposed manned lunar base. One objective is scientific investigation of the moon and its environment and the application of special properties of the moon to research problems. Another objective would be to produce the capability of using the materials of the moon for beneficial purposes throughout the earth-moon system. The third objective is to conduct research and development leading to a self-sufficient and self-supporting lunar base, the first extraterrestrial human colony. The potential benefits to earth deriving from these moon-based activities, such as technology development and realization, as well as growing industrialization of near-earth space, are addressed.

Duke, Michael B.; Mendell, Wendell W.; Roberts, Barney B.

1989-01-01

11

Establishing occupational and environmental health design requirements for Lunar and Mars settlements  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a study of Lunar and Mars settlement concepts, an analysis was made of fundamental design assumptions in five technical areas against a model list of occupational and environmental health concerns. The technical areas included the proposed science projects to be supported, habitat and construction issues, closed ecosystem issues, the \\

Craig Earnest Litton

1996-01-01

12

Permanent Lunar Surface Magnetism and Its Deflection of the Solar Wind  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic compressions intermittently observed outside the lunar wake in the solar wind may be limb shocks caused by the presence of local regions of permanent magnetism on the lunar limb. Observable compression would be due to regions of length scale (radius) at least as great as several tens of kilometers and field strength gtrsim 10 gammas. Thousands of such regions

Aaron Barnes; Patrick Cassen; J. D. Mihalov; Aharon Eviatar

1971-01-01

13

Radiological operational scenario for a permanent lunar base  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An operational scenario for a lunar base is postulated based on 30 lunar base personnel and 2 year tours of duty plus stipulated numbers of EVA's and sorties in the lunar rover vehicles. It is also postulated that the main shielding material for the lunar base units (habitats, laboratories, etc.) will be lunar regolith. Using the solar minimum period as the basis, total accumulated dose equivalents for the galactic cosmic radiation over the two year period are computed at various shielding depths. Depths of regolith of over 20 g/sq cm are sufficient to reduce the total dose equivalents to well under the present limits. The second arm of the radiological health strategy -- continuous and all-encompassing radiation dosimetry -- is also discussed in some detail. It is also emphasized that monitoring of the base personnel for genetic mutations and chromosomal aberrations must be part of the radiological health program in the lunar base.

McCormack, Percival D.

14

Thermal Analyses of Apollo Lunar Soils Provide Evidence for Water in Permanently Shadowed Areas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thermally-evolved-gas analyses were performed on the Apollo lunar soils shortly after their return to Earth [1-8]. The analyses revealed the presence of water evolving at temperatures above 200 C. Of particular interest are samples that were collected from permanently-shadowed locations (e.g., under a boulder) with a second sample collected in nearby sunlight, and pairs in which one was taken from the top of a trench, and the second was taken at the base of the trench, where the temperature would have been -10 to -20 C prior to the disturbance [9]. These samples include 63340/63500, 69941/69961, and 76240/76280. At the time that this research was first reported, the idea of hydrated minerals on the lunar surface was somewhat novel. Nevertheless, goethite was observed in lunar breccias from Apollo 14 [10], and it was shown that goethite, hematite and magnetite could originate in an equilibrium assemblage of lunar rocks

Cooper, Bonnie L.; Smith, M. C.; Gibson, E. K.

2011-01-01

15

Direct Solar Wind Proton Access into Permanently Shadowed Lunar Polar Craters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent analyses of Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer (LPNS) data have suggested that high abundances of hydrogen exist within cold traps at the lunar poles, and it has often been assumed that hydrogen-bearing volatiles sequestered in permanent shadow are topographically shielded from sputtering by solar wind protons. However, recent simulation results are presented showing that solar wind protons clearly access the floor of an idealized, shadowed lunar crater through a combination of thermal and ambipolar processes, in effect creating a plasma "miniwake". These simulations are the first to model the mini-wake environment in two spatial dimensions with a self-consistent lunar surface-plasma interaction. Progress is reported on constraining the nonzero particle fluxes and energies incident on kilometer-scale shadowed topography, such as a small crater embedded within a larger one. The importance of direct solar wind proton bombardment is discussed within the context of understanding the stability and inventory of hydrogen-bearing volatiles in shadow at the lunar poles. The support of the National Lunar Science institute, the DREAM institute, LPROPS, and the NASA Postdoctoral Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center administered by ORAU are gratefully acknowledged.

Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.

2011-01-01

16

Direct solar wind proton access into permanently shadowed lunar polar craters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent analyses of Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer (LPNS) data have suggested that high abundances of hydrogen exist within cold traps at the lunar poles, and it has often been assumed that hydrogen-bearing volatiles sequestered in permanent shadow are topographically shielded from sputtering by solar wind protons. However, recent simulation results are presented showing that textbf{solar wind protons clearly access the floor of an idealized, shadowed lunar crater} through a combination of thermal and ambipolar processes, in effect creating a plasma "mini-wake". These simulations are the first to model the mini-wake environment in two spatial dimensions with a self-consistent lunar surface-plasma interaction. Progress is reported on constraining the nonzero particle fluxes and energies incident on kilometer-scale shadowed topography, such as a small crater embedded within a larger one. The importance of direct solar wind proton bombardment is discussed within the context of understanding the stability and inventory of hydrogen-bearing volatiles in shadow at the lunar poles. textit{The support of the National Lunar Science Institute, the DREAM Institute, LPROPS, and the NASA Postdoctoral Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center administered by ORAU are gratefully acknowledged.}

Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.

2011-12-01

17

Anticipated Electrical Environment Within Permanently Shadowed Lunar Craters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shadowed locations ncar the lunar poles arc almost certainly electrically complex regions. At these locations near the terminator, the local solar wind flows nearly tangential to the surface and interacts with large-scale topographic features such as mountains and deep large craters, In this work, we study the solar wind orographic effects from topographic obstructions along a rough lunar surface, On the leeward side of large obstructions, plasma voids are formed in the solar wind because of the absorption of plasma on the upstream surface of these obstacles, Solar wind plasma expands into such voids) producing an ambipolar potential that diverts ion flow into the void region. A surface potential is established on these leeward surfaces in order to balance the currents from the expansion-limited electron and ion populations, Wc find that there arc regions ncar the leeward wall of the craters and leeward mountain faces where solar wind ions cannot access the surface, leaving an electron-rich plasma previously identified as an "electron cloud." In this case, some new current is required to complete the closure for current balance at the surface, and we propose herein that lofted negatively charged dust is one possible (nonunique) compensating current source. Given models for both ambipolar and surface plasma processes, we consider the electrical environment around the large topographic features of the south pole (including Shoemaker crater and the highly varied terrain near Nobile crater), as derived from Goldstone radar data, We also apply our model to moving and stationary objects of differing compositions located on the surface and consider the impact of the deflected ion flow on possible hydrogen resources within the craters

Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Killen, R. M.; Delory, G. T.; Collier, M. R.; Vondrak, R. R.

2010-01-01

18

Technical issues for lunar base structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The establishment of a permanent human presence on other planets will require establishing permanent infrastructure in new environments. Civil engineers select, define, and implement solutions to infrastructure design problems in unique environmental contexts. Wind and seismic loading are two examples of constraints long familiar to terrestrial civil engineering. Designing structrues for lunar exploration, development and eventual settlement will make use

Brent Sherwood; Larry Toups

1992-01-01

19

Depth and Horizontal Distribution of Volatiles in Lunar Permanently Shadowed Regions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Neutron spectroscopy from Lunar Prospector returned data consistent with the presence of water ice in the near-subsurface of the Moon in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) at low spatial resolution. Clementine and ground-based radar returned tantalizing, but inconclusive evidence of ice in lunar PSRs. Later, Mini-RF on Chandrayaan-1 and LRO detected a signature consistent with water ice in some polar craters on the Moon, but not all PSRs. Similarly, LEND on LRO detected a heterogeneous distribution of hydrogen among lunar PSRs. In addition, LAMP on LRO detected FUV spectra consistent with a heterogeneous distribution of frost on the surface of permanently shadowed regions. Yet the weakest spectral feature from LAMP was associated with the crater with the strongest hydrogen feature from LEND. The impact of LCROSS into Cabeus released water and other volatiles, but abundances were higher than the background amounts detected by neutron spectroscopy implying heterogeneity within that PSR. Data from any one instrument taken alone would lead one to a different conclusion about the distribution of volatiles than data taken from any other single instrument. Although the data from different instrumentation can seem to be disparate, the apparent discrepancy results from the different fields of view and sensitivities of the detection techniques. The complementary nature of these data can be exploited to provide a multi-dimensional view of volatiles in lunar PSRs. We apply a Monte Carlo model to describe the retention and redistribution of volatiles within lunar cold traps. The model runs constrain the coherence of volatile deposits with depth, area, and time, which allows us to examine how a given volatile distribution would appear to remote sensing experiments. This provides a big picture framework for integrating the observations of volatiles on the surface and at depth at the poles of the Moon with the goal of finding a distribution of volatiles in lunar PSRs consistent with all of the data.

Hurley, D. M.; Bussey, B.; Lawrence, D. J.; Gladstone, R.; Elphic, R. C.; Vondrak, R. R.

2011-12-01

20

LRO Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP): Exploration of Permanently Shadowed Regions and the Lunar Atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LRO/LAMP is a UV spectrograph designed to address how water is formed on the moon, transported through the lunar atmosphere, and deposited in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs). Its main objectives are to 1) identify exposed water frost in PSRs, 2) characterize landforms and albedos in PSRs, 3) demonstrate the feasibility of using natural starlight and sky-glow illumination for future lunar surface mission applications, and 4) to assay the lunar atmosphere and its variability. The LAMP spectrograph will accomplish the first three objectives by measuring interplanetary HI Ly? sky-glow and FUV starlight reflected from the PSRs. Both of these light sources provide fairly uniform, but faint, illumination (e.g., the reflected Ly? signal is expected to be ~10~R). Thanks to LAMP's sensitivity, however, by the end of the nominal 1-year mission the SNR for a Ly? albedo map will be >100/km2 in the polar regions, allowing the characterization of subtle compositional and structural features. Dayside and nightside lunar surface reflectance measurements of other regions are also planned to measure variations in the illumination sources for improved accuracy. The production and transport of Lunar atmosphere constituents H and Ar will be investigated by observation of their resonantly scattered FUV emissions. The detection and discovery of other constituent emissions is also expected. LAMP albedo maps of PSR landforms and potential surface water ice will be used to identify landing sites for future scientific exploration of these regions and investigation of the intriguing processes that occur within them.

Retherford, K. D.; Stern, S. A.; Black, R. K.; Slater, D. C.; Gladstone, G. R.; Feldman, P. D.; Crider, D. H.; Parker, J. W.; Dirks, G. J.; Versteeg, M. H.; Persson, K. B.; Sykes, H. A.; Davis, M. W.; Stack, J. A.; Case, T. R.; McCullough, L. D.; de Los Santos, A.; Kaufmann, D. E.; Andrews, P. M.

2006-12-01

21

Preliminary Mapping of Permanently Shadowed and Sunlit Regions Using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spin axis of the Moon is tilted by only 1.5° (compared with the Earth's 23.5°), leaving some areas near the poles in permanent shadow while other nearby regions remain sunlit for a majority of the year. Theory, radar data, neutron measurements, and Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) observations suggest that volatiles may be present in the cold traps created inside these permanently shadowed regions. While areas of near permanent illumination are prime locations for future lunar outposts due to benign thermal conditions and near constant solar power. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has two imaging systems that provide medium and high resolution views of the poles. During almost every orbit the LROC Wide Angle Camera (WAC) acquires images at 100 m/pixel of the polar region (80° to 90° north and south latitude). In addition, the LROC Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) targets selected regions of interest at 0.7 to 1.5 m/pixel [Robinson et al., 2010]. During the first 11 months of the nominal mission, LROC acquired almost 6,000 WAC images and over 7,300 NAC images of the polar region (i.e., within 2° of pole). By analyzing this time series of WAC and NAC images, regions of permanent shadow and permanent, or near-permanent illumination can be quantified. The LROC Team is producing several reduced data products that graphically illustrate the illumination conditions of the polar regions. Illumination movie sequences are being produced that show how the lighting conditions change over a calendar year. Each frame of the movie sequence is a polar stereographic projected WAC image showing the lighting conditions at that moment. With the WAC’s wide field of view (~100 km at an altitude of 50 km), each frame has repeat coverage between 88° and 90° at each pole. The same WAC images are also being used to develop multi-temporal illumination maps that show the percent each 100 m × 100 m area is illuminated over a period of time. These maps are derived by stacking all the WAC frames, selecting a threshold to determine if the surface is illuminated, and summing the resulting binary images. In addition, mosaics of NAC images are also being produced for regions of interest at a scale of 0.7 to 1.5 m/pixel. The mosaics produced so far have revealed small illuminated surfaces on the tens of meters scale that were previously thought to be shadowed during that time. The LROC dataset of the polar regions complements previous illumination analysis of Clementine images [Bussey et al., 1999], Kaguya topography [Bussey et al., 2010], and the current efforts underway by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Team [Mazarico et al., 2010] and provide an important new dataset for science and exploration. References: Bussey et al. (1999), Illumination conditions at the lunar south pole, Geophysical Research Letters, 26(9), 1187-1190. Bussey et al. (2010), Illumination conditions of the south pole of the Moon derived from Kaguya topography, Icarus, 208, 558-564. Mazarico et al. (2010), Illumination of the lunar poles from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Topography Data, paper presented at 41st LPSC, Houston, TX. Robinson et al. (2010), Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Instrument Overview, Space Sci Rev, 150, 81-124.

Speyerer, E.; Koeber, S.; Robinson, M. S.

2010-12-01

22

W.W.W. MOON? The why, what and when of a permanent manned lunar colony.  

PubMed

Several reasons for going back to the Moon are listed: scientific study of our natural satellite, Earth and in general the Solar System; exploitation of the resources of Outer Space; geopolitical considerations that made Apollo possible and are still valid in the long term; advancement of manned spaceflight, as robot-based exploration is time-wise inefficient and politically negligible. Technological, organisational and legal challenges are then outlined. After a discussion of human physiology, building materials and transportation of people and goods, an underground polar location is proposed as settlement site, either within kilometre-size lava tubes or man-made caves. An analysis of spaceflight history is conducted to determine a target date for returning to the Moon to stay. In the absence of political or commercial competition, experience indicates the last decades of the XXI century. To shorten this timescale, it is recommended to focus on accomplishing the task of establishing a reliable lunar travel and settlement system, rather than developing new technologies: simplifying the goals of each single step forward (as was the case of the Clementine mission) and concentrating on production-ready (or almost-ready) equipment (compare the ill-fated X-33 to the dependable Soyuz capsules). PMID:15852541

Morabito, Maurizio

2005-01-01

23

Testing Lunar Permanently Shadowed Regions for Water Ice: LEND Results from LRO  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We use measurements from the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) collimated sensors during more than one year of the mapping phase of NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission to make estimates of the epithermal neutron flux within known large Permanently Shadowed Regions (PSRs). These are compared with the local neutron background measured outside PSRs in sunlit regions. Individual and collective analyses of PSR properties have been performed. Only three large PSRs, Shoemaker and Cabeus in the south and Rozhdestvensky U in the north, have been found to manifest significant neutron suppression. All other PSRs have much smaller suppression, only a few percent, if at all. Some even display an excess of neutron emission in comparison to the sunlit vicinity around them. Testing PSRs collectively, we have not found any average suppression for them. Only the group of 18 large PSRs, with area >200 square kilometers, show a marginal effect of small average suppression, approx. 2%, with low statistical confidence. An approx. 2% suppression corresponds to approx. 125 ppm of hydrogen taking into account the global neutron suppression near the lunar poles and assuming a homogeneous H distribution in depth in the regolith. This means that all PSRs, except those in Shoemaker, Cabeus and Rozhdestvensky U craters, do not contain any significant amount of hydrogen in comparison with sunlit areas around them at the same latitude.

Sanin, A. B.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Droege, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J.; Golovin, D. V.; Harshman, K.; McClanahan, T. P.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Mazarico, E.; Milikh, G.; Neumann, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Smith, D. E.; Starr, R. D.; Zuber, M. T.

2012-01-01

24

The Distribution of Ice in Lunar Permanently Shadowed Regions: Science Enabling Exploration (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent prospecting indicates that water ice occurs in enhanced abundances in some lunar PSRs. That water constitutes a resource that enables lunar exploration if it can be harvested for fuel and life support. Future lunar exploration missions will need detailed information about the distribution of volatiles in lunar permanently shadowed regions (PSRs). In addition, the volatiles also offer key insights into the recent and distant past, as they have trapped volatiles delivered to the moon over ~2 Gyr. This comprises an unparalleled reservoir of past inner solar system volatiles, and future scientific missions are needed to make the measurements that will reveal the composition of those volatiles. These scientific missions will necessarily have to acquire and analyze samples of volatiles from the PSRs. For both exploration and scientific purposes, the precise location of volatiles will need to be known. However, data indicate that ice is distributed heterogeneously on the Moon. It is unlikely that the distribution will be known a priori with enough spatial resolution to guarantee access to volatiles using a single point sample. Some mechanism for laterally or vertically distributed access will increase the likelihood of acquiring a rich sample of volatiles. Trade studies will need to be conducted to anticipate the necessary range and duration of missions to lunar PSRs that will be needed to accomplish the mission objectives. We examine the spatial distribution of volatiles in lunar PSRs reported from data analyses and couple those with models of smaller scale processes. FUV and laser data from PSRs that indicate the average surface distribution is consistent with low abundances on the extreme surface in most PSRs. Neutron and radar data that probe the distribution at depth show heterogeneity at broad spatial resolution. We consider those data in conjunction with the model to understand the full, 3-D nature of the heterogeneity. A Monte Carlo technique simulates the stochastic process of impact gardening on a putative ice deposit. The model uses the crater production function as a basis for generating a random selection of impact craters over time. Impacts are implemented by modifying the topography, volatile content, and depth distribution in the simulation volume on a case by case basis. This technique will never be able to reproduce the exact impact history of a particular area. But by conducting multiple runs with the same initial conditions and a different seed to the random number generator, we are able to calculate the probability of situations occurring. Further, by repeating the simulations with varied initial conditions, we calculate the dependence of the expectation values on the inputs. We present findings regarding the heterogeneity of volatiles in PSRs as a function of age, initial ice thickness, and contributions from steady sources.

Hurley, D.; Elphic, R. C.; Bussey, B.; Hibbitts, C.; Lawrence, D. J.

2013-12-01

25

Human safety in the lunar environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Any attempt to establish a continuously staffed base or permanent settlement on the Moon must safely meet the challenges posed by the Moon's surface environment. This environment is drastically different from the Earth's, and radiation and meteoroids are significant hazards to human safety. These dangers may be mitigated through the use of underground habitats, the piling up of lunar materials as shielding, and the use of teleoperated devices for surface operations. The lunar environment is detailed along with concepts for survival.

Lewis, Robert H.

1992-01-01

26

a Permanent Magnet Hall Thruster for Orbit Control of Lunar Polar Satellites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Future moon missions devoted to lunar surface remote sensing and to many others scientific exploration topics will require more fine and higher precision orbit control. It is well known that, lunar satellites in polar orbits will suffer a high increase on the eccentricity due to the gravitational perturbation of the Earth. Without proper orbit correction the satellite life time will decrease and end up in a collision with the moon surface. It is pointed out by many authors that this effect is a natural consequence of the Lidov-Kozai resonance. In the present work, we propose a precise method of orbit eccentricity control based on the use of a low thrust Hall plasma thruster. The proposed method is based on an approach intended to keep the orbital eccentricity of the satellite at low values. A previous work on this subject was made using numerical integration considering two systems: the 3-body problem, Moon-Earth-satellite and the 4-body problem, Moon-Earth-Sun-satellite (??). In such simulation it is possible to follow the evolution of the satellite's eccentricity and find empirical expressions for the length of time needed to occur the collision with the moon. In this work, a satellite orbit eccentricity control maneuvering is proposed. It is based on working parameters of a low thrust propulsion permanent magnet Hall plasma thruster (PMHT), which is been developed at University of Brasilia, Brazil. We studied different arcs of active lunar satellite propulsion in order to be able to introduce a correction of the eccentricity at each cycle. The calculations were made considering a set of different thrust values, from 0.1N up to 0.4N which can be obtained by using the PMHT. In each calculation procedure we measured the length of eccentricity correction provided by active propulsion. From these results we obtained empirical expressions of the time needed for the corrections as a function of the initial altitude and as a function of the thrust value. 1. Winter, O. C. et all in Controlling the Eccentricity of Polar Lunar Orbits with Low Thrust Propulsion, Mathematical Problems in Engineering, vol. on Space Dynamics, 2009.

Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Silva Moraes, Bruno; Soares Ferreira, Ivan; Cardozo Mour, Decio; Winter, Othon

27

Magnetic hysteresis classification of the lunar surface and the interpretation of permanent remanence in lunar surface samples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A magnetic hysteresis classification of the lunar surface is presented. It was found that there is a distinct correlation between natural remanence (NRM), saturation magnetization, and the hysteresis ratios for the rock samples. The hysteresis classification is able to explain some aspects of time dependent magnetization in the lunar samples and relates the initial susceptibility to NRM, viscous remanence, and to other aspects of magnetization in lunar samples. It is also considered that since up to 60% of the iron in the lunar soil may be super paramagnetic at 400 K, and only 10% at 100 K, the 50% which becomes ferromagnetic over the cycle has the characteristics of thermoremanence and may provide for an enhancement in measurable field on the dark side during a subsatellite magnetometer circuit.

Wasilewski, P.

1972-01-01

28

Ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits - An ideal lunar resource  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With a view of investigating possible economic benefits that a permanent lunar settlement might provide to the near-earth space infrastructures, consideration was given to the ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits as sources of oxygen (for use as a propellant) and He-3 (for nuclear fusion fuel). This paper demonstrates that ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits would be excellent sources of a wide variety of valuable elements besides O and He-3, including Fe, Ti, H2, N, C, S, Cu, Zn, Cd, Bi, and Pb. It is shown that several ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits of regional extent exist on the lunar surface. The suitability of regional pyroclastic deposits for lunar mining operations, construction activities, and the establishment of permanent lunar settlements is examined.

Hawke, B. R.; Clark, B.; Coombs, C. R.

1990-01-01

29

Design of an unmanned lunar cargo lander that reconfigures into a shelter for a habitation module or disassembles into parts useful to a permanent manned lunar base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA plans to establish a permanent manned lunar base by the first decade of the twenty-first century. It is extremely expensive to transport material from earth to the moon. Therefore, expense would be reduced if the vehicle that lands cargo on the moon could itself meet some of the material needs of establishing the lunar base. The design of a multi-functional lander that is entirely useful to the base after landing is described. Alternate designs of the overall lander configuration and possible uses of the lander and its components after landing are contained. The design solution is a lander employing the Saddlebagged Fuel Tank Configuration. After landing, its structure will be converted into a habitation module shelter that supports a protective layer of regolith. The fuel tanks will be cleaned and used as storage tanks for the lunar base. The engines and instrumentation will be saved as stock parts. Recommendations for further research and technology development to enhance future lander designs are given.

Davanay, Lisa; Garner, Brian; Rigol, Jason

1989-01-01

30

Topography of the Lunar South Polar Region: Implications for the Size and Location of Permanently Shaded Areas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We analyze Clementine altimetry to constrain the size and location of proposed permanently shadowed regions in the vicinity of the lunar south pole. Long and short wavelength topography in the vicinity of the pole, in combination with measurements of depths of well-preserved craters and basins and the lunar topographic power spectrum, have direct bearing on the nature of elevations in the south polar region. A criterion based on geometric considerations and altimetry demonstrates that the existence of permanent shadowing is not very sensitive to the elevation of the south pole. In addition, permanent shadowing cannot be a consequence of large structures such as the South Pole-Aitken Basin and/or a 300-km degraded polar basin. Perennially dark regions, if they exist, are most likely associated with craters or other axisymmetric features with diameters of at most 80 km centered at the pole. For structures displaced 2 deg from the pole the maximum allowable diameter decreases to approximately 30 km.

Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.

1997-01-01

31

Critical issues for establishment of a permanently-occupied lunar base  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to determine the critical issues for a potential lunar outpost by polling a group of experts knowledgeable about decision-making involving the allocation of large-scale resources. A Delphi exercise is an iterative polling technique in which the group opinion is refined during successive iterations, while at the same time preserving differing viewpoints. The experts identified four critical issues: (1) demonstration of the value of a lunar base (e.g., cost effective lunar-based science, source of raw materials, technology spin-offs, etc.); (2) sustained political and financial support; (3) credibility of the government (i.e., NASA) in accomplishing such a large and complex program; (4) development of the military value of a lunar base.

Kent, Paul C., II

1987-09-01

32

Evolving concepts of lunar architecture: The potential of subselene development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In view of the superior environmental and operational conditions that are thought to exist in lava tubes, popular visions of permanent settlements built upon the lunar surface may prove to be entirely romantic. The factors that will ultimately come together to determine the design of a lunar base are complex and interrelated, and they call for a radical architectural solution. Whether lunar surface-deployed superstructures can answer these issues is called into question. One particularly troublesome concern in any lunar base design is the need for vast amounts of space, and the ability of man-made structures to provide such volumes in a reliable pressurized habitat is doubtful. An examination of several key environmental design issues suggests that the alternative mode of subselene development may offer the best opportunity for an enduring and humane settlement.

Daga, Andrew W.; Daga, Meryl A.; Wendel, Wendel R.

1992-01-01

33

A Permanent Magnet Hall Thruster for Pulsed Orbit Control of Lunar Polar Satellites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Future Moon missions devoted to Lunar surface remote sensing, for example, will require very fine and accurate orbit control. It is well known that Lunar satellites in polar orbits will suffer a high increase on the eccentricity due to the gravitational perturbation of the Earth. Without proper orbit correction the satellite lifetime will decrease and end up in a collision with the Moon surface. It is pointed out by many authors that this effect is a natural consequence of the Lidov-Kozai resonance. We studied different arcs of active lunar satellite propulsion, centered on the orbit apoapsis or periapsis, in order to be able to introduce a correction of the eccentricity at each cycle. The proposed method is based on an approach intended to keep the orbital eccentricity of the satellite at low values.

Silva Moraes, Brunno; Ferreira, José Leonardo; Soares Ferreira, Ivan; Cabo Winter, Othon; Cardozo Mourão, Décio

2014-05-01

34

Lunar polar coring lander  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

1990-01-01

35

Beagle 2 the Moon: An Experimental Package to Measure Polar Ice and Volatiles in Permanently Shadowed Areas or Beneath the Lunar Surface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has announced the selection of several Lunar Science Sortie Concept Studies for potential scientific payloads with future Lunar Missions. The Beagle 2 scientific package was one of those chosen for study. Near the beginning of the next decade will see the launch of scientific payloads to the lunar surface to begin laying the foundations for the return to the moon in the Vision for Space Exploration. Shortly thereafter, astronauts will return to the lunar surface with the ability to place scientific packages on the surface that will provide information about lunar resources and compositions of materials in permanently shadowed regions of the moon (1). One of the important questions which must be answered early in the program is whether there are lunar resources which would facilitate "living off the land" and not require the transport of resources and consumables from Earth (2). The Beagle science package developed to seek the signatures of life on Mars is the ideal payload (3) to use on the lunar surface for determining the nature of hydrogen, water and lunar volatiles found in the polar regions which could support the Vision for Space Exploration.

Gibson, E. K.; McKay, D. S.; Pillinger, C. T.; Wright, I. P.; Sims, M. R.; Richter, L.

2008-01-01

36

Testing of Lunar Permanently Shadowed Regions for Water Ice: LEND Results for about Three Years of Observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction: More than 50 years ago, it was sug-gested that some areas near the lunar poles are suffi-ciently cold to trap and preserve for a very long time (~Gy) hydrogen bearing volatiles, either primordial or produced at the Moon via solar wind interactions or brought to the Moon as water ice by comets and mete-oroids [1,2]. The results of observations made by radar onboard the Clementine spacecraft and by neutron (LPNS) and gamma-ray (LPGRS) spectrometers onboard the Lunar Prospector mission have been inter-preted as an enhancement of hydrogen abundance in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) [3]. Unfortu-nately, the spatial resolution of these instruments were much broader than the size of any largest PSRs [4] requiring model dependent data deconvolution to res-lve signal from PSRs itself. Data Analysis: We would like to present updated results of analysis of Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) data for about three years of lunar mapping. Data measured by collimated LEND detectors allows one to look at neutron flux distribution at Moon poles with much better spatial resolution then was achieved at previous space missions. Using the LEND data we had tested the hypothesis that all PSRs are contain a large amount of water ice permafrost and test for hydrogen presents in regolith of regions outside of PSRs. Discussion: Both analyses of individual PSRs and studies of groups of PSRs have shown that these spots of extreme cold at lunar poles are not associated with a strong effect of epithermal neutron flux suppression [5]. We found only three large PSRs, Shoemaker and Cabeus in the South and Rozhdestvensky U in the North, which manifest significant neutron suppression, from -5.5% to -14.9%. All other PSRs have much smaller suppression, no more than few percentages, if at all. Some PSRs even display excess of neutron emis-sion in respect to sunlit vicinity around them. Testing PSRs collectively, we have not found any average suppression for them. Only group of 18 large PSRs, with area >200 km2, show a marginal effect of small average suppression, ~2%, with low statistical confidence. A ~2% suppression corresponds to ~125 ppm of hydrogen taking into account the global neutron suppression near the lunar poles and assuming a homogeneous Hydrogen distribution in depth in the regolith [6]. References: [1] Arnold, J. R. (1979) JGR, 84, 5659-5668. [2] Watson, K., Murray B. C. and Brown H. (1961) JGR, 66, 3033-3045. [3] Feldman W. C. et al. (2001) JGR, 106, 23231-23252. [4] Maurice S. et al. (2004) JGR, 109, E07S04, 40 PP. [5] Mitrofanov I. G. et al. (2010) Science, 330, 483. [6] Sanin A.B. et al. (2012) JGR, 117, E00H26

Sanin, A.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J.; Golovin, D.; Harshman, K.; McClanahan, T. R.; Malakhov, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Sagdeev, R.; Starr, R. D.

2012-12-01

37

How Cold are the Floors of Lunar Polar Shadowed Craters?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Almost five decades ago Watson, et al, [1] speculated that molecules of volatile species might accumulate within the cryogenic environments of permanently shadowed polar craters. The subject was largely a scientific curiosity until recently. In the mid-1980's, people began to seriously discuss the feasibility of long-term or permanent human settlement of the Moon. Given that the Moon was known be missing the compounds need to support life and that importing volatiles from Earth is prohibitively expensive, lunar colonists were pictured as processing the putative polar volatiles. A bistatic radar experiment performed with the Clementine spacecraft was interpreted to suggest the presence of large quantities of ice at some polar locations. [2] The neutron spectrometer aboard the Lunar Prospector spacecraft reported high concentrations of hydrogen in the polar regolith, [3] and some interpretations of the data set pointed to very high concentrations in permanently shadowed craters. The reformulation of civilian space policy in 2004, known as the Vision for Space Exploration, emphasized lunar exploration with eye toward development of economic returns from cislunar space and long-tern human presence on the Moon. The theme of finding lunar resources was an impetus for the inclusion of the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Preliminary results from Diviner report an unexpectedly low temperature down to 35K in the depths of some craters. [4

Mendell, Wendell W.

2010-01-01

38

Human Lunar Destiny: Past, Present, and Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper offers conceptual strategy and rationale for returning astronauts to the moon. NASA's historic Apollo program enabled humans to make the first expeditionary voyages to the moon and to gather and return samples back to the earth for further study. To continue exploration of the moon within the next ten to fifteen years, one possible mission concept for returning astronauts using existing launch vehicle infrastructure is presented. During these early lunar missions, expeditionary trips are made to geographical destinations and permanent outposts are established at the lunar south pole. As these missions continue, mining operations begin in an effort to learn how to live off the land. Over time, a burgeoning economy based on mining and scientific activity emerges with the formation of more accommodating settlements and surface infrastructure assets. As lunar activity advances, surface infrastructure assets grow and become more complex, lunar settlements and outposts are established across the globe, travel to and from the moon becomes common place, and commerce between earth and the moon develops and flourishes. Colonization and development of the moon is completed with the construction of underground cities and the establishment of a full range of political, religious, educational, and recreational institutions with a diverse population from all nations of the world. Finally, rationale for diversifying concentrations of humanity throughout earth's neighborhood and the greater solar system is presented.

Fletcher, David

2002-01-01

39

ILEWG roadmap Robotic and Human Lunar Exploration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We shall discuss the rationale and roadmap of ongoing Moon missions, and how they can prepare for future human exploration. Various fundamental scientific investigations can be performed with robots and humans: clues on the formation and evolution of rocky planets, accretion and bombardment in the inner solar system, comparative planetology processes (tectonic, volcanic, impact cratering, volatile delivery), records astrobiology, survival of organics; past, present and future life. The roadmap includes also enabling technologies that prepare for the best syenrgies between robots and humans: Remote sensing miniaturised instruments; Surface geophysical and geochemistry package;Instrument deployment and robotic arm, nano-rover, sampling, drilling; Sample finder and collector, Support equipment for astronaut sorties; life science precursors for life support systems. We shall adddress requirements for robotic precursor programmes, global robotic village, technology development, resource utilisation, human aspects, science and exploration from lunar sorties, transition towards permanent settlements and lunar bases.

Foing, Bernard H.

40

Location selection and layout for LB10, a lunar base at the Lunar North Pole with a liquid mirror observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the site selection process and urban planning of a Lunar Base for a crew of 10 (LB10), with an infrared astronomical telescope, based on the concept of the Lunar LIquid Mirror Telescope. LB10 is a base designated for permanent human presence on the Moon. The base architecture is based on utilization of inflatable, rigid and regolith structures for different purposes. The location for the settlement is identified through a detailed analysis of surface conditions and terrain parameters around the Lunar North and South Poles. A number of selection criteria were defined regarding construction, astronomical observations, landing and illumination conditions. The location suggested for the settlement is in the vicinity of the North Pole, utilizing the geographical morphology of the area. The base habitat is on a highly illuminated and relatively flat plateau. The observatory in the vicinity of the base, approximately 3.5 kilometers from the Lunar North Pole, inside a crater to shield it from Sunlight. An illustration of the final form of the habitat is also depicted, inspired by the baroque architectural form.

Detsis, Emmanouil; Doule, Ondrej; Ebrahimi, Aliakbar

2013-04-01

41

Lunar laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

1986-01-01

42

Lunar surface magnetometers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetometers have been placed on the moon by astronauts of the Apollo 12, 14, 15, and 16 missions. These instruments have measured permanent fields due to fossil magnetic material in the lunar crust and transient fields due to electrical eddy currents generated in the lunar interior. A stationary magnetometer which transmits data continuously was flown on each of the Apollo

PALMER DYAL; DANIEL I. GORDON

1973-01-01

43

RS Landers: Lunar lander  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The future of the U.S. space program outlined by President Bush calls for a permanently manned lunar base. A payload delivery system will be required to support the buildup and operation of that lunar base. In response to this goal, RS Landers developed a conceptual design of a self-unloading, unmanned, reusable lunar lander. The lander will deliver a 7000-kg payload, with the same dimensions as a space station logistics module, from low lunar orbit (LLO) to any location on the surface of the Moon.

1991-01-01

44

Lunar and Planetary Bases, Habitats, and Colonies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This special bibliography includes the design and construction of lunar and Mars bases, habitats, and settlements; construction materials and equipment; life support systems; base operations and logistics; thermal management and power systems; and robotic...

2004-01-01

45

A lunar venture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the Earth's space station is in its final stages of design, the dream of a permanent manned space facility is now a reality. Despite this monumental achievement, however, man's quest to extend human habitation further out into space is far from being realized. The next logical step in space exploration must be the construction of a permanent lunar base. This lunar infrastucture can, in turn, be used as a staging ground for further exploration of the remote regions of the solar system. As outlined by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the lunar base program consists of three exploratory and implementation phases. In response to the technological and facility requirements of Phase 1 and 2 of this program, the Aerospace Vehicle Design Program of the University of Virgina (UVA) is proud to present a preliminary design for such a lunar infrastructure. This study is a comprehensive evaluation of the mission requirements as well as the design criteria for space vehicles and facilities. The UVA Lunar Venture is a dual system that consists of a lunar space station and a fleet of lunar landers/transporters. With such a design, it is demonstrated that all initial exploratory and construction requirements for the lunar base can be efficiently satisfied. Additionally, the need for such a dual system is justified both from a logistic and economic standpoint.

Lee, Joo Ahn; Trinh, Lu X.

1989-01-01

46

Lunar Community Church: Contributions to Lunar Living and to Evolution of Ethical and Spiritual Thinking.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Should religious institutions get interested in lunar settlement. Would their participation make positive contributions or would it discourage creative diversity and interfere with science and good technical judgement. Among the spacefaring nations of tod...

J. H. Allton

1992-01-01

47

Selenia: A habitability study for the development of a third generation lunar base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When Apollo astronauts landed on the Moon, the first generation of lunar bases was established. They consisted essentially of a lunar module and related hardware capable of housing two astronauts for not more than several days. Second generation lunar bases are being developed, and further infrastructure, such as space station, orbital transfer, and reusable lander vehicles will be necessary, as prolonged stay on the Moon is required for exploration, research, and construction for the establishment of a permanent human settlement there. Human life in these habitats could be sustained for months, dependent on a continual flow of life-support supplies from Earth. Third-generation lunar bases will come into being as self sufficiency of human settlements becomes feasible. Regeneration of water, oxygen production, and development of indigenous construction materials from lunar resources will be necessary. Greenhouses will grow food supplies in engineered biospheres. Assured protection from solar flares and cosmic radiation must be provided, as well as provision for survival under meteor showers, or the threat of meteorite impact. All these seem to be possible within the second decade of the next century. Thus, the builders of Selenia, the first of the third-generation lunar bases are born today. During the last two years students from the School of Architecture of the University of Puerto Rico have studied the problems that relate to habitability for prolonged stay in extraterrestrial space. An orbital personnel transport to Mars developed originally by the Aerospace Engineering Department of the University of Michigan was investigated and habitability criteria for evaluation of human space habitats were proposed. An important finding from that study was that the necessary rotational diameter of the vessel has to be on the order of two kilometers to ensure comfort for humans under the artificial gravity conditions necessary to maintain physiological well being of passengers, beyond the level of mere survival.

1991-01-01

48

Lunar base agriculture: Soils for plant growth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This work provides information on research and experimentation concerning various aspects of food production in space and particularly on the moon. Options for human settlement of the moon and Mars and strategies for a lunar base are discussed. The lunar environment, including the mineralogical and chemical properties of lunar regolith are investigated and chemical and physical considerations for a lunar-derived soil are considered. It is noted that biological considerations for such a soil include controlled-environment crop production, both hydroponic and lunar regolith-based; microorganisms and the growth of higher plants in lunar-derived soils; and the role of microbes to condition lunar regolith for plant cultivation. Current research in the controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) project is presented in detail and future research areas, such as the growth of higher research plants in CELSS are considered. Optimum plant and microbiological considerations for lunar derived soils are examined.

Ming, Douglas W. (editor); Henninger, Donald L. (editor)

1989-01-01

49

Lunar receiving laboratory.  

PubMed

The Lunar Receiving Laboratory will be the permanent depository of a portion of the collection of lunar samples; it will safeguard the collection, providing continuing security and ensuring scientific integrity. In carrying out the time-dependent experiments and continuing functions of the laboratory, NASA will rely on visiting expert scientists supplementing a relatively small resident staff; outside scientists will be relied upon for most investigations and detailed analyses of samples. It is believed that the designed procedures and facilities provided will ensure the maximum scientific return from the Apollo Program in the way of information from lunar samples. PMID:17737398

McLane, J C; King, E A; Flory, D A; Richardson, K A; Dawson, J P; Kemmerer, W W; Wooley, B C

1967-02-01

50

Lunar portable magnetometer experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of the Apollo 16 lunar portable magnetometer (LPM) experiment is to measure the permanent magnetic field at different geological sites on the lunar surface. The LPM field measurements are a vector sum of the steady remanent field from the lunar crust and of the time-varying ambient fields. The remanent magnetic fields measured in the Descartes region are the largest extraterrestrial fields yet measured in situ. These measurements show for the first time that the Descartes highlands have a stronger remanent magnetization than do the mare regions of the previous Apollo landing sites. The experimental technique used in the LPM experiment is described and the preliminary results obtained are discussed.

Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Sonett, C. P.; Dubois, R. L.; Simmons, G.

1972-01-01

51

Preliminary Definition of a Lunar Landing and Launch Facility (Complex 39L).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A preliminary definition of a lunar landing and launch facility has been formulated. A permanently manned lunar base and a baseline lunar module are assumed. The major features of the facility are specified and major design areas are described.

H. D. Matthews E. B. Jenson J. N. Linsley

1992-01-01

52

Preliminary definition of a lunar landing and launch facility (Complex 39L)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A preliminary definition of a lunar landing and launch facility has been formulated. A permanently manned lunar base and a baseline lunar module are assumed. The major features of the facility are specified and major design areas are described.

Matthews, H. Dennis; Jenson, Eric B.; Linsley, Jerald N.

1992-01-01

53

Remote Sensing Assessment of Lunar Resources: We Know Where to Go to Find What We Need  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The utilization of space resources is necessary to not only foster the growth of human activities in space, but is essential to the President s vision of a "sustained and affordable human and robotic program to explore the solar system and beyond." The distribution of resources will shape planning permanent settlements by affecting decisions about where to locate a settlement. Mapping the location of such resources, however, is not the limiting factor in selecting a site for a lunar base. It is indecision about which resources to use that leaves the location uncertain. A wealth of remotely sensed data exists that can be used to identify targets for future detailed exploration. Thus, the future of space resource utilization pre-dominantly rests upon developing a strategy for resource exploration and efficient methods of extraction.

Gillis, J. J.; Taylor, G. J.; Lucey, P. G.

2004-01-01

54

Scleractinian settlement patterns to natural cleared reef substrata and artificial settlement panels on an Indonesian coral reef  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recruitment is a key factor driving the population dynamics of scleractinian corals, but despite its importance, we still have a poor understanding of recruitment processes in the Coral triangle region, which contains the most biodiverse marine ecosystems in the world. This study aimed to compare settlement rates to artificial settlement panels with cleared areas of natural reef in order to assess whether panels are a suitable indicator of natural coral settlement rates. We recorded coral settlement rates to panels made of two different materials (concrete and terracotta), attached to the reef at two different orientations (vertical and horizontal), and compared these settlement rates to those on cleared areas of natural reef positioned on vertical reef walls, over a 12 month period. We examined settlement rates at four sites in the Wakatobi National Marine Park, south-east Sulawesi, Indonesia; two reefs were light-limited, highly sedimented sites with low coral cover (<10%) and two had moderate coral cover (approx. 40%) and lower sedimentation rates. Panels were directly attached to the reef at 6-7 m depth. The number of coral spat per tile ranged from 0 to 34 and no significant differences were reported between the settlement rates to cleared natural reef areas and settlement panels. Significantly higher numbers of spat settled on the cryptic (back) side of the panels, while no significant difference was found between settlement rates to the different panel materials, or between the different orientations or any combination of these two factors. There is, however, a significant difference in the settlement rates between sites, for both settlement panels and permanent cleared areas, with higher settlement rates at the sites with higher live coral cover. We conclude that both concrete and terracotta panels yield similar settlement rates, and orientation makes no difference to settlement rates when panels are directly attached to the reef. Our results demonstrate that artificial substrata provide comparable settlement rate data to natural substrata and therefore are suitable for monitoring coral settlement rates in the future.

Salinas-de-León, Pelayo; Costales-Carrera, Alba; Zeljkovic, Stephen; Smith, David J.; Bell, James J.

2011-05-01

55

Complete Lunar Exploration Coverage Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA's Vision for Space Exploration is to establish a permanent human presence on the Moon beginning no later than 2020. It is essential to provide an architecture that is expandable and evolvable to meet the current and future communication requirements for Constellation's International Space Station missions and lunar missions. This architecture includes the existing NASA ground-based and Earth-orbiting networks, as well as a possible network of lunar relay satellites. A key metric for decisions in selecting or expanding the communication infrastructure is its coverage capability. This article provides detailed coverage analysis for various phases of a lunar exploration mission, including the launches of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and the Lunar Surface Access Module/Earth Departure Stage (LSAM/EDS), their low-Earth-orbiting operations and docking; the trans-lunar insertion of the CEV/LSAM stack, its lunar orbiting insertion and low-lunar-orbiting operations; and the LSAM descent/ascent operations, as well as the Earth return phase. The human outpost of lunar exploration is assumed to be at the lunar south pole; the top 10 landing sites suggested by NASA's Exploration Systems Architecture Study for lunar sortie missions are also considered. Surface-to-surface, Earth, and solar coverage at the lunar south pole using Goldstone Solar System Radar terrain data are also analyzed and discussed.

Lee, C. H.; Cheung, K.-M.

2008-11-01

56

African rural settlement patterns.  

PubMed

Rural settlements, characterized by illiteracy, traditionalism, isolationism, and an agricultural economy, dominate Tropical Africa. This paper presents an historical review of settlement evolution from before colonial rule to the present, to provide a better understanding of rural life for government policy formulation purposes. Before colonial rule, the early 19th century slave trade drove many villagers into scattered, remote settlements which were further established by increased food production, and decreased migration. After Africa's partition (1885), various governments concentrated dispersed settlements for security and administrative control. Rural settlements were transformed through colonial force, desires by the villagers for more land and wealth, and new settlement establishment by Europeans. In present day Africa, improved communication, a more diversified economy, and less traditional conservatism still influence rural settlement patterns. Resource development and agricultural and medical reasons currently act to change settlements, but villagers are now compensated for such moves and may even improve their earning power from them. The author describes settlement patterns in Sierra Leone, which typify much of Tropical Africa. Hill settlements, which offered security against intertribal wars, predominated in the 19th Century, but the Hut Tax War (1989) brought tranquility and an improved economy. Today, much of rural Sierra Leone has lost its population to diamond and iron mining areas. Modernization has changed food, housing, settlement size, and arrangement and farming techniques. The author emphasizes the strong environmental influences on settlement evolution and development, and urges a greater understanding of rural settlements to aid in future planning for Tropical Africa's people. PMID:12143658

Kaloko, F R

1983-11-01

57

Lunar Water Resource Demonstration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., the Carnegie-Mellon University, JPL, and NEPTEC, NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE. This project is a ground demonstration of a system that would be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, drill into the regolith, determine what volatiles are present, and quantify them in addition to recovering oxygen by hydrogen reduction. The Lunar Prospector has determined these craters contain enhanced hydrogen concentrations averaging about 0.1%. If the hydrogen is in the form of water, the water concentration would be around 1%, which would translate into billions of tons of water on the Moon, a tremendous resource. The Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is a part of RESOLVE designed to capture lunar water and hydrogen and quantify them as a backup to gas chromatography analysis. This presentation will briefly review the design of LWRD and some of the results of testing the subsystem. RESOLVE is to be integrated with the Scarab rover from CMIJ and the whole system demonstrated on Mauna Kea on Hawaii in November 2008. The implications of lunar water for Mars exploration are two-fold: 1) RESOLVE and LWRD could be used in a similar fashion on Mars to locate and quantify water resources, and 2) electrolysis of lunar water could provide large amounts of liquid oxygen in LEO, leading to lower costs for travel to Mars, in addition to being very useful at lunar outposts.

Muscatello, Anthony C.

2008-01-01

58

Lunar lander ground support system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design of the Lunar Lander Ground Support System (LLGSS) is examined. The basic design time line is around 2010 to 2030 and is referred to as a second generation system, as lunar bases and equipment would have been present. Present plans for lunar colonization call for a phased return of personnel and materials to the moons's surface. During settlement of lunar bases, the lunar lander is stationary in a very hostile environment and would have to be in a state of readiness for use in case of an emergency. Cargo and personnel would have to be removed from the lander and transported to a safe environment at the lunar base. An integrated system is required to perform these functions. These needs are addressed which center around the design of a lunar lander servicing system. The servicing system could perform several servicing functions to the lander in addition to cargo servicing. The following were considered: (1) reliquify hydrogen boiloff; (2) supply power; and (3) remove or add heat as necessary. The final design incorporates both original designs and existing vehicles and equipment on the surface of the moon at the time considered. The importance of commonality is foremost in the design of any lunar machinery.

1991-01-01

59

Lunar Analog  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this viewgraph presentation, a ground-based lunar analog is developed for the return of manned space flight to the Moon. The contents include: 1) Digital Astronaut; 2) Bed Design; 3) Lunar Analog Feasibility Study; 4) Preliminary Data; 5) Pre-pilot Study; 6) Selection of Stockings; 7) Lunar Analog Pilot Study; 8) Bed Design for Lunar Analog Pilot.

Cromwell, Ronita L.

2009-01-01

60

Lunar architecture and urbanism  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human civilization and architecture have defined each other for over 5000 years on Earth. Even in the novel environment of space, persistent issues of human urbanism will eclipse, within a historically short time, the technical challenges of space settlement that dominate our current view. By adding modern topics in space engineering, planetology, life support, human factors, material invention, and conservation to their already renaissance array of expertise, urban designers can responsibly apply ancient, proven standards to the exciting new opportunities afforded by space. Inescapable facts about the Moon set real boundaries within which tenable lunar urbanism and its component architecture must eventually develop.

Sherwood, Brent

1992-01-01

61

Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is part of RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). RESOLVE is an ISRU ground demonstration: (1) A rover to explore a permanently shadowed crater at the south or north pole of the Moon (2) Drill core samples down to 1 meter (3) Heat the core samples to 150C (4) Analyze gases and capture water and/or hydrogen evolved (5) Use hydrogen reduction to extract oxygen from regolith

Muscatello, Anthony C.

2009-01-01

62

Lunar Resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the lunar resources that we know are available for human use while exploration of the moon. Some of the lunar resources that are available for use are minerals, sunlight, solar wind, water and water ice, rocks and regolith. The locations for some of the lunar resouces and temperatures are reviewed. The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission, and its findings are reviewed. There is also discussion about water retention in Permament Shadowed Regions of the Moon. There is also discussion about the Rock types on the lunar surface. There is also discussion of the lunar regolith, the type and the usages that we can have from it.

Edmunson, Jennifer

2010-01-01

63

Lunar Gene Bank for Endangered Species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the face of failure of conservation programs, a Gene Bank in the lunar PSR, preferably the Shoemaker crater incorporating natural cryopreservation will provide permanent preservation of germplasms to protect endangered species from extinction.

Swain, R. K.; Behera, D.; Sahoo, P. K.; Swain, S. K.; Sasmal, A.

2012-03-01

64

Can the US afford a lunar base  

SciTech Connect

Establishing a lunar base will require steady funding for a decade or two. The question addressed here is whether such a large space project is affordable at this time. The relevant facts and methodology are presented so that the reader may formulate independent answers. It is shown that a permanent lunar base can be financed without increasing NASA's historical budgetary trends.

Keaton, P.W.

1986-01-01

65

A lunar space station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A concept for a space station to be placed in low lunar orbit in support of the eventual establishment of a permanent moon base is proposed. This space station would have several functions: (1) a complete support facility for the maintenance of the permanent moon base and its population; (2) an orbital docking area to facilitate the ferrying of materials and personnel to and from Earth; (3) a zero gravity factory using lunar raw materials to grow superior GaAs crystals for use in semiconductors and mass produce inexpensive fiber glass; and (4) a space garden for the benefit of the air food cycles. The mission scenario, design requirements, and technology needs and developments are included as part of the proposal.

Trinh, LU; Merrow, Mark; Coons, Russ; Iezzi, Gabrielle; Palarz, Howard M.; Nguyen, Marc H.; Spitzer, Mike; Cubbage, Sam

1989-01-01

66

The Risdon Settlement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the key episodes in the history of the region of Australia called Tasmania is an incident known as the Risdon Massacre. In 1804 near the Risdon Settlement, a large number of aborigines were killed by settlement officials. This document invites students to investigate what really happened on the day of the Risdon massacre and in so doing,…

Tasmanian Education Dept., Hobart (Australia).

67

Hydrogen Mapping of the Lunar South Pole Using the LRO Neutron Detector Experiment LEND  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrogen has been inferred to occur in enhanced concentrations within permanently shadowed regions and, hence, the coldest areas of the lunar poles. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission was designed to detect hydrogen-bearing volatiles directly. Neutron flux measurements of the Moon's south polar region from the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)

I. G. Mitrofanov; A. B. Sanin; W. V. Boynton; G. Chin; J. B. Garvin; D. Golovin; L. G. Evans; K. Harshman; A. S. Kozyrev; M. L. Litvak; A. Malakhov; E. Mazarico; T. McClanahan; G. Milikh; M. Mokrousov; G. Nandikotkur; G. A. Neumann; I. Nuzhdin; R. Sagdeev; V. Shevchenko; V. Shvetsov; D. E. Smith; R. Starr; V. I. Tretyakov; J. Trombka; D. Usikov; A. Varenikov; A. Vostrukhin; M. T. Zuber

2010-01-01

68

Lunar power systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The findings of a study on the feasibility of several methods of providing electrical power for a permanently manned lunar base are provided. Two fundamentally different methods for lunar electrical power generation are considered. One is the use of a small nuclear reactor and the other is the conversion of solar energy to electricity. The baseline goal was to initially provide 300 kW of power with growth capability to one megawatt and eventually to 10 megawatts. A detailed, day by day scenario for the establishment, build-up, and operational activity of the lunar base is presented. Also presented is a conceptual approach to a supporting transportation system which identifies the number, type, and deployment of transportation vehicles required to support the base. An approach to the use of solar cells in the lunar environment was developed. There are a number of heat engines which are applicable to solar/electric conversions, and these are examined. Several approaches to energy storage which were used by the electric power utilities were examined and those which could be used at a lunar base were identified.

1986-01-01

69

Lunar History  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This section of the workshop describes the history of the moon, and offers explanations for the importance of understanding lunar history for engineers and users of lunar simulants. Included are summaries of the initial impact that is currently in favor as explaining the moon's formation, the crust generation, the creation of craters by impactors, the era of the lunar cataclysm, which some believe effected the evolution of life on earth, the nature of lunar impacts, crater morphology, which includes pictures of lunar craters that show the different types of craters, more recent events include effect of micrometeorites, solar wind, radiation and generation of agglutinates. Also included is a glossary of terms.

Edmunson, Jennifer E.

2009-01-01

70

Various problems in lunar habitat construction scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many papers describing the lunar base construction have been published previously. Lunar base has been considered to be a useful facility to conduct future scientific programs and to get new nuclear energy resource, namely 3He, for defending the environmental collapse on Earth and also to develop lunar resources such as oxygen and nitrogen for extending human activities in space more economically. The scale of the lunar base and the construction methods adopted are determined by the scenario of a lunar utilization program but constrained by the availability of the established space transportation technologies. As indicated in the scenarios described in papers regarding lunar base construction, the first steps of lunar missions are the investigation of lunar itself for conducting scientific research and for surveying the lunar base construction sites, the second steps are the outpost construction for conducting man-tended missions, for more precise scientific research and studying the lunar base construction methods, and third steps are the construction of a permanent base and the expansion of this lunar base for exploiting lunar resources. The missions within the first and second steps are all possible using the ferry (OTV) similar to the service and command modules of Apollo Spacecraft because all necessary weights to be landed on the lunar surface for these missions seem to be under the equivalent weight of the Apollo Lunar Lander. On the other hand, the permanent facilities constructed on the lunar surface in the third step requires larger quantities of construction materials to be transported from Earth, and a new ferry (advanced OTV) having higher transportation ability, at least above 6 times, compared with Apollo Service and Command Modules, are to be developed. The largest problems in the permament lunar base construction are related to the food production facilities, 30-40 m 2 plant cultivation area per person are required for providing the nutrition requirement and the necessary electric power per person for producing high energy foods, such as wheat, rice and potato, are now estimated ranging from 30 to 40 kW. The extension program of crew numbers under the limitation of usable transportation capability anticipated at present and the construction scenarios, including the numbers of facilities to be constructed every year, are to be determined based upon the requirements of plant cultivation area and of electric power for producing necessary and sufficient foods in order to accelerate the feasibility studies of each subsystem to be installed in the permanent lunar base in future.

Nitta, Keiji; Ohtsubo, Koji; Oguchi, Mitsuo; Ohya, Haruhiko; Kanbe, Seiichiro; Ashida, Akira; Sano, Kenichi

71

Lunar studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental and theoretical research, concerning lunar surface processes and the nature, origin and derivation of the lunar surface cover, conducted during the period of February 1, 1971 through January 31, 1976 is presented. The principle research involved were: (1) electrostatic dust motion and transport process; (2) seismology properties of fine rock powders in lunar conditions; (3) surface processes that darken the lunar soil and affect the surface chemical properties of the soil grains; (4) laser simulation of micrometeorite impacts (estimation of the erosion rate caused by the microemeteorite flux); (5) the exposure history of the lunar regolith; and (6) destruction of amino acids by exposure to a simulation of the solar wind at the lunar surface. Research papers are presented which cover these general topics.

Gold, T.

1979-01-01

72

Lunar Prospector  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scientists at the 30th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference held March 15-19, 1999 in Houston, Texas, have presented support for the theory that the "bulk of the Moon was ripped away from the early Earth when an object the size of Mars collided with the Earth." Analysis of data collected from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Lunar Prospector spacecraft has supported this theory. This site provides information on the Lunar Prospector Project.

73

Methods of extracting hydrogen from lunar soil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increasing interest in establishing a lunar base has generated considerable study on the utilization of lunar resources. Because of its importance in producing water, reducing oxides, and serving as a fuel for orbital tranfer vehicles, hydrogen is of prime importance as a resource. Lowman (1985) states that hydrogen would greatly facilitate the establishment of an autonomous permanent colony, and he calls hydrogen the most valuable lunar resource. Through the centuries, hydrogen has been embedded in lunar soil by the solar wind. The hydrogen can be extracted by heating the soil to 900 C (Carr et al, 1987). In order to obtain hydrogen on the lunar surface, an extraction method must be developed which will not only be reliable but also economically feasible. Three heating methods are examined for possible use in extracting hydrogen from lunar soil.

Bustin, Roberta

1988-10-01

74

NASA Lunar Base Wireless System Propagation Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There have been many radio wave propagation studies using both experimental and theoretical techniques over the recent years. However, most of studies have been in support of commercial cellular phone wireless applications. The signal frequencies are mostly at the commercial cellular and Personal Communications Service bands. The antenna configurations are mostly one on a high tower and one near the ground to simulate communications between a cellular base station and a mobile unit. There are great interests in wireless communication and sensor systems for NASA lunar missions because of the emerging importance of establishing permanent lunar human exploration bases. Because of the specific lunar terrain geometries and RF frequencies of interest to the NASA missions, much of the published literature for the commercial cellular and PCS bands of 900 and 1800 MHz may not be directly applicable to the lunar base wireless system and environment. There are various communication and sensor configurations required to support all elements of a lunar base. For example, the communications between astronauts, between astronauts and the lunar vehicles, between lunar vehicles and satellites on the lunar orbits. There are also various wireless sensor systems among scientific, experimental sensors and data collection ground stations. This presentation illustrates the propagation analysis of the lunar wireless communication and sensor systems taking into account the three dimensional terrain multipath effects. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of the lunar terrain. The obtained results indicate the lunar surface material, terrain geometry and antenna location are the important factors affecting the propagation characteristics of the lunar wireless systems. The path loss can be much more severe than the free space propagation and is greatly affected by the antenna height, surface material and operating frequency. The results from this paper are important for the lunar wireless system link margin analysis in order to determine the limits on the reliable communication range, achievable data rate and RF coverage performance at planned lunar base work sites.

Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Sham, Catherine C.

2007-01-01

75

Lunar Seismology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The past 4 years have marked the beginning of a new era in lunar exploration. With the successful landing of instruments on the lunar surface by unmanned spacecrafts of the Luna, Ranger, and Surveyor series, and finally the first manned landing on the moon in July 1969, as part of the Apollo program, direct measurements of the physical and chemical

Gary V. Latham

1971-01-01

76

Lunar Surface  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is about the lunar geology. Learners will model of the Moon's surface and to consider the geologic processes and rocks of each area. This activity is in Unit 2 of the Exploring the Moon teachers guide, which is designed for use especially, but not exclusively, with the Lunar Sample Disk program. Estimated materials cost does not include cost of binoculars or telescope.

77

Lunar History.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This section of the workshop describes the history of the moon, and offers explanations for the importance of understanding lunar history for engineers and users of lunar simulants. Included are summaries of the initial impact that is currently in favor a...

J. E. Edmunson

2009-01-01

78

Lunar cement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

Agosto, William N.

1992-01-01

79

Lunar cement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

Agosto, William N.

80

Regolith Biological Shield for a Lunar Outpost from High Energy Solar Protons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beyond Earth atmosphere, natural space radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Protons (SEPs) represents a significant hazard to both manned and robotic missions. For lunar settlements, protecting astronauts from SEPs is a key safety issue that needs to be addressed by identifying appropriate shielding materials. This paper investigates the interaction of SEPs with the lunar regolith, and quantifies

Tai T. Pham; Mohamed S. El-Genk

2008-01-01

81

A revolutionary lunar space transportation system architecture using extraterrestrial LOX-augmented NTR propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The concept of a liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engine is introduced, and its potential for revolutionizing lunar space transportation system (LTS) performance using extraterrestrial 'lunar-derived' liquid oxygen (LUNOX) is outlined. The LOX-augmented NTR (LANTR) represents the marriage of conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and airbreathing engine technologies. The large divergent section of the NTR nozzle functions as an 'afterburner' into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging from the NTR's choked sonic throat: 'scramjet propulsion in reverse.' By varying the oxygen-to-fuel mixture ratio (MR), the LANTR concept can provide variable thrust and specific impulse (Isp) capability with a LH2-cooled NTR operating at relatively constant power output. For example, at a MR = 3, the thrust per engine can be increased by a factor of 2.75 while the Isp decreases by only 30 percent. With this thrust augmentation option, smaller, 'easier to develop' NTR's become more acceptable from a mission performance standpoint (e.g., earth escape gravity losses are reduced and perigee propulsion requirements are eliminated). Hydrogen mass and volume is also reduced resulting in smaller space vehicles. An evolutionary NTR-based lunar architecture requiring only Shuttle C and/or 'in-line' shuttle-derived launch vehicles (SDV's) would operate initially in an 'expandable mode' with NTR lunar transfer vehicles (LTV's) delivering 80 percent more payload on piloted missions than their LOX/LH2 chemical propulsion counterparts. With the establishment of LUNOX production facilities on the lunar surface and 'fuel/oxidizer' depot in low lunar orbit (LLO), monopropellant NTR's would be outfitted with an oxygen propellant module, feed system, and afterburner nozzle for 'bipropellant' operation. The LANTR cislunar LTV now transitions to a reusable mode with smaller vehicle and payload doubling benefits on each piloted round trip mission. As the initial lunar outposts grow to centralized bases and settlements with a substantial permanent human presence, a LANTR-powered shuttle capable of 36 to 24 hour 'one-way' trip times to the moon and back becomes possible with initial mass in low earth orbit (IMLEO) requirements of approximately 160 to 240 metric tons, respectively.

Borowski, Stanley K.; Corban, Robert R.; Culver, Donald W.; Bulman, Melvin J.; Mcilwain, Mel C.

1994-01-01

82

A revolutionary lunar space transportation system architecture using extraterrestrial LOX-augmented NTR propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept of a liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engine is introduced, and its potential for revolutionizing lunar space transportation system (LTS) performance using extraterrestrial 'lunar-derived' liquid oxygen (LUNOX) is outlined. The LOX-augmented NTR (LANTR) represents the marriage of conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and airbreathing engine technologies. The large divergent section of the NTR nozzle functions as an 'afterburner' into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging from the NTR's choked sonic throat: 'scramjet propulsion in reverse.' By varying the oxygen-to-fuel mixture ratio (MR), the LANTR concept can provide variable thrust and specific impulse (Isp) capability with a LH2-cooled NTR operating at relatively constant power output. For example, at a MR = 3, the thrust per engine can be increased by a factor of 2.75 while the Isp decreases by only 30 percent. With this thrust augmentation option, smaller, 'easier to develop' NTR's become more acceptable from a mission performance standpoint (e.g., earth escape gravity losses are reduced and perigee propulsion requirements are eliminated). Hydrogen mass and volume is also reduced resulting in smaller space vehicles. An evolutionary NTR-based lunar architecture requiring only Shuttle C and/or 'in-line' shuttle-derived launch vehicles (SDV's) would operate initially in an 'expandable mode' with NTR lunar transfer vehicles (LTV's) delivering 80 percent more payload on piloted missions than their LOX/LH2 chemical propulsion counterparts. With the establishment of LUNOX production facilities on the lunar surface and 'fuel/oxidizer' depot in low lunar orbit (LLO), monopropellant NTR's would be outfitted with an oxygen propellant module, feed system, and afterburner nozzle for 'bipropellant' operation. The LANTR cislunar LTV now transitions to a reusable mode with smaller vehicle and payload doubling benefits on each piloted round trip mission. As the initial lunar outposts grow to centralized bases and settlements with a substantial permanent human presence, a LANTR-powered shuttle capable of 36 to 24 hour 'one-way' trip times to the moon and back becomes possible with initial mass in low earth orbit (IMLEO) requirements of approximately 160 to 240 metric tons, respectively.

Borowski, Stanley K.; Corban, Robert R.; Culver, Donald W.; Bulman, Melvin J.; McIlwain, Mel C.

1994-08-01

83

A strategy for a lunar base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A strategy for the establishment of a human-tended base on the moon that involves an evolutionary development spanning from an exploratory encampment to a self-sufficient lunar base is proposed. Four strategic architectural stages in the evolutionary human exploration and settlement of the moon, based on specified engineering requirements and feasible enabling technologies, are proposed. The four stages are: (1) exploratory; (2) pioneering; (3) outpost; and (4) base. Overall goals and specific objectives, functional requirements, structural characteristics, construction conditions, life support systems requirements, and supporting systems needed for lunar exploration and utilization in each stage are identified and discussed.

Sadeh, Willy Z.; Criswell, Marvin E.

1993-01-01

84

Electrical power integration for lunar operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electrical power for future lunar operations is expected to range from a few kilowatts for an early human outpost to many megawatts for industrial operations in the 21st century. All electrical power must be imported as chemical, solar, nuclear, or directed energy. The slow rotation of the Moon and consequent long lunar night impose severe mass penalties on solar systems needing night delivery from storage. The cost of power depends on the cost of the power systems the cost of its transportation to the Moon, operating cost, and, of course, the life of the power system. The economic feasibility of some proposed lunar ventures depends in part on the cost of power. This paper explores power integration issues, costs, and affordability in the context of the following representative lunar ventures: (1) early human outpost (10 kWe); (2) early permanent lunar base, including experimental ISMU activities (100 kWe); (3) lunar oxygen production serving an evolved lunar base (500 kWe); (4) lunar base production of specialized high-value products for use on Earth (5 kWe); and (5) lunar mining and production of helium-3 (500 kWe). The schema of the paper is to project likely costs of power alternatives (including integration factors) in these power ranges, to select the most economic, to determine power cost contribution to the product or activities, to estimate whether the power cost is economically acceptable, and, finally, to offer suggestions for reaching acceptability where cost problems exist.

Woodcock, Gordon

1992-01-01

85

The Lunar Prospector Gamma-Ray Spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The third mission in the NASA Discovery series is Lunar Prospector. It is scheduled for launch on 9 October, 1997 into a circular, 100 km altitude lunar polar orbit. The nominal mission lifetime is one year. One of the five components of its experimental payload is a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS), whose primary scientific objective is to provide global maps of the lunar elemental composition to depths of 20 cm. Scientifically discriminating results are expected for Fe, Ti, U, Th, K, Si, O, and perhaps Al, Ca, and Mg. In combination with a separate neutron spectrometer, also included on Lunar Prospector, a secondary objective of GRS is to search for, and determine the abundance of water ice to depths of 50 cm within permanently shaded craters at the lunar poles. Both experiments will also be used to search for, and determine the abundance of hydrogen implanted by the solar wind into lunar regolith to depths of 50 cm, thereby providing maps of regolith maturity. All Lunar Prospector experiments will be mounted at the ends of three, 1.9-m long booms that define the spin-plane of the satellite. The Lunar Prospector spin axis will be perpendicular to the lunar orbital plane and be flipped by 180deg half way through the mission.

Feldman, W. C.; Binder, A. B.; Hubbard, G. S.; McMurry, R. E., Jr.; Miller, M. C.; Prettyman, T. H.

1996-03-01

86

ISA accelerometer and Lunar science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years the Moon has become again a target for exploration activities, as shown by many missions, performed, ongoing or foreseen. The reasons for this new wave are manifold. The knowledge of formation and evolution of the Moon to its current state is important in order to trace the overall history of Solar System. An effective driving factor is the possibility of building a human settlement on its surface, with all the related issues of environment characterization, safety, resources, communication and navigation. Our natural satellite is also an important laboratory for fundamental physics: Lunar Laser Ranging is continuing to provide important data for testing gravitation theories. All these topics are providing stimulus and inspirations for new experiments. ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) can provide an important tool for lunar studies. Thanks to its structure (three one--dimensional sensors assembled in a composite structure) it works both in--orbit and on--ground, with the same configuration. It can therefore be used onboard a spacecraft, as a support to a radio science mission, and on the surface of the Moon, as a seismometer. This second option in particular has been proposed as a candidate to be hosted on NASA ILN (International Lunar Network) and ESA First Lunar Lander. After a description of the instrument, its use in the context of the missions will be described and discussed, giving emphasis on its integration with the other components of the respective experiments.

Iafolla, V.; Carmisciano, C.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Magnafico, C.; Peron, R.; Santoli, F.; Nozzoli, S.; Ungaro, D.; Argada, S.

2012-04-01

87

Conceptual second-generation lunar equipment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The spring 1990 Introduction to Design class was asked to conceptually design second-generation lunar vehicles and equipment as a semester design project. The basic assumption made in designing second-generation lunar vehicles and equipment was that a network of permanent lunar bases already existed. The designs were to facilitate the transportation of personnel and materials. The eight topics to choose from included flying vehicles, ground-based vehicles, robotic arms, and life support systems. Two teams of two or three members competed on each topic and results were exhibited at a formal presentation. A clean-propellant powered lunar flying transport vehicle, an extra-vehicular activity life support system, a pressurized lunar rover for greater distances, and a robotic arm design project are discussed.

1990-01-01

88

Prospecting Rovers for Lunar Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study of lunar rover options for exploring the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar environment is presented. The potential for nearly continuous solar illumination coupled with the potential for water ice, focus exploration planner's attention on the polar regions of the moon. These regions feature craters that scientists have reason to believe may contain water ice. Water ice can be easily converted to fuel cell reactants, breathing oxygen, potable water, and rocket propellant. For these reasons, the NASA Robotic Lunar Exploration Program (RLEP) sponsored a study of potential prospecting rover concepts as one part of the RLEP-2 Pre-Phase A. Numerous vehicle configurations and power, thermal, and communication options are investigated. Rover options in the 400kg to 530kg class are developed which are capable of either confirming the presence of water ice at the poles, or conclusively demonstrating its absence.

Graham, Jerry B.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Farmer, Jeffery T.

2007-01-01

89

Growing pioneer plants for a lunar base  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A precursory scenario of cultivating the first plants in a lunar greenhouse was elaborated in frames of a conceptual study to grow plants for a permanently manned lunar base. A prototype plant growth system represents an ornamental plant Tagetes patula L. for growing in a lunar rock anorthosite as a substrate. Microbial community anticipated to be in use to support a growth and development of the plant in a substrate of low bioavailability and provide an acceptable growth and blossoming of T. patula under growth limiting conditions.

Kozyrovska, N. O.; Lutvynenko, T. L.; Korniichuk, O. S.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Voznyuk, T. M.; Kononuchenko, O.; Zaetz, I.; Rogutskyy, I. S.; Mytrokhyn, O. V.; Mashkovska, S. P.; Foing, B. H.; Kordyum, V. A.

90

Concept for a Radioisotope Powered Dual Mode Lunar Rover  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over three decades ago, the Apollo missions manifestly demonstrated the value of a lunar rover to expand the exploration activities of lunar astronauts. The stated plan of the new Vision for Space Exploration to establish a permanent presence on the moon in the next decades gives new impetus to providing long range roving and exploration capability in support of the

John O. Elliott; Timothy M. Schriener; Keith Coste

2006-01-01

91

Can the United States afford a lunar base  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Establishing a lunar base will require steady funding for a decade or two. The question addressed is whether such a large space project is affordable at this time. The relevant facts and methodology are presented so that the reader may formulate independent answers. It is shown that a permanent lunar base can be financed without increasing NASA's historical budgetary trend.

Keaton, Paul W.

1988-03-01

92

Magnetostatic potential theory and the lunar magnetic dipole field  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lunar magnetic dipole moment is discussed. It is proposed that if a primordial core magnetic field existed, it would give rise to a present day nonzero external dipole magnetic field. This conclusion is based on the assumption that the lunar mantle is at least slightly ferromagnetic, and thus would maintain a permanent magnetization after the disappearance of the core

M. L. Goldstein

1975-01-01

93

Microwave Extraction of Water from Lunar Regolith Simulant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nearly a decade ago the DOD Clementine lunar orbital mission obtained data indicating that the permanently shaded regions at the lunar poles may have permanently frozen water in the lunar soil or `permafrost'. Currently a Lunar Lander Exploration Program is expected to land at the lunar pole to determine if water is present. The detection of water from the permafrost is an important goal for NASA. Extraction of water from lunar permafrost would be a valuable In-Situ Resource for Utilization (ISRU) in human life support and as a fuel. The use of microwave processing could permit the extraction of water without the need to dig, drill, or excavate the lunar surface. Microwave heating of regolith is potentially faster and more efficient than any other heating methods due to the very low thermal conductivity of the lunar regolith. Also, microwaves can penetrate into the soil permitting water removal from deep below the lunar surface. A cryogenic vacuum test facility was developed for evaluating the use of microwave heating and water extraction from a lunar regolith simulant. Water was collected in a cryogenic cold trap even with soil temperature well below 0 °C. The results of microwave extraction of water experiments will be presented.

Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

2007-01-01

94

Models of an early lunar dynamo  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The hypothesis that a dynamo once existed in the moon, and hence was the source of lunar paleomagnetism, is tested using a model for the global thermoremanent magnetization of spherical lithospheres. Various models of an ancient lunar dipole field are used which incorporate intensity variations and reversals, and which are consistent with lunar sample paleointensities. It is found that non-reversing lunar dynamos which have simple exponential decay histories beginning at 4.6 b.y. ago are inconsistent with this limit, unless the moon has been thoroughly demagnetized to a depth of tens of kilometers by impacts or other processes. An early lunar dynamo cannot be excluded by global scalar measurements unless the permanent lunar dipole moment is shown to be significantly less than 10 to the 13th power G/cu cm by future spacecraft measurements, which may be technologically impossible; vector measurements of lunar magnetic anomalies over the whole moon offer a possibility of determining the source of the field which magnetized the lunar crust.

Srnka, L. J.; Mendenhall, M. H.

1979-01-01

95

Lunar Phases  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Lunar Phases online science activity is provided by the Astrophysics Science Project Integrating Research and Education Web site, which is the educational outreach program of the HiRes Cosmic Ray Research Group at the University of Utah. This fascinating lesson utilizes an interactive lunar animation that allows students to learn how the moon's orbit around the earth affects how we see it. Although this concept may seem fairly straightforward, it can actually be somewhat confusing. This activity, though, does a good job of explaining and illustrating what is actually happening with the sun, earth, and moon at various times throughout the month. The entire lesson is also available in Spanish.

96

Human Settlements, Energy, and Industry  

SciTech Connect

Human settlements are integrators of many of the climate impacts initially felt in other sectors, and differ from each other in geographic location, size, economic circumstances, and political and social capacity. The most wide-spread serious potential impact is flooding and landslides, followed by tropical cyclones. A growing literature suggests that a very wide variety of settlements in nearly every climate zone may be affected, although the specific evidence is still very limited. Settlements with little economic diversification and where a high percentage of incomes derive from climate sensitive primary resource industries (agriculture, forestry and fisheries) are more sensitive than more diversified settlements

Scott, Michael J.; Gupta, Sujata; Jauregui, Ernesto; Nwafor, James; Satterthwaite, David; Wanasinghe, Yapa; Wilbanks, Thomas; Yoshino, Masatoshi; Kelkar, Ulka

2001-01-15

97

Lunar cement and lunar concrete  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results of a study to investigate methods of producing cements from lunar materials are presented. A chemical process and a differential volatilization process to enrich lime content in selected lunar materials were identified. One new cement made from lime and anorthite developed compressive strengths of 39 Mpa (5500 psi) for 1 inch paste cubes. The second, a hypothetical composition based on differential volatilization of basalt, formed a mineral glass which was activated with an alkaline additive. The 1 inch paste cubes, cured at 100C and 100 percent humidity, developed compressive strengths in excess of 49 Mpa (7100 psi). Also discussed are tests made with Apollo 16 lunar soil and an ongoing investigation of a proposed dry mix/steam injection procedure for casting concrete on the Moon.

Lin, T. D.

98

Lunar cement and lunar concrete  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of a study to investigate methods of producing cements from lunar materials are presented. A chemical process and a differential volatilization process to enrich lime content in selected lunar materials were identified. One new cement made from lime and anorthite developed compressive strengths of 39 Mpa (5500 psi) for 1 inch paste cubes. The second, a hypothetical composition based on differential volatilization of basalt, formed a mineral glass which was activated with an alkaline additive. The 1 inch paste cubes, cured at 100C and 100 percent humidity, developed compressive strengths in excess of 49 Mpa (7100 psi). Also discussed are tests made with Apollo 16 lunar soil and an ongoing investigation of a proposed dry mix/steam injection procedure for casting concrete on the Moon.

Lin, T. D.

1991-01-01

99

Lunar Seismology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes major findings from the passive seismic experiment on the Moon with the Apollo seismic network illustrated in a map. Concludes that human beings may have discovered something very basic about the physics of planetary interiors because of the affirmation of the presence of a warm'' lunar interior. (CC)

Latham, Gary V.

1973-01-01

100

Lunar Vehicles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The next step in lunar exploration will be the orbiting of an automated station around the moon, followed by the landing of a mobile station on the satellite. Some of the technical problems related to this station are mentioned: the possibility of moving ...

D. S. Andreescu

1967-01-01

101

Lunar Biospheres  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an activity about the conditions for a sustainable biosphere. Learners will build a biosphere that is a balanced, self-enclosed living system able to run efficiently over a long period of time. This activity is in Unit 3 of the Exploring the Moon teachers guide, which is designed for use especially, but not exclusively, with the Lunar Sample Disk program.

102

Lunar Sulfur.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to t...

D. L. Kuck

1991-01-01

103

29 CFR 2200.120 - Settlement procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...require the parties to provide statements of the issues in controversy and the factual predicate for each party's position on each...parties, conduct such other settlement proceedings as may aid in the settlement of the case. (d) Settlement...

2013-07-01

104

Lunar Landing Research Vehicle  

NASA Video Gallery

The lunar lander, called a Lunar Excursion Module, or Lunar Module (LM), was designed for vertical landing and takeoff, and was able to briefly hover and fly horizontally before landing. At first g...

105

Lunar sample analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The surface composition of lunar fines, the solar wind sputtering process, and the profile of reduced Fe in lunar samples are reported. Atomic absorption studies of trace metal, especially lead, distribution in lunar fines samples are described.

Housley, R. M.

1977-01-01

106

Lunar Missions and Datasets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are two slide presentations contained in this document. The first reviews the lunar missions from Surveyor, Galileo, Clementine, the Lunar Prospector, to upcoming lunar missions, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), Lunar Crater Observation & Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS), Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL), Lunar Atmosphere, Dust and Environment Explorer (LADEE), ILN and a possible Robotic sample return mission. The information that the missions about the moon is reviewed. The second set of slides reviews the lunar meteorites, and the importance of lunar meteorites to adding to our understanding of the moon.

Cohen, Barbara A.

2009-01-01

107

An engineer/constructor's view of lunar resource development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A strawman lunar outpost scenario has been postulated as a special focus to guide the papers in this symposium. This scenario describes an evolving facility with basic components, personnel, and activities intended to support lunar missions that lead to a permanent occupation on the lunar surface. The engineer/constructor's view of establishing a lunar outpost is largely concerned with identifying and analyzing the logistics needed to transform the engineering designs on paper into a constructed and operating facility. This means that all aspects of the outpost design will be examined to satisfy constructability requirements and to develop a construction management plan that leads to successful facility startup and routine operations. Whether the facility is to be devoted to materials production, vehicle refueling, or science projects will influence the construction plan in its details, but the construction of all lunar facilities will be mainly governed by the difficult logistics path from Earth to the lunar surface.

Jones, Carleton H.

1992-02-01

108

Bank for International Settlements  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Bank for International Settlements (BIS), a creation of the Hague Conference of 1930, is "a[n international] central banking institution" whose aim is "to promote the co-operation of central banks and to provide additional facilities for international financial operations." Its web site provides a detailed profile of BIS, along with its basic texts and charters. However, the power of the site is its publication section, a small but growing list of full text publications (Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format only), highlighted by the quarterly International Banking and Financial Market Developments, a "commentary on recent developments in international banking, securities and global derivatives markets based on partial information available for the [most recent quarter] and on more detailed banking data for [the previous quarter]." The site also contains BIS Review, "a collection of important articles and speeches by senior central bankers."

1997-01-01

109

Lunar Dust Environment and Plasma Package for Lunar Lander - Definition Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dust, the charged lunar surface, and the ambient plasma form a closely coupled system. The lunar surface is permanently under the influence of charging effects such as UV radiation or energetic solar wind and magnetospheric particles. The surface charging effects result in strong local electric fields which in turn may lead to mobilization and transport of charged dust particles. Furthermore, the environment can become even more complex in the presence of local crustal magnetic anomalies or due to sunlight/shadow transitions. A detail understanding of these phenomena and their dependence on external influences is a key point for future robotic and human lunar exploration and requires an appropriately tuned instrumentation for in-situ measurements. Here we present results from the concept and design phase A - a study of the Lunar Dust Environment and Plasma Package (L-DEPP), which has been proposed as one of model instrument payloads for the planned Lunar Lander mission of the European Space Agency. Focus is held on scientific objectives and return of the mission with respect to environmental and mission technology constraints and requirements. L-DEPP is proposed to consist of the following instruments: ELDA - Electrostatic Lunar Dust Analyser, LPM - Langmuir Probe and Magnetometer, LRU - Broadband radio receiver and electric field antennae and LEIA - Lunar Electron and Ion Analyser. In addition to the dust and plasma measurements the RADIO experiment will provide a site survey testing for future radio astronomy observations. Lunar Dust Environment and Plasma Package CAD Model

Laifr, J.; Auster, U.; Bale, S. D.; Delory, G. T.; Devoto, P.; Farrell, W. M.; Glassmeier, K.; Guicking, L.; Halekas, J. S.; Hellinger, P.; Hercik, D.; Horanyi, M.; Kataria, D.; Kozacek, Z.; Mazelle, C. X.; Omura, Y.; Owen, C. J.; Pavelka, R.; Plaschke, F.; Rucker, H. O.; Saito, Y.; Sternovsky, Z.; Stverak, S.; Travnicek, P. M.; Turin, P.; Vana, P.

2012-12-01

110

26 CFR 301.6224(c)-3 - Consistent settlements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...original settlement (that is, the settlement upon which the offered settlement terms are based). A consistent agreement must mirror the original settlement and may not be limited to selected items from the original settlement. Once a partner has...

2013-04-01

111

The lunar community church: Contributions to lunar living and to evolution of ethical and spiritual thinking  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Should religious institutions get interested in lunar settlement? Would their participation make positive contributions or would it discourage creative diversity and interfere with science and good technical judgement? Among the spacefaring nations of today, religion is distinctly separated from the governments that plan and pay for space exploration. However, as we move off the Earth, our art and philosophy will follow our science and technology. Spiritual thinking will follow as part of our culture. It is time to consider in what ways this can occur constructively. Transport of religious values to a lunar base may have positive effects in two ways. First, the social structure of a 'community church' as found in today's United States, supports its members psychologically. Mutual psychological and social support will be needed in a lunar community. Second, our space pioneers will experience a unique view of the universe which may, in their philosophical discussions, forge new ideas in the spiritual realm.

Allton, J. H.

1992-01-01

112

Lunar exploration and development--a sustainable model.  

PubMed

A long-term goal of space exploration is the development of a lunar settlement that will not only be largely self-sufficient but also contribute to the economy of the Earth-Moon system. Proposals for lunar mining and materials processing developments, as well as tourism-based applications, have appeared in the literature for many years. However, so great are the technical and financial difficulties associated with sustained lunar development that, more than 30 years after the end of the Apollo programme, there have been no practical advances towards this goal. While this may soon be remedied by a series of proposed unmanned orbiters, landers and rovers, the philosophy of lunar exploration and development remains the same as it has for decades: conquer, exploit, and ignore the consequences. By contrasting the well-recognised problems of Earth orbital debris and the barely recognised issue of intentional spacecraft impacts on the lunar surface, this paper illustrates the need for a new model for lunar exploration and development. This new paradigm would assign a value to the lunar environment and provide a balance between protection and exploitation, creating, in effect, a philosophy of sustainable development for the Moon. It is suggested that this new philosophy should be an integral part of any future strategy for lunar colonisation. PMID:16010758

Williamson, Mark

2005-01-01

113

Potential of derived lunar volatiles for life support  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lunar regolith contains small quantities of solar wind implanted volatile compounds that have vital, basic uses for maintaining life support systems of lunar or space settlements. Recent proposals to utilize the helium-3 isotope (He-3) derived from the lunar regolith as a fuel for fusion reactors would result in the availability of large quantities of other lunar volatile compounds. The quantities obtained would provide the annual life support replacement requirements of 1150 to 23,000 inhabitants per ton of He-3 recovered, depending on the volatile compound. Utilization of the lunar volatile compounds for life support depends on the costs, in terms of materials and energy, associated with their extraction from the lunar regolith as compared to the delivery costs of these compounds from Earth resources. Considering today's conservative estimated transportation costs ($10,000 dollars per kilogram) and regolith mining costs ($5 dollars per ton), the life support replacement requirements could be more economically supplied by recovering the lunar volatile compounds than transporting these materials from Earth resources, even before He-3 will be utilized as a fusion fuel. In addition, availability of lunar volatile compounds could have a significant cost impact on maintaining the life support systems of the space station and a Mars base.

Bula, R. J.; Wittenberg, L. J.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Kulcinski, G. L.

1992-01-01

114

Impact of lunar and planetary missions on the space station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The impacts upon the growth space station of several advanced planetary missions and a populated lunar base are examined. Planetary missions examined include sample returns from Mars, the Comet Kopff, the main belt asteroid Ceres, a Mercury orbiter, and a saturn orbiter with multiple Titan probes. A manned lunar base build-up scenario is defined, encompassing preliminary lunar surveys, ten years of construction, and establishment of a permanent 18 person facility with the capability to produce oxygen propellant. The spacecraft mass departing from the space station, mission Delta V requirements, and scheduled departure date for each payload outbound from low Earth orbit are determined for both the planetary missions and for the lunar base build-up. Large aerobraked orbital transfer vehicles (OTV's) are used. Two 42 metric ton propellant capacity OTV's are required for each the the 68 lunar sorties of the base build-up scenario. The two most difficult planetary missions (Kopff and Ceres) also require two of these OTV's. An expendable lunar lander and ascent stage and a reusable lunar lander which uses lunar produced oxygen are sized to deliver 18 metric tons to the lunar surface. For the lunar base, the Space Station must hangar at least two non-pressurized OTV's, store 100 metric tons of cryogens, and support an average of 14 OTV launch, return, and refurbishment cycles per year. Planetary sample return missions require a dedicated quarantine module.

1984-01-01

115

Versatile lunar lander for First Lunar Outpost  

Microsoft Academic Search

A stage-and-a-half cryogenic lunar lander for the First Lunar Outpost (FLO) is presented. Minimizing the impact of earth launch development and maximizing the compatibility with existing launch assets are emphasized in the lunar lander design. A standard platform, adaptable service module, and a modular engine cluster provide the versatility in a lander that can deliver the combined crew module and

Henry H. Woo; Henry J. Schmidt

1993-01-01

116

Design of a lunar transportation system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a good transportation infrastructure is a major requirement for the establishment of a permanent lunar base. Transportation is characterized by the technology available in a specific time frame and the need to transport personnel and cargo between Earth and Moon, and between lunar bases. In our study, attention was first focused on developing a transportation system for the first generation lunar base. As a first step, a tracked-type multipurpose lunar transportation vehicle was considered as a possible mode of transportation and a detailed study was conducted on the various aspects of the vehicle. Since the vehicle is composed of many moving parts, exposing it to the environment of the Moon, where fine dust particles are prevalent, can cause problems associated with lubrication and friction. The vehicle also posed problems concerning weight and power. Hence, several modifications were made to the above design ideas conceptually, and a Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS) is proposed as a more effective alternative with the following objectives: (1) minimizing the transportation of construction material and fuel from Earth or maximizing the use of the lunar material; (2) use of novel materials and light-weight structures; (3) use of new manufacturing methods and technology such as magnetic levitation using superconducting materials; and (4) innovative concepts of effectively utilizing the exotic lunar conditions, i.e., high thermal gradients, lack of atmosphere, lower gravity, etc. To achieve the above objectives of designing transportation systems from concept to operation, the project was planned in three phases: (1) conceptual design; (2) detailed analysis and synthesis; and (3) construction, testing, evaluation, and operation. In this project, both phases 1 and 2 have been carried out and work on phase 3 is in progress. In this paper, the details of the Lunar ARTS are discussed and the future work on the vehicle are also outlined.

Sankaravelu, A.; Goddard, H.; Gold, R.; Greenwell, S.; Lander, J.; Nordell, B.; Stepp, K.; Styer, M.

1989-01-01

117

An indirect search for lunar polar ices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The possibility of comet-derived ices in permanently shadowed lunar polar craters has been a question for space development for years. Calculations have shown that loss mechanisms exceed present flux; larger primordial cometary input would also now be gone. However, Nemesis theory bombardment scenarios, which are postulated to have caused mass extinctions on earth, would also have caused episodic cometary impacts on the moon, as recently as 13 million years ago, probably sufficient for the maintenance of lunar polar ices by the Arnold mechanism. Less volatile cometary compounds, such as sodium compounds, might have also survived in partially shadowed lunar polar areas where the sun is always low and partially hidden by terrain. Observational experiments were conducted to detect any enhanced sodium vapor emission at the lunar poles. These results were negative at the expected levels. If cometary materials less volatile than ices are not detected at the partially shadowed lunar areas, then doubt exists for the ices' existence in the permanently shadowed craters.

Graham, Francis G.

118

Photometric Lunar Surface Reconstruction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accurate photometric reconstruction of the Lunar surface is important in the context of upcoming NASA robotic missions to the Moon and in giving a more accurate understanding of the Lunar soil composition. This paper describes a novel approach for joint estimation of Lunar albedo, camera exposure time, and photometric parameters that utilizes an accurate Lunar-Lambertian reflectance model and previously derived Lunar topography of the area visualized during the Apollo missions. The method introduced here is used in creating the largest Lunar albedo map (16% of the Lunar surface) at the resolution of 10 meters/pixel.

Nefian, Ara V.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Morattlo, Zachary; Kim, Taemin; Beyer, Ross A.

2013-01-01

119

Lunar sulfur  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

Kuck, David L.

1991-01-01

120

Lunar surface vehicle model competition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During Fall and Winter quarters, Georgia Tech's School of Mechanical Engineering students designed machines and devices related to Lunar Base construction tasks. These include joint projects with Textile Engineering students. Topics studied included lunar environment simulator via drop tower technology, lunar rated fasteners, lunar habitat shelter, design of a lunar surface trenching machine, lunar support system, lunar worksite illumination (daytime), lunar regolith bagging system, sunlight diffusing tent for lunar worksite, service apparatus for lunar launch vehicles, lunar communication/power cables and teleoperated deployment machine, lunar regolith bag collection and emplacement device, soil stabilization mat for lunar launch/landing site, lunar rated fastening systems for robotic implementation, lunar surface cable/conduit and automated deployment system, lunar regolith bagging system, and lunar rated fasteners and fastening systems. A special topics team of five Spring quarter students designed and constructed a remotely controlled crane implement for the SKITTER model.

1990-01-01

121

Design of a lunar transportation system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The establishment of lunar bases is the next logical step in the exploration of space. Permanent lunar bases will support scientific investigation, the industrialization of space, and the development of self-sufficiency on the Moon. Scientific investigation and research and development would lead to applications utilizing lunar material resources. By utilizing these resources, the industrialization of space can become a reality. The above two factors coupled with the development of key and enabling technologies would lead to achievement of self-sufficiency of the lunar base. Attention was focused on specific design(s) to be pursued during subsequent stages in advanced courses. Some of the objectives in the project included: (1) minimizing the transportation of construction material and fuel from earth, or maximizing the use of the lunar material; (2) use of novel materials and light weight structures; (3) use of new manufacturing methods and technology such as magnetically levitated, or superconducting materials; and (4) innovative concepts of effectively utilizing the exotic lunar conditions, i.e. high thermal gradients, lack of atmosphere, zero wind forces, and lower gravity, etc.

1988-01-01

122

Lunar Dust Environment and Plasma Package for Lunar Lander - Definition Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dust, the charged lunar surface, and the ambient plasma form a closely coupled system. The lunar surface is permanently under the influence of charging effects such as UV radiation or energetic solar wind and magnetospheric particles. The surface charging effects result in strong local electric fields which in turn may lead to mobilization and transport of charged dust particles. Furthermore, the environment can become even more complex in the presence of local crustal magnetic anomalies or due to sunlight/shadow transitions. A detail understanding of these phenomena and their dependence on external influences is a key point for future robotic/human lunar exploration and requires an appropriately tuned instrumentation for in situ measurements. Here we present preliminary results from the concept and design phase A study of the Lunar Dust Environment and Plasma Package (L-DEPP), which has been proposed as one of model instrument payloads for the planned Lunar Lander mission of the European Space Agency. Focus is held on scientific objectives and return of the mission with respect to environmental and mission technology constraints and requirements. L-DEPP is proposed to consist of the following instruments: ELDA - Electrostatic lunar dust analyser, LP - Langmuir probe, RADIO - Broadband radio receiver & electric field antennae, LEIA - Lunar electron and ion analyser, and MAG - Flux-gate magnetometer. In addition to the dust and plasma measurements the RADIO experiment will provide a site survey testing for future radio astronomy observations.

Pavelka, R.; Hellinger, P.; Auster, H.; Bale, S.; Delory, G. T.; Devoto, P.; Farrell, W. M.; Glassmeier, K.; Guicking, L.; Halekas, J. S.; Hercik, D.; Horanyi, M.; Kataria, D.; Kozacek, Z.; Mazelle, C. X.; Owen, C. J.; Plaschke, F.; Rucker, H. O.; Sternovsky, Z.; Stverak, S.; Travnicek, P. M.; Vana, P.

2011-12-01

123

Lunar architecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The climatic conditions of Earth and human trends for discover the space, make these questions that how we can design a camp on the moon as a base for traveling in space or how we can live on that condition and what kind of camp we can have on the moon?!The first step in this way was creating the International Space Station on earth's orbit. (International Space Station, 2001) Settlement on moon was proposed since knowledge about it growth. Regarding to new technologies, architects parallel to engineers are trying to design and invent new ways for human settlement on moon because of its suitable conditions. Proposed habitats range from the actual spacecraft lander or their used fuel tanks, to inflatable modules of various shapes. Due to the researches until now, the first requirement for the living on other planets is water existence for human breath and fuel and after that we need to solve air pressure and gravity difference. (Colonization of the Moon, 2004) The Goal of this research is to answer to the question which is designing a camp on the Moon. But for this goal, there is need to think and study more about the subject and its factors. With qualitative and comparative methodology, the conditions of the Earth and the Moon will be comparing in different categories such as nature, human and design. I think that after water discovery, with using local materials and appropriate building design which can be on surface or underground, along with new sciences, we can plan for long period living on Moon. The important point is to consider Function, Form and Structure together in designing on the Moon. References: Colonization of the Moon. (2004). Retrieved December 14, 2009, from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonizationo ft heM oonStructure, InternationalSpaceStation.(2001).Retrie http : //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/InternationalS paceS tation

Malek, Shahin

124

Lunar orbiting prospector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the prime reasons for establishing a manned lunar presence is the possibility of using the potential lunar resources. The Lunar Orbital Prospector (LOP) is a lunar orbiting platform whose mission is to prospect and explore the Moon from orbit in support of early lunar colonization and exploitation efforts. The LOP mission is divided into three primary phases: transport from Earth to low lunar orbit (LLO), operation in lunar orbit, and platform servicing in lunar orbit. The platform alters its orbit to obtain the desired surface viewing, and the orbit can be changed periodically as needed. After completion of the inital remote sensing mission, more ambitious and/or complicated prospecting and exploration missions can be contemplated. A refueled propulsion module, updated instruments, or additional remote sensing packages can be flown up from the lunar base to the platform.

1988-01-01

125

Magnetostatic potential theory and the lunar magnetic dipole field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lunar magnetic dipole moment is discussed. It is proposed that if a primordial core magnetic field existed, it would give rise to a present day nonzero external dipole magnetic field. This conclusion is based on the assumption that the lunar mantle is at least slightly ferromagnetic, and thus would maintain a permanent magnetization after the disappearance of the core magnetic field. Using a simple mathematical model of the moon, calculations are performed which support this hypothesis.

Goldstein, M. L.

1975-01-01

126

A bootstrap lunar base: Preliminary design review 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A bootstrap lunar base is the gateway to manned solar system exploration and requires new ideas and new designs on the cutting edge of technology. A preliminary design for a Bootstrap Lunar Base, the second provided by this contractor, is presented. An overview of the work completed is discussed as well as the technical, management, and cost strategies to complete the program requirements. The lunar base design stresses the transforming capabilities of its lander vehicles to aid in base construction. The design also emphasizes modularity and expandability in the base configuration to support the long-term goals of scientific research and profitable lunar resource exploitation. To successfully construct, develop, and inhabit a permanent lunar base, however, several technological advancements must first be realized. Some of these technological advancements are also discussed.

1987-01-01

127

Lunar base and Mars base design projects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space design classes at the University of Texas at Austin undertook seven projects in support of the NASA/USRA advanced space design program during the 1988-89 year. A total of 51 students, including 5 graduate students, participated in the design efforts. Four projects were done within the Aerospace Engineering (ASE) design program and three within the Mechanical Engineering (ME) program. Both lunar base and Mars base design efforts were studied, and the specific projects were as follows: Lunar Crew Emergency Rescue Vehicle (ASE); Mars Logistics Lander Convertible to a Rocket Hopper (ME); A Robotically Constructed Production and Supply Base on Phobos (ASE); A Mars/Phobos Transportation System (ASE); Manned Base Design and Related Construction Issues for Mars/Phobos Mission (ME); and Health Care Needs for a Lunar Colony and Design of Permanent Medical Facility (ME).

Amos, J.; Campbell, J.; Hudson, C.; Kenny, E.; Markward, D.; Pham, C.; Wolf, C.

1989-01-01

128

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) instrument overview  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and Narrow Angle Cameras (NACs) are on the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). The WAC is a 7-color push-frame camera (100 and 400 m/pixel visible and UV, respectively), while the two NACs are monochrome narrow-angle linescan imagers (0.5 m/pixel). The primary mission of LRO is to obtain measurements of the Moon that will enable future lunar human exploration. The overarching goals of the LROC investigation include landing site identification and certification, mapping of permanently polar shadowed and sunlit regions, meter-scale mapping of polar regions, global multispectral imaging, a global morphology base map, characterization of regolith properties, and determination of current impact hazards.

Robinson, M. S.; Brylow, S. M.; Tschimmel, M.; Humm, D.; Lawrence, S. J.; Thomas, P. C.; Denevi, B. W.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Zerr, J.; Ravine, M. A.; Caplinger, M. A.; Ghaemi, F. T.; Schaffner, J. A.; Malin, M. C.; Mahanti, P.; Bartels, A.; Anderson, J.; Tran, T. N.; Eliason, E. M.; McEwen, A. S.; Turtle, E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Hiesinger, H.

2010-01-01

129

Pyroclastic deposits as sites for lunar bases  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits may prove to be excellent sites for the establishment of a permanent lunar base for mining purposes. A wide variety of potentially useful by-products could be produced (e.g., Fe, Ti, H, N, C, S, Cu, Zn, Cd, Bi, and Pb). A number of ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits of regional extent has been studied. The physical properties of the regional pyroclastic units have important implications for lunar construction. These extensive, deep deposits of ilmenite-rich pyroclastic material are block-free and uncontaminated; they could be easily excavated and would be ideal for lunar mining operations. These deep, loose pyroclastic deposits would also be ideal for rapidly covering base modules with an adequate thickness of shielding.

Hawke, B. Ray; Clark, Beth; Coombs, C. R.

1990-01-01

130

Vertical regolith shield wall construction for lunar base applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lunar bases located on the lunar surface will require permanent protection from radiation and launch ejecta. This paper outlines a method of providing physical protection using lunar regolith that is constructed in situ as a modular vertical wall using specially devised methods of containment and construction. Deployable compartments, reinforced with corner struts, are elevated and filled by a moving gantry. The compartments interlock to form a stable wall. Different wall heights, thicknesses, and plan configurations are achieved by varying the geometry of the individual compartments, which are made from woven carbon fibers. Conventional terrestrial structural engineering techniques can be modified and used to establish the structural integrity and performance of the wall assembly.

Kaplicky, Jan; Nixon, David; Wernick, Jane

1992-01-01

131

LCROSS (Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite) Observation Campaign: Strategies, Implementation, and Lessons Learned  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASA’s LCROSS (Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite) mission was designed to explore the nature of previously detected\\u000a enhanced levels of hydrogen near the lunar poles. The LCROSS mission impacted the spent upper stage of the launch vehicle\\u000a into a permanently shadowed region of the lunar surface to create an ejecta plume. The resultant impact crater and plume were\\u000a then

Jennifer L. Heldmann; Anthony Colaprete; Diane H. Wooden; Robert F. Ackermann; David D. Acton; Peter R. Backus; Vanessa Bailey; Jesse G. Ball; William C. Barott; Samantha K. Blair; Marc W. Buie; Shawn Callahan; Nancy J. Chanover; Young-Jun Choi; Al Conrad; Dolores M. Coulson; Kirk B. Crawford; Russell Dehart; Imke de Pater; Michael Disanti; James R. Forster; Reiko Furusho; Tetsuharu Fuse; Tom Geballe; J. Duane Gibson; David Goldstein; Stephen A. Gregory; David J. Gutierrez; Ryan T. Hamilton; Taiga Hamura; David E. Harker; Gerry R. Harp; Junichi Haruyama; Morag Hastie; Yutaka Hayano; Phillip Hinz; Peng K. Hong; Steven P. James; Toshihiko Kadono; Hideyo Kawakita; Michael S. Kelley; Daryl L. Kim; Kosuke Kurosawa; Duk-Hang Lee; Michael Long; Paul G. Lucey; Keith Marach; Anthony C. Matulonis; Richard M. McDermid; Russet McMillan; Charles Miller; Hong-Kyu Moon; Ryosuke Nakamura; Hirotomo Noda; Natsuko Okamura; Lawrence Ong; Dallan Porter; Jeffery J. Puschell; John T. Rayner; J. Jedadiah Rembold; Katherine C. Roth; Richard J. Rudy; Ray W. Russell; Eileen V. Ryan; William H. Ryan; Tomohiko Sekiguchi; Yasuhito Sekine; Mark A. Skinner; Mitsuru Sôma; Andrew W. Stephens; Alex Storrs; Robert M. Suggs; Seiji Sugita; Eon-Chang Sung; Naruhisa Takatoh; Jill C. Tarter; Scott M. Taylor; Hiroshi Terada; Chadwick J. Trujillo; Vidhya Vaitheeswaran; Faith Vilas; Brian D. Walls; Jun-Ihi Watanabe; William J. Welch; Charles E. Woodward; Hong-Suh Yim; Eliot F. Young

2011-01-01

132

Genesis lunar outpost: An evolutionary lunar habitat  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Students at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Department of Agriculture undertook a series of studies of lunar habitats during the 1989 to 1990 academic year. Undergraduate students from architecture and mechanical and structural engineering with backgrounds in interior design, biology and construction technology were involved in a seminar in the fall semester followed by a design studio in the spring. The studies resulted in three design alternatives for lunar habitation and an integrated design for an early stage lunar outpost.

Moore, Gary T. (compiler); Baschiera, Dino; Fieber, Joe; Moths, Janis

1990-01-01

133

Lunar Crustal History Recorded in Lunar Anorthosites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Anorthosites occur ubiquitously within the lunar crust at depths of 3-30 km in apparent confirmation of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) hypothesis. We have dated lunar anorthosite 67075, a Feldspathic Fragmental Breccia (FFB) collected near the rim of North Ray Crater by the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr techniques. We also have dated an anorthositic white clast (WC) in lunar meteorite Dhofar 908 by the Ar-39-Ar-40 technique and measured whole rock (WR) Sm-Nd data for a companion sample. We discuss the significance of the ages determined for these and other anorthosites for the early magmatic and bombardment history of the moon.

Nyquist, Laurence E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, D.; Park, J.; Bogard. D.; Garrison, D.; Yamaguchi, A.

2010-01-01

134

Material Damage from Impacts of Lunar Soil Particles Ejected by the Rocket Exhaust of Landing Spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper details the experimentation of lunar stimulant sandblasting. This was done to understand the damage that landing spacecraft on the moon will have to a permanent lunar outpost. The sandblasting was done with JSC-1A onto glass coupons. Correlations between the velocity and the damage done to the glass were not found. Reasons for this and future analyses are discussed.

Wittbrodt, Audelia C.; Metzger, Philip T.

2008-01-01

135

Material Damage from Impacts of Lunar Soil Particles Ejected by the Rocket Exhaust of Landing Spacecraft.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper details the experimentation of lunar stimulant sandblasting. This was done to understand the damage that landing spacecraft on the moon will have to a permanent lunar outpost. The sandblasting was done with JSC-1A onto glass coupons. Correlatio...

A. C. Wittbrodt P. T. Metzger

2008-01-01

136

Design of a lunar surface structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The next step for manned exploration and settlement is a return to the Moon. In such a return, the most challenging task is the construction of structures for habitation, considering the Moon's hostile environment. Therefore the question is: What is the best way to erect habitable structures on the lunar surface? Given the cost associated with bringing material to the Moon, In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is viewed by most as the basis for a successful manned exploration and settlement of the Solar system. Along these lines, we propose an advanced concept where the use of freeform fabrication technologies by autonomous mini-robots can form the basis for habitable lunar structures. Also, locally-available magnesium is proposed as the structural material. While it is one of the most pervasive metals in the regolith, magnesium has been only suggested only briefly as a viable option in the past. Therefore, a study has been conducted on magnesium and its alloys, taking into account the availability of the alloying elements on the Moon. An igloo-shaped magnesium structure, covered by sandbags of regolith shielding and supported on a sintered regolith foundation, is considered as a potential design of a lunar base, as well as the test bed for the proposed vision. Three studies are carried out: First a static analysis is conducted which proves the feasibility of the proposed material and method. Second, a thermal analysis is carried out to study the effect of the regolith shielding as well as the sensitivity of such designs to measurement uncertainties of regolith and sintered thermal properties. The lunar thermal environment is modeled for a potential site at 88º latitude in the lunar South Pole Region. Our analysis shows that the uncertainties are in an acceptable range where a three-meter thick shield is considered. Also, the required capacity of a thermal rejection system is estimated, choosing the thermal loads to be those of the Space Station modules. In the third study, a seismic model based on best available data has been developed and applied to our typical structure to assess the vulnerability of designs that ignore seismicity. Using random vibration and modal superposition methods, the structural response to a lunar seismic event of 7 Richter magnitude indicates that the seismic risk is very low. However, it must be considered for certain types of structural designs.

Mottaghi, Sohrob

137

LOLA: Defining Lunar Terrain  

NASA Video Gallery

The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument on board NASA's LRO spacecraft builds the highest detail topography currently available of the lunar terrain. In this video David Smith, LOLA's P...

138

Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

1982-01-01

139

Adhesion of Lunar Dust.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e.,...

O. R. Walton

2007-01-01

140

Lunar Oxygen as Monopropellant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper explores the feasibility of beamed energy propulsion to provide transportation to and from the lunar surface to low lunar orbit using lunar oxygen as propellant. Oxygen, as an Electro-Thermal Propulsion (ETP) monopropellant, has specific impulse comparing favorably with chemical bipropellants, though not as high as cryogenic LO2+LH2. Lunar hydrogen is not available in non-polar regions and costly to transport from earth for use as fuel for lunar operations. However, oxygen is a major component of lunar soil and available given ISRU (In Situ Resource Utilization) infrastructure. Low-gravity and vacuum environment plus low velocity increments are distinct advantages favoring lunar-based beamed energy propulsion. In lunar vacuum and low gravity environment, energy storage devices such as SMES (Superconductor Magnet Energy Storage) and FES (Flywheel Energy Storage) should exhibit improved efficiency. Microwave source design also favors vacuum operation.

Johansen, Donald G.

2008-04-01

141

First Lunar Outpost support study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The First Lunar Outpost (FLO) is the first manned step in the accomplishment of the Space Exploration Initiative, the Vice President's directive to NASA on the 20th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing. FLO's broad objectives are the establishment of a permanent human presence on the moon, supporting the utilization of extraterrestrial resources in a long-term, sustained program. The primary objective is to emplace and validate the first elements of a man tended outpost on the lunar surface to provide the basis for: (1) establishing, maintaining and expanding human activities and influence across the surface; (2) establishing, maintaining and enhancing human safety and productivity; (3) accommodating space transportation operations to and from the surface; (4) accommodating production of scientific information; (5) exploiting in-situ resources. Secondary objectives are: (1) to conduct local, small scale science (including life science); (2) In-situ resource utilization (ISRU) demonstrations; (3) engineering and operations tests; (4) to characterize the local environment; and (5) to explore locally. The current work is part of ongoing research at the Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture supporting NASA's First Lunar Outpost initiative. Research at SICSA supporting the First Lunar Outpost initiative has been funded through the Space Exploration Initiatives office at Johnson Space Center. The objectives of the current study are to further develop a module concept from an evaluation of volumetric and programmatic requirements, and pursue a high fidelity design of this concept, with the intention of providing a high fidelity design mockup to research planetary design issues and evaluate future design concepts.

Bartz, Christopher; Cook, John; Rusingizandekwe, Jean-Luc

1993-01-01

142

Lunar electrical conductivity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is pointed out that the lunar magnetometer experiment has made important contributions to studies of the lunar interior. Numerical inversions of the lunar electromagnetic response have been carried out, taking into account a void region behind the moon. The amplitude of the transfer function of an eight-layer model is considered along with a model of the temperature distribution inside the moon and the amplitude of the transfer function of a semiconductor lunar model.

Leavy, D.; Madden, T.

1974-01-01

143

Modeling Lunar Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A precise model of lunar dynamics is needed to analyze the very accurate lunar laser ranges. The orbital dynamics accounts for multi-body gravitational interactions, relativistic effects, nonspherical gravity fields, and tides on Earth and Moon. The lunar rotational dynamics involves torques from the lunar gravity field, figure-figure torques, tidal distortion, tidal dissipation, dissipation at a fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and torques from that oblate boundary.

Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.

2005-05-01

144

Modeling Lunar Dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

A precise model of lunar dynamics is needed to analyze the very accurate lunar laser ranges. The orbital dynamics accounts for multi-body gravitational interactions, relativistic effects, nonspherical gravity fields, and tides on Earth and Moon. The lunar rotational dynamics involves torques from the lunar gravity field, figure-figure torques, tidal distortion, tidal dissipation, dissipation at a fluid-core\\/solid-mantle boundary, and torques from

J. G. Williams; D. H. Boggs

2005-01-01

145

Copernicus - Lunar Surface Mapper  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Utah State University (USU) 1991-92 Space Systems Design Team has designed a Lunar Surface Mapper (LSM) to parallel the development of the NASA Office of Exploration lunar initiatives. USU students named the LSM 'Copernicus' after the 16th Century Polish astronomer, for whom the large lunar crater on the face of the moon was also named. The top level requirements

Shaun D. Anderson; Frank J. Redd

1993-01-01

146

Copernicus: Lunar surface mapper  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Utah State University (USU) 1991-92 Space Systems Design Team has designed a Lunar Surface Mapper (LSM) to parallel the development of the NASA Office of Exploration lunar initiatives. USU students named the LSM 'Copernicus' after the 16th century Polish astronomer, for whom the large lunar crater on the face of the moon was also named. The top level requirements

Frank J. Redd; Shaun D. Anderson

1992-01-01

147

Common lunar lander  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report focuses on the reference lander design developed at the Johnson Space Center, describing a small lunar soft lander with the capability to soft land about 64 kilograms of payload at any lunar latitude and longitude. The Artemis lander is a sun-pointing, three-axis vehicle that contributes to the translunar injection burn and performs the lunar orbit insertion, deorbit, descent

S. Bailey; J. Stecklein; H. Chen; W. Culpepper; C. D. Hyatt; E. Kluksdahl; T. Pelischek; D. Pruett; S. Rickman; L. Wagner

1992-01-01

148

Lunar Prospector Extended Mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) selected Lunar Prospector (LP) as one of the discovery missions to conduct solar system exploration science investigations. The mission is NASA's first lunar voyage to investigate key science objectives since Apollo and was launched in January 1998. In keeping with discovery program requirements to reduce total mission cost and utilize new technology, Lunar

David Folta; Mark Beckman; David Lozier; Ken Galal

1999-01-01

149

Autonomous Optical Lunar Navigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance of optical autonomous navigation is investigated for low lunar orbits and for high elliptical lunar orbits. Various options for employing the camera measurements are presented and compared. Strategies for improving navigation performance are developed and applied to the Orion vehicle lunar mission

Zanetti, Renato; Crouse, Brian; D'souza, Chris

2009-01-01

150

Solar lunar power  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current and projected technology is assessed for photovoltaic power for a lunar base. The following topics are discussed: requirements for power during the lunar day and night; solar cell efficiencies, specific power, temperature sensitivity, and availability; storage options for the lunar night; array and system integration; the potential for in situ production of photovoltaic arrays and storage medium.

Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

1994-01-01

151

Microwave processing of lunar materials: potential applications  

SciTech Connect

The microwave processing of lunar materials holds promise for the production of either water, oxygen, primary metals, or ceramic materials. Extra high frequency microwave (EHF) at between 100 and 500 gigahertz have the potential for selective coupling to specific atomic species and a concomitant low energy requirement for the extraction of specific materials, such as oxygen, from lunar ores. The coupling of ultra high frequency (UHF) (e.g., 2.45 gigahertz) microwave frequencies to hydrogen-oxygen bonds might enable the preferential and low energy cost removal (as H/sub 2/O) of implanted protons from the sun or of adosrbed water which might be found in lunar dust in permanently shadowed polar areas. Microwave melting and selective phase melting of lunar materials could also be used either in the preparation of simplified ceramic geometries (e.g., bricks) with custom-tailored microstructures, or for the direct preparation of hermetic walls in underground structures. Speculatively, the preparation of photovoltaic devices based on lunar materials, especially ilmenite, may be a potential use of microwave processing on the moon. Preliminary experiments on UHF melting of terrestrial basalt, basalt/ilmenite and mixtures show that microwave processing is feasible.

Meek, T.T.; Cocks, F.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Wright, R.A.

1984-01-01

152

Moonport: Transportation node in lunar orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An orbital transporation system between the Earth and Moon was designed. The design work focused on the requirements and configuration of an orbiting lunar base. The design utilized current Space Station technologies, but also focused on the specific requirements involved with a permanently manned, orbiting lunar station. A model of the recommended configuration was constructed. In order to analyze Moonport activity and requirements, a traffic model was designed, defining traffic between the lunar port, or Moonport and low Earth orbit. Also, a lunar base model was used to estimate requirements of the surface base on Moonport traffic and operations. A study was conducted to compare Moonport traffic and operations based in low lunar orbit and the L (sub 2) equilibrium point, behind the Moon. The study compared delta-V requirements to each location and possible payload deliveries to low Earth orbit from each location. Products of the Moonport location study included number of flights annually to Moonport, net payload delivery to low Earth orbit, and Moonport storage requirement.

1987-01-01

153

Costs and benefits of lunar oxygen: Engineering, operations, and economics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Oxygen is the most commonly discussed lunar resource. It will certainly not be the easiest to retrieve, but oxygen's fundamental place in propulsion and life support guarantees it continued attention as a prime candidate for early in situ resource utilization (ISRU). The findings are reviewed of recent investigation, sponsored by NASA-Ames, into the kinds of technologies, equipment, and scenarios (the engineering and operations costs) that will be required even to initiate lunar oxygen production. The infrastructure necessary to surround and support a viable oxygen-processing operation is explained. Selected details are used to illustrate the depth of technology challenges, extent of operations burdens, and complexity of decision linkages. Basic assumptions, and resulting timelines and mass manifests, are listed. These findings are combined with state-of-the-art knowledge of lunar and Mars propulsion options in simple economic input/output and internal-rate-of-return models, to compare production costs with performance benefits. Implications for three realistic scales of exploration architecture - expeditionary, aggressive science, and industrialization/settlement - are discussed. Conclusions are reached regarding the contextual conditions within which production of lunar oxygen (LLOX) is a reasonable activity. LLOX appears less useful for Mars missions than previously hoped. Its economical use in low Earth orbit hinges on production of lunar hydrogen as well. LLOX shows promise for lunar ascent/descent use, but that depends strongly on the plant mass required.

Sherwood, Brent; Woodcock, Gordon R.

1991-01-01

154

Design of a lunar transportation system, volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Spring 1990 Introduction to Design class was asked to conceptually design second generation lunar vehicles and equipment as a semester design project. A brief summary of four of the final projects, is presented. The designs were to facilitate the transportation of personnel and materials. The eight topics to choose from included flying vehicles, ground based vehicles, robotic arms, and life support systems. A lunar flying vehicle that uses clean propellants for propulsion is examined. A design that will not contribute to the considerable amount of caustic pollution already present in the sparse lunar atmosphere is addressed by way of ballistic flight techniques. A second generation redesign of the current Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) suit to increase operating time, safety, and efficiency is also addressed. A separate life support system is also designed to be permanently attached to the lunar rover. The two systems would interact through the use of an umbilical cord connection. A ground based vehicle which will travel for greater distances than a 37.5 kilometer radius from a base on the lunar surface was designed. The vehicle is pressurized due to the fact that existing lunar rovers are limited by the EVA suits currently in use. A robotic arm for use at lunar bases or on roving vehicles on the lunar surface was designed. The arm was originally designed as a specimen gathering device, but it can be used for a wide range of tasks through the use of various attachments.

1990-01-01

155

Lunar sample 14425 - Not a lunar tektite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis of a polished section of lunar sample 14425 shows, in contradiction to a previous report, that it has a composition similar to Apollo 14 breccias, but not to high-magnesium microtektites. Lunar sample 14425 is a large (8.006±0.006 mm dia.) glass bead. Sample 14425 is one of the largest glass beads returned from the moon. Semiquantitative analysis of the bead indicated that it has a composition unlike other lunar samples, but similar to high-magnesium microtektites (O'Keefe and Glass, 1985). A polished section was prepared at the Lunar Receiving Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. Quantitative analysis of this section shows that the spherule is extremely homogenous in composition and that the composition is similar to Apollo 14 impact breccias and not to any known terrestrial tektite. It appears that the glass bead was formed by impact melting and that it is not a lunar tektite.

Glass, B. P.

1986-01-01

156

The ISA accelerometer and Lunar science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years the Moon has become again a target for exploration activities, as shown by many missions, performed, ongoing or foreseen. The reasons for this new wave are manifold. The knowledge of formation and evolution of the Moon to its current state is important in order to trace the overall history of Solar System. An effective driving factor is the possibility of building a human settlement on its surface, with all the related issues of environment characterization, safety, resources, communication and navigation. Our natural satellite is also an important laboratory for fundamental physics: Lunar Laser Ranging is continuing to provide important data for testing gravitation theories. All these topics are providing stimulus and inspirations for new experiments: in fact a wide variety of them has been proposed to be conducted on the lunar surface. ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) can provide an important tool for lunar studies. Thanks to its structure (three one-dimensional sensors assembled in a composite structure) it works both in-orbit and on-ground, with the same configuration. It can therefore be used onboard a spacecraft, as a support to a radio science mission, and on the surface of the Moon, as a seismometer. This second option in particular has been the subject of preliminary studies and has been proposed as a candidate to be hosted on NASA ILN (International Lunar Network) and ESA First Lunar Lander. ISA-S (ISA-Seismometer) has a very high sensitivity, which has already been demonstrated with long time periods of usage on Earth. After a description of the instrument, its use in the context of landing missions will be described and discussed, giving emphasis on its integration with the other components of the systems.

Iafolla, Valerio; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Massimo Lucchesi, David; Lucente, Marco; Magnafico, Carmelo; Milyukov, Vadim; Nozzoli, Sergio; Peron, Roberto; Santoli, Francesco

2014-05-01

157

The lunar quarantine program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lunar quarantine program was designed to ensure that return of lunar material represented no threat to the public health, to agriculture, or to other living resources. It established definitely that no life exists on the moon. The crews of the three lunar quarantine missions, Apollo 11, 12, and 14, experienced no health problems as a result of their exposure to lunar samples. Plants and animals also showed no adverse effects. Stringent quarantine was terminated after Apollo 14, but lunar samples continued to be protected to guarantee that scientists would receive uncontaminated materials for study.

Johnston, R. S.; Mason, J. A.; Wooley, B. C.; Mccollum, G. W.; Mieszkuc, B. J.

1974-01-01

158

Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Lunar Remote Sensing: Fire, Ice, and Regolith  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The session "Lunar Remote Sensing: Fire, Ice, and Regolith" included the following:Compositional and Structural Study of the Aristarchus Plateau from Integrated UV-VIS-NIR Spectral Data; Clementine 2.7-?m Data: Mapping the Mare and Searching for Water; On the Search for Water at the Lunar Poles: Results of Forward Modeling of Permanently Shaded Areas and Lunar Prospector Measurements; Searching the Moon for Aluminous Mare Basalts Using Compositional Remote-Sensing Constraints I: Finding the Regions of Interest; Semi-automated Extraction of Contours from Lunar Topographic Maps; Basalts in Mare Humorum and S.E. Procellarum; The Hansteen and Helmet Volcanic Dome Regions on the Moon: Stratigraphy and Ages; Derivation of Elemental Abundance Maps at 15-km Spatial Resolution from the Merging of Clementine Optical and Lunar Prospector Geochemical Data; Remote Sensing and Geologic Studies of the Balmer Region of the Moon; Lava Flows in Mare Nubium and Mare Cognitum: A Geological History Based on Analysis of Multispectral Data; Development of Ground-based Lunar VIS/NEAR IR Spectral Imager; A BRDF Measurement Apparatus for Lab-based Samples; A New Source of High Resolution Lunar Images: Amateur Astronomers! ; Leakage of Gamma Rays and Neutrons from Thick Targets Bombarded by Energetic Protons; Progress on Reviving Lunar Orbiter: Scanning, Archiving, and Cartographic Processing at USGS; Modeling Lateral and Vertical Mixing by Impact Cratering with Applications for the Moon; Optical Maturity Study of Stuart#s Crater Candidate Impact; Evidence for Three Basins Beneath Oceanus Procellarum; and Ellipses of the South Pole-Aitken Basin: Implications for Basin Formation.

2004-01-01

159

Environment, agriculture, and settlement patterns in a marginal Polynesian landscape  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beginning ca. A.D. 1400, Polynesian farmers established permanent settlements along the arid southern flank of Haleakala Volcano, Maui, Hawaiian Islands; peak population density (43-57 persons per km2) was achieved by A.D. 1700-1800, and it was followed by the devastating effects of European contact. This settlement, based on dryland agriculture with sweet potato as a main crop, is represented by >3,000 archaeological features investigated to date. Geological and environmental factors are the most important influence on Polynesian farming and settlement practices in an agriculturally marginal landscape. Interactions between lava flows, whose ages range from 3,000 to 226,000 years, and differences in rainfall create an environmental mosaic that constrained precontact Polynesian farming practices to a zone defined by aridity at low elevation and depleted soil nutrients at high elevation. Within this productive zone, however, large-scale agriculture was concentrated on older, tephra-blanketed lava flows; younger flows were reserved for residential sites, small ritual gardens, and agricultural temples.

Kirch, P. V.; Hartshorn, A. S.; Chadwick, O. A.; Vitousek, P. M.; Sherrod, D. R.; Coil, J.; Holm, L.; Sharp, W. D.

2004-01-01

160

The ESA Lunar Lander and the search for Lunar Volatiles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following the Apollo era the moon was considered a volatile poor body. Samples collected from the Apollo missions contained only ppm levels of water formed by the interaction of the solar wind with the lunar regolith [1]. However more recent orbiter observations have indicated that water may exist as water ice in cold polar regions buried within craters at concentrations of a few wt. % [2]. Infrared images from M3 on Chandrayaan-1 have been interpreted as showing the presence of hydrated surface minerals with the ongoing hydroxyl/water process feeding cold polar traps. This has been supported by observation of ephemeral features termed "space dew" [3]. Meanwhile laboratory studies indicate that water could be present in appreciable quantities in lunar rocks [4] and could also have a cometary source [5]. The presence of sufficient quantities of volatiles could provide a resource which would simplify logistics for long term lunar missions. The European Space Agency (ESA's Directorate of Human Spaceflight and Operations) have provisionally scheduled a robotic mission to demonstrate key technologies to enable later human exploration. Planned for launch in 2018, the primary aim is for precise automated landing, with hazard avoidance, in zones which are almost constantly illuminated (e.g. at the edge of the Shackleton crater at the lunar south pole). These regions would enable the solar powered Lander to survive for long periods > 6 months, but require accurate navigation to within 200m. Although landing in an illuminated area, these regions are close to permanently shadowed volatile rich regions and the analysis of volatiles is a major science objective of the mission. The straw man payload includes provision for a Lunar Volatile and Resources Analysis Package (LVRAP). The authors have been commissioned by ESA to conduct an evaluation of possible technologies to be included in L-VRAP which can be included within the Lander payload. Scientific aims are to demonstrate the extraction of volatiles and determine the volatile inventory of the moon with a view for future In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Surface samples will be collected by a robotic arm with the possibility of a rover to collect more distant samples. The concentration, chemical and accurate isotopic ratios (D/H, 12C/13C, 15N/14N, 18O/16O and noble gases) of liberated volatiles will be determined, possibly using similar technology to the Philae comet lander of the Rosetta mission [6]. An additional aim is the monitoring of the chemical and isotopic composition of the tenuous lunar atmosphere [7] which will become contaminated by active human exploration. The lunar atmosphere will provide information on the processes involved in forming lunar volatiles and their concentration mechanisms. Modelling the effects of contamination from the Lander is an essential part of this study so that these can be recognized and minimized.

Morse, A. D.; Barber, S. J.; Pillinger, J. M.; Sheridan, S.; Wright, I. P.; Gibson, E. K.; Merrifield, J. A.; Waltham, N. R.; Waugh, L. J.; Pillinger, C. T.

2011-10-01

161

Understanding the Role of Local Management in Vegetation Recovery Around Pastoral Settlements in Northern Kenya  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent greening of the Sahel region and increase in vegetation cover around pastoral settlements previously described as "man-made deserts", have raised important questions on the permanency of land degradation associated with the over-exploitation of woody plants. Evidence presented is mostly on increased wetness, while management by local communities has received limited attention. This study evaluated changes in woody vegetation cover around the settlements of Kargi and Korr in northern Kenya, using satellite imagery (1986/2000), ecological ground surveys and interviews with local elders, in order to understand long-term changes in vegetation cover and the role of local community in vegetation dynamics. At both settlements, there were increments in vegetation cover and reduction in the extent of bare ground between 1986 and 2000. At Kargi settlement, there were more tree seedlings in the centre of settlement than further away. Mature tree class was more abundant in the centre of Korr than outside the settlement. The success of the regeneration and recovery of tree cover was attributed to the actions of vegetation management initiative including stringent measures by the local Environmental Management Committees. This study provides good evidence that local partnership is important for sustainable management of resources especially in rural areas where the effectiveness of government initiative is lacking.

Roba, Hassan G.; Oba, Gufu

2013-04-01

162

Understanding the role of local management in vegetation recovery around pastoral settlements in northern Kenya.  

PubMed

The recent greening of the Sahel region and increase in vegetation cover around pastoral settlements previously described as "man-made deserts", have raised important questions on the permanency of land degradation associated with the over-exploitation of woody plants. Evidence presented is mostly on increased wetness, while management by local communities has received limited attention. This study evaluated changes in woody vegetation cover around the settlements of Kargi and Korr in northern Kenya, using satellite imagery (1986/2000), ecological ground surveys and interviews with local elders, in order to understand long-term changes in vegetation cover and the role of local community in vegetation dynamics. At both settlements, there were increments in vegetation cover and reduction in the extent of bare ground between 1986 and 2000. At Kargi settlement, there were more tree seedlings in the centre of settlement than further away. Mature tree class was more abundant in the centre of Korr than outside the settlement. The success of the regeneration and recovery of tree cover was attributed to the actions of vegetation management initiative including stringent measures by the local Environmental Management Committees. This study provides good evidence that local partnership is important for sustainable management of resources especially in rural areas where the effectiveness of government initiative is lacking. PMID:23511910

Roba, Hassan G; Oba, Gufu

2013-04-01

163

Lunar in-core thermionic nuclear reactor power system conceptual design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a conceptual design of a lunar in-core thermionic reactor power system. The concept consists of a thermionic reactor located in a lunar excavation with surface mounted waste heat radiators. The system was integrated with a proposed lunar base concept representative of recent NASA Space Exploration Initiative studies. The reference mission is a permanently-inhabited lunar base requiring a 550 kWe, 7 year life central power station. Performance parameters and assumptions were based on the Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) Verification Program. Five design cases were analyzed ranging from conservative to advanced. The cases were selected to provide sensitivity effects on the achievement of TFE program goals.

Mason, Lee S.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Gallup, Donald R.

1991-01-01

164

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Cameras (LROC)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter LRO mission is scheduled to launch in the fall of 2008 as part of NASA s Robotic Lunar Exploration Program and is the first spacecraft to be built as part of NASA s Vision for Space Exploration The orbiter will be equipped with seven scientific instrument packages one of which is LROC The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera LROC has been designed to address two of LRO s primary measurement objectives landing site certification and monitoring of polar illumination In order to examine potential landing sites high-resolution images 0 5 m pixel will be used to assess meter-scale features near the pole and other regions on the lunar surface The LROC will also acquire 100 m pixel images of the polar regions of the Moon during each orbit for a year to identify areas of permanent shadow and permanent or near-permanent illumination In addition to these two main objectives the LROC team also plans to conduct meter-scale monitoring of polar regions under varying illumination angles acquire overlapping observations to enable derivation of meter-scale topography acquire global multispectral imaging to map ilmenite and other minerals derive a global morphology base map characterize regolith properties and determine current impact hazards by re-imaging areas covered by Apollo images to search for newly-formed impact craters The LROC is a modified version of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter s Context Camera and Mars Color Imager The LROC will be made up of four optical elements two identical narrow-angle telescopes

Robinson, M.; McEwen, A.; Eliason, E.; Joliff, B.; Hiesinger, H.; Malin, M.; Thomas, P.; Turtle, E.; Brylow, S.

165

Lunar base surface mission operations. Lunar Base Systems Study (LBSS) task 4.1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose was to perform an analysis of the surface operations associated with a human-tended lunar base. Specifically, the study defined surface elements and developed mission manifests for a selected base scenario, determined the nature of surface operations associated with this scenario, generated a preliminary crew extravehicular and intravehicular activity (EVA/IVA) time resource schedule for conducting the missions, and proposed concepts for utilizing remotely operated equipment to perform repetitious or hazardous surface tasks. The operations analysis was performed on a 6 year period of human-tended lunar base operation prior to permanent occupancy. The baseline scenario was derived from a modified version of the civil needs database (CNDB) scenario. This scenario emphasizes achievement of a limited set of science and exploration objectives while emplacing the minimum habitability elements required for a permanent base.

1987-01-01

166

Status of a Program Monitoring Optical Lunar Surface Transients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are observing the lunar near side intensively with a network of robotic imaging telescopes tuned to detect small transient changes in photometry (on timescales of ~1 to 100 min). We also describe a parallel program to detect quasi-permanent photometric surface changes.

Crotts, A. P. S.; Berger, A.; Cecil, G.; Cseresnjes, P.; Ebel, D.; Hickson, P.; Joner, M.; Pfrommer, T.; Marka, S.; Morehead, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Schultz, P. H.

2009-03-01

167

An evolution strategy for lunar nuclear surface power  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production and transmission of electric power for a permanently inhabited lunar base poses a significant challenge which can best be met through an evolution strategy. Nuclear systems offer the best opportunity for evolution in terms of both life and performance. Applicable nuclear power technology options include isotope systems (either radioisotope thermoelectric generators or dynamic isotope power systems) and reactor

Lee S. Mason

1992-01-01

168

Lifetimes of Lunar Satellite Orbits.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Space Exploration Initiative has generated a renewed interest in lunar mission planning. The lunar missions currently under study, unlike the Apollo missions, involve long stay times. Several lunar gravity models have been formulated, but mission plan...

K. W. Meyer J. J. Buglia P. N. Desai

1994-01-01

169

Apollo lunar landing commerative artwork  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Apollo lunar landing commerative artwork. View depicts an Apollo era astronaut standing on the lunar surface, facing the viewer, with an Earthrise reflected in his visor. Directly behind him, is the lunar lander.

1989-01-01

170

A primer in lunar geology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Primary topics in lunar geology range from the evolution of the solar system to lunar photointerpretation, impact crater formation, and sampling to analyses on various Apollo lunar landing site geomorphologies.

Greeley, R. (editor); Schultz, P. H. (editor)

1974-01-01

171

Cost estimates for lunar products and their respective commercial prices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A permanent lunar base as proposed by the President of the United States within the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) will have many uses, among others the production of goods. Initially, they will contribute to the logistic support and extension of facilities. On the long haul there might be commercial products to be sold on the extraterrestrial market. This paper presents the results of a detailed analysis of potential lunar products and services of a sizable lunar base having a life cycle of at least 50 years. Four different production scenarios between 5000 and 500,000 metric tons output of all lunar facilities per annum have been investigated. The cost estimated for each of the products and services considered are presented as functions of time and production volume.

Koelle, H. H.; Johenning, B.

172

A short course in lunar geology for earth science instructors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A four-day short course in lunar geology was developed, leading to the publication of a primer in lunar geology. The course was offered to 22 sponsored participants (community college teachers) and to representatives from the Lunar Science Institute, Houston, Texas, and from the Educational Program Office of NASA-Ames, on April 25-28, 1974. A follow-up survey of the course participants was made in two steps: on the last day of the course, and one year later. In general, the participants felt that the course was well organized and that the speakers were effective. Most of the participants introduced some aspects of what they learned into their own teaching material. Finally, a well-panel display about 7 1/2 feet high and 16 feet long designed to acquaint the viewer with elementary facts of lunar geology was constructed and permanently installed at the Space Science Center of Foothill College.

Greeley, R.; Shultz, P.

1975-01-01

173

Spatial variation in the environmental control of crab larval settlement in a micro-tidal austral estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Settlement of benthic marine invertebrates is determined by the interaction between physical factors and biological processes, in which the tide, wind, and predation can play key roles, especially for species that recruit within estuaries. This complexity promotes high variability in recruitment and limited predictability of the size of annual cohorts. This study describes the settlement patterns of megalopae of the commercially important crab Cancer edwardsii at three locations (one in the center and two at the mouth of the estuary) within the Valdivia River estuary (~39.9°S), over three consecutive years (2006-2008). At each location, 12 passive benthic collectors with a natural substratum were deployed for 48 h at 7-day intervals, over a lunar cycle. Half of the collectors were covered with mesh to exclude predators. The main findings were as follows: (1) circulation changes due to upwelling relaxation or onshore winds controlled crab settlement at sites within the mouth of the estuary, (2) at the internal estuarine site, settlement was dominated by tidal effects, and (3) the effect of predation on settlement was negligible at all scales. The results show that the predominant physical factor controlling the return of competent crab larvae to estuarine environments varies spatially within the estuary. The lack of tidal influence on settlement at the mouth of the estuary can be explained by the overwhelming influence of the intense upwelling fronts and the micro-tidal regime in the study area.

Pardo, Luis Miguel; Cardyn, Carlos Simón; Garcés-Vargas, José

2012-09-01

174

An improved map of the lunar south pole with earth based radar interferometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASApsilas long-term exploration goals include a return to manned missions to the Moon that will culminate in a permanent manned station on the Moon. Prior to embarking on such a mission, a series of precursor unmanned robotic missions are required to ascertain the best locations for manned exploration or a permanent lunar base. These precursor missions will consist of both

Scott Hensley; Eric Gurrola; Paul Rosen; Martin Slade; Joseph Jao; Mike Kobrick; Barbara Wilson; Curtis Chen; Raymond Jurgens

2008-01-01

175

Carbothermal Reduction of Lunar Materials for Oxygen Production on the Moon: Reduction of Lunar Simulants with Methane  

Microsoft Academic Search

The utilization of extraterrestrial resources will become a key element in space exploration and colonization of the Moon and Mars in the 21st century. Indeed, the development and operation of in-situ manufacturing plants are required to enable the establishment of permanent lunar and Martian bases. Oxygen manufacture for life support and propulsion will be the most important manufacturing process for

S. D. Rosenberg; O. Musbah; E. E. Rice

1996-01-01

176

Carbothermal Reduction of Lunar Materials for Oxygen Production on the Moon: Reduction of Lunar Simulants with Carbon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The utilization of extraterrestrial resources will become a key element in space exploration and colonization of the Moon and Mars in the 21st century. Indeed, the development and operation of in-situ manufacturing plants are required to enable the establishment of permanent lunar and Martian bases. Oxygen manufacture for life support and propulsion will be the most important manufacturing process for

S. D. Rosenberg; O. Musbah; E. E. Rice

1996-01-01

177

Lunar rock magnetism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between the magnetization and temperature in a high constant magnetic field for a temperature range between 5 K and 1100 K was examined for Apollo 11, 12 and 14 lunar materials. The average value of Curie point temperature is (768.2 ± 3.5)°C for the lunar igneous rocks and (762.5 ± 3.4)°C for the lunar fines and breccias. A

T. Nagata; R. M. Fisher; F. C. Schwerer

1972-01-01

178

Space Math: Lunar Math  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This booklet includes 17 problems relating to the Moon and its exploration. Images from NASA are analyzed to determine image scales and the physical sizes of various crates and features. The probability of meteor impacts near a lunar colony are calculated, and the horizon distance is determined using simple geometry. Also covered are: determining the mass of the Moon, a simple model for the lunar interior, heat flow rates, extracting oxygen from lunar rock, and lunar transits and eclipses. (8.5 x11, 28 pages, 11 color images, PDF file)

Odenwald, Sten

2008-01-01

179

Lunar occultation visibility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The question of lunar occultation visibility of stars is examined from both a theoretical and an observational viewpoint. The background light caused by the lunar surface, the brightness caused by the lunar glare, the brightness of the sky for dark, twilight, and daytime conditions, and the effects of the telescopic optics are taken into consideration. The results are compared to give the limit on stellar visibility at the time of a lunar occultation, and the model results are graphically demonstrated as a function of various input parameters. Comparisons with observations show good agreement, with an uncertainty of about one-third of a magnitude.

Schaefer, Bradley E.; Bulder, Henk J. J.; Bourgeois, Jean

1992-01-01

180

Lunar surface magnetometer experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Apollo 16 lunar surface magnetometer (LSM) activation completed the network installation of magnetic observatories on the lunar surface and initiated simultaneous measurements of the global response of the moon to large-scale solar and terrestrial magnetic fields. Fossil remanent magnetic fields have been measured at nine locations on the lunar surface, including the Apollo 16 LSM site in the Descartes highlands area. This fossil record indicates the possible existence of an ancient lunar dynamo or a solar or terrestrial field much stronger than exists at present. The experimental technique and operation of the LSM are described and the results obtained are discussed.

Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Colburn, D. S.; Schubert, G.

1972-01-01

181

Lunar Prospecting Using Thermal Wadis and Compact Rovers. Part A; Infrastructure for Surviving the Lunar Night  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent missions have confirmed the existence of water and other volatiles on the Moon, both in permanently-shadowed craters and elsewhere. Non-volatile lunar resources may represent significant additional value as infrastructure or manufacturing feedstock. Characterization of lunar resources in terms of abundance concentrations, distribution, and recoverability is limited to in-situ Apollo samples and the expanding remote-sensing database. This paper introduces an approach to lunar resource prospecting supported by a simple lunar surface infrastructure based on the Thermal Wadi concept of thermal energy storage and using compact rovers equipped with appropriate prospecting sensors and demonstration resource extraction capabilities. Thermal Wadis are engineered sources of heat and power based on the storage and retrieval of solar-thermal energy in modified lunar regolith. Because Thermal Wadis keep compact prospecting rovers warm during periods of lunar darkness, the rovers are able to survive months to years on the lunar surface rather than just weeks without being required to carry the burdensome capability to do so. The resulting lower-cost, long-lived rovers represent a potential paradigm breakthrough in extra-terrestrial prospecting productivity and will enable the production of detailed resource maps. Integrating resource processing and other technology demonstrations that are based on the content of the resource maps will inform engineering economic studies that can define the true resource potential of the Moon. Once this resource potential is understood quantitatively, humans might return to the Moon with an economically sound objective including where to go, what to do upon arrival, and what to bring along.

Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Suzuki, Nantel H.

2012-01-01

182

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Lunar Workshops for Educators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWEs) are a series of weeklong professional development workshops, accompanied by quarterly follow-up sessions, designed to educate and inspire grade 6-12 science teachers, sponsored by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Participants learn about lunar science and exploration, gain tools to help address common student misconceptions about the Moon, find out about the latest research results from LRO scientists, work with data from LRO and other lunar missions, and learn how to bring these data to their students using hands-on activities aligned with grade 6-12 National Science Education Standards and Benchmarks and through authentic research experiences. LWEs are held around the country, primarily in locations underserved with respect to NASA workshops. Where possible, workshops also include tours of science facilities or field trips intended to help participants better understand mission operations or geologic processes relevant to the Moon. Scientist and engineer involvement is a central tenant of the LWEs. LRO scientists and engineers, as well as scientists working on other lunar missions, present their research or activities to the workshop participants and answer questions about lunar science and exploration. This interaction with the scientists and engineers is consistently ranked by the LWE participants as one of the most interesting and inspiring components of the workshops. Evaluation results from the 2010 and 2011 workshops, as well as preliminary analysis of survey responses from 2012 participants, demonstrated an improved understanding of lunar science concepts among LWE participants in post-workshop assessments (as compared to identical pre-assessments) and a greater understanding of how to access and effectively share LRO data with students. Teachers reported increased confidence in helping students conduct research using lunar data, and learned about programs that would allow their students to make authentic contributions to lunar science. Participant feedback on workshop surveys was enthusiastically positive. 2012 was the third and final year for the LWEs in the current funding cycle. They will continue in a modified version at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, where the LRO Project Office and Education and Public Outreach Team are based. We will present evaluation results from our external evaluator, and share lessons learned from this workshop series. The LWEs can serve as a model for others interested in incorporating scientist and engineer involvement, data from planetary missions, and data-based activities into a thematic professional development experience for science educators. For more information about the LWEs, please visit http://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/lwe/index.html.

Jones, A. P.; Hsu, B. C.; Hessen, K.; Bleacher, L.

2012-12-01

183

Is the tobacco settlement constitutional?  

PubMed

In August 2005, the Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI), a conservative advocacy organization, filed a lawsuit in Louisiana challenging the legality of the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement (MSA). The suit alleges that the MSA, under which the states receive monetary payments and the four major tobacco companies are insulated from price competition, violates the Compact Clause and other provisions of the U.S. Constitution. This lawsuit threatens to unravel of one of the most significant opportunities to improve public health in United States history. We consider the merits of the lawsuit, the problems with the MSA that it highlights, and the potential consequences of the suit for public health. PMID:17199817

Rajkumar, Rahul; Gross, Cary P; Forman, Howard P

2006-01-01

184

A taxonomy for the evolution of human settlements on the moon and Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A proposed structure is described for partnerships with shared interests and investments to develop the technology and approach for evolutionary surface systems for the moon and Mars. Five models are presented for cooperation with specific references to the technical evolutionary path of the surface systems. The models encompass the standard customer/provider relationship, a concept for exclusive government use, a joint venture with a government-sponsored non-SEI market, a technology joint-development approach, and a redundancy model to insure competitive pricing. The models emphasize the nonaerospace components of the settlement technologies and the decentralized nature of surface systems that make the project suitable for private industrial development by several companies. It is concluded that the taxonomy be considered when examining collaborative opportunities for lunar and Martian settlement.

Roberts, Barney B.; Mandell, Humboldt C.

1991-01-01

185

Astronaut Alan Bean deploys Lunar Surface Magnetometer on lunar surface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, deploys the Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity on the Moon. The LSM is a component of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). The Lunar Module can be seen in the left background.

1969-01-01

186

Overview of lunar-based astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The opportunities along with the advantages and disadvantages of the Moon for astronomical observatories are carefully and methodically considered. Taking a relatively unbiased approach, it was concluded that lunar observatories will clearly be a major factor in the future of astronomy in the next century. He concludes that ground based work will continue because of its accessibility and that Earth orbital work will remain useful, primarily for convenience of access in constructing and operating very large space systems. Deep space studies will feature not only probes but extensive systems for extremely long baseline studies at wavelengths from gamma rays through visible and IR out to radio is also a conclusion drawn, along with the consideration that lunar astronomy will have found important permanent applications along lines such as are discussed at the present symposium and others quite unsuspected today.

Smith, Harlan J.

1988-01-01

187

Mechanics of lunar soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

The basic areas of the mechanics of lunar soils may be stated as: a study of the effect of low-level gravitational accelerations and high vacuum on the properties of mineral grains of various soils; a selection of soils and materials on the earth which may serve as analogs of the lunar soils and investigation of their properties and uses on

I. Io Cherkasov; V. V. Mikheev; V. P. Petrukhin; V. V. Shvarev

1970-01-01

188

A Lunar Polar Expedition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mission profile of a lunar polar expedition is outlined describing the vehicles, stages, and maneuvers required for a modest lunar base concept. The mission begins with automated precursor flights for site surveys, and heavy lift vehicles are used for four cargo missions. Translunar injection is accomplished during the crew earth-departure stage with a spacecraft similar to the Apollo Saturn

Richard Dowling; Robert L. Staehle; Thomas Svitek

1988-01-01

189

Lunar radar backscatter studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lunar surface material in the Plato area is characterized using Earth based visual, infrared, and radar signatures. Radar scattering in the lunar regolith with an existing optical scattering computer program is modeled. Mapping with 1 to 2 km resolution of the Moon using a 70 cm Arecibo radar is presented.

Thompson, T. W.

1979-01-01

190

Preserving a Lunar Legacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the first Russian flyby mission in 1959, the quest for robotic, and eventually, manned exploration of the moon became fact rather than fiction. Since then there have been innumerable spacecraft impacts and landers which have left artifacts and created archaeological sites on the lunar surface. One of the most significant events in lunar exploration came with the successful landing

B. O'Leary; L. F. Brown; R. A. Gibson; J. Versluis

2000-01-01

191

Lunar Roving Vehicle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners will construct a model of a lunar roving vehicle. This activity is in Unit 2 of the Exploring the Moon teachers guide, which is designed for use especially, but not exclusively, with the Lunar Sample Disk program.

192

A baseline lunar mine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A models lunar mining method is proposed that illustrates the problems to be expected in lunar mining and how they might be solved. While the method is quite feasible, it is, more importantly, a useful baseline system against which to test other, possible better, methods. Our study group proposed the slusher to stimulate discussion of how a lunar mining operation might be successfully accomplished. Critics of the slusher system were invited to propose better methods. The group noted that while nonterrestrial mining has been a vital part of past space manufacturing proposals, no one has proposed a lunar mining system in any real detail. The group considered it essential that the design of actual, workable, and specific lunar mining methods begin immediately. Based on an earlier proposal, the method is a three-drum slusher, also known as a cable-operated drag scraper. Its terrestrial application is quite limited, as it is relatively inefficient and inflexible. The method usually finds use in underwater mining from the shore and in moving small amounts of ore underground. When lunar mining scales up, the lunarized slusher will be replaced by more efficient, high-volume methods. Other aspects of lunar mining are discussed.

Gertsch, Richard E.

1992-01-01

193

The lunar cart  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Expanded experiment-carrying capability, to be used between the Apollo 11 capability and the lunar roving vehicle capability, was defined for the lunar surface crewmen. Methods used on earth to satisfy similar requirements were studied. A two-wheeled cart was built and tested to expected mission requirements and environments. The vehicle was used successfully on Apollo 14.

Miller, G. C.

1972-01-01

194

Lunar Soil Particle Separator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Soil Particle Separator (LSPS) beneficiates soil prior to in situ resource utilization (ISRU). It can improve ISRU oxygen yield by boosting the concentration of ilmenite, or other iron-oxide-bearing materials found in lunar soils, which can substantially reduce hydrogen reduction reactor size, as well as drastically decreasing the power input required for soil heating

Berggren, Mark

2010-01-01

195

Geomicrobiology beyond Earth: microbe-mineral interactions in space exploration and settlement.  

PubMed

Geomicrobiology investigates the interactions of microorganisms with geological substrates, and this branch of microbiology has enormous potential in the exploration and settlement of space. Microorganisms can be used to extract useful elements from extraterrestrial materials for industrial processes or for use as nutrients in life support systems. In addition, microorganisms could be used to create soil from lunar and Martian rocks. Furthermore, understanding the interactions of microorganisms with rocks is essential for identifying mineral biomarkers to be used in the search for life on other planetary bodies. Increasing space exploration activities make geomicrobiology an important applied science beyond Earth. PMID:20381355

Cockell, Charles S

2010-07-01

196

Lunar Balance and Locomotion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Balance control and locomotor patterns were altered in Apollo crewmembers on the lunar surface, owing, presumably, to a combination of sensory-motor adaptation during transit and lunar surface operations, decreased environmental affordances associated with the reduced gravity, and restricted joint mobility as well as altered center-of-gravity caused by the EVA pressure suits. Dr. Paloski will discuss these factors, as well as the potential human and mission impacts of falls and malcoordination during planned lunar sortie and outpost missions. Learning objectives: What are the potential impacts of postural instabilities on the lunar surface? CME question: What factors affect balance control and gait stability on the moon? Answer: Sensory-motor adaptation to the lunar environment, reduced mechanical and visual affordances, and altered biomechanics caused by the EVA suit.

Paloski, William H.

2008-01-01

197

Lunar Influences on Human Aggression.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used league records of all Canadian hockey games (N=426) played during a season to test a lunar-aggression hypothesis. Despite the use of multiple measures of lunar phase and interpersonal aggression, support for lunar influence was not forthcoming. Supplemental data revealed that beliefs in lunar influence are fairly common. (JAC)

Russell, Gordon W.; Dua, Manjula

1983-01-01

198

Humanoids for lunar and planetary surface operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a vision of humanoid robots as human's key partners in future space exploration, in particular for construction, maintenance/repair and operation of lunar/planetary habitats, bases and settlements. It integrates this vision with the recent plans, for human and robotic exploration, aligning a set of milestones for operational capability of humanoids with the schedule for the next decades and development spirals in the Project Constellation. These milestones relate to a set of incremental challenges, for the solving of which new humanoid technologies are needed. A system of systems integrative approach that would lead to readiness of cooperating humanoid crews is sketched. Robot fostering, training/education techniques, and improved cognitive/sensory/motor development techniques are considered essential elements for achieving intelligent humanoids. A pilot project in this direction is outlined.

Stoica, Adrian; Keymeulen, Didier; Csaszar, Ambrus; Gan, Quan; Hidalgo, Timothy; Moore, Jeff; Newton, Jason; Sandoval, Steven; Xu, Jiajing

2005-01-01

199

Lunar resource assessment: Strategies for surface exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Use of the indigenous resources of space to support long-term human presence is an essential element of the settlement of other planetary bodies. We are in a very early stage of understanding exactly how and under what circumstances space resources will become important. The materials and processes to recover them that we now think are critical may not ultimately be the raison d'etre for a resource utilization program. However, the need for strategic thinking proceeds in parallel with efforts to implement such plans and it is not too soon to begin thinking how we could and should use the abundant resources of materials and energy available from the Moon. The following commodities from the Moon are discussed: (1) bulk regolith, for shielding and construction on the lunar surface (ultimately for export to human-tended stations in Earth-Moon space), and (2) oxygen and hydrogen, for propellant and life support.

Spudis, Paul D.

1992-01-01

200

Estimation of municipal solid waste landfill settlement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The municipal solid waste landfill suffers from large postclosure settlement that occurs over an extended period of time. A large differential settlement may impair foundations, utilities, and other associated facilities constructed on top of a landfill. It may also lead to breakage of the geomembrane and damage of the cover system in a modern municipal solid waste landfill. The waste

Hoe I. Ling; Dov Leshchinsky; Yoshiyuki Mohri; Toshinori Kawabata

1998-01-01

201

7 CFR 1421.111 - Loan settlement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...settlement will be made by CCC on the basis of the basic marketing assistance loan rate that is in effect for the commodity...settlement shall be made by CCC on the basis of the basic marketing assistance loan rate that is in effect for the...

2010-01-01

202

Integration of Lunar Polar Remote-Sensing Data Sets: Evidence for Ice at the Lunar South Pole  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to investigate the feasibility of ice deposits at the lunar south pole, we have integrated all relevant lunar polar data sets. These include illumination data, Arecibo ground-based monostatic radar data, newly processed Clementine bistatic radar data, and Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer measurements. The possibility that the lunar poles harbor ice deposits has important implications not only as a natural resource for future human lunar activity but also as a record of inner solar system volatiles (e.g., comets and asteroids) over the past billion years or more. We find that the epithermal neutron flux anomalies, measured by Lunar Prospector, are coincident with permanently shadowed regions at the lunar south pole, particularly those associated with Shackleton crater. Furthermore, these areas also correlate with the beta=0 circular polarization ratio (CPR) enhancements revealed by new processing of Clementine bistatic radar echoes, which in turn are colocated with areas of anomalous high CPR observed by Arecibo Observatory on the lower, Sun-shadowed wall of Shackleton crater. Estimates of the extent of high CPR from Arecibo Observatory and Clementine bistatic radar data independently suggest that approximately 10 square kilometers of ice may be present on the inner Earth-facing wall of Shackleton crater. None of the experiments that obtained the data presented here were ideally suited for definitively identifying ice in lunar polar regions. By assessing the relative merits of all available data, we find that it is plausible that ice does occur in cold traps at the lunar south pole and that future missions with instruments specifically designed to investigate these anomalies are worthy.

Nozette, Stewart; Spudis, Paul D.; Robinson, Mark S.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Lichtenberg, Chris; Bonner, Robert

2001-01-01

203

Lunar base thermoelectric power station study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Under NASA's Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, and Teledyne Energy Systems have teamed with a number of universities, under the Segmented Thermoelectric Multicouple Converter (STMC) program, to develop the next generation of advanced thermoelectric converters for space reactor power systems. Work on the STMC converter assembly has progressed to the point where the lower temperature stage of the segmented multicouple converter assembly is ready for laboratory testing and the upper stage materials have been identified and their properties are being characterized. One aspect of the program involves mission application studies to help define the potential benefits from the use of these STMC technologies for designated NASA missions such as the lunar base power station where kilowatts of power are required to maintain a permanent manned presence on the surface of the moon. A modular 50 kWe thermoelectric power station concept was developed to address a specific set of requirements developed for this mission. Previous lunar lander concepts had proposed the use of lunar regolith as in-situ radiation shielding material for a reactor power station with a one kilometer exclusion zone radius to minimize astronaut radiation dose rate levels. In the present concept, we will examine the benefits and requirements for a hermetically-sealed reactor thermoelectric power station module suspended within a man-made lunar surface cavity. The concept appears to maximize the shielding capabilities of the lunar regolith while minimizing its handling requirements. Both thermal and nuclear radiation levels from operation of the station, at its 100-m exclusion zone radius, were evaluated and found to be acceptable. Site preparation activities are reviewed and well as transport issues for this concept. The goal of the study was to review the entire life cycle of the unit to assess its technical problems and technology needs in all areas to support the development, deployment, operation and disposal of the unit.

Determan, William; Frye, Patrick; Mondt, Jack; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Johnson, Ken; Stapfer, G.; Brooks, Michael D.; Heshmatpour, Ben

2006-01-01

204

Processes and energy costs for mining lunar Helium-3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary investigations show that obtaining He-3 from the moon is technically feasible and economically viable. With the exception of beneficiation, the proposed procedures are state of the art. Mass of equipment needed from earth is of some concern, but resupply will eventually be ameliorated by the use of titanium from indigenous ilmenite. A complete energy payback from a D/He-3 fusion reactor utilizing lunar He-3 is approx. 80, providing ample incentive for commercial investment is forthcoming. Byproducts will be of great value to the resupply of a permanent lunar base and enhancement of space exploration.

Sviatoslavsky, I. N.

1988-01-01

205

A Common Lunar Lander (CLL) for the space exploration initiative  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Information is given in viewgraph form on the Artemis project, a plan to establish a permanent base on the Moon. Information includes a summary of past and future events, the program rationale, a summary of potential payloads, the physical characteristics of experiments, sketches of equipment, design study objectives, and details of such payloads as the Geophysical Station Network, teleoperated rovers, astronomical telescopes, a Moon-Earth radio interferometer, very low frequency radio antennas, the Lunar Polar Crater Telescope, Lunar Resource Utilization Experiments, and biological experiments.

Bailey, Stephen

1991-01-01

206

Lunar base launch and landing facilities conceptual design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this study was to perform a first look at the requirements for launch and landing facilities for early lunar bases and to prepared conceptual designs for some of these facilities. The emphasis of the study is on the facilities needed from the first manned landing until permanent occupancy, the Phase 2 lunar base. Factors including surface characteristics, navigation system, engine blast effects, and expected surface operations are used to develop landing pad designs, and definitions fo various other elements of the launch and landing facilities. Finally, the dependence of the use of these elements and the evolution of the facilities are established.

Phillips, Paul G.; Simonds, Charles H.; Stump, William R.

1992-01-01

207

Copernicus - Lunar Surface Mapper  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Utah State University (USU) 1991-92 Space Systems Design Team has designed a Lunar Surface Mapper (LSM) to parallel the development of the NASA Office of Exploration lunar initiatives. USU students named the LSM 'Copernicus' after the 16th Century Polish astronomer, for whom the large lunar crater on the face of the moon was also named. The top level requirements for the Copernicus LSM are to produce a digital map of the lunar surface with an overall resolution of 12 meters (39.4 ft). It will also identify specified local surface features/areas to be mapped at higher resolutions by follow-on missions. The mapping operation will be conducted from a 300 km (186 mi) lunar-polar orbit. Although the entire surface should be mapped within six months, the spacecraft design lifetime will exceed one year with sufficient propellant planned for orbit maintenance in the anomalous lunar gravity field. The Copernicus LSM is a small satellite capable of reaching lunar orbit following launch on a Conestoga launch vehicle which is capable of placing 410 kg (900 lb) into translunar orbit. Upon orbital insertion, the spacecraft will weigh approximately 233 kg (513 lb). This rather severe mass constraint has insured attention to component/subsystem size and mass, and prevented 'requirements creep'. Transmission of data will be via line-of-sight to an earthased receiving system.

Anderson, Shaun D.; Redd, Frank J.

1993-02-01

208

Copernicus: Lunar surface mapper  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Utah State University (USU) 1991-92 Space Systems Design Team has designed a Lunar Surface Mapper (LSM) to parallel the development of the NASA Office of Exploration lunar initiatives. USU students named the LSM 'Copernicus' after the 16th century Polish astronomer, for whom the large lunar crater on the face of the moon was also named. The top level requirements for the Copernicus LSM are to produce a digital map of the lunar surface with an overall resolution of 12 meters (39.4 ft). It will also identify specified local surface features/areas to be mapped at higher resolutions by follow-on missions. The mapping operation will be conducted from a 300 km (186 mi) lunar-polar orbit. Although the entire surface should be mapped within six months, the spacecraft design lifetime will exceed one year with sufficient propellant planned for orbit maintenance in the anomalous lunar gravity field. The Copernicus LSM is a small satellite capable of reaching lunar orbit following launch on a Conestoga launch vehicle which is capable of placing 410 kg (900 lb) into translunar orbit. Upon orbital insertion, the spacecraft will weigh approximately 233 kg (513 lb). This rather severe mass constraint has insured attention to component/subsystem size and mass, and prevented 'requirements creep.' Transmission of data will be via line-of-sight to an earth-based receiving system.

Redd, Frank J.; Anderson, Shaun D.

209

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission Results and Future Plans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission is poised to take advantage of recent extraordinary discoveries on the Moon to advance lunar and planetary science with new, targeted investigations that focus on geologically recent and even contemporaneous changes on the Moon. We will present recent results for the mission and describe plans for a second two-year extension of the science mission. LRO has been in orbit for nearly 5 years. In that time it has been a witness to, and participant in, a remarkable era of lunar science where a paradigm shift is taking place from the view of the Moon as a static planet to one with many active processes. As we approach the end of the first extended mission, we review here the major results from the LRO. Examples include: enabled the development of comprehensive high resolution maps and digital terrain models of the lunar surface; discoveries on the nature of hydrogen distribution, and by extension water, at the lunar poles; measured of the daytime and nighttime temperature of the lunar surface including temperature down below 30 K in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs); direct measurement of Hg, H2, and CO deposits in the Cabeus PSR; evidence for recent tectonic activity on the Moon; and high resolution maps of the illumination conditions at the poles.

Keller, John; Petro, Noah; McLanahan, Timothy; Vondrak, Richard; Garvin, James

2014-05-01

210

The Lunar Regolith  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thick layer of regolith, fragmental and unconsolidated rock material, covers the entire lunar surface. This layer is the result of the continuous impact of meteoroids large and small and the steady bombardment of charged particles from the sun and stars. The regolith is generally about 4-5 m thick in mare regions and 10-15 m in highland areas (McKay et al., 1991) and contains all sizes of material from large boulders to sub-micron dust particles. Below the regolith is a region of large blocks of material, large-scale ejecta and brecciated bedrock, often referred to as the "megaregolith". Lunar soil is a term often used interchangeably with regolith, however, soil is defined as the subcentimeter fraction of the regolith (in practice though, soil generally refers to the submillimeter fraction of the regolith). Lunar dust has been defined in many ways by different researchers, but generally refers to only the very finest fractions of the soil, less than approx.10 or 20 microns. Lunar soil can be a misleading term, as lunar "soil" bears little in common with terrestrial soils. Lunar soil contains no organic matter and is not formed through biologic or chemical means as terrestrial soils are, but strictly through mechanical comminution from meteoroids and interaction with the solar wind and other energetic particles. Lunar soils are also not exposed to the wind and water that shapes the Earth. As a consequence, in contrast to terrestrial soils, lunar soils are not sorted in any way, by size, shape, or chemistry. Finally, without wind and water to wear down the edges, lunar soil grains tend to be sharp with fresh fractured surfaces.

Noble, Sarah

2009-01-01

211

The International Lunar Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new lunar science flight projects line has been introduced within NASA s Science Mission Directorate's (SMDs) proposed 2009 budget, including two new robotic missions designed to accomplish key scientific objectives and, when possible, provide results useful to the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and the Space Operations Mission Directorate (SOMD) as those organizations grapple with the challenges of returning humans to the Moon. The first mission in this line will be the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, an ESMD mission that will acquire key information for human return to the moon activities, which will transition after one year of operations to the SMD Lunar Science Program for a 2-year nominal science mission. The second mission, the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) will be launch in 2011 along with the GRAIL Discovery mission to the moon. The third is delivery of two landed payloads as part of the International Lunar Network (ILN). This flight projects line provides a robust robotic lunar science program for the next 8 years and beyond, complements SMD s initiatives to build a robust lunar science community through R&A lines, and increases international participation in NASA s robotic exploration plans. The International Lunar Network is envisioned as a global lunar geophysical network, which fulfills many of the stated recommendations of the recent National Research Council report on The Scientific Context for Exploration of the Moon [2], but is difficult for any single space agency to accomplish on its own. The ILN would provide the necessary global coverage by involving US and international landed missions as individual nodes working together. Ultimately, this network could comprise 8-10 or more nodes operating simultaneously, while minimizing the required contribution from each space agency. Indian, Russian, Japanese, and British landed missions are currently being formulated and SMD is actively seeking partnership with these and other space agencies to establish the ILN.

Cohen, Barbara A.

2008-01-01

212

Common lunar lander  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report focuses on the reference lander design developed at the Johnson Space Center, describing a small lunar soft lander with the capability to soft land about 64 kilograms of payload at any lunar latitude and longitude. The Artemis lander is a sun-pointing, three-axis vehicle that contributes to the translunar injection burn and performs the lunar orbit insertion, deorbit, descent and landing maneuvers with a single liquid bipropellant lander stage. Attention is given to mission profile and performance, the guidance, navigation and control subsystem, the propulsion subsystem, and the flight data subsystem.

Bailey, S.; Stecklein, J.; Chen, H.; Culpepper, W.; Hyatt, C. D.; Kluksdahl, E.; Pelischek, T.; Pruett, D.; Rickman, S.; Wagner, L.

1992-01-01

213

Early lunar magnetism.  

PubMed

It is uncertain whether the Moon ever formed a metallic core or generated a core dynamo. The lunar crust and returned samples are magnetized, but the source of this magnetization could be meteoroid impacts rather than a dynamo. Here, we report magnetic measurements and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological calculations for the oldest known unshocked lunar rock, troctolite 76535. These data imply that there was a long-lived field on the Moon of at least 1 microtesla approximately 4.2 billion years ago. The early age, substantial intensity, and long lifetime of this field support the hypothesis of an ancient lunar core dynamo. PMID:19150839

Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Weiss, Benjamin P; Shuster, David L; Buz, Jennifer

2009-01-16

214

Genesis of lunar regolith  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From comparing the mineral and chemical composition of regoliths with the compositions of primary magmatic lunar rocks, it is shown that mare regolith is enriched in aluminum and depleted in iron, titanium, and chromium. This effect cannot be accounted for only by the admixture of highland anorthositic material. The entire array of geochemical data points to the considerable role of depth-wise differentiation of the magmatic material in forming the composition of the primary lunar rocks and, naturally, the composition of the regolith. During regolith formation, processes of the effervescing of magma as it outflowed at the lunar surface were of primary importance. Impacts by micrometeorites represent another important factor.

Vinogradov, A. P.

1974-01-01

215

Technology needs for lunar and Mars space transfer systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The determination of appropriate space transportation technologies and operating modes is discussed with respect to both lunar and Mars missions. Three levels of activity are set forth to examine the sensitivity of transportation preferences including 'minimum,' 'full science,' and 'industrialization and settlement' categories. High-thrust-profile missions for lunar and Mars transportation are considered in terms of their relative advantages, and transportation options are defined in terms of propulsion and braking technologies. Costs and life-cycle cost estimates are prepared for the transportation preferences by using a parametric cost model, and a return-on-investment summary is given. Major technological needs for the programs are listed and include storable propulsion systems; cryogenic engines and fluids management; aerobraking; and nuclear thermal, nuclear electric, electric, and solar electric propulsion technologies.

Woodcock, Gordon R.; Cothran, Bradley C.; Donahue, Benjamin; Mcghee, Jerry

1991-01-01

216

Lunar subsurface architecture enhanced by artificial biosphere concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The integration of artificial biosphere technology with subselene architecture can create a life-enhancing, productive habitat that is safe from solar radiation and extreme temperature fluctuations while maximizing resources brought from Earth and derived from lunar regolith. In the short term, the resulting biotectural (biosphere and architectural) designs will not only make the structures more habitable, productive, and manageable, but will ultimately provide the self-sufficiency factors necessary for the mature lunar settlement. From a long-term perspective, this biotecture approach to astronautics and extraterrestrial development (1) helps reduce mass lift requirements, (2) contributes to habitat self-sufficiency, and (3) actualizes at least one philosophy of solar system exploration, which is to exploit nonterrestrial resources in an effort to conserve our natural resources on this planet.

Klassi, Jason D.; Rocha, Carlos J.; Carr, Charles A.

1992-01-01

217

Construction of the 16 meter Large Lunar Telescope (LLT)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The different materials that could be used to design the pedestal for a Moon based 16 meter telescope are discussed. The material that should be used has a low coefficient of thermal expansion, high modulus of elasticity, and high compressive and tensile strengths. For the model developed in this study, an aluminum-manganese alloy was used because of its low coefficient of thermal expansion. Due to variations in lunar soil conditions, both vertically and horizontally, three foundation systems are presented. The spudcan footing can be used in the case where dense soil is more than three meters. The spread footing is recommended where the dense soil is between one and three meters. Finally, in the third system, the Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) is used as a base support for the telescope's pedestal. The LEV support requires a prepared site. The soil should be compacted and stabilized, if necessary, to reduce settlement.

Omar, Husam Anwar

1990-01-01

218

Construction of the 16 meter Large Lunar Telescope (LLT)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The different materials that could be used to design the pedestal for a Moon based 16 meter telescope are discussed. The material that should be used has a low coefficient of thermal expansion, high modulus of elasticity, and high compressive and tensile strengths. For the model developed in this study, an aluminum-manganese alloy was used because of its low coefficient of thermal expansion. Due to variations in lunar soil conditions, both vertically and horizontally, three foundation systems are presented. The spudcan footing can be used in the case where dense soil is more than three meters. The spread footing is recommended where the dense soil is between one and three meters. Finally, in the third system, the Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) is used as a base support for the telescope's pedestal. The LEV support requires a prepared site. The soil should be compacted and stabilized, if necessary, to reduce settlement.

Omar, Husam Anwar

1990-10-01

219

Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment: Initial global mapping results (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been mapping the moon continuously since early July, 2009. The instrument has acquired thermal emission and solar reflectance data in nine spectral channels spanning a wavelength range from 0.3 to 400 microns, at spatial resolutions ranging from 0.2 to 1.3 km (Paige et al., 2009). Diviner’s growing dataset is revealing, for the first time, the extreme nature of the lunar thermal environment, and its diurnal and seasonal variability. The lunar polar regions are of special interest due to the presence of permanently shadowed regions that may contain cold-trapped water and other volatiles. Diviner has obtained sufficient coverage to make complete maps of annual maximum temperatures in the south polar region, and annual minimum temperatures in the north polar region. The results reveal the presence of large areas on the surface and beneath the surface that are capable of serving as long-term cold traps for water ice, as well as compounds of lower and higher volatility. In the low and mid-latitude regions, Diviner is mapping daytime and nighttime thermal emission in multiple spectral channels. Daytime measurements in Diviner’s three 8-micron channels have been used to map the wavelength of a distinct peak in the Moon’s thermal emission spectrum due to the Christiansen feature, an emissivity maximum associated with Si-O stretching vibrations (Greenhagen et al., this meeting). The results show strong correlations with lunar mineralogy derived from other remote sensing techniques and analysis of lunar samples. Diviner’s nighttime measurements in its four thermal mapping channels are mapping the global distribution of isolated exposures of high thermal inertia material associated with the recent excavation of blocky material by impact craters (Vasavada et al., this meeting). Diviner’s observations to date cover nearly 50% of the surface area of the moon. Over time, it is anticipated that Diviner will accumulate sufficient coverage to map most locations at multiple times per day. Future combined analyses of Diviner temperature, thermophysical properties and compositional data may provide new insights into the structure and history of the lunar regolith, and the nature and distribution of cold-trapped volatile compounds at the lunar poles. Greenhagen, B. T. et al. LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer: Compositional Investigation Coverage and Results, this meeting, 2009. Paige, D. A. et. al. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, Space Science Reviews, DOI: 10.1007/s11214-009-9529-2, 2009. Vasavada, A. R. et al. LRO Diviner: First Look at Lunar Global Temperatures and Thermophysical Properties, this meeting, 2009.

Paige, D. A.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Vasavada, A. R.; Allen, C.; Bandfield, J. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Calcutt, S. B.; de Jong, E. M.; Elphic, R. C.; Foote, E. J.; Foote, M. C.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; McCleese, D. J.; Ghent, R. R.; Glotch, T. D.; Hayne, P. O.; Lucey, P. G.; Murray, B. C.; Schofield, J. T.; Siegler, M. A.; Snook, K.; Soderblom, L. A.; Taylor, F. W.; Thomas, I. R.; Wyatt, M. B.

2009-12-01

220

Lunar microcosmos. [human factors of lunar habitat  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A human habitat on the lunar surface requires energy recycling metabolites based on the utilization of vegetative plants that are good photosynthesizers. Selection criteria involve reactions to fertilization by human excrements, suitability as food for man (with or without fractionation), physiological effects of prolonged ingestion of these plants, and technical methods for returning inedible portions back into the cycle.

Pirie, N.

1974-01-01

221

Lunar Rotation and the Lunar Interior  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/ solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and fluid core moment of inertia. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core plus Love number. Past detection of CMB flattening has been marginal but is improving, while direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved. Three decades of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data are analyzed using a weighted least-squares approach. The lunar solution parameters include dissipation at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, tidal dissipation, dissipation-related coefficients for rotation and orientation terms, potential Love number k2, a correction to the constant term in the tilt of the equator to the ecliptic which is meant to approximate the influence of core-mantle boundary flattening, and displacement Love numbers h2 and l2. Several solutions, with different combinations of solution parameters and constraints, are considered.

Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.; Dickey, J. O.

2003-01-01

222

Manned in Situ Confirmation of Lunar Ice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study is performed to investigate the feasibility of a manned expedition to the Moon using the European Ariane-5 launcher. The primary objective of this lunar mission is to confirm the presence of water at the South-Pole craters. It is believed that these permanently shadowed craters contain water in the form of ice. Secondary objective is to perform lunar surface science and making a first step towards a lunar outpost. Early results show that a minimum of two Ariane-5 launches is required. In this `two Ariane' scenario the first launch will bring a Lunar Landing Vehicle (LLV) into low lunar orbit. The second will launch two astronauts in a Crew Transfer Vehicle into a rendez- vous trajectory with the LLV. Arrived at the Moon, the astronauts will enter the LLV, undock from the CTV and land at the designated site located near the rim of the South-Pole Shackleton crater. The transfer strategy for both spacecraft will be the so-called direct transfer, taking about four days. At arrival the LLV will start mapping the landing site at a ground resolution of one meter. As a consequence of the polar orbit, the CTV has to arrive fourteen days later and surface operations can take about twelve days, accumulating in a total mission-duration of 36 days. 32 days for the CTV and 22 days for the LLV. In case a `two Ariane' flight does not posses sufficient capabilities also a `three Ariane' scenario is developed, in which the LLV is split-up into two stages and launched separately. These two will dock at the Moon forming a descent stage and an ascent stage. The third launch will be a CTV. During surface operations, astronauts will set up a solar power unit, install the sample retrieval system and carry out surface science. Samples of the crater floor will be retrieved by means of a probe or robot guided along a cable suspended over the crater rim. Also, this paper shows the way in which European astronauts can be brought to the Moon for other future missions, like the construction of a telescope, a lunar hotel, a lunar solar power system or even harvesting of Helium-3. The preliminary design study shows the feasibility of both missions, meaning that ESA has the capability to put a man on the Moon to search for ice and bring him back safely with today's technology.

Gerené, S. P. B.; Hummeling, R. W. J.; Ockels, W. J.

223

Oxygen extraction from lunar soil by fluorination  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mining and processing of lunar material could possibly lead to more cost-efficient scenarios for permanent presence of man in space and on the Moon. Production of oxygen for use as propellant seems especially important. Different candidate processes for oxygen-extraction from lunar soil were proposed, of which the reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen was studied most. This process, however, needs the concentration of ilmenite from lunar regolith to a large extent and releases oxygen only with low efficiency. Another possibility - the fluorination method - which works with lunar bulk material as feedstock is discussed. Liberation of oxygen from silicate or oxide materials by fluorination methods has been applied in geoscience since the early sixties. The fact that even at moderate temperatures 98 to 100 percent yields can be attained, suggests that fluorination of lunar regolith could be an effective way of propellant production. Lunar soil contains about 50 percent oxygen by weight which is gained nearly completely through this process as O2 gas. The second-most element Si is liberated as gaseous SiF4. It could be used for production of Si-metal and fluorine-recycling. All other main elements of lunar soil will be converted into solid fluorides which also can be used for metal-production and fluorine-recycling. Preliminary results of small scale experiments with different materials are discussed, giving information on specific oxygen-yields and amounts of by-products as functions of temperature. These experiments were performed with an already existing fluorine extraction and collection device at the University of Bonn, normally used for determination of oxygen-isotopic abundances. Optimum conditions, especially concerning energy consumption, are investigated. Extrapolation of the experimental results to large industrial-type plants on the Moon is tried and seems to be promising at first sight. The recycling of the fluorine is, however, crucial for the process. It might be achieved by means of electrolysis. This needs further investigation. The technical problem of transport and handling of the toxic and corrosive fluorine seems to be solvable and could be done by inert storage vessels.

Seboldt, W.; Lingner, S.; Hoernes, S.; Grimmeisen, W.

1991-01-01

224

Exploration of Lunar Craters using a Tracked Microrover Concept for the ESA Lunar Robotics Challenge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Robotic exploration of the lunar terrain is a crucial step towards future manned missions. There is evidence to suggest water ice ores may be found in the base of deep, polar craters as a result of the meteorite impacts which created them. These regions are in a permanent state of darkened deep-freeze due to their extreme latitudes, allowing the ice to remain intact. Lunar terrain is extremely inhospitable to all but the most robust of exploration vehicles. Surface conditions around the rim of large craters are rarely favourable for the descent and, more importantly, ascent of a ground-based vehicle. The ESA Lunar Robotics Challenge tasked eight teams from Universities across Europe to build microrovers capable of climbing into a terrestrial analogue of such a lunar crater, search the base for small samples of ore simulants and return them to a lander site outside of the crater. The University of Surrey Space Centre team designed a tracked vehicle based on a modified Mobile Robots Pioneer 3-AT microrover. The Pioneer on-board computer and microcontroller allowed the microrover to be equipped with off-the-shelf components, including a stereo camera for navigation, wireless Ethernet communications system for teleoperation and 5 degree of freedom robotic manipulator.

Brunskill, C.; Smith, B.; Humphrey, S.; Makhlouta, M.; Baig, S.; Lappas, V.

225

Models of the distribution and abundance of hydrogen at the lunar south pole  

Microsoft Academic Search

Permanently shadowed locations at the lunar poles are potential sites for significant concentrations of cold-trapped volatiles, including water ice. Hydrogen enhancements are seen at the poles, but the physical form, abundance and distribution of this hydrogen remains controversial. Using a pixon-based image reconstruction algorithm to effectively improve spatial resolution, we derive maps of the lunar south polar water-equivalent hydrogen concentration

R. C. Elphic; V. R. Eke; L. F. A. Teodoro; D. J. Lawrence; D. B. J. Bussey

2007-01-01

226

Lunar Surface Gravimeter Experiment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The lunar surface gravimeter used the moon as an instrumented antenna to search for gravitational waves predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity. Tidal deformation of the moon was measured. Gravitational radiation is a channel that is capable ...

J. Weber J. J. Giganti J. P. Richard J. V. Larson R. L. Tobias

1977-01-01

227

Lunar & Planetary Science, 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a summary of each paper presented at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference at the Johnson Space Center, Houston in March 1980. Topics relate to Venus, Jupiter, Mars, asteroids, meteorites, regoliths, achondrites, remote sensing, and cratering studies. (SA)

Geotimes, 1980

1980-01-01

228

Lunar Dust 101.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Largely due to rock and soil samples returned during the Apollo program, much has been learned about the composition and properties of lunar regolith. Although, for the most part, the mineral composition resembles terrestrial minerals, the characteristics...

J. R. Gaier

2008-01-01

229

Lunar Transfer Vehicle Studies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Lunar transportation architectures exist for several different mission scenarios. Direct flights from Earth are possible, as the Apollo program clearly demonstrated. Alternatively, a space transfer vehicle could be constructed in space by using the Space ...

J. T. Keeley

1993-01-01

230

An Unusual Lunar Halo  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a photograph of an unusual combination of lunar halos: the 22-degree refraction halo, the circumscribed halo, and a reflection halo. Deduces the form and orientations of the ice crystals responsible for the observed halo features. (MLH)

Cardon, Bartley L.

1977-01-01

231

Lunar robotic maintenance module  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A design for a robotic maintenance module that will assist a mobile 100-meter lunar drill is introduced. The design considers the following areas of interest: the atmospheric conditions, actuator systems, power supply, material selection, weight, cooling system and operation.

Ayres, Michael L.

1988-01-01

232

Lunar South Pole Illumination  

NASA Video Gallery

Simulated illumination conditions over the lunar South Pole region, from ~80°S to the pole. The movie runs for 28 days, centered on the LCROSS impact date on October 9th, 2009. The illumination ca...

233

Lunar Regolith Densification.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Core tube samples of the lunar regolith obtained during the Apollo missions showed a rapid increase in the density of the regolith with depth. Various hypotheses have been proposed for the possible cause of this phenomenon, including the densification of ...

H. Ko S. Sture

1991-01-01

234

Our World: Lunar Rock  

NASA Video Gallery

Learn about NASA'??s Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. See how NASA protects these precious moon rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts. Explore t...

235

Lunar sample contracts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The major scientific accomplishments through 1971 are reported for the particle track studies of lunar samples. Results are discussed of nuclear track measurements by optical and electron microscopy, thermoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, and differential thermal analysis.

Walker, R. M.

1974-01-01

236

NASA's Lunar Robotic Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Before returning humans to the Moon for mankind s seventh lunar landing, NASA will embark upon a series of robotic missions with International partnership, executed within the construct of an integrated program, designed specifically to prepare the way fo...

M. A. McGrath

2006-01-01

237

Base Lunar Alpha  

NASA Video Gallery

Tu misión: Recuperar los sistemas críticos cuando un meteoro daña los equipos de supervivencia de tu ambiente lunar. Parece una película de ciencia ficción, ¿verdad? En realidad, es el nuevo juego ...

238

Lunar Sulfur Capture System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor downstream of an in-ISRU process such as hydrogen reduction. The lunar-soil-sorbent trap is held at a temperature significantly lower than the operating temperature of the hydrogen reduction or other ISRU process in order to maximize capture of contaminants, but is held at a high enough temperature to allow moisture to pass through without condensing. The lunar soil benefits from physical beneficiation to remove ultrafine particles (to reduce pressure drop through a fixed bed reactor) and to upgrade concentrations of iron and/or calcium compounds (to improve reactivity with gaseous contaminants).

Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

2013-01-01

239

Lunar transient phenomena  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lunar transient phenomena (LTP) sightings are classified into five categories: brightenings, darkenings, reddish colorations, bluish colorations, and obscurations. There is evidence that the remaining LTP's are of lunar origin. A substantial number of sightings are independently confirmed. They have been recorded on film and spectrograms, as well as with photoelectric photometers and polarization equipment. It suggested that the LTP's may be gentle outgassings of less-than-volcanic proportions.

Cameron, W. S.

1991-03-01

240

Lunar sample analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The evolution of the lunar regolith under solar wind and micrometeorite bombardment is discussed as well as the size distribution of ultrafine iron in lunar soil. The most important characteristics of complex graphite, sulfide, arsenide, palladium, and platinum mineralization in a pegmatoid pyroxenite of the Stillwater Complex in Montana are examined. Oblique reflected light micrographs and backscattered electron SEM images of the graphite associations are included.

Housley, R. M.

1983-01-01

241

Lunar Commercialization Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation describes the goals and rules of the workshop on Lunar Commercialization. The goal of the workshop is to explore the viability of using public-private partnerships to open the new space frontier. The bulk of the workshop was a team competition to create a innovative business plan for the commercialization of the moon. The public private partnership concept is reviewed, and the open architecture as an infrastructure for potential external cooperation. Some possible lunar commercialization elements are reviewed.

Martin, Gary L.

2008-01-01

242

Lunar cinder cones.  

PubMed

Data on terrestrial eruptions of pyroclastic material and ballistic considerations suggest that in the lunar environment (vacuum and reduced gravity) low-rimmed pyroclastic rings are formed rather than the high-rimmed cinder cones so abundant on the earth. Dark blanketing deposits in the Taurus-Littrow region (Apollo 17 landing area) are interpreted as being at least partly composed of lunar counterparts of terrestrial cinder cones. PMID:17757977

McGetchin, T R; Head, J W

1973-04-01

243

Lunar Landing Sites  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is about landing on the Moon. Learners will design a spacecraft, choose a suitable lunar landing site, and present their ideas before the entire class using visual aides such as maps, diagrams, and 3-dimensional models. This activity is in Unit 2 of the Exploring the Moon teachers guide, which is designed for use especially, but not exclusively, with the Lunar Sample Disk program.

244

Harmonic settlement effects on uniform and tapered tank shells  

Microsoft Academic Search

For economic reasons, foundations of large tanks for fluid storage tend to be shallow and may consequently suffer differential settlement under load. But these tanks are ductile and are able to tolerate limited settlement without distress. For an economic limitation of settlement, the structure should be analyzed rationally. In this paper, the effects of peripheral differential settlement on the shell

M. Jonaidi; P. Ansourian

1998-01-01

245

Insolation Effects on Lunar Hydrogen: Observation from the LRO LEND and LOLA Instruments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Moon's polar permanent shadow regions (PSR) have long been considered the unique repository for volatile Hydrogen (H) Largely, this was due to the extreme and persistently cold environment that has been maintained over eons of lunar history. However, recent discoveries indicate that the H picture may be more complex than thc PSR hypothesis suggests. Observations by the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detect (LEND) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) indicate some H concentrations lie outside PSR. Similarly, observations from Chandraayan-l's M3 and Deep Impact's EPOXI near infra-red observations indicate diurnal cycling of volatile H in lower latitudes. These results suggest other geophysical phenomena may also play a role in the Lunar Hydrogen budget. In this presentation we review the techniques and results from the recent high latitude analysis and apply similar techniques to equatorial regions. Results from our low latitude analysis will be reported. We discuss interpretations and implications for Lunar Hydrogen studies

McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Droege, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J.; Harshman, K.; Livak, M. M.; Malakhov, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Namkung, M.; Nandikotkur, G.; Neumann, G.; Smith, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sanin, A. G.; Starr, R. D.; Trombka, J. I.; Zuber, M. T.

2011-01-01

246

Chemical processing of lunar materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

1979-01-01

247

Beneficiation of lunar ilmenite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the most important commodities lacking in the moon is free oxygen which is required for life and used extensively for propellent. Free oxygen, however, can be obtained by liberating it from the oxides and silicates that form the lunar rocks and regolith. Ilmenite (FeTiO3) is considered one of the leading candidates for production of oxygen because it can be reduced with a reasonable amount of energy and it is an abundant mineral in the lunar regolith and many mare basalts. In order to obtain oxygen from ilmenite, a method must be developed to beneficiate ilmenite from lunar material. Two possible techniques are electrostatic or magnetic methods. Both methods have complications because lunar ilmenite completely lacks Fe(3+). Magnetic methods were tested on eucrite meteorites, which are a good chemical simulant for low Ti mare basalts. The ilmenite yields in the experiments were always very low and the eucrite had to be crushed to xxxx. These data suggest that magnetic separation of ilmenite from fine grain lunar basalts would not be cost effective. Presently, experiments are being performed with electrostatic separators, and lunar regolith is being waited for so that simulants do not have to be employed.

Ruiz, Joaquin

1991-01-01

248

Lunar Orbit Anomaly  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Independent experiments show a large anomaly in measurements of lunar orbital evolution, with applications to cosmology and the speed of light. The Moon has long been known to be slowly drifting farther from Earth due to tidal forces. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment (LLRE) indicates the Moon's semimajor axis increasing at 3.82 ± .07 cm/yr, anomalously high. If the Moon were today gaining angular momentum at this rate, it would have coincided with Earth less than 2 Gyr ago. Study of tidal rhythmites indicates a rate of 2.9 ± 0.6 cm/yr. Historical eclipse observations independently measure a recession rate of 2.82 ± .08 cm/yr. Detailed numerical simulation of lunar orbital evolution predicts 2.91 cm/yr. LLRE differs from three independent experiments by over12 sigma. A cosmology where speed of light c is related to time t by GM=tc^3 has been suggested to predict the redshifts of Type Ia supernovae, and a 4.507034% proportion of baryonic matter. If c were changing in the amount predicted, lunar orbital distance would appear to increase by an additional 0.935 cm/yr. An anomaly in the lunar orbit may be precisely calculated, shedding light on puzzles of 'dark energy'. In Planck units this cosmology may be summarized as M=R=t.Lunar Recession Rate;

Riofrio, L.

2012-12-01

249

Ice in the lunar polar regions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The idea that ice and other trapped volatiles exist in permanently shadowed regions near the lunar poles was proposed by Watson, Murray, and Brown (1961). It is reexamined in the present paper, in the light of the vast increase of lunar knowledge. The stability of the traps and the trapping mechanism are verified. Four potential sources of lunar H2O, namely (1) solar wind reduction of Fe in the regolith, (2) H2O-containing meteoroids, (3) cometary impact, and (4) (the least certain) degassing of the interior, can supply amounts of trapped H2O estimated in the range of 10 to the 16th to 10 to the 17th g. Two important destructive mechanisms have been identified: photodissociation of H2O molecules adsorbed on the sunlit surface and sputtering or decomposition of trapped H2O by solar wind particles. The effect of impact gardening is mainly protective. The question of the presence of H2O in the traps remains open; it can be settled by experiment.

Arnold, J. R.

1979-01-01

250

Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 5  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics discussed include: Automation Recognition oF Crater-Like Structures in Terrestrial and Plantary Images; Condensation from Cluster-IDP Enriched Vapor Inside the Snow Line: Implications for Mercury, Asteroids, and Enstatite Chondrites; Tomographic Location of Potential Melt-Bearing Phenocrysts in Lunar Glass Spherules; Source and Evolution of Vapor Due to Impacts into Layered Carbonates and Silicates; Noble Gases and I-Xe Ages of the Zag Meteorite; The MArs Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) for the 209 Mars Science Laboratory; The Sedimentary Rocks of Meridiani Planum, in Context; Three-System Isotopic of Lunar Norite 78238: Rb-Sr Results; Constraints on the Role of Curium-247 as a Source of Fission Xenon in the Early Solar System; New Features in the ADS Abstract Service; Cassini RADAR's First Look at Titan; Volcanism and Volatile Recycling on Venus from Lithospheric Delamination; The Fate of Water in the Martian Magma Ocean and the Formation of an Early Atmosphere; Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer Water-Equivalent Hydrogen: Comparison with Glacial; Landforms on Tharsis; Using Models of Permanent Shadow to Constrain Lunar Polar Water Ice Abundances; Martian Radiative Transfer Modeling Using the Optimal Spectral Sampling Method; Petrological and Geochemical Consideration on the Tuserkanite Meteorite; and Mineralogy of Asteroids from Observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope.

2005-01-01

251

Space Solar Power Technology for Lunar Polar Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology for Laser-Photo-Voltaic Wireless Power Transistor (Laser-PV WPT) is being developed for lunar polar applications by Boeing and NASA Marshall Space Center. A lunar polar mission could demonstrate and validate Laser-PV WPT and other SSP technologies, while enabling access to cold, permanently shadowed craters that are believed to contain ice. Crater may hold frozen water and other volatiles deposited over billion of years, recording prior impact event on the moon (and Earth). A photo-voltaic-powered rover could use sunlight, when available, and laser light, when required, to explore a wide range of lunar terrain. The National Research Council recently found that a mission to the moon's south pole-Aitkir basin has priority for space science

Henley, Mark W.; Howell, Joe T.

2004-01-01

252

Lunar base launch and landing facility conceptual design, 2nd edition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents the Lunar Base Launch and Landing Facility Conceptual Design study. The purpose of this study was to examine the requirements for launch and landing facilities for early lunar bases and to prepare conceptual designs for some of these facilities. The emphasis of this study is on the facilities needed from the first manned landing until permanent occupancy. Surface characteristics and flight vehicle interactions are described, and various facility operations are related. Specific recommendations for equipment, facilities, and evolutionary planning are made, and effects of different aspects of lunar development scenarios on facilities and operations are detailed. Finally, for a given scenario, a specific conceptual design is developed and presented.

1988-01-01

253

24 CFR 7.43 - Settlement agreements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICY, PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS Equal Employment Opportunity Without Regard to Race, Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Remedies, Enforcement and Compliance § 7.43 Settlement...

2013-04-01

254

Hydrodynamic Factors Controlling Settlement in Fouling Organisms.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In recent years considerable effort has been directed toward understanding the behavioral and physiological events leading to the settlement and recruitment of fouling organisms. A wide variety of animals express preferences in the sites where they settle...

M. W. Denny

1991-01-01

255

7 CFR 1421.112 - Loan settlement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...this section in settlement of the marketing assistance loan, the sales...forfeiture under a non-recourse marketing assistance loan, CCC will...made by CCC on the basis of the basic marketing assistance loan rate that is...

2009-01-01

256

Chemosensory Stimulation of Molluscan Settlement and Metamorphosis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A Settlement and metamorphosis of invertebrate larvae are key points in establishing and maintaining marine communities (including those on the bottoms of ships and piers). This research employed physiological and molecular methods to clarly (1) the basis...

M. G. Hadfield

1996-01-01

257

Settlement of footing on compacted ash bed  

SciTech Connect

Compacted coal ash fills exhibit capillary stress due to contact moisture and preconsolidation stress due to the compaction process. As such, the conventional methods of estimating settlement of footing on cohesionless soils based on penetration tests become inapplicable in the case of footings on coal ash fills, although coal ash is also a cohesionless material. Therefore, a method of estimating load-settlement behavior of footings resting on coal ash fills accounting for the effect of capillary and preconsolidation stresses is presented here. The proposed method has been validated by conducting plate load tests on laboratory prepared compacted ash beds and comparing the observed and predicted load-settlement behavior. Overestimation of settlement greater than 100% occurs when capillary and preconsolidation stresses are not accounted for, as is the case in conventional methods.

Ramasamy, G.; Pusadkar, S.S. [IIT Roorkee, Roorkee (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

2007-11-15

258

The science of the lunar poles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It was the great geochemist Harold Urey who first called attention to peculiar conditions at the poles of the Moon where the very small inclination of the lunar spin axis with respect to the sun causes craters and other depressions to be permanently shaded from sunlight allowing very low temperatures. Urey suggested that the expected low temperature surfaces could cold trap and collect any vapors that might transiently pass through the lunar environment. Urey's notion has led to studies of the poles as a new research area in lunar science. The conditions and science of the poles are utterly unlike those of the familiar Moon of Neil Armstrong, and the study of the poles is similar to our understanding of the Moon itself at the dawn of the space age, with possibilities outweighing current understanding. Broadly, we can treat the poles as a dynamic system of input, transport, trapping, and loss. Volatile sources range from continuous, including solar wind, the Earth's polar fountain and micrometeorites, to episodic, including comets and wet asteroids, to nearly unique events including late lunar outgassing and passage through giant molecular clouds. The lunar exosphere transports volatiles to the poles, complicated by major perturbances to the atmosphere by volatile-rich sources. Trapping includes cold trapping, but also in situ creation of more refractory species such as organics, clathrates and water-bearing minerals, as well as sequester by regolith overturn or burial by larger impacts. Finally, volatiles are lost to space by ionization and sweeping. Spacecraft results have greatly added to the understanding of the polar system. Temperatures have been precisely measured by LRO, and thermal models now allow determination of temperature over the long evolution of the lunar orbit, and show very significant changes in temperature and temperature distribution with time and depth. Polar topography is revealed in detail by Selene and LRO laser altimeters while direct imaging of interiors of polar shadowed craters has been accomplished by many instruments from the ultraviolet to the radar. Imaging radars on Chandrayaan-1 and LRO have identified anomalous craters that may contain rich water ice deposits. Neutron spectrometers on Lunar Prospector and LRO directly detected hydrogen enhancements at both poles. Spectacularly, the LCROSS impact experiment detected a wide range of volatile elements and species at Cabeus crater in the lunar south polar region. While these measurements have catapulted polar science forward, much remains to be understood about the polar system, both from analysis of the current data, and new missions planned and in development. The general state of the lunar atmosphere is planned to be addressed by the UV and neutral mass spectrometers carried by the planned NASA LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere And Dust Environment Explorer) spacecraft creating an important baseline. But more data is necessary, from an in situ direct assay of polar volatiles to measurements of species and fluxes into and out of the cold traps over lengthy timescales.

Lucey, P. G.

2011-12-01

259

Molecular Nanotechnology and Space Settlement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Atomically precise manipulation of matter is becoming increasingly common in laboratories around the world. As this control moves into aerospace systems, huge improvements in computers, high-strength materials, and other systems are expected. For example, studies suggest that it may be possible to build: 10(exp 18) MIPS computers, 10(exp 15) bytes/sq cm write once memory, $153-412/kg-of-cargo single- stage-to-orbit launch vehicles and active materials which sense their environment and react intelligently. All of NASA's enterprises should benefit significantly from molecular nanotechnology. Although the time may be measured in decades and the precise path to molecular nanotechnology is unclear, all paths (diamondoid, fullerene, self-assembly, biomolecular, etc.) will require very substantial computation. This talk will discuss fullerene nanotechnology and early work on hypothetical active materials consisting of large numbers of identical machines. The speaker will also discuss aerospace applications, particularly missions leading to widespread space settlement (e.g., small near-Earth - object retrieval). It is interesting to note that control of the tiny - individual atoms and molecules - may lead to colonization of the huge -first the solar system, then the galaxy.

Globus, Al; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

260

Rare earth permanent magnets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Permanent magnets were discovered centuries ago from what was known as {open_quotes}lodestone{close_quotes}, a rock containing large quantities of the iron-bearing mineral magnetite (FeâOâ). The compass was the first technological use for permanent magnetic materials; it was used extensively for navigational purposes by the fifteenth century. During the twentieth century, as new applications for permanent magnets were developed, interest and research

Major-Sosias

1993-01-01

261

Review of Lunar Infrared Observations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Prior to 1960 the lunar surface was known to be highly insulating from the low temperatures observed during an eclipse and the lunar night. Directional effects in the infrared emission from the illuminated surface were understood to result from roughness....

J. M. Saari R. W. Shorthill

1966-01-01

262

First Oxygen from Lunar Basalt.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Carbotek/Shimizu process to produce oxygen from lunar soils has been successfully demonstrated on actual lunar samples in laboratory facilities at Carbotek with Shimizu funding and support. Apollo sample 70035 containing approximately 25 percent ilmen...

M. A. Gibson C. W. Knudsen D. J. Brueneman H. Kanamori R. O. Ness

1993-01-01

263

Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (lSRU) project called RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). This project is an Earth-based lunar precursor demonstration of a system that could be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, where it would drill into regolith, quantify the volatiles that are present, and extract oxygen by hydrogen reduction of iron oxides. The RESOLVE chemical processing system was mounted within the CMU rover "Scarab" and successfully demonstrated on Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano in November 2008. This technology could be used on Mars as well. As described at the 2008 Mars Society Convention, the Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) supports the objectives of the RESOLVE project by capturing and quantifying water and hydrogen released by regolith upon heating. Field test results for the quantification of water using LWRD showed that the volcanic ash (tephra) samples contained 0.15-0.41% water, in agreement with GC water measurements. Reduction of the RH in the surge tank to near zero during recirculation show that the water is captured by the water beds as desired. The water can be recovered by heating the Water Beds to 230 C or higher. Test results for the capture and quantification of pure hydrogen have shown that over 90% of the hydrogen can be captured and 98% of the absorbed hydrogen can be recovered upon heating the hydride to 400 C and desorbing the hydrogen several times into the evacuated surge tank. Thus, the essential requirement of capturing hydrogen and recovering it has been demonstrated. ,

Muscatello, Anthony C.; Captain, Janine E.; Quinn, Jacqueline W.; Gibson, Tracy L.; Perusich, Stephen A.; Weis, Kyle H.

2009-01-01

264

Lunar surface reflectance by LALT aboard KAGUYA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Laser Altimeter (LALT) aboard Japanese lunar explorer KAGUYA (SELENE) is a ranging instrument which measures the distance between the satellite and the lunar surface with accuracy of 1 m by detecting the timing delay of the reflected laser light. The main science goal of the LALT is to obtain the lunar global topographic data including polar regions for the study of the origin and the evolution of the Moon [1]. Besides, the LALT is equipped with an intensity monitor of the returned pulses. The intensity of the returned pulses contains information concerning surface roughness and reflectance of the footprints, which will contribute to the study of the lunar surface maturity and age. The reflectance at LALT wavelength (1064nm) is sensitive to the surface maturity and composition. The data should be particularly important at lunar polar regions where camera instruments should suffer from phase angle effects in the surface reflectance and moreover cannot obtain reflectance data at the permanently shadowed area. The normal operation of the LALT began on 30th, December 2007 after two months’ commissioning phase. Before the end of the normal operation phase in October 2008, the LALT measured more than 10 million range data. Unfortunately, due to the laser power decrease and also possible smaller surface reflectance than the expected value before launch (15 % at 1 micro meter), the return pulse intensity during the nominal mission phase is so small that they are not reliable enough to discuss the surface property. During the extended mission phase, which started November 2008, the satellite altitude decreased to 50 km. Due to the malfunction of the reaction wheel and high-voltage instruments were shutdown, the observation was suspended until 11th of February, 2009. LALT successfully resumed observation on 12th February and continued observation until the controlled crash of KAGUYA onto the Moon on 10th of June, 2009. Thanks to the lower orbit during this phase, the return pulse intensity is high enough to be used for the study of the surface property. Especially, it is of interest whether water ice exists or not on the bottom of the eternal shaded regions in the polar region. If we assume that the surface roughness within the size of the footprint is the same inside and the vicinity of a crater, the change of the intensity is due to the variety of the reflectance. It can be used for possible detection of the water ice if exists. We will report the initial results of the analysis of derived reflectance, especially of the lunar polar regions. references [1] H. Araki et. al., Science, 323, 897-900 (2009).

Noda, H.; Araki, H.; Ishihara, Y.; Tazawa, S.; Sasaki, S.; Kawano, N.

2009-12-01

265

Lunar Exploration Orbiter (LEO)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Moon is an integral part of the Earth-Moon system, it is a witness to more than 4.5 b. y. of solar system history, and it is the only planetary body except Earth for which we have samples from known locations. The Moon is our closest companion and can easily be reached from Earth at any time, even with a relatively modest financial budget. Consequently, the Moon was the first logical step in the exploration of our solar system before we pursued more distant targets such as Mars and beyond. The vast amount of knowledge gained from the Apollo and other lunar missions of the late 1960's and early 1970's demonstrates how valuable the Moon is for the understanding of our planetary system. Even today, the Moon remains an extremely interesting target scientifically and technologically, as ever since, new data have helped to address some of our questions about the Earth-Moon system, many questions remained. Therefore, returning to the Moon is the critical stepping-stone to further exploring our immediate planetary neighborhood. In this concept study, we present scientific and technological arguments for a national German lunar mission, the Lunar Explorations Orbiter (LEO). Numerous space-faring nations have realized and identified the unique opportunities related to lunar exploration and have planned missions to the Moon within the next few years. Among these missions, LEO will be unique, because it will globally explore the Moon in unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution. LEO will significantly improve our understanding of the lunar surface composition, surface ages, mineralogy, physical properties, interior, thermal history, gravity field, regolith structure, and magnetic field. The Lunar Explorations Orbiter will carry an entire suite of innovative, complementary technologies, including high-resolution camera systems, several spectrometers that cover previously unexplored parts of the electromagnetic spectrum over a broad range of wavelengths, microwave and radar experiments, a very sensitive magnetometer and gradiometer, a subsatellite, and a state-of-the-art optical communication system. The Lunar Explorations Orbiter concept is technologically challenging but feasible, and will gather unique, integrated, interdisciplinary data sets that are of high scientific interest and will provide an unprecedented new context for all other international lunar missions. In fact, the Lunar Explorations Orbiter will further establish Germany as a leader among space-faring nations and will demonstrate expertise and technological know-how, which is "Made in Germany". With its high visibility, LEO will foster the growing acceptance of space exploration in Germany and will capture the imagination of the general public.

Jaumann, R.; Spohn, T.; Hiesinger, H.; Jessberger, E. K.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Helbert, J.; Christensen, U.; Keller, H. U.; Mall, U.; Böhnhardt, H.; Hartogh, P.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Auster, H.-U.; Moreira, A.; Werner, M.; Pätzold, M.; Palme, H.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.; Mandea, M.; Lesur, V.; Häusler, B.; Hördt, A.; Eichentopf, K.; Hauber, E.; Hoffmann, H.; Köhler, U.; Kührt, E.; Michaelis, H.; Pauer, M.; Sohl, F.; Denk, T.; van Gasselt, S.

2007-08-01

266

Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project (LMMP) has been created to manage the development of a suite of lunar mapping and modeling products that support the Constellation Program (CxP) and other lunar exploration activities, including the planning, design, development, test and operations associated with lunar sortie missions, crewed and robotic operations on the surface, and the establishment of a lunar outpost. The project draws on expertise from several NASA and non-NASA organizations (MSFC, ARC, GSFC, JPL, CRREL and USGS). LMMP will utilize data predominately from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, but also historical and international lunar mission data (e.g. Apollo, Lunar Orbiter, Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1), as available and appropriate, to meet Constellation s data needs. LMMP will provide access to this data through a single, common, intuitive and easy to use NASA portal that transparently accesses appropriately sanctioned portions of the widely dispersed and distributed collections of lunar data, products and tools. LMMP will provide such products as DEMs, hazard assessment maps, lighting maps and models, gravity models, and resource maps. We are working closely with the LRO team to prevent duplication of efforts and ensure the highest quality data products. While Constellation is our primary customer, LMMP is striving to be as useful as possible to the lunar science community, the lunar education and public outreach (E/PO) community, and anyone else interested in accessing or utilizing lunar data.

Noble, Sarah K.; French, Raymond; Nall,Mark; Muery, Kimberly

2009-01-01

267

Lunar Contributions to Global Security  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lunar programs have helped to maintain a safe and secure world, and the converse is that without at least some islands of security and prosperity on Earth no lunar program can exist. Apollo and its giant failed Soviet competitor, plus the successful robotic lunar programs of both countries, acted as peaceful proxies for national strength and laid foundations for US-Russian

S. J. Campos

268

Economics of Lunar Mineral Exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploration of space is increasingly being rationalized by the potential for long-term commercial payoffs. The commercial use of lunar resources is gaining relevance as technology and infrastructure increase, and will depend on an adequate foundation of geological information. While past lunar exploration has provided detailed knowledge about the composition, geologic history and structural characteristics of the lunar surface at six

Brad R. Blair

1999-01-01

269

Lunar Far Side Regolith Depth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lunar far side contains the South Pole Aitken Basin, which is the largest known impact basin in the solar system, and is enhanced in titanium and iron compared to the rest of the lunar highlands. Although we have known of this enigmatic basin since the 60's, most lunar photography and science covered the equatorial near side where the Apollo

G. D. Bart; H. J. Melosh

2005-01-01

270

A lunar transportation system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Due to large amounts of oxygen required for space travel, a method of mining, transporting, and storing this oxygen in space would facilitate further space exploration. The following project deals specifically with the methods for transporting liquid oxygen from the lunar surface to the Lunar Orbit (LO) space station, and then to the Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) space station. Two vehicles were designed for operation between the LEO and LO space stations. The first of these vehicles is an aerobraked design vehicle. The Aerobrake Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) is capable of transporting 5000 lbm of payload to LO while returning to LEO with 60,000 lbm of liquid oxygen, and thus meet mission requirements. The second vehicle can deliver 18,000 lbm of payload to LO and is capable of bringing 60,000 lbm of liquid oxygen back to LEO. A lunar landing vehicle was also designed for operation between LO and the established moon base. The use of an electromagnetic railgun as a method for launching the lunar lander was also investigated. The feasibility of the railgun is doubtful at this time. A system of spheres was also designed for proper storing and transporting of the liquid oxygen. The system assumes a safe means for transferring the liquid oxygen from tank to tank is operational. A sophisticated life support system was developed for both the OTV and the lunar lander. This system focuses on such factors as the vehicle environment, waste management, water requirements, food requirements, and oxygen requirements.

1986-01-01

271

Lunar Simulation in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar has been assembled at the NASA Glenn Research Center to provide a high fidelity lunar simulation facility to test the interactions of lunar dust and lunar dust simulant with candidate aerospace materials and coatings. It has a sophisticated design which enables it to treat dust in a way that will remove adsorbed gases and create a chemically reactive surface. It can simulate the vacuum, thermal, and radiation environments of the Moon, including proximate areas of illuminated heat and extremely cold shadow. It is expected to be a valuable tool in the development of dust repellant and cleaning technologies for lunar surface systems.

Gaier, James R.; Sechkar, Edward A.

2007-01-01

272

SILVER: Surface Imaging for Lunar Volatiles, Resources, and Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Surface Imaging for Lunar Volatiles, Exploration, and Resources (SILVER) instrument is a proposed imaging investigation for the 2008 Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission. SILVER and its experienced Measurement Team will prepare for and support future lunar human exploration activities, especially landing site identification and certification on the basis of potential resources. SILVER combines a high-resolution pushbroom visible imaging channel (SILVER-HR) and a wide-field-of-view (45 deg) framing imaging channel (SILVER-WF). SILVER-HR will obtain a single-detector 6 km imaging swath of 12,228 pixels at 0.5 m/pixel to image greater than 100 sq km target areas from 50 km altitude, imaging greater than 15% the lunar surface during a 1 year nominal mission. SILVER-HR has excellent stray-light rejection and its imaging detector has selectable time delay integration (TDI) with up to 128 stages for extreme low-light sensitivity, permitting direct imaging of permanently shadowed polar regions in scattered sunlight or earthshine. SILVER-WF will obtain geodetic framing images in a 2048 x 2048 format at 20m/pixel, with 60% along-track overlap stereo for imaging context and for derivation of a global digital elevation model of meter-scale lunar topography.

Pappalardo, R. T.; Cobabe-Ammann, E.; Cook, A. C.; Greeley, R.; Gulick, V. C.; McClintock, W. E.; Moore, J. M.; Stern, S. A.; Vasavada, A. R.; McClelland, M.

2004-01-01

273

Carbon Reduction of Lunar Regolith for Oxygen Production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The utilization of extraterrestrial resources will become a key element in the exploration of the Moon and Mars. The ability to locally make propellants, life support consumables, and fuel cell reagents will significantly reduce mission cost by reducing launch mass, and reduce risk through reduced dependence on Earth-supplied materials. The presence of water/hydrogen on the Moon will significantly impact the design of space exploration hardware and systems, but the form and concentration of these resources are unknown. The goal of the first robotic lunar lander mission in 2009/2010 will likely be to determine what is in the permanently shadowed craters of the lunar poles. To meet this goal, the NASA/JSC-led RESOLVE project will develop and integrate an experiment package that can perform the following objectives: (1) obtain ``ground truth'' data for resources at lunar pole; (2) obtain bulk and fine-grained regolith characteristic and environment data; (3) extract and collect volatiles from regolith; (4) produce oxygen from regolith; and (5) perform a hydrogen/water resource processing demonstration after it has been evolved and collected. ORBITEC, an industry partner in the RESOLVE project, is developing a small chemical reactor that will produce oxygen from the lunar regolith using the carbothermal reduction process. The carbothermal reduction process uses a carbonaceous source (such as methane gas) at high temperatures (~1625 °C) to reduce ilmenite and silicates present in the lunar regolith.

Gustafson, Robert J.; Rice, Eric E.; White, Brant C.

2005-02-01

274

Rare earth permanent magnets  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey is given of the state of the art in rare earth permanent magnet research of materials based on Nd2Fe14B. The magnetic properties of various types of interstitially modified Fe-rich rare earth intermetallics are discussed, including the possibility to apply these materials in permanent magnets.

K. H. J. Buschow; F. H. Feijen; K. de Kort

1995-01-01

275

Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

276

The Lunar Thermal Ice Pump  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has long been suggested that water ice can exist in extremely cold regions near the lunar poles, where sublimation loss is negligible. The geographic distribution of H-bearing regolith shows only a partial or ambiguous correlation with permanently shadowed areas, thus suggesting that another mechanism may contribute to locally enhancing water concentrations. We show that under suitable conditions, water molecules can be pumped down into the regolith by day-night temperature cycles, leading to an enrichment of H2O in excess of the surface concentration. Ideal conditions for pumping are estimated and found to occur where the mean surface temperature is below 105 K and the peak surface temperature is above 120 K. These conditions complement those of the classical cold traps that are roughly defined by peak temperatures lower than 120 K. On the present-day Moon, an estimated 0.8% of the global surface area experiences such temperature variations. Typically, pumping occurs on pole-facing slopes in small areas, but within a few degrees of each pole the equator-facing slopes are preferred. Although pumping of water molecules is expected over cumulatively large areas, the absolute yield of this pump is low; at best, a few percent of the H2O delivered to the surface could have accumulated in the near-surface layer in this way. The amount of ice increases with vapor diffusivity and is thus higher in the regolith with large pore spaces.

Schorghofer, Norbert; Aharonson, Oded

2014-06-01

277

Simulation of lunar carbon chemistry. II - Lunar winds contribution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simulation experiments, computations, and analysis of glassy agglutinates show that a directly condensed lunar wind vapor phase is strongly depleted in carbon and sulfur compounds and may recrystallize rapidly in the lunar thermal cycle and separate from host crystals. Factors preventing identification of low-energy species implanted from the lunar atmosphere are discussed. Computational results indicate that the implanted lunar winds carbon originates both from the vapor phases injected into the lunar atmosphere during thermal metamorphism of mature lunar soil grains and from direct volatization of impacting micrometeorites. It is suggested that microglass splashes and tiny crystalline grains possibly attached to the surface of coarser grains do not affect the characteristics of solar wind carbon chemistry in the lunar soil.

Bibring, J. P.; Langevin, Y.; Maurette, M.; Burlingame, A. L.; Wszolek, P. C.

1974-01-01

278

Lunar Sample Compendium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Sample Compendium is a succinct summary of what has been learned from the study of Apollo and Luna samples of the Moon. Basic information is compiled, sample-by-sample, in the form of an advanced catalog in order to provide a basic description of each sample. Information presented is carefully attributed to the original source publication, thus the Compendium also serves as a ready access to the now vast scientific literature pertaining to lunar smples. The Lunar Sample Compendium is a work in progress (and may always be). Future plans include: adding sections on additional samples, adding new thin section photomicrographs, replacing the faded photographs with newly digitized photos from the original negatives, attempting to correct the age data using modern decay constants, adding references to each section, and adding an internal search engine.

Meyer, C.

2009-01-01

279

Lunar lander conceptual design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper is a first look at the problems of building a lunar lander to support a small lunar surface base. A series of trade studies was performed to define the lander. The initial trades concerned choosing number of stages, payload mass, parking orbit altitude, and propellant type. Other important trades and issues included plane change capability, propellant loading and maintenance location, and reusability considerations. Given a rough baseline, the systems were then reviewed. A conceptual design was then produced. The process was carried through only one iteration. Many more iterations are needed. A transportation system using reusable, aerobraked orbital transfer vehicles (OTV's) is assumed. These OTV's are assumed to be based and maintained at a low Earth orbit (LEO) space station, optimized for transportation functions. Single- and two-stage OTV stacks are considered. The OTV's make the translunar injection (TLI), lunar orbit insertion (LOI), and trans-Earth injection (TEI) burns, as well as midcourse and perigee raise maneuvers.

Stecklein, J. M.; Petro, A. J.; Stump, W. R.; Adorjan, A. S.; Chambers, T. V.; Donofrio, M.; Hirasaki, J. K.; Morris, O. G.; Nudd, G.; Rawlings, R. P.

1992-01-01

280

Lunar hydrogen extraction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper examines the power and mass requirements of a lunar hydrogen extraction plant producing five metric tons of hydrogen per year. These power and mass requirements are based upon experimental work that determined gaseous hydrogen release rates from lunar samples at various heating rates and temperatures. An optimum heating temperature and rate can be selected to minimize the processing plant's power and mass requirements. The impact of thermal recovery on the power and mass requirements is studied, as is the use of nuclear waste heat for processing the regolith. In addition, the potential of using the extracted hydrogen in the form of methane as a propellant for a Lunar Excursion Vehicle is examined.

Snaufer, M. J.; Alred, J. W.

1991-01-01

281

Lunar mining equipment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains preliminary concepts for mining and beneficiation of lunar regolith from a 50 metric ton/day mine. Assumptions for the design are outlined below. Lunar regolith is the material to be mined. Since it is already a fine-grained material, the two steps of crushing and breakup from a rock surface are eliminated. The size of the operation was set at 50 metric tons of regolith/day for a three-year period. Operations will occur around the clock to make most efficient use of equipment, thus we assume 24 hr/day. For simplicity we have assumed that the lunar regolith has a uniform density of 1.68 and that it can be mined to a depth of 6 m. No research was done on power supply or distribution. It was left to others to consider the various trade-offs between nuclear and solar power and to design the needed utility system.

Bekkedahl, S.; Breidenbach, T.; Brown, M.; Francis, C.; Freeman, J.; Scharnott, M.; Thon, R.

1989-01-01

282

Concrete lunar base investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar based subjected to one atmosphere internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design: (1) during construction; (2) under pressurization; and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the air-tightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the moon.

Lin, T. D.; Senseney, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry Dean; Lindbergh, Charles

1989-01-01

283

Concrete lunar base investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar base subjected to 1-atm internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design (1) during construction, (2) under pressurization, and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the airtightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the Moon.

Lin, T. D.; Senseny, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry D.; Lindbergh, Charles

1992-01-01

284

Estimating lunar pyroclastic deposit depth from imaging radar data: Applications to lunar resource assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lunar pyroclastic deposits represent one of the primary anticipated sources of raw materials for future human settlements. These deposits are fine-grained volcanic debris layers produced by explosive volcanism contemporaneous with the early stage of mare infilling. There are several large regional pyroclastic units on the Moon (for example, the Aristarchus Plateau, Rima Bode, and Sulpicius Gallus formations), and numerous localized examples, which often occur as dark-halo deposits around endogenic craters (such as in the floor of Alphonsus Crater). Several regional pyroclastic deposits were studied with spectral reflectance techniques: the Aristarchus Plateau materials were found to be a relatively homogeneous blanket of iron-rich glasses. One such deposit was sampled at the Apollo 17 landing site, and was found to have ferrous oxide and titanium dioxide contents of 12 percent and 5 percent, respectively. While the areal extent of these deposits is relatively well defined from orbital photographs, their depths have been constrained only by a few studies of partially filled impact craters and by imaging radar data. A model for radar backscatter from mantled units applicable to both 70-cm and 12.6-cm wavelength radar data is presented. Depth estimates from such radar observations may be useful in planning future utilization of lunar pyroclastic deposits.

Campbell, B. A.; Stacy, N. J.; Campbell, D. B.; Zisk, S. H.; Thompson, T. W.; Hawke, B. R.

1992-01-01

285

Radiation Environments for Lunar Programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Developing reliable space systems for lunar exploration and infrastructure for extended duration operations on the lunar surface requires analysis and mitigation of potential system vulnerabilities to radiation effects on materials and systems. This paper reviews the characteristics of space radiation environments relevant to lunar programs including the trans-Earth and trans-lunar injection trajectories through the Earth's radiation belts, solar wind surface dose environments, energetic solar particle events, and galactic cosmic rays and discusses the radiation design environments being developed for lunar program requirements to assure that systems operate successfully in the space environment.

Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; Blackwell, Willliam C.; Harine, Katherine J.

2007-01-01

286

Next Generation Lunar Retroreflector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lunar Laser Ranging to the Moon to the Apollo Retroreflector arrays has produced detailed information concerning the crust and interior of the moon (e.g., the discovery of the liquid core). It has also produced some of the best tests of General Relativity (i.e., the Strong Equivalence Principal, the Inertial Properties of Gravitational Energy and the Constancy of the Gravitational Constant G) [1, 2]. However, the combination of the design of the Apollo arrays and the lunar librations are now the limit the accuracy of the range measurements. We will now address the objectives, design and status of the "next generation" retroreflector package being developed.

Currie, D.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Behr, B.

2013-09-01

287

Lunar base siting.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are widely dispersed lunar sites of interest for known and potential resources, selenology and observatories. Discriminating characteristics include certain geologic and topographic features, local mineralogy and petrology, solar illumination, view of Earth and the celestial sphere, and soil engineering properties. Space vehicle arrival and departure trajectories favor equatorial and polar sites. Over time, base sites will be developed serving different purposes. Information may be the initial lunar "resource", in the form of observational and in-situ research. A base in Mare Smythii with subsidiary outposts is favorable for a variety of purposes, and preserves broad resource flexibility.

Staehle, R. L.; Burke, J. D.; Snyder, G. C.; Dowling, R.; Spudis, P. D.

288

Polar Lunar Regions: Exploiting Natural and Augmented Thermal Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In polar regions of the Moon, some areas within craters are permanently shadowed from solar illumination and can reach temperatures of 100 K or less. These regions could serve as cold traps, capturing ice and other volatile compounds. These potential ice stores have many applications for lunar exploration. Within double-shaded craters, even colder regions exist, with temperatures never exceeding 50 K in many cases. Observed temperatures suggest that these regions could enable equivalent liquid nitrogen cryogenic functions. These permanently shaded polar craters also offer unprecedented high-vacuum cryogenic environments, which in their current state could support cryogenic applications. Besides ice stores, the unique conditions at the lunar poles harbor an environment that provides an opportunity to reduce the power, weight, and total mass that needs to be carried from the Earth to the Moon for lunar exploration and research. Reducing the heat flux of geothermal, black body radiation can have significant impacts on the achievable temperature. With a few manmade augmentations, permanently shaded craters located near the lunar poles achieve temperatures even lower than those that naturally exist. Our analysis reveals that lightweight thermal shielding within shaded craters could create an environment several Kelvin above absolute zero. The temperature ranges of both naturally shaded and thermally augmented craters could enable the long-term storage of most gases, low-temperature superconductors for large magnetic fields, devices and advanced high-speed computing instruments. Augmenting thermal conditions in these craters could then be used as a basis for the development of an advanced thermal management architecture that would support a wide variety of cryogenically based applications. Lunar exploration and habitation capabilities would significantly benefit if permanently shaded craters, augmented with thermal shielding, were used to facilitate the operation of near absolute zero instruments, including a wide variety of cryogenically based propulsion, energy, communication, sensing, and computing devices. The required burden of carrying massive life-supporting components from the Earth to the Moon for lunar exploration and research potentially could be reduced.

Ryan, Robert E.; McKellip, Rodney; Brannon, David P.; Underwood, Lauren; Russell, Kristen J.

2007-01-01

289

Immigration, settlement and mortality of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) larvae and juveniles in a nursery ground, Shijiki bay, Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The occurrence, distribution and abundance of larvae and juveniles of a Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, were investigated in Shijiki Bay, south-western Japan, from 1982 through 1987, with special reference to immigration, settlement and mortality in this nursery ground. Sampling for pelagic larvae and settling and settled juveniles revealed that immigration and settlement occur during the late phase of metamorphosis, when flounders immigrate from coastal waters and settle in the near-shore sandy nursery area. Immigration of metamorphosing larvae begins in early April and continues until early June. The recruitment of flounders into the nursery ground was found to occur in several distinct phases, coinciding with spring tides. The semi-lunar periodicity found in the immigration of flounders may be due to the combination of landward tidal currents during spring tides and the tide-related vertical movements of metamorphosing flounders. Population size appeared to decrease rapidly during the first week after settlement, when lengths ranged from 11 to 14 mm. Field evidence demonstrated that heavy mortality may occur during the early phases of settlement, the extent depending on annual flounder densities and food abundance. Cannibalism of early-settled larger flounders on late-settled smaller flounders seemed to occur frequently in the nursery ground, and was more likely to occur under conditions of food deficiency and higher population densities. Thus, predation related t starvation could be one of the most important future research targets in determining recruitment dynamics in nursery areas.

Tanaka, M.; Goto, T.; Tomiyama, M.; Sudo, H.

290

The Lunar Configurable Array Telescope (LCAT)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The desire for a much larger space telescope than HST by astronomers is clearly demonstrated by the attendance at this Workshop. The reality is that a much larger space telescope than the HST collides with cost scaling reality. Coupled with this reality is the fact that any multi-billion dollar science project must have broad-based support from the science community and solid political support at both Presidential and Congressional levels. The HST successor is certainly in the same multi-billion dollar class as the Super Collider of the physics community, a project that has finally achieved the broad support base necessary for funding to follow. Advocacy of a bigger HST on the general grounds that 'bigger is better' will not be sufficient. A new concept needs to be developed that clearly diverges from scaling up of a traditional HST-type space telescope. With these realities in mind we have a few comments regarding the nature of a possible space telescope that may depart from what the organizers of this Workshop had in mind. The national goal declared by the President is Space Station, the Moon and Mars, in that order. Space Station is a potential location where a large system could be assembled prior to being sent into a high orbit. It is not a desirable environment for a large space telescope. Mars is not relevant as an observatory site. The Moon is very relevant for reasons we will address. Our comments are based on the premise of a permanent Lunar Outpost. One of the main arguments for a lunar telescope is a degree of permanency, that is, as long as a Lunar Outpost is maintained. In contrast, the relatively short lifetime of an orbiting telescope is a disadvantage, especially as a cost penalty. Access to a telescope in a 100,000 km orbit for refurbishment and resupply is a major problem with no solution in the present NASA planning. A telescope in conjunction with a Lunar Outpost means the possibility for continual upgrading or modifying the telescope to meet changing science objectives. The two main technical disadvantages of the Moon are: 1) its gravity field; and 2) direct Sun and Earth light. The gravity term is manageable. It also appears to be feasible to shield the telescope from direct sun and Earth light and from scattering from nearby lunar terrain. Thermal disturbances to the telescope also appear to be manageable by proper shielding, enabling the telescope to become as cold as if it were at a lunar pole crater. If these conditions are met, the telescope could be at a logistically convenient location near the Lunar Outpost. We want to address a concept that is significantly different from those presented in the preliminary communications from Garth Illingworth in order to help fill in the matrix of possibilities. This option, moreover, is of special interest to JPL and could be an area where JPL can contribute in future studies.

Meinel, Aden B.; Meinel, Marjorie P.

1989-01-01

291

The Lunar Configurable Array Telescope (LCAT)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The desire for a much larger space telescope than HST by astronomers is clearly demonstrated by the attendance at this Workshop. The reality is that a much larger space telescope than the HST collides with cost scaling reality. Coupled with this reality is the fact that any multi-billion dollar science project must have broad-based support from the science community and solid political support at both Presidential and Congressional levels. The HST successor is certainly in the same multi-billion dollar class as the Super Collider of the physics community, a project that has finally achieved the broad support base necessary for funding to follow. Advocacy of a bigger HST on the general grounds that 'bigger is better' will not be sufficient. A new concept needs to be developed that clearly diverges from scaling up of a traditional HST-type space telescope. With these realities in mind we have a few comments regarding the nature of a possible space telescope that may depart from what the organizers of this Workshop had in mind. The national goal declared by the President is Space Station, the Moon and Mars, in that order. Space Station is a potential location where a large system could be assembled prior to being sent into a high orbit. It is not a desirable environment for a large space telescope. Mars is not relevant as an observatory site. The Moon is very relevant for reasons we will address. Our comments are based on the premise of a permanent Lunar Outpost. One of the main arguments for a lunar telescope is a degree of permanency, that is, as long as a Lunar Outpost is maintained. In contrast, the relatively short lifetime of an orbiting telescope is a disadvantage, especially as a cost penalty. Access to a telescope in a 100,000 km orbit for refurbishment and resupply is a major problem with no solution in the present NASA planning. A telescope in conjunction with a Lunar Outpost means the possibility for continual upgrading or modifying the telescope to meet changing science objectives. The two main technical disadvantages of the Moon are: 1) its gravity field; and 2) direct Sun and Earth light. The gravity term is manageable. It also appears to be feasible to shield the telescope from direct sun and Earth light and from scattering from nearby lunar terrain. Thermal disturbances to the telescope also appear to be manageable by proper shielding, enabling the telescope to become as cold as if it were at a lunar pole crater. If these conditions are met, the telescope could be at a logistically convenient location near the Lunar Outpost. We want to address a concept that is significantly different from those presented in the preliminary communications from Garth Illingworth in order to help fill in the matrix of possibilities. This option, moreover, is of special interest to JPL and could be an area where JPL can contribute in future studies.

Meinel, Aden B.; Meinel, Marjorie P.

1990-01-01

292

Lunar soil properties and soil mechanics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The study to identify and define recognizable fabrics in lunar soil in order to determine the history of the lunar regolith in different locations is reported. The fabric of simulated lunar soil, and lunar soil samples are discussed along with the behavior of simulated lunar soil under dynamic and static loading. The planned research is also included.

Mitchell, J. K.; Houston, W. N.; Hovland, H. J.

1972-01-01

293

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO): Observations for Lunar Exploration and Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has the objectives of mapping the lunar surface, identifying safe landing sites, searching for resources and measuring the space radiation environment. After launch on June 18, 2009, the LRO spacecraft and instruments were activated and calibrated in an eccentric polar lunar orbit until September 15, when LRO was moved to a circular polar orbit with a mean altitude of 50 km. LRO will operate for at least one year to support the goals of NASA’s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), and for at least two years of extended operations for additional lunar science measurements supported by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD). LRO carries six instruments and a technology demonstration. The LRO instruments are: Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER), Diviner Lunar Radiometer Exploration Experiment (DLRE), Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND), Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC). The technology demonstration is a synthetic aperture radar system (mini-RF). LRO observations also supports the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), the lunar impact mission that was co-manifested with LRO on the Atlas V launch vehicle. This paper describes the LRO objectives and measurements that support exploration of the Moon and that address the science objectives outlined by the National Academy of Science’s report on the Scientific Context for Exploration of the Moon (SCEM). We also describe data accessibility by the science community.

Keller, J. W.; Vondrak, R. R.; Garvin, J.; Chin, G.

2009-12-01

294

Recent Lunar Magnetism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the Moon today does not have a core dynamo magnetic field [1], paleomagnetic analyses of Apollo samples and spacecraft magnetometry measurements of the lunar crust show magnetization and suggest there were magnetic fields on the Moon > 3 billion years ago [2]. It is unclear whether this magnetization is the product of an ancient core dynamo or that of

J. Buz; B. P. Weiss; I. Garrick-Bethell

2010-01-01

295

Pressurized Lunar Rover.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The pressurized lunar rover (PLR) consists of a 7 m long, 3 m diameter cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication sy...

K. Creel J. Frampton D. Honaker K. Mcclure M. Zeinali

1992-01-01

296

Lunar Dimensions: Annotated Bibliography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An annotated bibliography compiled from Soviet open sources published 1964-1966 and one Chicom open source published in 1965. It is the second in a series and it reflects Soviet developments from about mid-1965 in investigating lunar revolution, rotation,...

1966-01-01

297

Lunar transfer vehicle studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lunar transportation architectures exist for several different mission scenarios. Direct flights from Earth are possible, as the Apollo program clearly demonstrated. Alternatively, a space transfer vehicle could be constructed in space by using the Space Station as a base of operations, or multiple vehicles could be launched from Earth and dock in LEO without using a space station for support. Similarly, returning personnel could proceed directly to Earth or rendezvous at the Space Station for a ride back home on the Space Shuttle. Multiple design concepts exist which are compatible with these scenarios and which can support requirements of cargo, personnel, and mission objectives. Regardless of the ultimate mission selected, some technologies will certainly play a key role in the design and operation of advanced lunar transfer vehicles. Current technologies are capable of delivering astronauts to the lunar surface, but improvements are needed to affordably transfer the material and equipment that will be needed for establishing a lunar base. Materials and structures advances, in particular, will enable the development of more capable cryogenic fluid management and propulsion systems, improved structures, and more efficient vehicle assembly, servicing and processing.

Keeley, Joseph T.

1993-02-01

298

Beneficiation of Lunar Ilmenite.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One of the most important commodities lacking in the moon is free oxygen which is required for life and used extensively for propellent. Free oxygen, however, can be obtained by liberating it from the oxides and silicates that form the lunar rocks and reg...

J. Ruiz

1991-01-01

299

Craters detection on lunar  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project focuses on identification of craters in terms of its characteristics and detection of these visual features of the moon to determine a safe landing site for a lunar Lander. Cheng et al. proposed using craters as landmarks for navigation purposes because this geometric model grants a robust detection under different lighting conditions. Moreover, craters appear in enough density

Nur Diyana Kamarudin; Siti Noormiza Makhtar; Hizrin Dayana M. Hidzir

2011-01-01

300

A Lunar Chronology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses methods used in determination of absolute isotopic ages for the returned lunar material, including the uranium-lead, rubidium-strontium, and argon 40-argon 39 ratio methods. Indicates that there would exist a basin-forming bombardment period for the Moon extending over at least 300 million years. (CC)

Schaeffer, Oliver A.

1973-01-01

301

Lunar Phases Planisphere  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a lunar phases planisphere with which a user can answer questions about the rising and setting times of the Moon as well as questions about where the Moon will be at a given phase and time. The article contains figures that can be photocopied to make the planisphere. (Contains 2 figures.)

Shawl, Stephen J.

2010-01-01

302

Lunar troilite: Crystallography  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fine, euhedral crystals of troilite from lunar sample 10050 show a hexagonal habit consistent with the high-temperature NiAs-type structure. Complete three-dimensional counter intensity data have been measured and used to confirm and refine Bertaut's proposed low-temperature crystal structure.

Evans, Jr. , H. T.

1970-01-01

303

Pressurized lunar rover  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pressurized lunar rover (PLR) consists of a 7 m long, 3 m diameter cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, directional lighting, cameras, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The PLR shell is constructed of a layered carbon-fiber\\/foam composite. The

Kenneth Creel; Jeffrey Frampton; David Honaker; Kerry McClure; Mazyar Zeinali

1992-01-01

304

Gemini 7 Lunar Measurements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Radiometric and interferometric measurements were made of the lunar surface during a penumbral eclipse from the Gemini 7 spacecraft. Data were obtained in the region from 0.25 to 2.6 microns. The bond albedo of the moon is computed for the spectral region...

T. P. Condron J. J. Lovett W. H. Barnes L. Marcotte R. Nadile

1968-01-01

305

Lunar magma transport phenomena  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An outline of magma transport theory relevant to the evolution of a possible Lunar Magma Ocean and the origin and transport history of the later phase of mare basaltic volcanism is presented. A simple model is proposed to evaluate the extent of fractionation as magma traverses the cold lunar lithosphere. If Apollo green glasses are primitive and have not undergone significant fractionation en route to the surface, then mean ascent rates of 10 m/s and cracks of widths greater than 40 m are indicated. Lunar tephra and vesiculated basalts suggest that a volatile component plays a role in eruption dynamics. The predominant vapor species appear to be CO CO2, and COS. Near the lunar surface, the vapor fraction expands enormously and vapor internal energy is converted to mixture kinetic energy with the concomitant high-speed ejection of vapor and pyroclasts to form lunary fire fountain deposits such as the Apollo 17 orange and black glasses and Apollo 15 green glass.

Spera, Frank J.

1992-01-01

306

Lunar Stone Saw.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project addresses the problem of cutting lunar stones into blocks to be used to construct shelters to protect personnel and equipment from harmful solar radiation. This plant will manufacture 6 in x 1 ft x 2 ft blocks and will be located near the sou...

T. Clark T. Croker K. Hines M. Knight T. Walton

1988-01-01

307

Investigations of lunar materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the particle track work, a series of dating techniques for learning about the surface history of soil and rock samples was developed. The surface behavior and history of diverse lunar rocks and soils, erosion rates, and deposition rates were studied, along with incident heavy cosmic ray spectrum.

Fleischer, R. L.; Hart, H. R., Jr.

1973-01-01

308

Lunar Lab Activity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this photograph, technicians are transferring mice from a support germ free isolator, through a hypochlorite dunk tank, into the class III cabinetry in the Germ-free and Conventional Animal Laboratories of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory, building 37, of the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas. This laboratory was part of the overall physical, chemical, and biological test program of the Apollo 11 returned lunar samples. Aboard the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle, the Apollo 11 mission launched from The Kennedy Space Center, Florida on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The 3-man crew aboard the flight consisted of astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Edwin Aldrin, Lunar Module (LM) pilot; and Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. In 2 1/2 hours, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material which was returned to Earth for analysis.

1969-01-01

309

Lunar surface gravimeter experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lunar surface gravimeter used the moon as an instrumented antenna to search for gravitational waves predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity. Tidal deformation of the moon was measured. Gravitational radiation is a channel that is capable of giving information about the structure and evolution of the universe.

Giganti, J. J.; Larson, J. V.; Richard, J. P.; Tobias, R. L.; Weber, J.

1977-01-01

310

Extended duration lunar lander  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Selenium Technologies has been conducting preliminary design work on a manned lunar lander for use in NASA's First Lunar Outpost (FLO) program. The resulting lander is designed to carry a crew of four astronauts to a prepositioned habitat on the lunar surface, remain on the lunar surface for up to 45 days while the crew is living in the habitat, then return the crew to earth via direct reentry and land recovery. Should the need arise, the crew can manually guide the lander to a safe lunar landing site, and live in the lander for up to ten days on the surface. Also, an abort to earth is available during any segment of the mission. The main propulsion system consists of a cluster of four modified Pratt and Whitney RL10 rocket engines that use liquid methane (LCH4) and liquid oxygen (LOX). Four engines are used to provide redundancy and a satisfactory engine out capability. Differences between the new propulsion system and the original system include slightly smaller engine size and lower thrust per engine, although specific impulse remains the same despite the smaller size. Concerns over nozzle ground clearance and engine reliability, as well as more information from Pratt and Whitney, brought about this change. The power system consists of a combination of regenerative fuel cells and solar arrays. While the lander is in flight to or from the moon, or during the lunar night, fuel cells provide all electrical power. During the lunar day, solar arrays are deployed to provide electrical power for the lander as well as electrolyzers, which separate some water back into hydrogen and oxygen for later use by the fuel cells. Total storage requirements for oxygen, hydrogen, and water are 61 kg, 551 kg, and 360 kg, respectively. The lander is a stage-and-a-half design with descent propellant, cargo, and landing gear contained in the descent stage, and the main propulsion system, ascent propellant, and crew module contained in the ascent stage. The primary structure for both stages is a truss, to which all tanks and components are attached. The crew module is a conical shape similar to that of the Apollo Command Module, but significantly larger with a height and maximum diameter of six meters.

Babic, Nikola; Carter, Matt; Cosper, Donna; Garza, David; Gonzalez, Eloy; Goodine, David; Hirst, Edward; Li, Ray; Lindsey, Martin; Ng, Tony

1993-01-01

311

Tattoos and Permanent Makeup  

MedlinePLUS

... Temporary Tattoos, Henna/Mehndi, and "Black Henna." Reporting Adverse Reactions FDA urges consumers and healthcare providers to report adverse reactions from tattoos, permanent makeup, and temporary tattoos, as ...

312

47 CFR 3.50 - Retention of settlement records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND ADMINISTRATION OF ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.50 Retention...following settlement of an account with a foreign administration or...

2013-10-01

313

7 CFR 3550.252 - Debt settlement policies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Debt settlement policies. 3550.252 Section 3550.252 ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Post-Servicing Actions § 3550.252 Debt settlement policies. (a) Applicability. Debt...

2010-01-01

314

SETTLEMENT AND COVER SUBSIDENCE OF HAZARDOUS WASTE LANDFILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

Numerical models using equations for linearly elastic deformation were developed to predict the maximum expected amount of settlement and cover subsidence and potential cracking of the cover by differential settlement in uniformly, horizontally layered hazardous waste landfills. ...

315

An economic assessment of patent settlements in the pharmaceutical industry.  

PubMed

This article demonstrates that in recent years, patent settlements between branded and generic manufacturers involving "reverse payments" from branded manufacturers to generic manufacturers have received close antitrust scrutiny, driven by concerns that such settlements harm consumers by delaying the entry of lower-priced generic drugs. The authors note that such settlements will be a focus of the Obama Administration's antitrust enforcement policy, yet there is a growing consensus among the courts that such settlements are anticompetitive only under narrow sets of circumstances. In this article, the authors present an analytical framework for evaluating the competitive effects of patent settlements, including those involving reverse payments, and demonstrate that these settlements can benefit consumers. Thus, the authors conclude that while continued scrutiny of such settlements is important, broad brush treatments are inappropriate and only a more individualized evaluation can correctly determine the competitive effects of a particular settlement agreement. PMID:21443148

Dickey, Bret; Orszag, Jonathan; Tyson, Laura

2010-01-01

316

43 CFR 29.9 - Claims, settlement and adjudication.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...settlement and adjudication. 29.9 Section 29.9 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior TRANS-ALASKA PIPELINE LIABILITY FUND § 29.9 Claims, settlement and adjudication. (a)(1) Claims in...

2013-10-01

317

Human exploration and settlement of the Moon using LUNOX-augmented NTR propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An innovative trimodal nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) concept is described which combines conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR, Brayton cycle power generation and supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) technologies. Known as the liquid oxygen (LOX) augmented NTR (LANTR), this concept utilizes the large divergent section of the NTR nozzle as an 'afterburner' into which LOX is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging from the LANTR's choked sonic throat--'scramjet propulsion in reverse.' By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio (MR), the LANTR can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. As the MR varies from zero to seven, the thrust-to-weight ratio for a 15 thousand pound force (klbf) NTR increases by approximately 440%--from 3 to 13--while the Isp decreases by only approximately 45%--from 940 to 515 seconds. This thrust augmentation feature of the LANTR means that 'big engine' performance can be obtained using smaller more affordable, easier to test NTR engines. 'Reoxidizing' the bipropellant LANTR system in low lunar orbit (LLO) with high density 'lunar-derived' LOX (LUNOX) enables a reusable, reduced size and mass lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) which can be deployed and resupplied using two 66 t-class Shuttle-derived launch vehicles. The reusable LANTR can also transport 200 to 300% more payload on each piloted round trip mission than an expendable 'all LH2' NTR system. As initial outposts grow to eventual lunar settlements and LUNOX production capacity increases, the LANTR concept can also enable a rapid 'commuter' shuttle capable of 36 to 24 hour 'one way' trips to the Moon and back with reasonable size vehicles and initial mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO) requirements.

Borowski, Stanley K.; Culver, Donald W.; Bulman, Melvin J.

1995-10-01

318

Human exploration and settlement of the moon using lunox-augmented NTR propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An innovative trimodal nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) concept is described which combines conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR, Brayton cycle power generation and supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) technologies. Known as the liquid oxygen (LOS)-augmented NTR (LANTR), this concept utilizes the large divergent section of the NTR nozzle as an ``afterburner'' into which LOX is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging from the LANTR's choked sonic throat—``scramjet propulsion in reverse.'' By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio (MR), the LANTR can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. As the MR varies from zero to seven, the thrust-to-weight ratio for a 15 thousand pound force (klbf) NTR increases by ˜440%—from 3 to 13—while the Isp decreases by only ˜45%—from 940 to 515 seconds. This thrust augmentation feature of the LANTR means that ``big engine'' performance can be obtained using smaller, more affordable, easier to test NTR engines. ``Reoxidizing'' the bipropellant LANTR system in low lunar orbit (LLO) with high density ``lunar-derived'' LOX (LUNOX) enables a reusable, reduced size and mass lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) which can be deployed and resupplied using two 66 t-class Shuttle-derived launch vehicles. The reusable LANTR can also transport 200 to 300% more payload on each piloted round trip mission than an expendable ``all LH2'' NTR system. As initial outposts grow to eventual lunar settlements and LUNOX production capacity increases, the LANTR concept can also enable a rapid ``commuter'' shuttle capable of 36 to 24 hour ``one way'' trip to the Moon and back with reasonable size vehicles and initial mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO) requirements.

Borowski, Stanley K.; Culver, Donald W.; Bulman, Melvin J.

1995-01-01

319

Architecture for a Mobile Lunar Base Using Lunar Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the summers of 2004, and 2005, several studies were conducted in the Future Concepts Office at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with assistance from summer faculty and student program participants to develop concepts and architectures for mobile lunar habitats. This work included conceptual designs for a launch architecture derived from existing expendable launch systems; a lunar walker based on existing technology for the robotics; compatible hardware from the International Space Station (ISS) program for pressurized modules; and lunar resources utilization for environmental shielding. This paper provides a brief summary of some of the key findings from these studies, and identifies areas for future work that could lead to more robust lunar exploration architectures in the future. In conclusion, it is recommended that future exploration missions consider reusable depot / transfer vehicles, robotic walking technology for lunar exploration, and lunar resources utilization for environmental shielding of surface habitats.

Smitherman, David V.; Dayal, Vinay; Dunn, Daniel J.

2006-01-01

320

Understanding the Reactivity of Lunar Dust for Future Lunar Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fluorescence and EPR can be used to measure the reactivity of lunar soil. Lunar soil is highly activated by grinding. Reactivity is dependent upon soil maturity and locale. Maturity is based on the amount of nanophase iron (np-Fe) in a soil relative to the total iron (FeO). Lunar soil activity ia a direct function of the amount of np-Fe present. Reactive soil can be "deactivated" by humid atmosphere.

Wallace, W. T.; Jeevarajan, A. S.; Taylor, L. A.

2010-01-01

321

What Lunar Meteorites Tell Us About the Lunar Highlands Crust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first meteorite to be found1 that was eventually (1984) recognized to have originated from the Moon is Yamato 791197. The find date, November 20, 1979, was four days after the end of the first Conference on the Lunar Highland Crust. Since then, >75 other lunar meteorites have been found, and these meteorites provide information about the lunar highlands that was not known from studies of the Apollo and Luna samples

Korotev, R. L.; Jolliff, B. L.; Zeigler, R. A.

2012-01-01

322

COMPASS Final Report: Lunar Relay Satellite (LRS).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Lunar Relay Satellite (LRS) COllaborative Modeling and Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) session was tasked to design a satellite to orbit in an elliptical lunar polar orbit to provide relay communications between lunar South Pole asset...

M. L. McGuire S. R. Oleson

2012-01-01

323

76 FR 78977 - Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (Regulation X)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...to or part of a settlement service need not...by a practice, pattern or course of conduct...calendar days of settlement. As noted in Sec...escrow account analysis before establishing...example of aggregate analysis. Lines 1100-1108...and closing or settlement agents. The...

2011-12-20

324

47 CFR 1.956 - Settlement conferences.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...parties as to any or all of the matters in controversy; (2) To consider the necessity...encourage settlement of the matters in controversy by agreement between the parties; and (5) To consider other matters that may aid in the resolution of the contested...

2010-10-01

325

47 CFR 1.956 - Settlement conferences.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...parties as to any or all of the matters in controversy; (2) To consider the necessity...encourage settlement of the matters in controversy by agreement between the parties; and (5) To consider other matters that may aid in the resolution of the contested...

2013-10-01

326

47 CFR 1.956 - Settlement conferences.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...parties as to any or all of the matters in controversy; (2) To consider the necessity...encourage settlement of the matters in controversy by agreement between the parties; and (5) To consider other matters that may aid in the resolution of the contested...

2009-10-01

327

Offshore Settlement, Collateral, and Interest Rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in private payments arrangements, particularly at the wholesale level, challenge central banks' longstanding monopoly on the provision of the ultimate means of settlement for financial transac- tions. This paper examines competition between public payments ar- rangements and private intermediaries, and the effect on central banks' role in monetary policy. Central to the issue is the role of collateral

Charles M. Kahn

2008-01-01

328

Seismic bearing capacity and settlements of foundations  

SciTech Connect

Field and laboratory observations of seismic settlements of shallow foundations on granular soils that are not attributable to changes in density or liquefaction are explained in terms of seismic degradation of bearing capacity. Limit analysis using a Coulomb-type mechanism including inertial forces in the soil and on the footing gives expressions for seismic bearing capacity factors that are directly related to their static counterparts. Comparison of the two depicts clearly the rapid deterioration of the overall foundation capacity with increasing acceleration. Such periodic inertial fluidization causes finite settlements that are possible even in moderate earthquakes. Reduction in foundation capacity is due to both the seismic degradation of soil strength and the lateral inertial forces transmitted by shear to the foundation through the structure and any surcharge. A straightforward sliding-block procedure with examples is also presented for computing these settlements due to loss of bearing capacity for short time periods. The approach also leads to a design procedure for footings based on limiting seismic settlements to a prescribed value.

Richards, R. Jr. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (United States)); Elms, D.G. (Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand)); Budhu, M. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States))

1993-04-01

329

The ethical dimensions of space settlement  

Microsoft Academic Search

While proposals for settling in the space frontier have appeared in the technical literature for over 20 years, it is in the case of Mars that the ethical dimensions of space settlement have been most studied. Mars raises the questions of the rights and wrongs of the enterprise more forcefully because: (a) Mars may possess a primitive biota; and (b)

Martyn J Fogg

2000-01-01

330

Patent Settlements as a Barrier to Entry  

Microsoft Academic Search

We formulate a model of entry with two incumbent firms—a patent holder and an infringer—and a potential entrant, with asymmetric information about the validity of the infringed patent (patent strength) between incumbent firms and the entrant. Within this framework we show that patent settlements between the incumbent firms can be mutually beneficial even when the cost of trial is zero

Anne Duchêne; Konstantinos Serfes

2012-01-01

331

Long Term Creep Settlement and Simplified Prediction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A practical method of estimating the rate of creep and the time-settlement behavior of a footing on clay under three-dimensional conditions is described. This method, termed the 'extended stress path method' is an extension of earlier methods for calculat...

H. G. Poulos L. P. de Ambrosis E. H. Davis

1975-01-01

332

Lunar exploration and the advancement of biomedical research: a physiologist's view.  

PubMed

Over the next few years, it will become apparent just how important lunar exploration is to biomedical research and vice versa, and how critical both are to the future of human spaceflight. NASA's Project Constellation should put a new lunar-capable vehicle into service by 2014 that will rely on proven Space Shuttle components and allow four astronauts to spend 7 d on the lunar surface. A modern space transportation system opens up a unique opportunity in the space sciences--the establishment of a permanent lunar laboratory for the physical and life sciences. This commentary presents a rationale for focusing American efforts in space on such a Moon base in order to promote understanding of the long-term physiological effects of living on a planetary body outside the Van Allen belts. PMID:17042257

Piantadosi, Claude A

2006-10-01

333

Seismoacoustic lunar fields and lunar electromagnetic (nonthermal) emission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For better insight into lunar radio emissions, observations of the Moon were made during the maximal Geminids meteor shower and during the lunar eclipse without external effects. Statistical processing of the obtained data was carried out. It was found that the lunar endogenous and exogenous processes are displayed in both the seismic-emission fields and lunar nonthermal electromagnetic emissions. Both types of signals demonstrate good correlation. The seismic and electromagnetic emission processes have common periodicities, some of which determine the internal structure of the Moon. Similar regularities are expected for other bodies of the Solar System.

Khavroshkin, O. B.; Tsyplakov, V. V.; Berezhnoi, A. A.; Volvach, A. E.; Volvach, L. N.

2012-06-01

334

Petrology of lunar rocks and implication to lunar evolution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent advances in lunar petrology, based on studies of lunar rock samples available through the Apollo program, are reviewed. Samples of bedrock from both maria and terra have been collected where micrometeorite impact penetrated the regolith and brought bedrock to the surface, but no in situ cores have been taken. Lunar petrogenesis and lunar thermal history supported by studies of the rock sample are discussed and a tentative evolutionary scenario is constructed. Mare basalts, terra assemblages of breccias, soils, rocks, and regolith are subjected to elemental analysis, mineralogical analysis, trace content analysis, with studies of texture, ages and isotopic composition. Probable sources of mare basalts are indicated.

Ridley, W. I.

1976-01-01

335

Mineralogical studies of lunar meteorites and their lunar analogs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The minerology and textural properties of three lunar meteorites (Yamato 791197, ALH81005, and Yamato 82192) were analyzed and compared with lunar surface rock samples. The chemical composition and textures of pyroxene and the occurrance of glass matrices were specifically addressed. The study of glass in the lunar meteorites suggests that the glass was not produced by a meteorite impact which excavated the mass into orbit towards the Earth. The glass had been devitrified on the lunar surface before the excavation, and new glass was not produced by the last impact.

Takeda, H.; Mori, H.; Miyamoto, M.; Ishii, T.

1985-01-01

336

Adsorption of Water on JSC-1A Lunar Simulant Samples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Remote sensing probes sent to the moon in the 1990s indicated that water may exist in areas such as the bottoms of deep, permanently shadowed craters at the lunar poles, buried under regolith. Water is of paramount importance for any lunar exploration and colonization project which would require self-sustainable systems. Therefore, investigating the interaction of water with lunar regolith is pertinent to future exploration. The lunar environment can be approximated in ultra-high vacuum systems such as those used in thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Questions about water dissociation, surface wetting, degree of crystallization, details of water-ice transitions, and cluster formation kinetics can be addressed by TDS. Lunar regolith specimens collected during the Apollo missions are still available though precious, so testing with simulant is required before applying to use lunar regolith samples. Hence, we used for these studies JSC-1a, mostly an aluminosilicate glass and basaltic material containing substantial amounts of plagioclase, some olivine and traces of other minerals. Objectives of this project include: 1) Manufacturing samples using as little raw material as possible, allowing the use of surface chemistry and kinetics tools to determine the feasibility of parallel studies on regolith, and 2) Characterizing the adsorption kinetics of water on the regolith simulant. This has implications for the probability of finding water on the moon and, if present, for recovery techniques. For condensed water films, complex TDS data were obtained containing multiple features, which are related to subtle rearrangements of the water adlayer. Results from JSC-1a TDS studies indicate: 1) Water dissociation on JSC-1a at low exposures, with features detected at temperatures as high as 450 K and 2) The formation of 3D water clusters and a rather porous condensed water film. It appears plausible that the sub- m sized particles act as nucleation centers.

Goering, John; Sah, Shweta; Burghaus, Uwe; Street, Kenneth W.

2008-01-01

337

An update on the MoonLite Lunar mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In December 2008 the UK BNSC/STFC announced that it would undertake a phase-A study of the proposed 4 penetrator lunar mission, MoonLITE. A status report will be given which includes: a brief science overview; technological assessment (including some results of the first impact trials) and identification of critical areas; organisation and plans for the phase A; longer term plans given a successful phase A; and role of international collaborations. Background: The MoonLITE mission involves implanting 4 penetrators globally spaced at impact speeds of ~300m/s and is aimed for launch in 2014 and operate for 1 year. Each penetrator is designed to come to rest a few metres under the lunar surface to provide a solid emplacement for an effective seismic network and for geochemical and heat flow investigations. Polar emplacement will also allow an exciting ability to characterize the presence of water-ice currently indirectly inferred in the permanently shaded craters. They will also allow investigation of the presence of other volatiles, possibly including organics of astrobiologic interest. MoonLITE can also provide strong support for future human lunar missions including seismic detection of large quakes of surface regions which may dangerous to the construction of lunar habitation or observation facilities; and the possible presence and concentration of water which is important to support future human missions. Potential International Collaboration: The timing of this mission may allow arrangement of coincident impacts of other spacecraft which are at the end of their natural mission lifetime, to provide strong artificial seismic signals to allow probing the deep interior of the Moon. Perhaps no better way to end an otherwise very successful mission ? In addition, the presence of multiple Lunar orbiting spacecraft may allow the possibility of inter-communication between different missions to enhance telemetry rates from the lunar surface and provide mission fault tolerance.

Gowen, R.

2009-04-01

338

Lunar ash flows - Isothermal approximation.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Suggestion of the ash flow mechanism as one of the major processes required to account for some features of lunar soil. First the observational background and the gardening hypothesis are reviewed, and the shortcomings of the gardening hypothesis are shown. Then a general description of the lunar ash flow is given, and a simple mathematical model of the isothermal lunar ash flow is worked out with numerical examples to show the differences between the lunar and the terrestrial ash flow. The important parameters of the ash flow process are isolated and analyzed. It appears that the lunar surface layer in the maria is not a residual mantle rock (regolith) but a series of ash flows due, at least in part, to great meteorite impacts. The possibility of a volcanic contribution is not excluded. Some further analytic research on lunar ash flows is recommended.

Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.; O'Keefe, J. A.

1972-01-01

339

Carbothermal Reduction of Lunar Materials for Oxygen Production on the Moon: Reduction of Lunar Simulants with Methane  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The utilization of extraterrestrial resources will become a key element in space exploration and colonization of the Moon and Mars in the 21st century. Indeed, the development and operation of in-situ manufacturing plants are required to enable the establishment of permanent lunar and Martian bases. Oxygen manufacture for life support and propulsion will be the most important manufacturing process for the first of these plants. The Carbothermal Reduction Process for the manufacture of oxygen from lunar materials has three essential steps: the reduction of ferrous oxide and metallic silicates with methane to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen; the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen to form methane and water; and the electrolysis of water to form oxygen and hydrogen. This closed cyclic process does not depend upon the presence of water or water precursors in the lunar materials. It produces oxygen from silicates regardless of their precise composition and fine structure. In accord with the Statement of Work of Contract NAS 9-19080, Carbothermal Reduction of Lunar Materials for Oxygen Production on the Moon, ORBITEC has placed emphasis on the following issues to gain a better understanding of the Carbothermal Reduction Reaction of lunar regolith and to develop a low-risk, light-weight design for a lunar lander experiment: (1) highly efficient, i.e., greater than 95%, reduction of the lunar simulants with methane; (2) determination of conditions, particularly temperatures, required for initial and complete reduction of the lunar simulants; (3) identification of the products formed, gases and solids; (4) determination of solid product properties; (5) determination of reaction rates and mechanisms; and (6) demonstration of container materials. The most important of these issues were: (1) efficient reduction of the lunar simulants, i.e., JSC-1 and MLS-1A, with methane; (2) identification of the products formed , i.e., carbon monoxide, metals, e.g., iron and silicon, and slags, e.g., complex silicates; and (3) delivery of methane to the surface of the molten simulants without premature pyrolysis of the methane. The results of this empirical research are reported in this paper.

Rosenberg, S. D.; Musbah, O.; Rice, E. E.

1996-03-01

340

Carbothermal Reduction of Lunar Materials for Oxygen Production on the Moon: Reduction of Lunar Simulants with Carbon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The utilization of extraterrestrial resources will become a key element in space exploration and colonization of the Moon and Mars in the 21st century. Indeed, the development and operation of in-situ manufacturing plants are required to enable the establishment of permanent lunar and Martian bases. Oxygen manufacture for life support and propulsion will be the most important manufacturing process for the first of these plants. The Carbothermal Reduction Process for the manufacture of oxygen from lunar materials has three essential steps: the reduction of ferrous oxide and metallic silicates with methane to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen; the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen to form methane and water; and the electrolysis of water to form oxygen and hydrogen. This closed cyclic process does not depend upon the presence of water or water precursors in the lunar materials. It produces oxygen from silicates regardless of their precise composition and fine structure. In accord with the Statement of Work of Contract NAS 9-19080, Carbothermal Reduction of Lunar Materials for Oxygen Production on the Moon, ORBITEC has placed emphasis on the following issues to gain a better understanding of the Carbothermal Reduction Reaction of lunar regolith and to develop a low-risk, light-weight design for a lunar lander experiment: (1) reduction of lunar simulants with carbon (or equivalent); (2) determination of conditions, particularly temperatures, required for initial and complete reduction of lunar simulants by the carbon-containing reducing agents; (3) identification of the products formed, gases and solids; (4) determination of solid product properties; (5) determination of reaction rates and mechanisms; (6) selection and demonstration of container materials; and (7) selection and demonstration of heating methods. The most important of these issues were: (1) reduction of lunar simulants, i.e., JSC-1, MLS-1A, Ilmenite, and Gruenerite, with carbon, i.e., graphite; (2) identification of the products formed , i.e., carbon monoxide, metals, e.g., iron and silicon, and slags, e.g., complex silicates; (3) selection and demonstration of container materials, e.g., stabilized zirconia and yttria; and (4) selection and demonstration of heating methods. The results of this empirical research are reported in this paper.

Rosenberg, S. D.; Musbah, O.; Rice, E. E.

1996-03-01

341

Co-60 in lunar samples.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results obtained for Co-60 in lunar soils and rocks of different depths are discussed. These results are compared to a production calculation based on the work of Lingenfelter et al. (1972). The measurement of Co-60 activities can give information about the present-day equilibrium neutron flux in the lunar regolith. The most important quantity which can be derived from these data is the absolute present-day lunar neutron production rate.

Wahlen, M.; Finkel, R. C.; Imamura, M.; Kohl, C. P.; Arnold, J. R.

1973-01-01

342

Lunar Gene Bank For Endangered Species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Before the dawn of the 22nd century, we face the huge risk of losing our genetic heritage accumulated during aeons of evolution. The losses include hundreds of vertebrates, hundreds of thousands of plants and over a million insect species. The gene pools of many human ethnic groups are also threatened. As we have observed, adequate conservation of habitat is unfeasible and active breeding programs cover only a handful of the many thousand species threatened. Against such indispensable losses scientists are starting cryopreservation of germplasms by creation of gene banks. I propose to construct a cDNA library based gene bank for endangered species in the permanently shadowed polar lunar craters that would provide immunity from both natural disadvantages and humanitarian intrusions [4].

Swain, R.; Behera, D.; Sahoo, P. K.; Swain, S. K.; Sasmal, A.

2012-09-01

343

Lunar dust simulation using SPIS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new simulation of lunar dust motion is presented in this paper. A 3-dimensional software for lunar dust simulation has been developed to study both the lunar surface charging and the dust motion near a crater in the terminator region. The crater experienced differential charging due to shadowing of solar wind and solar UV flux. The edge in shadow has been found to charge to potential to ? ˜ -100 V which creates strong electric field for lunar dust levitation. Charged dust particles are then accelerated in both horizontal and vertical directions by the electric field of the crater.

Anuar, A.; Honary, F.

2013-09-01

344

Microwave and optical lunar transponders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The scientific areas which used data from the Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment, collected from measurements to the Apollo 11, 14, and 15 and Lunakhod 2, include lunar science (i.e., studies of variations in the lunar angular orientation from that for uniform rotation, lunar tidal displacements, and the lunar mass distribution), geodynamics, astrometry, and gravitational physics. This paper argues that the placement of microwave and optical transponders on the moon would improve the accuracy of laser range measurements by nearly two orders of magnitude and would simplify the measurements. The K-band microwave transponders would be operated at the lunar base and at two remote sites on the moon surface, yielding much improved lunar libration and tidal displacement measurements. A two-wavelength laser transponder also would be operated at the lunar base, allowing accurate tropospheric propagation corrections to be made. This would introduce major improvements in measurements of the lunar orbit and of the earth's rotation, and in tests of general relativity.

Bender, P. L.; Faller, J. E.; Hall, J. L.; Degnan, J. J.; Dickey, J. O.; Newhall, X. X.; Williams, J. G.; King, R. W.; Macknik, L. O.; O'Gara, D.

1990-01-01

345

Lunar Observer Laser Altimeter observations for lunar base site selection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the critical datasets for optimal selection of future lunar landing sites is local- to regional-scale topography. Lunar base site selection will require such data for both engineering and scientific operations purposes. The Lunar Geoscience Orbiter or Lunar Observer is the ideal precursory science mission from which to obtain this required information. We suggest that a simple laser altimeter instrument could be employed to measure local-scale slopes, heights, and depths of lunar surface features important to lunar base planning and design. For this reason, we have designed and are currently constructing a breadboard of a Lunar Observer Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument capable of acquiring contiguous-footprint topographic profiles with both 30-m and 300-m along-track resolution. This instrument meets all the severe weight, power, size, and data rate limitations imposed by Observer-class spacecraft. In addition, LOLA would be capable of measuring the within-footprint vertical roughness of the lunar surface, and the 1.06-micron relative surface reflectivity at normal incidence. We have used airborne laser altimeter data for a few representative lunar analog landforms to simulate and analyze LOLA performance in a 100-km lunar orbit. We demonstrate that this system in its highest resolution mode (30-m diameter footprints) would quantify the topography of all but the very smallest lunar landforms. At its global mapping resolution (300-m diameter footprints), LOLA would establish the topographic context for lunar landing site selection by providing the basis for constructing a 1-2 km spatial resolution global, geodetic topographic grid that would contain a high density of observations (e.g., approximately 1000 observations per each 1 deg by 1 deg cell at the lunar equator). The high spatial and vertical resolution measurements made with a LOLA-class instrument on a precursory Lunar Observer would be highly synergistic with high-resolution imaging datasets, and will allow for direct quantification of critical slopes, heights, and depths of features visible in images of potential lunar base sites.

Garvin, James B.; Bufton, Jack L.

1992-01-01

346

A geotechnical characterization of lunar soils and lunar soil simulants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many of the essential materials needed for the construction of a lunar base can be produced from the resources found on the lunar surface. Processing natural resources on the moon into useful products will reduce the need, and the cost, to bring everything from earth. The lunar regolith has been intensely studied with respect to understanding the formation of the moon and the earth, but as a construction material, the regolith is poorly characterized and poorly understood. To better understand how to 'work' with the lunar regolith, four loosely related research projects were conducted. Two projects relate to characterizing and understanding the geotechnical properties of regolith, two projects relate to manipulating and processing granular materials in the lunar environment. The shapes of lunar soil grains are characterized using fractals - results directly and quantitatively describe the rugged reentrant nature of the large scale structure and the relatively smooth surface texture of lunar soil grains. The nature of lunar soil cohesion is considered using tensile strength measurements of lunar soil simulant. It is likely that mechanical interlocking of irregular grains is the primary cause of lunar soil cohesion. This mechanism is highly sensitive to grain shape, but relatively insensitive to particle packing density. A series of experiments are conducted to try to understand how granular particles might sort by size in a vacuum. Even in a vacuum, fine particle subjected to shear strain segregate by a mechanism called the random fluctuating sieve The random fluctuating sieve also controls particle motion that determines the structure of wind-blown sand ripples. Hybrid microwave heating was used to sinter large structural bricks from lunar soil stimulant. While heating was prone to thermal runaway, microwave heating holds great promise as a simple, direct method of making sintered structural bricks.

Graf, John Carl

347

Adhesion of Lunar Dust  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

Walton, Otis R.

2007-04-01

348

Investigations of lunar materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The investigations were directed at determining the radiation history and surface chronology of lunar materials using the etched particle track technique. The major lunar materials studied are the igneous rocks and double core from Apollo 12, the breccia and soil samples from Apollo 14, and the core samples from Luna 16. In the course of this work two new and potentially important observations were made: (1) Cosmic ray-induced spallation-recoil tracks were identified. The density of such tracks, when compared with the density of tracks induced by a known flux of accelerator protons, yields the time of exposure of a sample within the top meter or two of moon's surface. (2) Natural, fine scale plastic deformation was found to have fragmented pre-existing charged particle tracks, allowing the dating of the mechanical event causing the deformation.

Comstock, G. M.; Fvwaraye, A. O.; Fleischer, R. L.; Hart, H. R., Jr.

1972-01-01

349

Lunar Core and Tides  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

2004-01-01

350

Lunar asymmetry and palaeomagnetism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A model is proposed for the early lunar evolution which accounts for the compositional asymmetry between the nearside and farside of the moon and the natural remanent magnetism of lunar rocks. According to the model, the preferred gravitational energy state consisted of an asymmetric accumulation of a liquid iron alloy (Fe-Ni and a small amount of sulfur) which displaces upwards the cold primordial undifferentiated core. The resulting depth asymmetry of the outer partially molten zone leads eventually to the subcrustal accumulation of light magnesium-rich pyroxenes and olivine, preferentially in one hemisphere, sufficient to explain the offset and also indirectly providing a possible explanation for the nearside concentration of KREEP and mass basalt. Slow downward migration of iron releases gravitational energy sufficient for convection and dynamo generation in an iron layer for about a billion years.

Stevenson, D. J.

1980-10-01

351

Lunar regolith densification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Core tube samples of the lunar regolith obtained during the Apollo missions showed a rapid increase in the density of the regolith with depth. Various hypotheses have been proposed for the possible cause of this phenomenon, including the densification of the loose regolith material by repeated shaking from the seismic tremors which have been found to occur at regular monthly intervals when the moon and earth are closest to one another. A test bed was designed to study regolith densification. This test bed uses Minnesota Lunar Simulant (MLS) to conduct shaking experiments in the geotechnical centrifuge with an inflight shake table system. By reproducing realistic in-situ regolith properties, the experiment also serves to test penetrator concepts. The shake table system was designed and used for simulation experiments to study effects of earthquakes on terrestrial soil structures. It is mounted on a 15 g-ton geotechnical centrifuge in which the self-weight induced stresses are replicated by testing an n-th scale model in a gravity field which is n times larger than Earth's gravity. A similar concept applies when dealing with lunar prototypes, where the gravity ratio required for proper simulation of lunar gravity effects is that between the centrifugal acceleration and the lunar gravity. Records of lunar seismic tremors, or moonquakes, were obtained. While these records are being prepared for use as the input data to drive the shake table system, records from the El Centro earthquake of 1940 are being used to perform preliminary tests, using a soil container which was previously used for earthquake studies. This container has a laminar construction, with the layers free to slide on each other, so that the soil motion during the simulated earthquake will not be constrained by the otherwise rigid boundaries. The soil model is prepared by pluviating the MLS from a hopper into the laminar container to a depth of 6 in. The container is mounted on the shake table and the centrifuge is operated to generate an acceleration of 10 times Earth's gravity or 60 times the lunar gravity, thus simulating a lunar regolith thickness of 30 ft. The shake table is then operated using the scaled 'moonquake' as the input motion. One or more model moonquakes are used in each experiment, after which the soil is analyzed for its density profile with depth. This is accomplished by removing from the soil bed a column of soil contained within a thin rubber sleeve which has been previously embedded vertically in the soil during pluviation. This column of soil is transferred to a gamma ray device, in which the gamma ray transmission transversely through the soil is measured and compared with standard calibration samples. In this manner, the density profile can be determined.

Ko, Hon-Yim; Sture, Stein

1991-11-01

352

Lunar asymmetry and palaeomagnetism  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model is proposed for the early lunar evolution which accounts for the compositional asymmetry between the nearside and farside of the moon and the natural remanent magnetism of lunar rocks. According to the model, the preferred gravitational energy state consisted of an asymmetric accumulation of a liquid iron alloy (Fe-Ni and a small amount of sulfur) which displaces upwards the cold primordial undifferentiated core. The resulting depth asymmetry of the outer partially molten zone leads eventually to the subcrustal accumulation of light magnesium-rich pyroxenes and olivine, preferentially in one hemisphere, sufficient to explain the offset and also indirectly providing a possible explanation for the nearside concentration of KREEP and mass basalt. Slow downward migration of iron releases gravitational energy sufficient for convection and dynamo generation in an iron layer for about a billion years.

Stevenson, D. J.

1980-01-01

353

Adhesion of Lunar Dust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

Walton, Otis R.

2007-01-01

354

Lunar regolith densification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Core tube samples of the lunar regolith obtained during the Apollo missions showed a rapid increase in the density of the regolith with depth. Various hypotheses have been proposed for the possible cause of this phenomenon, including the densification of the loose regolith material by repeated shaking from the seismic tremors which have been found to occur at regular monthly intervals when the moon and earth are closest to one another. A test bed was designed to study regolith densification. This test bed uses Minnesota Lunar Simulant (MLS) to conduct shaking experiments in the geotechnical centrifuge with an inflight shake table system. By reproducing realistic in-situ regolith properties, the experiment also serves to test penetrator concepts. The shake table system was designed and used for simulation experiments to study effects of earthquakes on terrestrial soil structures. It is mounted on a 15 g-ton geotechnical centrifuge in which the self-weight induced stresses are replicated by testing an n-th scale model in a gravity field which is n times larger than Earth's gravity. A similar concept applies when dealing with lunar prototypes, where the gravity ratio required for proper simulation of lunar gravity effects is that between the centrifugal acceleration and the lunar gravity. Records of lunar seismic tremors, or moonquakes, were obtained. While these records are being prepared for use as the input data to drive the shake table system, records from the El Centro earthquake of 1940 are being used to perform preliminary tests, using a soil container which was previously used for earthquake studies. This container has a laminar construction, with the layers free to slide on each other, so that the soil motion during the simulated earthquake will not be constrained by the otherwise rigid boundaries. The soil model is prepared by pluviating the MLS from a hopper into the laminar container to a depth of 6 in. The container is mounted on the shake table and the centrifuge is operated to generate an acceleration of 10 times Earth's gravity or 60 times the lunar gravity, thus simulating a lunar regolith thickness of 30 ft. The shake table is then operated using the scaled 'moonquake' as the input motion. One or more model moonquakes are used in each experiment, after which the soil is analyzed for its density profile with depth. This is accomplished by removing from the soil bed a column of soil contained within a thin rubber sleeve which has been previously embedded vertically in the soil during pluviation. This column of soil is transferred to a gamma ray device, in which the gamma ray transmission transversely through the soil is measured and compared with standard calibration samples. In this manner, the density profile can be determined. Preliminary results to date are encouraging, and the Center plans to study the effects of duration of shaking, intensity of the shaking motion, and the frequency of the motion.

Ko, Hon-Yim; Sture, Stein

1991-01-01

355

Probing the lunar interior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The discovery of lunar paleomagnetism in the lava samples returned from the Apollo 11 landing once again raised the question whether the moon possesses an iron core. It is pointed out that the important questions concerning the existence and electrical properties of a lunar core could be answered, in principle, using electromagnetic induction if high-quality data could be obtained at frequencies down to a few times 10 to the -6th Hz. The suggestion of Herbert (1980) that data of this kind might be extracted from the extensive simultaneous Apollo 15 and 16 surface magnetometer measurements is discussed. It is emphasized that issues will be resolved best if additional data are acquired, particularly in the low-frequency range. Attention is also given to the research done by Russel and co-workers (1981) and by Sonett (1982).

Srnka, L. J.; Runcorn, S. K.

1983-01-01

356

Lunar material transport vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proposed vehicle, the Lunar Material Transport Vehicle (LMTV), has a mission objective of efficient lunar soil material transport. The LMTV was designed to meet a required set of performance specifications while operating under a given set of constraints. The LMTV is essentially an articulated steering, double-ended dump truck. The vehicle moves on four wheels and has two identical chassis halves. Each half consists of a chassis frame, a material bucket, two wheels with integral curvilinear synchronous motors, a fuel cell and battery arrangement, an electromechanically actuated dumping mechanism, and a powerful microprocessor. The vehicle, as designed, is capable of transporting up to 200 cu ft of material over a one mile round trip per hour. The LMTV is capable of being operated from a variety of sources. The vehicle has been designed as simply as possible with attention also given to secondary usage of components.

Fisher, Charles D.; Lyons, Douglas; Wilkins, W. Allen, Jr.; Whitehead, Harry C., Jr.

1988-01-01

357

Lunar surface magnetometer experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Apollo 15 lunar-surface magnetometer (LSM) is one of a network of magnetometers that have been deployed on the moon to study intrinsic remanent magnetic fields and global magnetic response of the moon to large-scale solar and terrestrial magnetic fields. From these field measurements, properties of the lunar interior such as magnetic permeability, electrical conductivity, and temperature can be calculated. In addition, correlation with solar-wind-spectrometer data allows study of the the solar-wind plasma interaction with the moon and, in turn, investigation of the resulting absorption of gases and accretion of an ionosphere. These physical parameters and processes determined from magnetometer measurements must be accounted for by comprehensive theories of origin and evolution of the moon and solar system.

Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Sonett, C. P.

1972-01-01

358

Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently being developed in a collaborative effort between Langley Research Center and Kennedy Space Center. The screens typically consist of spiral shaped conductive traces patterned on high dielectric substrates (i.e. glass, quartz, polyimide film, etc.). Two broad categories of substrate materials are being investigated for the screens. One category consists of transparent substrates (i.e. glass, quartz, sapphire, etc.), and the other non-transparent sub-strates (Kapton, polyimide films, metals, etc.). The transparent screens utilize patterns made from indium tin oxide (ITO), a transparent conductive material, on clear substrates while the non-transparent screens use copper patterns on a transluscent or opaque substrates. Further, the screen is coated with a high dielectric polyimide cover layer to protect the screen pattern. One promising cover layer material that is currently being investigated is Langley Research Center-Soluble Imide (LaRC-SI), a NASA LaRC developed polyimide. Lastly, a top-coat of hard, inorganic material is evaporated onto the cover layer for protection from scratches due to abrasive nature of the dust. Of note, several top-coat materials are under investigation and include: aluminum oxide, silicon dioxide, titanium oxide, yttrium oxide, zirconium oxide, and zinc sulfide. The electrostatic dust mitigation screens function when a high voltage (700V or greater) is applied to the screen electrodes, thus creating an electromagnetic wave across the surface of the screen that repels the dust. Lunar dust typically contains a high positive charge; therefore, the screens are charged with a higher positive charge that effectively repels dust from the surface (i.e. like charges repel, unlike charges attract). It is anticipated that full development and maturation of this technology will enable humans to sustain a long term presence on the moon, and other planets where dust may have negative implications.

Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

359

Design a Lunar Rover!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this team design challenge (page 2-10 of PDF), learners design and build a model of a Lunar Transport Rover that will carry equipment and people on the surface of the Moon. Learners use household materials to construct the rover, then test it by rolling it down a ramp, and make modifications to improve their design. Learners can complete two follow-up activities included in this resource.

Administration, National A.

2013-01-30

360

First lunar outpost  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design and research efforts at the University of Puerto Rico have focused on the evaluation and refinement of the Habitability Criteria for a prolonged human presence in space during the last four years. Living quarters for a Mars mission and a third generation lunar base concept were proposed. This academic year, 1991-92, work on further refinement of the habitability criteria and design of partial gravity furniture was carried on. During the first semester, design alternatives for furniture necessary in a habitat design optimized for lunar and Martian environments were developed. Designs are based on recent research data from lunar and Mars gravity simulations, and current NASA standards. Artifacts will be submitted to NASA architects to be tested in KC-135 flights. Test findings will be submitted for incorporation in future updates to NASA habitat design standards. Second semester work was aimed at integrating these findings into the First Lunar Outpost (FLO), a mission scenario currently being considered by NASA. The mission consists of a manned return to the moon by crews of four astronauts for periods of 45 days. The major hardware components of the mission are as follows: (1) a Crew Module for the delivery of the crew and their supplies, and (2) the Habitat Module, which will arrive on the Moon unmanned. Our design efforts concentrated on this Habitat Module and on application of habitability criteria. Different geometries for the pressure vessel and their impact on the interior architecture were studied. Upon the selection of a geometry, a more detailed analysis of the interior design was performed, taking into consideration the reduced gravity, and the protection against radiation, micrometeorites, and the extreme temperature variation. A proposal for a FLO was submitted by the students, consisting essentially of a 24-feet (7.3 m.) by 35-feet (10.67 m) high vertical cylinder with work areas, crew quarters, galley, wardroom, leisure facilities, health maintenance, waste management, EVA operations facilities, and safe havens.

Andino, Aureo F.; Silva, Daniel; Ortiz, Nelson; Alvarez, Omar; Colon, Julio A.; Colon, Myrelle; Diaz, Alicia; Escobar, Xochiquetzal Y.; Garcia, Alberto; Gonzalez, Isabel C.

1992-01-01

361

Uses of lunar sulfur  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical, and biochemical properties. Although known abundances on the Moon are limited (approximately 0.1 percent in mare soils), sulfur is relatively extractable by heating. Coproduction of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich mare soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10 percent of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource.

Vaniman, D.; Pettit, D.; Heiken, G.

1992-01-01

362

Lunar concrete for construction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Feasibility of using concrete for lunar base construction was discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the Moon are provided in this paper, along with specific conclusions from the existing database.

Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

1992-01-01

363

Lunar concrete for construction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base.

Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

1988-01-01

364

Lunar Phases Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NAAP Lunar Phases Lab demonstrates how the earth-sun-moon geometry gives rise to the phases of the moon as seen from earth. A distant view of an observer looking down on earth as well as a perspective of an observer looking into the sky are used in the the simulator. This lab provides resources which include demonstration guides, in-class worksheets, technical documents and assessment pre- and post- tests.

365

Evidence for Phyllosilicates near the Lunar South Pole  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

While theoretically water ice could be stable in permanently shadowed areas near the lunar poles, there is conflicting observational evidence for the existence of water ice at either pole. Clementine's bistatic radar resumed a weak signal commensurate with water ice in the South Pole Aitken Basin; however, groundbased radar searches have not detected such a signal at either pole. Lunar Prospector measured large amounts of H (attributed to water) at both poles; however, Galileo near-infrared spectral measurements of the north polar region did not detect the prominent 3.0 micron absorption feature due to interlayer and adsorbed water in phyllosilicates. Evidence for the existence of water at the lunar poles is still ambiguous and controversial. We present evidence, based on the analysis of Galileo SSI images, for the presence of phyllosilicates near the lunar south pole. Using the color image sequence (560 nm, 670 nm, 756 nm, and 889 nm) of Lunmap 14 taken during the Galileo Earth-Moon pass I, we have identified areas that show evidence for a 0.7 microns absorption feature present in Fe-bearing phyllosilicates.

Vilas, Faith; Jensen, E.; Domingue, Deborah; McFadden, L.; Coombs, Cassandraa; Mendell, Wendell

1998-01-01

366

Modeling lunar volcanic eruptions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple physical arguments are used to show that basaltic volcanos on different planetary bodies would fountain to the same height if the mole fraction of gas in the magma scaled with the acceleration of gravity. It is suggested that the actual eruption velocities and fountain heights are controlled by the velocities of sound in the two phase gas/liquid flows. These velocities are in turn determined by the gas contents in the magma. Predicted characteristics of Hawaiian volcanos are in excellent accord with observations. Assuming that the only gas in lunar volcano is the CO which would be produced if the observed Fe metal in lunar basalts resulted from graphite reduction, lunar volcanos would fountain vigorously, but not as spectacularly as their terrestrial counterparts. The volatile trace metals, halogens, and sulfur released would be transported over the entire moon by the transient atmosphere. Orange and black glass type pyroclastic materials would be transported in sufficient amounts to produce the observed dark mantle deposits.

Housley, R. M.

1978-01-01

367

Lunar Exploration Architectures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The international space exploration plans foresee in the next decades multiple robotic and human missions to Moon and robotic missions to Mars, Phobos and other destinations. Notably the US has since the announcement of the US space exploration vision by President G. W. Bush in 2004 made significant progress in the further definition of its exploration programme focusing in the next decades in particular on human missions to Moon. Given the highly demanding nature of these missions, different initiatives have been recently taken at international level to discuss how the lunar exploration missions currently planned at national level could fit in a coordinate roadmap and contribute to lunar exploration. Thales Alenia Space - Italia is leading 3 studies for the European Space Agency focus on the analysis of the transportation, in-space and surface architectures required to meet ESA provided stakeholders exploration objectives and requirements. Main result of this activity is the identification of European near-term priorities for exploration missions and European long-term priorities for capability and technology developments related to planetary exploration missions. This paper will present the main studies' results drawing a European roadmap for exploration missions and capability and technology developments related to lunar exploration infrastructure development, taking into account the strategic and programmatic indications for exploration coming from ESA as well as the international exploration context.

Perino, Maria Antonietta

368

The lunar interior  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The compressional velocities are estimated for materials in the lunar interior and compared with lunar seismic results. The lower crust has velocities appropriate for basalts or anorthosites. The high velocities associated with the uppermost mantle imply high densities and a change in composition to a lighter assemblage at depths of the order of 120 km. Calcium and aluminum are probably important components of the upper mantle and are deficient in the lower mantle. Much of the moon may have accreted from material similar in composition to eucrites. The important mineral of the upper mantle is garnet; possible accessory minerals are kyanite, spinel, and rutile. If the seismic results stand up, the high velocity layer in the moon is more likely to be a high pressure form of anorthosite than eclogite, pyroxenite, or dunite. The thickness of the layer is of the order of 50 km. Cosmic abundances can be maintained if the lower mantle is ferromagnesium silicate with minimal amounts of calcium and aluminum. Achondrites such as eucrites and howardites have more of the required characteristics of the lunar interior than carbonaceous chondrites. A density inversion in the moon is a strong possibility.

Anderson, D. L.; Kovach, R. L.

1972-01-01

369

Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Yield Correlated with Lunar Elemental Abundances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing secondary "albedo" or "splash" particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Two lunar missions, Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith[1-4], with reduced neutron fluxes near the lunar poles being the result of collisions with hydrogen nuclei in ice deposits[5] in permanently shadowed craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy (~100 MeV) lunar albedo protons. LRO has been observing the surface and environment of the Moon since June of 2009. The CRaTER instrument (Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation) on LRO is designed to characterize the lunar radiation environment and its effects on simulated human tissue. CRaTER's multiple solid-state detectors can discriminate the different elements in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) population above ~10 MeV/nucleon, and can also distinguish between primary GCR protons arriving from deep space and albedo particles propagating up from the lunar surface. We use albedo protons with energies greater than 60 MeV to construct a cosmic ray albedo proton map of the Moon. The yield of albedo protons is proportional to the rate of lunar proton detections divided by the rate of incoming GCR detections. The map accounts for time variation in the albedo particles driven by time variations in the primary GCR population, thus revealing any true spatial variation of the albedo proton yield. Our current map is a significant improvement over the proof-of-concept map of Wilson et al.[6]. In addition to including twelve more months of CRaTER data here, we use more numerous minimum ionizing GCR protons for normalization, and we make use of all six of CRaTER's detectors to reduce contamination from spurious non-proton events in the data stream. We find find that the flux of lunar albedo protons is correlated with elemental abundances at the lunar surface. In general the yield of albedo protons from the maria is 1.1% ± 0.4% higher than the flux from the highlands. In addition there appear to be localized peaks in the albedo proton yield that are co-located with peaks in trace elemental abundances as measured by the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. References: [1] Feldman W. C. et al. (1998) Sci-ence, 281, 1496-1500. [2] Gasnault, O. et al. (2001) GRL, 28, 3797-3800. [3] Maurice, S. et al. (2004) JGR, 109, E07S04. [4] Mitrofanov I. G. et al. (2010) Science, 330, 483-486. [5] Feldman W. C. et al. (1997) JGR, 102, 25565-25574. [6] Wilson, J. K. et al. (2012) JGR, 117, E00H23.

Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Blake, J. B.; Golightly, M. J.; Kasper, J. C.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

2012-12-01

370

[Presentation of the Lunar Precursor Robotics Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Precursor Robotics Program (LPRP) is the host program for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate's (ESMD) lunar robotic precursor missions to the Moon. The program includes two missions, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), and the Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS). Both missions will provide the required lunar information to support development and operations of those systems required for Human lunar return. LPRP is developing a lunar mapping plan, Called the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project, to create the capability to archive and present all data from LRO, LCROSS, historical lunar missions, and international lunar missions for future mission planning and operations. LPRP is also developing its educational and public outreach activities for the Vision for Space Exploration's first missions. LPRP is working closely with the Science Mission Directorate as their lunar activities come into focus.

Lavoie, Anthony R.

2008-01-01

371

Electric Propulsion for Lunar Exploration and Lunar Base Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Using electric propulsion to deliver materials to lunar orbit for the development and construction of a lunar base was investigated. Because the mass of the base and its life-cycle resupply mass are large, high specific impulse propulsion systems may sign...

B. Palaszewski

1992-01-01

372

Performance of lunar sulfur concrete in lunar environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions such as impact and space radiation on the properties

Houssam A. Toutanji; Steve Evans; Richard N. Grugel

373

Photometry of the lunar surface during lunar eclipses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The photometric observations of the lunar surface during lunar eclipses were carried out on four nights between 1972 to 1978, using the 91 cm reflector of the Dodaira Station of the Tokyo Astronomical Observatory. The photometry was performed in B-, V-, and R-colours, and arranged in accordance with the angular distance from the centre of the Earth's shadow. The results

Naosuke Sekiguchi

1980-01-01

374

Recent Lunar Magnetism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although the Moon today does not have a core dynamo magnetic field [1], paleomagnetic analyses of Apollo samples and spacecraft magnetometry measurements of the lunar crust show magnetization and suggest there were magnetic fields on the Moon > 3 billion years ago [2]. It is unclear whether this magnetization is the product of an ancient core dynamo or that of impact-generated plasmas [3,4,5]. A key way to distinguish between these two hypotheses is to conduct paleomagnetic analyses of lunar impact glasses that formed after any putative core dynamo. Here we present a paleomagnetic study of Apollo 12 basalt 12017. This sample consists of a 3.2 billion year old basalt covered by ~9000 year old impact glass [6,7,8]. We have found that both the rock and glass are magnetized, but in widely divergent directions. The intensity of the fields which magnetized the rock and glass were 40 ?T and 1 ?T, respectively. Given the near certain absence of a lunar dynamo 9000 years ago, we have two hypotheses to explain the magnetization of the glass: magnetization by an impact-generated field and magnetization by magnetic fields generated by the rock underneath. The long cooling time of the glass (~10 s) relative to that expected for impact-generated field (milliseconds) suggests that impact-generated magnetization is highly improbable. We are currently modeling the magnetic fields of the underlying rock in order to determine whether it had sufficient strength and appropriate orientation to explain the magnetization of the glass. Initial calculations suggest that this is possible. [1] Russell et al., JGR, 79, 1105-1109, 1974 [2] Garrick-Bethell et al., Science,323, 356-359, 2009 [3] Wieczorek et al., Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry, 60, 221-364, 2006 [4] Crawford and Schultz, International Journal of Impact Engineering, 23, 169-180, 1999 [5] Hood and Artemieva, Icarus, 193, 485-502, 2007 [6] Horn et al., Meteoritical Society, 417-418, 1975 [7] Morrisson et al., Proceedings of the 3rd Lunar Science Conference, 3, 2767-2791, 1973 [8] Fleischer et al., Proceedings of the 2nd Lunar Science Conference, 2, 2559-2568, 1971

Buz, J.; Weiss, B. P.; Garrick-Bethell, I.

2010-12-01

375

Investigation of the daytime lunar atmosphere for lunar synthesis program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Synthesis studies of the daytime lunar atmoshere were directed toward improved understanding of fundamental lunar atmospheric dynamics and the relationship of the detectable atmosphere to physical processes of the lunar surface and interior. The primary source of data is the Apollo 17 lunar surface mass spectrometer. The Ar40 is radiogenic and its escape rate from the lunar atmosphere requires release of a significant fraction (about 8%) of the argon produced from the decay of K40 within the moon. Furthermore the process of argon release from the solid moon is time varying and related to seismic activity. Most of the helium on the moon is due to release of implanted solar wind alpha particles from the regolith.

Hodges, R. R., Jr.

1976-01-01

376

Lunar resources - Toward living off the lunar land  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is presented of possibilities for the exploitation of lunar materials already proven to exist by Apollo experience. It is noted that lunar soils contain various materials required for life support, construction, and transportation, but that the high cost of lifting material from the earth's surface suggests that, in the near term, lunar material should be considered for use both on the moon and in LEO. Lunar water production, farming, propellant production, and the production of glass, iron, aluminum, and silicon to be used in lunar construction are discussed. The role of solar power and the possibility of electrolysis of molten silicate as a means of producing oxygen and metals for use on the moon and in near-earth space are examined. The benefits of immediate investment in developmental technology (given extensive project lead times) are stressed.

Haskin, Larry A.; Colson, Russell O.

1989-01-01

377

Dielectric comparison of lunar and terrestrial fines at lunar conditions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dielectric properties of lunar fines 74241,2 in the audio-frequency range under lunarlike conditions are presented. Results suggest that volatiles are released during storage and transport of the lunar sample. Apparently, subsequent adsorption of volatiles on the sample surface alters its dielectric response. The assumed volatile influence disappears after evacuation. A comparison of the dielectric properties of lunar and terrestrial materials as a function of density, temperature, and frequency indicates that if the terrestrial sample analyzed were completely devoid of atmospheric moisture, it would present dielectric losses smaller than those of the lunar sample. It is concluded that density prevails over temperature as the controlling factor of dielectric permittivity in the lunar regolith and that dielectric losses vary slowly with depth.

Alvarez, R.

1974-01-01

378

Lunar Surface Morphology and Composition using Chandrayaan-1 TMC and Hyper-Spectral Instruments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The data provided by instruments onboard Chandrayaan-1 has been extensively used to pursue questions related to lunar science and to understand lunar evolution and lunar resources. Significant contributions to newer aspects of lunar geosciences have been addressed by the use of data provided by Chandrayaan-1 TMC and Hyperspectral instruments. Large number of lunar science studies in particular to study the morphology, surface age determination and composition of the Moon have resulted in better understanding of lunar evolutionary processes. Three instruments of Chandrayaan-1, Hyperspectral Imager (HYSI) of ISRO, Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) of NASA/JPL and SIR-2 of placecountry-regionGermany have provided new data on lunar surface composition by measuring lunar surface reflectance in an extended range of 0.4 to 3.0 mm of electromagnetic spectrum. Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) provided high resolution stereoscopic images of Moon surface at 5m spatial resolution for photo-geological mapping and three dimensional visualization. Compositional mapping of the Moon surfaces based on spectroscopy has been carried out using remotely acquired reflectance spectra from HySI, Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) and SIR-2 spectrometers. Towards the generation of science data, spectral lunar surface radiance data was converted to obtain surface reflectance in sixty four bands of HySI imager in the spectral region of 0.4 to 0.95 mm and corrections to photometric effects were done to normalized the lunar reflectance to a common viewing geometry. HySI reflectance data was used to map various lithological units of the Mare Moscoviense on the far side of the Moon. Five major compositional units of highland basin soils, ancient mature mare, highland contaminated mare, buried lava flows with low Ca-pyroxene and young mare units were identified. The central park of Tycho crater was studied in detail by using TMC, HySI and M3 data. Newer aspects about its morphology and composition have been reported by using these data sets. Compositionally, M3 data suggested that the lava ponds and channels on the summit of the central peak are dominated by high-Ca pyroxene rich rocks with sparse distribution of olivine. These new findings suggest that Tycho's central peak has undergone multiphase post-impact volcanic events. A new Lunar mineral Mg-Spinel was discovered at the central placePlaceTypepeak of PlaceNameCrater Theophilus on the near side of the Moon. These newly identified Mg-Spinel rich rock types are defined by their strong 2-? m absorption and lack of 1-? m absorptions in spectral reflectance response. High spatial resolution TMC data had been used extensively for studying the morphology of impact craters and to understand the impact cratering mechanism over lunar highlands and mare basatls. TMC data was used to study lunar morphological features such as lava tubes, sinous rilles, volcanic domes etc. Lunar surface is known to have presence of sinous rilles, which are believed to be collapsed lave tubes. A Lunar volcanic tube (figure 4) around ˜4 km length was identified as a potential source of future human settlement on the Moon using TMC images and digital elevation data in the Oceanus Procellarum region of the Moon. TMC data have also been used for absolute dating of lunar surface by employing. Studies have also been done to study the lunar non-mare volcanism around domes and few such domes were identified in the Mare Procellarum region of the Moon.

Chauhan, Prakash; Ajai, A.; Kiran Kumar, A. S.

2012-07-01

379

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO): Observations for Lunar Exploration and Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was implemented to facilitate scientific and engineering-driven mapping of the lunar surface at new spatial scales and with new remote sensing methods, identify safe landing sites, search for in situ resources, and measure the space radiation environment. After its successful launch on June 18, 2009, the LRO spacecraft and instruments were activated and calibrated in an eccentric polar lunar orbit until September 15, when LRO was moved to a circular polar orbit with a mean altitude of 50 km. LRO will operate for at least one year to support the goals of NASA’s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), and for at least two years of extended operations for additional lunar science measurements supported by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD). LRO carries six instruments with associated science and exploration investigations, and a telecommunications/radar technology demonstration. The LRO instruments are: Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER), Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (DLRE), Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND), Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC). The technology demonstration is a compact, dual-frequency, hybrid polarity synthetic aperture radar instrument (Mini-RF). LRO observations also support the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), the lunar impact mission that was co-manifested with LRO on the Atlas V (401) launch vehicle. This paper describes the LRO objectives and measurements that support exploration of the Moon and that address the science objectives outlined by the National Academy of Science’s report on the Scientific Context for Exploration of the Moon (SCEM). We also describe data accessibility by the science and exploration community.

Vondrak, Richard; Keller, John; Chin, Gordon; Garvin, James

2010-01-01

380

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO): Observations for Lunar Exploration and Science  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was implemented to facilitate scientific and engineering-driven mapping of the lunar surface at new spatial scales and with new remote sensing methods, identify safe landing sites, search for in situ resources, and measure the space radiation environment. After its successful launch on June 18,2009, the LRO spacecraft and instruments were activated and calibrated in an eccentric polar lunar orbit until September 15, when LRO was moved to a circular polar orbit with a mean altitude of 50 km. LRO will operate for at least one year to support the goals of NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), and for at least two years of extended operations for additional lunar science measurements supported by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). LRO carries six instruments with associated science and exploration investigations, and a telecommunications/radar technology demonstration. The LRO instruments are: Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER), Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (DLRE), Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND), Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC). The technology demonstration is a compact, dual-frequency, hybrid polarity synthetic aperture radar instrument (Mini-RF). LRO observations also support the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), the lunar impact mission that was co-manifested with LRO on the Atlas V (401) launch vehicle. This paper describes the LRO objectives and measurements that support exploration of the Moon and that address the science objectives outlined by the National Academy of Science's report on the Scientific Context for Exploration of the Moon (SCEM). We also describe data accessibility by the science and exploration community.

Vondrak, Richard; Keller, John; Chin, Gordon; Garvin, James

2010-01-01

381

Lunar resource utilization: Implications for commerce and exploration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Propellant derived from ice located in permanently shadowed craters near the Moon's poles has been proposed as a commercial venture for the Moon. A detailed analysis of the possibilities associated with lunar propellants has been carried out with an integrated technical-financial tool. The analysis shows that, with current understanding of the available technology for propellant production, transportation systems, and the market for launch of vehicles between LEO-GEO, it is difficult to demonstrate that a viable commercial opportunity exists to serve that market with lunar propellant. Improvements in technology, the location of higher concentrations of ice on the Moon, the availability of a space infrastructure, and a larger market each could significantly improve the prospects for commercial viability. A government-sponsored human exploration program, using the Earth-Moon L-1 point as a hub, could address many of these issues while avoiding program costs and could open commercial opportunities in space transportation.

Duke, Michael B.; Blair, Brad R.; Diaz, Javier

2003-06-01

382

Project Endurance: Six 90-day Missions on the Lunar Surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the hopes of paving the way for a permanently inhabited moon base, a six-mission program was designed, with missions being flown yearly from 2013 to 2018. Each mission will consist of a "habitat module" and an "ascent/descent module." These modules will be launched on a Delta IV rocket and a Space Shuttle, and will then connect with booster stages in LEO before finally reaching the moon. Throughout each mission, four crew members will explore the lunar surface in detail, conducting various scientific experiments over their 90-day stay, with the goal of expanding knowledge of the lunar environment. Missions will explore both the near and far sides of the moon, with communication satellites providing a link to far side missions.

Battaglia, Theresa; Clark, James; Collins, Michael; Gupta, Suneal; Herrmann, Todd; Hykin, Drew; Kimball, Mark; Kujawa, Brian; Lee, Benjamin; Lui, Yan

2002-01-01

383

ISRU Production of Life Support Consumables for a Lunar Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Similar to finding a home on Earth, location is important when selecting where to set up an exploration outpost. Essential considerations for comparing potential lunar outpost locations include: (1) areas nearby that would be useful for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) oxygen extraction from regolith for crew breathing oxygen as well as other potential uses; (2) proximity to a suitable landing site; (3) availability of sunlight; (4) capability for line-of-sight communications with Earth; (5) proximity to permanently-shadowed areas for potential in-situ water ice; and (6) scientific interest. The Mons Malapert1 (Malapert Mountain) area (85.5degS, 0degE) has been compared to these criteria, and appears to be a suitable location for a lunar outpost.

Cooper, Bonnie L.; Simon, Tom

2007-01-01

384

An evolution strategy for lunar nuclear surface power  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The production and transmission of electric power for a permanently inhabited lunar base poses a significant challenge which can best be met through an evolution strategy. Nuclear systems offer the best opportunity for evolution in terms of both life and performance. Applicable nuclear power technology options include isotope systems (either radioisotope thermoelectric generators or dynamic isotope power systems) and reactor systems with either static (thermoelectric or thermionic) or dynamic (Brayton, Stirling, Rankine) conversion. A power system integration approach that takes evolution into account would benefit by reduced development and operations cost, progressive flight experience, and simplified logistics, and would permit unrestrained base expansion. For the purposes of defining a nuclear power system evolution strategy, the lunar base development shall consist of four phases: precursor, emplacement, consolidation, and operations.

Mason, Lee S.

1992-02-01

385

Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

Pacey, Antony

1991-01-01

386

Permanents of Circulants.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A recurrence formula is obtained for permanents of circulants of the form alpha(I sub n) + beta P + gamma(P sup 2) and explicit formulas are deduced from it. It is shown that for doubly stochastic circulants alpha(I sub n) + beta P + gamma(P sup 2) the mi...

H. Minc

1971-01-01

387

Prairie Settlement: Nebraska Photographs and Family Letters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection from the Library of Congress American Memory project "integrates two collections from the holdings of the Nebraska State Historical Society: the Solomon D. Butcher photographs and the letters of the Uriah W. Oblinger family that together illustrate the story of settlement on the Great Plains." There are approximately 3,000 photographs of Central Nebraska taken during the period of 1862-1912 and some 3,000 pages of Oblinger family letters covering the same period. The letters discuss such typical settlement concerns as "land, work, neighbors, crops, religious meetings, problems with grasshoppers, financial problems, and the Easter Blizzard of 1873." The collections may be searched by keyword, or browsed by subjects, correspondents, and date.

388

Apollo 11 Lunar Science Conference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Report of a conference called to discuss the findings of 142 scientists from their investigations of samples of lunar rock and soil brought back by the Apollo 11 mission. Significant findings reported include the age and composition of the lunar samples, and the absence of water and organic matter. Much discussed was the origin and structure of…

Cochran, Wendell

1970-01-01

389

Relativistic Corrections to Lunar Occultations  

Microsoft Academic Search

During a lunar occultation the light of a star is bent by the solar gravitational field, while the lunar profile is much less shifted by relativistic light bending. Relativistic corrections of order of milliseconds in the absolute timing of occultations have to be considered for this effect. The accuracy of absolute timing predictions is studied with the aid of WinOccult

Costantino Sigismondi

390

Selected Precepts in Lunar Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an overview of selected approaches to Lunar Architecture to describe the parameters of this design problem space. The paper identifies typologies of architecture based on Lunar site features, structural concepts and habitable functions. This paper develops an analysis of these architectures based on the NASA Habitats and Surface Construction Road Map (1997) in which there are three

Marc M. Cohen

2002-01-01

391

Robotic Lunar Precursors to Apollo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In four short years (1964-1968) lunar science boomed, driven by NASA's three series of small robotic spacecraft: Ranger, Surveyor and Lunar Orbiter. These started their programmatic lives as remote laboratories, then were repurposed as "precursors" to the Apollo missions.

Bugos, G. E.; Boyd, J. W.

2008-07-01

392

Lunar Interferometric Radio Array: LIRA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Lunar Interferometric Radio Array (LIRA) is a performance driven design, with emphasis on utilizing the unique attributes of the far-side of the moon as a platform for radio astronomy. LIRA consists of three independent Lunar Telescope Units (LTUs), autonomously landed on the moon, and a communications relay satellite orbiting at libration point two (L2). Each LTU deploys a large

John Abbott; Shane Pixton; Christopher J. Roberts; Mahmut Reyhanoglu

2000-01-01

393

Precession of the lunar core  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goldreich (Goldreich, P. [1967]. J. Geophys. Res. 72, 3135) showed that a lunar core of low viscosity would not precess with the mantle. We show that this is also the case for much of lunar history. But when the Moon was close to the Earth, the Moon’s core was forced to follow closely the precessing mantle, in that the rotation

Jennifer Meyer; Jack Wisdom

2011-01-01

394

Precession of the lunar core  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Goldreich (Goldreich, P. [1967]. J. Geophys. Res. 72, 3135) showed that a lunar core of low viscosity would not precess with the mantle. We show that this is also the case for much of lunar history. But when the Moon was close to the Earth, the Moon's core was forced to follow closely the precessing mantle, in that the rotation axis of the core remained nearly aligned with the symmetry axis of the mantle. The transition from locked to unlocked core precession occurred between 26.0 and 29.0 Earth radii, thus it is likely that the lunar core did not follow the mantle during the Cassini transition. Dwyer and Stevenson (Dwyer, C.A., Stevenson, D.J. [2005]. An Early Nutation-Driven Lunar Dynamo. AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts GP42A-06) suggested that the lunar dynamo needs mechanical stirring to power it. The stirring is caused by the lack of locked precession of the lunar core. So, we do not expect a lunar dynamo powered by mechanical stirring when the Moon was closer to the Earth than 26.0-29.0 Earth radii. A lunar dynamo powered by mechanical stirring might have been strongest near the Cassini transition.

Meyer, Jennifer; Wisdom, Jack

2011-01-01

395

Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project (LMMP) has been created to manage the development of a suite of lunar mapping and modeling products that support the Constellation Program (CxP) and other lunar exploration activities, including the planning, design, development, test and operations associated with lunar sortie missions, crewed and robotic operations on the surface, and the establishment of a lunar outpost. The information provided through LMMP will assist CxP in: planning tasks in the areas of landing site evaluation and selection, design and placement of landers and other stationary assets, design of rovers and other mobile assets, developing terrain-relative navigation (TRN) capabilities, and assessment and planning of science traverses. The project draws on expertise from several NASA and non-NASA organizations (MSFC, ARC, GSFC, JPL, CRREL US Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, and the USGS). LMMP will utilize data predominately from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, but also historical and international lunar mission data (e.g. Apollo, Lunar Orbiter, Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1), as available and appropriate, to meet Constellation s data needs. LMMP will provide access to this data through a single intuitive and easy to use NASA portal that transparently accesses appropriately sanctioned portions of the widely dispersed and distributed collections of lunar data, products and tools. Two visualization systems are being developed, a web-based system called Lunar Mapper, and a desktop client, ILIADS, which will be downloadable from the LMMP portal. LMMP will provide such products as local and regional imagery and DEMs, hazard assessment maps, lighting and gravity models, and resource maps. We are working closely with the LRO team to prevent duplication of efforts and to ensure the highest quality data products. While Constellation is our primary customer, LMMP is striving to be as useful as possible to the lunar science community, the lunar commercial community, the lunar education and public outreach (E/PO) community, and anyone else interested in accessing or utilizing lunar data. A beta version of the portal and visualization systems is expected to be released in late 2009, with a version 1 release planned for early 2011.

Noble, Sarah K.; French, R. A.; Nall, M. E.; Muery, K. G.

2009-01-01

396

Tobacco Companies, State Attorneys Reach Settlement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week's In the News examines the November 16, 1998 $206 billion settlement reached between tobacco industry leaders and eight US states. The twelve resources discussed provide press releases, opinion, and background information on the economics of tobacco production and consumption in the US. Following increasing pressure from anti-tobacco activists at the state level, Philip Morris Incorporated, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation, and the Lorillard Tobacco Company settled pending lawsuits with New York, California, and Wisconsin, among other states. The agreement requires the companies to pay the potential medical costs of sick smokers based on a formula that factors state-by-state population, tobacco use, and previous Medicaid cost. The agreement also provides for a $1.5 billion anti-smoking campaign fund and bans billboard and transit ads in addition to "branded" merchandising -- the sale and distribution of items bearing tobacco brands' names or logos. Although these provisions give anti-smoking organizations much needed funding for educational resources, critics fear that the settlement protects the tobacco industry more than it hinders it. According to Gary Black, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., the settlement "removes the remaining threat of bankruptcy from the stocks and reduces the litigation discount that has plagued tobacco companies since 1994." With little risk of future lawsuits according to Black, "we're back to business as usual."

Waters, Megan.

1998-01-01

397

Lunar Global Petrologic Variations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An initial attempt at producing petrologic province maps of the lunar highlands combined orbital and sample geochemical data in variation diagrams.Three different variation diagrams were produced: Mg* (= 100 Mg/Mg+Fe) vs. [(Th/Ti)c, Al vs. Mg*/(Th/Ti)c, and Fe vs. (Th/Ti)c. ([Th/Ti]c is the ratio of Th to Ti, normalized to the chrondritic ratio for these elements.] Later work applied a ternary diagram approach to look at global lunar petrologic variations. This work used the Fe-(Th/Ti)c technique as this had the most spatial coverage with the available data and also appeared to be adequate at distinguishing between different rock types. In the ternary diagram, the apexes were assigned the average Fe and (Th/Ti), values of ferroan anorthosite, mare basalt, and KREEP rocks. Each apex was assigned a primary color while the center of the triangle was represented by gray. Each point on the lunar surface, covered by the Apollo geochemical instruments, was then assigned a color depending on where in the ternary their composition placed them. The resultant petrologic classification map shows how the petrologic units vary spatially. The main results from this work were as follows: (1) The highlands contain large areas of relatively pure ferroan anorthosite; (2) KREEP/Mg suite rocks represent a small percentage of the upper lunar crust; (3) farside outcrops of KREEP/ Mg suite rocks are associated with areas of crustal thinning, particularly on the floor of South Pole Aitken Basin; (4) the average composition of the highlands is richer in Fe than ferroan anorthosite, which supports the magma ocean hypothesis of crystal formation; and (5) regions of the eastern limb and farside highlands are relatively more mafic than average highlands. These areas have a high density of dark halo craters, supporting the idea that mare volcanism occurred in this region before the end of the heavy bombardment. This earlier work utilized the Apollo gamma and X-ray orbital datasets. These data provided limited coverage of the lunar surface (mostly confined to the equatorial latitudes). The gamma ray instrument covered approximately 19% of the lunar surface while the X-ray only covered 9%. With the Clementine and Lunar Prospector datasets, we now have global maps of Fe, Ti, and Th. Apart from global coverage, another important advantage of the new datasets is higher spatial resolution. The resolution of the Apollo instruments was 15 km for the X-ray and 100 km for the gamma ray. The Fe and Ti maps are derived from the full-resolution Clementine UV-VIS data, i.e., about 250 m/pixel. The resolution of the Th data, obtained by Lunar Prospector's neutron spectrometer, is currently about 150 km, but will be available in the future with a spatial resolution of 60 km. The other improvement provided by the recent lunar missions is the error associated with the data. The errors associated with the Fe, Ti, and Th values obtained by Apollo were 10-25 wt%. The error of the Clementine-derived Fe and Ti values is about 1% while the Th data have an error of about 1 ppm. We intend to investigate the petrologic variations on the Moon at a global scale using the new Clementine and Lunar Prospector elemental maps for Fe, Ti, and Th. We shall use the technique described in Davis and Spudis. An initial study has been undertaken that looks at some regions that were covered by the Apollo geochemistry data. Two mare regions, one in Imbrium and the other in Procellarum, match well with the results using the Apollo data. The highland terrain appears problematic. The calibration of the Th data is based on the assumption of a constant background. This is a valid assumption where Th counts are well above background limits, but as count rates decrease variations in Th concentration are more sensitive to background fluctuations. Eventually we will circumvent this problem by using the lower-altitude (i.e., higher resolution) Prospector data and a calibration derived from deconvolution of the gamma ray spectra with proper attention to background variations. The Th/Ti vs. Fe technique p

Bussey, D. B. J.; Spudis, P. D.; Gillis, J. J.

1999-01-01

398

Hydrogen mapping of the lunar south pole using the LRO neutron detector experiment LEND.  

PubMed

Hydrogen has been inferred to occur in enhanced concentrations within permanently shadowed regions and, hence, the coldest areas of the lunar poles. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission was designed to detect hydrogen-bearing volatiles directly. Neutron flux measurements of the Moon's south polar region from the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft were used to select the optimal impact site for LCROSS. LEND data show several regions where the epithermal neutron flux from the surface is suppressed, which is indicative of enhanced hydrogen content. These regions are not spatially coincident with permanently shadowed regions of the Moon. The LCROSS impact site inside the Cabeus crater demonstrates the highest hydrogen concentration in the lunar south polar region, corresponding to an estimated content of 0.5 to 4.0% water ice by weight, depending on the thickness of any overlying dry regolith layer. The distribution of hydrogen across the region is consistent with buried water ice from cometary impacts, hydrogen implantation from the solar wind, and/or other as yet unknown sources. PMID:20966247

Mitrofanov, I G; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W V; Chin, G; Garvin, J B; Golovin, D; Evans, L G; Harshman, K; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Malakhov, A; Mazarico, E; McClanahan, T; Milikh, G; Mokrousov, M; Nandikotkur, G; Neumann, G A; Nuzhdin, I; Sagdeev, R; Shevchenko, V; Shvetsov, V; Smith, D E; Starr, R; Tretyakov, V I; Trombka, J; Usikov, D; Varenikov, A; Vostrukhin, A; Zuber, M T

2010-10-22

399

Lunar lander ground support system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This year's project, like the previous Aerospace Group's project, involves a lunar transportation system. The basic time line will be the years 2010-2030 and will be referred to as a second generation system, as lunar bases would be present. The project design completed this year is referred to as the Lunar Lander Ground Support System (LLGSS). The area chosen for analysis encompasses a great number of vehicles and personnel. The design of certain elements of the overall lunar mission are complete projects in themselves. For this reason the project chosen for the Senior Aerospace Design is the design of specific servicing vehicles and additions or modifications to existing vehicles for the area of concern involving servicing and maintenance of the lunar lander while on the surface.

1991-01-01

400

Chronology of early lunar crust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The chronology of lunar rocks is summarized. The oldest pristine (i.e., lacking meteoritic contamination of admixed components) lunar rock, recently dated with Sm-Nd by Lugmair, is a ferroan anorthosite, with an age of 4.44 + 0.02 Ga. Ages of Mg-suite rocks (4.1 to 4.5 Ga) have large uncertainties, so that age differences between lunar plutonic rock suites cannot yet be resolved. Most mare basalts crystallized between 3.1 and 3.9 Ga. The vast bulk of the lunar crust, therefore, formed before the oldest preserved terrestrial rocks. If the Moon accreted at 4.56 Ga, then 120 Ma may have elapsed before lunar crust was formed.

Dasch, E. J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ryder, G.

1988-01-01

401

Lunar Regolith Particle Shape Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future engineering of structures and equipment on the lunar surface requires significant understanding of particle characteristics of the lunar regolith. Nearly all sediment characteristics are influenced by particle shape; therefore a method of quantifying particle shape is useful both in lunar and terrestrial applications. We have created a method to quantify particle shape, specifically for lunar regolith, using image processing. Photomicrographs of thin sections of lunar core material were obtained under reflected light. Three photomicrographs were analyzed using ImageJ and MATLAB. From the image analysis measurements for area, perimeter, Feret diameter, orthogonal Feret diameter, Heywood factor, aspect ratio, sieve diameter, and sieve number were recorded. Probability distribution functions were created from the measurements of Heywood factor and aspect ratio.

Kiekhaefer, Rebecca; Hardy, Sandra; Rickman, Douglas; Edmunson, Jennifer

2013-01-01

402

Organics in APOLLO Lunar Samples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of many unknowns prior to the Apollo landings concerned the possibility of life, its remains, or its organic precursors on the surface of the Moon. While the existence of lunar organisms was considered highly unlikely, a program of biological quarantine and testing for the astronauts, the Apollo Command Modules, and the lunar rock and soil samples, was instituted in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL). No conclusive evidence of lunar organisms, was detected and the quarantine program was ended after Apollo 14. Analyses for organic compounds were also con-ducted. Considerable effort was expended, during lunar surface operations and in the LRL, to minimize and quantify organic contamination. Post-Apollo curatorial operations and cleaning minimize contamination from particulates, oxygen, and water but no longer specifically address organic contamination. The organic compounds measured in Apollo samples are generally consistent with known sources of contamination.

Allen, C. C.; Allton, J. H.

2007-01-01

403

The isotopic record of lunar volcanism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some fundamental aspects of lunar history which have been established as a result of the Apollo program of lunary exploration and contemporaneous Soviet lunar missions are summarized, with emphasis on the isotopic data which record lunar global evolution most directly. It is shown that some lunar anorthosites formed about 4.45 Ga ago, consistent with the early formation of an anorthositic

L. E. Nyquist; C.-Y. Shih

1992-01-01

404

Humanoids in Support of Lunar and Planetary Surface Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a vision of humanoid robots as human's key partners in future space exploration, in particular for construction, maintenance/repair and operation of lunar/planetary habitats, bases and settlements. It integrates this vision with the recent plans for human and robotic exploration, aligning a set of milestones for operational capability of humanoids with the schedule for the next decades and development spirals in the Project Constellation. These milestones relate to a set of incremental challenges, for the solving of which new humanoid technologies are needed. A system of systems integrative approach that would lead to readiness of cooperating humanoid crews is sketched. Robot fostering, training/education techniques, and improved cognitive/sensory/motor development techniques are considered essential elements for achieving intelligent humanoids. A pilot project using small-scale Fujitsu HOAP-2 humanoid is outlined.

Stoica, Adrian; Keymeulen, Didier

2006-01-01

405

Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector is a tool for Lunar water ice testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Russian-made, Russian-funded instrument LEND (Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector) has been selected for NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission to provide the global search of hydrogen distribution through 1 - 2 meters of lunar subsurface with high spatial resolution from 50 km circular polar orbit of LRO. LEND have a full set of sensors for thermal, epithermal and high energy neutrons to provide data for neutron component of radiation environment in the broad range of more than nine decades of energy. The primary type of LEND sensor is 3He counter, which is used for 8 of 9 instrument's detectors. The 3He nucleus has large cross section to capture thermal and epithermal neutrons. Collimating modules around four 3 He counters effectively absorb neutrons that have large angles of incidence with respect to the normal to the surface of the Moon and provide high spatial resolution of LEND for mapping. The second type of LEND neutron sensor is sthylbene scintillation detector, which is effective for registration of high energy neutrons (0.3 - 15.0 MeV) and also installed inside collimating modules. Data form collimated 3 He sensors will be used to detect hydrogen-rich spots on circumpolar regions with sensitivity about 100 ppm of hydrogen with spatial resolution up to 5 km (Half Width Half Maximum) and to produce global mapping of hydrogen content with the resolution of 5 - 20 km. Data for high energy neutrons from collimated scintillation sensor on LEND could help to distinguish a spot with enhancement of implemented hydrogen in the regolith from a spot with water ice deposits. However, the most conclusive results from the reconnaissance of lunar water/hydrogen resources would come from the joint analysis of all mapping science instrument onboard LRO. Using the present knowledge of lunar polar regions, one may predict the set of potential targets for detection of water-ice rich craters (permanently shadowed places in circumpolar craters, so called ‘cold traps'). Preliminary estimations for LEND's hydrogen detection limits have been done for a set of such craters. There are quite promising estimations for these limits to ensure reliable detection of water ice deposits which probably exist in the Moon circumpolar craters.

Sanin, Anton

406

Advances in Lunar Science and Observational Opportunities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lunar science is currently undergoing a renaissance as our understanding of our Moon continues to evolve given new data from multiple lunar mission and new analyses. This talk will overview NASA's recent and future lunar missions to explain the scientific questions addressed by missions such as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (Grail), Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS), and the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE). The talk will also overview opportunities for participatory exploration whereby professional and amateur astronomers are encouraged to participate in lunar exploration in conjunction with NASA.

Heldmann, Jennifer

2012-01-01

407

A Blueprint of an International Lunar Robotic Village  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human civilization is destined to look, find and develop a second habitable destination in our Solar System, besides Earth: Moon and Mars are the two most likely and credible places based on proximity, available local resources and economics Recent international missions have brought back valuable information on both Moon and Mars. The vision is: A permanent presence on the Moon using advanced robotic systems as precursors to the future human settlement of the Moon is possible in the near-term. An international effort should be initiated to create a permanent robotic village to demonstrate and validate advanced technologies and systems across international boundaries, conduct broad science, explore new regions of the Moon and Mars, develop infrastructure, human habitats and shelters, facilitate development of commerce and stimulate public involvement and education.

Alkalai, Leon

2012-01-01

408

Understanding the Reactivity of Lunar Dust for Future Lunar Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the Apollo missions, dust was found to cause numerous problems for various instruments and systems. Additionally, the dust may have caused momentary health issues for some of the astronauts. Therefore, the plan to resume robotic and manned missions to the Moon in the next decade has led to a renewed interest in the properties of lunar dust, ranging from geological to chemical to toxicological. An important property to understand is the reactivity of the dust particles. Due to the lack of an atmosphere on the Moon, there is nothing to protect the lunar soil from ultraviolet radiation, solar wind, and meteorite impacts. These processes could all serve to activate the soil, or produce reactive surface species. On the Moon, these species can be maintained for millennia without oxygen or water vapor present to satisfy the broken bonds. Unfortunately, the Apollo dust samples that were returned to Earth were inadvertently exposed to the atmosphere, causing them to lose their reactive characteristics. In order to aid in the preparation of mitigation techniques prior to returning to the Moon, we measured the ability of lunar dust, lunar dust simulant, and quartz samples to produce hydroxyl radicals in solution[1]. As a first approximation of meteorite impacts on the lunar surface, we ground samples using a mortar and pestle. Our initial studies showed that all three test materials (lunar dust (62241), lunar dust simulant (JSC-1Avf), and quartz) produced hydroxyl radicals after grinding and mixing with water. However, the radical production of the ground lunar dust was approximately 10-fold and 3-fold greater than quartz and JSC-1 Avf, respectively. These reactivity differences between the different samples did not correlate with differences in specific surface area. The increased reactivity produced for the quartz by grinding was attributed to the presence of silicon- or oxygen-based radicals on the surface, as had been seen previously[2]. These radicals may also play a part in the reactivity of the lunar dust and lunar simulant. However, other factors would seem to be required to account for the greatly increased reactivity of the lunar soil. It was proposed that nanometer-size Fe 0 (zero valent) particles in the lunar soil might play a role, as they are not present in quartz or lunar dust simulant. The present work has been performed with the aim of understanding the origin of the considerable reactivity of lunar dust[3]. We have ground 8 lunar soils of varying maturity and source (highland or mare) and measured the hydroxyl-radical production and decay of the reactivity. It was determined that there is a direct correlation between the reactivity and the amount of nanophase metallic iron particles (as a function of soil maturity, I s/FeO, in which Is is the amount of iron present as nanophase iron particles present and FeO is the total iron content) in the samples; thus, the highland soils, with their lesser total FeO content, are less reactive than ground mare soils. Additionally, grinding of nanophase iron simulant [4] showed reactivity in line with the lunar soils and much greater than lunar dust simulant or quartz. Studies aimed at determining the time required to deactivate the reactive soils in a habitable environment showed that the average time to reach 50% of the initial reactivity was approximately 3.5 hours. However, even after one week, none of the soils had returned completely to its unground level of reactivity. In contrast to the reactivity results, there was no obvious correlation between the maturity of the soil and its deactivation time. These results provide the first chemical reactivity and persistence values as an important property of lunar soils, data that is paramount as mankind prepares to return to the Moon.

Wallace, William; Taylor, L. A.; Jeevarajan, Antony

2009-01-01

409

Lunar Daylight Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With 1 rover, 2 astronauts and 3 days, the Apollo 17 Mission covered over 30 km, setup 10 scientific experiments and returned 110 kg of samples. This is a lot of science in a short time and the inspiration for a barebones, return-to-the-Moon strategy called Daylight Exploration. The Daylight Exploration approach poses an answer to the question, What could the Apollo crew have done with more time and today s robotics? In contrast to more ambitious and expensive strategies that create outposts then rely on pressurized rovers to drive to the science sites, Daylight Exploration is a low-overhead approach conceived to land near the scientific site, conduct Apollo-like exploration then leave before the sun goes down. A key motivation behind Daylight Exploration is cost reduction, but it does not come at the expense of scientific exploration. As a goal, Daylight Exploration provides access to the top 10 science sites by using the best capabilities of human and robotic exploration. Most science sites are within an equatorial band of 26 degrees latitude and on the Moon, at the equator, the day is 14 Earth days long; even more important, the lunar night is 14 days long. Human missions are constrained to 12 days because the energy storage systems required to operate during the lunar night adds mass, complexity and cost. In addition, short missions are beneficial because they require fewer consumables, do not require an airlock, reduce radiation exposure, minimize the dwell-time for the ascent and orbiting propulsion systems and allow a low-mass, campout accommodations. Key to Daylight Exploration is the use of piloted rovers used as tele-operated science platforms. Rovers are launched before or with the crew, and continue to operate between crew visits analyzing and collecting samples during the lunar daylight

Griffin, Brand Norman

2010-01-01

410

Observe a lunar eclipse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Earth science animation enables middle and high school students to observe the events of a lunar eclipse. The introduction explains why the moon's appearance changes as is moves through the Earth's shadow. The animation shows the moon darken as it enters the penumbra, turn reddish-orange as it reaches the umbra, and lighten as it leaves the other side of the penumbra. Movie controls allow students to repeat, pause, or step through the animation, which can give students more time to analyze the images. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Education, Terc. C.; Littell, Mcdougal

2003-01-01

411

SAGE III Lunar Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SAGE III instrument measures the vertical distribution of atmospheric gases and aerosols by measuring the attenuation of the sun or moon's rays observed through the limb of the earth's atmosphere. The lunar measurements increase the SAGE III/Meteor mission's geographic coverage and create the opportunity to detect the nocturnal species nitrogen trioxide and chlorine dioxide, in addition to ozone and nitrogen dioxide. This paper describes the techniques employed to perform the chemical species retrieval, altitude registration, and preliminary results of the first 15 months of data.

Moore, J. R.; Zawodny, J. M.

2003-12-01

412

Lunar neutron stratigraphy.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Study of the isotopic composition of gadolinium and samarium in four soil and seven drill stem samples returned by the Apollo 15 mission. The results show the possibility to date sedimentary processes on the lunar surface for time scales of around 100 million years because of the particular dependence of neutron capture reactions on depth. The neutron flux has a distinct peak as a function of depth. This peak appears to lie below the level of shallow cratering for time scales of less than one billion years and consequently forms a readily identified marker layer of both depth and time.

Russ, G. P., III; Burnett, D. S.; Wasserburg, G. J.

1972-01-01

413

Lunar Phases Interactive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation depicts the moon's rotation around the Earth and the corresponding view from a single point on the Earth as time elapses. The representation has 4 animated components: 1) A view of rotating earth and moon, shown from above 2) A clock face showing the passage of time 3) An view from Earth of the of sky, sun and moon and changing to indicate day and night views 4) A 28-day calendar The four components interactively depict lunar phases over 28 day cycle.

414

Lunar Phases: Addressing Misconceptions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This exercise was designed to address student misconceptions about why the Moon exhibits phases. Using a sketchbook, digital camera, or flex cam, a student sits at the center of a darkened room illuminated by a single light source in a stationary position. Stools are set up surrounding the student in the center and other students take those positions, always keeping their faces toward the center. The center student sketches or take pictures of the faces at each of the positions. Substituting a sphere (such as a ball) for the students' faces provides an even more vivid illustration of the shadowing of the sphere and connects directly to the rationale for lunar phases.

Childs, Philip

415

Astronaut John Young photographed collecting lunar samples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, is photographed collecting lunar samples near North Ray crater during the third Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. This picture was taken by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Young is using the lunar surface rake and a set of tongs. The Lunar Roving Vehicle is parked in the field of large boulders in the background.

1972-01-01

416

Bringing You the Moon: Lunar Education Efforts of the Center for Lunar Science and Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration has developed a variety of programs and products, including Lunar Traveling Exhibits and the High School Lunar Research Project, featured at http://www.lpi.usra.edu/nlsi/education/.

Shaner, A. J.; Shupla, C.; Shipp, S.; Halligan, E.; Allen, J.; Kring, D. A.; Laconte, K.

2012-03-01

417

Can Fractional Crystallization of a Lunar Magma Ocean Produce the Lunar Crust.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

New techniques enable the study of Apollo samples and lunar meteorites in unprecedented detail, and recent orbital spectral data reveal more about the lunar farside than ever before, raising new questions about the supposed simplicity of lunar geology. Ne...

D. S. Draper J. F. Rapp

2013-01-01

418

Test Results From a Simulated High-Voltage Lunar Power Transmission Line  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Alternator Test Unit (ATU) in the Lunar Power System Facility (LPSF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio was modified to simulate high-voltage transmission capability. The testbed simulated a 1 km transmission cable length from the ATU to the LPSF using resistors and inductors installed between the distribution transformers. Power factor correction circuitry was used to compensate for the reactance of the distribution system to improve the overall power factor. This test demonstrated that a permanent magnet alternator can successfully provide high-frequency ac power to a lunar facility located at a distance.

Birchenough, Arthur; Hervol, David

2008-01-01

419

Test Results from a Simulated High Voltage Lunar Power Transmission Line  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Alternator Test Unit (ATU) in the Lunar Power System Facility (LPSF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH was modified to simulate high voltage transmission capability. The testbed simulated a 1 km transmission cable length from the ATU to the LPSF using resistors and inductors installed between the distribution transformers. Power factor correction circuitry was used to compensate for the reactance of the distribution system to improve the overall power factor. This test demonstrated that a permanent magnet alternator can successfully provide high frequency AC power to a lunar facility located at a distance.

Birchenough, Arthur; Hervol, David

2008-01-01

420

RESOLVE: An International Mission to Search for Volatiles at the Lunar Poles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerous studies have shown that the use of space resources to manufacture propellant and consumables can significantly reduce the launch mass of space exploration beyond earth orbit. Even the Moon, which has no atmosphere, is ricb in resources that can theoretically be harvested. A series of lunar missions over the last 20 years has shown an unexpected resource on the Moon. There is evidence that water ice and other volatiles useful for the production of propellants are located at the lunar poles, though most of it is located within permanently shadowed craters where accessing these resources is challenging.

Larson, William E.; Quinn, Jacqueline W.; Sanders, Gerald B.; Colaprete, Anthony; Elphic, Richard C.; Picard, Martin

2013-01-01

421

Press abstracts of the 21st Lunar and Planetary Science Conference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Program Committee for the Twenty-fisrt Lunar and Planetary Science Conference has chosen these contributions as having the greatest potential interest for the general public. The papers in this collection were written for general presentation, avoiding jargon and unnecessarily complex terms. More technical abstracts will be found in Lunar and Planetary Science XXI. Representative titles are: Ancient Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions on Mars: Global Model and Geological Evidence; Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of Ordinary Chondrites and Their Chondrules; Exposure Ages and Collisional History of L-Chondrite Parent Bodies; Models of Solar-Powered Geysers on Triton; and Search for Life: A Science Rationale for a Permanent Base on Mars.

1990-01-01

422

Lunar Crustal History from Isotopic Studies of Lunar Anorthosites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Anorthosites occur ubiquitously within the lunar crust at depths of approx.3-30 km in apparent confirmation of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) hypothesis. [1]. We will present recent chronological studies of anorthosites [2] that are relevant both to the LMO hypothesis and also to the lunar cataclysm hypothesis. Old (approx.4.4 Ga) Sm-Nd ages have been determined for some Apollo 16 anorthosites, and primitive initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios have been measured for several, but well-defined Rb-Sr ages concordant with the Sm-Nd ages have not been determined until now. Lunar anorthosite 67075, a Feldspathic Fragmental Breccia (FFB) collected near the rim of North Ray Crater, has concordant Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr ages of 4.47+/-0.07 Ga and 4.49+/-0.07 Ga, respectively. Initial Nd-143/Nd-144 determined from the Sm-Nd isochron corresponds to E(sub Nd,CHUR) = 0.3+/-0.5 compared to a Chondritic Uniform Reservoir, or E(sub Nd,HEDPB) = -0.6+/-0.5 compared to the initial Nd-143/Nd-144 of the HED Parent Body [3]. Lunar anorthosites tend to have E(sub Nd) > 0 when compared to CHUR, apparently inconsistent with derivation from a single lunar magma ocean. Although E(sub Nd) < 0 for some anorthosites, if lunar initial Nd-143/Nd-144 is taken equal to HEDR for the HED parent body [3], enough variability remains among the anorthosite data alone to suggest that lunar anorthosites do not derive from a single source, i.e., they are not all products of the LMO. An anorthositic clast from desert meteorite Dhofar 908 has an Ar-39-Ar-40 age of 4.42+/-0.04 Ga, the same as the 4.36-4.41+/-0.035 Ga Ar-39-Ar-40 age of anorthositic clast Y-86032,116 in Antarctic meteorite Yamato- 86032 [3,4]. Conclusions: (i) Lunar anorthosites come from diverse sources. Orbital geochemical studies confirm variability in lunar crustal composition [1, 5]. We suggest that the variability extends to anorthosites alone as shown by the Sm-Nd data (Fig. 2) and the existence of magnesian anorthosites (MAN, [6]) and "An93 anorthosites" [3,4]. (ii) Anorthositic clasts in lunar meteorites retain "high" Ar-Ar ages compared to Apollo anorthosites. This is perhaps a hint that "cataclysmic" impacts were on average less energetic in the mostly farside source regions of these meteorites than on the lunar nearside.

Nyquist, Laurence E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Bogard, D. D.; Yamaguchi, A.

2010-01-01

423

Searching for Lunar Water: The Lunar Volatile Resources Analysis Package  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ESA Lunar Lander has been conceived to demonstrate an autonomous landing capability. Once safely on the Moon the scientific payload will conduct investigations aimed at preparing the way for human exploration. As part of the provisional payload an instrument known as The Lunar Volatile Resources Analysis Package (L-VRAP) will analyse surface and exospheric volatiles. The presence and abundance of lunar water is an important consideration for ISRU (In Situ Resource Utilisation) since this is likely to be part of a strategy for supporting long-term human exploration of the Moon.

Morse, A. D.; Barber, S. J.; Dewar, K. R.; Pillinger, J. M.; Sheridan, S.; Wright, I, P.; Gibson, E. K.; Merrifield, J. A.; Howe, C. J.; Waugh, L. J.; Pilinger, C. T.

2012-01-01

424

Variable Permanent Magnet Quadrupole  

SciTech Connect

A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) is one of the candidates for the final focus lens in a linear collider. An over 120 T/m strong variable permanent magnet quadrupole is achieved by the introduction of saturated iron and a 'double ring structure'. A fabricated PMQ achieved 24 T integrated gradient with 20 mm bore diameter, 100 mm magnet diameter and 20 cm pole length. The strength of the PMQ is adjustable in 1.4 T steps, due to its 'double ring structure': the PMQ is split into two nested rings; the outer ring is sliced along the beam line into four parts and is rotated to change the strength. This paper describes the variable PMQ from fabrication to recent adjustments.

Mihara, T.; Iwashita, Y.; /Kyoto U.; Kumada, M.; /NIRS, Chiba; Spencer, C.M.; /SLAC

2007-05-23

425

Permanent Magnet Generator Designing Guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the requirements set to permanent magnet generators directly connected to electrical network especially when used in hydro electric plants. The influences of the requirements on the permanent magnet generator design parameters are discussed.

Tuomo Lindh; Pia Salminen; Juha Pyrhonen; Markku Niemela; Janne Kinnunen; Jorma Haataja

2007-01-01

426

Permanent-Magnet Generators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the theory of permanent-magnet generators piresented in Part I,1 design equations are derived for the short-circuit stabilized generator, and it is shown that the design may be optimized to yield the smallest machine for given specifications. A relationship between short-circuit current and inherent voltage regulation is given. The influence of some design parameters is discussed and recommendations are

D. J. Hanrahan; D. S. Toffolo

1963-01-01

427

Permanent homelessness in America?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper seeks to determine the approximate number of homeless persons in the U.S., the rate of change in the number, and whether or not the problem is likely to be permanent or transitory. It makes particular use of a new 1985 survey of over 500 homeless people in New York City. It finds that:(1)the much-maligned 1984 study by the

Richard B. Freeman; Brian Hall

1987-01-01

428

The study of lunar rotation by Japanese lunar landing missions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The internal structure of the planet is one of the important clues to know its origin and evolution. So far, gravity, rotation, seismic wave, electro-magnetic wave, and heat flow observations have been carried out. In these methods, we plan to load rotation estimation instrument for next Japanese lunar exploration project SELENE-2 and SELENE-3. LLR: The Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) is the method to measure the distance between the Earth and the Moon using laser beam. For more than 30 years since the Apollo and the Lunokhod mission placed retrograde reflectors on the Moon, LLR produced data on the lunar rotation as well as