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Sample records for permanent neurological deficits

  1. Neurologic deficit

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurologic deficit refers to abnormal function of a body area due to weaker function of the brain, spinal cord, muscles, or nerves. Examples include: Abnormal reflexes Inability to speak Decreased sensation Loss of balance ...

  2. Focal neurological deficits

    MedlinePlus

    A focal neurologic deficit is a problem with nerve, spinal cord, or brain function. It affects a specific ... of the back, neck, or head Electromyogram (EMG)/ nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap

  3. The Interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) Receptor Inhibitor Reparixin Improves Neurological Deficits and Reduces Long-term Inflammation in Permanent and Transient Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Pia; Triulzi, Sara; Cavalieri, Barbara; Di Bitondo, Rosa; Bertini, Riccardo; Barbera, Sara; Bigini, Paolo; Mennini, Tiziana; Gelosa, Paolo; Tremoli, Elena; Sironi, Luigi; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    Leukocyte infiltration is viewed as a pharmacological target in cerebral ischemia. We previously reported that reparixin, a CXCL8 receptor blocker that inhibits neutrophil infiltration, and related molecules can reduce infarct size in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The study aims were to compare the effects of reparixin in transient and permanent MCAO using varied treatment schedules and therapeutic windows to evaluate effects on long-term neurological deficits and late inflammatory response. Reparixin, administered for 1 to 3 days, 3.5 to 6 h after MCAO, ameliorates neurological function recovery and inhibits long-term inflammation. The infarct size reduction at 24 h, evaluated by TTC staining, is more pronounced in transient MCAO. MRI analysis identified a decrease in the progression of infarct size by reparixin that was more evident at 48 h in permanent MCAO, and was associated with a significantly improved recovery from long-term neurological deficits. PMID:17592546

  4. Methcathinone "Kitchen Chemistry" and Permanent Neurological Damage.

    PubMed

    Sikk, Katrin; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Methcathinone abuse is a significant cause of parkinsonism among young patients in the Eastern European countries. The drug is synthesized from over-the-counter cold remedies containing ephedrine or pseudoephedrine. The final mixture contains a high concentration of manganese if potassium permanganate is used as the oxidant agent. Though manganese is an essential trace element and its homeostasis is well maintained, exposure to a high level of manganese is neurotoxic. The use of manganese-contaminated methcathinone may cause permanent neurological damage and severe disability. Drug users develop a distinctive extrapyramidal syndrome that resembles classic manganese intoxication. Methcathinone could have additive neurotoxic effect to the progression of parkinsonism. The most prevalent symptoms are symmetrical bradykinesia, dystonias, and early postural, gait, and speech impairment. After cessation of exposure, the syndrome is generally irreversible and can even progress. PMID:26070761

  5. Neurological Deficits before and after Surgical Resection of Schwannomas in the Upper Extremities.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Hideyuki

    2016-06-01

    Background Schwannomas are the most common primary solitary tumor among peripheral nerve sheath tumors. The occurrence of transient or permanent neurological deficits after schwannoma resection is more common than previously recognized. Here, the neurological deficits before and after surgical resection of schwannomas in the upper extremities were examined. Methods The study included 43 upper-extremity schwannomas that were treated surgically between January 2000 and July 2013. The neurological status of each patient (such as pain, sensory disturbances, and motor disturbances) was evaluated preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at the final postoperative follow-up. Results Out of the 43 cases, 34 cases exhibited neurological symptoms before the operation, and in 31 of the 34 cases, neurological symptoms were either reduced or disappeared after the surgery. In 20 of the 43 cases, new neurological deficits that had not been observed preoperatively were noted immediately postoperatively; the newly acquired neurological deficits disappeared over time in 5 of the 20 cases. Significantly, more newly acquired neurological deficits remained in cases where the tumor was located in the upper arm and elbow than in cases where the tumor was located in the distal forearm. Conclusion New neurological deficits occurred after surgery in about half of the cases. This ratio was higher than expected, suggesting that schwannoma resection is not always a complication-free operation. Therefore, patients should be informed preoperatively about the possibility of neurological deficits. Furthermore, extreme care should be taken not to damage the affected and uninvolved nerves during surgery. PMID:26872028

  6. The Neurological Basis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Shirley; Bolan, Morna; Burton, Michael; Snyder, Sherry; Pasterczyk-Seabolt, Claire; Martin, Don

    1997-01-01

    Reviews research on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and examines the role of neurochemical stimulation and signs of neurological deficits. Describes the chemical action of drugs used to treat ADHD, along with cognitive, affective, and behavioral effects, and side effects. Elaborates on drug treatment and basic behavior modification…

  7. Animal models of neurological deficits: how relevant is the rat?

    PubMed

    Cenci, M Angela; Whishaw, Ian Q; Schallert, Timothy

    2002-07-01

    Animal models of neurological deficits are essential for the assessment of new therapeutic options. It has been suggested that rats are not as appropriate as primates for the symptomatic modelling of disease, but a large body of data argues against this view. Comparative analyses of movements in rats and primates show homology of many motor patterns across species. Advances have been made in identifying rat equivalents of akinesia, tremor, postural deficits and dyskinesia, which are relevant to Parkinson's disease. Rat models of hemiplegia, neglect and tactile extinction are useful in assessing the outcome of ischaemic or traumatic brain injury, and in monitoring the effects of therapeutic interventions. Studies in rodents that emphasize careful behavioural analysis should continue to be developed as effective and inexpensive models that complement studies in primates. PMID:12094213

  8. The neurological basis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Ballard, S; Bolan, M; Burton, M; Snyder, S; Pasterczyk-Seabolt, C; Martin, D

    1997-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a serious disability with long-term consequences. At present the disorder is considered organic in pathology, particularly in regard to central nervous system functioning. This paper reviews research on ADHD. The role of neurochemical stimulation is discussed, and the signs of neurological deficits are explored. Nearly 600,000 young people in the United States receive medication daily for ADHD, and these drugs mimic brain neurotransmitters. The chemical action of these drugs and the cognitive, affective, and behavioral effects are discussed. Side effects and dosage levels are also examined. Basic behavior modification with ADHD children and how these techniques can be combined with effective drug treatment are elaborated. PMID:9426808

  9. Missed Traumatic Thoracic Spondyloptosis With no Neurological Deficit: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Farooque, Kamran; Khatri, Kavin; Gupta, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic thoracic spondyloptosis is caused by high energy trauma and is usually associated with severe neurological deficit. Cases presenting without any neurological deficit can be difficult to diagnose and manage. Case Presentation We reported a four-week spondyloptosis of the ninth thoracic vertebra over the tenth thoracic vertebra, in a 20-year-old male without any neurological deficit. The patient had associated chest injuries. The spine injury was managed surgically with in-situ posterior instrumentation and fusion. The patient tolerated the operation well and postoperatively there was no neurological deterioration or surgical complication. Conclusions Patients presenting with spondyloptosis with no neurological deficit can be managed with in-situ fusion via pedicle screws, especially when presenting late and with minimal kyphosis. PMID:27218044

  10. Neurological deficit following combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Alzahrani

    2010-06-01

    A healthy man developed cauda equina syndrome after uneventful combined spinal and epidural anesthesia. No pre-existing neurologic disorder was recorded. There was no pain or paresthesia during needle placement, drug injection or catheter insertion. The sensory levels were improved within a few days following the deficit but little improvement on motor power but not on sphincter tone. Local anesthesia neurotoxicity was thought to be the leading cause of neurologic deficit in our case. PMID:20803872

  11. Adjuvant Embolization with N-butyl Cyanoacrylate in the Treatment of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations: Outcomes, Complications, and Predictors of Neurologic Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Komotar, Ricardo J.; Otten, Marc L.; Hahn, David K.; Fischer, Laura E.; Hwang, Brian Y.; Garrett, Matthew C.; Sciacca, Robert R.; Sisti, Michael B.; Solomon, Robert A.; Lavine, Sean D.; Connolly, E. Sander; Meyers, Philip M.

    2009-01-01

    development of immediate post-embolization neurological deficits. Nevertheless, a significant number of patients with treatment-related neurological deficits improve over time. The low incidence of permanent neurological deficits underscores the utility of this technique in carefully selected patients. PMID:19478232

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction is an important cause of neurological deficits in an inflammatory model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sadeghian, Mona; Mastrolia, Vincenzo; Rezaei Haddad, Ali; Mosley, Angelina; Mullali, Gizem; Schiza, Dimitra; Sajic, Marija; Hargreaves, Iain; Heales, Simon; Duchen, Michael R; Smith, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation can cause major neurological dysfunction, without demyelination, in both multiple sclerosis (MS) and a mouse model of the disease (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; EAE), but the mechanisms remain obscure. Confocal in vivo imaging of the mouse EAE spinal cord reveals that impaired neurological function correlates with the depolarisation of both the axonal mitochondria and the axons themselves. Indeed, the depolarisation parallels the expression of neurological deficit at the onset of disease, and during relapse, improving during remission in conjunction with the deficit. Mitochondrial dysfunction, fragmentation and impaired trafficking were most severe in regions of extravasated perivascular inflammatory cells. The dysfunction at disease onset was accompanied by increased expression of the rate-limiting glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase-2 in activated astrocytes, and by selective reduction in spinal mitochondrial complex I activity. The metabolic changes preceded any demyelination or axonal degeneration. We conclude that mitochondrial dysfunction is a major cause of reversible neurological deficits in neuroinflammatory disease, such as MS. PMID:27624721

  13. Neurological deficits and brain edema after intracerebral hemorrhage in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, T; Okauchi, M; Hua, Y; Schallert, T; Keep, R F; Xi, G

    2008-01-01

    We examined the time course of neurological deficits in gerbils after an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) induced by autologous blood infusion and examined its correlation with the severity of perihematomal edema. Mongolian gerbils (n = 15) were subjected to stereotaxic autologous blood infusion (30 or 60 microL) into the left caudate nucleus. Corner-turn and forelimb-placing tests were performed before, and 1 and 3 days after ICH. Perihematomal water content was measured by tissue gravimetry. Gerbils developed neurological deficits and perihematomal edema at day 1 after ICH. Both neurological deficits and perihematomal edema were significantly greater in animals with 60 microL blood infusion compared to the 30 microL infusion group, and both neurological deficits and edema were also greater at 3 days compared to 1 day after ICH. The severity of neurological deficits paralleled the degree of perihematomal edema. We conclude that the Mongolian gerbil is a suitable model for studies on the behavioral effects of ICH. PMID:19066097

  14. Chagas disease in a Texan horse with neurologic deficits.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Laura K; Hamer, Sarah A; Shaw, Sarah; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Auckland, Lisa D; Hodo, Carolyn L; Chaffin, Keith; Rech, Raquel R

    2016-01-30

    A 10-year-old Quarter Horse gelding presented to the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a six month-history of ataxia and lameness in the hind limbs. The horse was treated presumptively for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) based on clinical signs but was ultimately euthanized after its condition worsened. Gross lesions were limited to a small area of reddening in the gray matter of the thoracic spinal cord. Histologically, trypanosome amastigotes morphologically similar to Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, were sporadically detected within segments of the thoracic spinal cord surrounded by mild lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Ancillary testing for Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania spp. was negative. Conventional and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of affected paraffin embedded spinal cord were positive for T. cruzi, and sequencing of the amplified T. cruzi satellite DNA PCR fragment from the horse was homologous with various clones of T. cruzi in GenBank. While canine Chagas disease cases have been widely reported in southern Texas, this is the first report of clinical T. cruzi infection in an equid with demonstrable amastigotes in the spinal cord. In contrast to previous instances of Chagas disease in the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and humans, no inflammation or T. cruzi amastigotes were detected in the heart of the horse. Based on clinical signs, there is a potential for misdiagnosis of Chagas disease with other infectious diseases that affect the equine CNS. T. cruzi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with neurologic clinical signs and histologic evidence of meningomyelitis that originate in areas where Chagas disease is present. The prevalence of T. cruzi in horses and the role of equids in the parasite life cycle require further study. PMID:26801589

  15. Mild intermittent hypoxemia in neonatal mice causes permanent neurofunctional deficit and white matter hypomyelination.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Courtney; Sosunov, Sergey; Niatsetskaya, Zoya; Isler, Joseph A; Utkina-Sosunova, Irina; Jang, Isaac; Ratner, Veniamin; Ten, Vadim

    2015-02-01

    Very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants experience numerous, often self-limited non-bradycardic episodes of intermittent hypoxemia (IH). We hypothesized that these episodes of IH affect postnatal white matter (WM) development causing hypomyelination and neurological handicap in the absence of cellular degeneration. Based on clinical data from ten VLBW neonates; a severity, daily duration and frequency of non-bradycardic IH episodes were reproduced in neonatal mice. Changes in heart rate and cerebral blood flow during IH were recorded. A short-term and long-term neurofunctional performance, cerebral content of myelin basic protein (MBP), 2'3' cyclic-nucleotide 3-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), electron microscopy of axonal myelination and the extent of cellular degeneration were examined. Neonatal mice exposed to IH exhibited no signs of cellular degeneration, yet demonstrated significantly poorer olfactory discrimination, wire holding, beam and bridge crossing, and walking-initiation tests performance compared to controls. In adulthood, IH-mice demonstrated no alteration in navigational memory. However, sensorimotor performance on rota-rod, wire-holding and beam tests was significantly worse compared to naive littermates. Both short- and long-term neurofunctional deficits were coupled with decreased MBP, CNPase content and poorer axonal myelination compared to controls. In neonatal mice mild, non-ischemic IH stress, mimicking that in VLBW preterm infants, replicates a key phenotype of non-cystic WM injury: permanent hypomyelination and sensorimotor deficits. Because this phenotype has developed in the absence of cellular degeneration, our data suggest that cellular mechanisms of WM injury induced by mild IH differ from that of cystic periventricular leukomalacia where the loss of myelin-producing cells and axons is the major mechanism of injury. PMID:25476492

  16. Effects of CDP-choline on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kakihana, M.; Fukuda, N.; Suno, M.; Nagaoka, A.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism were studied in a rat model of transient cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced by occluding both common carotid arteries for 20 or 30 minutes 24 hours after the vertebral arteries were permanently occluded by electrocautery. CDP-choline was administered intraperitoneally twice daily for 4 days after reestablishing carotid blood flow. CDP-choline at two dosages (50 and 250 mg/kg) shortened the time required for recovery of spontaneous motor activity in a dose-related manner; recovery time was measured early after reperfusion. Neurologic signs were observed for 10 days. High-dose CDP-choline improved neurologic signs in the rats within 20-30 minutes of ischemia. When cerebral glucose metabolism was assessed on Day 4, increases in the levels of glucose and pyruvate were accompanied by decreases in the synthesis of labeled acetylcholine from uniformly labeled (/sup 14/C)glucose measured in the cerebral cortex of rats with 30 minutes of ischemia. High-dose CDP-choline also attenuated changes in these variables. CDP-(1,2-/sup 14/C)choline injected intravenously 10 minutes after reperfusion was used for membrane lipid biosynthesis. These results indicate that CDP-choline has beneficial effects on brain dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia, which may be due in part to the restorative effects of CDP-choline on disturbed cerebral glucose metabolism, probably by stimulating phospholipid biosynthesis.

  17. Treatment strategies for early neurological deficits related to malpositioned pedicle screws in the lumbosacral canal

    PubMed Central

    Du, J-Y.; Wu, J-S.; Wen, Z-Q.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To employ a simple and fast method to evaluate those patients with neurological deficits and misplaced screws in relatively safe lumbosacral spine, and to determine if it is necessary to undertake revision surgery. Methods A total of 316 patients were treated by fixation of lumbar and lumbosacral transpedicle screws at our institution from January 2011 to December 2012. We designed the criteria for post-operative revision scores of pedicle screw malpositioning (PRSPSM) in the lumbosacral canal. We recommend the revision of the misplaced pedicle screw in patients with PRSPSM = 5′ as early as possible. However, patients with PRSPSM < 5′ need to follow the next consecutive assessment procedures. A total of 15 patients were included according to at least three-stage follow-up. Results Five patients with neurological complications (PRSPSM = 5′) underwent revision surgery at an early stage. The other ten patients with PRSPSM < 5′ were treated by conservative methods for seven days. At three-month follow-up, only one patient showed delayed onset of neurological complications (PRSPSM 7′) while refusing revision. Seven months later, PRSPSM decreased to 3′ with complete rehabilitation. Conclusions This study highlights the significance of consecutively dynamic assessments of PRSPSMs, which are unlike previous implementations based on purely anatomical assessment or early onset of neurological deficits.and also confirms our hypothesis that patients with early neurological complications may not need revision procedures in the relatively broad margin of the lumbosacral canal. Cite this article: X-J. Lin. Treatment strategies for early neurological deficits related to malpositioned pedicle screws in the lumbosacral canal: A pilot study. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:46–51. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000477. PMID:26868892

  18. Systemic administration of urocortin after intracerebral hemorrhage reduces neurological deficits and neuroinflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remains a serious clinical problem lacking effective treatment. Urocortin (UCN), a novel anti-inflammatory neuropeptide, protects injured cardiomyocytes and dopaminergic neurons. Our preliminary studies indicate UCN alleviates ICH-induced brain injury when administered intracerebroventricularly (ICV). The present study examines the therapeutic effect of UCN on ICH-induced neurological deficits and neuroinflammation when administered by the more convenient intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Methods ICH was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by intrastriatal infusion of bacterial collagenase VII-S or autologous blood. UCN (2.5 or 25 μg/kg) was administered i.p. at 60 minutes post-ICH. Penetration of i.p. administered fluorescently labeled UCN into the striatum was examined by fluorescence microscopy. Neurological deficits were evaluated by modified neurological severity score (mNSS). Brain edema was assessed using the dry/wet method. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption was assessed using the Evans blue assay. Hemorrhagic volume and lesion volume were assessed by Drabkin's method and morphometric assay, respectively. Pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) expression was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Microglial activation and neuronal loss were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Administration of UCN reduced neurological deficits from 1 to 7 days post-ICH. Surprisingly, although a higher dose (25 μg/kg, i.p.) also reduced the functional deficits associated with ICH, it is significantly less effective than the lower dose (2.5 μg/kg, i.p.). Beneficial results with the low dose of UCN included a reduction in neurological deficits from 1 to 7 days post-ICH, as well as a reduction in brain edema, BBB disruption, lesion volume, microglial activation and neuronal loss 3 days post-ICH, and suppression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 production 1, 3 and 7 days post-ICH. Conclusion Systemic

  19. Seat belt syndrome with unstable Chance fracture dislocation of the second lumbar vertebra without neurological deficits

    PubMed Central

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Bohmer, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    The seat belt syndrome is a recognised complication of seat belt use in vehicles. Unstable Chance fractures of the spine without neurological deficits have been reported infrequently. We describe a young woman with completely disrupted Chance fracture of the second lumbar vertebra in association with left hemidiaphragmatic rupture/hernia, multiple bowel perforations, splenic capsular tear, left humeral shaft and multiple rib fractures. These injuries which resulted from high-speed vehicle collision and led to death of one of the occupants were readily detected by trauma series imaging. The patient was successfully treated by a dedicated multidisciplinary team which adopted a staged surgical approach and prioritisation of care. There were no manifested neurological or other deficits after 1 year of follow-up. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of such a case in Australasia. We discuss the challenging surgical management, highlighting the role of radiological imaging in such cases and provide a literature review. PMID:24403388

  20. Seat belt syndrome with unstable Chance fracture dislocation of the second lumbar vertebra without neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Bohmer, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    The seat belt syndrome is a recognised complication of seat belt use in vehicles. Unstable Chance fractures of the spine without neurological deficits have been reported infrequently. We describe a young woman with completely disrupted Chance fracture of the second lumbar vertebra in association with left hemidiaphragmatic rupture/hernia, multiple bowel perforations, splenic capsular tear, left humeral shaft and multiple rib fractures. These injuries which resulted from high-speed vehicle collision and led to death of one of the occupants were readily detected by trauma series imaging. The patient was successfully treated by a dedicated multidisciplinary team which adopted a staged surgical approach and prioritisation of care. There were no manifested neurological or other deficits after 1 year of follow-up. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of such a case in Australasia. We discuss the challenging surgical management, highlighting the role of radiological imaging in such cases and provide a literature review. PMID:24403388

  1. Clinical experience with nimodipine in the prophylaxis of neurological deficits after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kazner, E; Sprung, C; Adelt, D; Ammerer, H P; Karnick, R; Baumann, H; Böker, D K; Grotenhuis, J A; Jaksche, H; Istaitih, A R

    1985-05-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of the dihydropyridine calcium antagonist nimodipine (BAY e 9736) in the prophylaxis of ischemic neurological deficits after subarachnoid hemorrhage were investigated in 171 patients in an open, prospective, multicenter study. 68 of the patients had to be excluded from the efficacy assessment as they had failed to satisfy important inclusion criteria. The efficacy assessment was based on 104 patients of Hunt and Hess grades I-III. In 86 patients the ruptured aneurysm was clipped before or during the nimodipine therapy, while 18 patients did not undergo surgery owing to failure to detect an aneurysm, continuous deterioration of the clinical condition, or for other reasons. At the end of the nimodipine treatment 74 of the patients (71%) were completely free from symptoms or had only very slight neurological deficits. There were 10 patients (10%) with moderate and 10 with a severe disablement, 4 patients were apallic, and 6 (6%) died during the nimodipine treatment. In 4 patients (3.8%) cerebral vasospasm was the sole cause of severe neurological deficits or death, while in a further 3 patients (2.7%) vasospasm and other serious complications were responsible for poor outcome. 22 of the 171 patients (12.9%) died during or shortly after nimodipine therapy. Rebleeding occurred during nimodipine therapy in 7 of the 143 preoperatively treated cases (4.9%). PMID:4010865

  2. Ischemia may be the primary cause of the neurologic deficits in classic migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Skyhoj Olsen, T.; Friberg, L.; Lassen, N.A.

    1987-02-01

    This study investigates whether the cerebral blood flow reduction occurring in attacks of classic migraine is sufficient to cause neurologic deficits. Regional cerebral blood flow measured with the xenon 133 intracarotid injection technique was analyzed in 11 patients in whom a low-flow area developed during attacks of classic migraine. When measured with this technique, regional cerebral blood flow in focal low-flow areas will be overestimated because of the effect of scattered radiation (Compton scatter) on the recordings. In this study, this effect was particularly taken into account when evaluating the degree of blood flow reduction. During attacks of classic migraine, cerebral blood flow reductions averaging 52% were observed focally in the 11 patients. Cerebral blood flow levels known to be insufficient for normal cortical function (less than 16 to 23 mL/100 g/min) were measured in seven patients during the attacks. This was probably also the case in the remaining four patients, but the effect of scattered radiation made a reliable evaluation of blood flow impossible. It is concluded that the blood flow reduction that occurs during attacks of classic migraine is sufficient to cause ischemia and neurologic deficits. Hence, this study suggests a vascular origin of the prodromal neurologic deficits that may accompany attacks of classic migraine.

  3. Management of Neglected Traumatic Bilateral Cervical Facet Dislocations Without Neurological Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Farooque, Kamran; Khatri, Kavin; Gupta, Babita; Sharma, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sub axial cervical spine dislocations are common and managing these cases by closed reduction is successful in the majority of cases. However, treatment of old and neglected cases is difficult and the results may vary in terms of neurological and functional outcomes. Case Presentation: We present two cases of traumatic bilateral cervical facet dislocation with no neurological deficit (ND) who referred four months after the injury. They were managed via single stage anterior discectomy, posterior facet reduction, instrumentation, and then anterior reconstruction with bone graft and cervical plate. The patients had no ND in the postoperative period and returned to work. Discussion: Patients presenting with neck pain after a history of trauma should be evaluated thoroughly with radiographs and computed tomography. The management of old neglected facet dislocations is difficult, lengthy, and fraught with potential neurological complications; operative intervention can substantially improve the quality of life in these patients. PMID:26543838

  4. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Miki; Yamashita, Yushiro; Iramina, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS) are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7–11 years (27 males, six females) and twenty five adults participants aged 21–29 years old (19 males, six females) participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD. PMID:26797613

  5. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Miki; Yamashita, Yushiro; Iramina, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS) are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7-11 years (27 males, six females) and twenty five adults participants aged 21-29 years old (19 males, six females) participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD. PMID:26797613

  6. One-stage posterior instrumentation surgery for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral collapse with neurological deficits

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Manabu; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Kotani, Yoshihisa; Takahata, Masahiko; Hojo, Yoshihiro; Minami, Akio

    2010-01-01

    The number of reports describing osteoporotic vertebral fracture has increased as the number of elderly people has grown. Anterior decompression and fusion alone for the treatment of vertebral collapse is not easy for patients with comorbid medical problems and severe bone fragility. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of one-stage posterior instrumentation surgery for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral collapse with neurological deficits. A consecutive series of 21 patients who sustained osteoporotic vertebral collapse with neurological deficits were managed with posterior decompression and short-segmental pedicle screw instrumentation augmented with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWP) cables with or without vertebroplasty using calcium phosphate cement. The mean follow-up was 42 months. All patients showed neurologic recovery. Segmental kyphotic angle at the instrumented level was significantly improved from an average preoperative kyphosis of 22.8–14.7 at a final follow-up. Spinal canal occupation was significantly reduced from an average before surgery of 40.4–19.1% at the final follow-up. Two patients experienced loosening of pedicle screws and three patients developed subsequent vertebral compression fractures within adjacent segments. However, these patients were effectively treated in a conservative fashion without any additional surgery. Our results indicated that one-stage posterior instrumentation surgery augmented with UHMWP cables could provide significant neurological improvement in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral collapse. PMID:20157741

  7. Neurological deficits in mice with profound biotinidase deficiency are associated with demylination and axonal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pindolia, Kirit; Chen, Jieli; Cardwell, Cisley; Cui, Xu; Chopp, Michael; Wolf, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by neurological and cutaneous abnormalities. We have developed a transgenic knock-out mouse with biotinidase deficiency to better understand aspects of pathophysiology and natural history of the disorder in humans. Neurological deficits observed in symptomatic mice with biotinidase deficiency are similar to those seen in symptomatic children with the disorder. Using a battery of functional neurological assessment tests, the symptomatic mice performed poorly compared to wild-type mice. Demyelination, axonal degeneration, ventriculomegaly, and corpus callosum compression were found in the brains of untreated, symptomatic enzyme-deficient mice. With biotin treatment, the symptomatic mice improved neurologically and the white matter abnormalities resolved. These functional and anatomical findings and their reversal with biotin therapy are similar to those observed in untreated, symptomatic and treated individuals with biotinidase deficiency. The mouse with biotinidase deficiency appears to be an appropriate animal model in which to study the neurological abnormalities and the effects of treatment of the disorder. PMID:22579707

  8. Complete Fracture-Dislocation of the Thoracolumbar Spine with No Critical Neurological Deficit: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Kosuke; Sakai, Toshinori; Adachi, Keisuke; Inoue, Kazumasa; Endo, Satoshi; Tamaki, Yasuaki; Sairyo, Koichi; Nagamachi, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Fractures at the thoracolumbar junction are the most common spinal column fractures. Among type C fractures in the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen Spine Classification, cases with complete fracture-dislocations of the spinal column often result in a critical neurological deficit despite surgical treatment. We present a case of an 18-year-old man who had a complete fracture-dislocation of the T12 vertebral body and multiple injuries following high-energy trauma but no critical neurological deficits. Because of active bleeding in the left thoracic cavity, the patient underwent open reduction of the T12 vertebral body and anterior spinal fusion of the T11-L1 vertebral bodies via an anterior approach between the T9 and T10 ribs within 24 h of the accident. Four months postoperatively, the patient could ambulate independently, with a slight disturbance of light touch. At 6 months postoperatively, plain computed tomography scans showed bony union of the T12 vertebral body. We postulated two reasons for the absence of critical neurological dysfunction: (1) spontaneous spinal canal sparing because of the fracture of the right superior articular process in the L1 vertebral body and (2) fracture morphology, that is, a rotational fracture with mild to moderately strong shearing stress to the dura mater. J. Med. Invest. 63: 122-126, February, 2016. PMID:27040066

  9. Bilateral neurological deficits following unilateral minimally invasive TLIF: A review of four patients

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Alexander T.; Smith, Zachary A.; Lawton, Cort D.; Wong, Albert P.; Dahdaleh, Nader S.; Koht, Antoun; Fessler, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) is commonly used for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disorders. The rate of postoperative neurological deficits is traditionally low. New neurological postoperative complications may be underreported. We report our infrequent rate of MI-TLIF procedures complicated by postoperative weakness. Methods: A database of 340 patients was evaluated, all of whom underwent MI-TLIF procedures performed between January 2002 and June 2012 by the senior author. We identified four cases (1.2%) whose postoperative course was complicated with bilateral lower extremity weakness. We retrospectively reviewed their past medical history, operative time, estimated blood loss, length of hospital stay, changes in intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, and pre- and postoperative neurological exams. Results: The average age of the four patients was 65.5 years(range: 62-75 years), average body mass index (BMI) was 25.1 (range: 24.1-26.6), and there were three females and one male. All patients had preoperative degenerative spondylolisthesis (either grade I or grade II). All patients were placed on a Wilson frame during surgery and underwent unilateral left-sided MI-TLIF. Three out of the four patients had a past medical history significant for abdominal or pelvic surgery and one patient had factor V Leiden deficiency syndrome. Conclusions: The rate of new neurological deficits following an MI-TLIF procedure is low, as documented in this study where the rate was 1.2%. Nonetheless, acknowledgement and open discussion of this serious complication is important for surgeon education. Of interest, the specific etiology or pathophysiology behind these complications remains relatively unknown (e.g. direct neural injury, traction injury, hypoperfusion, positioning complication, and others) despite there being some similarities between the patients and their perioperative courses. PMID:25289152

  10. Surgical Treatment for Significant Fracture-dislocation of the Thoracic or Lumbar Spine without Neurologic Deficit: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Enishi, Tetsuya; Katoh, Shinsuke; Sogo, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fracture-dislocation of the thoracic or lumbar spine often results in severe neurologic deficits if dislocation is significant. However, cases of fracture-dislocation of the thoracic or lumbar spine without neurologic deficits are rarely reported in the literature, and the choice of the treatment has been controversial. Case Report: Two female patients, aged 27 and 35 years, were injured in motor vehicle accidents and did not have neurological deficits except for slight numbness in the thighs in one case. Radiologic examinations showed nearly complete fracture-dislocations at T7-8 and L1-2, respectively. In both cases, subtotal corpectomies and anterior reconstructions using Kaneda devices were performed after laminectomy in the lateral decubitus position. No neurological deterioration was observed after surgery. Conclusion: Anterior subtotal corpectomy and reconstruction combined with posterior decompression is a good option for these cases to restore the alignment and the stability of the spine. PMID:27298981

  11. Migrating bullet in the thecal sac at the level of the conus medullaris without neurological deficit.

    PubMed

    Koban, Orkun; Çal, Hasan; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Özcan-Ekşi, Emel Ece; Öğrenci, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    Bullets can lodge in the organs, blood vessels or thecal sac. To our knowledge, a migrating bullet at the level of the conus medullaris without neurological deficit has never been reported. We present our patient along with a discussion of bullet migration in the spinal canal and its mechanisms, diagnosis and treatment. A 29-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department due to a gunshot wound in the right upper quadrant of his abdomen. He had no neurological deficit. Spinal CT scan and plain radiography showed the bullet had passed through the L2 vertebral body and had migrated downwards until it had lost its energy and come to rest in the spinal canal at the L3 vertebra level. There was a grade 5 injury to the pancreas head concomitant with mesenteric injury of the transverse colon, harboring a 0.5 cm hole. He had an emergent laparotomy to have a Roux-en-Y reconstruction and repair of the transverse colon. After his general status stabilized, he was taken back to the operating room to extract the bullet from the spinal canal. L3 and partial L2 laminectomy were performed. The dura was opened and the bullet was observed intrathecally. No cerebrospinal fluid fistula was observed. The surgeries and post-operative period were uneventful. PMID:26921138

  12. Thoracic Nerve Root Schwannoma Filling the Spinal Canal Almost Entirely Without any Neurological Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Godlewski, Bartosz; Klauz, Grzegorz; Czepko, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Spinal tumours may be classified in three groups: 1) extradural, 2) intradural extramedullary and 3) intramedullary spinal cord tumours. Intradural extramedullary tumours arise from the leptomeninges or nerve roots and include schwannomas. A schwannoma is usually a firm grey-whitish tumour growing near a nerve trunk or ramus. It can be separated from the nerve without damaging neural tissue. Schwannomas are usually solitary tumours. Case Presentation We present the case of a 37-year-old male who underwent surgery for a tumour in the upper thoracic segment of the spinal canal. Although the tumour filled the spinal canal almost entirely, the patient did not manifest any neurological deficits. During the surgery, the tumour was removed completely. A histological examination confirmed a benign schwannoma lesion (WHO G1). Conclusions The question whether doctors are keen to order more diagnostic investigations (including both laboratory and imaging studies) than are necessary is often asked in clinical practice. The cost factor is also important. Not every patient with back pain is referred for an MRI study in the absence of characteristic neurological signs. The case of our patient, however, speaks in favour of early referral for such diagnostic modalities. Appropriate imaging studies, even in patients presenting with no neurological deficits, may help detect pathologies than can lead to severe disability. A spinal canal tumour filling the spinal canal almost entirely and displacing the spinal cord could cause spinal cord damage at any time with all the dire consequences such as paraplegia and loss of the ability to walk. PMID:27110539

  13. Transpedicular hydroxyapatite grafting with indirect reduction for thoracolumbar burst fractures with neurological deficit: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Toyone, Tomoaki; Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Wada, Yuichi; Kamikawa, Koya; Watanabe, Atsuya; Yamashita, Takeshi; Matsuki, Keisuke; Shiboi, Ryutaro; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Ochiai, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    Background: The major problem after posterior correction and instrumentation in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures is failure to support the anterior spinal column leading to loss of correction of kyphosis and hardware breakage. We conducted a prospective consecutive series to evaluate the outcome of the management of acute thoracolumbar burst fractures by transpedicular hydroxyapatite (HA) grafting following indirect reduction and pedicle screw fixation. Materials and Methods: Eighteen consecutive patients who had thoracolumbar burst fractures and associated incomplete neurological deficit were operatively treated within four days of admission. Following indirect reduction and pedicle screw fixation, transpedicular intracorporeal HA grafting to the fractured vertebrae was performed. Mean operative time was 125 min and mean blood loss was 150 ml. Their implants were removed within one year and were prospectively followed for at least two years. Results: The neurological function of all 18 patients improved by at least one ASIA grade, with nine (50%) patients demonstrating complete neurological recovery. Sagittal alignment was improved from a mean preoperative kyphosis of 17°to −2°(lordosis) by operation, but was found to have slightly deteriorated to 1° at final followup observation. The CT images demonstrated a mean spinal canal narrowing preoperatively, immediate postoperative and at final followup of 60%, 22% and 11%, respectively. There were no instances of hardware failure. No patient reported severe pain or needed daily dosages of analgesics at the final followup. The two-year postoperative MRI demonstrated an increase of one grade in disc degeneration (n = 17) at the disc above and in 11 patients below the fractured vertebra. At the final followup, flexion-extension radiographs revealed that a median range of motion was 4, 6 and 34 degrees at the cranial segment of the fractured vertebra, caudal segment and L1-S1, respectively. Bone

  14. Spinal Cord Hamartomatous Myelodysplasia in 2 Horses With Clinical Neurologic Deficits.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K R; MacKay, R J; Nelson, E A; Stieler, A L; Roberts, J F; Castleman, W L

    2016-07-01

    Two horses euthanized for neurologic deficits were diagnosed with hamartomatous myelodysplasia of the spinal cord. One was a 5-week-old Holsteiner colt exhibiting spasms of muscle rigidity in the extensor muscles of the limbs and epaxial muscles, and the other was a 3-year-old Thoroughbred colt exhibiting progressive ataxia and hypermetria in the pelvic limbs. Each had focal disorganization of the white and gray matter of the spinal cord forming a mass interspersed with neurons, glial cells, and disoriented axon bundles. In the Holsteiner colt, the mass was at the level of C5 and included islands of meningeal tissue contiguous with the leptomeninges. The mass occluded the central canal forming hydromyelia cranial to the occlusion. In the Thoroughbred colt, the mass was at the level of L1 on the dorsal periphery of the spinal cord and did not involve the central canal. PMID:26917551

  15. Rapid correction of neurologic deficits by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD).

    PubMed

    Choy, D S

    1996-02-01

    Immediate correction of neurologic deficits due to herniated disc disease following percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) has not previously been reported. In a review of 182 cases of herniated intervertebral disc disease with radicular pain syndromes, the author observed a high percentage of return of absent ankle and knee jerk reflexes, return of straight leg raising to normal, and a change of the characteristic rolling to one side, bending the knees, and propping up with the hands as the usual maneuver to change from a supine to a sitting position ("Choy sign") to an ability to sit up directly by trunk flexion, immediately, and at 1 day after PLDD. The neurophysiologic implications are discussed. PMID:9484094

  16. Neurological soft signs might be endophenotype candidates for patients with deficit syndrome schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Albayrak, Yakup; Akyol, Esra Soydaş; Beyazyüz, Murat; Baykal, Saliha; Kuloglu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a chronic, disabling, disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population. The nature of schizophrenia is heterogeneous, and unsuccessful efforts to subtype this disorder have been made. Deficit syndrome schizophrenia (DS) is a clinical diagnosis that has not been placed in main diagnostic manuals. In this study, we aimed to investigate and compare neurological soft signs (NSS) in DS patients, non-deficit schizophrenia (NDS) patients, and healthy controls (HCs). We suggest that NSS might be an endophenotype candidate for DS patients. Methods Sixty-six patients with schizophrenia and 30 HCs were enrolled in accordance with our inclusion and exclusion criteria. The patients were sub-typed as DS (n=24) and NDS (n=42) according to the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome. The three groups were compared in terms of sociodemographic and clinical variables and total scores and subscores on the Physical and Neurological Examination for Soft Signs (PANESS). Following the comparison, a regression analysis was performed for predictability of total PANESS score and its subscales in the diagnosis of DS and NDS. Results The groups were similar in terms of age, sex, and smoking status. The results of our study indicated that the total PANESS score was significantly higher in the DS group compared to the NDS and HC groups, and all PANESS subscales were significantly higher in the DS group than in the HC group. The diagnosis of DS was predicted significantly by total PANESS score (P<0.001, odds ratio =9.48, 95% confidence interval: 0.00–4.56); the synergy, graphesthesia, stereognosis, motor tasks, and ability to maintain posture subscales were found to be significant predictors. Conclusion This study confirms that NSS were higher in patients with DS. In addition, we suggest that our results might support the notion of DS as a different and distinct type of schizophrenia. NSS might also be a promising candidate as an endophenotype for DS. However

  17. Evaluation of survival and neurological deficit in rats in the new model of global transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, G A; Smol'yakova, V I; Osipenko, A N; Plotnikov, M B

    2014-12-01

    We propose a modification to rat model of transient global cerebral ischemia with four-vessel occlusion avoiding pneumothorax and minimizing the consequences of surgery. Survival and neurological deficit in rats in this model was studied over 5 days. PMID:25430646

  18. Conservative management of idiopathic anterior atlantoaxial subluxation without neurological deficits in an 83-year-old female: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Andrée-Anne; Wong, Jessica J.

    2014-01-01

    Atlantoaxial subluxation that is not related to traumatic, congenital, or rheumatological conditions is rare and can be a diagnostic challenge. This case report details a case of anterior atlantoaxial subluxation in an 83-year-old female without history of trauma, congenital, or rheumatological conditions. She presented to the chiropractor with insidious neck pain and headaches, without neurological deficits. Radiographs revealed a widened atlantodental space (measuring 6 mm) indicating anterior atlantoaxial subluxation and potential sagittal atlantoaxial instability. Prompt detection and appropriate conservative management resulted in favourable long-term outcome at 13-months follow-up. Conservative management included education, mobilizations, soft tissue therapy, monitoring for neurological progression, and co-management with the family physician. The purpose of this case report is to heighten awareness of the clinical presentation of idiopathic anterior atlantoaxial subluxation without neurological deficits. Discussion will focus on the incidence, mechanism, clinical presentation, and conservative management of a complex case of anterior atlantoaxial subluxation. PMID:24587500

  19. Traumatic Posterior Atlantoaxial Dislocation Without Associated Fracture but With Neurological Deficit: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Li, Feng; Guan, Hanfeng; Xiong, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Posterior atlantoaxial dislocation without odontoid fracture is extremely rare and often results in fatal spinal cord injury. According to the reported literature, all cases presented mild or no neurologic deficit, with no definite relation to upper spinal cord injury. Little is reported about traumatic posterior atlantoaxial dislocation, with incomplete quadriplegia associated with a spinal cord injury.We present a case of posterior atlantoaxial dislocation without associated fracture, but with quadriplegia, and accompanying epidural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage.The patient underwent gentle traction in the neutral position until repeated cranial computed tomography revealed no progression of the epidural hematoma. Thereafter, the atlantoaxial dislocation was reduced by using partial odontoidectomy via a video-assisted transcervical approach and maintained with posterior polyaxial screw-rod constructs and an autograft. Neurological status improved immediately after surgery, and the patient recovered completely after 1 year.Posterior fusion followed by closed reduction is the superior strategy for posterior atlantoaxial dislocation without odontoid fracture, according to literature. But for cases with severe neurological deficit, open reduction may be the safest choice to avoid the lethal complication of overdistraction of the spinal cord. Also, open reduction and posterior srew-rod fixation are safe and convenient strategies in dealing with traumatic posterior atlantoaxial dislocation patients with neurological deficit. PMID:26512572

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging observation in Pott's spine with or without neurological deficit

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Sohail; Jain, Anil Kumar; Saini, Namita Singh; Kumar, Sudhir; Mukunth, Rajagopalan; Kumar, Jaswant; Kumar, Pawan; Kaur, Prabhjot

    2015-01-01

    increases, and MD decreases at SOL in severe grade of paraplegia because of epidural collection while in milder grade, both decrease. In group A (without neurological deficit), mean FA and MD in patients with and without canal encroachment was similar. On tractography, both groups A and B (with or without neurological deficit) showed disruption of fiber tract at SOL and thickness of distally traced spinal cord was appreciably less than the upper cord. FA and MD could not differentiate between various grades of paraplegia. Although the number of patients in each group are small. PMID:26015628

  1. Success rate of motor evoked potentials for intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring: effects of age, lesion location, and preoperative neurologic deficits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Sterio, Djordje; Ming, Xu; Para, Devaki D; Butusova, Marri; Tong, Teresa; Beric, Aleksandar

    2007-06-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation with myogenic motor evoked potential (MEP) recording was used for intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring in 341 consecutive "high-risk" neurosurgical or orthopedic procedures. Overall, the success rate for establishing reliable MEP response was 94.8% for upper extremities and 66.6% for lower extremities. The rate was only 39.1% for lower extremities in patients with preoperative motor deficit and up to 81% in neurologically intact adults. Further analysis demonstrated that extremes of age or the presence of a lesion in the spinal cord and motor deficit contributed to failure in obtaining reliable MEPs. PMID:17545833

  2. LANGUAGE DEFICITS, LOCALIZATION, AND GRAMMAR: EVIDENCE FOR A DISTRIBUTIVE MODEL OF LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN IN APHASIC PATIENTS AND NEUROLOGICALLY INTACT INDIVIDUALS

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Frederic; Bates, Elizabeth; Wulfeck, Beverly; Utman, Jennifer; Dronkers, Nina; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2015-01-01

    Selective deficits in aphasics patients’ grammatical production and comprehension are often cited as evidence that syntactic processing is modular and localizable in discrete areas of the brain (e.g., Y. Grodzinsky, 2000). The authors review a large body of experimental evidence suggesting that morphosyntactic deficits can be observed in a number of aphasic and neurologically intact populations. They present new data showing that receptive agrammatism is found not only over a range of aphasic groups, but is also observed in neurologically intact individuals processing under stressful conditions. The authors suggest that these data are most compatible with a domain-general account of language, one that emphasizes the interaction of linguistic distributions with the properties of an associative processor working under normal or suboptimal conditions. PMID:11699116

  3. The Efficacy of Percutaneous Long-Segmental Posterior Fixation of Unstable Thoracolumbar Fracture with Partial Neurologic Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun Woo; Jang, Soo-Jin; Son, Jung-Hwan; Jang, Jae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with unstable thoracolumbar fracture (UTLF) who were treated by percutaneous long-segmental posterior fixation (PLSPF) by two vertebrae cranial to the fracture with two vertebrae caudal. Overview of Literature To the best of our knowledge, PLSPF for stabilization of UTLF has not been reported. Methods The study involved retrospective analysis and investigation from the results of 27 patients who had undergone PLSPF for stabilization of a UTLF with partial neurologic deficit, over a follow-up period of two years. Kyphotic angle (KA), anterior vertebral height percentage (AVHP) and cross-sectional ratio of the displaced fragment within the spinal canal were evaluated with simple radiographs and axial computed tomography scans preoperatively and two years postoperatively. The clinical outcome for pain was assessed by a visual analogue scale (VAS) and Denis' scale, and the degree of neurologic deficit was measured by modified Frankel classification. Results Five patients had minor complications. The KA, AVHP, and cross-sectional ratio of the displaced fragment improved significantly after surgery (p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.003, respectively). Neurologic recovery of one or more for the Frankel grade was seen in 19 patients with an average improvement of 1.7. The VAS and Denis' score improved significantly at a two year follow-up (p=0.02, p=0.012, respectively). Conclusions The technique of PLSPF is useful for the treatment of UTLF with partial neurologic deficit, and produces decreased morbidity and fewer complications. PMID:23741544

  4. Spontaneous Ocular and Neurologic Deficits in Transgenic Mouse Models of Multiple Sclerosis and Noninvasive Investigative Modalities: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Archana A.; Ding, Di; Lee, Richard K.; Levy, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, predominantly involving myelinated neurons of the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerve. Optic neuritis is frequently associated with MS and often precedes other neurologic deficits associated with MS. A large number of patients experience visual defects and have abnormalities concomitant with neurologic abnormalities. Transgenic mice manifesting spontaneous neurologic and ocular disease are unique models that have revolutionized the study of MS. Spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (sEAE) presents with spontaneous onset of demyelination, without the need of an injectable immunogen. This review highlights the various models of sEAE, their disease characteristics, and applicability for future research. The study of optic neuropathy and neurologic manifestations of demyelination in sEAE will expand our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying MS. Early and precise diagnosis of MS with different noninvasive methods has opened new avenues in managing symptoms, reducing morbidity, and limiting disease burden. This review discusses the spectrum of available noninvasive techniques, such as electrophysiological and behavioral assessment, optical coherence tomography, scanning laser polarimetry, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, pupillometry, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, gait, and cardiovascular monitoring, and their clinical relevance. PMID:22331505

  5. Pomegranate seed hydroalcoholic extract improves memory deficits in ovariectomized rats with permanent cerebral hypoperfusion /ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sarkaki, Alireza; Farbood, Yaghoub; Hashemi, Shieda; Rafiei Rad, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Estrogen deficit following menopause results in cognitive behaviors impairment. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of pomegranate seed extract (PGSE) on avoidance memories after permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (2CCAO) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Materials and Methods: Adult female Wistar rats were divided randomly into eight groups with 8 rats in each group: 1) Sham-operated for ovaries and 2CCAO (ShO); 2) OVX and sham operated for ischemia (OShI); 3-7) OVX with 2CCAO (OI) received PGSE (100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/2ml/kg or normal saline, orally) for 14 days (OI+E100, 200, 400, 800 or OI+Veh); 8) OShI received most effective dose of PGSE (200 and 400 mg/kg for passive and active avoidance memories respectively). Active and passive avoidance tasks were measured in Y-maze and two-way shuttle box respectively. Data were analyzed with one-way and RM-ANOVA followed by HSD post-hoc test. Results: Sensorimotor impaired in OShI+Veh and OI+Veh (P<0.001 vs. ShO). PGSE improved it significantly in dose dependently manner (P<0.001 vs. OI+Veh). Both types of memories were significantly impaired in OVX rats before and after 2CCAO (P<0.001). PGSE treatment significantly improved memories in OI groups (P<0.05, P<0.01 and P<0.001) compared with OI+Veh. No toxicity was observed with PGSE consumption (800 mg/kg, 2 weeks, orally). Conclusion: PGSE exhibits therapeutic potential for avoidance memories, which is most likely related at least in part to its phytoestrogenic and also antioxidative actions. PMID:25767756

  6. VPA Alleviates Neurological Deficits and Restores Gene Expression in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka I., Maky; Irie, Koichiro; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Nakashima, Kinichi; Zhao, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs once in every 10,000–15,000 live female births. Despite intensive research, no effective cure is yet available. Valproic acid (VPA) has been used widely to treat mood disorder, epilepsy, and a growing number of other disorders. In limited clinical studies, VPA has also been used to control seizure in RTT patients with promising albeit somewhat unclear efficacy. In this study we tested the effect of VPA on the neurological symptoms of RTT and discovered that short-term VPA treatment during the symptomatic period could reduce neurological symptoms in RTT mice. We found that VPA restores the expression of a subset of genes in RTT mouse brains, and these genes clustered in neurological disease and developmental disorder networks. Our data suggest that VPA could be used as a drug to alleviate RTT symptoms. PMID:24968028

  7. Diagnosis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Its Behavioral, Neurological, and Genetic Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Kathryn L.; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common developmental disorder often associated with other developmental disorders including speech, language, and reading disorders. Here, we review the principal features of ADHD and current diagnostic standards for the disorder. We outline the ADHD subtypes, which are based upon the dimensions…

  8. Global neurologic deficits with baylisascaris encephalitis in a previously healthy teenager.

    PubMed

    Chun, Colleen S; Kazacos, Kevin R; Glaser, Carol; Bardo, Dianna; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Nash, Robert

    2009-10-01

    We present a case of acute eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by Baylisascaris procyonis in a previously healthy teenager with a history of substance abuse. Treatment included methylprednisolone; no anthelmintic drugs were administered. This case identifies a new risk factor, altered behavior related to substance abuse, and a newly described outcome of cognitive deficits for B. procyonis disease in older children. PMID:19738504

  9. [Brachial plexus. Long lasting neurological deficit following interscalene blockade of the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Funk, W; Angerer, M; Sauer, K; Altmeppen, J

    2000-07-01

    An interscalene block of the brachial plexus was combined with general anaesthesia for repair of a complex chronic lesion of the shoulder. The localisation of the plexus with electro-stimulation and the injection of Bupivacain 0.5% were accomplished easily and without painful sensations. 48 hours later the block was still partially present. Paraesthesia and a sensory and motor innervation deficit affected mainly the dorsal fascicle, but also areas innervated by the median and lateral fascicles. The deficit did not completely disappear for 18 month. The cause could have been due to direct traumatisation during blockade or operation, toxic action of the injected substance (Bupivacain 0.5%, 30 ml), distension of the plexus, a cervical syndrome or an aseptic plexitis, although a definite determination is not possible. However, the pattern of the lesion and the lack of pain during localisation of the plexus and injection favour traumatisation during the acromioplasty. PMID:10969388

  10. Traumatic spondyloptosis at the cervico-thoracic junction without neurological deficits

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Lozen, Andrew; Gelsomino, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Background: There have been rare cases of traumatic cervical spondyloptosis without neurological compromise. We report another case and provide a review of the literature, with a focus on appropriate management. Case Description: A 60-year-old male rode his bicycle into a stationary semi-truck. He reported initial bilateral upper extremity paresthesias that resolved. Imaging demonstrated C7 on T1 spondyloptosis. Traction did not achieve reduction and a halo was applied. Subsequently, he underwent posterior decompression C6-T1, reduction via bilateral complete facetectomies at C7, and fixation from C4 to T2 fixation. Afterward, an anterior C7-T1 fixation occurred, where exposure was performed through a midline sternotomy. Postoperatively, he woke up with baseline motor and sensory examination in his extremities. He did exhibit voice hoarseness due to paralysis of the left vocal cords. He was discharged home 3 days after surgery. At 6 months follow-up, there was a progressive improvement of the left vocal cords to slight paresis; dynamic X-rays demonstrated no instability with good fusion progression. Conclusion: Traumatic cervical spondyloptosis without neurological compromise is a rare and challenging scenario. There is a concern for neurologic compromise with preoperative traction, but if specific posterior elements are fractured, the spinal canal may be wide enough where the concern for disc migration is minimal. For patients who have not been reduced preoperatively, a posterior approach with initial decompression to widen the canal, before reduction, appears safe. This scheme may avoid an initial anterior approach for decompression, necessitating a 3-stage procedure if circumferential stabilization is pursued. PMID:27274411

  11. [Neurological alterations and intellectual deficits with sudden visual loss in a 7-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Gotz-Wieckowska, A; Pawlak, M; Siwiec-Proscinska, J; Seget, M

    2013-05-01

    Neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NLC) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of lysosomal storage diseases. The most common NCL is the juvenile type which begins between the ages of 4 and 10 years in most cases with sudden visual loss which correlates with maculopathy and leads to blindness within a few years of presentation. After several years neurological deterioration ensues and in most cases death occurs in the 3rd decade of life. As with other storage disorders NCL is an incurable disease. PMID:23224126

  12. Tissue-type transglutaminase and the effects of cystamine on intracerebral hemorrhage-induced brain edema and neurological deficits

    PubMed Central

    Okauchi, Masanobu; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F.; Hua, Ya

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Neurodegeneration occurs after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and tissue-type transglutaminase (tTG) has a role in neurodegenerative disorders. The present study investigated tTG expression after ICH and the effects of a tTG inhibitor, cystamine, on ICH-induced brain edema and neurological deficits. Methods This study had two parts. In the first, male Sprague-Dawley rats received an intracaudate injection of 100 µL autologous whole blood or a needle insertion (sham). Rats were killed 3 days later and the brains used for immunohistochemistry, Western blots and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In the second set, ICH rats were treated intraperitoneally with either a tTG inhibitor, cystamine, or vehicle. Rats underwent behavioral testing and were killed at day-3 for measurement of brain swelling. Results tTG positive cells were found in the ipsilateral basal ganglia after ICH and most of those cells were neuron-like. Western blot analysis showed a 3-fold increase in tTG in the ipsilateral basal ganglia (p<0.01 vs. sham) after ICH. tTG mRNA levels were also significantly higher (8.5-fold increase vs. sham). Cystamine treatment attenuated ICH-induced brain swelling (day 3: 14.4±3.2 vs. 21.4±4.0% in vehicle-treated rats, p<0.01), neuronal death and improved functional outcome (forelimb placing score: 47±23 vs. 17±16% in vehicle-treated rats, p<0.05). Conclusions ICH induces perihematomal tTG upregulation and cystamine, a tTG inhibitor, reduces ICH-induced brain swelling and neurological deficits. PMID:19007756

  13. Firearm bullet settling into the lumbar spinal canal without causing neurological deficit: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Hakan, Tayfun; Çerçi, Ajlan; Gürcan, Serkan; Akçay, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncertainty still exists regarding the treatment of the patients presenting with gunshot wounds to the spine. Neurological insults, cerebrospinal fluid fistula, infection, lead or copper toxicity, migration of bullets, and spinal instability are included among the common challenging issues. Case Description: An 18-year-old woman was admitted with low back pain following a gunshot injury five days ago. She was neurologically intact. Radiological examinations showed that a bullet was settled in L4-5 disc space. The bullet was removed with a unilateral L4-5 partial hemilaminectomy and discectomy from the left side. The second case was of a 29-year-old man admitted with radiating leg pain on the right side following a gunshot injury from his left side of lower back four months ago. He had only positive straight leg raising test. Radiological studies showed two bullets, one was in the psoas muscle on the left side and the other was in spinal canal that had caused a burst fracture of the L5 vertebra. Following L5 laminectomy and bilateral L5-S1 facetectomy, the bullet was removed from the spinal canal and L5-S1 transpedicular posterior stabilization was performed. The postoperative period of both patients was unremarkable. Conclusion: Bullet settling into the lumbar spinal canal without causing neurological deficit may require surgical intervention. Removal of bullets provided not only pain relief in both the cases but also prevented future complications such as migration of the bullets, plumbism, and neuropathic pain and instability. PMID:27213110

  14. Perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1: towards a biomarker of neurologic deficits.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Niedzielska, Dagmara; Derlin, Thorsten; Koziolek, Eva J; Amthauer, Holger; Salmen, Benedikt; Pahnke, Jens; Brenner, Winfried; Mautner, Victor F; Buchert, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a single-gene disorder affecting neurologic function in humans. The NF1+/- mouse model with germline mutation of the NF1 gene presents with deficits in learning, attention, and motor coordination, very similar to NF1 patients. The present study performed brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in NF1+/- mice to identify possible perfusion differences as surrogate marker for altered cerebral activity in NF1. Cerebral perfusion was measured with hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) SPECT in NF1+/- mice and their wild-type littermates longitudinally at juvenile age and at young adulthood. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed to test for structural changes. There was increased HMPAO uptake in NF1 mice in the amygdala at juvenile age, which reduced to normal levels at young adulthood. There was no genotype effect on thalamic HMPAO uptake, which was confirmed by ex vivo measurements of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the thalamus. Morphologic analyses showed no major structural abnormalities. However, there was some evidence of increased density of microglial somata in the amygdala of NF1-deficient mice. In conclusion, there is evidence of increased perfusion and increased density of microglia in juvenile NF1 mice specifically in the amygdala, both of which might be associated with altered synaptic plasticity and, therefore, with cognitive deficits in NF1. PMID:25785829

  15. Fornix as an imaging marker for episodic memory deficits in healthy aging and in various neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Douet, Vanessa; Chang, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The fornix is a part of the limbic system and constitutes the major efferent and afferent white matter tracts from the hippocampi. The underdevelopment of or injuries to the fornix are strongly associated with memory deficits. Its role in memory impairments was suggested long ago with cases of surgical forniceal transections. However, recent advances in brain imaging techniques, such as diffusion tensor imaging, have revealed that macrostructural and microstructural abnormalities of the fornix correlated highly with declarative and episodic memory performance. This structure appears to provide a robust and early imaging predictor for memory deficits not only in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, but also in schizophrenia and psychiatric disorders, and during neurodevelopment and “typical” aging. The objective of the manuscript is to present a systematic review regarding published brain imaging research on the fornix, including the development of its tracts, its role in various neurological diseases, and its relationship to neurocognitive performance in human studies. PMID:25642186

  16. Cell- and gene-based therapeutic approaches for neurological deficits in Mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dao

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are a group of lysosomal storage diseases that are resulted from abnormal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans. Among the progressive multi-organ abnormalities often associated with MPS diseases, the deterioration of central nervous system (CNS) is the most challenging manifestations to be tackled, due to the impermeability of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Evolved with recent development in stem cell biotechnology and gene therapy, several novel experimental approaches have been investigated in animal models. In this review, we will address different approaches attempting to bypass the BBB for neuropathic MPS treatment using cell- and gene-based therapies. Several neurological findings in CNS pathophysiology emerged with therapeutic investigation will also be discussed. PMID:21235445

  17. Conservative versus operative treatment for thoracolumbar burst fractures without neurologic deficit.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Carolina; Flores, Sebastián; Molina, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Thoracolumbar burst fractures account for up to 17% of major spinal fractures. Both conservative and operative treatments are widely used in clinical practice to manage thoracolumbar burst fractures. Previous studies showed good functional results with both treatments, but surgical approach has been associated with higher cost and risks of causing unnecessary adverse effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified 14 systematic reviews including 25 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded that operative treatment may decrease the risk of neurologic impairment, but in turn, could increase the risk of general complications. It is unclear whether there are differences in pain reduction, improvement in function and quality of life, need for subsequent surgery or radiographic progression of kyphosis in both groups. PMID:27028069

  18. Reliability and Validity of the Assessment of Neurological Soft-Signs in Children with and without Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafsson, Peik; Svedin, Carl Goran; Ericsson, Ingegerd; Linden, Christian; Karlsson, Magnus K.; Thernlund, Gunilla

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To study the value and reliability of an examination of neurological soft-signs, often used in Sweden, in the assessment of children with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), by examining children with and without ADHD, as diagnosed by an experienced clinician using the DSM-III-R. Method: We have examined interrater reliability…

  19. PARP-1 Inhibition Attenuates Neuronal Loss, Microglia Activation and Neurological Deficits after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Loane, David J.; Zhao, Zaorui; Kabadi, Shruti V.; Hanscom, Marie; Byrnes, Kimberly R.; Faden, Alan I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes neuronal cell death as well as microglial activation and related neurotoxicity that contribute to subsequent neurological dysfunction. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) induces neuronal cell death through activation of caspase-independent mechanisms, including release of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), and microglial activation. Administration of PJ34, a selective PARP-1 inhibitor, reduced cell death of primary cortical neurons exposed to N-Methyl-N'-Nitro-N-Nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), a potent inducer of AIF-dependent cell death. PJ34 also attenuated lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ-induced activation of BV2 or primary microglia, limiting NF-κB activity and iNOS expression as well as decreasing generation of reactive oxygen species and TNFα. Systemic administration of PJ34 starting as late as 24 h after controlled cortical impact resulted in improved motor function recovery in mice with TBI. Stereological analysis demonstrated that PJ34 treatment reduced the lesion volume, attenuated neuronal cell loss in the cortex and thalamus, and reduced microglial activation in the TBI cortex. PJ34 treatment did not improve cognitive performance in a Morris water maze test or reduce neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. Overall, our data indicate that PJ34 has a significant, albeit selective, neuroprotective effect after experimental TBI, and its therapeutic effect may be from multipotential actions on neuronal cell death and neuroinflammatory pathways. PMID:24476502

  20. Dodecafluoropentane Emulsion (DDFPe) Decreases Stroke Size and Improves Neurological Scores in a Permanent Occlusion Rat Stroke Model

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A.T; Arthur, M.C; Nix, J.S; Montgomery, J.A; Skinner, R.D; Roberson, P.K; Borrelli, Michael; Culp, W.C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dodecafluoropentane emulsion (DDFPe), given IV one hour after stroke, has been shown to greatly reduce the percent stroke volume (%SV) in rabbits. With repeated doses its effect continued for 24 hours. Purpose: Test DDFPe as neuroprotective agent in permanent occlusion rat stroke models in Sprague Dawley (SD) and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) measuring both %SV and neurological assessment scores (NAS). Methods: The male rats received either saline (control), or one or four doses (1x or 4x) of DDFPe (0.6ml/kg IV) one hour post stroke. Treatment groups were SD (n=26) (control, 1x and 4x; n=12, 7 and 7) and SHR (n=14) (control, 1x and 4x; n=7, 3 and 4). The 4x doses were given at 1.5 hour intervals. At six hours post stroke, the rats received a NAS using standard tests for balance, reflexes, and motor performance. Then rats were euthanized and brains removed for TTC evaluation of %SV. Results: For %SV analysis strain differences were not significant therefore strains were combined. DDFPe significantly decreased %SV in 1x and 4xDDFPe groups compared to control groups (2.59±1.81 and 0.98±0.88 vs. 9.24±6.06, p≤0.001 each; p≤0.0001 for the overall test for treatment effect). The 1x versus 4xDDFPe groups were not significantly different (p=0.40). In NAS analysis both strains showed significant improvement with 4xDDFPe therapy vs. controls, (SD: 5.00+2.45 vs. 9.36+3.56, p=0.01; SHR: 7.75+4.43 vs. 12.14+3.08, p=0.05). Differences between the 1x DDFPe group and controls were not significant (SD: 8.43+3.69; SHR: 9. 33+3.51). Conclusion: DDFPe treatment provides significant neuroprotection when assessed six hours post stroke. PMID:25674164

  1. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ashok K.; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145–323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred. PMID:25165433

  2. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ashok K; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145-323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred. PMID:25165433

  3. Neurological deficits in solvent-exposed painters: a syndrome including impaired colour vision, cognitive defects, tremor and loss of vibration sensation.

    PubMed

    Dick, F; Semple, S; Chen, R; Seaton, A

    2000-10-01

    Five individuals are described who had participated in a study of former dockyard painters. All had worked between 16 years and 45 years as industrial painters, much of the time inside ships. All underwent structured neurological examination, colour vision testing (allowing calculation of a colour confusion index corrected for age and alcohol), and detailed psychometric testing. An occupational history sufficient to allow estimation of past exposure to solvents was taken. All gave a history of exposure to high concentrations of solvents at work, and several described episodes of acute narcosis. All showed neurological deficits and some had overt neurological disease, although in no case had this previously been linked to their work. The most striking features, sufficient to constitute a syndrome, were acquired blue-yellow colour vision deficits, coarse tremor, impaired vibration sensation in the legs and cognitive impairment. Their estimated cumulative exposures to solvents ranged between the equivalent of 13 and 37 calendar years working at the Occupational Exposure Standard concentration (OES years). This study for the first time gives an indication of the concentrations of solvents likely to lead to serious neurological disease in humans. It serves as a reminder to physicians to take an occupational history from patients with obscure neurological or psychological impairment. PMID:11029475

  4. Stroke atlas: a 3D interactive tool correlating cerebrovascular pathology with underlying neuroanatomy and resulting neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

    2013-02-01

    Understanding stroke-related pathology with underlying neuroanatomy and resulting neurological deficits is critical in education and clinical practice. Moreover, communicating a stroke situation to a patient/family is difficult because of complicated neuroanatomy and pathology. For this purpose, we created a stroke atlas. The atlas correlates localized cerebrovascular pathology with both the resulting disorder and surrounding neuroanatomy. It also provides 3D display both of labeled pathology and freely composed neuroanatomy. Disorders are described in terms of resulting signs, symptoms and syndromes, and they have been compiled for ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and cerebral aneurysms. Neuroanatomy, subdivided into 2,000 components including 1,300 vessels, contains cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, white matter, deep grey nuclei, arteries, veins, dural sinuses, cranial nerves and tracts. A computer application was developed comprising: 1) anatomy browser with the normal brain atlas (created earlier); 2) simulator of infarcts/hematomas/aneurysms/stenoses; 3) tools to label pathology; 4) cerebrovascular pathology database with lesions and disorders, and resulting signs, symptoms and/or syndromes. The pathology database is populated with 70 lesions compiled from textbooks. The initial view of each pathological site is preset in terms of lesion location, size, surrounding surface and sectional neuroanatomy, and lesion and neuroanatomy labeling. The atlas is useful for medical students, residents, nurses, general practitioners, and stroke clinicians, neuroradiologists and neurologists. It may serve as an aid in patient-doctor communication helping a stroke clinician explain the situation to a patient/family. It also enables a layman to become familiarized with normal brain anatomy and understand what happens in stroke. PMID:23859169

  5. Focal neurological deficits

    MedlinePlus

    ... reflex, swallowing difficulty, and frequent choking Speech or language difficulties, such as aphasia (a problem understanding or producing words) or dysarthria (a problem making the sounds of words), poor enunciation, poor understanding of speech, ...

  6. Effects of progesterone administration on infarct volume and functional deficits following permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishrat, Tauheed; Sayeed, Iqbal; Atif, Fahim; Stein, Donald G

    2009-02-27

    Recent experimental evidence indicates that progesterone (PROG) protects against various models of brain injury, including ischemic stroke. Most human studies of pharmacologic treatments for acute cerebral stroke have failed despite initial success in animal models. To simulate better the typical human stroke without reperfusion, the present study was conducted to examine the efficacy of PROG on infarct volume and functional outcome in a permanent model of stroke, using direct cauterization of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Twenty-four male adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent pMCAO by electro-coagulation and sham operation. After induction of permanent MCA occlusion (pMCAO), the rats received an initial intraperitoneal injection of PROG (8 mg/kg) or vehicle at 1 h post-occlusion followed by subcutaneous injections at 6, 24 and 48 h. Functional deficits were tested on the rotarod and grip-strength meter at 24, 48 and 72 h after pMCAO. The rats were killed 72 h after surgery and isolated brain was sectioned into coronal slices and stained with 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). PROG-treated rats showed a substantial reduction (54.05%) in the volume of the infarct (% contralateral hemisphere) compared to vehicle controls. In addition there was a significant improvement in ability to remain on an accelerating rotarod and increased grip strength observed in the pMCAO rats treated with PROG compared to vehicle. Taken together, these data indicate that PROG is beneficial in one of the best-characterized models of stroke, and may warrant further testing in future clinical trials for human stroke. PMID:19135987

  7. Effects of progesterone administration on infarct volume and functional deficits following permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ishrat, Tauheed; Sayeed, Iqbal; Atif, Fahim; Stein, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence indicates that progesterone (PROG) protects against various models of brain injury, including ischemic stroke. Most human studies of pharmacologic treatments for acute cerebral stroke have failed despite initial success in animal models. To simulate better the typical human stroke without reperfusion, the present study was conducted to examine the efficacy of PROG on infarct volume and functional outcome in a permanent model of stroke, using direct cauterization of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Twenty-four male adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent pMCAO by electro-coagulation and sham operation. After induction of permanent MCA occlusion (pMCAO), the rats received an initial intraperitoneal injection of PROG (8 mg/kg) or vehicle at 1h post-occlusion followed by subcutaneous injections at 6, 24 and 48 h. Functional deficits were tested on the rotarod and grip strength meter at 24, 48 and 72 h after pMCAO. The rats were killed 72 h after surgery and isolated brain was sectioned into coronal slices and stained with 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). PROG-treated rats showed a substantial reduction (54.05%) in the volume of the infarct (% contralateral hemisphere) compared to vehicle controls. In addition there was a significant improvement in ability to remain on an accelerating rotarod and increased grip strength observed in the pMCAO rats treated with PROG compared to vehicle. Taken together, these data indicate that PROG is beneficial in one of the best-characterized models of stroke, and may warrant further testing in future clinical trials for human stroke. PMID:19135987

  8. Combined abdominal and vaginal approach for bladder neck closure and permanent suprapubic tube: urinary diversion in the neurologically impaired woman.

    PubMed

    Levy, J B; Jacobs, J A; Wein, A J

    1994-12-01

    Chronic indwelling Foley catheter placement in the neurologically impaired patient can lead to pressure necrosis of the urethra with incontinence. We report on 2 series of patients who underwent bladder neck closure and insertion of a suprapubic catheter for this problem. Our initial group includes 4 patients who underwent 5 transvaginal procedures, of which 2 (40%) were successful. Subsequently, we modified our approach, and used a combined abdominal and transvaginal repair, which was successful in 10 consecutive patients with a followup of 6 to 40 months (mean 15.6). PMID:7966679

  9. Manic depressive psychosis and schizophrenia are neurological disorders at the extremes of CNS maturation and nutritional disorders associated with a deficit in marine fat.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, L F

    2001-12-01

    The maturational theory of brain development comprises manic depressive psychosis and schizophrenia. It holds that the disorders are part of human diversity in growth and maturation, which explains their ubiquity, shared susceptibility genes and multifactorial inheritance. Rate of maturation and age at puberty are the genotype; the disorders are localized at the extremes with normality in between. This is based on the association between onset of puberty and the final regressive event, with pruning of 40% of excitatory synapses leaving the inhibitory ones fairly unchanged. This makes excitability, a fundamental property of nervous tissue, a distinguishing factor: the earlier puberty, the greater excitability--the later puberty, the greater deficit. Biological treatment supports deviation from the norm: neuroleptics are convulsant; antidepressives are anti-epiletogenic. There is an association between onset of puberty and body-build: early maturers are pyknic broad-built, late ones linearly leptosomic. This discrepancy is similar to that in the two disorders, supporting the theory that body-build is the phenotype. Standard of living is the environmental factor, which affects pubertal age and shifts the panorama of mental illness accordingly. Unnatural death has increased with antipsychotics. Other treatment is needed. PUFA deficit has been observed in RBC in both disorders and striking improvements with addition of minor amounts of PUFA. This supports that dietary deficit might cause psychotic development and that prevention is possible. Other neurological disorders also profit from PUFA, underlining a general deficit in the diet. PMID:11918426

  10. Quantitative EEG Magnitudes in Children with and without Attention Deficit Disorder during Neurological Screening and Cognitive Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Helen J.; Barabasz, Marianne

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative EEG magnitude data were obtained from children with and without attention deficit disorder (ADD). The data suggest that the right fronto-centro-temporal region is not as "cognitively activated" relative to the left hemisphere in those children with ADD. Neurotherapy training of the right frontal and central regions in ADD children was…

  11. Post-traumatic hypoxia exacerbates neurological deficit, neuroinflammation and cerebral metabolism in rats with diffuse traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The combination of diffuse brain injury with a hypoxic insult is associated with poor outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury. In this study, we investigated the impact of post-traumatic hypoxia in amplifying secondary brain damage using a rat model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Rats were examined for behavioral and sensorimotor deficits, increased brain production of inflammatory cytokines, formation of cerebral edema, changes in brain metabolism and enlargement of the lateral ventricles. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to diffuse TAI using the Marmarou impact-acceleration model. Subsequently, rats underwent a 30-minute period of hypoxic (12% O2/88% N2) or normoxic (22% O2/78% N2) ventilation. Hypoxia-only and sham surgery groups (without TAI) received 30 minutes of hypoxic or normoxic ventilation, respectively. The parameters examined included: 1) behavioural and sensorimotor deficit using the Rotarod, beam walk and adhesive tape removal tests, and voluntary open field exploration behavior; 2) formation of cerebral edema by the wet-dry tissue weight ratio method; 3) enlargement of the lateral ventricles; 4) production of inflammatory cytokines; and 5) real-time brain metabolite changes as assessed by microdialysis technique. Results TAI rats showed significant deficits in sensorimotor function, and developed substantial edema and ventricular enlargement when compared to shams. The additional hypoxic insult significantly exacerbated behavioural deficits and the cortical production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β and TNF but did not further enhance edema. TAI and particularly TAI+Hx rats experienced a substantial metabolic depression with respect to glucose, lactate, and glutamate levels. Conclusion Altogether, aggravated behavioural deficits observed in rats with diffuse TAI combined with hypoxia may be induced by enhanced neuroinflammation, and a prolonged period of metabolic dysfunction. PMID

  12. Manual versus Automated Rodent Behavioral Assessment: Comparing Efficacy and Ease of Bederson and Garcia Neurological Deficit Scores to an Open Field Video-Tracking System

    PubMed Central

    Desland, Fiona A.; Afzal, Aqeela; Warraich, Zuha; Mocco, J

    2014-01-01

    Animal models of stroke have been crucial in advancing our understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia. Currently, the standards for determining neurological deficit in rodents are the Bederson and Garcia scales, manual assessments scoring animals based on parameters ranked on a narrow scale of severity. Automated open field analysis of a live-video tracking system that analyzes animal behavior may provide a more sensitive test. Results obtained from the manual Bederson and Garcia scales did not show significant differences between pre- and post-stroke animals in a small cohort. When using the same cohort, however, post-stroke data obtained from automated open field analysis showed significant differences in several parameters. Furthermore, large cohort analysis also demonstrated increased sensitivity with automated open field analysis versus the Bederson and Garcia scales. These early data indicate use of automated open field analysis software may provide a more sensitive assessment when compared to traditional Bederson and Garcia scales. PMID:24526841

  13. Revisiting the Cause of Focal Neurological Deficits and Profound Dyspnea at High Altitude-The Potential Role of Patent Foramen Ovale.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, David R

    2015-12-01

    A 49-year-old man developed weakness due to acute infarction of the left precentral gyrus. Subsequent investigation revealed a large patent foramen ovale (PFO), and it was concluded that the cerebral infarction was likely caused by a paradoxical embolus in association with the PFO. In hindsight, the PFO may explain several previous transient focal neurological deficits, some of which had occurred at high altitude and had been attributed to migraine. Furthermore, the large PFO may explain several episodes of profound shortness of breath that had occurred while exercising at high altitude during his lifetime, typically above 5000 m. Arterial hypoxemia due to hypobaric hypoxia may be exacerbated in individuals with PFO and affect physical performance at high altitude. PMID:26204201

  14. Comparing Single Versus Double Screw-Rod Anterior Instrumentation for Treating Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures with Incomplete Neurological Deficit: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu; Wang, Juan; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Following a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TCBF), anterior screw-rods apply pressure upon the graft site. However, there is limited evidence comparing single screw-rod anterior instrumentation (SSRAI) to double screw-rod anterior instrumentation (DSRAI) for TCBFs. Our objective was to compare SSRAI versus DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 51 participants with T11-L2 TCBFs (AO classification: A3) were randomly assigned to receive SSRAI or DSRAI. Key preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative data were collected. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine the independent factors associated with inferior clinical outcomes, as well as the comparative efficacy of SSRAI and DSRAI. RESULTS There were no significant differences in the key demographic and clinical characteristics between the two groups (all p>0.05). Smoking status was significantly associated with inferior three-month and six-month Denis pain scores (Wald statistic=4.246, p=0.039). Both SSRAI and DSRAI were significantly effective in improving three-month and six-month postoperative degree of kyphosis, three-month and six-month postoperative ASIA impairment scale scores, three-month and six-month postoperative Denis pain score, and three-month and six-month postoperative Denis work score (all p<0.001). Although there were no significant differences between DSRAI and SSRAI with respect to all outcomes (all p>0.05), DSRAI displayed significantly longer operating times, as well as significantly larger operative blood losses (both p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS SSRAI may be preferable over DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit due to its lower operating time and amount of operative blood loss. PMID:27197020

  15. Comparing Single Versus Double Screw-Rod Anterior Instrumentation for Treating Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures with Incomplete Neurological Deficit: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yu; Wang, Juan; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TCBF), anterior screw-rods apply pressure upon the graft site. However, there is limited evidence comparing single screw-rod anterior instrumentation (SSRAI) to double screw-rod anterior instrumentation (DSRAI) for TCBFs. Our objective was to compare SSRAI versus DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit. Material/Methods A total of 51 participants with T11-L2 TCBFs (AO classification: A3) were randomly assigned to receive SSRAI or DSRAI. Key preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative data were collected. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine the independent factors associated with inferior clinical outcomes, as well as the comparative efficacy of SSRAI and DSRAI. Results There were no significant differences in the key demographic and clinical characteristics between the two groups (all p>0.05). Smoking status was significantly associated with inferior three-month and six-month Denis pain scores (Wald statistic=4.246, p=0.039). Both SSRAI and DSRAI were significantly effective in improving three-month and six-month postoperative degree of kyphosis, three-month and six-month postoperative ASIA impairment scale scores, three-month and six-month postoperative Denis pain score, and three-month and six-month postoperative Denis work score (all p<0.001). Although there were no significant differences between DSRAI and SSRAI with respect to all outcomes (all p>0.05), DSRAI displayed significantly longer operating times, as well as significantly larger operative blood losses (both p<0.001). Conclusions SSRAI may be preferable over DSRAI for TCBFs with incomplete neurological deficit due to its lower operating time and amount of operative blood loss. PMID:27197020

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen pretreatment according to the gas micronuclei denucleation hypothesis reduces neurologic deficit in decompression sickness in rats.

    PubMed

    Katsenelson, K; Arieli, R; Arieli, Y; Abramovich, A; Feinsod, M; Tal, D

    2009-08-01

    During sudden or too rapid decompression, gas is released within supersaturated tissues in the form of bubbles, the cause of decompression sickness. It is widely accepted that these bubbles originate in the tissue from preexisting gas micronuclei. Pretreatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has been hypothesized to shrink the gas micronuclei, thus reducing the number of emerging bubbles. The effectiveness of a new HBO pretreatment protocol on neurologic outcome was studied in rats. This protocol was found to carry the least danger of oxygen toxicity. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were chosen to serve as a measure of neurologic damage. SSEPs in rats given HBO pretreatment before a dive were compared with SSEPs from rats not given HBO pretreatment and SSEPs from non-dived rats. The incidence of abnormal SSEPs in the animals subjected to decompression without pretreatment (1,013 kPa for 32 min followed by decompression) was 78%. In the pretreatment group (HBO at 304 kPa for 20 min followed by exposure to 1,013 kPa for 33 min and decompression) this was significantly reduced to 44%. These results call for further study of the pretreatment protocol in higher animals. PMID:19470698

  17. The effects of 4-aminopyridine on neurological deficits in chronic cases of traumatic spinal cord injury in dogs: a phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Blight, A R; Toombs, J P; Bauer, M S; Widmer, W R

    1991-01-01

    A Phase I trial of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) was carried out in 39 dogs referred to the veterinary teaching hospital with naturally occurring traumatic paraplegia or paraparesis. The rationale for the study was provided by the observation that 4-AP restores conduction in demyelinated nerve fibers in experimental spinal cord injury. Most injuries (77%) resulted from degenerative disk disease, occurring at or near the thoracolumbar junction, and producing chronic, complete paraplegia. Neurological examination of each dog was recorded on videotape before and at intervals after administration of 4-AP. The drug was administered systemically in total doses between 0.5 and 1 mg/kg body weight. Three areas of neurological status changed significantly at 15-45 minutes following administration of 4-AP: (a) striking improvements in hindlimb placing occurred in 18 animals; (b) increased awareness of painful stimuli to the hindlimb in 10 animals; (c) partial recovery of the cutaneus trunci muscle reflex of the back skin in 9 animals. These effects reversed within a few hours of administration. Other animals (36%) showed no change in neurological signs except a slight enhancement of hindlimb reflex tone. Significant side effects were seen in 6 dogs receiving higher intravenous doses, with elevation of body temperature and apparent anxiety, leading to mild seizures in 3 of the animals. These seizures were controlled with diazepam. The results indicate that conduction block may contribute significantly to functional deficits in closed-cord injuries and that potassium channel blockade may prove to be a valid, if limited approach to therapeutic intervention in chronic paraplegia and paraparesis. PMID:1870134

  18. High prevalence of minor neurologic deficits in a long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up of children with severe persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a severe condition that determines a profound brain hypoxia. Inhaled nitric oxide was approved for the treatment of PPHN since the end of the 1990s. The debate upon the long term outcome of these children is still open. Our aim was to investigate the incidence of minor long-term neurodevelopmental problems in a cohort of children affected by severe PPHN. Methods All neonates with severe PPHN treated with inhaled nitric oxide in our facility between 01.01.02 and 31.12.07 were seen in a follow up visit and evaluated with a neurodevelopmental scale, according to their age at the time of observation. Results in the study period 31 children were diagnosed with severe PPHN. 29 survived. 27 accepted to come for follow-up. Mean age: 41 months (range 12 - 70 months). 26% of the evaluated children had some behavioural problems, while 22% had some language disturbances. Conclusions This is the first neurodevelopmental follow-up of neonates with PPHN in which children older than 36 months have been evaluated. There is an unexpected high incidence of minor neurological deficits, mainly regarding the fields of language and behaviour. These deficits seem to be related to the severity of illness rather than to the treatment. Language and behaviour are considered "higher functions" in humans and their integrity can be better defined in older children. PMID:20540801

  19. Patients treated with antitumor drugs displaying neurological deficits are characterized by a low circulating level of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    De Santis, S; Pace, A; Bove, L; Cognetti, F; Properzi, F; Fiore, M; Triaca, V; Savarese, A; Simone, M D; Jandolo, B; Manzione, L; Aloe, L

    2000-01-01

    The aim of our study was to explore whether nerve growth factor (NGF) plays any role in the development of peripheral neuropathy induced by anticancer treatment. We measured the circulating NGF levels in 23 cancer patients before and after chemotherapy. We evaluated whether the development of peripheral neurotoxicity was associated with changes in basal NGF concentrations in patients studied with a comprehensive neurological and neurophysiological examination. The results of these studies showed that the circulating levels of NGF, which are about 20 pg/ml in plasma of controls, decrease during chemotherapy and in some cases completely disappeared after prolonged treatment with antitumor agents. The decrease in NGF levels seems to be correlated with the severity of neurotoxicity. These results clearly suggest that NGF might become a useful agent to prevent neuropathies induced by antineoplastic drugs and restore peripheral nerve dysfunction induced by these pharmacological compounds. PMID:10656436

  20. Validity and Reliability of Two-Dimensional Motion Analysis for Quantifying Postural Deficits in Adults With and Without Neurological Impairment.

    PubMed

    Paul, S S; Lester, M E; Foreman, K B; Dibble, L E

    2016-09-01

    Frequently, clinical balance outcome measures are limited by floor or ceiling effects and provide insufficient resolution to determine subtle deficits. Detailed assessment of postural control obtained through posturography may be cost-prohibitive or logistically infeasible in some clinical settings. Two-dimensional (2D) motion analysis may provide a clinically feasible means of obtaining detailed quantification of balance deficits. Forty-five participants aged 18-80 years, with and without Parkinson disease, performed the Push and Release (PR) test, sit-to-stand (STS), and timed single leg stance (SLS). Performance was captured simultaneously using a three-dimensional (3D) (10-camera laboratory-based 3D motion capture system and 3D motion analysis software) and 2D (two commercially available video cameras and 2D motion analysis software) system. Agreement was excellent between 2D and 3D systems for all outcomes of the PR and SLS (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC2,1 ] 0.96-0.99, 95% CIs 0.92-0.98 to 0.99-1.0), and ranged from fair to excellent for STS outcomes (ICC2,1 0.59-0.93, 95% CIs 0.36-0.75 to 0.87-0.96). Test-retest reliability (ICC3,1 0.89-1.0, 95% CIs 0.76-0.96 to 1.0-1.0) and inter-rater reliability (ICC2,1 0.77-1.0, 95% CIs 0.61-0.87 to 1.0-1.0) of the 2D obtained outcomes were excellent. A technology package of commonly available video cameras and 2D motion analysis software was a valid and reliable method for quantifying outcomes of postural control tasks in people with a range of balance abilities. Two-dimensional analysis can be used in clinical practice to provide balance assessments as a cost-effective alternative to 3D motion capture. Anat Rec, 299:1165-1173, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27314922

  1. Indication for Partial Vertebral Osteotomy and Realignment in Posterior Spinal Fixation for Osteoporotic Thoracolumbar Vertebral Collapse with Neurological Deficits.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Hanakita, Junya; Kawaoka, Taigo; Ohtake, Yasufumi; Adachi, Hiromasa; Shimizu, Kampei

    2016-08-15

    Instrumented spinal fixation is ordinarily required in patients who present with myelopathy or cauda equina syndrome secondary to vertebral collapse following osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture. Posterior spinal fixation is a major surgical option, and partial vertebral osteotomy (PVO) through a posterior approach is occasionally reasonable for achievement of complete neural decompression and improvement of excessive local kyphosis. However, the indications and need for PVO remain unclear. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine the efficacy and safety of posterior spinal fixation with or without PVO for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and identify patients who require neural decompression and alignment correction by PVO. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 20 patients (13 females, 7 males; mean age, 67.1 years) who underwent instrumented posterior fixation for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral fracture. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Japanese Orthopedic Association score and visual analog scale scores in the lumbar and leg areas. PVO was added with posterior spinal fixation in eight patients because neural decompression was incomplete after laminectomy as indicated by intraoperative echo imaging. Neurological and functional recovery significantly improved during follow-up. Clinical outcomes in patients who underwent PVO were similar to those in patients who did not undergo PVO. However, correction of the local kyphotic angle and improvement of spinal canal compromise after surgery was significant in patients who underwent PVO. The patients who required PVO had a less local kyphotic angle in the supine position and higher occupation rate of the fractured fragment in the spinal canal in the preoperative examination. PMID:27021642

  2. Indication for Partial Vertebral Osteotomy and Realignment in Posterior Spinal Fixation for Osteoporotic Thoracolumbar Vertebral Collapse with Neurological Deficits

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; KAWAOKA, Taigo; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; ADACHI, Hiromasa; SHIMIZU, Kampei

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented spinal fixation is ordinarily required in patients who present with myelopathy or cauda equina syndrome secondary to vertebral collapse following osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture. Posterior spinal fixation is a major surgical option, and partial vertebral osteotomy (PVO) through a posterior approach is occasionally reasonable for achievement of complete neural decompression and improvement of excessive local kyphosis. However, the indications and need for PVO remain unclear. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine the efficacy and safety of posterior spinal fixation with or without PVO for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and identify patients who require neural decompression and alignment correction by PVO. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 20 patients (13 females, 7 males; mean age, 67.1 years) who underwent instrumented posterior fixation for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral fracture. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Japanese Orthopedic Association score and visual analog scale scores in the lumbar and leg areas. PVO was added with posterior spinal fixation in eight patients because neural decompression was incomplete after laminectomy as indicated by intraoperative echo imaging. Neurological and functional recovery significantly improved during follow-up. Clinical outcomes in patients who underwent PVO were similar to those in patients who did not undergo PVO. However, correction of the local kyphotic angle and improvement of spinal canal compromise after surgery was significant in patients who underwent PVO. The patients who required PVO had a less local kyphotic angle in the supine position and higher occupation rate of the fractured fragment in the spinal canal in the preoperative examination. PMID:27021642

  3. Analysis of rapid alternating movements in Cree subjects exposed to methylmercury and in subjects with neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Beuter, A; de Geoffroy, A; Edwards, R

    1999-01-01

    To quantify rapid alternating movements (RAMs) we used a simple prototype developed in our laboratory that requires the subject to rotate two hand-held foam spheres connected to optical encoders via flexible rods. Ninety-six participants, including 30 control subjects, 36 Cree subjects exposed to methylmercury, 21 subjects with Parkinson's disease, 6 subjects with cerebellar deficits, and 3 subjects with essential tremor, were involved in the study (though data for 5 were later removed). Twelve characteristics were developed and calculated from the raw data. Conditions examined included two hands at natural cadence (NC2), right and left hands separately at fast cadence (FCl), and both hands at fast cadence (FC2). Two ratios (FC2/NC2) and (FC2/FC1) combining these conditions were also examined. Test-retest reliability was >0.80 for most characteristics but was <0.70 for some characteristics, especially in the conditions executed at normal cadence. Correlations between characteristics and numbers of outliers with respect to the control group distribution were used to reduce the set of characteristics from 12 to 7 (i.e., duration, range, maximum slope, similarity in shape, smoothness, sharpness, and coherence). ANOVAs on the three largest groups generated significant results for most characteristics in the three conditions and the two ratios for Cree subjects and subjects with Parkinson's disease. ANOVAs on 3 age-matched groups (n=6) suggest that methylmercury affects the performance of the Cree subjects with the higher exposure, especially in terms of smoothness, sharpness, and coherence. These preliminary results suggest that this test is sufficiently specific and sensitive to characterize the performance of different groups of subjects. Ratios tend to improve discrimination for Cree subjects in a few characteristics but not for patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:9931228

  4. Anterior D-rod and titanium mesh fixation for acute mid-lumbar burst fracture with incomplete neurologic deficits: A prospective study of 56 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhe-yuan; Ding, Zhen-qi; Liu, Hao-yuan; Fang, Jun; Liu, Hui; Sha, Mo

    2015-01-01

    -lumbar burst fractures with incomplete neurologic deficits can be achieved. The incident rate of complications was low. D-rod is a reliable implant and has some potential advantages in L4 vertebral fractures. PMID:26229171

  5. Serum concentration of adhesion molecules in patients with delayed ischaemic neurological deficit after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: the immunoglobulin and selectin superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, J; Mantle, D; Gregson, B; Mendelow, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Adhesion molecules are involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral ischaemia and may play a part in the pathophysiology of delayed ischaemic neurological deficit (DIND) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. It was hypothesised that after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, adhesion molecules may play a part in the pathophysiology of DIND as reflected by significantly altered serum concentrations in patients with and without DIND.
METHODS—In a prospective study, mean serum concentrations of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM, and E, P, and L-selectin were compared between patients without (n=23) and with (n=13) DIND in patients with World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grades 1 or 2subarachnoid haemorrhage. Serum was sampled from patients within 2 days of haemorrhage and on alternate days until discharge. Concentrations of adhesion molecules were measured by standard procedures using commercially available enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assays.
RESULTS—There were non-significant differences in serum concentrations of ICAM-1 (290.8 ng/ml v 238.4 ng/ml, p=0.0525), VCAM-1 (553.2ng/ml v 425.8 ng/ml, p=0.053), and PECAM (22.0 ng/ml v 21.0 ng/ml, p=0.56) between patients without and with DIND respectively. The E-selectin concentration between the two patient groups (44.0ng/ml v 37.4 ng/ml, p=0.33) was similar. The P-selectin concentration, however, was significantly higher in patients with DIND compared with those patients without DIND (149.5 ng/ml v 112.9 ng/ml, p=0.039). By contrast, serum L-selectin concentrations were significantly lower in patients with DIND (633.8 ng/ml v 897.9 ng/ml, p=0.013).
CONCLUSIONS—Of all the adhesion molecules examined in this study, P and L-selectin are involved in the pathophysiology of DIND after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

 PMID:11511705

  6. Inhibiting High-Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) Attenuates Inflammatory Cytokine Expression and Neurological Deficit in Ischemic Brain Injury Following Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Zhou, Gui-Ming; Wang, Li-Hua; Zhu, Li; Liu, Jin-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Li, Hong-Tao; Chen, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA), if untreated for more than 5 min, can induce severe brain damage, the underlying mechanism of which is still unclear. Previous studies have indicated that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein implicated in several inflammatory disorders, is involved in the inflammatory processes following brain ischemia. However, the role of HMGB1 in brain dysfunction after CA is yet to be determined. In a rat CA model, HMGB1 protein expression was higher at 1, 3, and 7 days post-CA, compared to that in naïve and sham-treated rats. Following injection of HMGB1 antibody (anti-HMGB1) into the cerebral ventricles, neurological deficit scores were significantly decreased in the CA group as compared to that in the naïve and sham group. Nissl staining showed significant neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA1 region following CA, which was significantly attenuated by anti-HMGB1-treatment (10 and 50 μg) in comparison with the vehicle-injected control. CA induced a significant increase in the levels of the cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the hippocampus as revealed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with anti-HMGB1 significantly inhibited IL-1β and TNF-α expression. Our study suggests that HMGB1 contributes significantly to CA-induced brain dysfunction and that inhibiting HMGB1 function and expression may be an effective therapeutic approach to CA-induced ischemic brain injury. PMID:27363991

  7. Motor and cognitive deficits due to permanent cerebral hypoperfusion/ischemia improve by pomegranate seed extract in rats.

    PubMed

    Hajipour, Somayeh; Sarkaki, Alireza; Mohammad, Seyed; Mansouri, Taghi; Pilevarian, Asghar; RafieiRad, Maryam

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of two weeks oral administration of Pomegranate Seed Extract (PGSE) on active avoidance memory and motor coordination activities after permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (2CCAO) in male adult rats. Adult male albino rats of Wistar strain (250 ± 20 g, 3-4 months) were used. Animals were divided into eight groups with 10 in each: (1) Sham operated (Sh); (2) Ischemic (I); (3) Ischemic received 100 mg kg(-1) PGSE, orally (I+E100); (4) Ischemic received 200 mg kg(-1) PGSE, orally (I+E200); (5) Ischemic received 400 mg kg(-1) PGSE, orally (I+E400); (6) Ischemic received 800 mg kg(-1) PGSE, orally (I+ E800); (7) Ischemic received 2 mL kg(-1) normal saline, orally (I+Veh); (8) Sham operated received 400 mg kg(-1) PGSE, orally (Sh+E400). In order to make 2CCAO an animal Cerebral Hypoperfusion Ischemia (CHI) model, carotid arteries were ligatured and then bilaterally cut. To evaluate active avoidance task, Correct Response Percentages (CRP) was measured by Y-maze apparatus and motor coordination activity was evaluated using standard behavioral tests by rotarod apparatus in all the rats. It was found that memory. Memory and motor coordination activities were significantly impaired in the rats after CHI (p < 0.01). PGSE treatment significantly improved impairment of memory and motor coordination in the rats with 2CCAO (p < 0.001). PGSE exhibited therapeutic potential for memory and muscular coordination, which was most likely related at least in some part to its antioxidative and free radical scavenging actions. PMID:26031017

  8. A case–control study examining whether neurological deficits and PTSD in combat veterans are related to episodes of mild TBI

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Ronald George; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Piero, Traci; Ruff, Suzanne Smith

    2012-01-01

    Background Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common injury among military personnel serving in Iraq or Afghanistan. The impact of repeated episodes of combat mTBI is unknown. Objective To evaluate relationships among mTBI, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and neurological deficits (NDs) in US veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan. Methods This was a case–control study. From 2091 veterans screened for traumatic brain injury, the authors studied 126 who sustained mTBI with one or more episodes of loss of consciousness (LOC) in combat. Comparison groups: 21 combat veterans who had definite or possible episodes of mTBI without LOC and 21 veterans who sustained mTBI with LOC as civilians. Results Among combat veterans with mTBI, 52% had NDs, 66% had PTSD and 50% had PTSD and an ND. Impaired olfaction was the most common ND, found in 65 veterans. The prevalence of an ND or PTSD correlated with the number of mTBI exposures with LOC. The prevalence of an ND or PTSD was >90% for more than five episodes of LOC. Severity of PTSD and impairment of olfaction increased with number of LOC episodes. The prevalence of an ND for the 34 combat veterans with one episode of LOC (4/34=11.8%) was similar to that of the 21 veterans of similar age and educational background who sustained civilian mTBI with one episode of LOC (2/21=9.5%, p-NS). Conclusions Impaired olfaction was the most frequently recognised ND. Repeated episodes of combat mTBI were associated with increased likelihood of PTSD and an ND. Combat setting may not increase the likelihood of an ND. Two possible connections between mTBI and PTSD are (1) that circumstances leading to combat mTBI likely involve severe psychological trauma and (2) that altered cerebral functioning following mTBI may increase the likelihood that a traumatic event results in PTSD. PMID:22431700

  9. Severe neurological decompression sickness in a U-2 pilot.

    PubMed

    Jersey, Sean L; Baril, Robert T; McCarty, Richmond D; Millhouse, Christina M

    2010-01-01

    Severe neurological decompression sickness (DCS) has been a rare entity in the U.S. Air Force, including the U-2 community. In over 50 yr of operation, few U-2 pilots reported severe neurological DCS in flight despite the extreme altitudes at which they operate. This article describes a near-fatal case of neurological DCS that occurred during a combat mission. The injury left the pilot with permanent cognitive deficits that correlated with focal lesions present on magnetic resonance imaging of his brain. To our knowledge, the images presented herein are the first to show radiological evidence of brain injury induced by altitude DCS. Though only a single case, the objective and clinical findings in the case pilot are similar to results documented in divers suffering DCS with central nervous system injury and victims of traumatic brain injury. DCS will remain a potentially serious threat to current and future air and space operations. PMID:20058739

  10. Neurology and orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Houlden, Henry; Charlton, Paul; Singh, Dishan

    2007-01-01

    Neurology encompasses all aspects of medicine and surgery, but is closer to orthopaedic surgery than many other specialities. Both neurological deficits and bone disorders lead to locomotor system abnormalities, joint complications and limb problems. The main neurological conditions that require the attention of an orthopaedic surgeon are disorders that affect the lower motor neurones. The most common disorders in this group include neuromuscular disorders and traumatic peripheral nerve lesions. Upper motor neurone disorders such as cerebral palsy and stroke are also frequently seen and discussed, as are chronic conditions such as poliomyelitis. The management of these neurological problems is often coordinated in the neurology clinic, and this group, probably more than any other, requires a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:17308288

  11. The unrecognized epidemic of blunt carotid arterial injuries: early diagnosis improves neurologic outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Biffl, W L; Moore, E E; Ryu, R K; Offner, P J; Novak, Z; Coldwell, D M; Franciose, R J; Burch, J M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the benefit of screening for blunt carotid arterial injuries (BCI) in patients who are asymptomatic. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Blunt carotid arterial injuries have the potential for devastating complications. Published studies report 23% to 28% mortality rates, with 48% to 58% of survivors having permanent severe neurologic deficits. Most patients have neurologic deficits when the injury is diagnosed. The authors hypothesized that screening patients who are asymptomatic and instituting early therapy would improve neurologic outcome. METHODS: The Trauma Registry of the author's Level I Trauma Center identified patients with BCI from 1990 through 1997. Beginning in August 1996, the authors implemented a screening for BCI. Arteriography was used for diagnosis. Patients without specific contraindications were anticoagulated. Endovascular stents were deployed in the setting of pseudoaneurysms. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients with BCI were identified among 15,331 blunt-trauma victims (0.24%). During the screening period, 25 patients were diagnosed with BCI among 2902 admissions (0.86%); 13 (52%) were asymptomatic. Overall, eight patients died, and seven of the survivors had permanent severe neurologic deficits. Excluding those dying of massive brain injury and patients admitted with coma and brain injury, mortality associated with BCI was 15%, with severe neurologic morbidity in 16% of survivors. The patients who were asymptomatic at diagnosis had a better neurologic outcome than those who were symptomatic. Symptomatic patients who were anticoagulated showed a trend toward greater neurologic improvement at the time of discharge than those who were not anticoagulated. CONCLUSIONS: Screening allows the identification of asymptomatic BCI and thereby facilitates early systemic anticoagulation, which is associated with improved neurologic outcome. The role of endovascular stents in the treatment of blunt traumatic pseudoaneurysms remains to be defined

  12. Maternal dietary loads of α-tocopherol depress protein kinase C signaling and synaptic plasticity in rat postnatal developing hippocampus and promote permanent deficits in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Betti, Michele; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Minelli, Andrea; Floridi, Alessandro; Lattanzi, Davide; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Bucherelli, Corrado; Prospero, Emilia; Frontini, Andrea; Santarelli, Lory; Baldi, Elisabetta; Benetti, Fernando; Galli, Francesco; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin E (α-tocopherol) supplementation has been tested as prophylaxis against gestational disorders associated with oxidative damage. However, recent evidence showing that high maternal α-tocopherol intake can adversely affect offspring development raises concerns on the safety of vitamin E extradosages during pregnancy. Besides acting as an antioxidant, α-tocopherol depresses cell proliferation and modulates cell signaling through inhibiting protein kinase C (PKC), a kinase that is deeply involved in neural maturation and plasticity. Possible effects of α-tocopherol loads in the maturing brain, where PKC dysregulation is associated to developmental dysfunctions, are poorly known. Here, supranutritional doses of α-tocopherol were fed to pregnant and lactating dams to evaluate the effects on PKC signaling and morphofunctional maturation in offspring hippocampus. Results showed that maternal supplementation potentiates hippocampal α-tocopherol incorporation in offspring and leads to marked decrease of PKC phosphorylation throughout postnatal maturation, accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of growth-associated protein-43 and myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate, two PKC substrates involved in neural development and plasticity. Although processes of neuronal maturation, synapse formation and targeting appeared unaffected, offspring of supplemented mothers displayed a marked reduction of long-term synaptic plasticity in juvenile hippocampus. Interestingly, this impairment persisted in adulthood, when a deficit in hippocampus-dependent, long-lasting spatial memory was also revealed. In conclusion, maternal supplementation with elevated doses of α-tocopherol can influence cell signaling and synaptic plasticity in developing hippocampus and promotes permanent adverse effects in adult offspring. The present results emphasize the need to evaluate the safety of supranutritional maternal intake of α-tocopherol in humans. PMID:20382010

  13. Is longer sevoflurane preconditioning neuroprotective in permanent focal cerebral ischemia?

    PubMed

    Qiu, Caiwei; Sheng, Bo; Wang, Shurong; Liu, Jin

    2013-08-15

    Sevoflurane preconditioning has neuroprotective effects in the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. However, its influence on permanent cerebral ischemia remains unclear. In the present study, the rats were exposed to sevoflurane for 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes, followed by induction of permanent cerebral ischemia. Results demonstrated that 30- and 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning significantly reduced the infarct volume at 24 hours after cerebral ischemia, and 60-minute lurane preconditioning additionally reduced the number of TUNEL- and caspase-3-positive cells in the ischemic penumbra. However, 120-minute sevoflurane preconditioning did not show evident neuroprotective effects. Moreover, 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning significantly attenuated neurological deficits and infarct volume in rats at 4 days after cerebral ischemia. These findings indicated that 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning can induce the best neuroprotective effects in rats with permanent cerebral ischemia through the inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:25206521

  14. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-09-15

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  15. Rare Neurological Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Uzma; Imdad, Aamer; Beg, Mirza

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease characterized by permanent gastrointestinal tract sensitivity to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has varied clinical manifestations, ranging from gastrointestinal to extraintestinal, including neurological, skin, reproductive and psychiatric symptoms, which makes its diagnosis difficult and challenging. Known neurological manifestations of CD include epilepsy with or without occipital calcification, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and ataxia, headache, neuropathies and behavior disorders. We present the case of a 14-year-old female with headaches and blurred vision for 1 year; she was noted to have papilledema on ophthalmic examination with increased cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure on lumber puncture and was diagnosed as a case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC). Meanwhile her workup for chronic constipation revealed elevated tissue transglutaminase IgA and antiendomysial IgA antibodies. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of CD. The patient was started on a gluten-free diet, leading to resolution of not only gastrointestinal symptoms but also to almost complete resolution of symptoms of PTC. This report describes the correlation of CD and PTC as its neurological manifestation. PMID:26120302

  16. Neurobehavioral, neurologic, and neuroimaging characteristics of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Glass, Leila; Ware, Ashley L; Mattson, Sarah N

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can have deleterious consequences for the fetus, including changes in central nervous system development leading to permanent neurologic alterations and cognitive and behavioral deficits. Individuals affected by prenatal alcohol exposure, including those with and without fetal alcohol syndrome, are identified under the umbrella of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). While studies of humans and animal models confirm that even low to moderate levels of exposure can have detrimental effects, critical doses of such exposure have yet to be specified and the most clinically significant and consistent consequences occur following heavy exposure. These consequences are pervasive, devastating, and can result in long-term dysfunction. This chapter summarizes the neurobehavioral, neurologic, and neuroimaging characteristics of FASD, focusing primarily on clinical research of individuals with histories of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure, although studies of lower levels of exposure, particularly prospective, longitudinal studies, will be discussed where relevant. PMID:25307589

  17. Near infrared transcranial laser therapy applied at various modes to mice following traumatic brain injury significantly reduces long-term neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Oron, Amir; Oron, Uri; Streeter, Jackson; De Taboada, Luis; Alexandrovich, Alexander; Trembovler, Victoria; Shohami, Esther

    2012-01-20

    Near-infrared transcranial laser therapy (TLT) has been found to modulate various biological processes including traumatic brain injury (TBI). Following TBI in mice, in this study we assessed the possibility of various near-infrared TLT modes (pulsed versus continuous) in producing a beneficial effect on the long-term neurobehavioral outcome and brain lesions of these mice. TBI was induced by a weight-drop device, and neurobehavioral function was assessed from 1 h to 56 days post-trauma using the Neurological Severity Score (NSS). The extent of recovery is expressed as the difference in NSS (dNSS), the difference between the initial score and that at any other later time point. An 808-nm Ga-Al-As diode laser was employed transcranially 4, 6, or 8 h post-trauma to illuminate the entire cortex of the brain. Mice were divided into several groups of 6-8 mice: one control group that received a sham treatment and experimental groups that received either TLT continuous wave (CW) or pulsed wave (PW) mode transcranially. MRI was taken prior to sacrifice at 56 days post-injury. From 5-28 days post-TBI, the NSS of the laser-treated mice were significantly lower (p<0.05) than those of the non-laser-treated control mice. The percentage of surviving mice that demonstrated full recovery at 56 days post-CHI (NSS=0, as in intact mice) was the highest (63%) in the group that had received TLT in the PW mode at 100 Hz. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis demonstrated significantly smaller infarct lesion volumes in laser-treated mice compared to controls. Our data suggest that non-invasive TLT of mice post-TBI provides a significant long-term functional neurological benefit, and that the pulsed laser mode at 100 Hz is the preferred mode for such treatment. PMID:22040267

  18. Current neurology

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, S.H. )

    1988-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases.

  19. Non-operative management is superior to surgical stabilization in spine injury patients with complete neurological deficits: A perspective study from a developing world country, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad; Ali, Syed Faizan; Enam, Syed Ather

    2011-01-01

    Background: Surgical stabilization of injured spine in patients with complete spinal cord injury is a common practice despite the lack of strong evidence supporting it. The aim of this study is to compare clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of surgical stabilization versus conservative management of spinal injury in patients with complete deficits, essentially from a developing country's point of view. Methods: A detailed analysis of patients with traumatic spine injury and complete deficits admitted at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Pakistan, from January 2004 till January 2010 was carried out. All patients presenting within 14 days of injury were divided in two groups, those who underwent stabilization procedures and those who were managed non-operatively. The two groups were compared with the endpoints being time to rehabilitation, length of hospital stay, 30 day morbidity/mortality, cost of treatment, and status at follow up. Results: Fifty-four patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and half of these were operated. On comparing endpoints, patients in the operative group took longer time to rehabilitation (P-value = 0.002); had longer hospital stay (P-value = 0.006) which included longer length of stay in special care unit (P-value = 0.002) as well as intensive care unit (P-value = 0.004); and were associated with more complications, especially those related to infections (P-value = 0.002). The mean cost of treatment was also significantly higher in the operative group (USD 6,500) as compared to non-operative group (USD 1490) (P-value < 0.001). Conclusion: We recommend that patients with complete SCI should be managed non-operatively with a provision of surgery only if their rehabilitation is impeded due to pain or deformity. PMID:22145085

  20. Neurological Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Deborah; Musial, Maryann K

    2016-01-01

    Reasons for completing a neurological exam include: detecting life-threatening conditions, identifying nervous system dysfunction and the effects of this dysfunction on activities of daily living, comparing current data to previous exams to determine trends, and to provide a database upon which to base collaborative care across disciplines. In this third article of a four-part series, subjective and objective assessment of the neurological exam is reviewed. PMID:26645839

  1. Neurological assessment.

    PubMed

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2016-08-01

    Neurological system assessment is an important skill for the orthopaedic nurse because the nervous system has such an overlap with the musculoskeletal system. Nurses whose scope of practice includes such advanced evaluation, e.g. nurse practitioners, may conduct the examination described here but the information will also be useful for nurses caring for patients who have abnormal neurological assessment findings. Within the context of orthopaedic physical assessment, possible neurological findings are evaluated as they complement the patient's history and the examiner's findings. Specific neurological assessment is integral to diagnosis of some orthopaedic conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome. In other situations such as crushing injury to the extremities, there is high risk of associated neurological or neurovascular injury. These patients need anticipatory examination and monitoring to prevent complications. This article describes a basic neurological assessment; emphasis is on sensory and motor findings that may overlap with an orthopaedic presentation. The orthopaedic nurse may incorporate all the testing covered here or choose those parts that further elucidate specific diagnostic questions suggested by the patient's history, general evaluation and focused musculoskeletal examination. Abnormal findings help to suggest further testing, consultation with colleagues or referral to a specialist. PMID:27118633

  2. Neurological channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Graves, T; Hanna, M

    2005-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane-bound proteins that perform key functions in virtually all human cells. Such channels are critically important for the normal function of the excitable tissues of the nervous system, such as muscle and brain. Until relatively recently it was considered that dysfunction of ion channels in the nervous system would be incompatible with life. However, an increasing number of human diseases associated with dysfunctional ion channels are now recognised. Such neurological channelopathies are frequently genetically determined but may also arise through autoimmune mechanisms. In this article clinical, genetic, immunological, and electrophysiological aspects of this expanding group of neurological disorders are reviewed. Clinical situations in which a neurological channelopathy should enter into the differential diagnosis are highlighted. Some practical guidance on how to investigate and treat this complex group of disorders is also included. PMID:15640425

  3. Etiology of Attention Disorders: A Neurological/Genetic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grantham, Madeline Kay

    This paper explores the historical origins of attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) as a neurological disorder, current neurological and genetic research concerning the etiology of ADD/ADHD, and implications for diagnosis and treatment. First, ADD/ADHD is defined and then the origins of ADD/ADHD as a…

  4. Neurological outcome after arterial ischemic stroke in children

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Jafar; Ariyana, Alireza; Yaghini, Omid; Ghazavi, Mohammad Reza; Keikhah, Mojtaba; Salari, Mehri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is an important cause of disability in children. Pediatric stroke may be due to significant permanent cognitive and motor handicap in children. In this study, we evaluated long-term outcomes of stroke in pediatric patients who have been discharged with definite diagnosis of stroke in Tehran Mofid children’s Hospital and Imam Hossein children’s Hospital located in Isfahan, Iran, from 2005 to 2012. Materials and Methods: A total of 53 children with stroke were included in the study. Stroke outcomes as motor disability, seizures, and cognitive dysfunctions were assessed. Results: After a median follow-up of 4 years, 15 (29%) patients experienced full recovery. Thirty-eight (71%) patients had some degree of neurological handicap. Conclusion: Approximately 70% of children with arterial ischemic stroke suffer from long-term neurological disabilities including motor deficits, cognitive impairment, and late seizures. Stroke recurrence is the most important risk factor responsible for severe adverse neurological outcomes in pediatric stroke. PMID:27376046

  5. Urgent discectomy: Clinical features and neurological outcome

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Ruth; Lange, Max; Brawanski, Alexander; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the clinical features and outcome of patients with progressive neurological deficits due to disc herniation who were treated surgically within 24 h. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who were admitted between 2004 and 2013 via the Emergency Department. Records were screened for presenting symptoms, neurological status at admission, discharge, and 6-week follow-up. Results: About 72 of 526 patients underwent surgery within 24 h. Magnetic resonance imaging showed lumbar disc herniation in 72 patients. The most common presenting symptoms included radiculopathy (n = 69), the Lasègue sign (n = 60), sensory deficits (n = 57), or motor deficits (n = 47). In addition, 11 patients experienced perineal numbness and 12 had bowel and bladder dysfunction. At discharge, motor and sensory deficits and bowel and bladder dysfunction had improved significantly (P < 0.001, P = 0.029, and P = 0.015, respectively). Conclusion: Motor deficits, sensory deficits, and cauda equina dysfunction were significantly improved immediately after urgent surgery. After 6 weeks, motor and sensory deficits were also significantly improved compared to the neurological status at discharge. Thus, we advocate immediate surgery of disc herniation in patients with acute onset of motor deficits, perineal numbness, or bladder or bowel dysfunction indicative of cauda equina syndrome. PMID:26958423

  6. Pragmatic Communication Deficits in Children with Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broeders, Mark; Geurts, Hilde; Jennekens-Schinkel, Aag

    2010-01-01

    Background: Various psychiatric and neurological disorders including epilepsy have been associated with language deficits. Pragmatic language deficits, however, have seldom been the focus of earlier studies in children with epilepsy. Moreover, it is unknown whether these pragmatic deficits are related to general intellectual functioning. Both…

  7. Neurologic complications of scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Newton, H B

    2001-06-01

    Recreational scuba diving has become a popular sport in the United States, with almost 9 million certified divers. When severe diving injury occurs, the nervous system is frequently involved. In dive-related barotrauma, compressed or expanding gas within the ears, sinuses and lungs causes various forms of neurologic injury. Otic barotrauma often induces pain, vertigo and hearing loss. In pulmonary barotrauma of ascent, lung damage can precipitate arterial gas embolism, causing blockage of cerebral blood vessels and alterations of consciousness, seizures and focal neurologic deficits. In patients with decompression sickness, the vestibular system, spinal cord and brain are affected by the formation of nitrogen bubbles. Common signs and symptoms include vertigo, thoracic myelopathy with leg weakness, confusion, headache and hemiparesis. Other diving-related neurologic complications include headache and oxygen toxicity. PMID:11417773

  8. Protective effect of delta opioid receptor agonist (D-Ala2, D-Leu5) enkephalin on permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Danyun; Liu, Haitong; Zhu, Hui; Li, Shitong; Yao, Junyan

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effect of delta opioid receptor agonist (D-Ala, D-Leu) enkephalin (DADLE) on the permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Thirty four male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned randomly into three groups: sham group (group Sham, n=10), artificial cerebrospinal fluid group (group ACSF, n=12), and DADLE group (group DADLE, n=12). Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed to induce permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Then, the animals in group DADLE and group ACSF were treated with DADLE or ACSF by an intracerebroventricular injection at 45 min after ischemia. Neurologic deficit scores were assessed according to the Garcia criterion at 24 h after ischemia. Infarct volume was determined using the 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining method. The histological analysis was used to evaluate the extent of cerebral injury. Compared with the control group, the Garcia scores were significantly higher (P=0.000) and the infarct volumes (P=0.018) were significantly smaller in the DADLE treatment group at 24 h after ischemia. These neurologic changes were closely correlated with the outcome of the infarct volumes. In addition, the histological examination showed more intact neurons in rats treated with DADLE than those treated with ACSF at 24 h after ischemia (P=0.000). DADLE by intracerebroventricular administration at 45 min after ischemia can improve neurologic outcome and mitigate cortical neuronal injury induced by permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats. PMID:27232517

  9. Neurology in Federico Fellini?s work and life.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Caramelli, Paulo; Cardoso, Francisco Eduardo Costa

    2014-09-01

    The authors present a historical review of the neurological diseases related to the famous moviemaker Federico Fellini. There is an account of diseases depicted on his movies as well as his ischemic stroke and consequent neurological deficit - left spatial neglect. PMID:25252239

  10. Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice

    PubMed Central

    Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

  11. Neurology of Volition

    PubMed Central

    Kranick, Sarah M.; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders of volition may be characterized by deficits in willing and/or agency. When we move our bodies through space, it is the sense that we intended to move (willing) and that our actions were a consequence of this intention (self-agency) that gives us the sense of voluntariness and a general feeling of being “in control.” While it is possible to have movements that share executive machinery ordinarily used for voluntary movement but lack a sense of voluntariness, such as psychogenic movement disorders, it is also possible to claim volition for presumed involuntary movements (early chorea) or even when no movement is produced (anosognosia). The study of such patients should enlighten traditional models of how the percepts of volition are generated in the brain with regards to movement. We discuss volition and its components as multi-leveled processes with feedforward and feedback information flow, and dependence on prior expectations as well as external and internal cues. PMID:23329204

  12. Neurology and neurologic practice in China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions. PMID:22123780

  13. Going high with preexisting neurological conditions.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Ralf W; Siegel, Adrian M; Hackett, Peter H

    2007-01-01

    This review presents the potential impact of high altitude exposure on preexisting neurological conditions in patients usually living at low altitude. The neurological conditions include permanent and transient ischemia of the brain, occlusive cerebral artery disease, cerebral venous thrombosis, intracranial hemorrhage and vascular malformations, multiple sclerosis, intracranial space-occupying lesions, dementia, extrapyramidal disorders, migraine and other headaches, and epileptic seizures. New developments in diagnostic work-up and treatment of preexisting neurological conditions are also mentioned where applicable. For each neurological disorder, the authors developed absolute and relative contraindications for a trip to high altitude. These recommendations are not based on the results of controlled randomized trials, but mainly on case reports, pathophysiological considerations, and extrapolations from the low altitude situation. PMID:17584004

  14. Neuroprotective effects of andrographolide in a rat model of permanent cerebral ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Su Jing; Wong, WS Fred; Wong, Peter TH; Bian, Jin-Song

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Andrographolide is a diterpenoid lactone isolated from a traditional medicinal herb, Andrographis paniculata. It possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity. The present study examined potential therapeutic effects of andrographolide on cerebral ischaemia using a rat model with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The MCA in rats was permanently occluded (by cautery), and 24 h later neurological effects were assessed with behavioural scores. Infarct volume and microglial activation were determined histologically. The p65 form of the transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), was measured by Western blot, and cytokines by immunoassay of brain extracts. KEY RESULTS Andrographolide, given i.p. 1 h after pMCAO, reduced infarct volume with a maximum reduction of approximately 50% obtained at 0.1 mg·kg−1. Neurological deficits were also reduced by andrographolide, reflecting a correlation between infarct volume and neurological deficits. pMCAO was found to induce activation of microglia and elevate tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and prostaglandin (PG)E2 in the ischaemic brain areas. Andrographolide (0.1 mg·kg−1) significantly attenuated or abolished these effects. In addition, andrographolide suppressed the translocation of p65 from cytosol to nucleus, indicating reduced NF-κB activation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Andrographolide exhibited neuroprotective effects, with accompanying suppression of NF-κB and microglial activation, and reduction in the production of cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β, and pro-inflammatory factors such as PGE2. Our findings suggest that andrographolide may have therapeutic value in the treatment of stroke. PMID:20880404

  15. Can Break-Dance Break Your Neck? C1/C2 Luxation with a Combined Dens Fracture Without Neurological Deficits in an 11-Year Old Boy After a Break-Dance Performance.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Athanasios K; Kinzel, Adrian; Blaeser, Klaus; Thissen, Joost; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Scholz, Martin

    2015-09-28

    Atlantoaxial dislocation in children is a very rare condition. We present the case of a dislocation happened during a break-dance maneuver. The purpose of this report is describing dangers of break-dancing and discussing the treatment we chose. The patient was followed up until 12 months after surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the cervical spine were evaluated. Translaminar fixation of C1/C2 had been performed after manual reposition under X-ray illumination. After a 12-month follow-up, the patient shows a stable condition without neurological dysfunction. He is not allowed to perform any extreme sports. PMID:26664716

  16. Caffeic acid protects mice from memory deficits induced by focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro Fernandes, Francisco Diego; Fontenele Menezes, Ana Paula; de Sousa Neves, Julliana Catharina; Fonteles, Analu Aragão; da Silva, Ana Thais Araújo; de Araújo Rodrigues, Patrícia; Santos do Carmo, Marta Regina; de Souza, Carolina Melo; de Andrade, Geanne Matos

    2014-10-01

    Brain ischemia pathophysiology involves a complex cascade of events such as inflammation and oxidative stress that lead to neuronal loss and cognitive deficits. Caffeic acid (CA) is a natural phenolic compound with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. To evaluate the neuroprotective efficacy of this compound in mice subjected to a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, animals were pretreated and post-treated with CA, 2, 20, and 60 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally, at 24, 48, 72, 96, or 120 h after ischemia. Animals were evaluated at 24 h after the permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion for brain infarction and neurological deficit score. At 72 h after the occlusion, animals were evaluated for locomotor activity, working memory, and short-term aversive memory; long-term aversive memory was evaluated 24 h after the evaluation of short-term aversive memory. Finally, at 120 h after the event, spatial memory and the expression levels of synaptophysin (SYP), SNAP-25, and caspase 3 were evaluated. The treatment with CA reduced the infarcted area and improved neurological deficit scores. There was no difference in locomotor activity between groups. The working, spatial, and long-term aversive memory deficits improved with CA. Furthermore, western blotting data showed that the expression of SYP, which correlates with synaptic formation and function, decreased after ischemic insult, and CA inhibited the reduction of SYP expression. Ischemia also increased, and CA treatment decreased, caspase 3 expression. These results suggest that CA exerts neuroprotective and antidementia effects, at least in part, by preventing the loss of neural cells and synapses in ischemic brain injury. PMID:25171077

  17. Effect of JTP-2942, a novel thyrotropin-releasing hormone analog, on motor deficits after chronic focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Yonemori, F; Yamaguchi, T; Nakayama, H; Narita, K; Hojo, S; Tamura, A

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the chronic effects of a novel thyrotropin-releasing hormone analog, JTP-2942 (N(alpha)-[(1S, 2R)-2-methyl-4-oxocyclopentylcarbonyl]-L-histidyl-L-prolinamide monohydrate), on behavioral changes after stroke, the authors examined its effects on motor and neurologic deficits using a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model in rats. A left MCA was permanently occluded at a proximal site. From 1 week after occlusion, JTP-2942 was intravenously administered once a day for 4 weeks. Sensorimotor performance was evaluated weekly for 10 weeks after the occlusion. The ability of the rat to maintain its body position on an inclined plane and neurologic examination based on hemiparesis and abnormal posture were examined. After all behavioral examinations were completed, the degree of shrinkage of the left hemisphere was measured. The ability of MCA-occluded rats to maintain body position on an inclined plane in the left-headed position was significantly lower than that of sham-operated rats throughout the test period. JTP-2942 gradually improved this deficit dose dependently, and a dose of 0.03 mg/kg of JTP-2942 significantly improved performance to the levels of the sham-operated rats. Neurologic deficits were also observed in MCA-occluded rats. JTP-2942 also significantly improved these deficits dose dependently. On the other hand, CDP-choline (500 mg/kg, administered intravenously), a therapeutic agent for the disturbance of consciousness and hemiparesis after stroke, improved neurologic deficits but did not affect the motor deficits measured using the inclined plane. It is noteworthy that the effects of JTP-2942 on these deficits were observed 4 weeks after cessation of drug administration. Furthermore, there was no difference in the degree of shrinkage of the cerebrum among the MCA-occluded groups. In the present study, long-lasting improving effects of JTP-2942 on the impairment of motor and neurologic functions were observed in rats with MCA occlusion

  18. [Neurological diseases and nutrition -- what can we do?].

    PubMed

    Tamási, Péter

    2014-12-21

    Neurological diseases and nutrition are in complex relationship. In the first part of this review the nutritional consequences of acute neurological diseases is presented, with special emphasis on traumatic injuries of the nervous system and stroke. Nutritional therapy of these patients is described in detail. In addition, chronic, degenerative neurological pathological conditions are also discussed, including nutritional consequences and possibilities of therapy. Some ethical and legal issues are also considered. The second part of this review article describes neurological consequences of nutritional problems, both deficits of macro- and micronutrients and toxic effects. PMID:25497154

  19. Exendin-4-loaded PLGA microspheres relieve cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and neurologic deficits through long-lasting bioactivity-mediated phosphorylated Akt/eNOS signaling in rats.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chiang-Ting; Jou, Ming-Jia; Cheng, Tai-Yu; Yang, Chih-Hui; Yu, Tzu-Ying; Li, Ping-Chia

    2015-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation in the brain provides neuroprotection. Exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP-1 analog, has seen limited clinical usage because of its short half-life. We developed long-lasting Ex-4-loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres (PEx-4) and explored its neuroprotective potential against cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats. Compared with Ex-4, PEx-4 in the gradually degraded microspheres sustained higher Ex-4 levels in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid for at least 2 weeks and improved diabetes-induced glycemia after a single subcutaneous administration (20 μg/day). Ten minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (CAO) combined with hemorrhage-induced hypotension (around 30 mm Hg) significantly decreased cerebral blood flow and microcirculation in male Wistar rats subjected to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. CAO increased cortical O2(-) levels by chemiluminescence amplification and prefrontal cortex edema by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging analysis. CAO significantly increased aquaporin 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and led to cognition deficits. CAO downregulated phosphorylated Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-Akt/p-eNOS) signaling and enhanced nuclear factor (NF)-κBp65/intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and apoptosis in the cerebral cortex. PEx-4 was more effective than Ex-4 to improve CAO-induced oxidative injury and cognitive deficits. The neuroprotection provided by PEx-4 was through p-Akt/p-eNOS pathways, which suppressed CAO-enhanced NF-κB/ICAM-1 signaling, ER stress, and apoptosis. PMID:26058696

  20. The Effect of Methylphenidate on Neurological Soft Signs in ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Hrtanek, Igor; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid; Snircova, Eva; Kulhan, Tomas; Farsky, Ivan; Nosalova, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neurological soft signs are very common in children with the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and the first line medication of this disorder is methylphenidate. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of methylphenidate on the neurological soft signs in children and adolescents suffering from ADHD depending on the dose of methylphenidate. Methods Thirty five patients with ADHD were investigated by the ADHD RS-IV parent version questionnaire and the Revised Neurological Examination for Subtle Signs before treatment adjustment and after four weeks of methylphenidate medication. The changes in hyperactivity symptomatology, neurological soft signs during therapy and the influence of the methylphenidate dose were statistically analyzed. Results A significant decrease in hyperactivity symptomatology was found after one month of methylphenidate medication (p=0.0001) and significant decrease in neurological soft signs was demonstrated in 21 from a total of 26 items (p<0.05). Correlation analysis showed no relationship between the dose of methylphenidate and the improvement of neurological soft signs. Similarly, the improvement of ADHD symptomatology had not correlation with the improvement of neurological soft signs. Conclusion The study demonstrated the positive effect of methylphenidate on neurological soft signs in which improvement occurred independently of the dose, indicating that their progress may be due to methylphenidate treatment of any dose. The unrelated effect of methylphenidate on the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and neurological soft signs suggest that methylphenidate might be useful in the therapy of clumsy child syndrome and in ADHD treatment of non-responders. PMID:26508967

  1. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    PubMed

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding. PMID:19892141

  2. Sandfly virus seroconversion associated with neurologic presentation

    PubMed Central

    Makranz, Chen; Qutteineh, Hiba; Bin, Hanna; Lustig, Yaniv; Gomori, John Moshe; Honig, Asaf; Bayya, Abed El-Raouf; Moses, Allon E.; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Averbuch, Diana; Eichel, Roni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical presentation and unique neurologic manifestations of sandfly viruses (SFVs) in the Jerusalem area. Methods: We identified all patients with acute seroconversion to SFV at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Centers during the years 2008–2013 and retrospectively collected and analyzed the clinical and imaging data. Results: Nine patients (ranging from 1.5 to 85 years old) were identified. Presentation included acute neurologic disease, mostly with fever, change in consciousness and behavior, seizures, headache, meningitis, limb paresis, or myelitis. Eight patients had clinical signs of meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or encephalitis alone. Four patients had myelitis. MRI identified pathologic symmetrical changes in the basal ganglia, thalami, and other deep structures in 5 patients, and additional myelitis of the spine was noted on imaging in 3 patients. Seven patients had long-term follow-up: 4 completely recovered and 3 had remaining neurologic sequelae, among them 1 with permanent severe brain damage. Conclusion: Neurologic involvement associated with acute SFV infections is considered to be benign. However, in this series, all 9 patients presented with significant neurologic pathology associated with a unique finding of myelitis and symmetrical basal ganglia, thalami, or white matter involvement. Thus, acute SFV infection should be included in the differential diagnosis in febrile onset of neurologic manifestations and neuroradiologic changes. PMID:26767189

  3. ECT IN NEUROLOGICAL COUNDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Girish, K.; Gangadhar, B.N.; Janakiramaiah, N.

    2002-01-01

    It is a myth that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) produces greater side effects and worsens the neurological condition when used in neurologically ill patients. With the advancement and sophistication in ECT practice standards and modification procedures, it can be safely administered either to treat selected neurological conditions or the co-morbid psychiatric illnesses without additional risks. However ECT should be administered only after thorough evaluation of risks and benefits in such individuals. PMID:21206577

  4. [Sleep and neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Mayer, G

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the physiology of sleep-wake regulation can contribute to an understanding of the pathophysiology and symptoms of neurological diseases and is helpful for initiating specific therapies for sleep-wake cycle stabilization. Based on historically important observations on the close relationship between sleep and neurological diseases, new insights and developments in selected neurological entities are presented in this review article. PMID:27167889

  5. Neurological complications of infantile osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Lehman, R A; Reeves, J D; Wilson, W B; Wesenberg, R L

    1977-11-01

    Seven cases of infantile osteopetrosis are presented. Five of these were available for detailed clinical examination and 2 for retrospective review, including autopsy slides. Neurological deficits in these patients are reviewed. Involvement of the central nervous system parenchyma was suggested by observations of delayed development, ocular abnormalities, and reflex changes as well as radiographic and autopsy findings. Cerebral atrophy was present in several of our patients as well as some reported in the literature and may account for the ventricular enlargement found in many of these patients. Though hydrocephalus may be present, it is unclear that this is frequent or that it can occur without antecedent intracranial hemorrhage. The large head size is not accounted for by calvarial thickening or by hydrocephalus. Despite our patients' small stature, pituitary function appeared to be normal. Surgical decompression may stabilize cranial nerve function, particularly when the optic nerves are involved. PMID:617576

  6. Neurologic Recovery after Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Charles L.; Buchowski, Jacob M.; Stoker, Geoffrey E.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Objective The objective of this study is to describe the natural history of neurologic recovery after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods Patients between 18 and 80 years of age, diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy, who underwent single-level ACDF and were followed for a minimum of 2 years were identified from a single-center database. Sensory and motor deficits were documented and graded based on physical examination findings at preoperative and postoperative visits, and used to calculate deficit rates. Results One hundred eighteen patients were included in the study. Mean age was 46 ± 9.2 years and mean follow-up time was 3.8 ± 2.1 years. At the time of surgery, 66% had a sensory deficit. Recovery of sensory function was seen in 85% of patients within 1 year. At final follow-up, new sensory deficits had developed in 30% of patients, 60% of whom had adjacent-level sensory deficits. Patients with preoperative sensory deficits tended to be more likely to develop a new deficit postoperatively (p = 0.05). At the time of surgery, 55% had a motor deficit. Recovery of motor function was seen in 95% of patients within 1 year, and 14% developed new postoperative motor deficits by final follow-up. Of those patients who developed a new motor deficit postoperatively, 76% did so at an adjacent level. Conclusions In our series, a high percentage of patients recovered neurologic function during the first year after ACDF. Adjacent-level and remote-level degeneration were large contributors to neurologic deficits that occurred in subsequent years. PMID:24494180

  7. The Preoperative Neurological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Probasco, John; Sahin, Bogachan; Tran, Tung; Chung, Tae Hwan; Rosenthal, Liana Shapiro; Mari, Zoltan; Levy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are prevalent in the general population, and the neurohospitalist has an important role to play in the preoperative planning for patients with and at risk for developing neurological disease. The neurohospitalist can provide patients and their families as well as anesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitalists, and other providers guidance in particular to the patient’s neurological disease and those he or she is at risk for. Here we present considerations and guidance for the neurohospitalist providing preoperative consultation for the neurological patient with or at risk of disturbances of consciousness, cerebrovascular and carotid disease, epilepsy, neuromuscular disease, and Parkinson disease. PMID:24198903

  8. Essure Permanent Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Implants and Prosthetics Essure Permanent Birth Control Essure Permanent Birth Control Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... evaluation of the Essure System Essure is a permanent birth control method for women (female sterilization). Implantation of Essure ...

  9. Neurologic presentations of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elyse J; Valdes-Sueiras, Miguel; Commins, Deborah; Levine, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the cause of AIDS, has infected an estimated 33 million individuals worldwide. HIV is associated with immunodeficiency, neoplasia, and neurologic disease. The continuing evolution of the HIV epidemic has spurred an intense interest in a hitherto neglected area of medicine, neuroinfectious diseases and their consequences. This work has broad applications for the study of central nervous system (CNS) tumors, dementias, neuropathies, and CNS disease in other immunosuppressed individuals. HIV is neuroinvasive (can enter the CNS), neurotrophic (can live in neural tissues), and neurovirulent (causes disease of the nervous system). This article reviews the HIV-associated neurologic syndromes, which can be classified as primary HIV neurologic disease (in which HIV is both necessary and sufficient to cause the illness), secondary or opportunistic neurologic disease (in which HIV interacts with other pathogens, resulting in opportunistic infections and tumors), and treatment-related neurologic disease (such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome). PMID:19932385

  10. [Incomplete paraplegia after delayed diagnostics of motor function deficits. Severe malpractice?].

    PubMed

    Regauer, M; Neu, J

    2013-03-01

    A 72-year-old female patient was transferred to a rehabilitation centre after surgical stabilization of a subtrochanteric femoral fracture. However, adequate mobilization was not possible there and 5 days after transfer deficits in the motor function of both lower extremities were documented for the first time and an initial paraplegia was diagnosed the following day by a neurologist. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the suspicion of an unstable fracture of the seventh thoracic vertebral body 8 days after the initial symptoms, which was confirmed by computed tomography after another 3 days. Surgical decompression and stabilization were performed at a department for neurosurgery 4 days later but incomplete paraplegia persisted permanently. The patient complained about insufficient diagnostic measures at the rehabilitation centre. The expert opinion concluded that it would have been mandatory to investigate the matter of the newly occurring neurological symptoms immediately but this had only been performed after undue delay, which had to be interpreted as a case of medical malpractice. The expert pointed out that it was not possible to provide clear evidence that emergent diagnosis and surgery would have enabled a significantly better outcome.The arbitration board ascertained a lack of examination and argued that prompt and adequate diagnostic measures would have revealed the relevant pathological finding and thus surgery would have been performed immediately. According to the reversal of evidence in favor of the patient it could be assumed that no permanent neurological damage existed when the first neurological symptoms occurred and that emergent surgery at least had the potential to prevent permanent paraplegia. This opinion of the arbitration board is supported by numerous references in the literature. PMID:23478903

  11. [Palliative care in neurology].

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Leandro; Tarquini, Daniela; De Falco, Fabrizio A; Carlini, Giulia; Zappia, Mario; Toni, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care in neurology is characterized by the need of taking into account some distinguishing features which supplement and often differ from the general palliative approach to cancer or to severe organ failures. Such position is emphasized by a new concept of palliative assistance which is not limited to the "end of life" stage, as it was the traditional one, but is applied along the entire course of progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions. There are various reasons accounting for a differentiation of palliative care in neurology and for the development of specific expertise; the long duration of the advanced stages of many neurological diseases and the distinguishing features of some clinical problems (cognitive disorders, psychic disorders, etc.), in addition to the deterioration of some general aspects (nutrition, etc.), make the general criteria adopted for cancer, severe respiratory, hepatic or renal failures and heart failure inadequate. The neurological diseases which could benefit from the development of a specific palliative approach are dementia, cerebrovascular diseases, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, severe traumatic brain injury, brain cancers and multiple sclerosis, as well as less frequent conditions. The growing literature on palliative care in neurology provides evidence of the neurological community's increasing interest in taking care of the advanced and terminal stages of nervous system diseases, thus encouraging research, training and updating in such direction. This document aims to underline the specific neurological requirements concerning the palliative assistance. PMID:26228722

  12. William Shakespeare's neurology.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Many of Shakespeare's plays contain characters who appear to be afflicted by neurological or psychiatric disorders. Shakespeare, in his descriptive analysis of his protagonists, was contributing to the understanding of these disorders. In fact, Charcot frequently used Shakespearean references in his neurological teaching sessions, stressing how acute objective insight is essential to achieving expert clinical diagnosis. Charcot found in Shakespeare the same rigorous observational techniques for which he himself became famous. This chapter describes many of Shakespearean characters suffering from varied neurological disorders, including Parkinsonism, epilepsy, sleeping disturbances, dementia, headache, prion disease, and paralyses. PMID:24290473

  13. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Synonym(s): Lupus - Neurological Sequelae, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... health problems and have a normal lifespan with periodic doctor visits and treatments with various drugs. What ...

  14. The neurological examination.

    PubMed

    April, R S

    1995-06-01

    This chapter describes methods of clinical history taking and examination of the PLDD candidate with lumbar radicular symptoms. It stresses features of the classical neurological examination of the back and lower extremities in a concise, systematic fashion. PMID:10150641

  15. Neurologic emergencies in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, J O

    1991-06-01

    Any one neurologic emergency is rare during pregnancy. As a group, neurologic disorders are a major cause of maternal mortality. Optimal management requires a multidisciplinary approach and ready access to the collective experience of other clinicians. This article discusses the management of status epilepticus, eclamptic hypertensive encephalopathy, stroke, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, myasthenic crisis, porphyric crisis, acute Guillain-Barré syndrome, autonomic hyperreflexia, malignant hyperthermia, chorea gravidarum, and Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:1945251

  16. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. PMID:25890773

  17. Neurology in Asia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region. PMID:25666629

  18. Discovering Focus: Helping Students with ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valkenburg, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a neurological disorder which effects learning and that has a confusing set of diagnostic symptoms and an even more confusing set of remedies ranging from medication to meditation to nothing at all. Current neurological research suggests, however, that there are strategies that the individual with ADD can use to…

  19. Permanency and the Foster Care System.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Katie K; Friedman, Susan; Christian, Cindy W

    2015-10-01

    Each year over 20,000 youth age out of the child welfare system without reaching a permanent placement in a family. Certain children, such as those spending extended time in foster care, with a diagnosed disability, or adolescents, are at the highest risk for aging out. As young adults, this population is at and increased risk of incarceration; food, housing, and income insecurity; unemployment; educational deficits; receipt of public assistance; and mental health disorders. We reviewed the literature on foster care legislation, permanency, outcomes, and interventions. The outcomes of children who age out of the child welfare system are poor. Interventions to increase permanency include training programs for youth and foster parents, age extension for foster care and insurance coverage, an adoption tax credit, and specialized services and programs that support youth preparing for their transition to adulthood. Future ideas include expanding mentoring, educational support, mental health services, and post-permanency services to foster stability in foster care placements and encourage permanency planning. Children in the child welfare system are at a high risk for physical, mental, and emotional health problems that can lead to placement instability and create barriers to achieving permanency. Failure to reach the permanency of a family leads to poor outcomes, which have negative effects on the individual and society. Supporting youth in foster care throughout transitions may mediate the negative outcomes that have historically followed placement in out-of-home care. PMID:26403649

  20. A Visual Skills Inventory for Children with Neurological Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, D. L.; Mackie, R. T.; Dutton, G. N.; Bradnam, M. S.; Day, R. E.; McDaid, G. J.; Phillips, S.; Napier, A.; Herbert, A. M.; Saunders, K. J.; Shepherd, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments often have visual deficits that are difficult to quantify. We have compared visual skills evaluated by carers with results of a comprehensive visual assessment. Participants were 76 children with mild to profound intellectual and/or motor impairment (33 males, 43 females; age range 7mo-16y; mean age 5y 1mo…

  1. Neurology and Don Quixote.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Palma, Fermin

    2012-01-01

    Don Quixote de la Mancha, which is considered one of the most important and influential works of Western modern prose, contains many references of interest for almost all of the medical specialties. In this regard, numerous references to neurology can be found in Cervantes' immortal work. In this study, we aimed to read Don Quixote from a neurologist's point of view, describing the neurological phenomena scattered throughout the novel, including tremors, sleep disturbances, neuropsychiatric symptoms, dementia, epilepsy, paralysis, stroke, syncope, traumatic head injury, and headache; we relate these symptoms with depictions of those conditions in the medical literature of the time. We also review Cervantes' sources of neurological information, including the works by renowned Spanish authors such as Juan Huarte de San Juan, Dionisio Daza Chacón and Juan Valverde de Amusco, and we hypothesize that Don Quixote's disorder was actually a neurological condition. Although Cervantes wrote it four centuries ago, Don Quixote contains plenty of references to neurology, and many of the ideas and concepts reflected in it are still of interest. PMID:23006630

  2. Neurological complications of prolonged hunger strike.

    PubMed

    Başoğlu, M; Yetimalar, Y; Gürgör, N; Büyükçatalbaş, S; Kurt, T; Seçil, Y; Yeniocak, A

    2006-10-01

    We investigated neurological findings in 41 prisoners (mean age: 28.6) who participated in a hunger strike between 2000 and 2002. All cases were evaluated using neuropsychological, neuroradiological, and electrophysiological methods. The total duration of fasting ranged from 130 to 324 days (mean 199 days). All cases had 200-600 mg/day thiamine orally for 60-294 days (mean 156) during the hunger strike, and had neurological findings consistent with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. All 41 patients exhibited altered consciousness which lasted from 3 to 31 days. All patients also presented gaze-evoked horizontal nystagmus and truncal ataxia. Paralysis of lateral rectus muscles was found in 14. Amnesia was apparent in all cases. Abnormal nerve conduction study parameters were not found in the patient group, but the amplitude of compound muscle action potential of the median and fibular nerves and sensory nerve action potential amplitude of the sural nerve were lower than the control group, and distal motor latency of the posterior tibial nerve was significantly prolonged as compared with the control group. The latency of visual evoked potential was prolonged in 22 cases. Somatosensory evoked potential (P37) was prolonged but not statistically significant. Our most significant finding was that the effect of hunger was more prominent on the central nervous system than on the neuromuscular system, despite the fact that all patients were taking thiamine. In our opinion, partial recovery of neurological, and neurocognitive signs in prolonged hunger could be a result of permanent neurological injury. PMID:16987161

  3. Regenerative cellular therapies for neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael; Boulis, Nicholas; Rao, Mahendra; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-05-01

    The promise of stem cell regeneration has been the hope of many neurologic patients with permanent damage to the central nervous system. There are hundreds of stem cell trials worldwide intending to test the regenerative capacity of stem cells in various neurological conditions from Parkinson׳s disease to multiple sclerosis. Although no stem cell therapy is clinically approved for use in any human disease indication, patients are seeking out trials and asking clinicians for guidance. This review summarizes the current state of regenerative stem cell transplantation divided into seven conditions for which trials are currently active: demyelinating diseases/spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease, macular degeneration and peripheral nerve diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: PSC and the brain. PMID:26239912

  4. Neurological Sequelae Resulting from Encephalitic Alphavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, Shannon E.; Dineley, Kelly T.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    The recent surge in viral clinical cases and associated neurological deficits have reminded us that viral infections can lead to detrimental, long-term effects, termed sequelae, in survivors. Alphaviruses are enveloped, single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses in the Togaviridae family. Transmission of alphaviruses between and within species occurs mainly via the bite of an infected mosquito bite, giving alphaviruses a place among arboviruses, or arthropod-borne viruses. Alphaviruses are found throughout the world and typically cause arthralgic or encephalitic disease in infected humans. Originally detected in the 1930s, today the major encephalitic viruses include Venezuelan, Western, and Eastern equine encephalitis viruses (VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV, respectively). VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV are endemic to the Americas and are important human pathogens, leading to thousands of human infections each year. Despite awareness of these viruses for nearly 100 years, we possess little mechanistic understanding regarding the complications (sequelae) that emerge after resolution of acute infection. Neurological sequelae are those complications involving damage to the central nervous system that results in cognitive, sensory, or motor deficits that may also manifest as emotional instability and seizures in the most severe cases. This article serves to provide an overview of clinical cases documented in the past century as well as a summary of the reported neurological sequelae due to VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV infection. We conclude with a treatise on the utility of, and practical considerations for animal models applied to the problem of neurological sequelae of viral encephalopathies in order to decipher mechanisms and interventional strategies. PMID:27379085

  5. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  6. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guangchun; Sun, Jiya; Wang, Jiajia; Bai, Zhouxian; Song, Fuhai; Lei, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be discussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder. PMID:25108264

  7. Genetic Analysis in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Alan; Hardy, John

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, neurogenetics research had made some remarkable advances owing to the advent of genotyping arrays and next-generation sequencing. These improvements to the technology have allowed us to determine the whole-genome structure and its variation and to examine its effect on phenotype in an unprecedented manner. The identification of rare disease-causing mutations has led to the identification of new biochemical pathways and has facilitated a greater understanding of the etiology of many neurological diseases. Furthermore, genome-wide association studies have provided information on how common genetic variability impacts on the risk for the development of various complex neurological diseases. Herein, we review how these technological advances have changed the approaches being used to study the genetic basis of neurological disease and how the research findings will be translated into clinical utility. PMID:23571731

  8. [Neurological complications in uremia].

    PubMed

    Fong, Chin-Shih

    2008-06-01

    Neurological complications due to the uremic state or hemodialysis, contribute to the important cause of mortality in patients with uremia. Despite continuous advances in uremic treatment, many neurological complications of uremia, like uremic encephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy and myopathy fail to fully respond to hemodialysis. Moreover, hemodialysis or kidney transplantation may even induce neurological complications. Hemodialysis can directly or indirectly be associated with Wernicke's encephalopathy, dialytic dementia, dysequilibrium syndrome, cerebrovascular accidents, osmotic myelinolysis and mononeuropathy. Renal transplantation can give rise to rejection encephalopathy and acute femoral neuropathy. The use of immunosuppressive drugs after renal transplantation can cause reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy encephalopathy. The clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutical aspects of central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and myopathy complications in uremia are reviewed. PMID:18686653

  9. Genomic medicine and neurology.

    PubMed

    Vance, Jeffery M; Tekin, Demet

    2011-04-01

    The application of genetics to the understanding of neurology has been highly successful over the past several decades. During the past 10 years, tools were developed to begin genetic investigations into more common disorders such as Alzheimer disease, multiple sclerosis, autism, and Parkinson disease. The era of genomic medicine now has begun and will have an increasing effect on the daily care of common neurologic diseases. Thus it is important for neurologists to have a basic understanding of genomic medicine and how it differs from the traditional clinical genetics of the past. This article provides some basic information about genomic medicine and pharmacogenetics in neurology to help neurologists to begin to adopt these principles into their practice. PMID:22810818

  10. Prepuberal stimulation of 5-HT7-R by LP-211 in a rat model of hyper-activity and attention-deficit: permanent effects on attention, brain amino acids and synaptic markers in the fronto-striatal interface.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Lucia A; Treno, Concetta; Gironi Carnevale, Ugo A; Arra, Claudio; Boatto, Gianpiero; Nieddu, Maria; Pagano, Cristina; Illiano, Placido; Barbato, Fabiana; Tino, Angela; Carboni, Ezio; Laviola, Giovanni; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Adriani, Walter; Sadile, Adolfo G

    2014-01-01

    The cross-talk at the prefronto-striatal interface involves excitatory amino acids, different receptors, transducers and modulators. We investigated long-term effects of a prepuberal, subchronic 5-HT7-R agonist (LP-211) on adult behaviour, amino acids and synaptic markers in a model for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Naples High Excitability rats (NHE) and their Random Bred controls (NRB) were daily treated with LP-211 in the 5th and 6th postnatal week. One month after treatment, these rats were tested for indices of activity, non selective (NSA), selective spatial attention (SSA) and emotionality. The quantity of L-Glutamate (L-Glu), L-Aspartate (L-Asp) and L-Leucine (L-Leu), dopamine transporter (DAT), NMDAR1 subunit and CAMKIIα, were assessed in prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal (DS) and ventral striatum (VS), for their role in synaptic transmission, neural plasticity and information processing. Prepuberal LP-211 (at lower dose) reduced horizontal activity and (at higher dose) increased SSA, only for NHE but not in NRB rats. Prepuberal LP-211 increased, in NHE rats, L-Glu in the PFC and L-Asp in the VS (at 0.250 mg/kg dose), whereas (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) it decreased L-Glu and L-Asp in the DS. The L-Glu was decreased, at 0.125 mg/kg, only in the VS of NRB rats. The DAT levels were decreased with the 0.125 mg/kg dose (in the PFC), and increased with the 0.250 mg/kg dose (in the VS), significantly for NHE rats. The basal NMDAR1 level was higher in the PFC of NHE than NRB rats; LP-211 treatment (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) decreased NMDAR1 in the VS of NRB rats. This study represents a starting point about the impact of developmental 5-HT7-R activation on neuro-physiology of attentive processes, executive functions and their neural substrates. PMID:24709857

  11. Prepuberal Stimulation of 5-HT7-R by LP-211 in a Rat Model of Hyper-Activity and Attention-Deficit: Permanent Effects on Attention, Brain Amino Acids and Synaptic Markers in the Fronto-Striatal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Treno, Concetta; Gironi Carnevale, Ugo A.; Arra, Claudio; Nieddu, Maria; Pagano, Cristina; Illiano, Placido; Barbato, Fabiana; Carboni, Ezio; Laviola, Giovanni; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Adriani, Walter; Sadile, Adolfo G.

    2014-01-01

    The cross-talk at the prefronto-striatal interface involves excitatory amino acids, different receptors, transducers and modulators. We investigated long-term effects of a prepuberal, subchronic 5-HT7-R agonist (LP-211) on adult behaviour, amino acids and synaptic markers in a model for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Naples High Excitability rats (NHE) and their Random Bred controls (NRB) were daily treated with LP-211 in the 5th and 6th postnatal week. One month after treatment, these rats were tested for indices of activity, non selective (NSA), selective spatial attention (SSA) and emotionality. The quantity of L-Glutamate (L-Glu), L-Aspartate (L-Asp) and L-Leucine (L-Leu), dopamine transporter (DAT), NMDAR1 subunit and CAMKIIα, were assessed in prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal (DS) and ventral striatum (VS), for their role in synaptic transmission, neural plasticity and information processing. Prepuberal LP-211 (at lower dose) reduced horizontal activity and (at higher dose) increased SSA, only for NHE but not in NRB rats. Prepuberal LP-211 increased, in NHE rats, L-Glu in the PFC and L-Asp in the VS (at 0.250 mg/kg dose), whereas (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) it decreased L-Glu and L-Asp in the DS. The L-Glu was decreased, at 0.125 mg/kg, only in the VS of NRB rats. The DAT levels were decreased with the 0.125 mg/kg dose (in the PFC), and increased with the 0.250 mg/kg dose (in the VS), significantly for NHE rats. The basal NMDAR1 level was higher in the PFC of NHE than NRB rats; LP-211 treatment (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) decreased NMDAR1 in the VS of NRB rats. This study represents a starting point about the impact of developmental 5-HT7-R activation on neuro-physiology of attentive processes, executive functions and their neural substrates. PMID:24709857

  12. Creativity and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Lealani Mae Y

    2014-08-01

    Although humans have long valued creativity, the generation of such innovation is still incompletely understood. Looking at the healthy brain, researchers have localized certain parts for a basic understanding of these mechanisms. By researching the brain affected by neurological disease, scientists have observed unique manifestations of creativity, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and parkinsonian spectrum disorders, and stroke, which help clarify these creative underpinnings. Incorporating both healthy and disease models of cerebral functioning, neurological and neuroscientific research from recent years has built on established theories and expanded current knowledge. PMID:24938215

  13. Neurologic effects of alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, I; Messing, R O

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism, a worldwide disorder, is the cause of a variety of neurologic disorders. In this article we discuss the cellular pathophysiology of ethanol addition and abuse as well as evidence supporting and refuting the role of inheritance in alcoholism. A genetic marker for alcoholism has not been identified, but neurophysiologic studies may be promising. Some neurologic disorders related to longterm alcoholism are due predominantly to inadequate nutrition (the thiamine deficiency that causes Wernicke's encephalopathy), but others appear to involve the neurotoxicity of ethanol on brain (alcohol withdrawal syndrome and dementia) and peripheral nerves (alcoholic neuropathy and myopathy). Images PMID:7975567

  14. [Renogenic neurologic disorders].

    PubMed

    Barbas, I M; Kodzaev, Iu K; Rudenko, T V; Skoromets, A A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 137 patients with chronic diseases of the kidneys were examined, including 34 without and 103 with chronic renal insufficiency. The neurologic syndromes under study included encephalomyelopathy with a predominant damage to the coordination systems, polyneuropathy and myopathy. These neurological changes were expressed irrespective of chronic renal failure, while their degree directly correlated with its severity. Stabilography and tremorography proved adequate and objective methods of assessing coordination disorders and made it possible to detect the above changes at the preclinical stage. PMID:3002077

  15. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, F; Wandinger, K-P

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are immune-mediated erroneous attacks on the central or peripheral nervous systems, or both, directed originally against the tumour itself. They have been known for more than 40 years, but recently the discovery of new subgroups of paraneoplastic encephalitis syndromes with a remarkably good response to immune therapy has ignited new clinical and scientific interest. Knowledge of these subgroups and their associated autoantibodies is important in therapeutic decision-making. However, the abundance of new autoantibodies and syndromes can be confusing. This review paper summarizes current knowledge and new developments in the field of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, their classification, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:23937626

  16. Neurological Principles and Rehabilitation of Action Disorders: Common Clinical Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Sathian, K.; Buxbaum, Laurel J.; Cohen, Leonardo G.; Krakauer, John W.; Lang, Catherine E.; Corbetta, Maurizio; Fitzpatrick, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we use the CAP principles to consider the impact of common clinical problems on action. We focus on three major syndromes: paresis, apraxia and ataxia. We also review mechanisms that could account for spontaneous recovery, using what is known about the best studied clinical dysfunction, paresis, and also ataxia. Together, this and the previous paper lay the groundwork for the third paper in this series, which reviews the relevant rehabilitative interventions. PMID:21613535

  17. Rare earth permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Major-Sosias, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    Permanent magnets were discovered centuries ago from what was known as {open_quotes}lodestone{close_quotes}, a rock containing large quantities of the iron-bearing mineral magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The compass was the first technological use for permanent magnetic materials; it was used extensively for navigational purposes by the fifteenth century. During the twentieth century, as new applications for permanent magnets were developed, interest and research in permanent magnetic materials soared. Four major types of permanent magnets have been developed since the turn of the century.

  18. Ravel's neurological illness.

    PubMed

    Alonso, R J; Pascuzzi, R M

    1999-01-01

    In the last 10 years of his life, Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) experienced a gradually progressive decline in neurological function. Dr. Alajouanine examined Ravel, noting the presence of aphasia and apraxia with relative preservation of comprehension and memory. The exact diagnosis remains unclear, but the likelihood of a progressive degenerative disorder, such as frontotemporal dementia, is herein discussed. PMID:10718529

  19. Outpatients in Neurological Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, M. P.; Skeil, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the multidisciplinary approach used at a neurological rehabilitation clinic in England. Analysis of questionnaire responses from outpatients indicated general support for the multidisciplinary approach, though a significant minority felt intimidated by the large number of professionals seen simultaneously. Patients also…

  20. Infant neurologic assessment.

    PubMed

    Hobdell, E

    2001-08-01

    Infant neurologic assessment reflects the ongoing maturation of the central nervous system. Traditional approaches to assessment cannot be used. Key factors are accurate observation and flexibility in obtaining the data. A case example using a 4-month-old infant illustrates specific approaches to assessment. PMID:11497071

  1. Clinical neurological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, A H

    1995-06-01

    The importance of the neurological evaluation for PLDD procedures is discussed. Elements of the basic examination are outlined and the reason for specific methods of testing are offered. The physician should pay attention to patient complaints, mechanical signs, and patient capabilities. PMID:10150642

  2. Neurological Impress Method plus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, James; Lapp, Diane; Fisher, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of these two studies was to redirect interest to the Neurological Impress Method, a multisensory approach to reading instruction that occurs between a teacher and a student, which has been largely forgotten in mainstream and special education circles over the past decades. In addition to its emphasis on oral reading, we included a…

  3. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  4. Drug treatment of vertigo in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Berisavac, Ivana I; Pavlović, Aleksandra M; Trajković, Jasna J Zidverc; Šternić, Nadežda M Čovičković; Bumbaširević, Ljiljana G Beslać

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo is a common symptom in everyday clinical practice. The treatment depends on the specific etiology. Vertigo may be secondary to inner ear pathology, or any existing brainstem or cerebellar lesion but may also be psychogenic. Central vertigo is a consequence of a central nervous system lesion. It is often associated with a focal neurological deficit. Peripheral vertigo is secondary to dysfunction of the peripheral vestibular system and is usually characterized by an acute vertigo with loss of balance, sensation of spinning in the space or around self, and is exaggerated with changes of the head and body position; no other neurological deficit is present. Some medications may also cause vertigo. Depending on the cause of the vertigo, drugs with different mechanisms of action, physical therapy, psychotherapy, as well as surgery may be used to combat this disabling malady. Symptomatic treatment has a particularly important role, regardless of the etiology of vertigo. We reviewed the current medications recommended for patients with vertigo, their mechanisms of action and their most frequent side effects. PMID:26588629

  5. The neurological disease ontology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. Description ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms ‘disease’, ‘diagnosis’, ‘disease course’, and ‘disorder’. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. Conclusion ND seeks to provide a formal

  6. Neurologic aspects of palliative care: the end of life setting.

    PubMed

    Sizoo, Eefje M; Grisold, Wolfgang; Taphoorn, Martin J B

    2014-01-01

    As there are, to date, few curative treatment options for many neurologic diseases, end of life (EOL) care is an important aspect of the treatment of neurologic patients. In the EOL phase, treatment should be aimed at relieving symptoms, maintaining quality of life, and facilitating a peaceful and dignified way of dying. Common signs and symptoms in the EOL phase of neurologic patients are raised intracranial pressure, seizures, confusion, cognitive deficits, and impaired motor function. Supportive treatment of these symptoms (such as analgesic drugs, dexamethasone, antiepileptic and neuroleptic drugs) is of major importance to maintain quality of life as long as possible. Another key aspect of EOL care is EOL decision making, such as withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, and palliative sedation. The main goal of EOL decision making is the prevention and relief of suffering, even if this might hasten death. Especially in advanced stages of many neurologic diseases, confusion, cognitive deficits, communication deficits, and decreasing levels of consciousness may impair the competence of patients to participate in EOL decision making. Given that patient autonomy is increasingly essential, advance care planning (ACP) at an early stage of the disease should be considered. PMID:24365413

  7. PIPs in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Phosphoinositide (PIP) lipids regulate many aspects of cell function in the nervous system including receptor signalling, secretion, endocytosis, migration and survival. Levels of PIPs such as PI4P, PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 are normally tightly regulated by phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases. Deregulation of these biochemical pathways leads to lipid imbalances, usually on intracellular endosomal membranes, and these changes have been linked to a number of major neurological diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy, stroke, cancer and a range of rarer inherited disorders including brain overgrowth syndromes, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies and neurodevelopmental conditions such as Lowe's syndrome. This article analyses recent progress in this area and explains how PIP lipids are involved, to varying degrees, in almost every class of neurological disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids. PMID:25680866

  8. Post dengue neurological complication.

    PubMed

    Hasliza, A H; Tohid, H; Loh, K Y; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case. PMID:27099661

  9. Neurology goes global

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Farrah J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In recent years, the need for additional neurologists and neurologic expertise in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) has become more apparent. Many organizations are committed to this unmet need, but the scope of the problem remains mostly underappreciated. Neurologists may be skeptical about their value in resource-limited settings, yet we are critically needed and can have a marked effect. International experiences, however, must be carried out in ethical, informed, and sustainable ways in tandem with local health care providers when possible. We present a brief overview of critical issues in global neurology, the importance of focusing on benefits to the LMIC, and options for volunteer opportunities in clinical service, education, research, and disaster relief. Finally, we offer practical pointers and resources for planning these experiences. PMID:25110621

  10. Neurology and detective writing.

    PubMed

    Kempster, Peter A; Lees, Andrew J

    2013-12-01

    When searching for clues to reach a diagnosis, neurologists often empathise with the detective who is trying to solve a case. The premise of this article is that detective stories have been part of the fabric of neurology ever since the time that it evolved into a discrete medical speciality. We will examine how this form of narrative has found expression in detective mystery fiction and popular science publications created by 20th century neurologist physician-writers. We will also investigate the power of the neurologist's alter ego, Sherlock Holmes: his relationship to founders of clinical neuroscience such as Jean-Martin Charcot, William Gowers and Sigmund Freud, and his influences on neurological practice and its literary traditions. PMID:24006370

  11. Key sleep neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    St. Louis, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep disorders are frequent comorbidities in neurologic patients. This review focuses on clinical aspects and prognosis of 3 neurologic sleep disorders: narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Narcolepsy causes pervasive, enduring excessive daytime sleepiness, adversely affecting patients' daily functioning. RLS/WED is characterized by an uncomfortable urge to move the legs before sleep, often evolving toward augmentation and resulting in daylong bothersome symptoms. RBD causes potentially injurious dream enactment behaviors that often signify future evolution of overt synucleinopathy neurodegeneration in as many as 81% of patients. Timely recognition, referral for polysomnography, and longitudinal follow-up of narcolepsy, RLS/WED, and RBD patients are imperatives for neurologists in providing quality comprehensive patient care. PMID:24605270

  12. Permanent contraception for women.

    PubMed

    Micks, Elizabeth A; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2015-11-01

    Permanent methods of contraception are used by an estimated 220 million couples worldwide, and are often selected due to convenience, ease of use and lack of side effects. A variety of tubal occlusion techniques are available for female permanent contraception, and procedures can be performed using a transcervical or transabdominal approach. This article reviews currently available techniques for female permanent contraception and discusses considerations when helping patients choose a contraceptive method and tubal occlusion technique. PMID:26626698

  13. The neurologic examination.

    PubMed

    Averill, D R

    1981-08-01

    With practice, an orderly routine, and a basic understanding of neuroanatomy, the clinician should be able to tentatively localize lesions in the nervous system. Once the lesion is localized, ancillary studies are usually necessary to identify the disease process. In difficult cases when referral is impractical, an accurate description of the findings from the neurologic examination will greatly improve the value of consultation. PMID:6977917

  14. Palliative care and neurology

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  15. [Neurological Disorders and Pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P

    2016-02-01

    Neurological disorders caused by pregnancy and puerperium include the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, the amniotic fluid embolism syndrome (AFES), the postpartum angiopathy due to reversible vasoconstriction syndrome, and the Sheehan syndrome. Hypertension and proteinuria are the hallmarks of preeclampsia, seizures define eclampsia. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets constitute the HELLP syndrome. Vision disturbances including cortical blindness occur in the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). The Sheehan syndrome presents with panhypopituitarism post partum due to apoplexia of the pituitary gland in severe peripartal blood loss leading to longstanding hypotension. Some neurological disorders occur during pregnancy and puerperium with an increased frequency. These include stroke, sinus thrombosis, the restless legs syndrome and peripheral nerve syndromes, especially the carpal tunnel syndrome. Chronic neurologic diseases need an interdisciplinary approach during pregnancy. Some anticonvulsants double the risk of birth defects. The highest risk exists for valproic acid, the lowest for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. For MS interval treatment, glatiramer acetate and interferones seem to be safe during pregnancy. All other drugs should be avoided. PMID:26953551

  16. Simulation in neurology.

    PubMed

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Cavallini, Anna; Santalucia, Paola; Gensini, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    Simulation is a frontier for disseminating knowledge in almost all the fields of medicine and it is attracting growing interest because it offers a means of developing new teaching and training models, as well as of verifying what has been learned in a critical setting that simulates clinical practice. The role of simulation in neurology, until now limited by the obvious physical limitations of the dummies used to train students and learners, is now increasing since, today, it allows anamnestic data to be related to the instrumental evidence necessary for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making, i.e., to the findings of neurophysiological investigations (EEG, carotid and vertebral echography and transcranial Doppler, for example) and neuroradiological investigations (CT, MRI imaging), as well as vital parameter monitoring (ECG, saturimetry, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, etc.). Simulation, by providing learners with opportunities to discuss, with experts, different profiles of biological parameters (both during the simulation itself and in the subsequent debriefing session), is becoming an increasingly important tool for training those involved in evaluation of critical neurological patients (stroke, Guillan Barrè syndrome, myasthenia, status epilepticus, headache, vertigo, confusional status, etc.) and complex cases. In this SIMMED (Italian Society for Simulation in Medicine) position paper, the applications (present and, possibly, future) of simulation in neurology are reported. PMID:25926070

  17. Oscillating Permanent Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, M. M.; Haines, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes several ways to partially levitate permanent magnets. Computes field line geometries and oscillation frequencies. Provides several diagrams illustrating the mechanism of the oscillation. (YP)

  18. Neurological soft signs in psychometrically identified schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Kaczorowski, Jessica A; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2009-12-01

    Patients with schizophrenia often exhibit structural brain abnormalities, as well as neurological soft signs (NSS), consistent with its conceptualization as a neurodevelopmental disorder. NSS are mild, presumably nonlocalizing, neurological impairments that are inferred from performance deficits in domains such as sensory integration, motor coordination, and motor sequencing. The vulnerability for schizophrenia is presumed to be expressed across a broad continuum of impairment referred to as schizotypy. It is hypothesized that nondisordered people along the schizotypy continuum should exhibit elevated rates of NSS. The present study examined the relation of psychometrically identified positive and negative schizotypy with NSS using the Neurological Evaluation Scale in a nonclinically ascertained sample of young adults (n=177). As hypothesized, negative, but not positive, schizotypy was related to increased NSS in tasks that assessed fine and gross motor coordination, motor sequencing, eye movement abnormalities, and memory recall. However, positive schizotypy was associated with increased NSS in tasks related to sensory integration dysfunction. In general, the positivexnegative schizotypy interaction term was unrelated to individual NSS tasks. The findings support: a) the theory that the vulnerability for schizophrenia is expressed across a broad continuum of subclinical and clinical impairment referred to as schizotypy; b) the multidimensional structure of schizotypy; and c) the notion that schizotypy is an appropriate construct for understanding the etiology and development of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. PMID:19651490

  19. Bridging neuroanatomy, neuroradiology and neurology: three-dimensional interactive atlas of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

    2013-06-01

    Understanding brain pathology along with the underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance in medical education and clinical practice. To facilitate and expedite this understanding, we created a three-dimensional (3D) interactive atlas of neurological disorders providing the correspondence between a brain lesion and the resulting disorder(s). The atlas contains a 3D highly parcellated atlas of normal neuroanatomy along with a brain pathology database. Normal neuroanatomy is divided into about 2,300 components, including the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, arteries, veins, dural sinuses, tracts, cranial nerves (CN), white matter, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, visual system, muscles, glands and cervical vertebrae (C1-C5). The brain pathology database contains 144 focal and distributed synthesized lesions (70 vascular, 36 CN-related, and 38 regional anatomy-related), each lesion labeled with the resulting disorder and associated signs, symptoms, and/or syndromes compiled from materials reported in the literature. The initial view of each lesion was preset in terms of its location and size, surrounding surface and sectional (magnetic resonance) neuroanatomy, and labeling of lesion and neuroanatomy. In addition, a glossary of neurological disorders was compiled and for each disorder materials from textbooks were included to provide neurological description. This atlas of neurological disorders is potentially useful to a wide variety of users ranging from medical students, residents and nurses to general practitioners, neuroanatomists, neuroradiologists and neurologists, as it contains both normal (surface and sectional) brain anatomy and pathology correlated with neurological disorders presented in a visual and interactive way. PMID:23859280

  20. Neurological Impairment: Nomenclature and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Catherine E.; Weber, Robert E.

    Neurological impairment as discussed includes a range of disabilities referred to as neurological impairment: minimal brain dysfunction/damage, developmental disability, perceptual handicap, learning disability, hyperkinetic behavioral syndrome, and others. Defined are causes of neurological impairment and methods of diagnosis. Symptoms…

  1. [Delayed neurological syndrome after CO intoxication of elderly female].

    PubMed

    Vander Weyden, Liesbeth; Voigt, Roxana-Maria; Boonen, Steven; Fagard, Katleen; Dejaeger, Eddy

    2015-10-01

    This article discusses the case history of an 87-year old woman with loss of consciousness following accidental CO intoxication. A few weeks later, the patient's cognitive abilities progressively deteriorated. This is hence a case of Delayed Neurological Symptoms after CO intoxication. This condition occurs in 40% of patients with CO intoxication and manifests itself 3-240 days after apparent recovery. Symptoms can linger for a long time and are in some cases even permanent. Treatment of CO intoxication usually consists of administering normobaric oxygen and in certain cases hyperbaric oxygen. The role of treatment with hyberbaric oxygen in delayed neurological symptoms after CO intoxication remains controversial, however. PMID:26082431

  2. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  3. Functional Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion Disorder).

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Cavanna, Andrea E; Coburn, Kerry; Sampson, Shirlene; Reeve, Alya; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the physical characteristics, comorbid symptoms, psychological makeup, and neuropsychological performance of patients with functional neurological disorders (FNDs)/conversion disorders. Gross neurostructural deficits do not account for the patients' deficits or symptoms. This review describes the literature focusing on potential neurobiological (i.e. functional neuroanatomic/neurophysiological) findings among individuals with FND, examining neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies of patients with the various forms of motor and sensory FND. In summary, neural networks and neurophysiologic mechanisms may mediate "functional" symptoms, reflecting neurobiological and intrapsychic processes. PMID:26900733

  4. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Honnorat, Jérôme; Antoine, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) can be defined as remote effects of cancer that are not caused by the tumor and its metastasis, or by infection, ischemia or metabolic disruptions. PNS are rare, affecting less than 1/10,000 patients with cancer. Only the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is relatively frequent, occurring in about 1% of patients with small cell lung cancer. PNS can affect any part of the central and peripheral nervous system, the neuromuscular junction, and muscle. They can be isolated or occur in association. In most patients, the neurological disorder develops before the cancer becomes clinically overt and the patient is referred to the neurologist who has the charge of identifying a neurological disorder as paraneoplastic. PNS are usually severely disabling. The most common PNS are Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), subacute cerebellar ataxia, limbic encephalitis (LE), opsoclonus-myoclonus (OM), retinopathies (cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) and melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR), Stiff-Person syndrome (SPS), chronic gastrointestinal pseudoobstruction (CGP), sensory neuronopathy (SSN), encephalomyelitis (EM) and dermatomyositis. PNS are caused by autoimmune processes triggered by the cancer and directed against antigens common to both the cancer and the nervous system, designated as onconeural antigens. Due to their high specificity (> 90%), the best way to diagnose a neurological disorder as paraneoplastic is to identify one of the well-characterized anti-onconeural protein antibodies in the patient's serum. In addition, as these antibodies are associated with a restricted range of cancers, they can guide the search for the underlying tumor at a stage when it is frequently not clinically overt. This is a critical point as, to date, the best way to stabilize PNS is to treat the cancer as soon as possible. Unfortunately, about one-third of patients do not have detectable antibodies and 5% to 10% have an atypical antibody

  5. [Between neurology and psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Levine, Joseph; Toser, Doron; Zeev, Kaplan

    2014-06-01

    In this review we will discuss the broad spectrum of possible relationships between the fields of neurology and psychiatry alongside weighing the pros and cons of each alternative relationship. This is in the hope that such discussions will allow an informed decision regarding the construction of future relations between these two areas. The possible connections between the areas are discussed in light of possible relationships that exist between the two groups in the mathematical world with reference to the proposed solutions to the psychophysical mind-body problem. PMID:25095609

  6. Thermography in Neurologic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Vilaça-Alves, José; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado

    2015-01-01

    One kind of medical images that has been developed in the last decades is thermal images. These images are assessed by infrared cameras and have shown an exponential development in recent years. In this sense, the aim of this study was to describe possibilities of thermography usage in the neurologic practice. It was performed a systematic review in Web of Knowledge (Thompson Reuters), set in all databases which used two combination of keywords as “topic”: “thermography” and “neurology”; and “thermography” and “neurologic”. The chronological period was defined from 2000 to 2014 (the least 15 years). Among the studies included in this review, only seven were with experimental design. It is few to bring thermography as a daily tool in clinical practice. However, these studies have suggested good results. The studies of review and an analyzed patent showed that the authors consider the thermography as a diagnostic tool and they recommend its usage. It can be concluded that thermography is already used as a diagnostic and monitoring tool of patients with neuropathies, particularly in complex regional pain syndrome, and stroke. And yet, this tool has great potential for future research about its application in diagnosis of other diseases of neurological origin. PMID:26191090

  7. Medical marijuana in neurology.

    PubMed

    Benbadis, Selim R; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Bozorg, Ali; Giarratano, Melissa; Kalidas, Kavita; Katzin, Lara; Robertson, Derrick; Vu, Tuan; Smith, Amanda; Zesiewicz, Theresa

    2014-12-01

    Constituents of the Cannabis plant, cannabinoids, may be of therapeutic value in neurologic diseases. The most abundant cannabinoids are Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which possesses psychoactive properties, and cannabidiol, which has no intrinsic psychoactive effects, but exhibits neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies. A small number of high-quality clinical trials support the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity of multiple sclerosis, pain refractory to opioids, glaucoma, nausea and vomiting. Lower level clinical evidence indicates that cannabinoids may be useful for dystonia, tics, tremors, epilepsy, migraine and weight loss. Data are also limited in regards to adverse events and safety. Common nonspecific adverse events are similar to those of other CNS 'depressants' and include weakness, mood changes and dizziness. Cannabinoids can have cardiovascular adverse events and, when smoked chronically, may affect pulmonary function. Fatalities are rare even with recreational use. There is a concern about psychological dependence, but physical dependence is less well documented. Cannabis preparations may presently offer an option for compassionate use in severe neurologic diseases, but at this point, only when standard-of-care therapy is ineffective. As more high-quality clinical data are gathered, the therapeutic application of cannabinoids will likely expand. PMID:25427150

  8. Coprophagia in neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Josephs, Keith A; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Parisi, Joseph E; Lapid, Maria I

    2016-05-01

    We report on the unusual behavior of coprophagia (eating one's own feces) in neurologic disorders. The Mayo Clinic Health Sciences-computerized clinical database was queried for all patients evaluated at our institution between 1995 and 2015 in which coprophagia was documented in the medical records. Twenty-six patients were identified of which 17 had coprophagia. Of the 17 patients, five were excluded due to age at onset less than 10 years, leaving 12 adult patients for this study. The median age at onset of coprophagia in the 12 patients was 55 years (range 20-88 years), and half were female. Additional behaviors were common including scatolia (fecal smearing), hypersexuality, aggression, and pica (eating objects of any kind). Coprophagia was associated with neurodegenerative dementia in six patients, developmental delay in two, and one each with seizures, steroid psychosis, frontal lobe tumor, and schizoaffective disorder. Brain imaging in the six patients with dementia showed moderate-to-severe medial temporal lobe atrophy, as well as mild frontal lobe atrophy. Autopsy examination was performed in one patient and revealed frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathology. Many different behavioral and pharmacologic therapies were implemented, yet only haloperidol was associated with discontinuation of the behavior. Coprophagia is associated with different neurologic disorders, particularly neurodegenerative dementias. The behavior may be related to medial temporal lobe atrophy, similar to the Klüver-Bucy syndrome. Haloperidol appears to be effective in treating the behavior, at least in some patients. PMID:27017341

  9. Neurological events related to influenza A (H1N1) pdm09

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Graciela; Soto-Hernández, José Luis; Díaz-Alba, Alexandra; Ugalde, Yair; Mérida-Puga, Jorge; Rosetti, Marcos; Sciutto, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To review neurological complications after the influenza A (H1N1) pdm09, highlighting the clinical differences between patients with post-vaccine or viral infection. Design A search on Medline, Ovid, EMBASE, and PubMed databases using the keywords “neurological complications of Influenza AH1N1” or “post-vaccine Influenza AH1N1.” Setting Only papers written in English, Spanish, German, French, Portuguese, and Italian published from March 2009 to December 2012 were included. Sample We included 104 articles presenting a total of 1636 patient cases. In addition, two cases of influenza vaccine-related neurological events from our neurological care center, arising during the period of study, were also included. Main outcome measures Demographic data and clinical diagnosis of neurological complications and outcomes: death, neurological sequelae or recovery after influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 vaccine or infection. Results The retrieved cases were divided into two groups: the post-vaccination group, with 287 patients, and the viral infection group, with 1349 patients. Most patients in the first group were adults. The main neurological complications were Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) or polyneuropathy (125), and seizures (23). All patients survived. Pediatric patients were predominant in the viral infection group. In this group, 60 patients (4.7%) died and 52 (30.1%) developed permanent sequelae. A wide spectrum of neurological complications was observed. Conclusions Fatal cases and severe, permanent, neurological sequelae were observed in the infection group only. Clinical outcome was more favorable in the post-vaccination group. In this context, the relevance of an accurate neurological evaluation is demonstrated for all suspicious cases, as well as the need of an appropriate long-term clinical and imaging follow-up of infection and post-vaccination events related to influenza A (H1N1) pdm09, to clearly estimate the magnitude of neurological complications

  10. Fellowship programs in behavioral neurology.

    PubMed

    Green, R C; Benjamin, S; Cummings, J L

    1995-03-01

    We sent a behavioral neurology fellowship questionnaire to each of the training directors of 160 neurology residency programs throughout the world, seeking information about programs offering advanced training in behavioral neurology (or similar fellowships in cognitive neurology, neurobehavior, or cognitive neuroscience). Response rate was 100%. Thirty-four respondents reported active fellowship programs in behavioral neurology, and 28 additional respondents indicated that a behavioral neurology fellowship was planned. Nine of the 34 programs (26.5%) defined themselves as exclusively or predominantly concerned with dementia and age-related neurobehavioral disorders. Directors of the 34 active fellowship programs estimated that their combined programs had graduated 199 fellows and were currently training fifty. Most fellowships concentrated on outpatient clinical training, with teaching required by 78.1% and research required by 81.8%. Specialty certification for behavioral neurology was favored by over 75% of behavioral neurology fellowship training directors but by only 30% of training directors in residency programs without behavioral neurology fellowships. Behavioral neurology training programs have grown dramatically in response to an increased recognition of the academic interest in and the clinical needs for these services. PMID:7898686

  11. Neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in childhood moyamoya syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robertson, R L; Chavali, R V; Robson, C D; Barnes, P D; Eldredge, E A; Burrows, P E; Scott, R M

    1998-11-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in children with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as compared to children without MMS. Materials and methods. One-hundred-ninety consecutive cerebral angiograms obtained in 152 children were evaluated. Sixty of these angiograms were obtained in 40 children with MMS. Patients underwent neurologic evaluation prior to and after the procedure. For this study, a neurologic complication was defined as any new focal neurologic deficit or alteration in mental status occurring during the procedure or within the ensuing 24 hours. Results. There were 2 neurologic complications within 24 hours of angiography, one in the MMS group and one in the non-MMS group. One patient with MMS became mute following angiography. The symptom resolved within 12 hours. One patient without MMS being examined postoperatively for residual arteriovenous malformation developed intracranial hemorrhage requiring reexploration 12 hours after the angiogram. Using a two-tail Fisher's exact test, there was no significant statistical difference in the ischemic (P = 0.3) or hemorrhagic (P = 1.0) complication rates between the group of patients with MMS and the non-MMS groups. Conclusion. The risk of a neurologic complication from cerebral angiography in children with MMS is low and not statistically different from the risk in children with other cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:9799310

  12. Neurological damage arising from intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis.

    PubMed

    Rei, M; Ayres-de-Campos, D; Bernardes, J

    2016-01-01

    Complications occurring at any level of foetal oxygen supply will result in hypoxaemia, and this may ultimately lead to hypoxia/acidosis and neurological damage. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the short-term neurological dysfunction caused by intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis, and this diagnosis requires the presence of a number of findings, including the confirmation of newborn metabolic acidosis, low Apgar scores, early imaging evidence of cerebral oedema and the appearance of clinical signs of neurological dysfunction in the first 48 h of life. Cerebral palsy (CP) consists of a heterogeneous group of nonprogressive movement and posture disorders, frequently accompanied by cognitive and sensory impairments, epilepsy, nutritional deficiencies and secondary musculoskeletal lesions. Although CP is the most common long-term neurological complication associated with intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis, >80% of cases are caused by other phenomena. Data on minor long-term neurological deficits are scarce, but they suggest that less serious intellectual and motor impairments may result from intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis. This chapter focuses on the existing evidence of neurological damage associated with poor foetal oxygenation during labour. PMID:26148854

  13. The neurology of poverty.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, G

    1982-01-01

    An intellectual deficit is known to exist in populations where extreme poverty is rife and is thus seen extensively in the lower socio-economic strata of underdeveloped nations. Poverty is a complex entity whose sociological and economic indicators often bear little relevance to the biological agents which can affect the central nervous system. An attempt is made to express poverty in terms of identifiable defects, physiological in nature. Thus adverse socio-economic factors are converted into specific biological entities which, though necessary for adequate development of the brain, are restricted where there is poverty. A number of causative deficiencies, including nutritional, visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular, affective, and other stimuli are postulated. These interact and potentiate one another. Each is capable of an independent action on the brain and examples are given of some sensory deprivations as well as malnutrition and their possible mechanism of action. If the various deficiencies can independently harm the brain, then a number of separate specific functions should be affected; examples are offered. The nature of this intellectual deficit is probably a non-fulfillment of genetic potential of certain specific functions of the brain, which may exhibit limited variations between one community and another, depending on cultural differences. The deleterious effect of this intellectual impairment is seen most clearly in figures of school desertion, for example in Latin America. Analogous data for adults is scarce. PMID:7112171

  14. Neurological and neuropsychological functions in adults with a history of developmental arsenic poisoning from contaminated milk powder.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Ohta, Hitoshi; Bellinger, David C; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    During the summer of 1955, mass arsenic poisoning of bottle-fed infants occurred in the western part of Japan due to contaminated milk powder, and more than 100 died; some childhood victims were later found to suffer from neurological sequelae in adolescence. This unique incident enabled us to explore infancy as a critical period of arsenic exposure in regard to developmental neurotoxicity and its possible persistence through adulthood. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the association between developmental arsenic exposure and the neurological outcomes more than 50 years later. We conducted a retrospective cohort study during the period from April 2012 to February 2013 in two hospitals in Okayama Prefecture, Japan. The study sample consisted of 50 individuals: 27 known poisoning victims from Okayama Prefecture, and 23 non-exposed local controls of similar age. In addition to neurological examination, we adapted a battery of neurophysiological and neuropsychological tests to identify the types of brain functions affected by early-life arsenic exposure. While limited abnormalities were found in the neurophysiological tests, neuropsychological deficits were observed. Except for Finger tapping, all test scores in the exposed group--Vocabulary and Block Design from Wechsler Adults Intelligent Scale III, Design memory subtest from Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning 2, and Grooved pegboard test--were substantially below those obtained by the unexposed. The exposed group showed average performance at least 1.2 standard deviations below the average for the controls. Exposed participants performed less well than controls, even after exclusion of subjects with recognized disabilities or those with a high level of education. Adults who had suffered arsenic poisoning during infancy revealed neuropsychological dysfunctions, even among those subjects not recognized as having disabilities. Developmental neurotoxicity due to arsenic likely results in permanent

  15. Child neurology services in Africa.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Newton, Charles R

    2011-12-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level. PMID:22019842

  16. History of neurologic examination books.

    PubMed

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors). PMID:25829645

  17. Child Neurology Services in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilmshurst, Jo M.; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Newton, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level. PMID:22019842

  18. Antisense Therapy in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua J.A.; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Antisense therapy is an approach to fighting diseases using short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides. Recently, antisense therapy has emerged as an exciting and promising strategy for the treatment of various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Previous and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided encouraging early results. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), dysferlinopathy (including limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B; LGMD2B, Miyoshi myopathy; MM, and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset; DMAT), and myotonic dystrophy (DM) are all reported to be promising targets for antisense therapy. This paper focuses on the current progress of antisense therapies in neurology. PMID:25562650

  19. Consciousness: a neurological perspective.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Shah, Sachin; Eddy, Clare M; Williams, Adrian; Rickards, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Consciousness is a state so essentially entwined with human experience, yet so difficult to conceptually define and measure. In this article, we explore how a bidimensional model of consciousness involving both level of arousal and subjective awareness of the contents of consciousness can be used to differentiate a range of healthy and altered conscious states. These include the different sleep stages of healthy individuals and the altered states of consciousness associated with neurological conditions such as epilepsy, vegetative state and coma. In particular, we discuss how arousal and awareness are positively correlated in normal physiological states with the exception of REM sleep, while a disturbance in this relationship is characteristic of vegetative state, minimally conscious state, complex partial seizures and sleepwalking. PMID:21447904

  20. Neurology and diving.

    PubMed

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent. PMID:24365363

  1. Neurologic Complications of Psychomotor Stimulant Abuse.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Psychomotor stimulants are drugs that act on the central nervous system (CNS) to increase alertness, elevate mood, and produce a sense of well-being. These drugs also decrease appetite and the need for sleep. Stimulants can enhance stamina and improve performance in tasks that have been impaired by fatigue or boredom. Approved therapeutic applications of stimulants include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), narcolepsy, and obesity. These agents also possess potent reinforcing properties that can result in excessive self-administration and abuse. Chronic use is associated with adverse effects including psychosis, seizures, and cerebrovascular accidents, though these complications usually occur in individuals with preexisting risk factors. This chapter reviews the adverse neurologic consequences of chronic psychomotor stimulant use and abuse, with a focus on two prototypical stimulants methamphetamine and cocaine. PMID:26070756

  2. [Cannabinoids in neurology--Brazilian Academy of Neurology].

    PubMed

    Brucki, Sonia M D; Frota, Norberto Anísio; Schestatsky, Pedro; Souza, Adélia Henriques; Carvalho, Valentina Nicole; Manreza, Maria Luiza Giraldes; Mendes, Maria Fernanda; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth; Vasconcelos, Cláudia; Tumas, Vitor; Ferraz, Henrique B; Barbosa, Egberto; Jurno, Mauro Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA). Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases. PMID:25992535

  3. Chronic Hyponatremia Causes Neurologic and Psychologic Impairments.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Haruki; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Takagi, Hiroshi; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Izumida, Hisakazu; Nakashima, Kohtaro; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Seiji; Kiyota, Atsushi; Fukumoto, Kazuya; Iwama, Shintaro; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Arima, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Yukio; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oiso, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common clinical electrolyte disorder. Once thought to be asymptomatic in response to adaptation by the brain, recent evidence suggests that chronic hyponatremia may be linked to attention deficits, gait disturbances, risk of falls, and cognitive impairments. Such neurologic defects are associated with a reduction in quality of life and may be a significant cause of mortality. However, because underlying diseases such as adrenal insufficiency, heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and cancer may also affect brain function, the contribution of hyponatremia alone to neurologic manifestations and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone rat model, we show here that sustained reduction of serum sodium ion concentration induced gait disturbances; facilitated the extinction of a contextual fear memory; caused cognitive impairment in a novel object recognition test; and impaired long-term potentiation at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. In vivo microdialysis revealed an elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the hippocampus of chronically hyponatremic rats. A sustained low extracellular sodium ion concentration also decreased glutamate uptake by primary astrocyte cultures, suggesting an underlying mechanism of impaired long-term potentiation. Furthermore, gait and memory performances of corrected hyponatremic rats were equivalent to those of control rats. Thus, these results suggest chronic hyponatremia in humans may cause gait disturbance and cognitive impairment, but these abnormalities are reversible and careful correction of this condition may improve quality of life and reduce mortality. PMID:26376860

  4. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  5. Neurological manifestation of methyl bromide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Suwanlaong, Kanokrat; Phanthumchinda, Kammant

    2008-03-01

    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic gas with poor olfactory warning properties. It is widely used as insecticidal fumigant for dry foodstuffs and can be toxic to central and peripheral nervous systems. Most neurological manifestations of methyl bromide intoxication occur from inhalation. Acute toxicity characterized by headache, dizziness, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and visual disturbances. Tremor, convulsion, unconsciousness and permanent brain damage may occur in severe poisoning. Chronic exposure can cause neuropathy, pyramidal and cerebellar dysfunction, as well as neuropsychiatric disturbances. The first case of methyl bromide intoxication in Thailand has been described. The patient was a 24-year-old man who worked in a warehouse of imported vegetables fumigated with methyl bromide. He presented with unstable gait, vertigo and paresthesia of both feet, for two weeks. He had a history of chronic exposure to methyl bromide for three years. His fourteen co-workers also developed the same symptoms but less in severity. Neurological examination revealed ataxic gait, decreased pain and vibratory sense on both feet, impaired cerebellar signs and hyperactive reflex in all extremities. The serum concentration of methyl bromide was 8.18 mg/dl. Electrophysilogical study was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (MRI) revealed bilateral symmetrical lesion of abnormal hypersignal intensity on T2 and fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences at bilateral dentate nuclei of cerebellum and periventricular area of the fourth ventricle. This incident stresses the need for improvement of worker education and safety precautions during all stages of methyl bromide fumigation. PMID:18575299

  6. [Sarcopenia and frailty in neurology].

    PubMed

    Maetzler, W; Drey, M; Jacobs, A H

    2015-04-01

    Sarcopenia and frailty are common geriatric syndromes and are associated with adverse health outcome and impaired health-related quality of life. Co-occurrences of these two syndromes with age-related neurological diseases are potentially high but not well investigated. Moreover, it is not well understood how these syndromes interact with neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and stroke. This article introduces the currently most accepted concepts of sarcopenia and frailty, discusses the potential relevance of the syndromes for geriatric patients and presents examples of studies that investigated potential interactions between these geriatric and neurological syndromes and conditions. First results indicate that (i) the co-occurrence of these geriatric syndromes and age-related neurological diseases is high, (ii) sarcopenia and frailty can influence the clinical state of neurological diseases to a relevant extent and (iii) at least some common causes and pathophysiological processes confer the geriatric and neurological conditions. In conclusion, profound knowledge about the interaction of sarcopenia, frailty and age-associated neurological conditions is currently not available. Such knowledge would have an enormous potential for improved therapy of these neurological conditions. PMID:25787725

  7. Nonlanguage disorders of speech reflect complex neurologic apparatus.

    PubMed

    Valenstein, E

    1975-09-01

    jerk or gag reflex, and absence of other upper motor neuron signs, such as upgoing toes, indicate a lower motor neuron or neuromuscular junction problem. Appropriate tests to rule out myasthenia gravis should be done. The other conditions discussed here are often obvious from their clinical presentation. Although the specific disorder of speech sometimes is helpful in localizing the cause, in most patients, the associated deficits on neurologic examination are of greatest value. PMID:169183

  8. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    PubMed

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed. PMID:11143502

  9. Neurological manifestations of malaria.

    PubMed

    Román, G C; Senanayake, N

    1992-03-01

    The involvement of the nervous system in malaria is reviewed in this paper. Cerebral malaria, the acute encephalopathy which complicates exclusively the infection by Plasmodium falciparum commonly affects children and adolescents in hyperendemic areas. Plugging of cerebral capillaries and venules by clumped, parasitized red cells causing sludging in the capillary circulation is one hypothesis to explain its pathogenesis. The other is a humoral hypothesis which proposes nonspecific, immune-mediated, inflammatory responses with release of vasoactive substances capable of producing endothelial damage and alterations of permeability. Cerebral malaria has a mortality rate up to 50%, and also a considerable longterm morbidity, particularly in children. Hypoglycemia, largely in patients treated with quinine, may complicate the cerebral symptomatology. Other central nervous manifestations of malaria include intracranial hemorrhage, cerebral arterial occlusion, and transient extrapyramidal and neuropsychiatric manifestations. A self-limiting, isolated cerebellar ataxia, presumably caused by immunological mechanisms, in patients recovering from falciparum malaria has been recognized in Sri Lanka. Malaria is a common cause of febrile seizures in the tropics, and it also contributes to the development of epilepsy in later life. Several reports of spinal cord and peripheral nerve involvement are also available. A transient muscle paralysis resembling periodic paralysis during febrile episodes of malaria has been described in some patients. The pathogenesis of these neurological manifestations remains unexplored, but offers excellent perspectives for research at a clinical as well as experimental level. PMID:1307475

  10. Neurological Symptoms of Hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a bone metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPL), which encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). This disease is characterized by disrupted bone and tooth mineralization, and reduced serum AP activity. Along with bone and tooth symptoms, many neurological symptoms, seizure, encephalopathy, intracranial hypertension, mental retardation, deafness, and growth hormone deficiency (GHD), are frequently found in HPP patients. Seizure occurs in severe HPP types soon after birth, and responds to pyridoxine, but is an indicator of lethal prognosis. Encephalopathy rarely presents in severe HPP types, but has severe sequelae. Intracranial hypertension complicated in mild HPP types develops after the age of 1 year and sometimes need neurosurgical intervention. Mental retardation, deafness and GHD are more frequently found in Japanese HPP patients. Mental retardation occurs in all HPP types. Deafness in perinatal lethal type is both conductive and sensorineural. GHD develops in all but perinatal lethal type and the diagnosis tends to delay. The pathogenesis of these neural features of HPP might be due to impairment of both vitamin B6 metabolism and central nervous system development by ALPL mutations. PMID:26219717

  11. Paraneoplastic neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Franz; Tschernatsch, Marlene

    2010-10-01

    The article provides an overview on the diagnosis and pathogenesis of paraneoplastic neurological disorders (PNDs), and subsequently the current therapeutic strategies in these patients. PNDs are nervous system dysfunctions in cancer patients, which are not due to a local effect of the tumor or its metastases. Most of these clinically defined syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer, especially small-cell lung cancer, lymphoma and gynecological tumors. In a part of the PND, an overlapping of different clinical syndromes can be observed. Highly specific autoantibodies directed against onconeuronal antigens led to the current hypothesis of an autoimmune pathophysiology. Whereas the most central nervous PNDs are more T-cell-mediated, limbic encephalitis can be caused by pathogenic receptor autoantibodies. The PND of the neuromuscular junction and paraneoplastic autonomic neuropathy are mainly associated with receptor or ion channel autoantibodies. The childhood opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and the PNDs associated with receptor/ion channel autoantibodies often respond to immunosuppressive therapies, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulins. By contrast, most CNS PNDs associated with defined antineuronal antibodies directed against intracellular antigens only stabilize after tumor treatment. PMID:20925471

  12. Neurologic Itch Management.

    PubMed

    Şavk, Ekin

    2016-01-01

    Neurologic itch is defined as pruritus resulting from any dysfunction of the nervous system. Itch arising due to a neuroanatomic pathology is seen to be neuropathic. Causes of neuropathic itch range from localized entrapment of a peripheral nerve to generalized degeneration of small nerve fibers. Antipruritic medications commonly used for other types of itch such as antihistamines and corticosteroids lack efficacy in neuropathic itch. Currently there are no therapeutic options that offer relief in all types of neuropathic pruritus, and treatment strategies vary according to etiology. It is best to decide on the appropriate tests and procedures in collaboration with a neurologist during the initial work-up. Treatment of neuropathic itch includes general antipruritic measures, local or systemic pharmacotherapy, various physical modalities, and surgery. Surgical intervention is the obvious choice of therapy in cases of spinal or cerebral mass, abscess, or hemorrhagic stroke, and may provide decompression in entrapment neuropathies. Symptomatic treatment is needed in the vast majority of patients. General antipruritic measures should be encouraged. Local treatment agents with at least some antipruritic effect include capsaicin, local anesthetics, doxepin, tacrolimus, and botulinum toxin A. Current systemic therapy relies on anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Phototherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and physical therapy have also been of value in selected cases. Among the avenues to be explored are transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain, new topical cannabinoid receptor agonists, various modes of acupuncture, a holistic approach with healing touch, and cell transplantation to the spinal cord. PMID:27578080

  13. History of neurologic examination books

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word “examination” in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's “Blue Book of Neurology” (“Blue Bible”) was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors). PMID:25829645

  14. Permanent versus disconnectable FPSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yong; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2009-06-01

    Floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) vessels offer a cost-effective field development solution, especially in deepwater areas lacking an adequate pipeline network. Most FPSOs are permanently moored, i.e. the complete system is designed to withstand any kind of extreme environment at the field location. FPSOs that can be quickly disconnected from their moorings and risers have also been designed and deployed. The key feature of this type of disconnectable FPSO is that it can be disconnect and so avoid dangerous environmental conditions such as icebergs, hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico and typhoons in the South China Sea. In this paper, the concept of disconnectable FPSOs for deepwater field development is presented. Key technologies and their engineering analyses are highlighted. The merits and demerits of disconnectable vs permanent FPSOs are then evaluated. The paper concludes that both permanent and disconnectable FPSOs are versatile floating systems and their selection depends on safety, technological, cost and operational considerations.

  15. Neurologic Manifestations of Enterovirus 71 Infection in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Yeon; Lee, Myoung Sook; Kim, Dong Bin

    2016-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 frequently involves the central nervous system and may present with a variety of neurologic manifestations. Here, we aimed to describe the clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profiles of patients presenting with neurologic complications of enterovirus 71 infection. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 pediatric patients hospitalized with acute neurologic manifestations accompanied by confirmed enterovirus 71 infection at Ulsan University Hospital between 2010 and 2014. The patients' mean age was 2.9 ± 5.5 years (range, 18 days to 12 years), and 80.6% of patients were less than 4 years old. Based on their clinical features, the patients were classified into 4 clinical groups: brainstem encephalitis (n = 21), meningitis (n = 7), encephalitis (n = 2), and acute flaccid paralysis (n = 1). The common neurologic symptoms included myoclonus (58.1%), lethargy (54.8%), irritability (54.8%), vomiting (48.4%), ataxia (38.7%), and tremor (35.5%). Twenty-five patients underwent an MRI scan; of these, 14 (56.0%) revealed the characteristic increased T2 signal intensity in the posterior region of the brainstem and bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei. Twenty-six of 30 patients (86.7%) showed CSF pleocytosis. Thirty patients (96.8%) recovered completely without any neurologic deficits; one patient (3.2%) died due to pulmonary hemorrhage and shock. In the present study, brainstem encephalitis was the most common neurologic manifestation of enterovirus 71 infection. The characteristic clinical symptoms such as myoclonus, ataxia, and tremor in conjunction with CSF pleocytosis and brainstem lesions on MR images are pathognomonic for diagnosis of neurologic involvement by enterovirus 71 infection. PMID:27051240

  16. Neurologic Manifestations of Enterovirus 71 Infection in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 frequently involves the central nervous system and may present with a variety of neurologic manifestations. Here, we aimed to describe the clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profiles of patients presenting with neurologic complications of enterovirus 71 infection. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 pediatric patients hospitalized with acute neurologic manifestations accompanied by confirmed enterovirus 71 infection at Ulsan University Hospital between 2010 and 2014. The patients’ mean age was 2.9 ± 5.5 years (range, 18 days to 12 years), and 80.6% of patients were less than 4 years old. Based on their clinical features, the patients were classified into 4 clinical groups: brainstem encephalitis (n = 21), meningitis (n = 7), encephalitis (n = 2), and acute flaccid paralysis (n = 1). The common neurologic symptoms included myoclonus (58.1%), lethargy (54.8%), irritability (54.8%), vomiting (48.4%), ataxia (38.7%), and tremor (35.5%). Twenty-five patients underwent an MRI scan; of these, 14 (56.0%) revealed the characteristic increased T2 signal intensity in the posterior region of the brainstem and bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei. Twenty-six of 30 patients (86.7%) showed CSF pleocytosis. Thirty patients (96.8%) recovered completely without any neurologic deficits; one patient (3.2%) died due to pulmonary hemorrhage and shock. In the present study, brainstem encephalitis was the most common neurologic manifestation of enterovirus 71 infection. The characteristic clinical symptoms such as myoclonus, ataxia, and tremor in conjunction with CSF pleocytosis and brainstem lesions on MR images are pathognomonic for diagnosis of neurologic involvement by enterovirus 71 infection. PMID:27051240

  17. Beyond ADHD: A Consideration of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Pedagogy in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prosser, Brenton J.

    2008-01-01

    A psycho-medical discourse that explains behavioural dysfunction through neurological deficit has dominated debate about attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, if only medical questions are asked, only medical answers will be found, resulting in more or less drug treatment. When behavioural dysfunction results in impairment…

  18. Clinical, Imaging and Pathological Correlates of a Hereditary Deficit in Verb and Action Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bak, Thomas H.; Yancopoulou, Despina; Nestor, Peter J.; Xuereb, John H.; Spillantini, Maria G.; Pulvermuller, Friedemann; Hodges, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Selective verb and noun deficits have been observed in a number of neurological conditions and their occurrence has been interpreted as evidence for different neural networks underlying the processing of specific word categories. We describe the first case of a familial occurrence of a selective deficit of verb processing. Father (Individual I)…

  19. Dynamic changes in neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra following permanent ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi-hao; He, Hong-yun; Yang, Li-qiang; Zhang, Peng-yue

    2016-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra following stroke remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the dynamic changes in autophagy and apoptosis in the penumbra to provide insight into potential therapeutic targets for stroke. An adult Sprague-Dawley rat model of permanent ischemic stroke was prepared by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the penumbra post-ischemia were evaluated by western blot assay and immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3, respectively. Levels of both LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3 in the penumbra gradually increased within 5 hours post-ischemia. Thereafter, levels of both proteins declined, especially LC3-II. The cerebral infarct volume increased slowly 1–4 hours after ischemia, but subsequently increased rapidly until 5 hours after ischemia. The severity of the neurological deficit was positively correlated with infarct volume. LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3 levels were high in the penumbra within 5 hours after ischemia, and after that, levels of these proteins decreased at different rates. LC3-II levels were reduced to a very low level, but cleaved caspase-3 levels remained high 72 hours after ischemia. These results indicate that there are temporal differences in the activation status of the autophagic and apoptotic pathways. This suggests that therapeutic targeting of these pathways should take into consideration their unique temporal dynamics.

  20. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  1. Perspectives on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: executive functions, working memory, and language disabilities.

    PubMed

    Westby, Carol; Watson, Silvana

    2004-08-01

    The conceptualization of the nature of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has changed in the last decade. ADHD is now viewed as a neurologically based condition with primary deficits in executive functions and working memory (WM). Students with ADHD have deficits in discourse organization, inferring, and monitoring that are related to their executive function and WM deficits. A large number of students with ADHD also have comorbid reading and language disabilities that exist in addition to the deficits directly associated with the ADHD. Comprehensive evaluation of students with ADHD is essential to address their specific learning needs. PMID:15359368

  2. Cytokine Therapies in Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Azodi, Shila; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of glycoproteins that coordinate physiological functions. Cytokine deregulation is observed in many neurological diseases. This article reviews current research focused on human clinical trials of cytokine and anticytokine therapies in the treatment of several neurological disease including stroke, neuromuscular diseases, neuroinfectious diseases, demyelinating diseases, and neurobehavioral diseases. This research suggests that cytokine therapy applications may play an important role in offering new strategies for disease modulation and treatment. Further, this research provides insights into the causal link between cytokine deregulation and neurological diseases. PMID:27388288

  3. Neurologic Manifestations of Blood Dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Couriel, Daniel R; Ricker, Holly; Steinbach, Mary; Lee, Catherine J

    2016-08-01

    Neurologic manifestations are common in blood diseases, and they can be caused by the hematologic disorder or its treatment. This article discusses hematologic diseases in adult patients, and categorizes them into benign and malignant conditions. The more common benign hematologic diseases associated with neurologic manifestations include anemias, particularly caused by B12 deficiency and sickle cell disease, and a variety of disorders of hemostasis causing bleeding or thrombosis, including thrombotic microangiopathy. Malignant conditions like multiple myeloma, leukemias, and lymphomas can have neurologic complications resulting from direct involvement, or caused by the different therapies to treat these cancers. PMID:27443994

  4. Neurological effects of deep diving.

    PubMed

    Grønning, Marit; Aarli, Johan A

    2011-05-15

    Deep diving is defined as diving to depths more than 50 m of seawater (msw), and is mainly used for occupational and military purposes. A deep dive is characterized by the compression phase, the bottom time and the decompression phase. Neurological and neurophysiologic effects are demonstrated in divers during the compression phase and the bottom time. Immediate and transient neurological effects after deep dives have been shown in some divers. However, the results from the epidemiological studies regarding long term neurological effects from deep diving are conflicting and still not conclusive. Prospective clinical studies with sufficient power and sensitivity are needed to solve this very important issue. PMID:21377169

  5. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... us to find out more about ADHD. Share Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Easy-to-Read) Download PDF Download ePub Order ... attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder , or ADHD . What is attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD? ADHD is a common mental disorder ...

  6. Attention Deficit Syndrome: Educational Bugaboo of the 90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Svea J.

    The increase in the diagnosis of attention deficit disorder (ADD) and the characteristics and treatment of ADD using sensory motor exercises are discussed. Reasons for the disability are explored, including neurological differences and difficulties in interpreting sensory input. Problems with focusing and hearing as well as hypersensitivity to…

  7. Dyspraxia in Autism: Association with Motor, Social, and Communicative Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dziuk, M. A.; Larson, J. C. Gidley; Apostu, A.; Mahone, E. M.; Denckla, M. B.; Mostofsky, S. H.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired performance of skilled gestures, referred to as dyspraxia, is consistently reported in children with autism; however, its neurological basis is not well understood. Basic motor skill deficits are also observed in children with autism and it is unclear whether dyspraxia observed in children with autism can be accounted for by problems with…

  8. Female children with incarcerated adult family members at risk for lifelong neurological decline.

    PubMed

    Brewer-Smyth, Kathleen; Pohlig, Ryan T; Bucurescu, Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    A secondary analysis of data from adult female prison inmates in the mid-Atlantic United States defined relationships between having incarcerated adult family members during childhood and neurological outcomes. Of 135 inmates, 99 (60%) had one or more incarcerated adult family members during childhood. Regression analyses revealed that having incarcerated adult family members was related to greater frequency and severity of childhood abuse and higher incidence of neurological deficits in adulthood, especially related to traumatic brain injuries, compared to those without incarcerated adult family members. Along with being role models, adult family members impact the neurological health of children throughout their life-span. PMID:26788781

  9. [Neurological syndromes, encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-06-01

    The remote effects of malignant tumors in most cases of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes(PNS)are mediated by autoimmune processes against antigens shared by the tumor cells and the nervous tissue(onconeural antigens). Onconeural (or paraneoplastic)antibodies are broadly categorized into two groups according to the location of the corresponding onconeural antigens, inside or on the surface of neurons. Antibodies established as clinically relevant diagnostic markers for PNS are designated as well-characterized onconeural antibodies (or classical antibodies)that target intracellular antigens(Hu, Yo, Ri, CV2/CRMP5,Ma2, and amphiphysin). They also serve as useful markers in detecting primary tumors. Recent identification of new antibodies as markers of subtypes of limbic encephalitis has also expanded the concept of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. These autoantibodies are directed to neuronal cell-surface antigens including neurotransmitter receptors(NMDA, AMPA, and GABAB receptors)and ion channels(VGKC). They are less frequently associated with cancer, so that they cannot be used as specific markers for PNS. Autoimmune limbic encephalitis with anti-neuronal cell surface antobodies and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with classical antibodies overlap in some clinical features but are pathophysiologically distinct. Classical antibodies are not simple tumor markers. They seem to be closely related to the disease mechanisms because specific intrathecal synthesis has been shown in PNS patients. However, attempts to produce an animal model of PNS by passive transfer of these antibodies have been unsuccessful, and there is no direct evidence demonstrating the pathogenic role of classical antibodies. Instead, some circumstantial evidence, including pathological studies showing extensive infiltrates of T cells in the CNS of the patients, supports the hypothesis that cytotoxic-T cell mechanisms cause irreversible neuronal damage. On the other hand, humoral immune

  10. Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

  11. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  12. Neurologic manifestations of Kanzaki disease.

    PubMed

    Umehara, F; Matsumuro, K; Kurono, Y; Arimura, K; Osame, M; Kanzaki, T

    2004-05-11

    We describe the neurologic findings in a patient with alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency (Kanzaki disease). Clinical and electrophysiologic studies revealed sensory-motor polyneuropathy, and sural nerve pathology showed decreased density of myelinated fibers with axonal degeneration. The patient had mildly impaired intellectual function with abnormal brain MRI and sensory-neuronal hearing impairment with repeated episodes of vertigo attacks. These findings suggest that Kanzaki disease may develop neurologic complications in the CNS and peripheral nervous system. PMID:15136691

  13. Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

    2014-09-01

    Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology. PMID:25027011

  14. Variable Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, T.; Iwashita, Y.; Kumada, M.; Spencer, C.M.; /SLAC

    2007-05-23

    A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) is one of the candidates for the final focus lens in a linear collider. An over 120 T/m strong variable permanent magnet quadrupole is achieved by the introduction of saturated iron and a 'double ring structure'. A fabricated PMQ achieved 24 T integrated gradient with 20 mm bore diameter, 100 mm magnet diameter and 20 cm pole length. The strength of the PMQ is adjustable in 1.4 T steps, due to its 'double ring structure': the PMQ is split into two nested rings; the outer ring is sliced along the beam line into four parts and is rotated to change the strength. This paper describes the variable PMQ from fabrication to recent adjustments.

  15. Permanent Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The health risks and side effects of fluoroquinolone use include the risk of tendon rupture and myasthenia gravis exacerbation, and on August 15, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration updated its warning to include the risk of permanent peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of fluoroquinolone-induced peripheral neuropathy in a patient treated for clinically diagnosed urinary tract infection with ciprofloxacin antibiotic. PMID:26425618

  16. Permanent magnet design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leupold, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Design techniques developed for the exploitation of high energy magnetically rigid materials such as Sm-Co and Nd-Fe-B have resulted in a revolution in kind rather than in degree in the design of a variety of electron guidance structures for ballistic and aerospace applications. Salient examples are listed. Several prototype models were developed. These structures are discussed in some detail: permanent magnet solenoids, transverse field sources, periodic structures, and very high field structures.

  17. Long-lasting neuroprotection and neurological improvement in stroke models with new, potent and brain permeable inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, F; Cozzi, A; Chiarugi, A; Formentini, L; Camaioni, E; Pellegrini-Giampietro, DE; Chen, Y; Liang, S; Zaleska, MM; Gonzales, C; Wood, A; Pellicciari, R

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSES Thienyl-isoquinolone (TIQ-A) is a relatively potent PARP inhibitor able to reduce post-ischaemic neuronal death in vitro. Here we have studied, in different stroke models in vivo, the neuroprotective properties of DAMTIQ and HYDAMTIQ, two TIQ-A derivatives able to reach the brain and to inhibit PARP-1 and PARP-2. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Studies were carried out in (i) transient (2 h) middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), (ii) permanent MCAO (pMCAO) and (iii) electrocoagulation of the distal portion of MCA in conjunction with transient (90 min) bilateral carotid occlusion (focal cortical ischaemia). KEY RESULTS In male rats with tMCAO, HYDAMTIQ (0.1–10 mg·kg−1) injected i.p. three times, starting 4 h after MCAO, reduced infarct volumes by up to 70%, reduced the loss of body weight by up to 60% and attenuated the neurological impairment by up to 40%. In age-matched female rats, HYDAMTIQ also reduced brain damage. Protection, however, was less pronounced than in the male rats. In animals with pMCAO, HYDAMTIQ administered 30 min after MCAO reduced infarct volumes by approximately 40%. In animals with focal cortical ischaemia, HYDAMTIQ treatment decreased post-ischaemic accumulation of PAR (the product of PARP activity) and the presence of OX42-positive inflammatory cells in the ischaemic cortex. It also reduced sensorimotor deficits for up to 90 days after MCAO. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Our results show that HYDAMTIQ is a potent PARP inhibitor that conferred robust neuroprotection and long-lasting improvement of post-stroke neurological deficits. PMID:21913897

  18. Hypoxic Adaptation during Development: Relation to Pattern of Neurological Presentation and Cognitive Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkham, Fenella J.; Datta, Avijit K.

    2006-01-01

    Children with acute hypoxic-ischaemic events (e.g. stroke) and chronic neurological conditions associated with hypoxia frequently present to paediatric neurologists. Failure to adapt to hypoxia may be a common pathophysiological pathway linking a number of other conditions of childhood with cognitive deficit. There is evidence that congenital…

  19. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E.; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination. PMID:24688139

  20. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M

    2014-04-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination. PMID:24688139

  1. [Urgent neurologic states: experience at the Neurology Clinic in Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Loncarević, Nedim; Dimitrijević, Jovan; Hrnjica, Mehmed; Hećo, Suad

    2004-01-01

    There is a quite good definition of medical care for patients suffering from chronicle neurological diseases. However the neurologist role in taking care of urgent cases is substantially less determined. This paper is analyzing one year efforts of the on duty neurological team in the Out Patient Department and Emergency Division of the Neurology Department in Sarajevo. During this period the on duty neurological team examined the total of 3939 patients, out of which 1022 patients where kept for treatment. The patients where most frequently assigned to the Emergency unit for following reasons: vascular incident of the Central Nervous System(1955 patients or 50%), cerebrovascular accident represented with 1290 or 33%, and TIA of the carotid and vertebrobasilar area 544 or 14% along with hypertensive encephalopathia, 118 or 3%. This is followed by the group of the short-term disturbance of consciousness (472 or 125), out of which the consciousness crises represented 257 or 7%, and epileptic crises 215 or 5%. Following are the lower percentages of the headaches (287 or 7%), radicular painful syndrome of cervical and lumbal area (209 or 5%), vertigo (183 or 5%), neurophatia (167 or 4%), etc. The more extensive number of patients admitted at the Emergency Division where suffering from brain stroke (800 or 78%), TIA was represented by a lower number (172 or 17%). Only 50 patients had other diagnosis. The ischemic stroke represented 674 or 81% with patients suffering from the brain stroke and the hemorrhagic stroke 153 or 19%. Today, the urgent neurological conditions represent a particular area of Neurology, not only neurologists need to know but also other medical doctors, to enable the patients to be forwarded on time to the appropriate care institution. PMID:15202312

  2. Carvedilol promotes neurological function, reduces bone loss and attenuates cell damage after acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Da; Huang, Ying; Li, Bin; Jia, Changqing; Liang, Feng; Fu, Qin

    2015-02-01

    Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to permanent functional deficits via mechanical injury and secondary mechanisms, but the therapeutic strategy for SCI is limited. Carvedilol has been shown to possess multiple biological and pharmacological properties. The of the present study was to investigate the possible protective effect of carvedilol in SCI rats. An acute SCI rat model was established and neurological function was tested. After carvedilol (10 mg/kg, oral gavage) treatment for 21 days, the status of osteoporosis, neuron damage, astrocyte activation, inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis were evaluated in rats. Carvedilol significantly improved locomotor activity that was decreased by SCI. In addition, carvedilol promoted bone growth by regulating the expression of nuclear factor-κB ligand (receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand; RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), inactivating osteoclasts and thereby increasing bone mineral density in tibias. In addition, carvedilol reduced SCI-induced neural damage, increased neuron number and reduced astrocyte activation in the spinal cord. Furthermore, the production and mRNA expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were significantly reduced, reduced glutathione content and superoxide dismutase activity were markedly increased and malondialdehyde content was markedly decreased in the spinal cords of carvedilol-treated rats. These results indicate that carvedilol exhibits anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects in SCI rats. In addition, the expression of Fas and Fas ligand was reduced by carvedilol treatment, which, in turn, reduced cleaved caspase 3 expression and finally decreased the number of apoptotic cells in the spinal cord. In conclusion, carvedilol promotes neurological function, reduces bone loss and attenuates cell damage after acute SCI in rats. PMID:25424914

  3. Neurological signs in congenital iodine-deficiency disorder (endemic cretinism).

    PubMed

    DeLong, G R; Stanbury, J B; Fierro-Benitez, R

    1985-06-01

    Neurological examinations were made of 67 children and adults with congenital iodine-deficiency disorder (endemic cretinism) in four rural villages in highland Ecuador. There was a distinct and readily identifiable pattern of neurological deficits. These included, to varying degrees: deaf-mutism or lesser degrees of bilateral hearing-loss or dysarthria; spasticity, particularly involving the proximal lower extremities; mental deficiency of a characteristic type; and rigidity and bradykinesia. Not all of these elements were found in all cases. Less common features were strabismus, kyphoscoliosis and frontal-lobe signs. There were exceptional cases with hypotonia. In contrast, cerebellar function was largely spared, as were functions of emotion and attention, vegetative and autonomic functions, social interaction, and probably memory, except in the most severely involved. PMID:4018426

  4. Potroom palsy? Neurologic disorder in three aluminum smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Longstreth, W T; Rosenstock, L; Heyer, N J

    1985-11-01

    We studied three patients with a progressive neurologic disorder, all of whom had worked for over 12 years in the same potroom of an aluminum smelting plant. All had incoordination and an intention tremor. Two of the three patients had cognitive deficits, and the most severely affected patient also had spastic paraparesis. None had involvement of the peripheral nervous system. Despite extensive evaluations, the cause of these patients' problems remains obscure. It is tempting to implicate one of the numerous substances to which the patients were exposed in the potroom, but none is known to cause the neurologic problems seen in these patients. Neurotoxic effects of aluminum in animals are directed at the central nervous system, and theoretically long-term low-level exposure to aluminum in the potroom could explain the findings in our patients. PMID:4062445

  5. Potroom palsy. Neurologic disorder in three aluminum smelter workers

    SciTech Connect

    Longstreth, W.T. Jr.; Rosenstock, L.; Heyer, N.J.

    1985-11-01

    The authors studied three patients with a progressive neurologic disorder, all of whom had worked for over 12 years in the same potroom of an aluminum smelting plant. All had incoordination and an intention tremor. Two of the three patients had cognitive deficits, and the most severely affected patient also had spastic paraparesis. None had involvement of the peripheral nervous system. Despite extensive evaluations, the cause of these patients problems remains obscure. It is tempting to implicate one of the numerous substances to which the patients were exposed in the potroom, but none is known to cause the neurologic problems seen in these patients. Neurotoxic effects of aluminum in animals are directed at the central nervous system, and theoretically long-term low-level exposure to aluminum in the potroom could explain the findings in our patients.

  6. Neurological and neurocognitive functions from intrauterine methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kado, Yoko; Diez, Midory Higa; Kishikawa, Toshihiro; Sanada, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    In the 1950s, large-scale food poisoning caused by methylmercury was identified in Minamata, Japan. Although severe intrauterine exposure cases (ie, congenital Minamata disease patients) are well known, possible impacts of methylmercury exposure in utero among residents, which is likely at lower levels than in congenital Minamata disease patients, are rarely explored. In 2014, the authors examined neurological and neurocognitive functions among 18 exposed participants in Minamata, focusing on fine motor, visuospatial construction, and executive functions. More than half of the participants had some fine motor and coordination difficulties. In addition, several participants had lower performance for neurocognitive function tests (the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure test and Keio version of the Wisconsin card sorting test). These deficits imply diffuse brain damage. This study suggests possible neurological and neurocognitive impacts of prenatal exposure to methylmercury among exposed residents of Minamata. PMID:26267674

  7. Management and rehabilitation of neurologic patients with sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Basson, Rosemary; Bronner, Gila

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disease frequently negatively affects sexual experience in multiple ways. The patient's sexual self-image, sexual function, propensity to sexual pain, and motivation to be sexually active may be impacted, as may the sexual experiences of the partner. Difficulties with mobility can limit both partners' sexual arousal and pleasure. Conditions associated with chronic pain or continence concerns add further distress. Thus sexual rehabilitation needs to address many areas. Comorbid depression is common and needs to be stabilized before definitive treatment of sexual dysfunction. Management strategies include cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and sex therapy and, for erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation, pharmacotherapy can be added. Benefit from all these modalities is confirmed in the general population but only pharmacologic treatment of erectile dysfunction has been studied in neurologic patients, where benefit is also seen. Testosterone is indicated only for comorbid testosterone deficit: very occasionally the neurologic condition causes secondary male hypogonadism. No androgen deficiency state has been identified in women. Results of testosterone treatment in women are conflicting: recruited women were not clearly dysfunctional and women with neurologic conditions have not been studied. Future research involving both partners using combined medical and psychologic therapy as followed in clinical practice is advocated. PMID:26003258

  8. AMPA Receptors as Therapeutic Targets for Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin; Goodman, Lucy; Fourie, Chantelle; Schenk, Susan; Leitch, Beulah; Montgomery, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Almost every neurological disease directly or indirectly affects synapse function in the brain. However, these diseases alter synapses through different mechanisms, ultimately resulting in altered synaptic transmission and/or plasticity. Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter that mediates excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain through activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptors. These receptors have therefore been identified as a target for the development of therapeutic treatments for neurological disorders including epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, autism, and drug addiction. The fact that AMPA receptors play a dominant role throughout the brain raises the significant challenge of selectively targeting only those regions affected by disease, and clinical trials have raised doubt regarding the feasibility of specifically targeting AMPA receptors for new therapeutic options. Benzamide compounds that act as positive allosteric AMPA receptor modulators, known as AMPAkines, can act on specific brain regions and were initially proposed to revolutionize the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with neurological disorders. Their therapeutic potential has since declined due to inconsistent results in clinical trials. However, recent advances in basic biomedical research are significantly increasing our knowledge of AMPA receptor structure, binding sites, and interactions with auxiliary proteins. In particular, the large complex of postsynaptic proteins that interact with AMPA receptor subunits have been shown to control AMPA receptor insertion, location, pharmacology, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. These proteins are now being considered as alternative therapeutic target sites for modulating AMPA receptors in neurological disorders. PMID:26920691

  9. Untreated non-phenylketonuric-hyperphenylalaninaemia: intellectual and neurological outcome.

    PubMed

    Weglage, J; Ullrich, K; Pietsch, M; Fünders, B; Zass, R; Koch, H G

    1996-07-01

    The intellectual, neurological, and neuropsychological outcome of patients with non-phenylketonuric-hyperphenylalaninaemia (PKU-HPA) (serum phenylalanine levels under free diet < 600 mumol/l) has not been systematically studied so far. We therefore tested 28 patients (mean age = 21.8, SD = 4.2 years) for IQ (WAIS-R/WISC-R), school performance, job career, clinical neurological examination, fine motor performance (motor performance task), and selective and sustained attention (stroop task, Dot Pattern Exercise from the Sonneville visual attention task). In addition, cranial MRI (1.5 T unit) was obtained in 10 of these patients. Clinical-neurological examination revealed no significant abnormalities in the non-PKU-HPA patients. They also had a normal IQ (mean = 101.9, SD = 13.6). Compared to their healthy siblings, they attended a normal school and had a normal job career. The motor performance task revealed no deficits in fine motor abilities. The patients performed normally in the stroop task and the dot pattern exercise. Their MRIs were normal. Our results indicate that patients with non-PKU-HPA are not at risk for developing intellectual, neurological, and neuropsychological impairment, as described for patients with treated mild or classical phenylketonuria. From this point of view a dietary treatment is not necessary in patients with hyperphenylalaninaemia. PMID:8828604

  10. Associations between neurologic dysfunction and lesions in canine fucosidosis.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, J L; Taylor, R M

    2016-04-01

    Canine fucosidosis in English Springer spaniels is the only animal model of the neurovisceral lysosomal storage disease fucosidosis available for preclinical therapeutic trials. For this reason, it is crucial to identify critical time points in disease progression, and if there are particular lesions associated with specific aspects of neurologic dysfunction. Historical records of 53 canine fucosidosis cases from 1979 to 2009 containing a neurologic dysfunction score assessing motor, behavioral and sensory dysfunction were interrogated by statistical analysis. Motor and behavioral dysfunction scores assessing gait deficits and apprehensive behavior first significantly increased at 12-17 months, and increased at each 6-month interval thereafter. Sensory dysfunction scores, assessing hearing loss, balance and vision deterioration, did not significantly increase until 18-23 months, and coincided with a rapid decline in neurologic function. Regression analysis incorporating published neuropathology data, measured by image analysis, identified neuroinflammation and apoptotic cell death as significant informative predictors of increasing neurologic dysfunction. These findings indicate that the level of neuropathology required to induce consistent and conspicuous clinical signs in canine fucosidosis is reached by approximately 12 months of age in the absence of other disease processes. Significant association between neuroinflammation and apoptotic cell death also suggests that specifically targeting these lesions combined with enzyme replacement in future studies may reduce disease burden in fucosidosis. Overall, examining this historical clinical data to identify associations between the extent of neuropathology and degree of clinical dysfunction provides a useful reference tool for monitoring disease and evaluating therapeutic trials conducted in canine fucosidosis. PMID:26711085

  11. Occupational neurological disorders in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a literature review of occupational neurological disorders and related research in Korea, focusing on chemical hazards. We reviewed occupational neurological disorders investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute of Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency between 1992 and 2009, categorizing them as neurological disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) or as neurodegenerative disorders. We also examined peer-reviewed journal articles related to neurotoxicology, published from 1984 to 2009. Outbreaks of occupational neurological disorder of the CNS due to inorganic mercury and carbon disulfide poisoning had helped prompt the development of the occupational safety and health system of Korea. Other major neurological disorders of the CNS included methyl bromide intoxication and chronic toxic encephalopathy. Most of the PNS disorders were n-hexane-induced peripheral neuritis, reported from the electronics industry. Reports of manganese-induced Parkinsonism resulted in the introduction of neuroimaging techniques to occupational medicine. Since the late 1990s, the direction of research has been moving toward degenerative disorder and early effect of neurotoxicity. To understand the early effects of neurotoxic chemicals in the preclinical stage, more follow-up studies of a longer duration are necessary. PMID:21258587

  12. Occupational Neurological Disorders in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a literature review of occupational neurological disorders and related research in Korea, focusing on chemical hazards. We reviewed occupational neurological disorders investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute of Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency between 1992 and 2009, categorizing them as neurological disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) or as neurodegenerative disorders. We also examined peer-reviewed journal articles related to neurotoxicology, published from 1984 to 2009. Outbreaks of occupational neurological disorder of the CNS due to inorganic mercury and carbon disulfide poisoning had helped prompt the development of the occupational safety and health system of Korea. Other major neurological disorders of the CNS included methyl bromide intoxication and chronic toxic encephalopathy. Most of the PNS disorders were n-hexane-induced peripheral neuritis, reported from the electronics industry. Reports of manganese-induced Parkinsonism resulted in the introduction of neuroimaging techniques to occupational medicine. Since the late 1990s, the direction of research has been moving toward degenerative disorder and early effect of neurotoxicity. To understand the early effects of neurotoxic chemicals in the preclinical stage, more follow-up studies of a longer duration are necessary. PMID:21258587

  13. Neurologic Complications in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Abbas; Soltani, Mohammad Hossein; Kamranmanesh, Mohammadreza; Tabibi, Ali; Mohsen Ziaee, Seyed Amir; Nouralizadeh, Akbar; Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Poorzamani, Mahtab; Gharaei, Babak; Ozhand, Ardalan; Lashay, Alireza; Ahanian, Ali; Aminsharifi, Alireza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Asl-Zare, Mohammad; Ali Beigi, Faramarz Mohammad; Najjaran, Vahid; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been the preferred procedure for the removal of large renal stones in Iran since 1990. Recently, we encountered a series of devastating neurologic complications during PCNL, including paraplegia and hemiplegia. There are several reports of neurologic complications following PCNL owing to paradoxical air emboli, but there are no reports of paraplegia following PCNL. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had undergone PCNL in 13 different endourologic centers and retrieved data related to neurologic complications after PCNL, including coma, paraplegia, hemiplegia, and quadriplegia. Results The total number of PCNL procedures in these 13 centers was 30,666. Among these procedures, 11 cases were complicated by neurologic events, and four of these cases experienced paraplegia. All events happened with the patient in the prone position with the use of general anesthesia and in the presence of air injection. There were no reports of neurologic complications in PCNL procedures performed with the patient under general anesthesia and in the prone position and with contrast injection. Conclusions It can be assumed that using room air to opacify the collecting system played a major role in the occurrence of these complications. Likewise, the prone position and general anesthesia may predispose to these events in the presence of air injection. PMID:23526482

  14. Liquids with permanent porosity.

    PubMed

    Giri, Nicola; Del Pópolo, Mario G; Melaugh, Gavin; Greenaway, Rebecca L; Rätzke, Klaus; Koschine, Tönjes; Pison, Laure; Gomes, Margarida F Costa; Cooper, Andrew I; James, Stuart L

    2015-11-12

    Porous solids such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks are useful in molecular separation and in catalysis, but their solid nature can impose limitations. For example, liquid solvents, rather than porous solids, are the most mature technology for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide because liquid circulation systems are more easily retrofitted to existing plants. Solid porous adsorbents offer major benefits, such as lower energy penalties in adsorption-desorption cycles, but they are difficult to implement in conventional flow processes. Materials that combine the properties of fluidity and permanent porosity could therefore offer technological advantages, but permanent porosity is not associated with conventional liquids. Here we report free-flowing liquids whose bulk properties are determined by their permanent porosity. To achieve this, we designed cage molecules that provide a well-defined pore space and that are highly soluble in solvents whose molecules are too large to enter the pores. The concentration of unoccupied cages can thus be around 500 times greater than in other molecular solutions that contain cavities, resulting in a marked change in bulk properties, such as an eightfold increase in the solubility of methane gas. Our results provide the basis for development of a new class of functional porous materials for chemical processes, and we present a one-step, multigram scale-up route for highly soluble 'scrambled' porous cages prepared from a mixture of commercially available reagents. The unifying design principle for these materials is the avoidance of functional groups that can penetrate into the molecular cage cavities. PMID:26560299

  15. Liquids with permanent porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Nicola; Del Pópolo, Mario G.; Melaugh, Gavin; Greenaway, Rebecca L.; Rätzke, Klaus; Koschine, Tönjes; Pison, Laure; Gomes, Margarida F. Costa; Cooper, Andrew I.; James, Stuart L.

    2015-11-01

    Porous solids such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks are useful in molecular separation and in catalysis, but their solid nature can impose limitations. For example, liquid solvents, rather than porous solids, are the most mature technology for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide because liquid circulation systems are more easily retrofitted to existing plants. Solid porous adsorbents offer major benefits, such as lower energy penalties in adsorption-desorption cycles, but they are difficult to implement in conventional flow processes. Materials that combine the properties of fluidity and permanent porosity could therefore offer technological advantages, but permanent porosity is not associated with conventional liquids. Here we report free-flowing liquids whose bulk properties are determined by their permanent porosity. To achieve this, we designed cage molecules that provide a well-defined pore space and that are highly soluble in solvents whose molecules are too large to enter the pores. The concentration of unoccupied cages can thus be around 500 times greater than in other molecular solutions that contain cavities, resulting in a marked change in bulk properties, such as an eightfold increase in the solubility of methane gas. Our results provide the basis for development of a new class of functional porous materials for chemical processes, and we present a one-step, multigram scale-up route for highly soluble ‘scrambled’ porous cages prepared from a mixture of commercially available reagents. The unifying design principle for these materials is the avoidance of functional groups that can penetrate into the molecular cage cavities.

  16. The neurological basis of occupation.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline. PMID:17623380

  17. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. PMID:25666773

  18. [Child neurology and multimedia technology].

    PubMed

    Nihei, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Methods of computer technology (intelligent technology, IT), such as multimedia and virtual reality, are utilized more and more in all medical fields including child neurology. Advances in the digitalization of individual medical data and multi-media technology have enabled patients to be able to obtain their own medical data by small media and to receive medical treatment at any hospitals even if they are located in distance place. Changes from a doctor oriented to patients oriented medicine is anticipated. It is necessary to store medical data from birth to adulthood and to accumulate epidemiological data of rare diseases such as metabolic diseases or degenerative diseases especially in child neurology, which highly require tele medicine and telecare at home. Moreover, IT may improve in the QOL of patients with neurological diseases and of their families. Cooperation of medicine and engineering is therefore necessary. Results of our experiments on telemedicine, telecare and virtual reality are described. PMID:11808201

  19. Examination of Neurological Subtle Signs in ADHD as a Clinical Tool for the Diagnosis and Their Relationship to Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrin, Maite; Vance, Alasdair

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neurological subtle signs (NSS) are minor neurological abnormalities that have been shown to be increased in a number of neurodevelopmental conditions. For attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), it remains unclear whether NSS may aid the clinical diagnostic process. Methods: This study explored the association of total and…

  20. Permanent Turbidity-Standards

    PubMed Central

    Roessler, William G.; Brewer, Carl R.

    1967-01-01

    Permanent turbidity reference standards suitable for measurement of microbial suspensions were prepared by suspending finely divided titanium dioxide in aryl sulfonamide-formaldehyde or methylstyrene resins. Turbidities of these standards, adjusted to a useful range for microbiological and immunological studies, were compared with other reference standards in use today. Tube holders for a Coleman Photonephelometer and a Nepho-Colorimeter were modified to eliminate the water well and to allow use of optically standardized 10-, 16-, or 18-mm test tubes. The standards and the tube holders have been used satisfactorily for more than 12 years. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6077410

  1. Angiotensin AT2-receptor stimulation improves survival and neurological outcome after experimental stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Schwengel, Katja; Namsolleck, Pawel; Lucht, Kristin; Clausen, Bettina H; Lambertsen, Kate L; Valero-Esquitino, Veronica; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Müller, Susanne; Widdop, Robert E; Denton, Kate M; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Iwai, Masaru; Boato, Francesco; Dahlöf, Björn; Hallberg, Anders; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, U Muscha

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of post-stroke, direct AT2-receptor (AT2R) stimulation with the non-peptide AT2R-agonist compound 21 (C21) on infarct size, survival and neurological outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice and looked for potential underlying mechanisms. C57/BL6J or AT2R-knockout mice (AT2-KO) underwent MCAO for 30 min followed by reperfusion. Starting 45 min after MCAO, mice were treated once daily for 4 days with either vehicle or C21 (0.03 mg/kg ip). Neurological deficits were scored daily. Infarct volumes were measured 96 h post-stroke by MRI. C21 significantly improved survival after MCAO when compared to vehicle-treated mice. C21 treatment had no impact on infarct size, but significantly attenuated neurological deficits. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) (receptor for BDNF) and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) were significantly increased in the peri-infarct cortex of C21-treated mice when compared to vehicle-treated mice. Furthermore, the number of apoptotic neurons was significantly decreased in the peri-infarct cortex in mice treated with C21 compared to controls. There were no effects of C21 on neurological outcome, infarct size and expression of BDNF or GAP-43 in AT2-KO mice. From these data, it can be concluded that AT2R stimulation attenuates early mortality and neurological deficits after experimental stroke through neuroprotective mechanisms in an AT2R-specific way. Key message • AT2R stimulation after MCAO in mice reduces mortality and neurological deficits.• AT2R stimulation increases BDNF synthesis and protects neurons from apoptosis.• The AT2R-agonist C21 acts protectively when applied post-stroke and peripherally. PMID:26983606

  2. What we talk about when we talk about access deficits

    PubMed Central

    Mirman, Daniel; Britt, Allison E.

    2014-01-01

    Semantic impairments have been divided into storage deficits, in which the semantic representations themselves are damaged, and access deficits, in which the representations are intact but access to them is impaired. The behavioural phenomena that have been associated with access deficits include sensitivity to cueing, sensitivity to presentation rate, performance inconsistency, negative serial position effects, sensitivity to number and strength of competitors, semantic blocking effects, disordered selection between strong and weak competitors, correlation between semantic deficits and executive function deficits and reduced word frequency effects. Four general accounts have been proposed for different subsets of these phenomena: abnormal refractoriness, too much activation, impaired competitive selection and deficits of semantic control. A combination of abnormal refractoriness and impaired competitive selection can account for most of the behavioural phenomena, but there remain several open questions. In particular, it remains unclear whether access deficits represent a single syndrome, a syndrome with multiple subtypes or a variable collection of phenomena, whether the underlying deficit is domain-general or domain-specific, whether it is owing to disorders of inhibition, activation or selection, and the nature of the connection (if any) between access phenomena in aphasia and in neurologically intact controls. Computational models offer a promising approach to answering these questions. PMID:24324232

  3. Proust, neurology and Stendhal's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Cardoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Marcel Proust is one of the most important French writers of the 20th century. His relationship with medicine and with neurology is possibly linked to the fact that his asthma was considered to be a psychosomatic disease classified as neurasthenia. Stendhal's syndrome is a rare psychiatric syndrome characterized by anxiety and affective and thought disturbances when a person is exposed to a work of art. Here, the authors describe neurological aspects of Proust's work, particularly the occurrence of Stendhal's syndrome and syncope when he as well as one of the characters of In Search of Lost Time see Vermeer's View of Delft during a visit to a museum. PMID:24642490

  4. Neurological complications of rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tullu, Millind S; Rodrigues, Sean; Muranjan, Mamta N; Bavdekar, Sandeep B; Kamat, Jaishree R; Hira, Priya R

    2003-02-01

    The rabies vaccines containing neural elements are used in some countries including India. We report three cases that presented with various neurological complications following the use of these vaccines. The presenting manifestations included those of encephalitis, radiculitis and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. These neurological complications are highlighted so that scientific evidence compels the community to discontinue the use of the neural tissue rabies vaccines. Newer generation cell culture rabies vaccines should be preferred over the neural tissue rabies vaccines for post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:12626831

  5. Neurologic Emergencies in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Nentwich, Lauren M; Grimmnitz, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Neurologic diseases are a major cause of death and disability in elderly patients. Due to the physiologic changes and increased comorbidities that occur as people age, neurologic diseases are more common in geriatric patients and a major cause of death and disability in this population. This article discusses the elderly patient presenting to the emergency department with acute ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, chronic subdural hematoma, traumatic brain injury, seizures, and central nervous system infections. This article reviews the subtle presentations, difficult workups, and complicated treatment decisions as they pertain to our older patients." PMID:27475016

  6. Neurology of the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Fenner, W R

    1988-05-01

    Owing to improvements in health care, more animals are living to advanced ages. Many abnormal neurologic conditions can affect these patients, but those most commonly associated with advancing years include degenerative, neoplastic, and idiopathic processes. An understanding of the "normal" age-related changes seen on a neurologic examination must be kept in mind when evaluating geriatric patients. Special care and consideration of the patient and client are often required in managing these cases, especially because treatment protocols are often unsuccessful or do not exist, resulting in a prognosis that is often poor at best. PMID:3289252

  7. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-06-23

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  8. Neurologic Manifestations of Chronic Methamphetamine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Rusyniak, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    COMMENTARY ON METHAMPHETAMINE ABUSE FOR PSYCHIATRIC PRACTICE Every decade seems to have its own unique drug problem. The 1970s had hallucinogens, the 1980s had crack cocaine, the 1990s had designer drugs, the 2000s had methamphetamine (Meth), and in the 2010s we are dealing with the scourge of prescription drug abuse. While each of these drug epidemics has distinctive problems and history, the one with perhaps the greatest impact on the practice of Psychiatry is Meth. By increasing the extracellular concentrations of dopamine while slowly damaging the dopaminergic neurotransmission, Meth is a powerfully addictive drug whose chronic use preferentially causes psychiatric complications. Chronic Meth users have deficits in memory and executive functioning as well as higher rates of anxiety, depression, and most notably psychosis. It is because of addiction and chronic psychosis from Meth abuse that the Meth user is most likely to come to the attention of the practicing Psychiatrist/Psychologist. Understanding the chronic neurologic manifestations of Meth abuse will better arm practitioners with the diagnostic and therapeutic tools needed to make the Meth epidemic one of historical interest only. PMID:23688691

  9. The status of telerehabilitation in neurological applications.

    PubMed

    Hailey, David; Roine, Risto; Ohinmaa, Arto; Dennett, Liz

    2013-09-01

    We systematically reviewed the evidence for the effectiveness of tele-neurorehabilitation (TNR) applications. The review included recent reports on rehabilitation for any disability associated with a neurological deficit or condition. Study quality was assessed using an approach that considered both study performance and study design. Judgements were made on whether each application had been successful, and whether further data were needed to establish the application as suitable for routine use. Nineteen credible studies that reported patient outcomes or administrative changes were identified. These studies related to 13 conditions. The focus of rehabilitation included Internet-supported treatments for management of fatigue, pain and depression; promotion of physical activity; and speech therapy. Sixteen studies were of high or good quality and three were fair to good, with some limitations. In 13 of the 19 studies the TNR application was successful in providing at least equivalent outcomes to conventional approaches. Additional work would be needed on eight applications to establish suitability for routine use, and would be desirable in five. Thus the recent literature provides further support for TNR applications, showing the promise of this field in a number of areas. However, the database of credible studies remains small. PMID:24163293

  10. Little Albert: A neurologically impaired child.

    PubMed

    Fridlund, Alan J; Beck, Hall P; Goldie, William D; Irons, Gary

    2012-11-01

    Evidence collected by Beck, Levinson, and Irons (2009) indicates that Albert B., the "lost" infant subject of John B. Watson and Rosalie Rayner's (1920) famous conditioning study, was Douglas Merritte (1919-1925). Following the finding that Merritte died early with hydrocephalus, questions arose as to whether Douglas's condition was congenital, rather than acquired in 1922, as cited on his death certificate. This etiology would imply that "Little Albert" was not the "healthy" and "normal" infant described by Watson and numerous secondary sources. Detailed analyses of Watson's (1923) film footage of Albert suggested substantial behavioral and neurological deficits. The anomalies we observed on film of Albert B. are insufficiently explained by his hospital upbringing but are consistent with findings from newly discovered medical records of Douglas Merritte. These documents revealed that the infant suffered from congenital obstructive hydrocephalus, iatrogenic streptococcal meningitis/ventriculitis, and retinal and optic nerve atrophy. The medical history also indicates that Albert's sessions with Watson occurred during periods when Douglas's clinical course was relatively stable. Further inquiries found ample sources of information available to Watson that would have made him aware of Douglas/Albert's medical condition at the times he tested the baby. Experimental ethics, Watson's legacy, and the Albert study are discussed in light of these new findings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23397921

  11. [Cerebrolysin in pediatric neurology practice].

    PubMed

    Petrukhin, A S; Pylaeva, O A

    2014-01-01

    Мany aspects of сerebrolysin treatment in a wide range of nervous system disorders in children are described. High efficacy and well tolerated therapy are revealed. These findings expand the perspectives of using сerebrolysin in pediatric neurology. PMID:24637827

  12. A Program for Neurological Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Louis

    A program for neurological organization is explained and its purposes are stated. Hints are given for working with both child and parents; and form for evaluating measures of neuromotor fitness is included. Also provided is a checklist for rating motor exploration, including movements performed lying on the back, on the knees, or standing or on…

  13. Neurology Case Studies: Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses interesting vascular neurology cases including the management of intracranial stenosis, migraine headache and stroke risk, retinal artery occlusions associated with impaired hearing, intracranial occlusive disease, a heritable cause of stroke and vascular cognitive impairment, and an interesting clinico-neuroradiologic disorder associated with eclampsia. PMID:27445238

  14. Neurological Aspects of Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Louis R.

    The author, a neurologist, looks at the nature of reading disabilities. He suggests that many reading disabilities are the result of normal constitutional differences and that the term "minimal brain dysfunction" is rarely appropriate and does not help the remediation process. Noted are various theories which relate neurology and reading ability.…

  15. [Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome with Dementia].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Keiko

    2016-04-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome with limbic encephalopathy tends to progress rapidly, presenting with physical symptoms such as ataxia or sensory disturbance. However, some affected patients demonstrate amnesia, inactivity, or abnormal behavior, which lead to the diagnosis of dementia. It is important to perform an extensive differential diagnosis with autoantibody-examination and tumor survey, so as not to overlook potentially treatable dementia. PMID:27056857

  16. Fly model causes neurological rethink

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandappa, Madhumala K

    2013-01-01

    A Drosophila model for a neurological disorder called type 2B Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease reveals that it has its origins in a partial loss of function, rather than a gain of function, which points to the need for a new therapeutic approach. PMID:24336781

  17. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test. PMID:24998831

  18. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:24964115

  19. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  20. Deficit in automatic sound-change detection may underlie some music perception deficits after acute hemispheric stroke.

    PubMed

    Kohlmetz, C; Altenmüller, E; Schuppert, M; Wieringa, B M; Münte, T F

    2001-01-01

    Music perception deficits following acute neurological damage are thought to be rare. By a newly devised test battery of music-perception skills, however, we were able to identify among a group of 12 patients with acute hemispheric stroke six patients with music perception deficits (amusia) while six others had no such deficits. In addition we recorded event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in a passive listening task with frequent standard and infrequent pitch deviants designed to elicit the mismatch negativity (MMN). The MMN in the patients with amusia was grossly reduced, while the non-amusic patients and control subjects had MMNs of equal size. These data show that amusia is quite common in unselected stroke patients. The MMN reduction suggests that amusia is related to unspecific automatic stimulus classification deficits in these patients. PMID:11527548

  1. Graded permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, R.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of semihard magnetic phases and interfaces on the performance of nanostructured two-phase permanent magnets is investigated by model calculations. In addition to the trivial coercivity increase due to the replacement of soft regions by semihard regions, there is a coercivity enhancement even if the volume-averaged anisotropy is kept constant during the introduction of the semihard phase. A variational approach is used to derive analytical results for representative anisotropy profiles. The improvement is operative on length scales slightly larger than that of the soft phase in hard-soft composites, but the main challenge is to find semihard light or heavy transition metal phases with a high magnetization. There are several Fe- and Co-based phases, but most are thin-film systems and difficult to use in bulk magnets. Very hard nanostructured magnets may also be created from soft phases with negative but large anisotropy constants (hard-magnetic soft-soft magnets).

  2. Achieving permanency for LGBTQ youth.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jill; Freundlich, Madelyn

    2006-01-01

    This article brings together two significant efforts in the child welfare field: achieving permanence for youth in out-of-home care and meeting the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. During the past several years, a national movement has taken place to assure all children and youth have a permanent family connection before leaving the child welfare system; however, LGBTQ youth are not routinely included in the permanency discussions. At the same time, efforts in addressing the needs of LGBTQ youth have increased, but permanency is rarely mentioned as a need. This article offers models of permanence and practices to facilitate permanence with LGBTQ youth and their families. It also offers a youth-driven, individualized process, using youth development principles to achieve relational, physical, and legal permanence. Reunification efforts are discussed, including services, supports, and education required for youth to return to their family of origin. For those who cannot return home, other family resources are explored. The article also discusses cultural issues as they affect permanence for LGBTQ youth, and, finally, addresses the need for ongoing support services to sustain and support permanency. PMID:16846117

  3. Neurological Assessment Scores in Rabbit Embolic Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aliza; Woods, Sean; Skinner, Robert; Hatton, Jeff; Lowery, John; Roberson, Paula; Hennings, Leah; Culp, William C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neurological outcomes and behavioral assessments are widely used in animal models of stroke, but assessments in rabbit models are not fully validated. The wryneck model of neurological assessment scores (NAS) was compared to percent infarct volume (%IV) values (infarct volume is a proven clinical indicator of stroke severity) and arterial occlusion localization in three rabbit angiographic stroke models. Hypothesis: NAS values will correlate with percent infarct volume values. Methods: Anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits (N=131, 4-5 kg) received internal carotid artery emboli by angiographic catheter introduced into the femoral artery and occlusions were characterized. Rabbits were evaluated at 24 hours post embolism using the NAS test of 0 (normal) to 10 (death). Deficit criteria included neck twist, righting reflex, extension reflex in hind paw and forepaw, and posture. Brain sections stained with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) were analyzed for %IV. Volume of the infarct was measured and calculated as a percent of the total brain volume. Results: The aggregate correlation for NAS values vs. %IV values was R=0.61, p<0.0001, a strong positive relationship, while correlations of the NAS components ranged from R=0.28-0.46. Occlusionsof the posterior cerebral artery vs. the middle cerebral artery alone produced significantly greater deficit scores at p<0.0001. Conclusions: These positive results validate the NAS system in the rabbit angiographic embolic stroke model. PMID:24265650

  4. Biological factors underlying sex differences in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Loke, Hannah; Harley, Vincent; Lee, Joohyung

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence, age of onset, pathophysiology, and symptomatology of many neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions differ significantly between males and females. Females suffer more from mood disorders such as depression and anxiety, whereas males are more susceptible to deficits in the dopamine system including Parkinson's disease (PD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Until recently, these sex differences have been explained solely by the neuroprotective actions of sex hormones in females. Emerging evidence however indicates that the sex chromosome genes (i.e. X- and Y-linked genes) also contribute to brain sex differences. In particular, the Y-chromosome gene, SRY (Sex-determining Region on the Y chromosome) is an interesting candidate as it is expressed in dopamine-abundant brain regions, where it regulates dopamine biosynthesis and dopamine-mediated functions such as voluntary movement in males. Furthermore, SRY expression is dysregulated in a toxin-induced model of PD, suggesting a role for SRY in the pathogenesis of dopamine cells. Taken together, these studies highlight the importance of understanding the interplay between sex-specific hormones and sex-specific genes in healthy and diseased brain. In particular, better understanding of regulation and function of SRY in the male brain could provide entirely novel and important insights into genetic factors involved in the susceptibility of men to neurological disorders, as well as development of novel sex-specific therapies. PMID:26028290

  5. Neurological sequelae of the operation "baby lift" airplane disaster.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M; Conners, C K; Brook, I; Feldman, S; Mason, J K; Dugas, M; Collis, L; Copeland, B; Lewis, O; Denhoff, E

    1994-01-01

    The aircraft disaster of the first flight of Operation "Baby Lift", which departed from Saigon, Vietnam, April 4, 1975, was survived by 149 orphaned children on their way to adoptive homes in the West. It had 157 passenger fatalities. The aircraft disaster exposed the surviving children to a complex disaster environment in which subatmospheric decompression, hypoxia, and deceleration were experienced, many children suffered a transient unconsciousness. We examined 135 surviving children between 1978 and 1985. The U.S. resident children were examined in the years 1979 to 1982 at an average age of 8 years and 6 months. They displayed the following symptomatology: attention deficit (> 75%), hyperactivity (> 65%), impulse disorder (> 55%), learning disabilities (> 35%), speech and language pathology (> 70%), and soft neurological signs (> 75%). The European children were examined in the years 1983 to 1985. On arrival at the adoptive home, 2 weeks after the accident they displayed the following symptomatology: muscle hypotonia (26%), seizures (2.5%), and regressed developmental milestones (33%). At the time of the diagnostic evaluations (1983 to 1985) the average age was 11 years and 8 months. They displayed the following symptomatology: attention deficit (59%), hyperactivity (52%), impulse disorder (48%), learning disabilities (43%), soft neurological signs (43%), epilepsy (16%), and speech and language pathology (34%). We conclude that a complex disaster environment can cause brain damage in children without prolonged unconsciousness, and that victims of disasters require a thorough evaluation from a multidisciplinary team. PMID:7923394

  6. [Neurology].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Arseny A; Rossetti, Andrea O; Michel, Patrik; Benninger, David; Nater, Bernard; Wider, Christian; Hirt, Lorenz; Kuntzer, Thierry; Démonet, Jean-François; Du Pasquier, Renaud A; Vingerhoets, François

    2016-01-13

    In 2015, cerebral stimulation becomes increasingly established in the treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Efficacy of endovascular treatment has been demonstrated for acute ischemic stroke. Deep brain stimulation at low frequency improves dysphagia and freezing of gait in Parkinson patients. Bimagrumab seems to increase muscular volume and force in patients with inclusion body myositis. In cluster-type headache, a transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulator is efficient in stopping acute attacks and also reducing their frequency. Initial steps have been undertaken towards modulating memory by stimulation of the proximal fornix. Teriflunomide is the first oral immunomodulatory drug for which efficacy has been shown in preventing conversion from clinical isolated syndrome to multiple sclerosis. PMID:26946707

  7. Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder: a therapeutic option

    PubMed Central

    Topczewski, Abram

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of a therapeutic regimen to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients. Methods A total of 140 patients initially underwent physical, neurological and laboratory evaluation. Thereafter, treatment was initiated with a compounding product consisting of a tricyclic antidepressant and an anxiolytic. Results The response was positive in 71.43% of patients in controlling hyperactivity and improving dispersion and attention deficit. Conclusion The therapeutic regimen utilized proved to be an effective therapeutic alternative, especially for patients who do not adapt to psychostimulant drugs. PMID:25295451

  8. Neurotrophic factors and neurologic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, D M; Mobley, W C

    1994-01-01

    Discovered only 40 years ago, nerve growth factor is the prototypic neurotrophic factor. By binding to specific receptors on certain neurons in the peripheral nervous system and brain, nerve growth factor acts to enhance their survival, differentiation, and maintenance. In recent years, many additional neurotrophic factors have been discovered; some are structurally related to nerve growth factor while others are distinct from it. The robust actions of neurotrophic factors have suggested their use in preventing or lessening the dysfunction and death of neurons in neurologic disorders. We review the progress in defining neurotrophic factors and their receptors and in characterizing their actions. We also discuss some of the uses of neurotrophic factors in animal models of disease. Finally, we discuss how neurotrophic factors could be implicated in the pathogenesis of neurologic disorders. Images PMID:7975562

  9. Clinical neurology and executive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M

    2000-01-01

    Executive function is a uniquely human ability that permits an individual to plan, carry out, and monitor a sequence of actions that is intended to accomplish a goal. This crucial neurobehavioral capacity depends on the integrity of the frontal lobes, most importantly the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and their connections. Executive dysfunction is associated with a wide range of neurologic disorders that affect these regions. In this paper, executive dysfunction is considered from the perspective of behavioral neurology, and the lesion method is employed to illustrate this impairment in a diverse group of disorders. Frontal system damage leading to disturbed executive function is common and clinically significant. Recognition of this syndrome is critical for ensuring the correct diagnosis, accurate prognosis, and appropriate treatment of affected patients. Executive dysfunction also represents an intriguing aspect of brain-behavior relationships and offers important insights into one of the highest cerebral functions. PMID:10879543

  10. Neurological disorders and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Casella, Giovanni; Bordo, Bianca M; Schalling, Renzo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; DI Bella, Camillo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) determines neurologic manifestations in 10% of all CD patients. We describe the most common clinical manifestations as cerebellar ataxia, gluten encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, peripheral neuropathies, sensorineural hearing loss, epilepsy, headache, depression, cognitive deficiencies and other less described clinical conditions. Our aim is to perform, as more as possible, a review about the most recent update on the topics in international literature. It is important to consider clinical neurological manifestations in celiac patients and to research these conditions also in the follow-up because they may start also one year after the start of gluten free diet (GFD) as peripheral neuropathy. The association with autism is analysed and possible new association with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) are considered. PMID:26619901

  11. Recent imaging advances in neurology.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Lorenzo; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    Over the recent years, the application of neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has considerably advanced the understanding of complex neurological disorders. PET is a powerful molecular imaging tool, which investigates the distribution and binding of radiochemicals attached to biologically relevant molecules; as such, this technique is able to give information on biochemistry and metabolism of the brain in health and disease. MRI uses high intensity magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses to provide structural and functional information on tissues and organs in intact or diseased individuals, including the evaluation of white matter integrity, grey matter thickness and brain perfusion. The aim of this article is to review the most recent advances in neuroimaging research in common neurological disorders such as movement disorders, dementia, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury and multiple sclerosis, and to evaluate their contribution in the diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:25808503

  12. Botulinum Toxin in Pediatric Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Enas Abdallah Ali

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are natural molecules produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria called Clostradium boltulinum. The toxin has a peculiar mechanism of action by preventing the release of acetylcholine from the presynaptic membrane. Consequently, it has been used in the treatment of various neurological conditions related to muscle hyperactivity and/or spasticity. Also, it has an impact on the autonomic nervous system by acting on smooth muscle, leading to its use in the management of pain syndromes. The use of botulinum toxin in children separate from adults has received very little attention in the literature. This review presents the current data on the use of botulinum neurotoxin to treat various neurological disorders in children. PMID:27335961

  13. Neurological diseases in famous painters.

    PubMed

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Visual art production involves multiple processes including basic motor skills, such as coordination of movements, visual-spatial processing, emotional output, sociocultural context, and creativity. Thus, the relationship between artistic output and brain diseases is particularly complex, and brain disorders may lead to impairment of artistic production in multiple domains. Neurological conditions may also occasionally modify artistic style and lead to surprisingly innovative features in people with an initial loss of creativity. This chapter focuses on anecdotal reports of various neurological disorders and their potential consequences on works produced by famous or well-established artists, including Carl Frederik Reutersward, Giorgio de Chirico, Krystyna Habura, Leo Schnug, Ignatius Brennan, and many others. PMID:24041285

  14. Bravo! Neurology at the opera.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Brandy R

    2010-01-01

    Opera is a complex musical form that reflects the complexity of the human condition and the human brain. This article presents an introduction to the portrayal of medical professionals in opera, including one neurologist, as well as two characters in whom neurological disease contributes to the action of the musical drama. Consideration is also given to the neuroanatomy and neuropathology of opera singers with further speculation regarding the neural underpinnings of the passion of opera's audience. PMID:20375526

  15. Some neurological aspects of laughter.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2004-01-01

    This brief survey of laughter attempts an analysis of its neurological mechanisms, evolution, role in social behaviour and its clinicopathological importance. The mechanisms of laughter, its physiological consequences and its demonstration by sound spectrography are considered. Something resembling laughter occurs in certain primates, and possibly rodents, though there are important differences. The evolution of laughter in a social context is appraised. Pathological laughter arises rarely, usually caused by diseases of the frontal or temporal lobes, and in hypothalamic hamartomata in children. PMID:15528918

  16. Survey of Neurological Disorders in Children Aged 9-15 Years in Northern India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rashmi; Bhave, Anupama; Bhargava, Roli; Agarwal, G G

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of neurological disorders in resource-poor settings, although likely to be high, is largely unexplored. The prevalence and risk factors for neurological disorders, including epilepsy and intellectual, motor, vision, and hearing deficits, in children aged 9 to 15 years in the community were investigated. A new instrument was developed, validated, and used in a 2-stage community survey for neurological disorders in Lucknow, India. Screen-positives and random proportion of screen-negatives were validated using predefined criteria. Prevalence of different neurological disorders was calculated by weighted proportions. Of 6431 children screened, 221 were positive. A total of 214 screen-positives and 251 screen-negatives were validated. Prevalence of neurological disorders was 31.3 per 1000 children of this age group (weighted 95% confidence interval = 16.5, 46.4). The final model for risk factors included age, mud house, delayed cry at birth, and previous head injury. The prevalence of neurological disorders is high in this region. Predictors of neurological disorders are largely modifiable. PMID:26428662

  17. Neurological manifestations of filarial infections.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Devender; Dumas, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infections cause a huge public health burden wherever they are endemic. These filaria may locate anywhere in the human body. Their manifestations and pathogenic mechanisms, except the most common ones, are rarely investigated systematically. Their neurological manifestations, however, are being increasingly recognized particularly with onchocerciasis or Loa loa infections, Wuchereria bancrofti, or Mansonella perstans. The risk of developing these manifestations may also increase in cases that harbor multiple filariasis or coinfections, for instance as with Plasmodium. The microfilaria of Onchocerca and Loa loa are seen in cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations of these infections is complex; however, pathogenic reactions may be caused by mechanical disruption, e.g., degeneration often followed by granulomas, causing fibrosis or mass effects on other tissues, vascular lesions, e.g., vascular block of cerebral vessels, or disordered inflammatory responses resulting in meningitis, encephalitis or localized inflammatory responses. The chances of having neurological manifestations may also depend upon the frequency and"heaviness"of infection over a lifetime. Hence, this type of infection should no longer be considered a disease of the commonly affected areas but one that may produce systemic effects or other manifestations, and these should be considered in populations where they are endemic. PMID:23829914

  18. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sandroni, Claudio; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction of neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest remains difficult. Previous guidelines recommended ocular reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and serum biomarkers for predicting poor outcome within 72h from cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines were based on patients not treated with targeted temperature management and did not appropriately address important biases in literature. Recent findings Recent evidence reviews detected important limitations in prognostication studies, such as low precision and, most importantly, lack of blinding, which may have caused a self-fulfilling prophecy and overestimated the specificity of index tests. Maintenance of targeted temperature using sedatives and muscle relaxants may interfere with clinical examination, making assessment of neurological status before 72 h or more after cardiac arrest unreliable. Summary No index predicts poor neurological outcome after cardiac arrest with absolute certainty. Prognostic evaluation should start not earlier than 72 h after ROSC and only after major confounders have been excluded so that reliable clinical examination can be made. Multimodality appears to be the most reasonable approach for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:25922894

  19. Genomic medicine and neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Lupski, James R.

    2011-01-01

    “Genomic medicine” refers to the diagnosis, optimized management, and treatment of disease—as well as screening, counseling, and disease gene identification—in the context of information provided by an individual patient’s personal genome. Genomic medicine, to some extent synonymous with “personalized medicine,” has been made possible by recent advances in genome technologies. Genomic medicine represents a new approach to health care and disease management that attempts to optimize the care of a patient based upon information gleaned from his or her personal genome sequence. In this review, we describe recent progress in genomic medicine as it relates to neurological disease. Many neurological disorders either segregate as Mendelian phenotypes or occur sporadically in association with a new mutation in a single gene. Heritability also contributes to other neurological conditions that appear to exhibit more complex genetics. In addition to discussing current knowledge in this field, we offer suggestions for maximizing the utility of genomic information in clinical practice as the field of genomic medicine unfolds. PMID:21594611

  20. Another Neurological Disorder Tied to Zika

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_157678.html Another Neurological Disorder Tied to Zika It may cause meningoencephalitis, an infection and swelling ... list of neurological disorders potentially associated with the Zika virus continues to grow, health officials reported Wednesday. ...

  1. Human Neurological Development: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Neurological development is considered as the major human potential. Vision, vestibular function, intelligence, and nutrition are discussed as well as the treatment of neurological disfunctions, coma, and convulsive seizures.

  2. Cell therapy: the final frontier for treatment of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Susmita; Singh, Gurbind; Sreejith, Sailaja; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Husin, Juani Mazmin; Datta, Indrani; Pal, Rajarshi; Das, Anjan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are devastating because they cause increasing loss of cognitive and physical functions and affect an estimated 1 billion individuals worldwide. Unfortunately, no drugs are currently available to halt their progression, except a few that are largely inadequate. This mandates the search of new treatments for these progressively degenerative diseases. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been successfully isolated, propagated, and characterized from the adult brains of mammals, including humans. The confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain via NSCs opens up fresh avenues for treating neurological problems. The proof-of-concept studies demonstrating the neural differentiation capacity of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo have raised widespread enthusiasm toward cell-based interventions. It is anticipated that cell-based neurogenic drugs may reverse or compensate for deficits associated with neurological diseases. The increasing interest of the private sector in using human stem cells in therapeutics is evidenced by launching of several collaborative clinical research activities between Pharma giants and research institutions or small start-up companies. In this review, we discuss the major developments that have taken place in this field to position stem cells as a prospective candidate drug for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:23253099

  3. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is adenosine the common link?

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-10-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the 'adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities' implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic 'comorbidity model', in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain co-morbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  4. Permanent dots in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, L M

    1987-01-01

    Currently the word tattoo is used to describe the permanent marks used on patients in radiation therapy. This article offers alternative wording and the reasons why a new term is suggested. Guidelines for the standardization and administration of permanent marks concludes the article. PMID:3588884

  5. Permanent-Magnet Meissner Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Permanent-magnet meissner bearing features inherently stable, self-centering conical configuration. Bearing made stiffer or less stiff by selection of magnets, springs, and spring adjustments. Cylindrical permanent magnets with axial magnetization stacked coaxially on rotor with alternating polarity. Typically, rare-earth magnets used. Magnets machined and fitted together to form conical outer surface.

  6. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... finish things? If so, your child may have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Nearly everyone shows some of these behaviors at times, but ADHD lasts more than 6 months and causes problems ...

  7. Understanding Attention Deficit Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villegas, Orlando; And Others

    This booklet provides basic information regarding attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), in their separate modalities, with hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention. Explanations are offered concerning short attention span, impulsive behavior, hyperactivity, and beginning new activities before completing the previous one. Theories…

  8. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a problem caused by the presence of 1 or more of ... of these behaviors. INATTENTIVE SYMPTOMS Doesn't pay attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork ...

  9. NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH RELEVANT TO READING--1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ISOM, JOHN B.

    ASPECTS OF NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH ARE PRESENTED UNDER THE TOPICS OF NEUROLOGICAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT, CEREBRAL DOMINANCE, "SPLIT-BRAIN" SYNDROME, AND SEQUENCING. THE FIRST TWO AREAS INDICATE THAT ASSESSMENT OF A CHILD'S NEUROLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT MUST TAKE INTO ACCOUNT VARIATION OF RATE AND DEGREE OF DEVELOPMENT, AND THAT THE SIGNIFICANCE OF…

  10. Functional symptoms in neurology: mimics and chameleons.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Reuber, Markus; Carson, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The mimics and chameleons of functional symptoms in neurology could be a whole textbook of neurology. Nevertheless, there are some recurring themes when things go wrong, notably diagnostic bias introduced by the presence or absence of psychiatric comorbidity or life events, neurological diseases that look 'weird' and lack of appreciation of the more unusual features of functional symptoms themselves. PMID:23468561

  11. MicroRNA-150 regulates blood-brain barrier permeability via Tie-2 after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhi; He, Quan-Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao-Lu; Baral, Suraj; Jin, Hui-Juan; Zhu, Yi-Yi; Li, Man; Xia, Yuan-Peng; Mao, Ling; Hu, Bo

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, involved in poststroke edema and hemorrhagic transformation, is important but elusive. We investigated microRNA-150 (miR-150)-mediated mechanism in the disruption of BBB after stroke in rats. We found that up-regulation of miR-150 increased permeability of BBB as detected by MRI after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in vivo as well as increased permeability of brain microvascular endothelial cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro. The expression of claudin-5, a key tight junction protein, was decreased in the ischemic boundary zone after up-regulation of miR-150. We found in brain microvascular endothelial cells that overexpression of miR-150 decreased not only cell survival rate but also the expression levels of claudin-5 after oxygen-glucose deprivation. With dual-luciferase assay, we confirmed that miR-150 could directly regulate the angiopoietin receptor Tie-2. Moreover, silencing Tie-2 with lentivirus-delivered small interfering RNA reversed the effect of miR-150 on endothelial permeability, cell survival, and claudin-5 expression. Furthermore, poststroke treatment with antagomir-150, a specific miR-150 antagonist, contributed to BBB protection, infarct volume reduction, and amelioration of neurologic deficits. Collectively, our findings suggested that miR-150 could regulate claudin-5 expression and endothelial cell survival by targeting Tie-2, thus affecting the permeability of BBB after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, and that miR-150 might be a potential alternative target for the treatment of stroke.-Fang, Z., He, Q.-W., Li, Q., Chen, X.-L., Baral, S., Jin, H.-J., Zhu, Y.-Y., Li, M., Xia, Y.-P., Mao, L., Hu, B. MicroRNA-150 regulates blood-brain barrier permeability via Tie-2 after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats. PMID:26887441

  12. The ART of HIV therapies: dopaminergic deficits and future treatments for HIV pediatric encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Katy M; Mactutus, Charles F; Booze, Rosemarie M

    2013-01-01

    The concerted efforts of clinicians, scientists and caregivers of HIV-infected children have led to tremendous advances in our understanding of pediatric HIV/AIDS. Antiretroviral therapy (ART; formerly known as highly active antiretroviral therapy [HAART]) has significantly extended the longevity of HIV-infected children, but there are limitations to improvements in quality of life that may persist despite therapy. ART has remarkably reduced the incidence of neurologic deficits for the majority of infected children, but some patients do not experience these benefits and children living in poorer nations, who may not have access to antiretrovirals, are particularly at risk for developing neurologic deficits. This article reviews the neurologic symptoms of pediatric HIV infection that manifest as dopaminergic disruptions and explores potential future adjuvant therapies for HIV-related neurologic disorders in children. PMID:19254168

  13. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition ameliorates deficits in motivational drive

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Apathy is frequently observed in numerous neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, as well as neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. Apathy is defined as a lack of motivation characterized by diminished goal-oriented behavior and self-initiated activity. This study evaluated a chronic restraint stress (CRS) protocol in modeling apathetic behavior, and determined whether administration of an anticholinesterase had utility in attenuating CRS-induced phenotypes. Methods We assessed behavior as well as regional neuronal activity patterns using FosB immunohistochemistry after exposure to CRS for 6 h/d for a minimum of 21 d. Based on our FosB findings and recent clinical trials, we administered an anticholinesterase to evaluate attenuation of CRS-induced phenotypes. Results CRS resulted in behaviors that reflect motivational loss and diminished emotional responsiveness. CRS-exposed mice showed differences in FosB accumulation, including changes in the cholinergic basal forebrain system. Facilitating cholinergic signaling ameliorated CRS-induced deficits in initiation and motivational drive and rescued immediate early gene activation in the medial septum and nucleus accumbens. Conclusions Some CRS protocols may be useful for studying deficits in motivation and apathetic behavior. Amelioration of CRS-induced behaviors with an anticholinesterase supports a role for the cholinergic system in remediation of deficits in motivational drive. PMID:22433906

  14. Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings.

    PubMed

    Galińska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic musical exercises is performed. They make use of the executive peculiarity of musical instruments and musical structures to prime, cue and coordinate movements. Among musical components, a repetitive rhythm plays a significant role. It regulates physiologic and behavioural functions through the mechanism of entrainment (synchronization of biological rhythms with musical rhythm based on acoustic resonance). It is especially relevant for patients with a deficient internal timing system in the brain. Additionally, regular rhythmic patterns facilitate memory encoding and decoding of non-musical information hence music is an efficient mnemonic tool. The music as a hierarchical, compound language of time, with its unique ability to access affective/motivational systems in the brain, provides time structures enhancing perception processes, mainly in the range of cognition, language and motor learning. It allows for emotional expression and improvement of the motivation for rehabilitation activities. The new technologies of rhythmic sensory stimulation (i.e. Binaural Beat Stimulation) or rhythmic music in combination with rhythmic light therapy appear. This multimodal forms of stimulation are used in the treatment of stroke, brain injury, dementia and other cognitive deficits. Clinical outcome studies provide evidence of the significant superiority of rehabilitation with music over the one without music. PMID:26488358

  15. Neurology outside Paris following Charcot.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Thierry; Clarac, François; Petit, Henri; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    The Middle Ages saw the development of numerous universities in the different provinces that later became the kingdom of France. In 1794, Napoleon I established 3 medical schools in Paris, Montpellier and Strasbourg, which were transformed into medical faculties in 1808. France had always been a highly centralized country, but during the 19th century, this trend started to change with the creation of medical faculties in Nancy (1872), Lille (1877), Lyon (1878), Bordeaux (1879), Toulouse (1891), Algiers (1910) and Marseille (1930). Following the creation of the 12 foundation courses, specialized chairs were progressively established in Paris, but for a long time this remained restricted to the French capital. However, with the emergence of medicine as an academic discipline in several towns outside Paris, came the development of neurology. This was greatly influenced by former students of Jean-Martin Charcot, local personalities, and the interactions between the two. Leading figures included Albert Pitres in Bordeaux, Léon Ingelrans in Lille, Eugène Devic and Jules Froment in Lyon, Lucien Cornil in Marseille, Joseph Grasset in Montpellier, and Marcel Riser in Toulouse. The interaction between French and Germanic medical communities also developed at this turbulent time under the influence of several great physicians such as Wilhelm Waldeyer, Adolf Kussmaul, and later Jean Alexandre Barré in Strasbourg, and Hippolyte Bernheim in Nancy. There are a number of other university towns outside Paris in which the development of neurology was probably influenced by the same interactions with psychiatry. It would be worth carrying out a thorough analysis of these towns in order to present an exhaustive overview of the development of neurology in France. PMID:20938155

  16. [Present and future of neurology in Spain].

    PubMed

    Illa Sendra, I; García De Yébenes Prous, J; Ramo Tello, C; Polo Esteban, J M; Molinuevo Guix, J L; Robles Bayón, A; Mulas Delgado, F; Alvarez Sabín, J; Aguilar Barbera, M; Berciano Blanco JA, J A; Blesa González, R; Carnero Pardo, C; Castillo Sánchez, J; Del Ser Quijano, T; Ferrer Abizanda, I; García-Albea Ristol, E; Gómez Isla, T; Graus Ribas, F; Jiménez Hernández, M D; Liaño Martínez, H; Matías Guiu-Guia, J; Zarranz Imirizaldu, J J; Paradas López, C; Elena Martínez, G; Maltas Pérez, G; Ponce Rodríguez, M T

    2001-11-01

    This is a document prepared by the Spanish Society of Neurology (SEN), which was given to the President of Spain (Mr. José María Aznar) last September with the main aim of examining the current situation of Neurology in our country. It analyses the present and future of Neurology in clinical assistance, teaching and research. To prepare this document the criteria of patients' associations has been considered, including the Declaration of Madrid which has been subscribed by thirty of these associations. In spite of its relevant development in the previous decades, the current situation of Neurology in Spain is far from the ideal. To reach the recommendable menber of 3 or 4 neurologists per 100,000 inhabitants it is necessary to duplicate the present number of neurologists which has been estimated around 2/100,000; this situation is especially urgent in some Autonomous Communities. The most important problems in neurological assistance are: inadequate follow-up of the chronic outpatients, low numbers of neurological beds and of duties of Neurology, as well as of neurological case of patients with urgent neurological disorders. It is also necessary to increase the number of professors of Neurology to adequately cover pregraduate teaching; again there are important differences in teaching positions among Autonomous Communities. Neurology residence should be prolonged from 4 to 5 years. Finally, it is necessary to support the appearance of superespecialised units and to promote a coordinated research with other close specialities including basic neuroscience. PMID:11742621

  17. Emerging and Reemerging Neurologic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    The list of emerging and reemerging pathogens that cause neurologic disease is expanding. Various factors, including population growth and a rise in international travel, have contributed to the spread of pathogens to previously nonendemic regions. Recent advances in diagnostic methods have led to the identification of novel pathogens responsible for infections of the central nervous system. Furthermore, new issues have arisen surrounding established infections, particularly in an increasingly immunocompromised population due to advances in the treatment of rheumatologic disease and in transplant medicine. PMID:25360203

  18. Neurological infections after neuraxial anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Felicity

    2008-03-01

    Infection is the commonest cause of serious neurologic sequelae of neuraxial anesthesia. The incidence depends on operator skill and patient population. Meningitis, a complication of dural puncture, is usually caused by viridans streptococci. The risk factors are dural puncture during labor, no mask and poor aseptic technique, vaginal infection and bacteremia. Epidural abscess is a complication of epidural catheterization, route of entry the catheter track and the organism usually the staphylococcus. Principal risk factors are prolonged catheterization, poor aseptic technique and traumatic insertion. Prevention includes wearing a mask, using a full sterile technique, avoiding prolonged catheterization and prescribing antibiotics in a high-risk situation. PMID:18319178

  19. Neurology in the market place.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, I R

    1992-01-01

    The White Paper, "Working for Patients", led to a change in the way in which hospitals were funded from April 1991. The changes will have profound effects on the future shape of health care in the United Kingdom. Neurologists will need to understand the new National Health Service if their patients are to benefit from the changes. If neurology is to survive as a specialty separate from general medicine it will have to show that it can provide quality care which is accessible, relevant, efficient and effective, at a price which Districts can afford. PMID:1564499

  20. Atypical neurological manifestations of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Neeraj; Gupta, Monica; Singh, Ram; Kumar, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is known as a great mimic. It can manifest subtly or abruptly, typically or atypically. This aspect of the disease can frequently mislead physicians. We present two patients of malaria with atypical neurological manifestations. The first patient of Plasmodium falciparum malaria presented with fever and altered sensorium; MRI of the brain suggested cerebral venous thrombosis. The second patient of Plasmodium vivax presented with fever, double vision and right eye lateral rectus palsy due to unilateral sixth cranial nerve involvement. Both patients were managed with antimalarials and supportive medical management, and had uneventful recoveries. PMID:25150266

  1. Periodic permanent magnet focused klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, R Lawrence

    2015-04-21

    A periodic permanent magnet (PPM) klystron has beam transport structures and RF cavity structures, each of which has permanent magnets placed substantially equidistant from a beam tunnel formed about the central axis, and which are also outside the extent of a cooling chamber. The RF cavity sections also have permanent magnets which are placed substantially equidistant from the beam tunnel, but which include an RF cavity coupling to the beam tunnel for enhancement of RF carried by an electron beam in the beam tunnel.

  2. Hyaluronidase and Hyaluronan Oligosaccharides Promote Neurological Recovery after Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Dohare, Preeti; Arshad, Arslan; Zia, Muhammad T.; Panda, Sanjeet; Korumilli, Ritesh; Kayton, Robert; Hascall, Vincent C.; Lauer, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in premature infants results in inflammation, arrested oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) maturation, and reduced myelination of the white matter. Hyaluronan (HA) inhibits OPC maturation and complexes with the heavy chain (HC) of glycoprotein inter-α-inhibitor to form pathological HA (HC–HA complex), which exacerbates inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that IVH would result in accumulation of HA, and that either degradation of HA by hyaluronidase treatment or elimination of HCs from pathological HA by HA oligosaccharide administration would restore OPC maturation, myelination, and neurological function in survivors with IVH. To test these hypotheses, we used the preterm rabbit model of glycerol-induced IVH and analyzed autopsy samples from premature infants. We found that total HA levels were comparable in both preterm rabbit pups and human infants with and without IVH, but HA receptors—CD44, TLR2, TLR4—were elevated in the forebrain of both humans and rabbits with IVH. Hyaluronidase treatment of rabbits with IVH reduced CD44 and TLR4 expression, proinflammatory cytokine levels, and microglia infiltration. It also promoted OPC maturation, myelination, and neurological recovery. HC–HA and tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 were elevated in newborns with IVH; and depletion of HC–HA levels by HA oligosaccharide treatment reduced inflammation and enhanced myelination and neurological recovery in rabbits with IVH. Hence, hyaluronidase or HA oligosaccharide treatment represses inflammation, promotes OPC maturation, and restores myelination and neurological function in rabbits with IVH. These therapeutic strategies might improve the neurological outcome of premature infants with IVH. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Approximately 12,000 premature infants develop IVH every year in the United States, and a large number of survivors with IVH develop cerebral palsy and cognitive deficits. The onset of IVH induces inflammation

  3. Hyaluronidase and Hyaluronan Oligosaccharides Promote Neurological Recovery after Intraventricular Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Dohare, Preeti; Arshad, Arslan; Zia, Muhammad T; Panda, Sanjeet; Korumilli, Ritesh; Kayton, Robert; Hascall, Vincent C; Lauer, Mark E; Ballabh, Praveen

    2016-01-20

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in premature infants results in inflammation, arrested oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) maturation, and reduced myelination of the white matter. Hyaluronan (HA) inhibits OPC maturation and complexes with the heavy chain (HC) of glycoprotein inter-α-inhibitor to form pathological HA (HC-HA complex), which exacerbates inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that IVH would result in accumulation of HA, and that either degradation of HA by hyaluronidase treatment or elimination of HCs from pathological HA by HA oligosaccharide administration would restore OPC maturation, myelination, and neurological function in survivors with IVH. To test these hypotheses, we used the preterm rabbit model of glycerol-induced IVH and analyzed autopsy samples from premature infants. We found that total HA levels were comparable in both preterm rabbit pups and human infants with and without IVH, but HA receptors--CD44, TLR2, TLR4--were elevated in the forebrain of both humans and rabbits with IVH. Hyaluronidase treatment of rabbits with IVH reduced CD44 and TLR4 expression, proinflammatory cytokine levels, and microglia infiltration. It also promoted OPC maturation, myelination, and neurological recovery. HC-HA and tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 were elevated in newborns with IVH; and depletion of HC-HA levels by HA oligosaccharide treatment reduced inflammation and enhanced myelination and neurological recovery in rabbits with IVH. Hence, hyaluronidase or HA oligosaccharide treatment represses inflammation, promotes OPC maturation, and restores myelination and neurological function in rabbits with IVH. These therapeutic strategies might improve the neurological outcome of premature infants with IVH. Significance statement: Approximately 12,000 premature infants develop IVH every year in the United States, and a large number of survivors with IVH develop cerebral palsy and cognitive deficits. The onset of IVH induces inflammation of the

  4. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  5. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present. PMID:21720901

  6. Neurologic infections in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jay, Cheryl A; Solbrig, Marylou V

    2014-01-01

    Even at a time when HIV/AIDS and immunosuppressive therapy have increased the number of individuals living with significant immunocompromise, diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major comorbid disorder for several rare but potentially lethal infections, including rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis and malignant external otitis. DM is also a commonly associated condition in patients with nontropical pyomyositis, pyogenic spinal infections, Listeria meningitis, and blastomycosis. As West Nile virus spread to and across North America over a decade ago, DM appeared in many series as a risk factor for death or neuroinvasive disease. More recently, in several large international population-based studies, DM was identified as a risk factor for herpes zoster. The relationships among infection, DM, and the nervous system are multidirectional. Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 DM, while parasitic infections have been hypothesized to protect against autoimmune disorders, including type 1 DM. DM-related neurologic disease can predispose to systemic infection - polyneuropathy is the predominant risk factor for diabetic foot infection. Because prognosis for many neurologic infections depends on timely institution of antimicrobial and sometimes surgical therapy, neurologists caring for diabetic patients should be familiar with the clinical features of the neuroinfectious syndromes associated with DM. PMID:25410222

  7. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živković, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  8. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zivković, Saša A

    2013-08-27

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  9. Neurological causes of taste disorders.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, J G; Lang, C J G

    2006-01-01

    In caring for patients with taste disorders, the clinical assessment should include complete examination of the cranial nerves and, in particular, gustatory testing. Neurophysiological methods such as blink reflex and masseter reflex allow the testing of trigeminofacial and trigeminotrigeminal pathways. Modern imaging methods (MRI and computed tomography) enable the delineation of the neuroanatomical structures which are involved in taste and their relation to the bony skull base. From a neurological point of view, gustatory disorders can result from damage at any location of the neural gustatory pathway from the taste buds via the peripheral (facial, glossopharyngeal and vagal nerve) and central nervous system (brainstem, thalamus) to its representation within the cerebral cortex. Etiopathogenetically, a large number of causes has to be considered, e.g. drugs and physical agents, cerebrovascular disorders including dissection of the carotid artery and pontine/thalamic lesions, space-occupying processes - in particular tumors compressing the cerebellopontine angle and the jugular foramen of the skull base - head trauma and skull base fractures, isolated cranial mononeuropathy (e.g. Bell's palsy) or polyneuropathy, epilepsy, dementia, multiple sclerosis and major depression. In addition to this, aging can also lead to diminished taste perception. Due to the broad differential diagnostic considerations, it is essential to look for additional, even mild, neurological signs and symptoms. Treatment must relate to the underlying cause. Zinc may be tried in idiopathic dysgeusia. PMID:16733343

  10. Autoimmune neurologic disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming; Gorman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune neurologic diseases are of major clinical importance in children. Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are now increasingly recognized in childhood, where the antibodies bind to cell surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The antibodies are directed towards ion channels, receptors, and membrane proteins; and the diseases include limbic encephalitis and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antibody encephalitis, among many others. Additionally there are conditions where the wider immune system is implicated. Neurologic features like seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders, with neuroimaging and electrophysiologic features, may indicate a specific antibody-mediated or immune disorder. Often, phenotypic overlap is observed between these conditions, and phenotypic variation seen in children with the same condition. Nevertheless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement, although huge efforts are still required to optimize the outcome for many patients. In many patients no antibodies have yet been identified, even though they respond to immunotherapies. Here we describe the known antibodies and associated diseases, discuss conditions that are thought to be immune-mediated but have no known immunologic biomarker, and provide guidelines for the investigation and classification of these disorders. PMID:27112693

  11. Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H; Wilson, James V Kinnier

    2014-09-01

    We here review Babylonian descriptions of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, psychoses, obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, psychopathic behaviour, depression and anxiety. Most of these accounts date from the first Babylonian dynasty of the first half of the second millennium BC, within a millennium and a half of the origin of writing. The Babylonians were remarkably acute and objective observers of medical disorders and human behaviour. Their detailed descriptions are surprisingly similar to modern 19th and 20th century AD textbook accounts, with the exception of subjective thoughts and feelings which are more modern fields of enquiry. They had no knowledge of brain or psychological function. Some neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. stroke or facial palsy, had a physical basis requiring the attention of a physician or asû, using a plant and mineral based pharmacology; some disorders such as epilepsy, psychoses, depression and anxiety were regarded as supernatural due to evil demons or spirits, or the anger of personal gods, and thus required the intervention of the priest or ašipu; other disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder and psychopathic behaviour were regarded as a mystery. The Babylonians were the first to describe the clinical foundations of neurology and psychiatry. We discuss these accounts in relation to subsequent and more modern clinical descriptions. PMID:25037816

  12. Neurologic Complication Following Spinal Epidural Anesthesia in a Patient with Spinal Intradural Extramedullary Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Won

    2010-01-01

    Paraplegia following spinal epidural anesthesia is extremely rare. Various lesions for neurologic complications have been documented in the literature. We report a 66-year-old female who developed paraplegia after left knee surgery for osteoarthritis under spinal epidural anesthesia. In the recovery room, paraplegia and numbness below T4 vertebra was checked. A magnetic resonance image (MRI) scan showed a spinal thoracic intradural extramedullary (IDEM) tumor. After extirpation of the tumor, the motor weakness improved to the grade of 3/5. If a neurologic deficit following spinal epidural anesthesia does not resolve, a MRI should be performed without delay to accurately diagnose the cause of the deficit and optimal treatment should be rendered for the causative lesion. PMID:21430985

  13. Rey's 15-Item Visual Memory Test for the Detection of Malingering: Normative Observations on Patients with Neurological Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Gregory P.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    To gather normative observations on a visual memory test developed by A. Rey (1964), it was administered to 100 temporal-lobe epilepsy patients with memory deficits and 56 outpatients with neurological disorders. Results suggest a cutoff score of 7 on the memory test may alert the clinician to possible factitious memory complaints. (SLD)

  14. Atlantic Conjunctures in Anglo-American Neurology:

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The emergence of neurology at Johns Hopkins presents a case study for reconsidering the international and institutional contexts of neurology generally. Using a variety of sources, Hopkins's interwar plans for neurology are presented and contextualized in the international environment of neurology, medical research, and philanthropy. During this period, neurology across the world, especially in Britain, was undergoing vast institutional changes. In order for Hopkins to remain at the forefront of excellence in both medicine and medical education, a program in neurology was deemed essential, and this would seem now to have been an unproblematic advance. Spearheading the project for the establishment of neurology at Hopkins was the dean of the medical school, Lewis H. Weed. Weed attempted from 1919 until 1942 to establish a department of neurology but had only limited success. The fact that finding support proved challenging for Weed and Johns Hopkins casts a provocative light on the broader historiography of neurology and illustrates the important role of the international context in defining neurology professionally. PMID:18791299

  15. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disorders that affect pediatric patients. It is valuable to think about 'endocrine disorder' as a cause of the neurologic manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of hormonal imbalance can rapidly relieve the neurologic symptoms. Better understanding of the interaction between the endocrine system and the nervous system, combined with the knowledge about the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations presented in the endocrine disorders might allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of the endocrine disorders. PMID:25654063

  16. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences. Aims To examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders. Method We performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes. Results Basal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders. Conclusions From a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  17. Brain banking for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Huitinga, Inge; Klioueva, Natasja; McLean, Catriona A; Kretzschmar, Hans; Smith, Colin; Ironside, James W

    2013-11-01

    Brain banks are used to gather, store, and provide human brain tissue for research and have been fundamental to improving our knowledge of the brain in health and disease. To maintain this role, the legal and ethical issues relevant to the operations of brain banks need to be more widely understood. In recent years, researchers have reported that shortages of high-quality brain tissue samples from both healthy and diseased people have impaired their efforts. Closer collaborations between brain banks and improved strategies for brain donation programmes will be essential to overcome these problems as the demand for brain tissue increases and new research techniques become more widespread, with the potential for substantial scientific advances in increasingly common neurological disorders. PMID:24074724

  18. Neurological problems of jazz legends.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Phillip L

    2009-08-01

    A variety of neurological problems have affected the lives of giants in the jazz genre. Cole Porter courageously remained prolific after severe leg injuries secondary to an equestrian accident, until he succumbed to osteomyelitis, amputations, depression, and phantom limb pain. George Gershwin resisted explanations for uncinate seizures and personality change and herniated from a right temporal lobe brain tumor, which was a benign cystic glioma. Thelonious Monk had erratic moods, reflected in his pianism, and was ultimately mute and withdrawn, succumbing to cerebrovascular events. Charlie Parker dealt with mood lability and drug dependence, the latter emanating from analgesics following an accident, and ultimately lived as hard as he played his famous bebop saxophone lines and arpeggios. Charles Mingus hummed his last compositions into a tape recorder as he died with motor neuron disease. Bud Powell had severe posttraumatic headaches after being struck by a police stick defending Thelonious Monk during a Harlem club raid. PMID:19666887

  19. Porphyria and its neurologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Jennifer A; Dyck, P James B

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrias are rare disorders resulting from a defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. They can produce significant disease of both the peripheral and central nervous systems, in addition to other organ systems, with acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and variegate porphyria as the subtypes associated with neurologic manifestations. The presence of a motor-predominant peripheral neuropathy (axonal predominant), accompanied by gastrointestinal distress and neuropsychiatric manifestations, should be a strong clue to the diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical confirmation can be made through evaluation of urine porphyrins during an exacerbation of disease. While hematin is helpful for acute treatment, long-term effective management requires avoidance of overstimulation of the cytochrome P450 pathway, as well as other risk factor control. PMID:24365356

  20. Neurological manifestations of osteoid osteoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kiers, L; Shield, L K; Cole, W G

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and radiological features of 38 children with osteoid osteomas were analysed retrospectively. Twenty nine patients had lesions of the femur (n = 17) or tibia (n = 12). The mean duration from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 13.8 months. In seven patients the history of pain and abnormalities on examination suggested a possible neurological disorder. Fourteen of 29 patients (48%) with femoral or tibial osteomas had localised muscle atrophy, and 10 patients (34%) had diminished or absent deep tendon reflexes in the affected limb. Two patients had painless lesions. Six patients had normal plain radiographs. Delay in the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma may be prevented by the knowledge that pain may be referred or radicular, that the concomitant occurrence of muscle atrophy and depressed deep tendon reflexes are relatively common findings, and that the characteristic radiological features may only appear late in the course of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2169226

  1. Nutrition in neurologically impaired children

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition, either under- or overnutrition, is a common condition among neurologically impaired children. Energy needs are difficult to define in this heterogeneous population, and there is a lack of information on what normal growth should be in these children. Non-nutritional factors may influence growth, but nutritional factors such as insufficient caloric intake, excessive nutrient losses and abnormal energy metabolism also contribute to growth failure. Malnutrition is associated with significant morbidity, while nutritional rehabilitation improves overall health. Nutritional support should be an integral part of the management of neurologically impaired children, and should focus not only on improving nutritional status but also on improving quality of life for patients and their families. When considering nutritional intervention, oromotor dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux and pulmonary aspiration must be addressed and a multidisciplinary team should be involved. Children at risk for nutrition-related problems should be identified early. An assessment of nutritional status should be performed at least yearly, and more frequently in infants and young children, or in children at risk for malnutrition. Oral intake should be optimized if safe, but enteral tube feedings should be initiated in children with oromotor dysfunction, leading to clinically significant aspiration, or in children unable to maintain an adequate nutritional status with oral intake. Nasogastric tube feeding should be used for short-term intervention, but if long-term nutritional intervention is required, a gastrostomy should be considered. Antireflux procedures should be reserved for children with significant gastroesophageal reflux. The patient’s response to nutritional intervention should be carefully monitored to avoid excessive weight gain after initiation of enteral nutrition, and paediatric formulas should be used to avoid micronutrient deficiencies. PMID:20592978

  2. Idiosyncratic quinoline central nervous system toxicity: Historical insights into the chronic neurological sequelae of mefloquine☆

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Remington L.

    2014-01-01

    Mefloquine is a quinoline derivative antimalarial which demonstrates promise for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Traditionally employed in prophylaxis and treatment of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria, recent changes to the approved European and U.S. product labeling for mefloquine now warn of a risk of permanent and irreversible neurological sequelae including vertigo, loss of balance and symptoms of polyneuropathy. The newly described permanent nature of certain of these neurological effects challenges the conventional belief that they are due merely to the long half-life of mefloquine and its continued presence in the body, and raises new considerations for the rational use of the drug against parasitic disease. In this opinion, it is proposed that many of the reported lasting adverse neurological effects of mefloquine are consistent with the chronic sequelae of a well characterized but idiosyncratic central nervous system (CNS) toxicity syndrome (or toxidrome) common to certain historical antimalarial and antiparasitic quinolines and associated with a risk of permanent neuronal degeneration within specific CNS regions including the brainstem. Issues in the development and licensing of mefloquine are then considered in the context of historical awareness of the idiosyncratic CNS toxicity of related quinoline drugs. It is anticipated that the information presented in this opinion will aid in the future clinical recognition of the mefloquine toxidrome and its chronic sequelae, and in informing improved regulatory evaluation of mefloquine and related quinoline drugs as they are explored for expanded antiparasitic use and for other indications. PMID:25057461

  3. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions. PMID:27264859

  4. Neurologic sequelae of methotrexate and ionizing radiation: a new classification

    SciTech Connect

    Bleyer, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Therapy for prevention of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia has had a dramatic effect on disease-free survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Now, a majority of children may be in complete remission indefinitely, having completed therapy years ago. Unfortunately, some of these long-term survivors have residual neurologic dysfunction, varying in severity from the not uncommon occurrence of mild intellectual deficit to the fortunately rare instance of debilitating leukoencephalopathy. To help identify inciting factors and ultimately render CNS prophylaxis less neurotoxic, this article attempts to categorize the types of neurotoxicities reported in patients treated with methotrexate (MTX) and ionizing radiation. A variety of clinical syndromes are described and related temporally to these treatment modalities. Analyzed in this way, combinations including CNS irradiation appear to be the most neurotoxic. The safest methods are the single modalities, of which high-dose iv MTX may be the least neurotoxic.

  5. Brain Infarction: Rare Neurological Presentation of African Bee Stings.

    PubMed

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Duarte-Valdivieso, Nancy Carolina; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Bee stings are commonly encountered worldwide. Various manifestations after bee sting have been described including local reactions which are common, systemic responses such as anaphylaxis, diffuse intravascular coagulation and hemolysis. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who developed neurologic deficit 5 hours after bee stings, which was confirmed to be left frontal infarction on brain CT-scan. The case does not follow the reported  pattern  of hypovolemic or anaphylactic shock, hemolysis and/or  rhabdomyolysis, despite the potentially lethal amount of venom injected. Diverse mechanisms have been proposed to give an explanation to all the clinical manifestation of both toxic and allergic reactions secondary to bee stings. Currently, the most accepted one state that victims can develop severe syndrome characterized by the release of a large amount of cytokines. PMID:27162866

  6. Planning for deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigators with limited water supplies that lead to deficit irrigation management need to make decisions about crop selection, water allocations to each crop, and irrigation schedules. Many of these decisions need to occur before the crop is planted and depend on yield-evapotranspiration (ET) and yi...

  7. Long term neurological outcome of herpes encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lahat, E; Barr, J; Barkai, G; Paret, G; Brand, N; Barzilai, A

    1999-01-01

    Twenty eight children with herpes simplex encephalitis were followed up for a mean of 5.5 years. Two children died and 26survived, of whom 16 were left with no neurological sequelae and 10 had persistent neurological sequelae. Mean (SD) Glasgow coma score was significantly lower in the patients with neurological sequelae (7.7 (1.5)) and the patients who died (4.5 (0.7)), compared with the patients without neurological sequelae (11 (1.7)).

 PMID:10325763

  8. Neurological and Psychiatric Diseases and Their Unique Cognitive Profiles: Implications for Nursing Practice and Research

    PubMed Central

    Vance, David E.; Dodson, Joan E.; Watkins, Jason; Kennedy, Bridgett H.; Keltner, Norman L.

    2013-01-01

    To successfully negotiate and interact with one’s environment, optimal cognitive functioning is needed. Unfortunately, many neurological and psychiatric diseases impede certain cognitive abilities such as executive functioning or speed of processing; this can produce a poor fit between the patient and the cognitive demands of his or her environment. Such non-dementia diseases include bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression, and anxiety disorders, just to name a few. Each of these diseases negatively affects particular areas of the brain, resulting in distinct cognitive profiles (e.g., deficits in executive functioning but normal speed of processing as seen in schizophrenia). In fact, it is from these cognitive deficits in which such behavioral and emotional symptoms may manifest (e.g., delusions, paranoia). This article highlights the distinct cognitive profiles of such common neurological and psychiatric diseases. An understanding of such disease-specific cognitive profiles can assist nurses in providing care to patients by knowing what cognitive deficits are associated with each disease and how these cognitive deficits impact everyday functioning and social interactions. Implications for nursing practice and research are posited within the framework of cognitive reserve and neuroplasticity. PMID:23422693

  9. Oculomotor Deficits after Chemotherapy in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Einarsson, Einar-Jón; Patel, Mitesh; Petersen, Hannes; Wiebe, Thomas; Magnusson, Måns; Moëll, Christian; Fransson, Per-Anders

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric malignancies have substantially increased the number of childhood cancer survivors. However, reports suggest that some of the chemotherapy agents used for treatment can cross the blood brain barrier which may lead to a host of neurological symptoms including oculomotor dysfunction. Whether chemotherapy at young age causes oculomotor dysfunction later in life is unknown. Oculomotor performance was assessed with traditional and novel methods in 23 adults (mean age 25.3 years, treatment age 10.2 years) treated with chemotherapy for a solid malignant tumor not affecting the central nervous system. Their results were compared to those from 25 healthy, age-matched controls (mean age 25.1 years). Correlation analysis was performed between the subjective symptoms reported by the chemotherapy treated subjects (CTS) and oculomotor performance. In CTS, the temporal control of the smooth pursuit velocity (velocity accuracy) was markedly poorer (p<0.001) and the saccades had disproportionally shorter amplitude than normal for the associated saccade peak velocity (main sequence) (p = 0.004), whereas smooth pursuit and saccade onset times were shorter (p = 0.004) in CTS compared with controls. The CTS treated before 12 years of age manifested more severe oculomotor deficits. CTS frequently reported subjective symptoms of visual disturbances (70%), unsteadiness, light-headedness and that things around them were spinning or moving (87%). Several subjective symptoms were significantly related to deficits in oculomotor performance. To conclude, chemotherapy in childhood or adolescence can result in severe oculomotor dysfunctions in adulthood. The revealed oculomotor dysfunctions were significantly related to the subjects' self-perception of visual disturbances, dizziness, light-headedness and sensing unsteadiness. Assessments of oculomotor function may, thus, offer an objective method to track and rate the level of neurological

  10. Oculomotor Deficits after Chemotherapy in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Einarsson, Einar-Jón; Patel, Mitesh; Petersen, Hannes; Wiebe, Thomas; Magnusson, Måns; Moëll, Christian; Fransson, Per-Anders

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric malignancies have substantially increased the number of childhood cancer survivors. However, reports suggest that some of the chemotherapy agents used for treatment can cross the blood brain barrier which may lead to a host of neurological symptoms including oculomotor dysfunction. Whether chemotherapy at young age causes oculomotor dysfunction later in life is unknown. Oculomotor performance was assessed with traditional and novel methods in 23 adults (mean age 25.3 years, treatment age 10.2 years) treated with chemotherapy for a solid malignant tumor not affecting the central nervous system. Their results were compared to those from 25 healthy, age-matched controls (mean age 25.1 years). Correlation analysis was performed between the subjective symptoms reported by the chemotherapy treated subjects (CTS) and oculomotor performance. In CTS, the temporal control of the smooth pursuit velocity (velocity accuracy) was markedly poorer (p<0.001) and the saccades had disproportionally shorter amplitude than normal for the associated saccade peak velocity (main sequence) (p = 0.004), whereas smooth pursuit and saccade onset times were shorter (p = 0.004) in CTS compared with controls. The CTS treated before 12 years of age manifested more severe oculomotor deficits. CTS frequently reported subjective symptoms of visual disturbances (70%), unsteadiness, light-headedness and that things around them were spinning or moving (87%). Several subjective symptoms were significantly related to deficits in oculomotor performance. To conclude, chemotherapy in childhood or adolescence can result in severe oculomotor dysfunctions in adulthood. The revealed oculomotor dysfunctions were significantly related to the subjects’ self-perception of visual disturbances, dizziness, light-headedness and sensing unsteadiness. Assessments of oculomotor function may, thus, offer an objective method to track and rate the level of neurological

  11. Functional neurological disorders: the neurological assessment as treatment.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon

    2016-02-01

    The neurologist's role in patients with functional disorders has traditionally been limited to making the diagnosis, excluding a 'disease' and pronouncing the symptoms to be 'non-organic' or 'psychogenic'. In this article, I argue that there are multiple opportunities during routine assessment of a patient with a functional disorder for the neurologist to take the lead with treatment. These opportunities occur throughout history taking, during the examination and, with greatest potential for treatment, at the end of the consultation. Elements of the neurologist's discussion that may be most useful include (a) emphasis that symptoms are genuine, common and potentially reversible; (b) explanation of the positive nature of the diagnosis (ie, not a diagnosis of exclusion); (c) simple advice about distraction techniques, self-help techniques and sources of information; (d) referral on to appropriate physiotherapy and/or psychological services; and (e) offering outpatient review. I also discuss how new diagnostic criteria for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 and changes proposed for International Classification of Diseases may facilitate changes that allow neurologists to bring their management of patients with functional disorders in line with other multidisciplinary neurological disorders in the outpatient clinic. PMID:26715762

  12. Lodestone: Nature's own permanent magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1976-01-01

    Magnetic hysteresis and microstructural details are presented which explain why the class of magnetic iron ores defined as proto-lodestones, can behave as permanent magnets, i.e. lodestones. Certain of these proto-lodestones which are not permanent magnets can be made into permanent magnets by charging in a field greater than 1000 oersted. This fact, other experimental observations, and field evidence from antiquity and the middle ages, which seems to indicate that lodestones are found as localized patches within massive ore bodies, suggests that lightning might be responsible for the charging of lodestones. The large remanent magnetization, high values of coercive force, and good time stability for the remanent magnetization are all characteristics of proto-lodestone iron ores which behave magnetically as fine scale ( 10 micrometer) intergrowths when subjected to magnetic hysteresis analysis. The magnetic results are easily understood by analysis of the complex proto lodestone microstructural patterns observable at the micrometer scale and less.

  13. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... us to find out more about ADHD. Share Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Basics Download PDF Download ePub Order a free ... attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder , or ADHD . What is attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD? ADHD is a common mental disorder ...

  14. Visuo-manual coordination in preterm infants without neurological impairments.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Maja; Chokron, Sylvie; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The extent of and reasons for visuo-manual coordination deficits in moderate and late preterm born infants without neurological impairments are not well known. This paper presents a longitudinal study on the visuo-manual development of twelve preterm infants, born after 33-36 weeks of gestation without neurological complications, between the ages of 6 and 12 months. Visuo-manual integration and grasping were assessed using the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, along with bimanual coordination and handedness tests. Visual function was examined once prior to the beginning of the study. Gross motor development was also evaluated every month. Preterm infants were compared to a control group of ten full-term infants according to corrected age. Compared to full-terms, the visual perception of preterm infants was close to normal, with only a measure of visual fixation lower than in full-terms. In contrast, preterm infants had delayed development of visuo-manual integration, grasping, bimanual coordination, and handedness even when compared using corrected age. Tonicity and gestational age at birth were the main variables associated to the delays. These results are discussed in terms of the possible factors underlying such delays. They need to be confirmed on a larger sample of preterm born children, and to be correlated with later development. This would allow developing markers of future neuropsychological impairments during childhood. PMID:26812594

  15. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  16. Extended Attention Span Training System: Video Game Neurotherapy for Attention Deficit Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Alan T.; Bogart, Edward H.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Extended Attention Span Training (EAST) system for modifying attention deficits, which takes the concept of biofeedback one step further by making a video game more difficult as the player's brain waves indicate that attention is waning. Notes contributions of this technology to neuropsychology and neurology, where the emphasis is on…

  17. Adults with Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder: Assessment and Treatment Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, John S.; Harper, Dennis C.

    2007-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among adults is characterized by inattentiveness and impulsivity. This article provides counselors with information about the etiology, assessment, and treatment of adult ADHD. The identification of the genetic and neurological features of ADHD has led to improvements in evaluation and treatment.…

  18. Neurologic complications of thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kudrjavcev, T

    1978-01-01

    Until such time as results of more rigorous studies are available, the morbidity rates for thyroid dysfunction cited here must suffice. The 1955 to 1956 outpatient "incidence" for England and Wales was 1.1 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 1.7 per 1,000 for myxedema (18). United States in-patient "incidence" for 1971 was 0.16 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 0.13 per 1,000 for myxedema (25). The 1935 to 1967 average annual incidence of Graves' disease for females in Olmsted County, Minnesota, was 30.5 per 100,000 (10). Well over 50% of hyperthyroid patients have clinical evidence of mild or moderate muscle weakness. Usually this weakness is proximal, and electro-myography and muscle biopsy confirm the existence of myopathic process (Table 11). Severe muscular weakness of acute onset is relatively rare and is encountered in approximately 1% of hyperthyroid patients (11,17,40). Ophthalmoplegia and psychosis are reported 4% and 2% of patients, respectively (17). Myasthenia gravis, although well publicized, is estimated to occur in less than 1% of patients (3,30). TPP is virtually nonexistent in the West; in the Orient it is reported in 2 to 8% of hyperthyroid patients and is 20 to 60 times more frequent in the hyperthyroid male than in the hyperthyroid female (Table 12). The neurologic symptomatology of myxedema is more extensive, and agreement among the various series is poor. The only unselected series addressing itself to neuromuscular manifestations of myxedema that is suitable for citation is that of Scarpalezos et al. (36). This comprehensive study was done without apparent patient selection, and it reported 2% of patients with definite carpal tunnel syndrome, 6% with myopathy, and 18% with polyneuropathy (Table 13). Reported percentages of hypothyroid patients found to have neurologic manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction are extremely diverse: ataxic gait was reported in 5 to 32% (6,7,12,27) of patients and dysdiadochokinesia in 6 to 52% (7,12,27). Psychosis

  19. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, P I

    1985-03-01

    Neurologic complications continue to occur in approximately 30 per cent of all patients with infective endocarditis and represent a major factor associated with an increased mortality rate in that disease. Of these complications, cerebral embolism is the most common and the most important, occurring in as many as 30 per cent of all patients, most of whom ultimately die. Emboli that are infected also account for all the other complications (mycotic aneurysm, meningitis or meningoencephalitis, brain abscess) that may develop. Emboli are more common in patients with mitral valve infection and in those infected with more virulent organisms. Mycotic aneurysms (often preceded by an embolic event) occur more frequently and earlier in the course of acute endocarditis, rather than later, which is more common in the course of subacute disease. The management of a cerebral mycotic aneurysm depends on the presence or absence of hemorrhage, its anatomic location and the clinical course. Healing can occur during the course of effective antimicrobial therapy and thus will preclude the need for automatic surgery in all angiographically demonstrated aneurysms. The indication for surgical intervention must be evaluated on an individual basis. Meningitis is usually purulent when associated with virulent organisms, but the CSF may present an aseptic formula when associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage or multiple microscopic embolic lesions, infected or otherwise. Macroscopic brain abscesses are rare, but multiple microscopic abscesses are not uncommon in patients with acute endocarditis due to virulent organisms. Seizures are not uncommon in patients with infective endocarditis. Focal seizures are more commonly associated with acute emboli, whereas generalized seizures are more commonly associated with systemic metabolic factors. Penicillin neurotoxicity should be considered in seizure patients with compromised renal function who are receiving high doses of penicillin. The CSF tends

  20. How Permanent Is Permanent Placement for Substance-Exposed Infants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twomey, Jean E.; Lester, Barry M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe a study of families in the Family Drug Treatment Court (FTDC), an effort to promote permanent placement for substance-exposed infants within time requirements mandated by the 1997 Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA). The purpose of the study was to evaluate parent functioning after FTDC involvement, infant developmental…

  1. Semipermanent and permanent injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek H

    2009-10-01

    Today, an impressive array of injectable dermal fillers for facial soft-tissue augmentation is available in the United States. These agents, most of which were introduced in the last half decade, represent a variety of semipermanent and permanent fillers across several categories. Physicians can choose between semipermanent fillers, such as hyaluronic acid derivatives (HA), calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA), and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA), and longer-lasting, so-called "permanent fillers," such as polymethyl methacrylate microspheres (PMMA), highly purified forms of liquid silicone, and hydrogel polymers. PMID:19850193

  2. Neurological and robot-controlled induction of an apparition.

    PubMed

    Blanke, Olaf; Pozeg, Polona; Hara, Masayuki; Heydrich, Lukas; Serino, Andrea; Yamamoto, Akio; Higuchi, Toshiro; Salomon, Roy; Seeck, Margitta; Landis, Theodor; Arzy, Shahar; Herbelin, Bruno; Bleuler, Hannes; Rognini, Giulio

    2014-11-17

    Tales of ghosts, wraiths, and other apparitions have been reported in virtually all cultures. The strange sensation that somebody is nearby when no one is actually present and cannot be seen (feeling of a presence, FoP) is a fascinating feat of the human mind, and this apparition is often covered in the literature of divinity, occultism, and fiction. Although it is described by neurological and psychiatric patients and healthy individuals in different situations, it is not yet understood how the phenomenon is triggered by the brain. Here, we performed lesion analysis in neurological FoP patients, supported by an analysis of associated neurological deficits. Our data show that the FoP is an illusory own-body perception with well-defined characteristics that is associated with sensorimotor loss and caused by lesions in three distinct brain regions: temporoparietal, insular, and especially frontoparietal cortex. Based on these data and recent experimental advances of multisensory own-body illusions, we designed a master-slave robotic system that generated specific sensorimotor conflicts and enabled us to induce the FoP and related illusory own-body perceptions experimentally in normal participants. These data show that the illusion of feeling another person nearby is caused by misperceiving the source and identity of sensorimotor (tactile, proprioceptive, and motor) signals of one's own body. Our findings reveal the neural mechanisms of the FoP, highlight the subtle balance of brain mechanisms that generate the experience of "self" and "other," and advance the understanding of the brain mechanisms responsible for hallucinations in schizophrenia. PMID:25447995

  3. [Delirium in patients with neurological diseases: diagnosis, management and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Hüfner, K; Sperner-Unterweger, B

    2014-04-01

    Delirium is a common acute neuropsychiatric syndrome. It is characterized by concurrent disturbances of consciousness and attention, perception, reasoning, memory, emotionality, the sleep-wake cycle as well as psychomotor symptoms. Delirium caused by alcohol or medication withdrawal is not the subject of the current review. Specific predisposing and precipitating factors have been identified in delirium which converge in a common final pathway of global brain dysfunction. The major predisposing factors are older age, cognitive impairment or dementia, sensory deficits, multimorbidity and polypharmacy. Delirium is always caused by one or more underlying pathologies which need to be identified. In neurology both primary triggers of delirium, such as stroke or epileptic seizures and also secondary triggers, such as metabolic factors or medication side effects play a major role. Nonpharmacological interventions are important in the prevention of delirium and lead to an improvement in prognosis. Delirium is associated with increased mortality and in the long term the development of cognitive deficits and functional impairment. PMID:24668399

  4. Functional neurological disorders: mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Alexander; Gelauff, Jeannette; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Ludwig, Lea; McWhirter, Laura; Williams, Stevie; Gardiner, Paula; Carson, Alan; Stone, Jon

    2016-03-01

    Functional neurological disorders are common problems in neurologic practice. In the past decade there has been an increasing interest in this group of disorders both from a clinical as well as research point of view. In this review, we highlight some of the most salient and exciting publications from recent years focusing especially on new findings illuminating mechanism and studies examining treatment. PMID:26410744

  5. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications. PMID:21193369

  6. Neurology of inherited glycosylation disorders

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, HH; Eklund, E A; Ng, BG; Patterson, M C

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation comprise most of the nearly 70 genetic disorders known to be caused by impaired synthesis of glycoconjugates. The effects are expressed in most organ systems, and most involve the nervous system. Typical manifestations include structural abnormalities, (eg, rapidly progressive cerebellar atrophy), myopathies (including congenital muscular dystrophies and limb-girdle dystrophies), strokes and stroke-like episodes, epileptic seizures, developmental delay, and demyelinating neuropathy. Patients can have neurological symptoms associated with coagulopathies, immune dysfunction with or without infections, and cardiac, renal, or hepatic failure, which are common features of glycosylation disorders. The diagnosis of congenital disorders of glycosylation should be considered for any patient with multisystem disease and in those with more specific phenotypic features. Measurement of concentrations of selected glycoconjugates can be used to screen for many of these disorders, and molecular diagnosis is becoming more widely available in clinical practice. Disease-modifying treatments are available for only a few disorders, but all affected individuals benefit from early diagnosis and aggressive management. PMID:22516080

  7. Neurologic complications of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Spudich, Serena S; Ances, Beau M

    2012-01-01

    The effects of HIV-1 in the nervous system are a topic of avid interest to investigators and clinicians focused on HIV, judging by the large and discriminating audience at the oral sessions and poster presentations relating to neuroscience at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Major areas of investigation at this year's conference included the use of neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging to assess the state of the central nervous system (CNS) and effects of antiretroviral therapy during HIV infection as well as basic and clinical studies of neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). Numerous important suggestions emerged during the meeting. Among them was the proposition that earlier initiation of therapy might benefit the CNS. Another was that the relationship between HIV and normal aging remains unclear and warrants further study. Still another was that ongoing abnormalities may persist despite treatment with antiretroviral therapy-including measurable brain microglial activation, detectable cerebrospinal fluid HIV, and progression of neurologic impairment. PMID:22710906

  8. Neurology in the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Carl H; Daroff, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Between December 1965 and December 1971, the United States maintained armed forces in Vietnam never less than 180,000 men and women in support of the war. At one time, this commitment exceeded half a million soldiers, sailors, and airmen from both the United States and its allies. Such forces required an extensive medical presence, including 19 neurologists. All but two of the neurologists had been drafted for a 2-year tour of duty after deferment for residency training. They were assigned to Vietnam for one of those 2 years in two Army Medical Units and one Air Force facility providing neurological care for American and allied forces, as well as many civilians. Their practice included exposure to unfamiliar disorders including cerebral malaria, Japanese B encephalitis, sleep deprivation seizures, and toxic encephalitis caused by injection or inhalation of C-4 explosive. They and neurologists at facilities in the United States published studies on all of these entities both during and after the war. These publications spawned the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Study, which was conceived during the Korean War and continues today as the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Center. It initially focused on post-traumatic epilepsy and later on all effects of brain injury. The Agent Orange controversy arose after the war; during the war, it was not perceived as a threat by medical personnel. Although soldiers in previous wars had developed serious psychological impairments, post-traumatic stress disorder was formally recognized in the servicemen returning from Vietnam. PMID:27035455

  9. Neurology and the Global HIV epidemic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of people living with HIV infection reside in resource-limited settings. As compared to resource-rich settings, there are important differences in the epidemiology and outcomes of HIV infection in resource-limited settings. Nonetheless, little HIV neurology research occurs in these regions. We will first review clinical, epidemiological and translational HIV neurology research originating from resource-limited settings. We will then discuss the barriers to conducting neurological research such as limited human resources, diagnostics and access to medications. Finally, we will review existing initiatives to build capacity for research in resource-limited settings. Despite the barriers, there is growing interest in and opportunities for collaborative international neurological research. Including viral and human populations from across the globe in HIV neurology research may lead to important implementation science, clinical and basic science discoveries. PMID:24715490

  10. State neurologic societies and the AAN

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, Pushpa; Showers, Dave; Levi, Bruce; Showers, Melissa; Jones, Elaine C.; Busis, Neil A.; Comella, Cynthia L.; Pulst, Stefan M.; Hosey, Jonathan P.; Griggs, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This report considers the recommendations of the State Society Task Force (SSTF), which evaluated how the relationship between the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and neurologic societies of individual states can foster the care of patients with neurologic diseases. The task force also evaluated the role of state neurosociety and state medical society interactions in supporting the profession of neurology. The SSTF recommended that the AAN expand current support services to state neurosocieties and foster additional neurosociety development. Specific services to be considered by the AAN include online combined AAN/state neurosociety dues payment and enhanced Web support. The role of the AAN as a liaison between state neurosocieties and state medical societies is important to facilitate state level advocacy for neurology. PMID:25110622

  11. Neurological complications associated with epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-05-01

    Multiple case reports of neurological complications resulting from intraarterial injection of corticosteroids have led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue a warning, requiring label changes, warning of serious neurological events, some resulting in death. The FDA has identified 131 cases of neurological adverse events, including 41 cases of arachnoiditis. A review of the literature reveals an overwhelming proportion of the complications are related to transforaminal epidural injections, of which cervical transforaminal epidural injections constituted the majority of neurological complications. Utilization data of epidural injections in the Medicare population revealed that cervical transforaminal epidural injections constitute only 2.4 % of total epidural injections and <5 % of all transforaminal epidural injections. Multiple theories have been proposed as the cause of neurological injury including particulate steroid, arterial intimal flaps, arterial dissection, dislodgement of plaque causing embolism, arterial muscle spasm, and embolism of a fresh thrombus following disruption of the intima. PMID:25795154

  12. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  13. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  14. Microfilm Permanence and Archival Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avedon, Don M.

    1972-01-01

    The facts about microfilm permanence and archival quality are presented in simple terms. The major factors, including the film base material, the film emulsion, processing, and storage conditions are reviewed. The designations on the edge of the film are explained and a list of refernces provided. (14 references) (Author)

  15. Frictionless Bearing Uses Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation was to develop a frictionless bearing for high speed, light load applications. The device involves the incorporation of permanent magnets in the bearing design. The repulsion of like magnetic poles provides concentric support of the inner member so that no metallic contact occurs between the bearing surfaces.

  16. The global perspective on neurology training: the World Federation of Neurology survey.

    PubMed

    Steck, Andreas; Struhal, Walter; Sergay, Stephen M; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2013-11-15

    This World Federation of Neurology (WFN) study aimed to characterize the status quo of post-graduate neurology training throughout the world and enable a better orientation on global training in neurology. Basic data on training curricula and working conditions of neurology residents and neurologists in 39 countries worldwide were evaluated. Our data show considerable differences in manpower and training, but a continuous improvement within the last 10 years of observation. Worldwide a spread of interim evaluations and final examinations of different types are used. Online resources will undoubtedly profoundly change skill and knowledge acquisition and training practices in Neurology in the coming years. PMID:23953945

  17. Mitochondrial Biology and Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Arun, Siddharth; Liu, Lei; Donmez, Gizem

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are extremely active organelles that perform a variety of roles in the cell including energy production, regulation of calcium homeostasis, apoptosis, and population maintenance through fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the form of oxidative stress and mutations can contribute to the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's (PD), Alzheimer's (AD), and Huntington's diseases (HD). Abnormalities of Complex I function in the electron transport chain have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, inhibiting ATP production and generating reactive oxygen species that can cause major damage to mitochondria. Mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can contribute to neurodegenerative disease, although the pathogenesis of these conditions tends to focus on nuclear mutations. In PD, nuclear genome mutations in the PINK1 and parkin genes have been implicated in neurodegeneration [1], while mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 have been implicated in a variety of clinical symptoms of AD [5]. Mutant htt protein is known to cause HD [2]. Much progress has been made to determine some causes of these neurodegenerative diseases, though permanent treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:26903445

  18. Mitochondrial Biology and Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Siddharth; Liu, Lei; Donmez, Gizem

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are extremely active organelles that perform a variety of roles in the cell including energy production, regulation of calcium homeostasis, apoptosis, and population maintenance through fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the form of oxidative stress and mutations can contribute to the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s (PD), Alzheimer’s (AD), and Huntington’s diseases (HD). Abnormalities of Complex I function in the electron transport chain have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, inhibiting ATP production and generating reactive oxygen species that can cause major damage to mitochondria Mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can contribute to neurodegenerative disease, although the pathogenesis of these conditions tends to focus on nuclear mutations. In PD, nuclear genome mutations in the PINK1 and parkin genes have been implicated in neurodegeneration [1], while mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 have been implicated in a variety of clinical symptoms of AD [5]. Mutant htt protein is known to cause HD [2]. Much progress has been made to determine some causes of these neurodegenerative diseases, though permanent treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:26903445

  19. Profile of neurological disorders in an adult neurology clinic in Kumasi, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Akassi, John; Badu, Elizabeth; Okorozo, Aham; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Akpalu, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the burden of neurological disorders is highest among populations in developing countries there is a dearth of data on the clinical spectrum of these disorders. Objective To profile the frequency of neurologic disorders and basic demographic data in an adult neurology out-patient service commissioned in 2011 in Kumasi, Ghana. Methods The study was conducted at the neurology clinic of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana. Over a three year period, all medical records of patients enrolled at the out-patient neurology clinic was reviewed by a neurologist and neurological diagnoses classified according to ICD-10. Results 1812 adults enrolled for care in the neurology out-patient service between 2011 and 2013. This comprised of 882 males and 930 females (male: female ratio of 1.0: 1.1) with an overall median age of 54 (IQR, 39–69) years. The commonest primary neurological disorders seen were strokes, epilepsy and seizure disorders, and movement disorders at frequencies of 57.1%, 19.8%, and 8.2% respectively. Conclusions Cerebrovascular diseases, epilepsy and movement disorders were among the commonest neurological disorders and the major contributors to neurologic morbidity among Ghanaians in an urban neurology clinic. PMID:27110596

  20. [Neurology in Japan before World War II].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Modern Western medicine was introduced into Japan by a Dutch doctor Pompe van Meerdervoort in 1855. A German physician EOE von Balz devoted himself to educating medicine at Tokyo Medical School, the predecessor of the present University of Tokyo for 25 years. Hiroshi Kawahara and Kinnosuke Miura, pioneers of Japan Neurology, received their education by him. Kawahara first described X-linked bulvo-spinal muscular atrophy, and published the first Japanese textbook of clinical neurology in 1897. In 1902, Miura and others founded the Japanese Society of Neuro-Psychiatry, the forerunner of the present " Japanese Society of Neurology ". Both Seizo Katsunuma, Professor of Nagoya University, and Junnjiro Kato, Professor of Tohoku University, succeeded Miura's neurology. Miura investigated into the cause of beriberi, but ended in failure. Hasegawa's proposal at the Diet in 1894 that the Japan Government should found an independent department of neurology in the University of Tokyo was unfortunately rejected. There was no foundation of independent institute, department and clinic of neurology before World War II. Consequently Japanese neurology was on the ebb at that time. PMID:24291835

  1. Neurologic Complications in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Rubinos, Clio; Ruland, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Complications involving the central and peripheral nervous system are frequently encountered in critically ill patients. All components of the neuraxis can be involved including the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. Neurologic complications adversely impact outcome and length of stay. These complications can be related to underlying critical illness, pre-existing comorbid conditions, and commonly used and life-saving procedures and medications. Familiarity with the myriad neurologic complications that occur in the intensive care unit can facilitate their timely recognition and treatment. Additionally, awareness of treatment-related neurologic complications may inform decision-making, mitigate risk, and improve outcomes. PMID:27098953

  2. Neurology--the next 10 years.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Ferriero, Donna M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Bettegowda, Chetan; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Kessler, John A; Vezzani, Annamaria; Waxman, Stephen G; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte; Weller, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Since the launch of our journal as Nature Clinical Practice Neurology in 2005, we have seen remarkable progress in many areas of neurology research, but what does the future hold? Will advances in basic research be translated into effective disease-modifying therapies, and will personalized medicine finally become a reality? For this special Viewpoint article, we invited a panel of Advisory Board members and other journal contributors to outline their research priorities and predictions in neurology for the next 10 years. PMID:26503922

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine for neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Kline, Karen L

    2002-02-01

    The use of complementary and alternative veterinary medicine in treating neurologic disorders has increased in popularity in response to advances in human alternative and integrative therapies. Neurolocalization of lesions to the brain, spinal cord, and neuromuscular systems is discussed, as well as the diagnostics and therapeutics used to treat such disorders. Emphasis is placed on integrative and alternative treatments for such neurologic diseases as seizures, cerebrovascular accidents, canine cognitive disorder, meningitis, intervertebral disc disease, fibrocartilagenous embolism, degenerative myelopathy, and myopathies. Thorough physical and neurologic examinations, establishment of a correct diagnosis, and integrative therapeutics are aimed at improving the overall quality of life of the veterinary patient. PMID:11890124

  4. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes. PMID:7652089

  5. Striatal dysfunction in attention deficit and hyperkinetic disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, H.C.; Henriksen, L.; Bruhn, P.; Borner, H.; Nielsen, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    We have previously reported that periventricular structures are hypoperfused in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study has expanded the number of patients, who were divided into two groups: six patients with pure ADHD, and 13 patients with ADHD in combination with other neurologic symptoms. By using xenon 133 inhalation and emission tomography, the regional cerebral blood flow distribution was determined and compared with a control group. Striatal regions were found to be hypoperfused and, by inference, hypofunctional in both groups. This hypoperfusion was statistically significant in the right striatum in ADHD, and in both striatal regions in ADHD with other neuropsychologic and neurologic symptoms. The primary sensory and sensorimotor cortical regions were highly perfused. Methylphenidate increased flow to striatal and posterior periventricular regions, and tended to decrease flow to primary sensory regions. Low striatal activity, partially reversible with methylphenidate, appears to be a cardinal feature in ADHD.

  6. Soft Neurological Signs and Cognitive Function in Obsessive-compulsive Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhuri, Chetali Vijay; Parkar, Shubhangi R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Modern research on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) indicates that the primary cause of OCD, which was earlier explained only on basis of psychoanalytical theories, is biological. Our study attempts to investigate the neurobiological signs in form of soft neurological signs and cognitive function in OCD. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at psychiatric facility of Seth G.S. Medical College and KEM Hospital. Materials and Method: 50 OCD patients and age- and education-matched controls were selected for the study. Established instruments were used to assess the neurological soft signs (NSS) and the cognitive deficits. Results: OCD patients had significant more NSS in tests for motor coordination, sensory integration, complex motor tasks, hard signs, and right/left and spatial orientation. Cognitive deficits in the domains of visuospatial ability, executive function, attention, and working memory were significantly more in OCD patients compared to controls. Conclusion: Our study highlights the role of biological factors in form of soft neurological signs and cognitive dysfunction in the development of the OCD. PMID:27570338

  7. Neurological, neuropsychological, and functional outcome following treatment for unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Towgood, Karren; Ogden, Jenni A; Mee, Edward

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study was to carry out a detailed investigation of the neurological, neuropsychological, and return-to-work status of treatment for unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). A prospective design was used to evaluate the outcome of UIA treatment in a group of 26 UIA patients. Over a 24-month period UIA patients were assessed prior to treatment, during hospitalization, at three months and at six months following treatment. Their performance was compared to a group of 20 matched controls. Neurological morbidity as a result of the UIA treatment was 5%, as assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) or Rankin at 3 months. The Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS) proved to be unreliable as a measure of cognitive change. Reliability of change analysis was more sensitive than group analysis, and revealed a pattern of cognitive deficits in 10% of patients as a result of the UIA treatment. In addition, 25% of patients reported a change in work role as a result of the UIA treatment. While 10% of patients sustained mild to moderate neurological and cognitive impairments 3 to 6 months following UIA treatment, their deficits were not as wide-ranging nor as severe as those sustained by patients who survive a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). PMID:16212679

  8. Roles of Circular RNAs in Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a novel type of endogenous noncoding RNA receiving increasing attention. They have been shown to act as a natural microRNA sponges that repress the activity of corresponding miRNAs by binding with them, thus regulating target genes. Numerous studies have shown that miRNAs are involved in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Therefore, circRNAs may act as important regulatory factors in the occurrence and development processes of neurological disease. PMID:27147959

  9. Hors d'oeuvres for neurology.

    PubMed

    Pascuzzi, R M

    1999-01-01

    From time to time, in the setting of lectures, rounds, or casual conversation, there is a need for hors d'oeuvres; small pieces, spices, and artifacts that generate a bit of thought and interest with a neurological twist. A potpourri of neurological trivia is herein presented for the purpose of stimulating the reader and serving as a brief reserve of questions and topics for use on rounds. PMID:10718544

  10. Functional Disorders in Neurology: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new consensus term Persistent Posturo-Perceptual Dizziness (PPPD), axial jerking/myoclonus as a functional movement disorder, functional speech symptoms, post-concussion disorder with functional cognitive symptoms and finally advances in treatment of dissociative seizures and functional motor disorders. PMID:27445247

  11. Neurocognitive Deficits After Radiation Therapy for Brain Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saad, Shumaila; Wang, Tony J C

    2015-12-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) has proven to be an effective therapeutic tool in treatment of a wide variety of brain tumors; however, it has a negative impact on quality of life and neurocognitive function. Cognitive dysfunction associated with both the disease and adverse effects of RT is one of the most concerning complication among long-term survivors. The effects of RT to brain can be divided into acute, early delayed, and late delayed. It is, however, the late delayed effects of RT that lead to severe neurological consequences such as minor-to-severe cognitive deficits due to irreversible focal or diffuse necrosis of brain parenchyma. In this review, we discuss current and emerging data regarding the relationship between RT and neurocognitive outcomes, and therapeutic strategies to prevent/treat postradiation neurocognitive deficits. PMID:25503433

  12. Comorbidity between neurological illness and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hesdorffer, Dale C

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in many neurological disorders, including epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and stroke. These comorbidities increase disease burden and may complicate the treatment of the combined disorders. Initial studies of the comorbidity of psychiatric and neurological disorders were cross-sectional, and time order of the associations was impossible to elucidate. More recent work has clarified time associations between psychiatric disorders and neurological disorders, particularly in epilepsy and stroke where epidemiological evidence suggests that there is a bidirectional relationship. This article takes an epidemiological approach to understanding these relationships and focuses mostly on epilepsy. Although, these relationships are understood in many neurological disorders, routine screening for psychiatric disorders in neurological disorders is infrequent, mostly due to the lack of partnerships between psychiatrists and neurologists and the paucity of neuropsychiatrists. Much more needs to be done to improve the detection and treatment of patients affected by neurological and psychiatric disorders. Understanding the scope of this overlap may inspire collaborations to improve the lives of people affected by both disorders. PMID:26898322

  13. Perimenopause as a neurological transition state.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Roberta D; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Mack, Wendy J; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    Perimenopause is a midlife transition state experienced by women that occurs in the context of a fully functioning neurological system and results in reproductive senescence. Although primarily viewed as a reproductive transition, the symptoms of perimenopause are largely neurological in nature. Neurological symptoms that emerge during perimenopause are indicative of disruption in multiple estrogen-regulated systems (including thermoregulation, sleep, circadian rhythms and sensory processing) and affect multiple domains of cognitive function. Estrogen is a master regulator that functions through a network of estrogen receptors to ensure that the brain effectively responds at rapid, intermediate and long timescales to regulate energy metabolism in the brain via coordinated signalling and transcriptional pathways. The estrogen receptor network becomes uncoupled from the bioenergetic system during the perimenopausal transition and, as a corollary, a hypometabolic state associated with neurological dysfunction can develop. For some women, this hypometabolic state might increase the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases later in life. The perimenopausal transition might also represent a window of opportunity to prevent age-related neurological diseases. This Review considers the importance of neurological symptoms in perimenopause in the context of their relationship to the network of estrogen receptors that control metabolism in the brain. PMID:26007613

  14. Chapter 50: history of tropical neurology.

    PubMed

    Ogunniyi, Adesola

    2010-01-01

    Tropical neurology began less than two centuries ago. Consumption of dietary toxins predominated at the beginning and gave birth to the geographic entity. The story moved from lathyrism through Jamaican neuropathy to cassava-induced epidemic neuropathy, which was contrasted with Konzo, also associated with cassava. Other tropical diseases enumerated with chronological details include: Chaga's diseases, kwashiorkor, Madras type of motor neuron disease, atlanto-axial dislocation, Burkitt's lymphoma and Kuru, associated with cannibalism among the Fore linguistic group in New Guinea. More recent documentation includes the Cuban neuropathy in 1991 with an epidemic of visual loss and neuropathy, Anaphe venata entomophagy in Nigeria presenting as seasonal ataxia, and neurological aspects of the human immunodeficiency virus infection complete the picture. With time, professional associations were formed and the pioneers were given prominence. The World Federation of Neurology featured Geographic Neurology as a theme in 1977 and Tropical Neurology was given prominence at its 1989 meeting in New Delhi, India. The situation remains unchanged with regards to rare diseases like Meniere's, multiple sclerosis, hereditary disorders. However, with westernization and continued urbanization, changing disease patterns are being observed and tropical neurology may depart from dietary toxins to more western world-type disorders. PMID:19892153

  15. 21 CFR 886.4445 - Permanent magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Permanent magnet. 886.4445 Section 886.4445 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4445 Permanent magnet. (a) Identification. A permanent magnet is a nonelectric device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and remove...

  16. 21 CFR 886.4445 - Permanent magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permanent magnet. 886.4445 Section 886.4445 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4445 Permanent magnet. (a) Identification. A permanent magnet is a nonelectric device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and remove...

  17. 21 CFR 886.4445 - Permanent magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permanent magnet. 886.4445 Section 886.4445 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4445 Permanent magnet. (a) Identification. A permanent magnet is a nonelectric device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and remove...

  18. 21 CFR 886.4445 - Permanent magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permanent magnet. 886.4445 Section 886.4445 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4445 Permanent magnet. (a) Identification. A permanent magnet is a nonelectric device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and remove...

  19. 21 CFR 886.4445 - Permanent magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permanent magnet. 886.4445 Section 886.4445 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4445 Permanent magnet. (a) Identification. A permanent magnet is a nonelectric device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and remove...

  20. 22 CFR 401.3 - Permanent offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Permanent offices. 401.3 Section 401.3 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE General § 401.3 Permanent offices. The permanent offices of the Commission shall be at Washington, in the District...

  1. 22 CFR 401.3 - Permanent offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Permanent offices. 401.3 Section 401.3 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE General § 401.3 Permanent offices. The permanent offices of the Commission shall be at Washington, in the District...

  2. Teaching Object Permanence: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Susan M.; Vargas, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    "Object permanence," also known as "object concept" in the field of visual impairment, is one of the most important early developmental milestones. The achievement of object permanence is associated with the onset of representational thought and language. Object permanence is important to orientation, including the recognition of landmarks.…

  3. Anchoring the Deficit of the Anchor Deficit: Dyslexia or Attention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willburger, Edith; Landerl, Karin

    2010-01-01

    In the anchoring deficit hypothesis of dyslexia ("Trends Cogn. Sci.", 2007; 11: 458-465), it is proposed that perceptual problems arise from the lack of forming a perceptual anchor for repeatedly presented stimuli. A study designed to explicitly test the specificity of the anchoring deficit for dyslexia is presented. Four groups, representing all…

  4. Clinicopathological conference: A 71-year-old female with neurological deficits, chest pain, and electrocardiographic changes.

    PubMed

    Narang, Aneesh T; Alian, Andrus

    2010-10-01

    The authors present a case of a 71-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with slurred speech, left sided facial droop, and right arm and leg weakness. During her ED stay, she developed left sided chest pain and right arm numbness in the setting of EKG changes. The patient's clinical course is outlined and a discussion of the potential etiologies as well as the clinical management is provided. PMID:21040102

  5. Plasticity and modular control of locomotor patterns in neurological disorders with motor deficits

    PubMed Central

    Ivanenko, Y. P.; Cappellini, G.; Solopova, I. A.; Grishin, A. A.; MacLellan, M. J.; Poppele, R. E.; Lacquaniti, F.

    2013-01-01

    Human locomotor movements exhibit considerable variability and are highly complex in terms of both neural activation and biomechanical output. The building blocks with which the central nervous system constructs these motor patterns can be preserved in patients with various sensory-motor disorders. In particular, several studies highlighted a modular burst-like organization of the muscle activity. Here we review and discuss this issue with a particular emphasis on the various examples of adaptation of locomotor patterns in patients (with large fiber neuropathy, amputees, stroke and spinal cord injury). The results highlight plasticity and different solutions to reorganize muscle patterns in both peripheral and central nervous system lesions. The findings are discussed in a general context of compensatory gait mechanisms, spatiotemporal architecture and modularity of the locomotor program. PMID:24032016

  6. Sustained Perceptual Deficits from Transient Sensory Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Sanes, Dan H.

    2015-01-01

    displays an increased vulnerability to the sensory environment. Here, we identify a precise developmental window during which mild hearing loss affects the maturation of an auditory perceptual cue that is known to support animal communication, including human speech. Furthermore, animals reared with transient hearing loss display deficits in perceptual learning. Our results suggest that speech and language delays associated with transient or permanent childhood hearing loss may be accounted for, in part, by deficits in central auditory processing mechanisms. PMID:26224865

  7. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Madhuri

    2015-03-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common behavioral disorder in children. It is characterized by motor hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention inappropriate for the age. Approximately 5-10 % of school age children are diagnosed to have ADHD. The affected children show significant impairment in social behavior and academic performance. The DSM-5 criteria are useful in diagnosing three subtypes of ADHD based on presence of symptoms described in 3 domains viz ., inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. Co-morbidities like specific learning disability, anxiety disorder, oppositional defiant disorder are commonly associated with ADHD.Education of parents and teachers, behavioral therapy and medication are main components of management. Methylphenidate and Atomoxetine are effective in controlling symptoms of ADHD in most children. Research studies estimated that 30-60 % of children continue to show symptoms of ADHD in adulthood. The general practitioner can play an important role in early diagnosis, appropriate assessment and guiding parents for management of children with ADHD. PMID:25186567

  8. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Marguerite; Nigg, Joel T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, there have been numerous technical and methodological advances available to clinicians and researchers to better understand attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its etiology. Despite the growing body of literature investigating the disorder’s pathophysiology, ADHD remains a complex psychiatric disorder to characterize. This chapter will briefly review the literature on ADHD, with a focus on its history, the current genetic insights, neurophysiologic theories, and the use of neuroimaging to further understand the etiology. We address some of the major concerns that remain unclear about ADHD, including subtype instability, heterogeneity, and the underlying neural correlates that define the disorder. We highlight that the field of ADHD is rapidly evolving; the descriptions provided here will hopefully provide a sturdy foundation for which to build and improve our understanding of the disorder. PMID:24214656

  9. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Thapar, Anita; Cooper, Miriam

    2016-03-19

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder with a prevalence of 1·4-3·0%. It is more common in boys than girls. Comorbidity with childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorders and psychiatric disorders is substantial. ADHD is highly heritable and multifactorial; multiple genes and non-inherited factors contribute to the disorder. Prenatal and perinatal factors have been implicated as risks, but definite causes remain unknown. Most guidelines recommend a stepwise approach to treatment, beginning with non-drug interventions and then moving to pharmacological treatment in those most severely affected. Randomised controlled trials show short-term benefits of stimulant medication and atomoxetine. Meta-analyses of blinded trials of non-drug treatments have not yet proven the efficacy of such interventions. Longitudinal studies of ADHD show heightened risk of multiple mental health and social difficulties as well as premature mortality in adult life. PMID:26386541

  10. Permanent-File-Validation Utility Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derry, Stephen D.

    1988-01-01

    Errors in files detected and corrected during operation. Permanent File Validation (PFVAL) utility computer program provides CDC CYBER NOS sites with mechanism to verify integrity of permanent file base. Locates and identifies permanent file errors in Mass Storage Table (MST) and Track Reservation Table (TRT), in permanent file catalog entries (PFC's) in permit sectors, and in disk sector linkage. All detected errors written to listing file and system and job day files. Program operates by reading system tables , catalog track, permit sectors, and disk linkage bytes to vaidate expected and actual file linkages. Used extensively to identify and locate errors in permanent files and enable online correction, reducing computer-system downtime.

  11. Neurological Sequelae in Adults After E coli O104

    PubMed Central

    Schuppner, Ramona; Maehlmann, Justus; Dirks, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Tryc, Anita B.; Sandorski, Kajetan; Bahlmann, Elisabeth; Kielstein, Jan T.; Giesemann, Anja M.; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In an outbreak of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections and associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (STEC O104:H4) in Germany in the year 2011 neurological complications in adult patients occurred unexpectedly frequent, ranging between 48% and 100% in different patient groups. Few is known about the long-term effects of such complications and so we performed follow-up exams on 44 of the patients treated for STEC-HUS at Hannover Medical Scool in this observational study. Standardized follow-up exams including neurological and neuropsychological assessments, laboratory testing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and EEG were carried out. Subgroups were examined 2 (n = 34), 7 (n = 22), and 19 (n = 23) months after disease onset. Additionally, at the 19-month follow-up, quality of life, sleep quality, and possible fatigue were assessed. Nineteen months after disease onset 31 patients were reassessed, 22 of whom still suffered from symptoms such as fatigue, headache, and attention deficits. In the neuropsychological assessments only 39% of the patients performed normal, whereas 61% scored borderline pathological or lower. Upon reviewal, the follow-up data most prominently showed a secondary decline of cognitive function in about one-quarter of the patients. Outcome was not related to treatment or laboratory data in the acute phase of the disease nor length of hospitalization. Prognosis of STEC-HUS associated brain dysfunction in adults with regard to severity of symptoms is mostly good; some patients however still have not made a full recovery. Patients’ caretakers have to be aware of possible secondary decline of brain function as was observed in this study. PMID:26871766

  12. Neurological Manifestations of Brucellosis in an Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Mushbiq

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease causing serious public health problems in countries of the Middle-East and developing countries like India. Neurobrucellosis is one of the devastating complications of this re-emerging zoonosis. The objective of this review was to identify the neurological manifestations of Brucellosis in an Indian population and bring into light the effective modalities used for treating neurobrucellosis. A systematic review of the scientific literature reported in accordance with the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines was conducted. Three databases (PubMed, IndMed, and ScienceDirect) were used to analyze retrospectively case reports of sufficient quality for data extraction (from the last 15 years, 2002-2016), and relevant literature was reviewed. Most of the cases had a definite history of exposure to Brucella through occupational contact with cattle, drinking raw milk, or living near unhygienic abattoir or even trips to epidemic areas outside India. The common presentations include fever, meningitis, brisk deep-tendon reflexes, extensor plantars, sensory deficit usually below the twelfth thoracic vertebral level, weakness of lower limbs, ocular signs of papilledema, and retrobulbar neuritis. The usual systemic findings associated were hepatosplenomegaly and weight-loss. Neurobrucellosis needs to be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin involving neurological symptoms and systemic involvement. Prognosis is good if there is a combination of antibiotics, each with different mechanisms of action given in full dose. Suitable measures for its prevention are also suggested. PMID:27555982

  13. Neurological Manifestations of Brucellosis in an Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Tarfarosh, Shah Faisal Ahmad; Manzoor, Mushbiq

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease causing serious public health problems in countries of the Middle-East and developing countries like India. Neurobrucellosis is one of the devastating complications of this re-emerging zoonosis. The objective of this review was to identify the neurological manifestations of Brucellosis in an Indian population and bring into light the effective modalities used for treating neurobrucellosis. A systematic review of the scientific literature reported in accordance with the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines was conducted. Three databases (PubMed, IndMed, and ScienceDirect) were used to analyze retrospectively case reports of sufficient quality for data extraction (from the last 15 years, 2002-2016), and relevant literature was reviewed. Most of the cases had a definite history of exposure to Brucella through occupational contact with cattle, drinking raw milk, or living near unhygienic abattoir or even trips to epidemic areas outside India. The common presentations include fever, meningitis, brisk deep-tendon reflexes, extensor plantars, sensory deficit usually below the twelfth thoracic vertebral level, weakness of lower limbs, ocular signs of papilledema, and retrobulbar neuritis. The usual systemic findings associated were hepatosplenomegaly and weight-loss. Neurobrucellosis needs to be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin involving neurological symptoms and systemic involvement. Prognosis is good if there is a combination of antibiotics, each with different mechanisms of action given in full dose. Suitable measures for its prevention are also suggested. PMID:27555982

  14. Method of making permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1993-09-07

    A method for making an isotropic permanent magnet comprises atomizing a melt of a rare earth-transition metal alloy (e.g., an Nd--Fe--B alloy enriched in Nd and B) under conditions to produce protectively coated, rapidly solidified, generally spherical alloy particles. Wherein a majority of the particles are produced/size classified within a given size fraction (e.g., 5 to 40 microns diameter) exhibiting optimum as-atomized magnetic properties and subjecting the particles to concurrent elevated temperature and elevated isotropic pressure for a time effective to yield a densified, magnetically isotropic magnet compact having enhanced magnetic properties and mechanical properties. 13 figures.

  15. Method of making permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Dennis, Kevin W.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Anderson, Iver E.

    1993-09-07

    A method for making an isotropic permanent magnet comprises atomizing a melt of a rare earth-transition metal alloy (e.g., an Nd--Fe--B alloy enriched in Nd and B) under conditions to produce protectively coated, rapidly solidified, generally spherical alloy particles wherein a majority of the particles are produced/size classified within a given size fraction (e.g., 5 to 40 microns diameter) exhibiting optimum as-atomized magnetic properties and subjecting the particles to concurrent elevated temperature and elevated isotropic pressure for a time effective to yield a densified, magnetically isotropic magnet compact having enhanced magnetic properties and mechanical properties.

  16. The Significance of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Disorders: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Akansha; Roberto, Aaron J; Mohan, Abhishek; Lorenzo, Aileen; Jones, Kathryn; Carney, Martin J; Liogier-Weyback, Luis; Hwang, Soonjo; Lapidus, Kyle A B

    2016-03-01

    The relationship of cortical structure and specific neuronal circuitry to global brain function, particularly its perturbations related to the development and progression of neuropathology, is an area of great interest in neurobehavioral science. Disruption of these neural networks can be associated with a wide range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Herein we review activity of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy (Temporal Lobe Epilepsy - TLE), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and mood disorders. We discuss the implications of DMN disruptions and their relationship to the neurocognitive model of each disease entity, the utility of DMN assessment in clinical evaluation, and the changes of the DMN following treatment. PMID:27505016

  17. FROM REINFORCEMENT LEARNING MODELS OF THE BASAL GANGLIA TO THE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF PSYCHIATRIC AND NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Tiago V.; Frank, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade and a half, reinforcement learning models have fostered an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the functions of dopamine and cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical (CBGTC) circuits. More recently, these models, and the insights that they afford, have started to be used to understand key aspects of several psychiatric and neurological disorders that involve disturbances of the dopaminergic system and CBGTC circuits. We review this approach and its existing and potential applications to Parkinson’s disease, Tourette’s syndrome, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, addiction, schizophrenia, and preclinical animal models used to screen novel antipsychotic drugs. The approach’s proven explanatory and predictive power bodes well for the continued growth of computational psychiatry and computational neurology. PMID:21270784

  18. Nmf9 Encodes a Highly Conserved Protein Important to Neurological Function in Mice and Flies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuxiao; Ross, Kevin D.; Seidner, Glen A.; Gorman, Michael R.; Poon, Tiffany H.; Wang, Xiaobo; Keithley, Elizabeth M.; Lee, Patricia N.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Joiner, William J.; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Many protein-coding genes identified by genome sequencing remain without functional annotation or biological context. Here we define a novel protein-coding gene, Nmf9, based on a forward genetic screen for neurological function. ENU-induced and genome-edited null mutations in mice produce deficits in vestibular function, fear learning and circadian behavior, which correlated with Nmf9 expression in inner ear, amygdala, and suprachiasmatic nuclei. Homologous genes from unicellular organisms and invertebrate animals predict interactions with small GTPases, but the corresponding domains are absent in mammalian Nmf9. Intriguingly, homozygotes for null mutations in the Drosophila homolog, CG45058, show profound locomotor defects and premature death, while heterozygotes show striking effects on sleep and activity phenotypes. These results link a novel gene orthology group to discrete neurological functions, and show conserved requirement across wide phylogenetic distance and domain level structural changes. PMID:26131556

  19. The Significance of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Disorders: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Akansha; Roberto, Aaron J.; Mohan, Abhishek; Lorenzo, Aileen; Jones, Kathryn; Carney, Martin J.; Liogier-Weyback, Luis; Hwang, Soonjo; Lapidus, Kyle A.B.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship of cortical structure and specific neuronal circuitry to global brain function, particularly its perturbations related to the development and progression of neuropathology, is an area of great interest in neurobehavioral science. Disruption of these neural networks can be associated with a wide range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Herein we review activity of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Epilepsy (Temporal Lobe Epilepsy - TLE), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and mood disorders. We discuss the implications of DMN disruptions and their relationship to the neurocognitive model of each disease entity, the utility of DMN assessment in clinical evaluation, and the changes of the DMN following treatment.

  20. Neurological manifestations of gastrointestinal disorders, with particular reference to the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Zaffaroni, M

    2001-11-01

    Neurological manifestations of gastrointestinal disorders are described, with particular reference to those resembling multiple sclerosis (MS) on clinical or MRI grounds. Patients with celiac disease can present cerebellar ataxia, progressive myoclonic ataxia, myelopathy, or cerebral, brainstem and peripheral nerve involvement. Antigliadin antibodies can be found in subjects with neurological dysfunction of unknown cause, particularly in sporadic cerebellar ataxia ("gluten ataxia"). Patients with Whipple's disease can develop mental and psychiatric changes, supranuclear gaze palsy, upper motoneuron signs, hypothalamic dysfunction, cranial nerve abnormalities, seizures, ataxia, myorhythmia and sensory deficits. Neurological manifestations can complicate inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) due to vascular or vasculitic mechanisms. Cases with both Crohn's disease and MS or cerebral vasculitis are described. Epilepsy, chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy, muscle involvement and myasthenia gravis are also reported. The central nervous system can be affected in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection because of vasculitis associated with HCV-related cryoglobulinemia. Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) is a disease caused by multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA. It is characterized by peripheral neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, deafness, leukoencephalopathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms due to visceral neuropathy. Neurological manifestations can be the consequence of vitamin B1, nicotinamide, vitamin B12, vitamin D, or vitamin E deficiency and from nutritional deficiency states following gastric surgery. PMID:11794474

  1. Psycho-Neurological Status in Children with Malocclusions and Muscle Pressure Habits.

    PubMed

    Rubleva, Irina A; Persin, Leonid S; Slabkovskaya, Anna B; Zavadenko, Nikolay N; Deregibus, Andrea; Debernardi, Cesare L

    2015-01-01

    Non-nutritive sucking behaviors such as finger- and tongue-sucking, tongue thrust, lips- or cheek-sucking, nail-, lip- or tongue-biting and other pressure habits represent risk factors for malocclusion. The association between psycho-neurological disorders and different types of malocclusion in children with sucking habits was long studied. During neurological examination, many children with sucking habits are diagnosed as Minimal Cerebral Dysfunction or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) bearers. The aim of this study is to assess the psycho-neurological status and motor disorders in children with malocclusion and normal occlusion. 135 children, aged between 8 and 12 years old, were examined, 42 children with normal occlusion and 93 children with different types of malocclusion. Besides clinical examination, all children were studied by the following psychoneurological methods: 1) Parent's Questionnaire, 2) Diagnostic interview Kiddie-Sads 3) Physical and Neurological Exam for Subtle Signs and 4) stabilometric tests. This study shows as in presence of dentofacial anomalies, pressure habits, ADHD reports significant effects on the functional state of the motor system: increases are noted in all basic parameters of statokinesiograms (crossed distance, sway area and ellipse surface), which lead to increased physiologic energy costs to maintain the vertical position of the body. PMID:26349285

  2. Norman Geschwind and the use of history in the (re)birth of behavioral neurology.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Howard I

    2015-01-01

    When Norman Geschwind (1926-1984) attended medical school in the 1940s, his psychiatry professors taught as if behavior were unrelated to neuropathology. The focus of neurology remained the diagnosis and treatment of aphasias and epilepsies, while cognitive impairments and developmental disorders were classified as functional (psychological) disorders. Geschwind was troubled by the fact that many of the patients he saw with neurological deficits also presented with behavioral (developmental) disorders. Geschwind's generation also had been taught that aphasias resulted from global rather than localized or focal neurological lesions. These holists, including the prepsychoanalytic Sigmund Freud, targeted the work of aphasiologist Carl Wernicke as an exemplar of the flaws of the localizationist hypothesis. Reading Wernicke in the original, Geschwind discovered a complex and multilayered explanation for aphasias that implicated lesions located in association pathways that, when extensive, resulted in behavioral disorders. Geschwind also reread the works of the holists, discovering that, while their rhetoric rejected Wernicke, their explanations of aphasias actually reinforced Wernicke's hypothesis. Building on his reading of these historical documents and his clinical experiences, Geschwind urged the resurrection of Wernicke's disconnection syndromes that Geschwind labeled as Behavioral Neurology. PMID:25210887

  3. Multiscale Entropy Analysis of EEG for Assessment of Post-Cardiac Arrest Neurological Recovery Under Hypothermia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaoxu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G.; Maybhate, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac arrest (CA) can be fatal. Although hypothermia has been shown to be beneficial, understanding the mechanism and establishing neurological outcomes remains challenging because effects of CA and hypothermia are not well characterized. This paper aims to analyze EEG (and the α-rhythms) using multiscale entropy (MSE) to demonstrate the ability of MSE in tracking changes due to hypothermia and compare MSE during early recovery with long-term neurological examinations. Ten Wistar rats, upon post-CA resuscitation, were randomly subjected to hypothermia (32 °C–34 °C, N = 5) or normothermia (36.5 °C–37.5 °C, N = 5). EEG was recorded and analyzed using MSE during seven recovery phases for each experiment: baseline, CA, and five early recovery phases (R1–R5). Postresuscitation neurological examination was performed at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h to obtain neurological deficit scores (NDSs). Results showed MSE to be a sensitive marker of changes in α-rhythms. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between the MSE for two groups during recovery, suggesting that MSE can successfully reflect temperature modulation. A comparison of short-term MSE and long-term NDS suggested that MSE could be used for predicting favorability of long-term outcome. These experiments point to the role of cortical rhythms in reporting early neurological response to ischemia and therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:19174339

  4. Multiscale entropy analysis of EEG for assessment of post-cardiac arrest neurological recovery under hypothermia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaoxu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Thakor, Nitish V; Maybhate, Anil

    2009-04-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac arrest (CA) can be fatal. Although hypothermia has been shown to be beneficial, understanding the mechanism and establishing neurological outcomes remains challenging because effects of CA and hypothermia are not well characterized. This paper aims to analyze EEG (and the alpha-rhythms) using multiscale entropy (MSE) to demonstrate the ability of MSE in tracking changes due to hypothermia and compare MSE during early recovery with long-term neurological examinations. Ten Wistar rats, upon post-CA resuscitation, were randomly subjected to hypothermia (32 degrees C-34 degrees C, N = 5) or normothermia (36.5 degrees C-37.5 degrees C, N = 5). EEG was recorded and analyzed using MSE during seven recovery phases for each experiment: baseline, CA, and five early recovery phases (R1-R5). Postresuscitation neurological examination was performed at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h to obtain neurological deficit scores (NDSs). Results showed MSE to be a sensitive marker of changes in alpha-rhythms. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between the MSE for two groups during recovery, suggesting that MSE can successfully reflect temperature modulation. A comparison of short-term MSE and long-term NDS suggested that MSE could be used for predicting favorability of long-term outcome. These experiments point to the role of cortical rhythms in reporting early neurological response to ischemia and therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:19174339

  5. Neurological long term consequences of deep diving.

    PubMed Central

    Todnem, K; Nyland, H; Skeidsvoll, H; Svihus, R; Rinck, P; Kambestad, B K; Riise, T; Aarli, J A

    1991-01-01

    Forty commercial saturation divers, mean age 34.9 (range 24-49) years, were examined one to seven years after their last deep dive (190-500 metres of seawater). Four had by then lost their divers' licence because of neurological problems. Twenty seven (68%) had been selected by neurological examination and electroencephalography before the deep dives. The control group consisted of 100 men, mean age 34.0 (range 22-48) years. The divers reported significantly more symptoms from the nervous system. Concentration difficulties and paraesthesia in feet and hands were common. They had more abnormal neurological findings by neurological examination compatible with dysfunction in the lumbar spinal cord or roots. They also had a larger proportion of abnormal electroencephalograms than the controls. The neurological symptoms and findings were highly significantly correlated with exposure to deep diving (depth included), but even more significantly correlated to air and saturation diving and prevalence of decompression sickness. Visual evoked potentials, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not show more abnormal findings in the divers. Four (10%) divers had had episodes of cerebral dysfunction during or after the dives; two had had seizures, one had had transitory cerebral ischaemia and one had had transitory global amnesia. It is concluded that deep diving may have a long term effect on the nervous system of the divers. PMID:2025592

  6. Neurologic autoimmunity: mechanisms revealed by animal models.

    PubMed

    Bradl, Monika; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, neurologic autoimmunity has become a major consideration in the diagnosis and management of patients with many neurologic presentations. The nature of the associated antibodies and their targets has led to appreciation of the importance of the accessibility of the target antigen to antibodies, and a partial understanding of the different mechanisms that can follow antibody binding. This chapter will first describe the basic principles of autoimmune inflammation and tissue damage in the central and peripheral nervous system, and will then demonstrate what has been learnt about neurologic autoimmunity from circumstantial clinical evidence and from passive, active, and occasionally spontaneous or genetic animal models. It will cover neurologic autoimmune diseases ranging from disorders of neuromuscular transmission, peripheral and ganglionic neuropathy, to diseases of the central nervous system, where autoantibodies are either pathogenic and cause destruction or changes in function of their targets, where they are harmless bystanders of T-cell-mediated tissue damage, or are not involved at all. Finally, this chapter will summarize the relevance of current animal models for studying the different neurologic autoimmune diseases, and it will identify aspects where future animal models need to be improved to better reflect the disease reality experienced by affected patients, e.g., the chronicity or the relapsing/remitting nature of their disease. PMID:27112675

  7. Neurologic diseases in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bilgrami, Mohammed; O'Keefe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy there has been an improvement in the quality of life for people with HIV infection. Despite the progress made, about 70% of HIV patients develop neurologic complications. These originate either in the central or the peripheral nervous system (Sacktor, 2002). These neurologic disorders are divided into primary and secondary disorders. The primary disorders result from the direct effects of the virus and include HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), HIV-associated vacuolar myelopathy (VM), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP). Secondary disorders result from marked immunosuppression and include opportunistic infections and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). A differential diagnosis which can be accomplished by detailed history, neurologic examination, and by having a good understanding of the role of HIV in various neurologic disorders will help physicians in approaching these problems. The focus of this chapter is to discuss neuropathogenesis of HIV, the various opportunistic infections, primary CNS lymphoma, neurosyphilis, CNS tuberculosis, HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), and vacuolar myelopathy (VM). It also relies on the treatment recommendations and guidelines for the above mentioned neurologic disorders proposed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. PMID:24365422

  8. [Neurocognitive and social cognition deficits in patients with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Kułakowska, Dorota; Biernacka, Katarzyna; Wilkos, Ewelina; Rybakowski, Filip; Kucharska-Pietura, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the article the authors present a set of the actual concepts explaining problems of cognitive functions and social cognition currently observed in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). It is possible; through the neuroimaging research, to get better understanding of the brain specifics in these individuals. Even though, the AN remains a disease with very complex and multifactorial etiology which remains a huge medical challenge. Currently, popular is the view that takes into consideration the integrating role of the insula and subcortical structures (such as hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus) in the regulation of cognitive and emotional processes in people suffering from AN. There is still an open problem, however, of the selection of therapeutic interventions targeting these deficits. The second part of the article presents the attempt to describe deficits in neurocognitive and social cognition in people with AN occurring prior to illness, during and after the recovery. Particular attention has been paid to the most frequently described in the literature--neurocognitive deficits such as rigidity of thinking, weak central coherence, and deficits in social cognition, including mental processes of perception and expression of emotions, disorders of the theory of mind (ToM) and empathy. The results of previous studies, their scarcity in Poland, do not give a satisfactory answer to the question whether the above mentioned disorders are a feature of endophenotype or condition in an episode of the disease. Research point to the more permanent nature, which may be more resistant to therapeutic modifications. PMID:25204093

  9. Amelioration of Stroke-Induced Neurological Deficiency by Lyophilized Powder of Catapol and Puerarin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Xue, Qiang; Li, Xu; Zhang, Jifen; Fu, Zhifeng; Feng, Binbin; Chen, Yi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Catalpol and puerarin are active ingredients isolated from Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch and Radix Puerariae, respectively. They are popular in research for their poly-pharmacological effects. This research focused on effect of anti-stroke by lyophilized powder of catalpol and puerarin (C-P) and potential mechanisms. At the beginning of research, C-P was identified and analyzed by HPLC. Neurological function was evaluated by Longa score, neurological complex function score and beam balance score after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (PMCAO) in mice. Infarct volume and water content were evaluated after treatment of C-P. Anti-oxidative stress, anti-apoptosis, angiogenesis and neurogenesis were investigated by ELISA, WB and immunohistochemical stain respectively. With treatment of C-P, neurological deficiency of PMCAO mice was ameliorated. Morphologically, infarct volume and water content in ischemic hemisphere were significantly reduced by C-P. In vivo and in vitro, oxidative stress injury was extenuated by C-P. Meanwhile, Caspase-3 was down-regulated and Bxl-2 was up-regulated by C-P in vivo. In addition, C-P enhanced angiogenesis around the infarct of cortex and neurogenesis in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus (DG). Hence, C-P ameliorated stroke-induced neurological deficiency through its multiple neuroprotections. What's more, this article provides us a novel formula of active ingredients for stroke. PMID:24719562

  10. Closure of the larynx for intractable aspiration in neurologically impaired patients.

    PubMed

    Tatekawa, Yukihiro; Hosino, Noriko; Hori, Tetsuo; Kaneko, Michio

    2010-05-01

    We present three patients with intractable aspiration pneumonia in the setting of permanent neurologic impairment, who had received a tracheostomy and showed a juxtaposition of the innominate artery against the trachea. Neurologically impaired patients often show a juxtaposition or compression of the innominate artery against the trachea by chest deformity in the setting of severe scoliosis, which could result in a trachea-innominate artery fistula. For intractable aspiration, laryngotracheal separation is safely performed and effective in controlling aspiration, but is occasionally complicated by trachea-innominate artery fistula. As an alternative procedure, we performed a closure of the larynx in these three cases, using double flaps of the vocal folds and false vocal folds, as a treatment for intractable aspiration. After operation, the patients did well without complication or clinical evidence of recurrent aspiration. PMID:20383513

  11. Faststats: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)* Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data ... attention deficit disorder (ADD)" is used rather than "attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)" in some data sources. More data Association ...

  12. [Minimal requirements for MR diagnosis of the brain for clarification of nonspecific neurological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Lanfermann, H; Zanella, F E

    1998-01-01

    The main tasks of MRI diagnosis of the brain for unspecific neurological symptoms such as, for example, headache, psychiatric diseases, subjective cognitive deficits, and retarded development in children generally involve the reliable exclusion of morphologically detectable lesions. Since there can be no universally accepted protocol for all possible situations, a basis protocol is given under consideration of modern fast spin echo, turbo FLAIR, and T2*-weighted gradient echo sequences to obtain important information in a short time. In addition, useful supplements are suggested that can proved further relevant data in dependence on the respective condition. PMID:9538922

  13. Transverse Myelitis in Acute Hepatitis A Infection: The Rare Co-Occurrence of Hepatology and Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Chonmaitree, Piyanant; Methawasin, Kulthida

    2016-01-01

    Transverse myelitis refers to the inflammatory process involving the spinal cord. Clinical features can be either acute or subacute onset that results in neurological deficits such as weakness and/or numbness of extremities as well as autonomic dysfunctions. While there are some etiologies related, a viral infection is common. However, the hepatitis A virus rarely causes myelitis. This report provides details of a hepatitis A infectious patient who developed myelitis as comorbidity. Although, the disability was initially severe, the patient successfully recovered with corticosteroid treatment. PMID:27403101

  14. Transverse Myelitis in Acute Hepatitis A Infection: The Rare Co-Occurrence of Hepatology and Neurology.

    PubMed

    Chonmaitree, Piyanant; Methawasin, Kulthida

    2016-01-01

    Transverse myelitis refers to the inflammatory process involving the spinal cord. Clinical features can be either acute or subacute onset that results in neurological deficits such as weakness and/or numbness of extremities as well as autonomic dysfunctions. While there are some etiologies related, a viral infection is common. However, the hepatitis A virus rarely causes myelitis. This report provides details of a hepatitis A infectious patient who developed myelitis as comorbidity. Although, the disability was initially severe, the patient successfully recovered with corticosteroid treatment. PMID:27403101

  15. Neurological complications of cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Honan, W; Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2001-03-01

    To obtain preliminary data on neurological complications of spinal manipulation in the UK all members of the Association of British Neurologists were asked to report cases referred to them of neurological complications occurring within 24 hours of cervical spine manipulation over a 12-month period. The response rate was 74%. 24 respondents reported at least one case each, contributing to a total of about 35 cases. These included 7 cases of stroke in brainstem territory (4 with confirmation of vertebral artery dissection), 2 cases of stroke in carotid territory and 1 case of acute subdural haematoma. There were 3 cases of myelopathy and 3 of cervical radiculopathy. Concern about neurological complications following cervical spine manipulation appears to be justified. A large long-term prospective study is required to determine the scale of the hazard. PMID:11285788

  16. Neurological complications of cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevinson, C; Honan, W; Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2001-01-01

    To obtain preliminary data on neurological complications of spinal manipulation in the UK all members of the Association of British Neurologists were asked to report cases referred to them of neurological complications occurring within 24 hours of cervical spine manipulation over a 12-month period. The response rate was 74%. 24 respondents reported at least one case each, contributing to a total of about 35 cases. These included 7 cases of stroke in brainstem territory (4 with confirmation of vertebral artery dissection), 2 cases of stroke in carotid territory and 1 case of acute subdural haematoma. There were 3 cases of myelopathy and 3 of cervical radiculopathy. Concern about neurological complications following cervical spine manipulation appears to be justified. A large long-term prospective study is required to determine the scale of the hazard. PMID:11285788

  17. Placebo Controlled Procedural Trials for Neurological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Horng, Sam H.; Miller, Franklin G.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Neurological disease has been a central focus in the ongoing ethical debate over the use of invasive placebo controls, especially sham surgery. The risk to research subjects and necessary use of deception involved in these procedures must be balanced against the methodological need to control for bias and the placebo effect. We review a framework formulated for the ethical assessment of sham surgery in the context of research evaluating novel procedures for neurological conditions. Special issues raised include the growing evidence of expectation and conditioning effects in a number of neurological diseases, the escalating scale of risk from different types of invasive placebo interventions, and the increasing use of crossover designs, which allow a switch from placebo to active intervention without additional procedures. PMID:17599718

  18. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for inherited neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Tur-Kaspa, Ilan; Jeelani, Roohi; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2014-07-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an option for couples at risk of having offspring with an inherited debilitating or fatal neurological disorder who wish to conceive a healthy child. PGD has been carried out for conditions with various modes of inheritance, including spinal muscular atrophy, Huntington disease, fragile X syndrome, and chromosomal or mitochondrial disorders, and for susceptibility genes for cancers with nervous system involvement. Most couples at risk of transmitting a genetic mutation would opt for PGD over prenatal testing and possible termination of a pregnancy. The aim of this Perspectives article is to assist neurologists in counselling and treating patients who wish to explore the option of PGD to enable conception of an unaffected child. PGD can be accomplished for most disorders in which the genetic basis is known, and we argue that it is time for clinicians and neurological societies to consider the evidence and to formulate guidelines for the responsible integration of PGD into modern preventative neurology. PMID:24866878

  19. Astrocytes: The missing link in neurological disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Ching John; Deneen, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is comprised of numerous cell types that work in concert to facilitate proper function and homeostasis. Disruption of these carefully orchestrated networks results in neuronal dysfunction, manifesting itself in a variety of neurological disorders. While neuronal dysregulation is causative of symptoms manifest in the clinic, the etiology of these disorders is often more complex than simply a loss of neurons or intrinsic dysregulation of their function. In the adult brain, astrocytes comprise the most abundant cell type and play key roles in CNS physiology, therefore it stands to reason that dysregulation of normal astrocyte function contributes to the etiology and progression of varied neurological disorders. We review here some neurological disorders associated with an astrocyte factor and discuss how the related astrocyte dysfunction contributes to the etiology and/or progression of these disorders. PMID:24365571

  20. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Pediatric Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Ümit Özgür; Atay Kapucu, Lütfiye Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging can provide important complementary information in the management of pediatric patients with neurological diseases. Pre-surgical localization of the epileptogenic focus in medically refractory epilepsy patients is the most common indication for nuclear medicine imaging in pediatric neurology. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, nuclear medicine imaging is particularly useful when magnetic resonance imaging findings are normal or its findings are discordant with electroencephalogram findings. In pediatric patients with brain tumors, nuclear medicine imaging can be clinically helpful in the diagnosis, directing biopsy, planning therapy, differentiating tumor recurrence from post-treatment sequelae, and assessment of response to therapy. Among other neurological diseases in which nuclear medicine has proved to be useful are patients with head trauma, inflammatory-infectious diseases and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:27299282

  1. Neurologic complications following pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Partha S; Kwon, Charles; Klein, Melanie; Corder, Julie; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2014-06-01

    We reviewed neurologic complications after renal transplantation in children over a 20-year period. Neurologic complications were classified as early (within 3 months) and delayed (beyond 3 months). Of 115 children, 10 (8.7%) had complications. Early complications were found in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 4 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to immunosuppressant toxicity, sepsis/presumed meningitis, and indeterminate) and headaches in 1. One patient with seizures received levetiracetam for 6 months and 1 with headaches received amitriptyline prophylaxis. Late complications were noted in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 3 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy), headaches in 2, and tremors in 1. Two patients with seizures were treated with anti-epilepsy medications; 1 with migraine received cyproheptadine prophylaxis. Neurologic complications develop in children after renal transplantation. Seizures due to posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome were the commonest complication. Early detection and appropriate management of these complications is important. PMID:23752071

  2. Mitochondria in Neuroplasticity and Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Mark P.; Gleichmann, Marc; Cheng, Aiwu

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport generates the ATP that is essential for the excitability and survival of neurons, and the protein phosphorylation reactions that mediate synaptic signaling and related long-term changes in neuronal structure and function. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that divide, fuse and move purposefully within axons and dendrites. An Major functions of mitochondria in neurons include the regulation of Ca2+ and redox signaling, developmental and synaptic plasticity, and the arbitration of cell survival and death. The importance of mitochondria in neurons is evident in the neurological phenotypes in rare diseases caused by mutations in mitochondrial genes. Mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, perturbed Ca2+ homeostasis and apoptosis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of prominent neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, stroke, ALS and psychiatric disorders. Advances in understanding the molecular and cell biology of mitochondria are leading to novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:19081372

  3. Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25083051

  4. What Should a Family Physician Know About Neurology?

    PubMed Central

    Murray, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    Ten per cent of patients visiting their family physician have a neurological complaint, and 1% to 2% eventually are diagnosed as having a definite neurological problem. Although most neurological problems can be managed effectively by the family physician, many physicians have trouble conducting a neurological examination confidently, interpreting the results of their findings, or deciding what tests should be done. The author outlines what the family practitioner should know about the field, including certain basic concepts about the nervous system, the appropriate attitude toward neurological problems and patients, characteristics of an efficient, high-yield neurological screening examination, and emergency management of common and treatable neurological conditions. PMID:21234042

  5. Visual behaviours of neurologically impaired children with cerebral visual impairment: an ethological study

    PubMed Central

    Porro, G; Dekker, E; Van Nieuwenhuizen, O; Wittebol-Post, D; Schilder, M; Schenk-Rootlieb, A; Treffers, W

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Visual functions of neurologically impaired children with permanent cerebral visual impairment (CVI) can be difficult to determine. This study investigated the behavioural profile of CVI children by means of ethological observations in order to gain a better understanding of their visual functions.
METHODS—Video registrations of nine subjects who were unable to undergo more orthodox methods of visual function testing were observed and analysed by an ethologist.
RESULTS—A series of behaviours (direct signs) and supportive or confirming behavioural elements (indirect signs) indicating some visual perception in the children were found.
CONCLUSION—Detailed ethological observations of visual behaviour were shown to be useful for analysing visual functions of children with permanent CVI.

 Keywords: cerebral visual impairment; visual function; visual behaviour; ethological analysis PMID:9924323

  6. Learning Disability, Attention-Deficit Disorder, and Language Impairment as Outcomes of Prematurity: A Longitudinal Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherkes-Julkowski, Miriam

    1998-01-01

    A longitudinal study of 28 mildly preterm children and 20 full-term comparison children found 75% of preterm children had a learning disability, attention deficit disorder (ADD), language impairment, mild neurologic impairment, or general school problems by grade 5. Evidence of differences in attention deployment at ages 13 and 15 months for ADD…

  7. Career Decision Making for Male Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Model of Critical Factors Aiding in Transitional Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gregory B.

    2009-01-01

    This study is intended to reveal helpful information that will guide high school practitioners in serving students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) more effectively. ADHD is neurological in origin, making it invisible. This disorder makes people susceptible to distractibility, impulsivity, disorganization, frustration, anxiety,…

  8. Non-Drug Interventions for Improving Classroom Behavior and Social Functioning of Young Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radcliff, David

    This paper explores research on use of medication and non-drug interventions to modify the behavior of preschool children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It begins by discussing the symptoms of ADHD, neurological differences between children with ADHD and those without ADHD, and expected adolescent and adult outcomes for…

  9. Neurologic Complications in Treated HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Nisha S; Chow, Felicia C

    2016-07-01

    Effective combination antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV infection into a chronic disease, with HIV-infected individuals living longer and reaching older age. Neurological disease remains common in treated HIV, however, due in part to ongoing inflammation and immune activation that persist in chronic infection. In this review, we highlight recent developments in our understanding of several clinically relevant neurologic complications that can occur in HIV infection despite treatment, including HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, symptomatic CSF escape, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27170369

  10. [Rehabilitation methods in small animal neurology].

    PubMed

    Kathmann, I; Demierre, S; Jaggy, A

    2001-10-01

    Rehabilitation is an important part of the treatment of neurological diseases. The primary goal of these methods is an optimal functional restoring of the neuro-muscular system. Massages, thermo-, hydro- and electrotherapy, as well as therapy of movement are different treatment possibilities with their own indication, which are combined in a physiotherapy program. It follows an overview of the different physiotherapeutic methods and their application in some of the most common neurological diseases, as for example intervertebral disc problems or degenerative myelopathy. PMID:11680910

  11. Imaging Manifestations of Neurologic Complications in Anemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ritesh; Sabat, Shyam; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    The hallmark signs and symptoms of anemia are directly related to a decrease in oxygen delivery to vital tissues and organs and include pallor, fatigue, lightheadedness, and shortness of breath. Neurologic complications are often nonspecific and can include poor concentration, irritability, faintness, tinnitus, and headache. If undiagnosed or untreated, anemia can progress to cognitive dysfunction, psychosis, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and more focal syndromes, such as stroke, seizures, chorea, and transverse myelitis. Imaging can play an important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of these neurologic and systemic complications associated with anemia, and hence, better outcome. PMID:27443995

  12. How to write a neurology case report.

    PubMed

    Rison, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Neurology case reports have a long history of transmitting important medical information across many generations for the improvement of patient care. Case reports contribute much to the physician's knowledge base from which treatment hypotheses and ideas form. Elements of a modern case report, as presented in the CARE (CAse REport) guidelines, include the abstract, introduction, case presentation, discussion, conclusion, patient's perspective, and consent statement. The sections are described here, as well as the application of CARE guidelines to a published neuromuscular case report. Writing case reports offer an ideal opportunity for neurologists to publish interesting case findings and carry on the tradition of neurologic case reporting. PMID:27048575

  13. Neurological and neuropsychological characteristics of occipital, occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal infarction.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Antje; Grimsen, Cathleen; Kehrer, Stefanie; Bahnemann, Markus; Spang, Karoline; Prass, Maren; Irlbacher, Kerstin; Köhnlein, Martin; Lipfert, Anika; Brunner, Freimuth; Kastrup, Andreas; Fahle, Manfred; Brandt, Stephan A

    2014-07-01

    Neuropsychological deficits after occipital infarction are most often described in case studies and only a small sample of studies has attempted to exactly correlate the anatomical localization of lesions with associated neuropsychological symptoms. The present study investigated a large number of patients (N = 128) in order to provide an overview of neurological and neuropsychological deficits after occipital, occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal infarction. A particular approach of the study was to define exact anatomical correlates of neuropsychological dysfunction by using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) in 61 patients. In addition to a visual field defect and phosphenes, patients often reported anomia, difficulties in reading and memory deficits. Visual disorders, such as achromatopsia, akinetopsia or prosopagnosia, were rarely reported by the patients. Memory and visual disorders were diagnosed efficiently using simple clinical screening tests, such as the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test for immediate recall, the Demtect and the Lang Stereo Test. Visual field defects, reading disorders and the perception of phosphenes were associated primarily with lesions of the calcarine sulcus. Anomia and memory deficits were related to lesions of the occipital inferior gyrus, the lingual gyrus and hippocampus, as well as to lesions of principal white matter tracts. PMID:23206528

  14. The Perceived Deficits Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Allison; Nikelshpur, Olga M.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; DeLuca, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cognitive dysfunction affects approximately 43% to 70% of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) and is an important determinant of several functional outcomes in MS and quality of life. Brief neuropsychological test batteries have been developed specifically for use in MS and are widely used to aid clinicians in assessing levels of cognitive impairment in MS. Neuropsychologists and neurologists also frequently use briefer screening measures, such as the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire (PDQ), to assist in determining whether a more extensive neuropsychological evaluation is warranted. However, despite the ease of such measures, the relationship between self-report and objective cognitive impairment has been inconsistent, at best. Moreover, factors such as depression, fatigue, anxiety, and personality have been found to be more related to reports of cognitive difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the relationship between subjective cognitive concerns and objective cognitive impairment while accounting for related symptoms. Methods: We examined the association of self-reported cognitive concerns on the PDQ with objective cognitive measures, as well as depression, anxiety, fatigue, and self-efficacy. Results: There was no relationship between self-reported cognitive concerns and objective performance. Rather, reports on the PDQ were more correlated with reports of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and self-efficacy. Conclusions: Depression and poor self-efficacy can contribute to reports of cognitive difficulties. Effective treatment to improve these factors seems warranted given the impact of perceived cognitive impairment on outcomes in MS and the potential for more accurate self-reports. PMID:27551243

  15. [Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

    PubMed

    Cunill, Ruth; Castells, Xavier

    2015-04-20

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common childhood psychiatric disorders and can persist into the adulthood. ADHD has important social, academic and occupational consequences. ADHD diagnosis is based on the fulfillment of several clinical criteria, which can vary depending on the diagnostic system used. The clinical presentation can show great between-patient variability and it has been related to a dysfunction in the fronto-striatal and meso-limbic circuits. Recent investigations support a model in which multiple genetic and environmental factors interact to create a neurobiological susceptibility to develop the disorder. However, no clear causal association has yet been identified. Although multimodal treatment including both pharmacological and psychosocial interventions is usually recommended, no convincing evidence exists to support this recommendation. Pharmacological treatment has fundamentally shown to improve ADHD symptoms in the short term, while efficacy data for psychosocial interventions are scarce and inconsistent. Yet, drug treatment is increasingly popular and the last 2 decades have witnessed a sharp increase in the prescription of anti-ADHD medications coinciding with the marketing of new drugs to treat ADHD. PMID:24787685

  16. Common neurologic complications of HIV-1 infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Newton, H B

    1995-02-01

    Complications of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome may involve any level of the central or peripheral nervous system. Acute encephalitis, aseptic meningitis and acute demyelinating polyneuropathy may occur early in the course of HIV infection, while dementia, central nervous system-related cancer, opportunistic infections and autonomic neuropathy typically present later. Headache and mental status changes are common early manifestations of central nervous system involvement. Most severe headaches are related to an identifiable cause, including a mass lesion, opportunistic cerebral infection and medication side effect. Memory deficits, concentration difficulties and abnormalities on mental status testing may represent early AIDS dementia complex (HIV encephalopathy), the most common neurologic complication. In patients with AIDs, the differential diagnosis of cerebral mass lesions on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging includes cerebral toxoplasmosis, tuberculous or fungal abscess, focal viral encephalitis, metastatic resonance imaging includes cerebral toxoplasmosis, tuberculous or fungal abscess, focal viral encephalitis, metastatic Kaposi's sarcoma and primary CNS lymphoma. Peripheral neuromuscular disease, including distal symmetric polyneuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, and HIV and chronic zidovudine myopathy, affects 15 to 40 percent of all persons with HIV infection or AIDS. PMID:7840035

  17. Impaired movement timing in neurological disorders: rehabilitation and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hove, Michael J.; Keller, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    Timing abnormalities have been reported in many neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s disease (PD). In PD, motor-timing impairments are especially debilitating in gait. Despite impaired audiomotor synchronization, PD patients’ gait improves when they walk with an auditory metronome or with music. Building on that research, we make recommendations for optimizing sensory cues to improve the efficacy of rhythmic cuing in gait rehabilitation. Adaptive rhythmic metronomes (that synchronize with the patient’s walking) might be especially effective. In a recent study we showed that adaptive metronomes synchronized consistently with Parkinson patients’ footsteps without requiring attention; this improved stability and reinstated healthy gait dynamics. Other strategies could help optimize sensory cues for gait rehabilitation. Groove music strongly engages the motor system and induces movement; bass-frequency tones are associated with movement and provide strong timing cues. Thus, groove and bass-frequency pulses could deliver potent rhythmic cues. These strategies capitalize on the close neural connections between auditory and motor networks; and auditory cues are typically preferred. However, moving visual cues greatly improve visuomotor synchronization and could warrant examination in gait rehabilitation. Together, a treatment approach that employs groove, auditory, bass-frequency, and adaptive (GABA) cues could help optimize rhythmic sensory cues for treating motor and timing deficits. PMID:25773624

  18. Multiparametric mapping of neurological soft signs in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hirjak, Dusan; Wolf, Robert C; Kubera, Katharina M; Stieltjes, Bram; Thomann, Philipp A

    2016-04-01

    Minor motor and sensory deficits or neurological soft signs (NSS) are frequently found in patients with schizophrenia at any stage of their illness. Although previous studies have reported that NSS are associated with altered structure and function within fronto-parietal areas, it remains unclear whether the neuroanatomical basis of NSS may be confounded by underlying pathological processes, and by antipsychotic treatment. Morphological brain correlates of NSS in healthy subjects have seldom been investigated. This study evaluated the relationship between NSS levels and abnormalities of subcortical and cortical structures in healthy individuals. High-resolution MRI data at 3 Tesla were obtained from 68 healthy individuals. Automated segmentation of caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus, and brainstem was performed using both FSL-FIRST and Freesurfer. The surface-based analysis via Freesurfer enabled calculation of cortical thickness, area and folding (local gyrification index). NSS were examined on the Heidelberg Scale and related to both subcortical and cortical measurements. Using two fully automated brain segmentations methods, we found no significant association between NSS levels and morphological changes in subcortical structures. Higher NSS scores were associated with morphological changes of cortical thickness, area and folding in multiple areas comprising superior frontal, middle temporal, insular and postcentral regions. Our findings demonstrate the benefit of surface-based approaches when investigating brain correlates of NSS. The data lend further support to the hypothesis that NSS in healthy individuals involve multiple cortical rather than subcortical brain regions. PMID:25528225

  19. Impaired movement timing in neurological disorders: rehabilitation and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Hove, Michael J; Keller, Peter E

    2015-03-01

    Timing abnormalities have been reported in many neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). In PD, motor-timing impairments are especially debilitating in gait. Despite impaired audiomotor synchronization, PD patients' gait improves when they walk with an auditory metronome or with music. Building on that research, we make recommendations for optimizing sensory cues to improve the efficacy of rhythmic cuing in gait rehabilitation. Adaptive rhythmic metronomes (that synchronize with the patient's walking) might be especially effective. In a recent study we showed that adaptive metronomes synchronized consistently with PD patients' footsteps without requiring attention; this improved stability and reinstated healthy gait dynamics. Other strategies could help optimize sensory cues for gait rehabilitation. Groove music strongly engages the motor system and induces movement; bass-frequency tones are associated with movement and provide strong timing cues. Thus, groove and bass-frequency pulses could deliver potent rhythmic cues. These strategies capitalize on the close neural connections between auditory and motor networks; and auditory cues are typically preferred. However, moving visual cues greatly improve visuomotor synchronization and could warrant examination in gait rehabilitation. Together, a treatment approach that employs groove, auditory, bass-frequency, and adaptive (GABA) cues could help optimize rhythmic sensory cues for treating motor and timing deficits. PMID:25773624

  20. The Therapeutic Effects of Singing in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wan, Catherine Y; Rüber, Theodor; Hohmann, Anja; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2010-04-01

    Music making (playing an instrument or singing) is a multimodal activity that involves the integration of auditory and sensorimotor processes. The ability to sing in humans is evident from infancy, and does not depend on formal vocal training but can be enhanced by training. Given the behavioral similarities between singing and speaking, as well as the shared and distinct neural correlates of both, researchers have begun to examine whether singing can be used to treat some of the speech-motor abnormalities associated with various neurological conditions. This paper reviews recent evidence on the therapeutic effects of singing, and how it can potentially ameliorate some of the speech deficits associated with conditions such as stuttering, Parkinson's disease, acquired brain lesions, and autism. By reviewing the status quo, it is hoped that future research can help to disentangle the relative contribution of factors to why singing works. This may ultimately lead to the development of specialized or "gold-standard" treatments for these disorders, and to an improvement in the quality of life for patients. PMID:21152359

  1. [Permanent vascular access for haemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Manafov, E N; Batrashov, V A; Sergeev, O G; Yudaev, S S

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a permanent vascular access (PVA) is the pledge of successful treatment of patients being on chronic haemodialysis (CD). Creation and maintenance of a functioning PVA is the priority task of vascular and endovascular surgeons, nephrologists and specialists of haemodialysis departments. According to the KDOQI guidelines, the most preferable type of PVA is a native arteriovenous fistula (AVF). As an alternative it is possible to use a synthetic prosthesis for creating an arteriovenous shunt (AVS) or implantation of a central venous catheter (CVC). Various complications of vascular accesses leading to their loss create the necessity of forming just another PVA, thus negatively influencing the life span and quality of life of this cohort of patients. Improving surgical technique and approaches to treatment, as well as carrying out dynamic monitoring of the condition of the created PVA make it possible to considerably decrease the incidence rate of such complications and to improve the quality of medical care rendered. PMID:26451410

  2. Torque Performance and Permanent Magnet Arrangement for Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naohisa; Sanada, Masayuki; Morimoto, Shigeo; Takeda, Yoji

    The use of the interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) has increased in the industrial field because of its excellent characteristics, such as high efficiency, wide range of speed operation and flexibility of the rotor structure. Therefore, the IPMSM, especially one using the rare earth permanent magnet, is being actively studied. In the IPMSM using the rare earth permanent magnet, typically the permanent magnet is deeply embedded in the rotor. However, torque performances are significantly influenced by the rotor structures. This paper describes the torque performances for a single-layer IPMSM using the rare earth permanent magnet when the permanent magnet arrangements are changed.

  3. [Scans without Evidence of Dopamine Deficit (SWEDDs)].

    PubMed

    Mukai, Yohei; Murata, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine transporter (DaT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and [18F]fluoro-L-DOPA ([18F]DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) facilitate the investigation of dopaminergic hypofunction in neurodegenerative diseases. DaT SPECT and [18F]DOPA PET have been adopted as survey tools in clinical trials. In a large study on Parkinson's disease, 4-15% of subjects clinically diagnosed with early-stage Parkinson's disease had normal dopaminergic functional imaging scans. These are called Scans without Evidence of Dopamine Deficit (SWEDDs), and are considered to represent a state different from Parkinson's disease. Neurological diseases that exhibit parkinsonism and have normal dopaminergic cells in the nigrostriatal system (e.g., essential tremor, psychogenic parkinsonism, DOPA-responsive dystonia, vascular parkinsonism, drug-induced parkinsonism, manganism, brain tumor, myoclonus-dystonia (DYT11), and fragile X syndrome) might be diagnosed with SWEDDs. True bradykinesia with fatigue or decrement may be useful for distinguishing between Parkinson's disease and SWEDDs. However, because SWEDDs encompass many diseases, their properties may not be uniform. In this review, we discuss DaT SPECT, the concept of SWEDDs, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26764301

  4. Teaching Undergraduate Medical Students the Neurological Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laguna, Jose F.; Stillman, Paula L.

    1978-01-01

    The University of Arizona College of Medicine program described extends the role of practical instructor or programmed patient to that of evaluator and teacher of neurological examinations skills for preclinical medical students. The process may help improve the quality of medical education without increasing the size of clinical faculty. (LBH)

  5. [Preventing swallowing disorders in neurological patients].

    PubMed

    Poindessous, Jean-Luc; Basta, Martial; Da Silva, José; Tillard, Audrey; Rasquier, Stéphanie; Héron, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Swallowing disorders in neurological rehabilitation are common and important as they can have harmful consequences. A multi-disciplinary hospital team was created to study ways of preventing their occurrence. This article presents the areas to focus on and the main orientations of patient management. PMID:26654505

  6. The Neurologic Manifestations of Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    The nervous system contains some of the body's most metabolically demanding cells that are highly dependent on ATP produced via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the neurological system is consistently involved in patients with mitochondrial disease. Symptoms differ depending on the part of the nervous system affected. Although almost…

  7. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Mailankody, Pooja; Isnwara, Pawanraj Palu; Prasad, Chandrajit; Mustare, Veerendrakumar

    2015-01-01

    Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X) was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1) gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation). Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes. PMID:25745327

  8. [Detection and management of the neurologic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Leemann, Beatrice; Sergi, Sabrina; Sahinpasic, Leila; Schnider, Armin

    2016-03-01

    Neurologic dysphagia is frequent and has consequences which can be severe, such as, denutrition andpneumonia. In most cases, it can be detected with a clinical exam. The management includes some general measures, an adaptation of textures, specific rehabilitation, and nutritional assessment to judge whether complementary enteral nutrition is needed. PMID:27089605

  9. Chapter 17: cognitive assessment in neurology.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Victor W

    2010-01-01

    Modern interests in cognitive assessment began with Franz Gall's early 19th century theory of mental organology and Paul Broca's reports in the 1860s on patients with focal brain injury and aphemia. These workers spurred interest in assessing delimited mental abilities in relation to discrete cerebral areas. With roots in experimental and educational psychology, the intelligence testing movement added assessment tools that could be applied to neurological patients. Early- to mid-20th-century landmarks were Alfred Binet and Theodore Simon's intelligence scale, Howard Knox's nonverbal performance tests, and the intelligence quotient conceived by Lewis Terman and refined by David Wechsler. Also developed during this era were Henry Head's Serial Tests for aphasic patients and Kurt Goldstein's tests for brain-injured patients with impairments in "abstract attitude" and concept formation. Other investigators have contributed procedures for the evaluation of language functions, memory, visuospatial and visuoconstructive skills, praxis, and executive functions. A further milestone was the development of short standardized cognitive instruments for dementia assessment. Within a neurological arena, the historical emphasis has been on a flexible, process-driven approach to the service of neurological diagnosis and syndrome identification. Advances in clinical psychology, neurology, and the cognate clinical neurosciences continue to enrich assessment options. PMID:19892120

  10. The Transformation: Monarch Institute for Neurological Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reclaiming Children and Youth, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Those utilizing the Monarch Institute and its powerful website include educational and mental health professionals looking for training, or employers seeking qualified workers who happen to have neurological differences. Most are students and their parents who are worried and in pain because they have a problem. The young person is not progressing…

  11. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  12. Prenatal Antecedents of Newborn Neurological Maturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Rubin, Suzanne E.; Shiffler, Dorothy E.; Henderson, Janice L.; Pillion, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Fetal neurobehavioral development was modeled longitudinally using data collected at weekly intervals from 24 to 38 weeks gestation in a sample of 112 healthy pregnancies. Predictive associations between 3 measures of fetal neurobehavioral functioning and their developmental trajectories to neurological maturation in the first weeks after birth…

  13. Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Neurologic Medications.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, Eman; Nunneley, Chloe E; Hsu, Sylvia; Kass, Joseph S

    2016-03-01

    Life-threatening and benign drug reactions occur frequently in the skin, affecting 8 % of the general population and 2-3 % of all hospitalized patients, emphasizing the need for physicians to effectively recognize and manage patients with drug-induced eruptions. Neurologic medications represent a vast array of drug classes with cutaneous side effects. Approximately 7 % of the United States (US) adult population is affected by adult-onset neurological disorders, reflecting a large number of patients on neurologic drug therapies. This review elucidates the cutaneous reactions associated with medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following neurologic pathologies: Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, epilepsy, Huntington disease, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and pseudobulbar affect. A search of the literature was performed using the specific FDA-approved drug or drug classes in combination with the terms 'dermatologic,' 'cutaneous,' 'skin,' or 'rash.' Both PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were utilized, with side effects ranging from those cited in randomized controlled trials to case reports. It behooves neurologists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians to be aware of the recorded cutaneous adverse reactions and their severity for proper management and potential need to withdraw the offending medication. PMID:26914914

  14. Neurology of sex steroids and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Schipper, H M

    1986-11-01

    Under normal circumstances, sex steroids interact with diverse neural substrates to modulate a host of activities essential to the preservation of the individual and the species. In addition, sex hormones play an important role in various human neurologic conditions including strokes, migraine, certain movement disorders and peripheral neuropathies, and possibly even the behavior of CNS neoplasms. PMID:3025581

  15. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  17. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  18. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  19. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  20. Prevention of Neurologic Injuries in Equestrian Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, William H.; Bixby-Hammett, Doris M.

    1988-01-01

    Risk of neurological injuries accompanies horseback riding, especially for children and adolescents. This article describes the mechanisms of craniospinal injuries and suggests measures to lessen risks. Measures include: identifying individuals who should not ride, developing criteria for resumption of riding after injury, developing protective…

  1. Neurological Vision Rehabilitation: Description and Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, John; Katsaros, Jennifer; Vu, Yurika; Goodrich, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have been notable for the high rates of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that have been incurred by the troops. Visual impairments often occur following TBI and present new challenges for rehabilitation. We describe a neurological vision rehabilitation therapy that addresses the unique needs of patients with vision…

  2. Augmented railgun using a permanent magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuki, S.; Akiyama, H.; Eguchi, N.; Sueda, T.; Soejima, M.; Maeda, S.; Sato, K.N.

    1995-08-01

    The use of a permanent magnet instead of an electromagnet has been proposed for the augmentation of the magnetic field of a railgun driven by a current of approximately 20 kA. A permanent magnet has the following advantages in comparison with conventional augmentations using additional turns: (1) simple configuration of the system, (2) temporally and spatially constant magnetic fields, and (3) high efficiency. Here, the operation of a conventional railgun and that of an augmented railgun using a permanent magnet are compared experimentally, and the usefulness of the permanent magnet is described. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  3. Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    1998-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may arise when key brain circuits do not develop properly, perhaps due to an altered gene or genes. Describes ADHD in detail and introduces a psychological model of ADHD. (ASK)

  4. Behavioral deficits following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in the rat.

    PubMed

    Germanò, A F; Dixon, C E; d'Avella, D; Hayes, R L; Tomasello, F

    1994-06-01

    To characterize some of the short-term and long-term functional consequences of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rats, we employed a battery of well-characterized tests for assessment of acute and chronic behavioral and neurologic performances. Three groups of 10 rats (blood injected, mock CSF injected and sham-operated controls) were studied. During the acute stage, simple nonpostural somatomotor reflexes (pinna and corneal reflexes), simple postural responses (paw flexion, tail flexion, and head support), startle response, and postural functions (righting reflex) did not differ significantly between the experimental groups. Assessments of body weight, beam walking ability, and beam balancing revealed significant disturbances in blood-injected rats. This work demonstrates that this single-hemorrhage rodent model of SAH is associated with the induction of enduring neurologic and behavioral deficits. Because of the significant interspecies difference, a direct extrapolation of our results to humans may not be appropriate. However, we suggest that the observed behavioral and neurologic changes may parallel those seen in humans after SAH. Results reported here further confirm the rat model of SAH as a viable laboratory instrument for the study of the pathophysiology of SAH and provide normative values for the evaluation of new treatment modalities. PMID:7996588

  5. Neurological susceptibility to a skull defect

    PubMed Central

    Honeybul, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Background: There continues to be considerable interest in the use of decompressive craniectomy in the management of neurological emergencies. The procedure is technically straightforward; however, it is becoming increasingly apparent that it is associated with significant complications. One complication that has received relatively little attention is the neurological dysfunction that can occur due to the absence of the bone flap and the subsequent distortion of the brain under the scalp as cerebral swelling subsides. The aim of this narrative review was to examine the literature available regarding the clinical features described, outline the proposed pathophysiology for these clinical manifestations and highlight the implications that this may have for rehabilitation of patients with a large skull defect. Methods: A literature search was performed in the MEDLINE database (1966 to June 2012). The following keywords were used: Hemicraniectomy, decompressive craniectomy, complications, syndrome of the trephined, syndrome of the sinking scalp flap, motor trephined syndrome. The bibliographies of retrieved reports were searched for additional references. Results: Various terms have been used to describe the different neurological signs and symptoms with which patients with a skull defect can present. These include; syndrome of the trephined, posttraumatic syndrome, syndrome of the sinking scalp flap, and motor trephined syndrome. There is, however, considerable overlap between the conditions described and a patient's individual clinical presentation. Conclusion: It is becoming increasingly apparent that certain patients are particularly susceptible to the presence of a large skull defect. The term “Neurological Susceptibility to a Skull Defect” (NSSD) is therefore suggested as a blanket term to describe any neurological change attributable to the absence of cranial coverage. PMID:25024883

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS’s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. “Epigenetics”, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics

  7. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS's regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. "Epigenetics", introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics and

  8. Delayed neurological deterioration with an unknown cause subsequent to surgery for intraspinal meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    YANG, TAO; WU, LIANG; DENG, XIAOFENG; YANG, CHENLONG; ZHANG, YAN; ZHANG, DONG; XU, YULUN

    2015-01-01

    Delayed neurological deterioration in the absence of direct cord insult following surgical decompression is rare, but severe post-operative complication occurs in chronically compressive spinal disorders. In the present study, the clinical medical records and radiological findings of 10 patients who underwent surgical removal of intraspinal meningiomas and then experienced delayed post-operative neurological deterioration were reviewed. The cases are presented with consideration of the possible underlying mechanisms. There were five male and five female patients, with a mean age of 46.8 years. The mean duration of illness from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 42.8 months. Seven tumors were located in the thoracic region and three in the cervical region of the spine. The tumors compressed the cord severely and gross total removal was achieved in all cases. Immediately subsequent to the surgery, all patients were able to move all extremities, but the onset of the neurological deterioration occurred at post-operative hours 3–8 in all cases (mean, 5 h post-surgery). In four cases, radiological examination revealed an area of high signal changes intrinsic to the cord on T2-weighted images, but without residual compression. The mean follow-up period was 49.6 months. Nine patients reported a marked recovery in status compared with the pre-operative presentation during the several weeks to months following surgery. The surgical removal of intraspinal meningiomas may lead to delayed and severe neurological deterioration in the post-operative period in the absence of direct mechanical cord insult. Ischemia-reperfusion injury may be one potential etiology of this deterioration. Recognition of the neurological deficit following surgical excision of intraspinal meningiomas may improve pre-operative patient counseling and merits further study for the determination of the precise pathophysiology. PMID:26137065

  9. Contemporary Teaching of Neurology. Teaching Neurological Behavior to General Practitioners: A Fresh Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derouesne, C.; Salamon, R.

    1977-01-01

    Ways in which teaching neurology can be simplified for the nonspecialist practitioner are addressed in this assessment of the state-of-the-art in France. The hypothesis implies simplifying both the diagnoses and symptomatology. (LBH)

  10. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  11. Knockout of silent information regulator 2 (SIRT2) preserves neurological function after experimental stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Krey, Lea; Lühder, Fred; Kusch, Kathrin; Czech-Zechmeister, Bozena; Könnecke, Birte; Fleming Outeiro, Tiago; Trendelenburg, George

    2015-12-01

    Sirtuin-2 (Sirt2) is a member of the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase family. Various members of the sirtuin class have been found to be involved in processes related to longevity, regulation of inflammation, and neuroprotection. Induction of Sirt2 mRNA was found in the whole hemisphere after experimental stroke in a recent screening approach. Moreover, Sirt2 protein is highly expressed in myelin-rich brain regions after stroke. To examine the effects of Sirt2 on ischemic stroke, we induced transient focal cerebral ischemia in adult male Sirt2-knockout and wild-type mice. Two stroke models with different occlusion times were applied: a severe ischemia (45 minutes of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)) and a mild one (15 minutes of MCAO), which was used to focus on subcortical infarcts. Neurological deficit was determined at 48 hours after 45 minutes of MCAO, and up to 7 days after induction of 15 minutes of cerebral ischemia. In contrast to recent data on Sirt1, Sirt2(-/-) mice showed less neurological deficits in both models of experimental stroke, with the strongest manifestation after 48 hours of reperfusion. However, we did not observe a significant difference of stroke volumes or inflammatory cell count between Sirt2-deficient and wild-type mice. Thus we postulate that Sirt2 mediates myelin-dependent neuronal dysfunction during the early phase after ischemic stroke. PMID:26219598

  12. [Bilateral carotid dissection. A not to underestimate cause of neurological loss after road accident].

    PubMed

    Stock, K; Peters, S; Behrmann, C; Spielmann, R P

    2002-10-01

    The dissection of the internal carotid artery is a rare complication of acceleration traumas of the upper spine. 30% of these dissections are caused by road accidents and again less than 30% of these occur bilateral as shown here. The symptoms are fronto-temporal and periorbital starting headaches spreading out to the occiput and Horner's syndrome. Complete hemiplegia as in our case is an impressive exception but the doctor in attendance should think of the carotid dissection. The exclusion of this complication is obligatory because treatment and outcome depend on it.The dynamic effects of bilateral carotid dissections may, as shown here, lead to relapsing cerebral infarctions with persisting neurologic deficits up to manifest hemiparesis. But restitution can be accomplished if early diagnosed by DSA and/or MRI. Therapy of choice is early prevention of persisting neurologic deficits using effective dosed heparin and depending on the residual lumen of the vessel oral anticoagulants or platelet antagonists for one year. PMID:12376897

  13. Hypoxic adaptation during development: relation to pattern of neurological presentation and cognitive disability.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Fenella J; Datta, Avijit K

    2006-07-01

    Children with acute hypoxic-ischaemic events (e.g. stroke) and chronic neurological conditions associated with hypoxia frequently present to paediatric neurologists. Failure to adapt to hypoxia may be a common pathophysiological pathway linking a number of other conditions of childhood with cognitive deficit. There is evidence that congenital cardiac disease, asthma and sleep disordered breathing, for example, are associated with cognitive deficit, but little is known about the mechanism and whether there is any structural change. This review describes what is known about how the brain reacts and adapts to hypoxia, focusing on epilepsy and sickle cell disease (SCD). We prospectively recorded overnight oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SpO2) in 18 children with intractable epilepsy, six of whom were currently or recently in minor status (MS). Children with MS were more likely to have an abnormal sleep study defined as either mean baseline SpO2 <94% or >4 dips of >4% in SpO2/hour (p = .04). In our series of prospectively followed patients with SCD who subsequently developed acute neurological symptoms and signs, mean overnight SpO2 was lower in those with cerebrovascular disease on magnetic resonance angiography (Mann-Whitney, p = .01). Acute, intermittent and chronic hypoxia may have detrimental effects on the brain, the clinical manifestations perhaps depending on rapidity of presentation and prior exposure. PMID:16764614

  14. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional

  15. Leadership in a (permanent) crisis.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Ronald; Grashow, Alexander; Linsky, Marty

    2009-01-01

    The current economic crisis is not just another rough spell. Today's mix of urgency, high stakes, and uncertainty will continue even after the recession ends. The immediate crisis--which we will get through with policy makers' expert technical adjustments--sets the stage for a sustained, or even permanent, crisis, a relentless series of challenges no one has encountered before. Instead of hunkering down and relying on their familiar expertise to deal with the sustained crisis, people in positions of authority--whether they are CEOs or managers heading up a company initiative--must practice what the authors call adaptive leadership. They must, of course, tackle the underlying causes of the crisis, but they must also simultaneously make the changes that will allow their organizations to thrive in turbulent environments. Adaptive leadership is an improvisational and experimental art, requiring some new practices. Like Julie Gilbert, who overcame internal resistance to reorient Best Buy toward female purchasers, adaptive leaders get things done to meet today's challenges and then modify those things to thrive in tomorrow's world. They also embrace disequilibrium, using turbulence as an opportunity to build crucial new capacities, as Paul Levy did to rescue Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from a profound financial crisis. Finally, adaptive leaders, such as Egon Zehnder, the founder of an executive search firm, draw out the leadership skills that reside deep in the organization, recognizing the interdependence of all employees and mobilizing everyone to generate solutions. PMID:19630256

  16. Prevalence factors associated with equine herpesvirus type 1 infection in equids with upper respiratory tract infection and/or acute onset of neurological signs from 2008 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, N; Mapes, S; Akana, N; Barnett, C; MacKenzie, C; Gaughan, E; Craig, B; Chappell, D; Vaala, W

    2016-01-16

    The objective of the present case-control study was to determine prevalence factors associated with the detection of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in horses presented to veterinarians with clinical signs related to an upper respiratory tract infection and/or acute onset of neurological disease from March 2008 to December 2014. Nasal secretions and whole blood from 4228 equids with acute onset of fever, respiratory signs and/or neurological deficits were tested by qPCR for EHV-1. Categorical analyses were performed to determine the association between observations and EHV-1. A total of 117/4228 (2.7 per cent) equids tested qPCR-positive for EHV-1, with most of the isolates belonging to the non-neuropathogenic genotype (N752). EHV-1 PCR-positive equids were over-represented in racing horses. Depression, anorexia, nasal discharge and coughing were significantly less frequently reported in the EHV-1 qPCR-positive equids compared with the EHV-1 qPCR-negative cases. Neurological deficits were more frequently reported in the EHV-1 qPCR-positive cases. This study provides contemporary information on the frequency of EHV-1 detection by qPCR in blood and nasal secretions from horses with fever, respiratory signs and neurological deficits. PMID:26607427

  17. Neurology as career option among postgraduate medical students

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Namit B.; Khadilkar, Satish V.; Bangar, Sachin S.; Patil, Tukaram R.; Chaudhari, Chetan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the context of inadequacy of neurology workforce in India, it is important to understand factors that post-graduate medical students consider for and against choosing neurology as their career option. Understanding these factors will help in planning strategies to encourage students to pursue a career in neurology. At present, there is a paucity of studies addressing this issue in India. Aims and Objectives: (1) To analyze factors, which post-graduate students consider for and against choosing neurology as a career specialty. (2) To access the level and quality of neurology exposure in the current MBBS and MD curricula. Materials and Methods: Statewide questionnaire based study was conducted in the state of Maharashtra for students eligible to take DM neurology entrance examination (MD Medicine and MD Pediatrics). Results: In this survey, 243 students were enrolled. Factors bringing students to neurology were - intellectual challenge and logical reasoning (72%), inspired by role model teachers (63%), better quality-of-life (51%) and scope for independent practice without expensive infrastructure (48%). Factors preventing students from taking neurology were - perception that most neurological diseases are degenerative (78%), neurology is mainly an academic specialty (40%), neurophobia (43%) and lack of procedures (57%). Inadequate exposure and resultant lack of self-confidence were common (31%, 70-80%). 84% of the students felt the need for a short term certification course in neurology after MD. Conclusions: To attract more students to neurology, “role model” teachers of neurology could interact and teach students extensively. Neurologists’ efforts to shed their diagnostician's image and to shift their focus to therapeutics will help change the image of neurology. Out-patient neurology clinics should be incorporated early in the student's career. Procedures attract students; hence, they should be made conversant with procedures and

  18. Permanent-magnet multipole with adjustable strength

    DOEpatents

    Halbach, K.

    1982-09-20

    Two or more magnetically soft pole pieces are symmetrically positioned along a longitudinal axis to provide a magnetic field within a space defined by the pole pieces. Two or more permanent magnets are mounted to an external magnetically-soft cylindrical sleeve which rotates to bring the permanent magnets into closer coupling with the pole pieces and thereby adjustably control the field strength of the magnetic field produced in the space defined by the pole pieces. The permanent magnets are preferably formed of rare earth cobalt (REC) material which has a high remanent magnetic field and a strong coercive force. The pole pieces and the permanent magnets have corresponding cylindrical surfaces which are positionable with respect to each other to vary the coupling there between. Auxiliary permanent magnets are provided between the pole pieces to provide additional magnetic flux to the magnetic field without saturating the pole pieces.

  19. Permanent magnet multipole with adjustable strength

    DOEpatents

    Halbach, Klaus

    1985-01-01

    Two or more magnetically soft pole pieces are symmetrically positioned along a longitudinal axis to provide a magnetic field within a space defined by the pole pieces. Two or more permanent magnets are mounted to an external magnetically-soft cylindrical sleeve which rotates to bring the permanent magnets into closer coupling with the pole pieces and thereby adjustably control the field strength of the magnetic field produced in the space defined by the pole pieces. The permanent magnets are preferably formed of rare earth cobalt (REC) material which has a high remanent magnetic field and a strong coercive force. The pole pieces and the permanent magnets have corresponding cylindrical surfaces which are positionable with respect to each other to vary the coupling therebetween. Auxiliary permanent magnets are provided between the pole pieces to provide additional magnetic flux to the magnetic field without saturating the pole pieces.

  20. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.