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Sample records for permeable stretching surface

  1. Heat transfer characteristics for the Maxwell fluid flow past an unsteady stretching permeable surface embedded in a porous medium with thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Ranjan De, P.; Layek, G. C.

    2013-05-01

    An unsteady boundary layer flow of a non-Newtonian fluid over a continuously stretching permeable surface in the presence of thermal radiation is investigated. The Maxwell fluid model is used to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. Similarity solutions for the transformed governing equations are obtained. The transformed boundary layer equations are then solved numerically by the shooting method. The flow features and heat transfer characteristics for different values of the governing parameters (unsteadiness parameter, Maxwell parameter, permeability parameter, suction/blowing parameter, thermal radiation parameter, and Prandtl number) are analyzed and discussed in detail.

  2. MHD boundary layer flow of Casson fluid passing through an exponentially stretching permeable surface with thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swati, Mukhopadhyay; Iswar, Chandra Moindal; Tasawar, Hayat

    2014-10-01

    This article numerically examines the boundary layer flow due to an exponentially stretching surface in the presence of an applied magnetic field. Casson fluid model is used to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. The flow is subjected to suction/blowing at the surface. Analysis is carried out in presence of thermal radiation and prescribed surface heat flux. In this study, an exponential order stretching velocity and prescribed exponential order surface heat flux are accorded with each other. The governing partial differential equations are first converted into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using appropriate transformations and then solved numerically. The effect of increasing values of the Casson parameter is to suppress the velocity field. However the temperature is enhanced when Casson parameter increases. It is found that the skin-friction coefficient increases with increasing values of suction parameter. Temperature also increases for large values of power index n in both suction and blowing cases at the boundary. It is observed that the thermal radiation enhances the effective thermal diffusivity and hence the temperature rises.

  3. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  4. Numerical solution for the flow and heat transfer due to a permeable stretching surface embedded in a porous medium with a second-order slip and viscous dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khader, M. M.; Megahed, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to introduce a numerical simulation using the implicit finite difference method (FDM) with the theoretical study for the effect of viscous dissipation on the steady flow with heat transfer of Newtonian fluid towards a permeable stretching surface embedded in a porous medium with a second-order slip. The governing non-linear partial differential equations are converted into non-linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) by using similarity variables. Exact solutions corresponding to momentum and energy equations for the case of no slip conditions are obtained. The resulting ODEs are successfully solved numerically with the help of FDM. Graphically results are shown for non-dimensional velocities and temperature. The effects of the porous parameter, the suction (injection) parameter, Eckert number, first- and second-order velocity slip parameter and the Prandtl number on the flow and temperature profiles are presented. Moreover, the local skin friction and Nusselt numbers are presented. Comparison of numerical results is made with the earlier published results under limiting cases.

  5. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  6. MHD heat and mass transfer flow over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Yasin, Mohd Hafizi; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2016-06-01

    The steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effects is investigated. The similarity transformation is introduced to transform the governing partial differential equations into a system of ordinary differential equations before being solved numerically using a shooting method. The results are obtained for the skin friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number as well as the velocity, temperature and the concentration profiles for some values of the governing parameters, namely, suction/injection parameter S, stretching/shrinking parameter λ, magnetic parameter M, radiation parameter R, heat source/sink Q and chemical rate parameter K. For the shrinking case, there exist two solutions for a certain range of parameters, but the solution is unique for the stretching case. The stability analysis verified that the upper branch solution is linearly stable and physically reliable while the lower branch solution is not. For the reliable solution, the skin friction coefficient increases in the present of magnetic field. The heat transfer rate at the surface decreases in the present of radiation.

  7. Activation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Receptor 2 Mediates Endothelial Permeability Caused by Cyclic Stretch.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yufeng; Gawlak, Grzegorz; O'Donnell, James J; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2016-05-01

    High tidal volume mechanical ventilation and the resultant excessive mechanical forces experienced by lung vascular endothelium are known to lead to increased vascular endothelial leak, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. One reported mechanotransduction pathway of increased endothelial cell (EC) permeability caused by high magnitude cyclic stretch (18% CS) involves CS-induced activation of the focal adhesion associated signalosome, which triggers Rho GTPase signaling. This study identified an alternative pathway of CS-induced EC permeability. We show here that high magnitude cyclic stretch (18% CS) rapidly activates VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling by dissociating VEGFR2 from VE-cadherin at the cell junctions. This results in VEGFR2 activation, Src-dependent VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation, and internalization leading to increased endothelial permeability. This process is also accompanied by CS-induced phosphorylation and internalization of PECAM1. Importantly, CS-induced endothelial barrier disruption was attenuated by VEGFR2 inhibition. 18% CS-induced EC permeability was linked to dissociation of cell junction scaffold afadin from the adherens junctions. Forced expression of recombinant afadin in pulmonary endothelium attenuated CS-induced VEGFR2 and VE-cadherin phosphorylation, preserved adherens junction integrity and VEGFR2·VE-cadherin complex, and suppressed CS-induced EC permeability. This study shows for the first time a mechanism whereby VEGFR2 activation mediates EC permeability induced by pathologically relevant cyclic stretch. In this mechanism, CS induces dissociation of the VE-cadherin·VEGFR2 complex localized at the adherens juctions, causing activation of VEGFR2, VEGFR2-mediated Src-dependent phosphorylation of VE-cadherin, disassembly of adherens junctions, and EC barrier failure. PMID:26884340

  8. Permeability-Selectivity Analysis of Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Membranes: Effect of Pore Size and Shape Distribution and Membrane Stretching.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Usama; Arif, Abul Fazal Muhammad; Bashmal, Salem

    2016-01-01

    We present a modeling approach to determine the permeability-selectivity tradeoff for microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes with a distribution of pore sizes and pore shapes. Using the formulated permeability-selectivity model, the effect of pore aspect ratio and pore size distribution on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of the membrane is analyzed. A finite element model is developed to study the effect of membrane stretching on the distribution of pore sizes and shapes in the stretched membrane. The effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of membranes is also analyzed. The results show that increasing pore aspect ratio improves membrane performance while increasing the width of pore size distribution deteriorates the performance. It was also found that the effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff is greatly affected by the uniformity of pore distribution in the membrane. Stretching showed a positive shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve of membranes with well-dispersed pores while in the case of pore clustering, a negative shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve was observed. PMID:27509528

  9. A computational study of entropy generation in magnetohydrodynamic flow and heat transfer over an unsteady stretching permeable sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed Butt, Adnan; Ali, Asif

    2014-01-01

    The present article aims to investigate the entropy effects in magnetohydrodynamic flow and heat transfer over an unsteady permeable stretching surface. The time-dependent partial differential equations are converted into non-linear ordinary differential equations by suitable similarity transformations. The solutions of these equations are computed analytically by the Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM) then solved numerically by the MATLAB built-in routine. Comparison of the obtained results is made with the existing literature under limiting cases to validate our study. The effects of unsteadiness parameter, magnetic field parameter, suction/injection parameter, Prandtl number, group parameter and Reynolds number on flow and heat transfer characteristics are checked and analysed with the aid of graphs and tables. Moreover, the effects of these parameters on entropy generation number and Bejan number are also shown graphically. It is examined that the unsteadiness and presence of magnetic field augments the entropy production.

  10. Boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a nonlinearly permeable stretching/shrinking sheet in a nanofluid

    PubMed Central

    Zaimi, Khairy; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2014-01-01

    The steady boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a nanofluid past a nonlinearly permeable stretching/shrinking sheet is numerically studied. The governing partial differential equations are reduced into a system of ordinary differential equations using a similarity transformation, which are then solved numerically using a shooting method. The local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number and some samples of velocity, temperature and nanoparticle concentration profiles are graphically presented and discussed. Effects of the suction parameter, thermophoresis parameter, Brownian motion parameter and the stretching/shrinking parameter on the flow, concentration and heat transfer characteristics are thoroughly investigated. Dual solutions are found to exist in a certain range of the stretching/shrinking parameter for both shrinking and stretching cases. Results indicate that suction widens the range of the stretching/shrinking parameter for which the solution exists. PMID:24638147

  11. Non-alignment stagnation-point flow of a nanofluid past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet: Buongiorno's model.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Rohana Abdul; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with a stagnation-point boundary layer flow towards a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet in a nanofluid where the flow and the sheet are not aligned. We used the Buongiorno model that is based on the Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis to describe the nanofluid in this problem. The main purpose of the present paper is to examine whether the non-alignment function has the effect on the problem considered when the fluid suction and injection are imposed. It is interesting to note that the non-alignment function can ruin the symmetry of the flows and prominent in the shrinking sheet. The fluid suction will reduce the impact of the non-alignment function of the stagnation flow and the stretching/shrinking sheet but at the same time increasing the velocity profiles and the shear stress at the surface. Furthermore, the effects of the pertinent parameters such as the Brownian motion, thermophoresis, Lewis number and the suction/injection on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are also taken into consideration. The numerical results are shown in the tables and the figures. It is worth mentioning that dual solutions are found to exist for the shrinking sheet. PMID:26440761

  12. Specific surface area model for foam permeability.

    PubMed

    Pitois, O; Lorenceau, E; Louvet, N; Rouyer, F

    2009-01-01

    Liquid foams were recognized early to be porous materials, as liquid flowed between the gas bubbles. Drainage theories have been established, and foam permeability has been modeled from the microscopic description of the equivalent pores geometry, emphasizing similarities with their solid counterparts. But to what extent can the theoretical work devoted to the permeability of solid porous materials be useful to liquid foams? In this article, the applicability of the Carman-Kozeny model on foam is investigated. We performed measurements of the permeability of foams with nonmobile surfactants, and we show that, in introducing an equivalent specific surface area for the foam, the model accurately describes the experimental data over two orders of magnitude for the foam liquid fraction, without any additional parameters. Finally, it is shown that this model includes the previous permeability models derived for foams in the dry foams limit. PMID:19032030

  13. Effect of thermal radiation on MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in a permeable capillary in stretching motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, J. C.; Sinha, A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a theoretical analysis is presented for magnetohydrodynamic flow of blood in a capillary, its lumen being porous and wall permeable. The unsteadiness in the flow and temperature fields is caused by the time-dependence of the stretching velocity and the surface temperature. Thermal radiation, velocity slip and thermal slip conditions are taken into account. In order to study the flow field as well as the temperature field, the problem is formulated as a boundary value problem consisting of a system of nonlinear coupled partial differential equations. The problem is analysed by using similarity transformation and boundary layer approximation. Solution of the problem is achieved by developing a suitable numerical method and using high speed computers. Computational results for the variation in velocity, temperature, skin-friction co-efficient and Nusselt number are presented in graphical/tabular form. Effects of different parameters are adequately discussed. Since the study takes care of thermal radiation in blood flow, the results reported here are likely to have an important bearing on the therapeutic procedure of hyperthermia, particularly in understanding/regulating blood flow and heat transfer in capillaries.

  14. Direct measurement of surface stress of stretched soft solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Dufresne, Eric

    The wetting profile of liquid droplets on soft solids is determined by the competition between elasticity and solid surface stress. Near the contact point, the bulk elasticity becomes negligible such that Neumann's classic analysis nicely captures the wetting geometry and provides us an effective approach to directly measure the solid surface stress. Here, we report our experiments using confocal microscopy in studying the wetting of liquids on soft PDMS gels. While the droplets are sitting on the top, the substrates are biaxially strained. We observe that the wetting profiles and the three-phase contact angles are changing dramatically as the substrate is stretched. With Neumann's principle, we obtain the quantitative relation between surface stress of the PDMS and the applied strain. These results suggest a significant strain-dependence of surface energy and surface stress for our PDMS.

  15. Unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical stretching surface.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenli; Su, Ning; Liu, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of thermal radiation on unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical permeable stretching surface in porous medium, where the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity are also considered. By using a similarity transformation, the governing time-dependent boundary layer equations for momentum and thermal energy are first transformed into coupled, non-linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. Numerical solutions to these equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions are obtained by the numerical shooting technique with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta scheme. Numerical results show that as viscosity variation parameter increases both the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient increase whereas the temperature decreases slightly. With the increase of viscosity variation parameter, the velocity decreases near the sheet surface but increases far away from the surface of the sheet in the boundary layer. The increase in permeability parameter leads to the decrease in both the temperature and the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient, and the increase in both the velocity and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient. PMID:25264737

  16. Unsteady Convection Flow and Heat Transfer over a Vertical Stretching Surface

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenli; Su, Ning; Liu, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of thermal radiation on unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical permeable stretching surface in porous medium, where the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity are also considered. By using a similarity transformation, the governing time-dependent boundary layer equations for momentum and thermal energy are first transformed into coupled, non-linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. Numerical solutions to these equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions are obtained by the numerical shooting technique with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta scheme. Numerical results show that as viscosity variation parameter increases both the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient increase whereas the temperature decreases slightly. With the increase of viscosity variation parameter, the velocity decreases near the sheet surface but increases far away from the surface of the sheet in the boundary layer. The increase in permeability parameter leads to the decrease in both the temperature and the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient, and the increase in both the velocity and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient. PMID:25264737

  17. Boundary layer flow of nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The steady boundary layer flow of nanofluid over an exponential stretching surface is investigated analytically. The transport equations include the effects of Brownian motion parameter and thermophoresis parameter. The highly nonlinear coupled partial differential equations are simplified with the help of suitable similarity transformations. The reduced equations are then solved analytically with the help of homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence of HAM solutions are obtained by plotting h-curve. The expressions for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction are computed for some values of the parameters namely, suction injection parameter α, Lewis number Le, the Brownian motion parameter Nb and thermophoresis parameter Nt. PMID:22289390

  18. Flow Past a Permeable Stretching/Shrinking Sheet in a Nanofluid Using Two-Phase Model

    PubMed Central

    Zaimi, Khairy; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2014-01-01

    The steady two-dimensional flow and heat transfer over a stretching/shrinking sheet in a nanofluid is investigated using Buongiorno’s nanofluid model. Different from the previously published papers, in the present study we consider the case when the nanofluid particle fraction on the boundary is passively rather than actively controlled, which make the model more physically realistic. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by a shooting method. The effects of some governing parameters on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are graphically presented and discussed. Dual solutions are found to exist in a certain range of the suction and stretching/shrinking parameters. Results also indicate that both the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase with increasing values of the suction parameter. PMID:25365118

  19. Flow past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet in a nanofluid using two-phase model.

    PubMed

    Zaimi, Khairy; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2014-01-01

    The steady two-dimensional flow and heat transfer over a stretching/shrinking sheet in a nanofluid is investigated using Buongiorno's nanofluid model. Different from the previously published papers, in the present study we consider the case when the nanofluid particle fraction on the boundary is passively rather than actively controlled, which make the model more physically realistic. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by a shooting method. The effects of some governing parameters on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are graphically presented and discussed. Dual solutions are found to exist in a certain range of the suction and stretching/shrinking parameters. Results also indicate that both the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase with increasing values of the suction parameter. PMID:25365118

  20. Non-alignment stagnation-point flow of a nanofluid past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet: Buongiorno’s model

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Rohana Abdul; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with a stagnation-point boundary layer flow towards a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet in a nanofluid where the flow and the sheet are not aligned. We used the Buongiorno model that is based on the Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis to describe the nanofluid in this problem. The main purpose of the present paper is to examine whether the non-alignment function has the effect on the problem considered when the fluid suction and injection are imposed. It is interesting to note that the non-alignment function can ruin the symmetry of the flows and prominent in the shrinking sheet. The fluid suction will reduce the impact of the non-alignment function of the stagnation flow and the stretching/shrinking sheet but at the same time increasing the velocity profiles and the shear stress at the surface. Furthermore, the effects of the pertinent parameters such as the Brownian motion, thermophoresis, Lewis number and the suction/injection on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are also taken into consideration. The numerical results are shown in the tables and the figures. It is worth mentioning that dual solutions are found to exist for the shrinking sheet. PMID:26440761

  1. Non-alignment stagnation-point flow of a nanofluid past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet: Buongiorno’s model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Rohana Abdul; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2015-10-01

    The paper deals with a stagnation-point boundary layer flow towards a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet in a nanofluid where the flow and the sheet are not aligned. We used the Buongiorno model that is based on the Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis to describe the nanofluid in this problem. The main purpose of the present paper is to examine whether the non-alignment function has the effect on the problem considered when the fluid suction and injection are imposed. It is interesting to note that the non-alignment function can ruin the symmetry of the flows and prominent in the shrinking sheet. The fluid suction will reduce the impact of the non-alignment function of the stagnation flow and the stretching/shrinking sheet but at the same time increasing the velocity profiles and the shear stress at the surface. Furthermore, the effects of the pertinent parameters such as the Brownian motion, thermophoresis, Lewis number and the suction/injection on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are also taken into consideration. The numerical results are shown in the tables and the figures. It is worth mentioning that dual solutions are found to exist for the shrinking sheet.

  2. Image stretching on a curved surface to improve satellite gridding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    A method for substantially reducing gridding errors due to satellite roll, pitch and yaw is given. A gimbal-mounted curved screen, scaled to 1:7,500,000, is used to stretch the satellite image whereby visible landmarks coincide with a projected map outline. The resulting rms position errors averaged 10.7 km as compared with 25.6 and 34.9 km for two samples of satellite imagery upon which image stretching was not performed.

  3. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, Tom; Smith, Leslie; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Durr, Hans H.; Manning, Andrew H.; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of -5 x 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change.

  4. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, T.; Smith, L.; Moosdorf, N.; Hartmann, J.; Durr, H.H.; Manning, A.H.; Van Beek, L. P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of ???5 ?? 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Convective Flow of Sisko Fluid over a Bidirectional Stretching Surface.

    PubMed

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation focuses the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the steady three-dimensional Sisko fluid driven by a bidirectional stretching sheet. The modeled partial differential equations are reduced to coupled ordinary differential equations by a suitable transformation. The resulting equations are solved numerically by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta algorithm in combination with Newton's method in the domain [0,∞). The numerical results for the velocity and temperature fields are graphically presented and effects of the relevant parameters are discussed in detail. Moreover, the skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number for different values of the power-law index and stretching ratio parameter are presented through tabulated data. The numerical results are also verified with the results obtained analytically by the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Additionally, the results are validated with previously published pertinent literature as a limiting case of the problem. PMID:26110873

  6. Convective Flow of Sisko Fluid over a Bidirectional Stretching Surface

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation focuses the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the steady three-dimensional Sisko fluid driven by a bidirectional stretching sheet. The modeled partial differential equations are reduced to coupled ordinary differential equations by a suitable transformation. The resulting equations are solved numerically by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta algorithm in combination with Newton's method in the domain [0,∞). The numerical results for the velocity and temperature fields are graphically presented and effects of the relevant parameters are discussed in detail. Moreover, the skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number for different values of the power-law index and stretching ratio parameter are presented through tabulated data. The numerical results are also verified with the results obtained analytically by the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Additionally, the results are validated with previously published pertinent literature as a limiting case of the problem. PMID:26110873

  7. MEASUREMENT OF THE SURFACE PERMEABILITY OF BASEMENT CONCRETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development, testing, and use of a portable surface permeameter suitable for field use in measuring the surface permeability of concrete in new houses. he permeameter measures the airflow induced by a pressure difference across a temporary test seal appli...

  8. MEAUSREMENT OF THE SURFACE PERMEABILITY OF BASEMENT CONCRETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development, testing, and use of a portable surface permeameter suitable for field use in measuring the surface permeability of concrete in new houses. he permeameter measures the airflow induced by a pressure difference across a temporary test seal appli...

  9. g-Jitter Mixed Convective Slip Flow of Nanofluid past a Permeable Stretching Sheet Embedded in a Darcian Porous Media with Variable Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed J.; Khan, Waqar A.; Amin, Norsarahaida S.

    2014-01-01

    The unsteady two-dimensional laminar g-Jitter mixed convective boundary layer flow of Cu-water and Al2O3-water nanofluids past a permeable stretching sheet in a Darcian porous is studied by using an implicit finite difference numerical method with quasi-linearization technique. It is assumed that the plate is subjected to velocity and thermal slip boundary conditions. We have considered temperature dependent viscosity. The governing boundary layer equations are converted into non-similar equations using suitable transformations, before being solved numerically. The transport equations have been shown to be controlled by a number of parameters including viscosity parameter, Darcy number, nanoparticle volume fraction, Prandtl number, velocity slip, thermal slip, suction/injection and mixed convection parameters. The dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles as well as friction factor and heat transfer rates are presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the velocity reduces with velocity slip parameter for both nanofluids for fluid with both constant and variable properties. It is further found that the skin friction decreases with both Darcy number and momentum slip parameter while it increases with viscosity variation parameter. The surface temperature increases as the dimensionless time increases for both nanofluids. Nusselt numbers increase with mixed convection parameter and Darcy numbers and decreases with the momentum slip. Excellent agreement is found between the numerical results of the present paper with published results. PMID:24927277

  10. Near Surface Vapor Bubble Layers in Buoyant Low Stretch Burning of Polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Large-scale buoyant low stretch stagnation point diffusion flames over solid fuel (polymethylmethacrylate) were studied for a range of aerodynamic stretch rates of 2-12/ sec which are of the same order as spacecraft ventilation-induced stretch in a microgravity environment. An extensive layer of polymer material above the glass transition temperature is observed. Unique phenomena associated with this extensive glass layer included substantial swelling of the burning surface, in-depth bubble formation, and migration and/or elongation of the bubbles normal to the hot surface. The bubble layer acted to insulate the polymer surface by reducing the effective conductivity of the solid. The reduced in-depth conduction stabilized the flame for longer than expected from theory neglecting the bubble layer. While buoyancy acts to move the bubbles deeper into the molten polymer, thermocapillary forces and surface regression both act to bring the bubbles to the burning surface. Bubble layers may thus be very important in low gravity (low stretch) burning of materials. As bubbles reached the burning surface, monomer fuel vapors jetted from the surface, enhancing burning by entraining ambient air flow. Popping of these bubbles at the surface can expel burning droplets of the molten material, which may increase the fire propagation hazards at low stretch rates.

  11. Hydromagnetic Steady Flow of Maxwell Fluid over a Bidirectional Stretching Surface with Prescribed Surface Temperature and Prescribed Surface Heat Flux

    PubMed Central

    Shehzad, Sabir Ali; Alsaedi, Ahmad; Hayat, Tasawar

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady hydromagnetic three-dimensional boundary layer flow of Maxwell fluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. Both cases of prescribed surface temperature (PST) and prescribed surface heat flux (PHF) are considered. Computations are made for the velocities and temperatures. Results are plotted and analyzed for PST and PHF cases. Convergence analysis is presented for the velocities and temperatures. Comparison of PST and PHF cases is given and examined. PMID:23874523

  12. Unidirectional Fast Growth and Forced Jumping of Stretched Droplets on Nanostructured Microporous Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aili, Abulimiti; Li, Hongxia; Alhosani, Mohamed H; Zhang, TieJun

    2016-08-24

    Superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces have demonstrated outstanding capability in energy and water applications by promoting dropwise condensation, where fast droplet growth and efficient condensate removal are two key parameters. However, these parameters remain contradictory. Although efficient droplet removal is easily obtained through coalescence jumping on uniform superhydrophobic surfaces, simultaneously achieving fast droplet growth is still challenging. Also, on such surfaces droplets can grow to larger sizes without restriction if there is no coalescence. In this work, we show that superhydrophobic nanostructured microporous surfaces can manipulate the droplet growth and jumping. Microporous surface morphology effectively enhances the growth of droplets in pores owing to large solid-liquid contact area. At low supersaturations, the upward growth rate (1-1.5 μm/s) of these droplets in pores is observed to be around 15-25 times that of the droplets outside the pores. Meanwhile, their top curvature radius increases relatively slowly (∼0.25 μm/s) due to pore confinement, which results in a highly stretched droplet surface. We also observed forced jumping of stretched droplets in pores either through coalescence with spherical droplets outside pores or through self-pulling without coalescence. Both experimental observation and theoretical modeling reveal that excess surface free energy stored in the stretched droplet surface and micropore confinement are responsible for this pore-scale-forced jumping. These findings reveal the insightful physics of stretched droplet dynamics and offer guidelines for the design and fabrication of novel super-repellent surfaces with microporous morphology. PMID:27486890

  13. Paxillin mediates stretch-induced Rho signaling and endothelial permeability via assembly of paxillin-p42/44MAPK-GEF-H1 complex.

    PubMed

    Gawlak, Grzegorz; Tian, Yufeng; O'Donnell, James J; Tian, Xinyong; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2014-07-01

    Suboptimal ventilator support or regional ventilation heterogeneity in inflamed lungs causes excessive tissue distension, which triggers stretch-induced pathological signaling and may lead to vascular leak and lung dysfunction. Focal adhesions (FAs) are cell-substrate adhesive complexes participating in cellular mechanotransduction and regulation of the Rho GTPase pathway. Stretch-induced Rho regulation remains poorly understood. We used human lung endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to pathological cyclic stretch (CS) at 18% distension to test the hypothesis that FA protein paxillin participates in CS-induced Rho activation by recruiting the Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor GEF-H1. CS induced phosphorylation of paxillin and activated p42/44-MAP kinase, Rho GTPase, and paxillin/GEF-H1/p42/44-MAPK association. CS caused nearly 2-fold increase in EC permeability, which was attenuated by paxillin knockdown. Expression of the paxillin-Y31/118F phosphorylation mutant decreased the CS-induced paxillin/GEF-H1 association (16.3 ± 4.1%), GEF-H1 activation (28.9 ± 9.2%), and EC permeability (28.7 ± 8.1%) but not CS-induced p42/44-MAPK activation. Inhibition of p42/44-MAPK suppressed CS-induced paxillin/GEF-H1 interactions (15.9 ± 7.9%), GEF-H1 activation (11.7 ± 4.3%), and disruption of EC monolayer. Expression of GEF-H1T678A lacking p42/44-MAPK phosphorylation site attenuated Rho activation (31.2±11.6%). We conclude that MAPK-dependent targeting of GEF-H1 to paxillin is involved in the regulation of CS-induced Rho signaling and EC permeability. This study proposes a novel concept of paxillin-GEF-H1-p42/44-MAPK module as a regulator of pathological mechanotransduction.-Gawlak, G., Tian, Y., O'Donnell, J. J., III, Tian, X., Birukova, A. A., Birukov, K. G. Paxillin mediates stretch-induced Rho signaling and endothelial permeability via assembly of paxillin-p42/44MAPK-GEF-H1 complex. PMID:24706358

  14. Liquid Spills on Permeable Soil Surfaces: Experimental Confirmations

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Carver S.; Keller, Jason M.

    2005-09-29

    Predictive tools for assessing the quantity of a spill on a soil from the observed spreading area could contribute to improving remediation when it is necessary. On a permeable soil, the visible spill area only hints about the amount of liquid that might reside below the surface. An understanding of the physical phenomena involved with spill propagation on a soil surface is key to assessing the liquid amount possibly present beneath the surface. The objective of this study is an improved prediction capability for spill behavior.

  15. On curve and surface stretching in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etemadi, Nassrollah

    1989-01-01

    Cocke (1969) proved that in incompressible, isotropic turbulence the average material line (material surface) elements increase in comparison with their initial values. Good estimates of how much they increase in terms of the eigenvalues of the Green deformation tensor were rigorously obtained.

  16. Hydromagnetic Flow and Heat Transfer over a Porous Oscillating Stretching Surface in a Viscoelastic Fluid with Porous Medium.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sami Ullah; Ali, Nasir; Abbas, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    An analysis is carried out to study the heat transfer in unsteady two-dimensional boundary layer flow of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) second grade fluid over a porous oscillating stretching surface embedded in porous medium. The flow is induced due to infinite elastic sheet which is stretched periodically. With the help of dimensionless variables, the governing flow equations are reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations. This system has been solved numerically using the finite difference scheme, in which a coordinate transformation is used to transform the semi-infinite physical space to a bounded computational domain. The influence of the involved parameters on the flow, the temperature distribution, the skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number is shown and discussed in detail. The study reveals that an oscillatory sheet embedded in a fluid-saturated porous medium generates oscillatory motion in the fluid. The amplitude and phase of oscillations depends on the rheology of the fluid as well as on the other parameters coming through imposed boundary conditions, inclusion of body force term and permeability of the porous medium. It is found that amplitude of flow velocity increases with increasing viscoelastic and mass suction/injection parameters. However, it decreases with increasing the strength of the applied magnetic field. Moreover, the temperature of fluid is a decreasing function of viscoelastic parameter, mass suction/injection parameter and Prandtl number. PMID:26657931

  17. Hydromagnetic Flow and Heat Transfer over a Porous Oscillating Stretching Surface in a Viscoelastic Fluid with Porous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sami Ullah; Ali, Nasir; Abbas, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    An analysis is carried out to study the heat transfer in unsteady two-dimensional boundary layer flow of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) second grade fluid over a porous oscillating stretching surface embedded in porous medium. The flow is induced due to infinite elastic sheet which is stretched periodically. With the help of dimensionless variables, the governing flow equations are reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations. This system has been solved numerically using the finite difference scheme, in which a coordinate transformation is used to transform the semi-infinite physical space to a bounded computational domain. The influence of the involved parameters on the flow, the temperature distribution, the skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number is shown and discussed in detail. The study reveals that an oscillatory sheet embedded in a fluid-saturated porous medium generates oscillatory motion in the fluid. The amplitude and phase of oscillations depends on the rheology of the fluid as well as on the other parameters coming through imposed boundary conditions, inclusion of body force term and permeability of the porous medium. It is found that amplitude of flow velocity increases with increasing viscoelastic and mass suction/injection parameters. However, it decreases with increasing the strength of the applied magnetic field. Moreover, the temperature of fluid is a decreasing function of viscoelastic parameter, mass suction/injection parameter and Prandtl number. PMID:26657931

  18. Analytical solutions for a mass moving along a finite stretched string with random surface irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Q.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper derives the analytical solution for the stochastic analysis of a concentrated mass moving at a constant velocity along a finite stretched string with random surface irregularities. Firstly, the problem of computing the spectral power density (PSD) of the random response is transformed into the problem of computing the transient response of a concentrated mass moving at a constant velocity along a stretched string with harmonic random surface irregularities. Next, the analytical solutions of the contact force between the string and the mass are derived for harmonically varying surface irregularities. Finally, the PSDs of contact force and the displacement of the string are determined in terms of the PSD of the random surface irregularities. The analytical solutions cover all three cases of subsonic, sonic or supersonic velocities. The proposed method was verified based on a comparison with the semi-analytical method.

  19. DNA stretching on the wall surfaces in curved microchannels with different radii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    DNA molecule conformation dynamics and stretching were made on semi-circular surfaces with different radii (500 to 5,000 μm) in microchannels measuring 200 μm × 200 μm in cross section. Five different buffer solutions - 1× Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE), 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE), 1× Tris-EDTA (TE), 1× Tris-phosphate-EDTA (TPE), and 1× Tris-buffered saline (TBS) solutions - were used with a variety of viscosity such as 40, 60, and 80 cP, with resultant 10−4 ≤ Re ≤ 10−3 and the corresponding 5 ≤ Wi ≤ 12. The test fluids were seeded with JOJO-1 tracer particles for flow visualization and driven through the test channels via a piezoelectric (PZT) micropump. Micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measuring technique was applied for the centered-plane velocity distribution measurements. It is found that the radius effect on the stretch ratio of DNA dependence is significant. The stretch ratio becomes larger as the radius becomes small due to the larger centrifugal force. Consequently, the maximum stretch was found at the center of the channel with a radius of 500 μm. PMID:25147488

  20. DNA stretching on the wall surfaces in curved microchannels with different radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Wu, Fong-He; Tsai, Ming-Ju

    2014-08-01

    DNA molecule conformation dynamics and stretching were made on semi-circular surfaces with different radii (500 to 5,000 μm) in microchannels measuring 200 μm × 200 μm in cross section. Five different buffer solutions - 1× Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE), 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE), 1× Tris-EDTA (TE), 1× Tris-phosphate-EDTA (TPE), and 1× Tris-buffered saline (TBS) solutions - were used with a variety of viscosity such as 40, 60, and 80 cP, with resultant 10-4 ≤ Re ≤ 10-3 and the corresponding 5 ≤ Wi ≤ 12. The test fluids were seeded with JOJO-1 tracer particles for flow visualization and driven through the test channels via a piezoelectric (PZT) micropump. Micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measuring technique was applied for the centered-plane velocity distribution measurements. It is found that the radius effect on the stretch ratio of DNA dependence is significant. The stretch ratio becomes larger as the radius becomes small due to the larger centrifugal force. Consequently, the maximum stretch was found at the center of the channel with a radius of 500 μm.

  1. Two-dimensional oblique stagnation-point flow towards a stretching surface in a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Iqbal; Labropulu, Fotini; Pop, Ioan

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the steady two-dimensional stagnation-point flow of a viscoelastic Walters' B' fluid over a stretching surface is examined. It is assumed that the fluid impinges on the wall obliquely. Using similarity variables, the governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of two non-dimensional ordinary differential equations. These equations are then solved numerically using the shooting method with a finite-difference technique.

  2. Stretching of a polymer chain anchored to a surface: the massive field theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usatenko, Zoryana

    2014-09-01

    Taking into account the well-known correspondence between the field theoretical φ4 O(n)-vector model in the limit n → 0 and the behaviour of long-flexible polymer chains, the investigation of stretching of an ideal and a real polymer chain with excluded volume interactions in a good solvent anchored to repulsive and inert surfaces is performed. The calculations of the average stretching force which arises when the free end of a polymer chain moves away from a repulsive or inert surface are performed up to one-loop order of the massive field theory approach in fixed space dimensions d = 3. The analysis of the obtained results indicates that the average stretching force for a real polymer chain anchored to a repulsive surface demonstrates different behaviour for the cases \\tilde{z}\\ll1 and \\tilde{z}\\gg1 , where \\tilde{z}=z^\\prime/Rz . Besides, the results obtained in the framework of the massive field theory approach are in good agreement with previous theoretical results for an ideal polymer chain and results of a density functional theory approach for the region of small applied forces when deformation of a polymer chain in the direction of the applied force is not bigger than the linear extension of a polymer chain in this direction. The better agreement between these two methods is observed in the case where the number of monomers increases and the polymer chain becomes longer.

  3. Unsteady stagnation-point flow and heat transfer of a special third grade fluid past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet.

    PubMed

    Naganthran, Kohilavani; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the unsteady stagnation-point boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a special third grade fluid past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet has been studied. Similarity transformation is used to transform the system of boundary layer equations which is in the form of partial differential equations into a system of ordinary differential equations. The system of similarity equations is then reduced to a system of first order differential equations and has been solved numerically by using the bvp4c function in Matlab. The numerical solutions for the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer coefficient as well as the velocity and temperature profiles are presented in the forms of tables and graphs. Dual solutions exist for both cases of stretching and shrinking sheet. Stability analysis is performed to determine which solution is stable and valid physically. Results from the stability analysis depict that the first solution (upper branch) is stable and physically realizable, while the second solution (lower branch) is unstable. PMID:27091085

  4. Unsteady stagnation-point flow and heat transfer of a special third grade fluid past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naganthran, Kohilavani; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the unsteady stagnation-point boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a special third grade fluid past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet has been studied. Similarity transformation is used to transform the system of boundary layer equations which is in the form of partial differential equations into a system of ordinary differential equations. The system of similarity equations is then reduced to a system of first order differential equations and has been solved numerically by using the bvp4c function in Matlab. The numerical solutions for the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer coefficient as well as the velocity and temperature profiles are presented in the forms of tables and graphs. Dual solutions exist for both cases of stretching and shrinking sheet. Stability analysis is performed to determine which solution is stable and valid physically. Results from the stability analysis depict that the first solution (upper branch) is stable and physically realizable, while the second solution (lower branch) is unstable.

  5. Unsteady stagnation-point flow and heat transfer of a special third grade fluid past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet

    PubMed Central

    Naganthran, Kohilavani; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the unsteady stagnation-point boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a special third grade fluid past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet has been studied. Similarity transformation is used to transform the system of boundary layer equations which is in the form of partial differential equations into a system of ordinary differential equations. The system of similarity equations is then reduced to a system of first order differential equations and has been solved numerically by using the bvp4c function in Matlab. The numerical solutions for the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer coefficient as well as the velocity and temperature profiles are presented in the forms of tables and graphs. Dual solutions exist for both cases of stretching and shrinking sheet. Stability analysis is performed to determine which solution is stable and valid physically. Results from the stability analysis depict that the first solution (upper branch) is stable and physically realizable, while the second solution (lower branch) is unstable. PMID:27091085

  6. Permeable Surface Corrections for Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Casper, Jay H.

    2005-01-01

    The acoustic prediction methodology discussed herein applies an acoustic analogy to calculate the sound generated by sources in an aerodynamic simulation. Sound is propagated from the computed flow field by integrating the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation on a suitable control surface. Previous research suggests that, for some applications, the integration surface must be placed away from the solid surface to incorporate source contributions from within the flow volume. As such, the fluid mechanisms in the input flow field that contribute to the far-field noise are accounted for by their mathematical projection as a distribution of source terms on a permeable surface. The passage of nonacoustic disturbances through such an integration surface can result in significant error in an acoustic calculation. A correction for the error is derived in the frequency domain using a frozen gust assumption. The correction is found to work reasonably well in several test cases where the error is a small fraction of the actual radiated noise. However, satisfactory agreement has not been obtained between noise predictions using the solution from a three-dimensional, detached-eddy simulation of flow over a cylinder.

  7. Group analysis and numerical computation of magneto-convective non-Newtonian nanofluid slip flow from a permeable stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. J.; Ferdows, M.; Bég, O. Anwar

    2014-10-01

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer flow of non-Newtonian power-law nanofluids past a linearly stretching sheet with a linear hydrodynamic slip boundary condition is investigated numerically. The non-Newtonian nanofluid model incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Similarity transformations and corresponding similarity equations of the transport equations are derived via a linear group of transformations. The transformed equations are solved numerically using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order numerical method available in the Maple 14 software for the influence of power-law (rheological) index, Lewis number, Prandtl number, thermophoresis parameter, Brownian motion parameter, magnetic field parameter and linear momentum slip parameter. Validation is achieved with an optimized Nakamura implicit finite difference algorithm (NANONAK). Representative results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and concentration profiles have been presented graphically. The present results of skin friction factor and reduced heat transfer rate are also compared with the published results for several special cases of the model and found to be in close agreement. The study has applications in electromagnetic nano-materials processing.

  8. Convective heat transfer in a micropolar fluid over an unsteady stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K. V.; Vaidya, H.; Vajravelu, K.

    2016-05-01

    An unsteady boundary layer free convective flow and heat transfer of a viscous incompressible, microploar fluid over a vertical stretching sheet is investigated. The stretching velocity is assumed to vary linearly with the distance along the sheet. Two equal and opposite forces are impulsively applied along the x-axis so that the sheet is stretched, keeping the origin fixed in the micropolar fluid. The transformed highly non-linear boundary layer equations are solved numerically by an implicit finite difference scheme for the transient, state from the initial to the final steady-state. To validate the numerical method, comparisons are made with the available results in the literature for some special cases and the results are found to be in good agreement. The obtained numerical results are analyzed graphically for the velocity, the microrotation, and the temperature distribution; whereas the skin friction, the couple stress coefficient and the Nusselt number are tabulated for different values of the pertinent parameters. Results exhibit a drag reduction and an increase in the surface heat transfer rate in the micropolar fluid flow compared to the Newtonian fluid flow.

  9. In vivo measurement of skin surface strain and sub-surface layer deformation induced by natural tissue stretching.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Raman; Gerhardt, Lutz-Christian; Lee, Zing S; Byers, Robert A; Woods, Daniel; Sanz-Herrera, José A; Franklin, Steve E; Lewis, Roger; Matcher, Stephen J; Carré, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Stratum corneum and epidermal layers change in terms of thickness and roughness with gender, age and anatomical site. Knowledge of the mechanical and tribological properties of skin associated with these structural changes are needed to aid in the design of exoskeletons, prostheses, orthotics, body mounted sensors used for kinematics measurements and in optimum use of wearable on-body devices. In this case study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation (DIC) were combined to determine skin surface strain and sub-surface deformation behaviour of the volar forearm due to natural tissue stretching. The thickness of the epidermis together with geometry changes of the dermal-epidermal junction boundary were calculated during change in the arm angle, from flexion (90°) to full extension (180°). This posture change caused an increase in skin surface Lagrange strain, typically by 25% which induced considerable morphological changes in the upper skin layers evidenced by reduction of epidermal layer thickness (20%), flattening of the dermal-epidermal junction undulation (45-50% reduction of flatness being expressed as Ra and Rz roughness profile height change) and reduction of skin surface roughness Ra and Rz (40-50%). The newly developed method, DIC combined with OCT imaging, is a powerful, fast and non-invasive methodology to study structural skin changes in real time and the tissue response provoked by mechanical loading or stretching. PMID:27310571

  10. Three-dimensional flow with heat transfer of a viscoelastic fluid over a stretching surface with a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Rajeswari; Sabaskar, J.

    2016-03-01

    The present research study deals with the steady flow and heat transfer of a viscoelastic fluid over a stretching surface in two lateral directions with a magnetic field applied normal to the surface. The fluid far away from the surface is ambient and the motion in the flow field is caused by stretching surface in two directions. This result is a three-dimensional flow instead of two-dimensional as considered by many authors. Self-similar solutions are obtained numerically. For some particular cases, closed form analytical solutions are also obtained. The numerical calculations show that the skin friction coefficients in x- and y-directions and the heat transfer coefficient decrease with the increasing elastic parameter, but they increase with the stretching parameter. The heat transfer coefficient for the constant heat flux case is higher than that of the constant wall temperature case.

  11. Stretch-dependent changes in surface profiles of the human crystalline lens during accommodation: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Hooman Mohammad; Kanapathipillai, Sangarapillai; Zarrabi, Khosrow; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Background A nonlinear isotropic finite element (FE) model of a 29 year old human crystalline lens was constructed to study the effects of various geometrical parameters on lens accommodation. Methods The model simulates dis-accommodation by stretching of the lens and predicts the change in the lens capsule, cortex and nucleus surface profiles at select states of stretching/accommodation. Multiple regression analysis (MRA) is used to develop a stretch-dependent mathematical model relating the lens sagittal height to the radial position of the lens surface as a function of dis-accommodative stretch. A load analysis is performed to compare the FE results to empirical results from lens stretcher studies. Using the predicted geometrical changes, the optical response of the whole eye during accommodation was analysed by ray-tracing. Results Aspects of lens shape change relative to stretch were evaluated including change in diameter (d), central thickness (T) and accommodation (A). Maximum accommodation achieved was 10.29 D. From the MRA, the stretch-dependent mathematical model of the lens shape related lens curvatures as a function of lens ciliary stretch well (maximum mean-square residual error 2.5×10−3 µm, p<0.001). The results are compared with those from in vitro studies. Conclusions The FE and ray-tracing predictions are consistent with EVAS studies in terms of load and power change versus change in thickness. The mathematical stretch-dependent model of accommodation presented may have utility in investigating lens behaviour at states other than the relaxed or fully-accommodated states. PMID:25727940

  12. The Effect of Thermophoresis on Unsteady Oldroyd-B Nanofluid Flow over Stretching Surface

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Faiz G.; Ahamed, Sami M. S.; Sibanda, Precious; Khumalo, Melusi

    2015-01-01

    There are currently only a few theoretical studies on convective heat transfer in polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, the unsteady incompressible flow of a polymer nanocomposite represented by an Oldroyd-B nanofluid along a stretching sheet is investigated. Recent studies have assumed that the nanoparticle fraction can be actively controlled on the boundary, similar to the temperature. However, in practice, such control presents significant challenges and in this study the nanoparticle flux at the boundary surface is assumed to be zero. We have used a relatively novel numerical scheme; the spectral relaxation method to solve the momentum, heat and mass transport equations. The accuracy of the solutions has been determined by benchmarking the results against the quasilinearisation method. We have conducted a parametric study to determine the influence of the fluid parameters on the heat and mass transfer coefficients. PMID:26312754

  13. The Effect of Thermophoresis on Unsteady Oldroyd-B Nanofluid Flow over Stretching Surface.

    PubMed

    Awad, Faiz G; Ahamed, Sami M S; Sibanda, Precious; Khumalo, Melusi

    2015-01-01

    There are currently only a few theoretical studies on convective heat transfer in polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, the unsteady incompressible flow of a polymer nanocomposite represented by an Oldroyd-B nanofluid along a stretching sheet is investigated. Recent studies have assumed that the nanoparticle fraction can be actively controlled on the boundary, similar to the temperature. However, in practice, such control presents significant challenges and in this study the nanoparticle flux at the boundary surface is assumed to be zero. We have used a relatively novel numerical scheme; the spectral relaxation method to solve the momentum, heat and mass transport equations. The accuracy of the solutions has been determined by benchmarking the results against the quasilinearisation method. We have conducted a parametric study to determine the influence of the fluid parameters on the heat and mass transfer coefficients. PMID:26312754

  14. MHD viscous Casson fluid flow and heat transfer with second-order slip velocity and thermal slip over a permeable stretching sheet in the presence of internal heat generation/absorption and thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megahed, Ahmed M.

    2015-04-01

    This article is devoted to describing the boundary layer flow and heat transfer for an electrically conducting Casson fluid over a permeable stretching surface with second-order slip velocity model and thermal slip conditions in the presence of internal heat generation/absorption and thermal radiation. The basic equations governing the flow and heat transfer are in the form of partial differential equations; the same have been reduced to a set of highly non-linear ordinary differential equations by applying suitable similarity transformations. Exact solution corresponding to momentum equation is obtained, and, in the case of no slip conditions, we get the exact solutions for both momentum and energy equation. The resulting similarity equations are solved numerically by shooting method. Comparisons with previously published work are performed and the results are found to be in excellent agreement. In the present work the effect of magnetic parameter, suction/injection parameter, Casson parameter, slip parameters, radiation parameter, internal heat generation/absorption parameter and the Prandtl number on flow and heat transfer characteristics have been discussed. Also, the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number at the sheet are computed and discussed. It is found that the temperature rises to a higher value when the Casson parameter increases but the reverse is true for the velocity distribution. Finally, increasing the velocity and thermal slip parameters makes the rate of heat transfer decrease.

  15. The Non-Alignment Stagnation-Point Flow Towards a Permeable Stretching/Shrinking Sheet in a Nanofluid Using Buongiorno's Model: A Revised Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Rohana Abdul; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    A numerical study on the stagnation-point boundary layer flow of a viscous and incompressible (Newtonian) fluid past a stretching/shrinking sheet with the fluid suction using Buongiorno's model is considered. The main focus of this article is the effects of the non-alignment of the flow and the surface of the sheet. We have also studied the problem using a new boundary condition that is more physically realistic which assumes that the nanoparticle fraction at the surface is passively controlled. The governing equations of this problem are reduced to the ordinary differential equations using some similarity transformations which are then solved using the bvp4c function in Matlab. From the results obtained, we concluded that the effect of the non-alignment function is the same as in the regular fluid or nanofluid. However, it is found that the fluid suction can reduce the effect of the non-alignment at the surface. Dual solutions have also been discovered in this problem and from the stability analysis it is found that the first solution is stable while the second solution is not stable.

  16. Multiple solutions of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows induced by a stretching flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Ishak, Anuar

    2015-08-01

    New solutions of flow induced by a biorthogonally stretching surface are reported. The flexible membrane has linear stretching rate a along the x-axis and b along the y-axis. A similarity reduction of the Navier-Stokes equations yields a coupled pair of ordinary differential equations governed the single parameter α = b / a . Dual solutions are found in the region αt < α ⩽ 1 , where αt = - 0.2514 . One of the two components of the dual solutions exhibits algebraic decay in the far field. It appears that no self-similar solutions exist for α <αt . It is also shown that the exact solution for flow induced by a unilaterally stretching sheet due to Crane has dual solutions with algebraic decay in the far field.

  17. Thermophysical effects of carbon nanotubes on MHD flow over a stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul Haq, Rizwan; Khan, Zafar Hayat; Khan, Waqar Ahmed

    2014-09-01

    This article is intended for investigating the effects of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and volume fraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the flow and heat transfer in two lateral directions over a stretching sheet. For this purpose, three types of base fluids specifically water, ethylene glycol and engine oil with single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes are used in the analysis. The convective boundary condition in the presence of CNTs is presented first time and not been explored so far. The transformed nonlinear differential equations are solved by the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method with a shooting technique. The dimensionless velocity and shear stress are obtained in both directions. The dimensionless heat transfer is determined on the surface. Three different models of thermal conductivity are comparable for both CNTs and it is found that the Xue [1] model gives the best approach to guess the superb thermal conductivity in comparison with the Maxwell [2] and Hamilton and Crosser [3] models. And finally, another finding suggests the engine oil provides the highest skin friction and heat transfer rates.

  18. Nanofluid flow and forced convection heat transfer over a stretching surface considering heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, M.; Valipour, P.; Shambooli, M.; Ayani, M.; Mirparizi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, magnetic field effects on the forced convection flow of a nanofluid over a stretching surface in the presence of heat generation/absorption are studied. The equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme featuring the shooting technique. Different types of nanoparticles as copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) with water as their base fluid has been considered. The influence of significant parameters, such as magnetic parameter, volume fraction of the nanoparticles, heat generation/absorption parameter, velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The results show that the values of temperature profiles increase with increasing heat generation/absorption and volume fraction of the nanoparticles but they decrease with increasing velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter. Also, it can be found that selecting silver as nanoparticle leads to the highest heat transfer enhancement.

  19. Surface potential and permeability of rock cores under asphaltenic oil flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkafeef, S.F.; Gochin, R.J.; Smith, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    The surface properties, wetting behaviour and permeability of rock samples are central to understanding recovery behaviour in oil reservoirs. This paper will present a method new to petroleum engineering to show how area/length ratios for porous systems can be obtained by combining streaming potential and streaming current measurements on rock cores. This has allows streaming current measurements (independent of surface conductivity errors) to be made on rock samples using hydrocarbon solvents with increasing concentrations of asphaltene. Negative surface potentials for the rock became steadily more positive as asphaltene coated the pore surfaces, with permeability reduction agreeing well with petrographic analysis.

  20. Magnetic field analysis in a suspension of gyrotactic microorganisms and nanoparticles over a stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Khan, Zafar Hayat

    2016-07-01

    The combine effects of magnetic field bioconvection, Brownian motion and thermophoresis on a free convection nanofluid flow over a stretching sheet containing gyrotactic microorganisms are investigated. The self-similar Buongiorno model is analyzed first time for stretching sheet numerically. The present results are compared with available data and are found in an excellent agreement. Pertinent results are presented graphically and discussed quantitatively with respect to variation in bioconvection parameters.

  1. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Maintains Normal Vascular Permeability by Preserving Endothelial Surface Glycocalyx in Intact Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min; Fan, Jie; Tarbell, John, M.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was found to protect the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity-dependent shedding of ESG in cultured endothelial cell studies. We aimed to further test that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels. Methods We quantified the ESG in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery and measured the vascular permeability to albumin in the presence and absence of 1 μM S1P. We also measured permeability to albumin in the presence of MMP inhibitors and compared the measured permeability with those predicted by a transport model for the inter-endothelial cleft. Results We found that in the absence of S1P, the fluorescence intensity of the FITC-anti-heparan sulfate labeled ESG was ~10% of that in the presence of S1P, while the measured permeability to albumin was ~6.5 fold that in the presence of S1P. Similar results were observed with MMP inhibition. The predictions by the mathematical model further confirmed that S1P maintains microvascular permeability by preserving ESG. Conclusions Our results show that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels, consistent with parallel observation in cultured endothelial monolayers. PMID:27015105

  2. Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase Transformation and Surface Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Chih-Ying Chen

    2005-06-30

    Two-phase flow through fractured media is important in petroleum, geothermal, and environmental applications. However, the actual physics and phenomena that occur inside fractures are poorly understood, and oversimplified relative permeability curves are commonly used in fractured reservoir simulations. In this work, an experimental apparatus equipped with a high-speed data acquisition system, real-time visualization, and automated image processing technology was constructed to study three transparent analog fractures with distinct surface roughnesses: smooth, homogeneously rough, and randomly rough. Air-water relative permeability measurements obtained in this study were compared with models suggested by earlier studies and analyzed by examining the flow structures. A method to evaluate the tortuosities induced by the blocking phase, namely the channel tortuosity, was proposed from observations of the flow structure images. The relationship between the coefficients of channel tortuosity and the relative permeabilities was studied with the aid of laboratory experiments and visualizations. Experimental data from these fractures were used to develop a broad approach for modeling two-phase flow behavior based on the flow structures. Finally, a general model deduced from these data was proposed to describe two-phase relative permeabilities in both smooth and rough fractures. For the theoretical analysis of liquid-vapor relative permeabilities, accounting for phase transformations, the inviscid bubble train models coupled with relative permeability concepts were developed. The phase transformation effects were evaluated by accounting for the molecular transport through liquid-vapor interfaces. For the steam water relative permeabilities, we conducted steam-water flow experiments in the same fractures as used for air-water experiments. We compared the flow behavior and relative permeability differences between two-phase flow with and without phase transformation effects

  3. Numerical Simulation of MHD Hiemenz Flow of a Micropolar Fluid towards a Nonlinear Stretching Surface through a Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajesh; Bhargava, Rama

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the two-dimensional boundary layer problem of Hiemenz flow (two-dimensional flow of a fluid near a stagnation point) of an incompressible micropolar fluid towards a nonlinear stretching surface placed in a porous medium in the presence of transverse magnetic field is examined. The resulting nonlinear differential equations governing the problem have been transformed by a similarity transformation into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are solved numerically by the Element Free Galerkin method. The influence of various parameters on the velocity, microrotation, temperature, and concentration is shown. Some of the results are compared with the Finite Element Method. Finally, validation of the numerical results is demonstrated for local skin friction ? for hydrodynamic micropolar fluid flow on a linearly stretching surface.

  4. a Study on Improvement and its Evaluation for the Surface Layer of Concrete Placed with Permeable Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryoichi; Habuchi, Takashi; Amino, Takahiko; Fukute, Tsutomu

    Permeable form can improve the quality of the surface layer of concrete and can enhance the durability of concrete structures. In this study, the improvement and its evaluation for the surface layer of concrete placed with permeable form were investigated. For these purposes, accelerated carbonation test, chloride ion penetration test, air permeability test, rebound hummer test and water permeability test were conducted using the concrete specimen. As a result, it was found that the air permeability correlates the carbonation depth, chloride ion penetration depth, rebound number and water permeable volume of concrete. Moreover, the possibility that the improvement for the surface layer of concrete can be quantitatively evaluated by air permeability test was shown.

  5. Surface tension driven processes densify and retain permeability in magma and lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ben M.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jérémie; Ian Schipper, C.; Mark Jellinek, A.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kelly Russell, J.; Lavallée, Yan; Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    We offer new insights into how an explosive eruption can transition into an effusive eruption. Magma containing >0.2 wt% dissolved water has the potential to vesiculate to a porosity in excess of 80 vol.% at atmospheric pressure. Thus all magmas contain volatiles at depth sufficient to form foams and explosively fragment. Yet gas is often lost passively and effusive eruptions ensue. Magmatic foams are permeable and understanding permeability in magma is crucial for models that predict eruptive style. Permeability also governs magma compaction models. Those models generally imply that a reduction in magma porosity and permeability generates an increased propensity for explosivity. Here, our experimental results show that surface tension stresses drive densification without creating an impermeable 'plug', offering an additional explanation of why dense magmas can avoid explosive eruption. In both an open furnace and a closed autoclave, we subject pumice samples with initial porosity of ∼70 vol.% to a range of isostatic pressures (0.1-11 MPa) and temperatures (350-950 °C) relevant to shallow volcanic environments. Our experimental data and models constrain the viscosity, permeability, timescales, and length scales over which densification by pore-scale surface tension stresses competes with density-driven compaction. Where surface tension dominates the dynamics, densification halts at a plateau connected porosity of ∼25 vol.% for our samples. SEM, pycnometry and micro-tomography show that in this process (1) microporous networks are destroyed, (2) the relative pore network surface area decreases, and (3) a remaining crystal framework enhances the longevity of macro-pore connectivity and permeability critical for sustained outgassing. We propose that these observations are a consequence of a surface tension-driven retraction of viscous pore walls at areas of high bubble curvature (micro-vesicular network terminations), and that this process drives bulk

  6. Evaluation of Surface Infiltration Testing Procedures in Permeable Pavement Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete provides limited guidance on how to select testing locations, so research is needed to evaluate how testing sites should be selected and how results should be interpreted to assess surface ...

  7. The efficacy of surface electromyographic biofeedback assisted stretching for the treatment of chronic low back pain: a case-series.

    PubMed

    Moore, Aimee; Mannion, Jamie; Moran, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with low back pain (LBP) commonly present with an impaired flexion-relaxation (FR) response, characterised as continued lumbar muscle activation at maximal voluntary flexion. The aim of the present investigation was to explore the effectiveness of a surface electromyographic assisted stretching (SEMGAS) programme in improving FR. Nine volunteers with chronic LBP and an impaired FR took part in weekly biofeedback SEMGAS sessions and performed a home-based stretching programme, for 5 weeks. FR, Oswestry Disability Index, Numeric Pain Rating Scale and Sit and Reach were recorded pre and post-intervention as well as at a 4-6-week follow-up. Of the nine participants included, three improved FR to statistically significant levels. These three participants also achieved a clinically important change in pain intensity scores. The results suggest that SEMGAS may provide benefits to some individuals with chronic LBP and impaired FR, although larger scale investigation of SEMGAS alone is indicated. PMID:25603739

  8. On the protonation of oxo- and hydroxo- groups of the goethite (α-FeOOH) surface: A FTIR spectroscopic investigation of surface O-H stretching vibrations.

    SciTech Connect

    Boily, Jean F; Felmy, Andrew R

    2008-06-01

    The O–H stretching region of goethite particles evaporated at different levels of acidity was investigated by Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR)-Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two-dimensional IR Correlation Spectroscopy was used to identify correlations between different sets of discrete surface OH stretches and a Multivariate Curve Resolution analysis was used to resolve the predominant spectral components. Two dominant groups of hydroxyls were identified on the basis of their differences in proton affinity. Group I hydroxyls appear as two 3698/3541 and 3660/3490 cm-1 band pairs. Group II hydroxyls are manifested through the 3648 and 3578 cm-1 bands at greater levels of surface proton loading. There is consequently no correlation between O–H stretching frequencies and proton affinity. Groups I and II were assigned to mostly singly- (–OH) and doubly- (μ-OH) coordinated hydroxyls, respectively. Stretches arising from triply-coordinated (μ3-OH) are proposed to be embedded within the dominant O–H band of bulk goethite. The possibility that these sites contribute to Group I and II hydroxyls should, however, not be entirely dismissed without further investigations. A reexamination of Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD)-FTIR data of one goethite sample evaporated from alkaline conditions [Boily J.-F., Szanyi J., Felmy A. R. (2006) A combined FTIR and TPD study on the bulk and surface dehydroxylation and decarbonation of synthetic goethite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta70, 3613–3624] provided further constraints to this band assignment by providing clues to the network of surface hydrogen bonds. Important cooperative effects between hydrogen-bonded surface hydroxyls are suggested to play a crucial role on the variations of the position and intensity of discrete O–H stretching bands as a function of protonation level and temperature.

  9. On the protonation of oxo- and hydroxo-groups of the goethite (α-FeOOH) surface: A FTIR spectroscopic investigation of surface O H stretching vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boily, Jean-François; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2008-07-01

    The O-H stretching region of goethite particles evaporated at different levels of acidity was investigated by Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR)-Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two-dimensional IR Correlation Spectroscopy was used to identify correlations between different sets of discrete surface OH stretches and a Multivariate Curve Resolution analysis was used to resolve the predominant spectral components. Two dominant groups of hydroxyls were identified on the basis of their differences in proton affinity. Group I hydroxyls appear as two 3698/3541 and 3660/3490 cm -1 band pairs. Group II hydroxyls are manifested through the 3648 and 3578 cm -1 bands at greater levels of surface proton loading. There is consequently no correlation between O-H stretching frequencies and proton affinity. Groups I and II were assigned to mostly singly- (-OH) and doubly- (μ-OH) coordinated hydroxyls, respectively. Stretches arising from triply-coordinated (μ 3-OH) are proposed to be embedded within the dominant O-H band of bulk goethite. The possibility that these sites contribute to Group I and II hydroxyls should, however, not be entirely dismissed without further investigations. A reexamination of Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD)-FTIR data of one goethite sample evaporated from alkaline conditions [Boily J.-F., Szanyi J., Felmy A. R. (2006) A combined FTIR and TPD study on the bulk and surface dehydroxylation and decarbonation of synthetic goethite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta70, 3613-3624] provided further constraints to this band assignment by providing clues to the network of surface hydrogen bonds. Important cooperative effects between hydrogen-bonded surface hydroxyls are suggested to play a crucial role on the variations of the position and intensity of discrete O-H stretching bands as a function of protonation level and temperature.

  10. Methods to Use Surface Infiltration Tests in Permeable Pavement Systems to Determine Maintenance Frequency

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, there is limited guidance on selecting test sites to measure surface infiltration rates in permeable pavement systems to determine maintenance frequency. The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete suggest to either (1) p...

  11. Evaluation of Surface and Subsurface Processes in Permeable Pavement Infiltration Trenches

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems can be affected by clogging of the pavement surface and/or clogging at the interface where the subsurface storage layer meets the underlying soil. As infiltration and exfiltration are the primary functional mechanisms for ...

  12. X-ray microtomography characterization of porosity, permeability and reactive surface changes during dissolution.

    PubMed

    Gouze, Philippe; Luquot, Linda

    2011-03-01

    Numerical programs for simulating flow and reactive transport in porous media are essential tools for predicting reservoir properties changes triggered by CO(2) underground injection. At reservoir scale, meshed models in which equations are solved assuming that constant macroscopic properties can be defined in each cells, are widely used. However, the parameterization of the dissolution-precipitation problem and of the feedback effects of these processes on the flow field is still challenging. The problem arises from the mismatch between the scales at which averaged parameters are defined in the meshed model and the scale at which chemical reactions occur and modify the pore network geometry. In this paper we investigate the links between the dissolution mechanisms that control the porosity changes and the related changes of the reactive surface area and of the permeability. First, the reactive surface area is computed from X-ray microtomography data obtained before and after a set of dissolution experiments of pure calcite rock samples using distinctly different brine-CO(2) mixtures characterizing homogeneous to heterogeneous dissolution regimes. The results are used to validate the power law empirical model relating the reactive surface area to porosity proposed by Luquot and Gouze (2009). Second, we investigate the spatial distribution of the effective hydraulic radius and of the tortuosity, two structural parameters that control permeability, in order to explain the different porosity-permeability relationships observed for heterogeneous and homogeneous dissolution regimes. It is shown that the increase of permeability is due to the decrease of the tortuosity for homogeneous dissolution, whereas it is due to the combination of tortuosity decrease and hydraulic radius increase for heterogeneous dissolution. For the intermediate dissolution regime, identified to be the optimal regime for increasing permeability with small changes in porosity, the increase of

  13. Surface porosity and permeability of porous media with a periodic microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, N.M.

    1995-07-01

    Various ways of determining the surface porosity, the relation between the porosity and the surface porosity and the presentation of the permeability in terms of the characteristics of the microstructure of the porous medium are analyzed with reference to model porous media with a periodic microstructure. It is shown that it is necessary to distinguish between the geometric (scalar) and physical (tensor) surface porosities and that the geometric surface porosity, the physical surface porosity and the porosity are different characteristics of the porous medium.

  14. A Surface-Modified Hydrogen-Permeable Palladium-Silver Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petriev, I. S.; Frolov, V. Yu.; Bolotin, S. N.; Baryshev, M. G.; Kopytov, G. F.

    2015-12-01

    A composite target is developed for magnetron sputtering of alloys using silver and palladium with different area ratios. A process is proposed for modification of both surfaces of palladium-silver films formed by PVD and electroplating to improve hydrogen permeability of the amorphous palladium layer electrodeposited from a water solution of its salt at the current density exceeding the diffusion current density for these conditions. The modified palladium-silver membrane becomes hydrogen-permeable at room temperature at the overpressure values up to 0.3 MPa.

  15. Model-based analysis of micropolar nanofluid flow over a stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S. T.; Nadeem, Sohail; Ul Haq, Rizwan

    2014-08-01

    This article deals with the study of micropolar nanofluids flow over a stretching sheet. This study uses the compatible models to deal with the effects of two different kinds of nanoparticles (copper (Cu) and silver (Ag)) within the base fluids (water and Kerosene oil). Developed governing boundary layer equations and the boundary conditions are transformed into the system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Numerical results are constructed for velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number by considering the thermo-physical properties of both base fluids and particles. Fluid flow behavior is analyzed through stream lines and a conclusion has been developed under the observation of fluid flow behavior.

  16. Thermal radiation and Hall effects on boundary layer flow past a non-isothermal stretching surface embedded in porous medium with non-uniform heat source/sink and fluid-particle suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gireesha, B. J.; Mahanthesh, B.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy; Manjunatha, P. T.

    2016-04-01

    Theoretical study on hydromagnetic heat transfer in dusty viscous fluid on continuously stretching non-isothermal surface, with linear variation of surface temperature or heat flux has been carried out. Effects of Hall current, Darcy porous medium, thermal radiation and non-uniform heat source/sink are taken into the account. The sheet is considered to be permeable to allow fluid suction or blowing, and stretching with a surface velocity varied according to a linear. Two cases of the temperature boundary conditions were considered at the surface namely, PST and PHF cases. The governing partial differential equations are transferred to a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations by employing suitable similarity transformations and then they are solved numerically. Effects of various pertinent parameters on flow and heat transfer for both phases is analyzed and discussed through graphs in detail. The values of skin friction and Nusselt number for different governing parameters are also tabulated. Comparison of the present results with known numerical results is presented and an excellent agreement is found.

  17. Influence of thickness and permeability of endothelial surface layer on transmission of shear stress in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, SongPeng; Zhang, XiangJun; Tian, Yu; Meng, YongGang; Lipowsky, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    The molecular coating on the surface of microvascular endothelium has been identified as a barrier to transvascular exchange of solutes. With a thickness of hundreds of nanometers, this endothelial surface layer (ESL) has been treated as a porous domain within which fluid shear stresses are dissipated and transmitted to the solid matrix to initiate mechanotransduction events. The present study aims to examine the effects of the ESL thickness and permeability on the transmission of shear stress throughout the ESL. Our results indicate that fluid shear stresses rapidly decrease to insignificant levels within a thin transition layer near the outer boundary of the ESL with a thickness on the order of ten nanometers. The thickness of the transition zone between free fluid and the porous layer was found to be proportional to the square root of the Darcy permeability. As the permeability is reduced ten-fold, the interfacial fluid and solid matrix shear stress gradients increase exponentially two-fold. While the interfacial fluid shear stress is positively related to the ESL thickness, the transmitted matrix stress is reduced by about 50% as the ESL thickness is decreased from 500 to 100 nm, which may occur under pathological conditions. Thus, thickness and permeability of the ESL are two main factors that determine flow features and the apportionment of shear stresses between the fluid and solid phases of the ESL. These results may shed light on the mechanisms of force transmission through the ESL and the pathological events caused by alterations in thickness and permeability of the ESL.

  18. Effect of perfusate hematocrit on urea permeability-surface area in isolated dog lung

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.E.; Roselli, R.J.; Haselton, F.R.; Harris, T.R.

    1986-10-01

    Seven dog lower left lung lobes were statically inflated and perfused at a constant rate for each lobe with a perfusate in which the hematocrit was altered over a wide range. The permeability-surface area of urea was calculated from multiple indicator dilution curves using two separate injectates for each hematocrit level. One injectate contained only /sup 125/I-albumin as the vascular reference tracer and the other contained both /sup 51/Cr-erythrocytes and /sup 125/I-albumin as the vascular reference tracers; both contained (/sup 14/C)urea as the permeating tracer. The results strongly indicate that the phenomenon of erythrocyte trapping of urea does not affect the calculation of urea permeability-surface area product provided the appropriate albumin-erythrocyte composite reference tracer is utilized in its calculation.

  19. Muscle afferent potential (`A-wave') in the surface electromyogram of a phasic stretch reflex in normal humans

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Alex. M.; Michie, Patricia T.; Glue, Leonard C. T.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper tested the hypothesis that the afferent potential elicited by a tendon tap in an isometrically recorded phasic stretch reflex can be detected in the surface EMG of normal humans when appropriate techniques are used. These techniques involved (1) training the subjects to relax mentally and physically so that the EMG was silent before and immediately after the diphasic MAP which reflects a highly synchronous discharge of afferent impulses from low threshold muscle stretch receptors after a tendon tap, and (2) using a data retrieval computer to summate stimulus-locked potentials in the EMG over a series of 16 samples using taps of uniform peak force and duration on the Achilles tendon to elicit the tendon jerk in the calf muscles. A discrete, diphasic potential (`A-wave') was recorded from EMG electrodes placed on the surface of the skin over the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The `A-wave' afferent potential had the opposite polarity to the corresponding efferent MAP. Under control conditions of relaxation the `A-wave' had a latency after the onset of the tap of 2 msec, the peak to peak amplitude was of the order of 5 μV and the duration was in the range of 6 to 10 msec. Further experiments were conducted to show that the `A-wave' (1) was not an artefact of the instrumentation used, (2) had a threshold at low intensities of stimulation, and (3) could be reliably augmented by using a Jendrassik manoeuvre compared with the potential observed during control (relaxation) conditions. The results support the conclusion that the `A-wave' emanates from the pool of muscle spindles which discharges impulses along group Ia nerve fibres in response to the phasic stretch stimulus because the primary ending of the spindles is known to initiate the stretch reflex and the spindles can be sensitized by fusimotor impulses so that their threshold is lowered as a result of a Jendrassik manoeuvre. The finding has important implications for the

  20. High Guanidinium Permeability Reveals Dehydration-Dependent Ion Selectivity in the Plasmodial Surface Anion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Bokhari, Abdullah A. B.; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K.; Fuller, Alexandra; Pillai, Ajay D.; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria parasites grow within vertebrate erythrocytes and increase host cell permeability to access nutrients from plasma. This increase is mediated by the plasmodial surface anion channel (PSAC), an unusual ion channel linked to the conserved clag gene family. Although PSAC recognizes and transports a broad range of uncharged and charged solutes, it must efficiently exclude the small Na+ ion to maintain infected cell osmotic stability. Here, we examine possible mechanisms for this remarkable solute selectivity. We identify guanidinium as an organic cation with high permeability into human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum, but negligible uptake by uninfected cells. Transport characteristics and pharmacology indicate that this uptake is specifically mediated by PSAC. The rank order of organic and inorganic cation permeabilities suggests cation dehydration as the rate-limiting step in transport through the channel. The high guanidinium permeability of infected cells also allows rapid and stringent synchronization of parasite cultures, as required for molecular and cellular studies of this pathogen. These studies provide important insights into how nutrients and ions are transported via PSAC, an established target for antimalarial drug development. PMID:25243175

  1. Thermal radiation effects on MHD flow of a micropolar fluid over a stretching surface with variable thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Mostafa A. A.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of variable thermal conductivity and radiation on the flow and heat transfer of an electrically conducting micropolar fluid over a continuously stretching surface with varying temperature in the presence of a magnetic field are considered. The surface temperature is assumed to vary as a power-law temperature. The governing conservation equations of mass, momentum, angular momentum and energy are converted into a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations by means of similarity transformation. The resulting system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations is solved numerically. The numerical results show that the thermal boundary thickness increases as the thermal conductivity parameter S increases, while it decreases as the radiation parameter F increases. Also, it was found that the Nusselt number increases as F increases and decreases as S increases.

  2. Rho kinase signaling pathways during stretch in primary alveolar epithelia.

    PubMed

    DiPaolo, Brian C; Margulies, Susan S

    2012-05-15

    Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) maintain integrity of the blood-gas barrier with actin-anchored intercellular tight junctions. Stretched type I-like AECs undergo magnitude- and frequency-dependent actin cytoskeletal remodeling into perijunctional actin rings. On the basis of published studies in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), we hypothesize that RhoA activity, Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, and phosphorylation of myosin light chain II (MLC2) increase in stretched type I-like AECs in a manner that is dependent on stretch magnitude, and that RhoA, ROCK, or MLC2 activity inhibition will attenuate stretch-induced actin remodeling and preserve barrier properties. Primary type I-like AEC monolayers were stretched biaxially to create a change in surface area (ΔSA) of 12%, 25%, or 37% in a cyclic manner at 0.25 Hz for up to 60 min or left unstretched. Type I-like AECs were also treated with Rho pathway inhibitors (ML-7, Y-27632, or blebbistatin) and stained for F-actin or treated with the myosin phosphatase inhibitor calyculin-A and quantified for monolayer permeability. Counter to our hypothesis, ROCK activity and MLC2 phosphorylation decreased in type I-like AECs stretched to 25% and 37% ΔSA and did not change in monolayers stretched to 12% ΔSA. Furthermore, RhoA activity decreased in type I-like AECs stretched to 37% ΔSA. In contrast, MLC2 phosphorylation in HPAECs increased when HPAECs were stretched to 12% ΔSA but then decreased when they were stretched to 37% ΔSA, similar to type I-like AECs. Perijunctional actin rings were observed in unstretched type I-like AECs treated with the Rho pathway inhibitor blebbistatin. Myosin phosphatase inhibition increased MLC2 phosphorylation in stretched type I-like AECs but had no effect on monolayer permeability. In summary, stretch alters RhoA activity, ROCK activity, and MLC2 phosphorylation in a manner dependent on stretch magnitude and cell type. PMID:22287611

  3. Rho kinase signaling pathways during stretch in primary alveolar epithelia

    PubMed Central

    DiPaolo, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) maintain integrity of the blood-gas barrier with actin-anchored intercellular tight junctions. Stretched type I-like AECs undergo magnitude- and frequency-dependent actin cytoskeletal remodeling into perijunctional actin rings. On the basis of published studies in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), we hypothesize that RhoA activity, Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, and phosphorylation of myosin light chain II (MLC2) increase in stretched type I-like AECs in a manner that is dependent on stretch magnitude, and that RhoA, ROCK, or MLC2 activity inhibition will attenuate stretch-induced actin remodeling and preserve barrier properties. Primary type I-like AEC monolayers were stretched biaxially to create a change in surface area (ΔSA) of 12%, 25%, or 37% in a cyclic manner at 0.25 Hz for up to 60 min or left unstretched. Type I-like AECs were also treated with Rho pathway inhibitors (ML-7, Y-27632, or blebbistatin) and stained for F-actin or treated with the myosin phosphatase inhibitor calyculin-A and quantified for monolayer permeability. Counter to our hypothesis, ROCK activity and MLC2 phosphorylation decreased in type I-like AECs stretched to 25% and 37% ΔSA and did not change in monolayers stretched to 12% ΔSA. Furthermore, RhoA activity decreased in type I-like AECs stretched to 37% ΔSA. In contrast, MLC2 phosphorylation in HPAECs increased when HPAECs were stretched to 12% ΔSA but then decreased when they were stretched to 37% ΔSA, similar to type I-like AECs. Perijunctional actin rings were observed in unstretched type I-like AECs treated with the Rho pathway inhibitor blebbistatin. Myosin phosphatase inhibition increased MLC2 phosphorylation in stretched type I-like AECs but had no effect on monolayer permeability. In summary, stretch alters RhoA activity, ROCK activity, and MLC2 phosphorylation in a manner dependent on stretch magnitude and cell type. PMID:22287611

  4. Surface Infiltration Rates of Permeable Surfaces: Six Month Update (November 2009 through April 2010)

    EPA Science Inventory

    At the end of October 2009, EPA opened a parking lot on the Edison Environmental Center that included three parking rows of permeable pavement. The construction was a cooperative effort among EPA’s Office of Administration and Resources Management, National Risk Management Resea...

  5. Three-Dimensional Flow of an Oldroyd-B Nanofluid towards Stretching Surface with Heat Generation/Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Azeem Khan, Waqar; Khan, Masood; Malik, Rabia

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the steady three-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface with heat generation/absorption effects. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These nonlinear ordinary differential equations are then solved analytically by using the homotpy analysis method (HAM). Graphically results are presented and discussed for various parameters, namely, Deborah numbers and , heat generation/absorption parameter Prandtl parameter , Brownian motion parameters, thermophoresis parameter and Lewis number . We have seen that the increasing values of the Brownian motion parameter and thermophoresis parameter leads to an increase in the temperature field and thermal boundary layer thickness while the opposite behavior is observed for concentration field and concentration boundary layer thickness. To see the validity of the present work, the numerical results are compared with the analytical solutions obtained by Homotopy analysis method and noted an excellent agreement for the limiting cases. PMID:25170945

  6. MHD Convective Flow of Jeffrey Fluid Due to a Curved Stretching Surface with Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Maria; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks at the flow of Jeffrey fluid due to a curved stretching sheet. Effect of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions is considered. An electrically conducting fluid in the presence of applied magnetic field is considered. Convective boundary conditions model the heat transfer analysis. Transformation method reduces the governing nonlinear partial differential equations into the ordinary differential equations. Convergence of the obtained series solutions is explicitly discussed. Characteristics of sundry parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are analyzed by plotting graphs. Computations for pressure, skin friction coefficient and surface heat transfer rate are presented and examined. It is noted that fluid velocity and temperature through curvature parameter are enhanced. Increasing values of Biot number correspond to the enhancement in temperature and Nusselt number. PMID:27583457

  7. Soret and Dufour Effects in the Flow of Williamson Fluid over an Unsteady Stretching Surface with Thermal Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Saeed, Yusra; Asad, Sadia; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    This paper looks at the simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer in the flow of Williamson fluid over an unsteady stretching surface. The effects of thermal radiation and viscous dissipation are considered in an energy equation. Besides, the energy and concentration equations are coupled with the combined effects of Soret and Dufour. The convective conditions for both temperature and mass concentration are employed. The transformation procedure reduces the time-dependent boundary layer equations of momentum, energy, and concentration to the non-linear ordinary differential equations. Through graphs and numerical values, the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields are discussed for different physical parameters. It is found that the thermal and concentration Biot numbers have an increasing impact on both temperature and concentration fields, respectively.

  8. Numerical Study of Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for Viscoelastic Flow Due to an Exponentially Stretching Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Khan, Junaid; Mustafa, M.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the flow and heat transfer in upper-convected Maxwell fluid above an exponentially stretching surface. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model is employed for the formulation of the energy equation. This model can predict the effects of thermal relaxation time on the boundary layer. Similarity approach is utilized to normalize the governing boundary layer equations. Local similarity solutions are achieved by shooting approach together with fourth-fifth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique and Newton’s method. Our computations reveal that fluid temperature has inverse relationship with the thermal relaxation time. Further the fluid velocity is a decreasing function of the fluid relaxation time. A comparison of Fourier’s law and the Cattaneo-Christov’s law is also presented. Present attempt even in the case of Newtonian fluid is not yet available in the literature. PMID:26325426

  9. Rotating Flow of Magnetite-Water Nanofluid over a Stretching Surface Inspired by Non-Linear Thermal Radiation.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, M; Mushtaq, A; Hayat, T; Alsaedi, A

    2016-01-01

    Present study explores the MHD three-dimensional rotating flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid induced by a radiative surface. The base fluid is considered as water with magnetite-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Novel concept of non-linear radiative heat flux is considered which produces a non-linear energy equation in temperature field. Conventional transformations are employed to obtain the self-similar form of the governing differential system. The arising system involves an interesting temperature ratio parameter which is an indicator of small/large temperature differences in the flow. Numerical simulations with high precision are determined by well-known shooting approach. Both uniform stretching and rotation have significant impact on the solutions. The variation in velocity components with the nanoparticle volume fraction is non-monotonic. Local Nusselt number in Fe3O4-water ferrofluid is larger in comparison to the pure fluid even at low particle concentration. PMID:26894690

  10. Rotating Flow of Magnetite-Water Nanofluid over a Stretching Surface Inspired by Non-Linear Thermal Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Present study explores the MHD three-dimensional rotating flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid induced by a radiative surface. The base fluid is considered as water with magnetite-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Novel concept of non-linear radiative heat flux is considered which produces a non-linear energy equation in temperature field. Conventional transformations are employed to obtain the self-similar form of the governing differential system. The arising system involves an interesting temperature ratio parameter which is an indicator of small/large temperature differences in the flow. Numerical simulations with high precision are determined by well-known shooting approach. Both uniform stretching and rotation have significant impact on the solutions. The variation in velocity components with the nanoparticle volume fraction is non-monotonic. Local Nusselt number in Fe3O4–water ferrofluid is larger in comparison to the pure fluid even at low particle concentration. PMID:26894690

  11. Numerical Study of Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for Viscoelastic Flow Due to an Exponentially Stretching Surface.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Khan, Junaid; Mustafa, M; Hayat, T; Alsaedi, A

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the flow and heat transfer in upper-convected Maxwell fluid above an exponentially stretching surface. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model is employed for the formulation of the energy equation. This model can predict the effects of thermal relaxation time on the boundary layer. Similarity approach is utilized to normalize the governing boundary layer equations. Local similarity solutions are achieved by shooting approach together with fourth-fifth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique and Newton's method. Our computations reveal that fluid temperature has inverse relationship with the thermal relaxation time. Further the fluid velocity is a decreasing function of the fluid relaxation time. A comparison of Fourier's law and the Cattaneo-Christov's law is also presented. Present attempt even in the case of Newtonian fluid is not yet available in the literature. PMID:26325426

  12. Correlations between effective permeability and marrow contact channels surface of vertebral endplates.

    PubMed

    Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Accadbled, Franck; Molinier, François; Bonnevialle, Nicolas; de Gauzy, Jérôme Sales; Swider, Pascal

    2010-09-01

    Homeostasis of the intervertebral disc relies on nutrient supply and waste clearance through the dense capillary network that is in contact with the cartilage endplate (CEP). We developed a micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT) method to quantify the marrow contact channel surface (MCCS) with the CEP and to validate the hypothesis according to which MCCS was correlated to the effective permeability of the vertebral endplate (VEP) and influenced by the mechanical stimuli. The influence of compression loading on local vascularization was investigated. Six 4-week-old skeletally immature pigs were instrumented with left pedicle screws and rod at both T5-T6 and L1-L2 levels to create asymmetrical spine tethers. After 3 months of growth, three cylindrical specimens of the VEP (one central and two lateral right and left) were obtained from both the instrumented and the control levels. We used a previously validated method for measuring permeability. Micro-CT analysis (resolution 12 microm) yielded a gray-scale 2D-image of the discal end of each specimen converted into a binary 2D-image to derive the MCCS. Correlations between MCCS and effective permeability were assessed. Effective permeability and MCCS were significantly decreased compared to the control group especially on the tethered side (-41.5%, p = 0.004 and -52.5%, p = 0.0009, respectively). Correlations were significant and showed maximal value (r(2) = 0.430, p < 0.0001) on the tethered side involving maximal compressive loadings. Mechanical stimuli, due to unbalanced growth, altered the vascularization and the convective properties of the CEP. The cascade of mechanobiological events should offer perspectives for research on disc degeneration and attempted treatment. PMID:20225324

  13. Unveiling the Surface Structure of Amorphous Solid Water via Selective Infrared Irradiation of OH Stretching Modes.

    PubMed

    Noble, J A; Martin, C; Fraser, H J; Roubin, P; Coussan, S

    2014-03-01

    In the quest to understand the formation of the building blocks of life, amorphous solid water (ASW) is one of the most widely studied molecular systems. Indeed, ASW is ubiquitous in the cold interstellar medium (ISM), where ASW-coated dust grains provide a catalytic surface for solid phase chemistry, and is believed to be present in the Earth's atmosphere at high altitudes. It has been shown that the ice surface adsorbs small molecules such as CO, N2, or CH4, most likely at OH groups dangling from the surface. Our study presents completely new insights concerning the behavior of ASW upon selective infrared (IR) irradiation of its dangling modes. When irradiated, these surface H2O molecules reorganize, predominantly forming a stabilized monomer-like water mode on the ice surface. We show that we systematically provoke "hole-burning" effects (or net loss of oscillators) at the wavelength of irradiation and reproduce the same absorbed water monomer on the ASW surface. Our study suggests that all dangling modes share one common channel of vibrational relaxation; the ice remains amorphous but with a reduced range of binding sites, and thus an altered catalytic capacity. PMID:26274073

  14. Coupled-surface investigation of the photodissociation of NH{sub 3}(A-tilde): Effect of exciting the symmetric and antisymmetric stretching modes

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhommeau, David; Valero, Rosendo; Truhlar, Donald G.; Jasper, Ahren W.

    2009-06-21

    Using previously developed potential energy surfaces and their couplings, non-Born-Oppenheimer trajectory methods are used to study the state-selected photodissociation of ammonia, prepared with up to six quanta of vibrational excitation in the symmetric ({nu}{sub 1}) or antisymmetric ({nu}{sub 3}) stretching modes of NH{sub 3}(A-tilde). The predicted dynamics is mainly electronically nonadiabatic (that is, it produces ground electronic state amino radicals). The small probability of forming the excited-state amino radical is found, for low excitations, to increase with total energy and to be independent of whether the symmetric or antisymmetric stretch is excited; however some selectivity with respect to exciting the antisymmetric stretch is found when more than one quantum of excitation is added to the stretches, and more than 50% of the amino radical are found to be electronically excited when six quanta are placed in the antisymmetric stretch. These results are in contrast to the mechanism inferred in recent experimental work, where excitation of the antisymmetric stretch by a single quantum was found to produce significant amounts of excited-state products via adiabatic dissociation at total energies of about 7.0 eV. Both theory and experiment predict a broad range of translational energies for the departing H atoms when the symmetric stretch is excited, but the present simulations do not reproduce the experimental translational energy profiles when the antisymmetric stretch is excited. The sensitivity of the predicted results to several aspects of the calculation is considered in detail, and the analysis leads to insight into the nature of the dynamics that is responsible for mode selectivity.

  15. Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 cell surface structures and supernatant increase paracellular permeability through different pathways.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ranjita; Anderson, Rachel C; Altermann, Eric; McNabb, Warren C; Ganesh, Siva; Armstrong, Kelly M; Moughan, Paul J; Roy, Nicole C

    2015-08-01

    Lactobacillus fermentum is commonly found in food products, and some strains are known to have beneficial effects on human health. However, our previous research indicated that L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases in vitro intestinal barrier integrity. The hypothesis was that cell surface structures of AGR1487 are responsible for the observed in vitro effect. AGR1487 was compared to another human oral L. fermentum strain, AGR1485, which does not cause the same effect. The examination of phenotypic traits associated with the composition of cell surface structures showed that compared to AGR1485, AGR1487 had a smaller genome, utilized different sugars, and had greater tolerance to acid and bile. The effect of the two strains on intestinal barrier integrity was determined using two independent measures of paracellular permeability of the intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) assay specifically measures ion permeability, whereas the mannitol flux assay measures the passage of uncharged molecules. Both live and UV-inactivated AGR1487 decreased TEER across Caco-2 cells implicating the cell surfaces structures in the effect. However, only live AGR1487, and not UV-inactivated AGR1487, increased the rate of passage of mannitol, implying that a secreted component(s) is responsible for this effect. These differences in barrier integrity results are likely due to the TEER and mannitol flux assays measuring different characteristics of the epithelial barrier, and therefore imply that there are multiple mechanisms involved in the effect of AGR1487 on barrier integrity. PMID:25943073

  16. Impact of caprock permeability on vertical ground surface displacements in geological underground utilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Tillner, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Geological underground utilisation inducing pore pressure changes in underground reservoirs is generally accompanied by hydro-mechanical processes. Thereby, pore pressure increase due to fluid injection may trigger ground surface uplift, while a decrease in pore pressure due to reservoir fluid production is known to induce ground subsidence. Different coupled hydro-mechanical simulation studies (e.g. Klimkowski et al., 2015, Kempka et al., 2014, Tillner et al., 2014) indicate that ground surface displacements can achieve a magnitude of several decimetres, if storage or production operations are being carried out at an industrial scale. Consequently, detailed knowledge on the parameters impacting ground surface uplift or subsidence is of major interest for the success of any geological underground utilisation in order to avoid surface infrastructure damage by spatially varying deformations. Furthermore, ground subsidence may result increased groundwater levels as experienced in different underground coal mining districts. In the present study, we carried out coupled hydro-mechanical simulations to account for the impact of caprock permeability on ground surface displacements resulting from geological underground utilisation. Thereto, different simulation scenarios were investigated using a synthetic 3D coupled numerical simulation model with varying caprock permeability and vertical location of the open well section in the target reservoir. Material property ranges were derived from available literature, while a normal faulting stress state was applied in all simulation scenarios. Our simulation results demonstrate that caprock permeability has a significant impact on the pressure development, and thus on vertical displacements at the ground surface as well as at the reservoir top. An increase in caprock permeability from 1 x 10-20 m2 by two orders of magnitude doubles vertical displacements at the ground surface, whereas vertical displacements at the reservoir top

  17. Continuum percolation on nonorientable surfaces: the problem of permeable disks on a Klein bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, V. D.; Grekhov, A. M.; Tronin, V. N.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-11-01

    The percolation threshold and wrapping probability (R ∞) for the two-dimensional problem of continuum percolation on the surface of a Klein bottle have been calculated by the Monte Carlo method with the Newman-Ziff algorithm for completely permeable disks. It has been shown that the percolation threshold of disks on the Klein bottle coincides with the percolation threshold of disks on the surface of a torus, indicating that this threshold is topologically invariant. The scaling exponents determining corrections to the wrapping probability and critical concentration owing to the finite-size effects are also topologically invariant. At the same time, the quantities R ∞ are different for percolation on the torus and Klein bottle and are apparently determined by the topology of the surface. Furthermore, the difference between the R ∞ values for the torus and Klein bottle means that at least one of the percolation clusters is degenerate.

  18. Drop motion induced by repeated stretching and relaxation on a gradient surface with hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Longley, Jonathan E; Dooley, Erin; Givler, Douglas M; Napier, William J; Chaudhury, Manoj K; Daniel, Susan

    2012-10-01

    The motion of a droplet can be induced by periodically compressing and extending it between two similar gradient surfaces possessing significant wetting hysteresis. The shape fluctuation of the drop during repeated compression-extension cycles leads to its ratchetlike motion toward the region of higher wettability. A simple model requiring the volume preservation of the drop during the compression-extension cycles is sufficient to account for the effect and predict drop velocity across the surface when drop size and cycle frequency are specified. In connection with this study, we also report a variation of the standard vapor phase adsorption method of preparing a chemically graded surface that allows for good control over the steepness and the length of the active zone. The method can be used to produce a linear or a radial gradient, both of which are employed here to drive droplet motion along these patterns. This type of discrete droplet motion can be used to move drops on surfaces to transport materials within miniaturized digital fluidic devices. PMID:22950893

  19. Boundary layer flow past a stretching/shrinking surface beneath an external uniform shear flow with a convective surface boundary condition in a nanofluid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The problem of a steady boundary layer shear flow over a stretching/shrinking sheet in a nanofluid is studied numerically. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method with shooting technique. Two types of nanofluids, namely, Cu-water and Ag-water are used. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction, the type of nanoparticles, the convective parameter, and the thermal conductivity on the heat transfer characteristics are discussed. It is found that the heat transfer rate at the surface increases with increasing nanoparticle volume fraction while it decreases with the convective parameter. Moreover, the heat transfer rate at the surface of Cu-water nanofluid is higher than that at the surface of Ag-water nanofluid even though the thermal conductivity of Ag is higher than that of Cu. PMID:21711841

  20. Stretch Marks

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes that can go with bodybuilding. People who use steroid-containing skin creams or ointments (such as hydrocortisone) for more than a few weeks may also get stretch marks. So might people who have to ... surgeon. These doctors may use one of many types of treatments — from actual ...

  1. The effect of surface active agents on the relative permeability of brine and gas in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, M.W.; Schraufnagel, R.A.; Smith, K.; Thomas, T.

    1995-11-01

    All oil and gas producing wells produce hydrocarbon at some residual water saturation. Therefore, the relative permeability to the hydrocarbon at the effective water saturation dictates performance and not the absolute permeability of the formation. Surface active agents are included in most aqueous treating fluids to improve the compatibility of aqueous fluids with the hydrocarbon containing reservoir. A review of the literature indicates very little core flow data to describe the effects to be expected. Traditionally, it is believed that the reduced surface tension will reduce capillary pressure and enhance the recovery of water after the treatment. The reduced water saturation is then believed to result in higher effective gas saturation and higher relative permeability to gas after the treatment. The principal emphasis of this study has been the development of non-damaging stimulation fluids to improve the production of methane from coalbed methane and other low permeability gas reservoirs.

  2. Atomic diffusion on vicinal surfaces: step roughening impact on step permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranguelov, B.; Michailov, M.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of mass transport in material science for systems with reduced dimensionality holds special academic and technological attention since the fine diffusion control of adatoms could initiate exotic nanoscale patterning at epitaxial interfaces. The present study brings out important details of the atomic diffusion mechanisms on vicinal surfaces, accounting for the subtle competition between an external field imposed on the migrating adatoms and the roughening of the steps bordering the atomic terraces. The computational model reveals a temperature gap for breakdown of step permeability in the vicinity of the step roughening transition and sheds light on recently observed experimental results for atomic step dynamics on Si surfaces. The present study also demonstrates the extended capability of atomistic models in computer simulations to unravel simultaneous effects, to distinguish between them, and finally to assess their specific contribution to experimentally observed complex physical phenomena.

  3. Stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance of permeable pavement layers.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhi-Guang; Lv, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Ying; Cui, Zhen-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the laboratory-scale permeable pavement layers, including a surface permeable brick layer, coarse sand bedding layers (thicknesses = 2, 3.5, and 5 cm), and single-graded gravel sub-base layers (thicknesses = 15, 20, 25, and 30 cm), were built to evaluate stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance. And, the infiltration rate (I) and concentrations of suspended solids (SS), total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and total nitrogen (TN) were measured under the simulated rainfall intensity of 72.4 mm/h over duration of 60 min. The results indicate that the thickness factor primarily influences the infiltration rate and pollutant removal rate. The highest steady infiltration rate was for surface brick layer 51.0 mm/h, for 5-cm sand bedding layer 32.3 mm/h, and for 30-cm gravel sub-base layer 42.3 mm/h, respectively. The SS average removal rate was relative higher (79.8 ∼ 98.6 %) for all layers due to the interception and filtration. The average removal rates of TP and COD were for surface layer 71.2 and 24.1 %, for 5-cm bedding layer 54.8 and 9.0 %, and for 20-cm sub-base layer 72.2 and 26.1 %. Ammonia nitrogen and TN cannot steadily be removed by layers according to the experiment results. The optimal thickness of bedding sands was 5 cm, and that of sub-base gravels was 20 ∼ 30 cm. PMID:26429141

  4. Boundary layer flow near a stagnation point on a permeable vertical surface immersed in a nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Noor Adila; Yacob, Nor Azizah; Bachok, Norfifah; Ramli, Nazirah; Ishak, Anuar

    2015-10-01

    A steady mixed convection boundary layer flow near a stagnation point on a permeable vertical surface immersed in a nanofluid is investigated. The velocity of the external flow is assumed to vary linearly with the distance from the stagnation-point. The governing partial differential equations are first transformed into ordinary differential equations, before being solved numerically using the Keller box method with the help of MATLAB software. The effects of physical parameters such as the suction/injection parameter, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter and Lewis number on the heat and mass transfer rate at the surface as well as the temperature and concentration profiles are analyzed and discussed. Both assisting and opposing flows are considered. It is found that, increasing the thermophoresis parameter, Brownian motion parameter and Lewis number are to decrease the heat transfer rate at the surface, but on the other hand increase the mass transfer rate at the surface for both assisting and opposing flows. In addition, increasing suction parameter tends to increase the heat transfer rate at the surface. However, the opposite behavior occurs for the effect of mass transfer rate at the surface.

  5. Partial slip effect on non-aligned stagnation point nanofluid over a stretching convective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Rashid, Mehmood; Noreen Sher, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present study inspects the non-aligned stagnation point nano fluid over a convective surface in the presence of partial slip.Two types of base fluids namely water and kerosene are selected with Cu nanoparticles. The governing physical problem is presented and transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear differential equations using suitable similarity transformations. These equations are then solved numerically using midpoint integration scheme along with Richardson extrapolation via Maple. Impact of relevant physical parameters on the dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are portrayed through graphs. Physical quantities such as local skin frictions co-efficient and Nusselt numbers are tabularized. It is detected from numerical computations that kerosene-based nano fluids have better heat transfer capability compared with water-based nanofluids. Moreover it is found that water-based nanofluids offer less resistance in terms of skin friction than kerosene-based fluid. In order to authenticate our present study, the calculated results are compared with the prevailing literature and a considerable agreement is perceived for the limiting case.

  6. Acoustic Effects on Colloid/Surface Interactions and Porous-Media Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, P. M.; Abdel-Fattah, A. I.; Duran, J.

    2004-12-01

    Acoustic and seismic waves have been observed to influence porous fluid-flow behavior in the Earth and geomaterials over a wide range of scale lengths (microns to kilometers). Examples include oil reservoir production increases induced by seismic (1 to 500 Hz) waves, and mobilizing colloidal clays in sandstone cores by ultrasonic (10 to 50 kHz) energy. The effects of stress-wave propagation on both colloid electrokinetics and fluid-flow dynamics in porous media are not understood. In particular, the coupling of acoustic and seismic waves with colloid behavior is an important mechanism to understand because the distribution of colloids in a porous medium will directly affect its permeability. Recent experimental observations indicate that very-high-frequency (0.5 to 5 MHz) acoustic energy can induce attachment and detachment of micron-size colloids at solid surfaces. Using a microscopic, video image-processing system focused on a glass flow-visualization cell, the behavior of 0.5- to 3-micron diameter polystyrene spheres suspended in 0 to 0.1 M aqueous solution was observed. Initial image-processing-based analysis of acoustically-induced colloid/surface detachment events indicates that very-high-frequency acoustics not only increases particle detachment, but may also permanently "deactivate" colloid attachment (or "active") sites on the glass cell surface. The ability of acoustics to attach or detach colloids also appears to depend on the colloid size and ionic strength of the suspending solution. Other experiments show that seismic-band (1 to 1000 Hz) mechanical stress oscillations can change the permeability of centimeter-size sandstone cores due to mobilization of micron-size colloids contained in the pore space. A unique core-holder apparatus that mechanically strains 2.54-cm-diameter porous rock samples during constant-rate fluid flow was used for these experiments. During single-phase brine flow through sandstone, axial stress oscillations at 50 Hz mobilized

  7. Convective heat transfer in MHD slip flow over a stretching surface in the presence of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul Haq, Rizwan; Nadeem, Sohail; Khan, Z. H.; Noor, N. F. M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, thermal conductivity and viscosity of both single-wall and multiple-wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) within the base fluids (water, engine oil and ethylene glycol) of similar volume have been investigated when the fluid is flowing over a stretching surface. The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and viscous dissipation effects are also incorporated in the present phenomena. Experimental data consists of thermo-physical properties of each base fluid and CNT have been considered. The mathematical model has been constructed and by employing similarity transformation, system of partial differential equations is rehabilitated into the system of non-linear ordinary differential equations. The results of local skin friction and local Nusselt number are plotted for each base fluid by considering both Single Wall Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) and Multiple-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT). The behavior of fluid flow for water based-SWCNT and MWCNT are analyzed through streamlines. Concluding remarks have been developed on behalf of the whole analysis and it is found that engine oil-based CNT have higher skin friction and heat transfer rate as compared to water and ethylene glycol-based CNT.

  8. Three-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B nanofluid towards stretching surface with heat generation/absorption.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waqar Azeem; Khan, Masood; Malik, Rabia

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the steady three-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface with heat generation/absorption effects. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These nonlinear ordinary differential equations are then solved analytically by using the homotpy analysis method (HAM). Graphically results are presented and discussed for various parameters, namely, Deborah numbers β1 and β2, heat generation/absorption parameter λ, Prandtl parameter Pr, Brownian motion parameters Nb, thermophoresis parameter Nt and Lewis number Le. We have seen that the increasing values of the Brownian motion parameter Nt and thermophoresis parameter Nt leads to an increase in the temperature field and thermal boundary layer thickness while the opposite behavior is observed for concentration field and concentration boundary layer thickness. To see the validity of the present work, the numerical results are compared with the analytical solutions obtained by Homotopy analysis method and noted an excellent agreement for the limiting cases. PMID:25170945

  9. Effects of Streptococcus sanguinis Bacteriocin on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Membrane Permeability, and Ultrastructure of Candida Thallus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shengli; Zhao, Yingnan; Xia, Xue; Dong, Xue; Ge, Wenyu; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans (C.a) and Candida tropicalis (C.t) were treated with Streptococcus sanguinis bacteriocin (S.s bacteriocin), respectively; the bacteriostatic dynamics of S.s bacteriocin, their effects on cell surface hydrophobicity, leakage of inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance, cytosolic calcium concentration, and ultrastructure changes of Candida thallus were detected and analyzed. The results showed that inhibitory effect of S.s bacteriocin on C.a and C.t reached peak level at 24 h, the cell-surface hydrophobicity decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after S.s bacteriocin treatment, and there was leakage of cytoplasmic inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance from C.a and C.t; cytosolic calcium concentration decreased greatly. After 24 h treatment by S.s bacteriocin, depressive deformity and defect could be found in the cell surface of C.a and C.t; the thallus displayed irregular forms: C.a was shrunken, there was unclear margins abutting upon cell wall and cell membrane, nucleus disappeared, and cytoplasm was inhomogeneous; likewise, C.t was first plasmolysis, and then the cytoplasm was shrunk, the ultrastructure of cell wall and cell membrane was continuously damaged, and the nucleus was karyolysis. It was illustrated that S.s bacteriocin had similar antifungal effect on C.a and C.t; their cell surface hydrophobicity, membrane permeability, and ultrastructure were changed significantly on exposure to S.s bacteriocin. PMID:26064919

  10. Effects of Streptococcus sanguinis Bacteriocin on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Membrane Permeability, and Ultrastructure of Candida Thallus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengli; Zhao, Yingnan; Xia, Xue; Dong, Xue; Ge, Wenyu; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans (C.a) and Candida tropicalis (C.t) were treated with Streptococcus sanguinis bacteriocin (S.s bacteriocin), respectively; the bacteriostatic dynamics of S.s bacteriocin, their effects on cell surface hydrophobicity, leakage of inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance, cytosolic calcium concentration, and ultrastructure changes of Candida thallus were detected and analyzed. The results showed that inhibitory effect of S.s bacteriocin on C.a and C.t reached peak level at 24 h, the cell-surface hydrophobicity decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after S.s bacteriocin treatment, and there was leakage of cytoplasmic inorganic phosphorus and macromolecular substance from C.a and C.t; cytosolic calcium concentration decreased greatly. After 24 h treatment by S.s bacteriocin, depressive deformity and defect could be found in the cell surface of C.a and C.t; the thallus displayed irregular forms: C.a was shrunken, there was unclear margins abutting upon cell wall and cell membrane, nucleus disappeared, and cytoplasm was inhomogeneous; likewise, C.t was first plasmolysis, and then the cytoplasm was shrunk, the ultrastructure of cell wall and cell membrane was continuously damaged, and the nucleus was karyolysis. It was illustrated that S.s bacteriocin had similar antifungal effect on C.a and C.t; their cell surface hydrophobicity, membrane permeability, and ultrastructure were changed significantly on exposure to S.s bacteriocin. PMID:26064919

  11. Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, Robert R.; Schroeder, John L.

    1999-05-11

    A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO.sub.2 at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere.

  12. Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons

    DOEpatents

    Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.

    1999-05-11

    A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO{sub 2} at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere. 3 figs.

  13. Consequences of Anisotropic Permeability and Surface Tension for Magmatic Segregation in Deforming Mantle Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-West, J.; Katz, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of partially molten regions of the mantle are not well understood--in part due to the inaccessibility of these regions to observation. However it is widely agreed that experiments performed on synthetic mantle rocks [e.g KZK10] act as a reasonable test of theoretical models of magma dynamics. One robust feature of experiments on partially molten mantle rocks deformed under strain is the emergence of high-porosity bands at an angle of between 15° and 20° to the shear plane. A number of theoretical approaches have been made to reproduce the formation of these low angle bands in models. The most recent approaches, for example by Takei and Katz [TK13], have involved the inclusion of anisotropic viscosity in diffusion creep arising from the grain-scale redistribution of melt as formulated in a theoretical model by Takei and Holtzman [TH09]. It is reasonable to assume that this melt-preferred orientation (MPO) that leads to anisotropy in viscosity may also lead to anisotropy in permeability. However, the effect of anisotropic permeability remains unexplored. We investigate its impact on the dynamics of partially molten rock, and specifically on its role in low-angle band formation in deformation under simple shear. We work with the continuum model of two-phase-flow as formulated by McKenzie [M84] with the addition of anisotropic permeability. There are some apparent inconsistencies in this model. Firstly, the model predicts continued segregation of melt into bands of 100% porosity, while experiments report maximum porosities in the region of 30%. Secondly, linear stability analyses find maximal growth-rates for porosity perturbations that vary on arbitrarily small length-scales. We study how the inclusion of surface forces into the model could regulate these effects. REFERENCES: KZK10 = King, Zimmerman, & Kohlstedt (2010), J Pet, 10.1093/petrology/egp062. TK13 = Takei & Katz (2013), JFM, 10.1017/jfm.2013.482. TH09 = Takei & Holtzman (2009a), JGR, 10

  14. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein promotes complement activation for neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis on bacterial surface

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, H; Gogami, A; Miyagawa, Y; Nanbo, A; Murakami, Y; Baba, T; Nagasawa, S

    2001-01-01

    The neutrophil bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) has both bactericidal and lipopolysaccharide-neutralizing activities. The present study suggests that BPI also plays an important role in phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by neutrophils through promotion of complement activation on the bacterial surface. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that fluorescein-labelled E. coli treated with BPI were phagocytosed in the presence of serum at two- to five-fold higher levels than phagocytosis of the bacteria without the treatment. In contrast, phagocytosis of the fluoresceined bacteria with or without treatment by BPI did not occur at all in the absence of serum. The phagocytosis stimulated by BPI and serum was dose-dependent. The effect of BPI on phagocytosis in the presence of serum was not observed on Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Interestingly, the complement C3b/iC3b fragments were deposited onto the bacterial surface also as a function of the BPI concentration under conditions similar to those for phagocytosis. Furthermore, the BPI-promoted phagocytosis was blocked completely by anti-C3 F(ab′)2 and partially by anti-complement receptor (CR) type 1 and/or anti-CR type 3. These findings suggest that BPI accelerates complement activation to opsonize bacteria with complement-derived fragments, leading to stimulation of phagocytosis by neutrophils via CR(s). PMID:11529944

  15. Surface altered zeolites as permeable barriers for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The authors characterized surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for its ability to sorb organic and inorganic contaminants from water. The ultimate objective is to use SMZ as a permeable barrier to prevent migration of contaminants in groundwater. This report summarizes results under Phase 1 of a three-phase project leading to a full-scale field demonstration of SMZ permeable- barrier technology.

  16. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Bowman; Zhaohui Li; Stephen J. Roy; Todd Burt; Timothy L. Johnson; Richard L. Johnson

    1999-08-30

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector.

  17. Changes in the permeability and morphology of dentine surfaces after brushing with a Thai herbal toothpaste: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Vajrabhaya, La-ongthong; Korsuwannawong, Suwanna; Harnirattisai, Choltacha; Teinchai, Chayada

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate dentine permeability after brushing with Twin Lotus®, Thai herbal toothpaste by comparing with Sensodyne Rapid Relief®, a commercial desensitizing toothpaste, and also after artificial saliva (AS) immersion or citric acid challenge. Materials and Methods: Dentine discs from human mandibular third molars were divided into three groups (n = 20) and brushed with either experimental toothpaste or water (control) for 2 min with an automated toothbrush. Then, 10 discs were immersed in AS, and the other 10 discs were immersed in 6% citric acid to simulate the conditions of the oral environment. The dentine permeability of each specimen was measured before brushing and after each treatment using a fluid filtration system. Morphological changes in the dentine were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Both toothpastes significantly reduced dentine permeability, and a crystalline precipitate was observed on the dentine surface under SEM observation. No significant difference was found between the two toothpaste groups with regard to dentine permeability after brushing and AS or acid immersion. Conclusions: The dentine permeability reduction caused by the two toothpastes did not differ after brushing or after AS or citric acid immersion. PMID:27095904

  18. Permeability of acetic acid across gel and liquid-crystalline lipid bilayers conforms to free-surface-area theory.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, T X; Anderson, B D

    1997-01-01

    Solubility-diffusion theory, which treats the lipid bilayer membrane as a bulk lipid solvent into which permeants must partition and diffuse across, fails to account for the effects of lipid bilayer chain order on the permeability coefficient of any given permeant. This study addresses the scaling factor that must be applied to predictions from solubility-diffusion theory to correct for chain ordering. The effects of bilayer chemical composition, temperature, and phase structure on the permeability coefficient (Pm) of acetic acid were investigated in large unilamellar vesicles by a combined method of NMR line broadening and dynamic light scattering. Permeability values were obtained in distearoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, and dilauroylphosphatidylcholine bilayers, and their mixtures with cholesterol, at various temperatures both above and below the gel-->liquid-crystalline phase transition temperatures (Tm). A new scaling factor, the permeability decrement f, is introduced to account for the decrease in permeability coefficient from that predicted by solubility-diffusion theory owing to chain ordering in lipid bilayers. Values of f were obtained by division of the observed Pm by the permeability coefficient predicted from a bulk solubility-diffusion model. In liquid-crystalline phases, a strong correlation (r = 0.94) between f and the normalized surface density sigma was obtained: in f = 5.3 - 10.6 sigma. Activation energies (Ea) for the permeability of acetic acid decreased with decreasing phospholipid chain length and correlated with the sensitivity of chain ordering to temperature, [symbol: see text] sigma/[symbol: see text](1/T), as chain length was varied. Pm values decreased abruptly at temperatures below the main phase transition temperatures in pure dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers (30-60-fold) and below the pretransition in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

  19. Optimized water vapor permeability of sodium alginate films using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Xu, Jiachao; Gao, Xin; Fu, Xiaoting

    2013-11-01

    The water vapor permeability (WVP) of films is important when developing pharmaceutical applications. Films are frequently used as coatings, and as such directly influence the quality of the medicine. The optimization of processing conditions for sodium alginate films was investigated using response surface methodology. Single-factor tests and Box-Behnken experimental design were employed. WVP was selected as the response variable, and the operating parameters for the single-factor tests were sodium alginate concentration, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) concentration and CaCl2 solution immersion time. The coefficient of determination ( R 2) was 0.97, indicating statistical significance. A minimal WVP of 0.389 8 g·mm/(m2·h·kPa) was achieved under the optimum conditions. These were found to be a sodium alginate concentration, CMC concentration and CaCl2 solution immersion time at 8.04%, 0.13%, and 12 min, respectively. This provides a reference for potential applications in manufacturing film-coated hard capsule shells.

  20. Reaction-Induced Permeability Change in Thermally Cracked and Deformed Aplite: Importance of Reactive Surface Area and Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenthorey, E.

    2004-12-01

    This experimental study investigates hydrothermal reactions in a granitic system and attempts to quantify how such reactions affect hydrologic properties, namely specimen permeability. Of specific interest is the evolution of permeability under variable differential stress conditions, from the compactional and dilatancy regimes to that of shear failure. Under these different stress conditions, reactive surface area will vary, possibly affecting the rate and absolute magnitude of permeability change. Experiments were conducted using a Paterson gas apparatus capable of independently controlling confining pressure (Pc), pore pressure (Pp) and axial load. Most experiments were conducted at Pc=100 MPa and Pp=50 MPa with temperatures of 200-600° C. Under isostatic conditions, permeability was observed to increase with temperature due to increased thermal cracking at grain boundaries. As differential stress was increased in each experiment, permeability was first observed to decrease, presumably due to crack closure. Upon continued loading to higher stresses, dilatancy resulted in significant permeability enhancement. In later experiments, permeability was allowed to evolve at each stress level and was observed to decay by an exponential function of the form k α 1-μ (1-exp(-rt))2, suggesting a precipitation type mechanism for the observed permeability change. The rate constant AƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.â_orAƒAøAøâ_sA¬? progressively increased up to 500° C, but was much smaller in the 600° C experiment, indicating a possible change in the precipitating mineral assemblage as suggested by experimental studies in the KNASH system. Overall, reaction rates were enhanced during dilatancy and after rupture, an observation suggesting a negative feedback effect, in which enhanced mineral precipitation moderates permeability generation during episodes of deformation. The nature of fluid flow in such systems is crucial to the formation of porphyry metal deposits and also plays a

  1. Studies on water transport through the sweet cherry fruit surface: IX. Comparing permeability in water uptake and transpiration.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Marco; Lau, Steffen; Knoche, Moritz

    2005-01-01

    Water uptake and transpiration were studied through the surface of intact sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit, exocarp segments (ES) and cuticular membranes (CM) excised from the cheek of sweet cherry fruit and astomatous CM isolated from Schefflera arboricola (Hayata) Hayata, Citrus aurantium L., and Stephanotis floribunda Brongn. leaves or from Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. and Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum Fasciculatum Group fruit. ES and CM were mounted in diffusion cells. Water (deionized) uptake into intact sweet cherry fruit, through ES or CM interfacing water as a donor and a polyethyleneglycol (PEG 6000, osmotic pressure 2.83 MPa)-containing receiver was determined gravimetrically. Transpiration was quantified by monitoring weight loss of a PEG 6000-containing donor (2.83 MPa) against dry silica as a receiver. The permeability coefficients for osmotic water uptake and transpiration were calculated from the amount of water taken up or transpired per unit surface area and time, and the driving force for transport. Permeability during osmotic water uptake was markedly higher than during transpiration in intact sweet cherry fruit (40.2-fold), excised ES of sweet cherry fruit (12.5- to 53.7-fold) and isolated astomatous fruit and leaf CM of a range of species (on average 23.0-fold). Partitioning water transport into stomatal and cuticular components revealed that permeability of the sweet cherry fruit cuticle for water uptake was 11.9-fold higher and that of stomata 56.8-fold higher than the respective permeability during transpiration. Increasing water vapor activity in the receiver from 0 to 1 increased permeability during transpiration across isolated sweet cherry fruit CM about 2.1-fold. Permeability for vapor uptake from saturated water vapor into a PEG 6000 receiver solution was markedly lower than from liquid water, but of similar magnitude to the permeability during self-diffusion of (3)H(2)O in the absence of osmotica. The energy of activation for

  2. Characterization of Adsorbed Molecular Water on the Surface of a Stretched Polytetrafluoroethylene Tape Analyzed by (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Chihiro; Shimoaka, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2016-03-10

    A single molecule often exhibits a largely different material character from a bulk matter. Although a perfluoroalkyl (Rf) compound is a representative one, many interests have mostly been devoted to the bulk character only thus far, leaving the single molecular character unclear. Recently, a new theoretical framework, stratified dipole-arrays (SDA) theory, has appeared for comprehensive understanding of Rf compounds in terms of both single and bulk systems. On this theory, a mechanically stretched polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is expected to exhibit a single-molecular character having dipole-driven properties, which should attract molecular water. In the present study, a stretched PTFE tape is revealed to attract molecular water (not water droplet) in fact, and the adsorbed water molecules are highly restricted in motion by the dipole-dipole interaction studied by using (1)H NMR, which agrees with the prediction by the SDA theory. PMID:26848611

  3. The Influence of Selected Liquid and Soil Properties on the Propagation of Spills over Flat Permeable Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jason M.; Simmons, Carver S.

    2005-02-15

    In an effort to determine spill characteristics, information about a spill's spatial distribution with time is being studied. For permeable surfaces, spill phenomenology is controlled by liquid and soil properties, the most relevant of which are presented in this report. The pertinent liquid and soil properties were tabulated for ten liquids and four soils. The liquids represented an array of organic compounds, some of which are or are soon to be documented in the liquid spectra library by the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The soils were chosen based on ongoing surface spectra work and to represent a range of relevant soil properties. The effect of the liquid and soil properties on spill phenomenology were explored using a spill model that couples overland flow described by gravity currents with the Green-Ampt infiltration model. From the simulations, liquid viscosity was found to be a controlling liquid property in determining the amount of time a spill remains on the surface, with the surface vanish time decreasing as viscosity decreased. This was attributed to decreasing viscosity increasing both the hydraulic conductivity of the soil and allowing for the spill to more quickly spread out onto an unsaturated soil surface. Soil permeability also controlled vanish times with the vanish times increasing as permeability decreased, corresponding to finer textured materials. Maximum spill area was found to be largely controlled by liquid viscosity on coarse, highly permeable soils. On the less permeable soils maximum spill area began to be controlled by the steady-area spill height due to the restricting of infiltration to the extent that the spill is then able to reach its steady-area spill height. Simulations performed with and without the inclusion of capillarity in the Green-Ampt infiltration model displayed the importance of capillarity in describing infiltration rate in fine textured soils. In coarse textured

  4. Superoxide mediates tight junction complex dissociation in cyclically stretched lung slices.

    PubMed

    Song, Min Jae; Davidovich, Nurit; Lawrence, Gladys G; Margulies, Susan S

    2016-05-24

    We found that stretching Type I rat alveolar epithelial cell (RAEC) monolayers at magnitudes that correspond to high tidal-volume mechanical ventilation results in the production of reactive oxygen species, including nitric oxide and superoxide. Scavenging superoxide with Tiron eliminated the stretch-induced increase in cell monolayer permeability, and similar results were reported for rats ventilated at large tidal volumes, suggesting that oxidative stress plays an important role in barrier impairment in ventilator-induced lung injury associated with large stretch and tidal volumes. In this communication we show that mechanisms that involve oxidative injury are also present in a novel precision cut lung slices (PCLS) model under identical mechanical loads. PCLSs from healthy rats were stretched cyclically to 37% change in surface area for 1 hour. Superoxide was visualized using MitoSOX. To evaluate functional relationships, in separate stretch studies superoxide was scavenged using Tiron or mito-Tempo. PCLS and RAEC permeability was assessed as tight junction (TJ) protein (occludin, claudin-4 and claudin-7) dissociation from zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) via co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot, after 1h (PCLS) or 10min (RAEC) of stretch. Superoxide was increased significantly in PCLS, and Tiron and mito-Tempo dramatically attenuated the response, preventing claudin-4 and claudin-7 dissociation from ZO-1. Using a novel PCLS model for ventilator-induced lung injury studies, we have shown that uniform, biaxial, cyclic stretch generates ROS in the slices, and that superoxide scavenging that can protect the lung tissue under stretch conditions. We conclude that PCLS offer a valuable platform for investigating antioxidant treatments to prevent ventilation-induced lung injury. PMID:26592435

  5. Fractional boundary layer flow and radiation heat transfer of MHD viscoelastic fluid over an unsteady stretching surface

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bingyu; Zheng, Liancun Chen, Shengting

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents an investigation for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) viscoelastic fluid boundary layer flow and radiation heat transfer over an unsteady stretching sheet in presence of heat source. Time dependent fractional derivative is first introduced in formulating the boundary layer equations. Numerical solutions are obtained by using the finite difference scheme and L1-algorithm approximation. Results indicate that the proposed model describes a basic delaying times framework for viscoelastic flow and radiation heat transfer. The effects of involved parameters on velocity and temperature fields are shown graphically and analyzed in detail.

  6. Effect of stretch on passive transport in toad urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Lief, P D; Mutz, B F; Bank, N

    1976-06-01

    In order to gain further information about the effect of stretch on the urinary bladder of the toad, transepithelial movement of radioactive sucrose, chloride, and urea was measured across bladder sacs during acute changes in the internal volume. Short-circuit current (SCC) and total tissue conductance (Kt) were also measured in each experiment. It was found that sudden large increases or smaller graded increases in volume resulted in a consistent fall in the tracer permeability (P*) of all three isotopes. However, this fall was due entirely to the larger area term in the calculation of P* rather than any real change in isotope movement. When total diffusion (TD) of each isotope was calculated by a method that eliminated the changes in surface area, it was apparent that stretch produced no significant effects on the transepithelial movement of any of these three molecules. Large stretch also resulted in parallel increases in SCC and Kt in most bladders. We conclude from these observations that the intercellular pathway for sucrose and chloride and the transcellular pathway for urea are unaltered by degrees of stretch that enhance SCC and sodium transport. By inference, the observed increases in Kt appear to represent changes in specific active pathway conductance (Ka), and may relate importantly to the changes in sodium transport. PMID:820207

  7. Water Quality Performance of Three Side-by-Side Permeable Pavement Surface Materials: Three Year Update

    EPA Science Inventory

    Communities are increasingly installing structural low impact development (LID) practices to mange stormwater and reduce pollutant loads associated with stormwater runoff. Permeable pavement is a LID practice that has limited research on working-scale, side-by-side performance o...

  8. Get up and Stretch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crupi, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Daily stretching has many benefits for one's body. It can relieve stress and tension, it increases flexibility and it can help prevent injuries. There are many stretching exercises that a teacher can do with his or her students to help promote daily stretching routines. In this article, the author presents several stretching exercises and some…

  9. Martian Post-Impact Hydrothermal Systems: Effects of Permeability and Freezing on Surface Discharge and Water:Rock Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, C. J.; Nimmo, F.; Travis, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A km-scale bolide delivers enough energy to heat subsurface water, and drive hydrothermal circulation (Abramov and Kring, 2005). This post-impact hydrothermal (PIH) circulation can lead to surface discharge of water, and chemical alteration - both are potentially detectable. We present the effects that permeability and freezing have on discharge and water:rock (W/R) ratios. We simulate the evolution of PIH systems using MAGHNUM (detailed in Travis et al., 2003). MAGHNUM solves the time-dependent transport of water and heat through a porous medium, incorporating phase transitions between ice (applicable to Mars), vapor and water. PIH evolution depends on heat sources and permeability (k); these, in turn, control discharge and chemical alteration which depends on both the peak temperatures and the W/R ratio (Schwenzer and Kring, 2008). Recently, CRISM detected phyllosilicate-rich material within ~45 km craters (Mustard et al., 2008) and the HiRISE camera imaged gullies, some emanating from central peaks, within many high latitude craters. We model a 45 km crater created by a 3.9 km dia., 7 km/s impactor. Simulations run for 100,000 yrs in a 2D axisymmetric domain with a heat flux of 32.5 mW m-2. Thus far we have tested systems with a range of surface k's (10-4 to 1 darcys) that decay exponentially with depth and are exposed to two surface temperatures (5°C and -53°C). In general W/R ratios increase with increased k. Focusing in on the upper 200 m at the center of the crater, fluid temperatures remain > 100°C for 9000 yrs and flow yields W/R ratios of 10 when exposed to a surface temperature of 5°C. Dropping the surface temperature below freezing to a Mars-like - 53°C maintains upper 200 m temperatures > 100°C for only 600 yrs and W/R ratios are reduced to 1. Higher permeabilities yield higher W/R ratios but reduced time exposure to high temperatures. When surface temperatures are below freezing total system discharge is roughly independent of k for modest

  10. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Bowman; Pengfei Zhang; Xian Tao

    2002-03-01

    This report summarizes experiments to develop and test surfactant-modified zeolite/zero-valent iron (SMZ/ZVI) pellets for permeable reactive barriers to treat groundwater contamination. Coating a glass foam core with a mixture of hexadecyltrimethylammonium surfactant, zeolite, and ZVI produced a high hydraulic conductivity, mechanically stable pellet. Laboratory experiments showed that the pellets completely removed soluble chromate from aqueous solution, and reduced perchloroethylene (PCE) concentrations more than pellets that lacked surfactant. Based upon the laboratory results, they predicted a 1-m-wide SMZ/ZVI barrier that would reduce PCE concentrations by four orders of magnitude. Thirteen cubic meters (470 cubic feet) of SMZ/ZVI pellets were manufactured and emplaced in a permeable barrier test facility. A controlled plume of chromate and PCE was allowed to contact the barrier for four weeks. The entire plume was captured by the barrier. No chromate was detected downgradient of the barrier. The PCE broke through the barrier after four weeks, and downgradient concentrations ultimately exceeded 10% of the influent PCE. The less-than-expected PCE reduction was attributed to insufficient surfactant content, the large size, and pH-altering characteristics of the bulk-produced pellets. The pellets developed here can be improved to yield a performance- and cost-competitive permeable barrier material.

  11. Aligned magnetic field and cross-diffusion effects of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, C.; Sandeep, N.; Sugunamma, V.; Rushi Kumar, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of aligned magnetic field, thermal radiation, heat generation/absorption, cross-diffusion, viscous dissipation, heat source and chemical reaction on the flow of a nanofluid past an exponentially stretching sheet in porous medium. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to set of ordinary differential equations using self-similarity transformation, which are then solved numerically using bvp4c Matlab package. Finally the effects of various non-dimensional parameters on velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are thoroughly investigated and presented through graphs and tables. We observed that an increase in the aligned angle strengthens the applied magnetic field and decreases the velocity profiles of the flow. Soret and Dufour numbers are helpful to enhance the heat transfer rate. An increase in the heat source parameter, radiation parameter and Eckert number increases the mass transfer rate. Mixed convection parameter has tendency to enhance the friction factor along with the heat and mass transfer rate.

  12. Aligned magnetic field and cross-diffusion effects of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, C.; Sandeep, N.; Sugunamma, V.; Rushi Kumar, B.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of aligned magnetic field, thermal radiation, heat generation/absorption, cross-diffusion, viscous dissipation, heat source and chemical reaction on the flow of a nanofluid past an exponentially stretching sheet in porous medium. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to set of ordinary differential equations using self-similarity transformation, which are then solved numerically using bvp4c Matlab package. Finally the effects of various non-dimensional parameters on velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are thoroughly investigated and presented through graphs and tables. We observed that an increase in the aligned angle strengthens the applied magnetic field and decreases the velocity profiles of the flow. Soret and Dufour numbers are helpful to enhance the heat transfer rate. An increase in the heat source parameter, radiation parameter and Eckert number increases the mass transfer rate. Mixed convection parameter has tendency to enhance the friction factor along with the heat and mass transfer rate.

  13. Stretching Cells with Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guck, Jochen

    2003-03-01

    Trapped in a two-beam laser trap, any dielectric object experiences surface stresses induced by the laser light that lead to a "stretching" of the object. This can be explained with simple ray optics as well as with a modified Mie theory approach. Based on this phenomenon we have developed an optical tool to probe the viscoelastic properties of individual cells - an optical stretcher. The cell's deformation at a known induced stress reveals the mechanical properties of the cell and the underlying cytoskeleton. Thus, the optical stretcher can be used for contact-free microrheology on individual cells. Step-stress experiments on mouse fibroblasts reveal two main time regimes. At stress duration times shorter than a minute cells behave like a passive viscoelastic fluid. The frequency dependence of the complex shear modulus and the terminal relaxation time are consistent with a weakly entangled, transiently crosslinked actin gel, while contributions from other cytoskeletal filaments can be largely ruled out. At stretching times longer than a minute cells show an active response evidenced by a continued elongation after stretch. Malignantly transformed fibroblasts are less elastic and less viscous. Experiments on various other cell types with the optical stretcher confirm very generally that the viscoelastic response of cells changes during the progression of cancer and other diseases, which are accompanied by cytoskeletal changes, and the normal differentiation of cells. This suggests using optical deformability as a novel inherent cell marker. Instead of having to "look" for changes, light can now directly be used to "feel" for altered cells. Incorporated into a microfluidic device this can be done at rates that could eventually rival flow cytometers rendering the optical stretcher an ideal device for cytological diagnosis of disease and the screening and sorting of heterogeneous cell populations.

  14. Influence of Magnetic Field in Three-Dimensional Flow of Couple Stress Nanofluid over a Nonlinearly Stretching Surface with Convective Condition

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Aziz, Arsalan; Muhammad, Taseer; Ahmad, Bashir

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) three-dimensional flow of couple stress nanofluid subject to the convective boundary condition. Flow is generated due to a nonlinear stretching of the surface in two lateral directions. Temperature and nanoparticles concentration distributions are studied through the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Couple stress fluid is considered electrically conducting through a non-uniform applied magnetic field. Mathematical formulation is developed via boundary layer approach. Nonlinear ordinary differential systems are constructed by employing suitable transformations. The resulting systems have been solved for the convergent series solutions of velocities, temperature and nanoparticles concentration profiles. Graphs are sketched to see the effects of different interesting flow parameters on the temperature and nanoparticles concentration distributions. Numerical values are computed to analyze the values of skin-friction coefficients and Nusselt number. PMID:26714259

  15. Influence of Magnetic Field in Three-Dimensional Flow of Couple Stress Nanofluid over a Nonlinearly Stretching Surface with Convective Condition.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Aziz, Arsalan; Muhammad, Taseer; Ahmad, Bashir

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) three-dimensional flow of couple stress nanofluid subject to the convective boundary condition. Flow is generated due to a nonlinear stretching of the surface in two lateral directions. Temperature and nanoparticles concentration distributions are studied through the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Couple stress fluid is considered electrically conducting through a non-uniform applied magnetic field. Mathematical formulation is developed via boundary layer approach. Nonlinear ordinary differential systems are constructed by employing suitable transformations. The resulting systems have been solved for the convergent series solutions of velocities, temperature and nanoparticles concentration profiles. Graphs are sketched to see the effects of different interesting flow parameters on the temperature and nanoparticles concentration distributions. Numerical values are computed to analyze the values of skin-friction coefficients and Nusselt number. PMID:26714259

  16. Permeability and kinetic coefficients for mesoscale BCF surface step dynamics: Discrete two-dimensional deposition-diffusion equation analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Renjie; Evans, James W.; Oliveira, Tiago J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, a discrete version of deposition-diffusion equations appropriate for description of step flow on a vicinal surface is analyzed for a two-dimensional grid of adsorption sites representing the stepped surface and explicitly incorporating kinks along the step edges. Model energetics and kinetics appropriately account for binding of adatoms at steps and kinks, distinct terrace and edge diffusion rates, and possible additional barriers for attachment to steps. Analysis of adatom attachment fluxes as well as limiting values of adatom densities at step edges for nonuniform deposition scenarios allows determination of both permeability and kinetic coefficients. Behavior of these quantities is assessedmore » as a function of key system parameters including kink density, step attachment barriers, and the step edge diffusion rate.« less

  17. Human stretch reflex pathways reexamined

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Sebik, Oğuz; Berna Ünver, M.; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Reflex responses of tibialis anterior motor units to stretch stimuli were investigated in human subjects. Three types of stretch stimuli were applied (tap-like, ramp-and-hold, and half-sine stretch). Stimulus-induced responses in single motor units were analyzed using the classical technique, which involved building average surface electromyogram (SEMG) and peristimulus time histograms (PSTH) from the discharge times of motor units and peristimulus frequencygrams (PSF) from the instantaneous discharge rates of single motor units. With the use of SEMG and PSTH, the tap-like stretch stimulus induced five separate reflex responses, on average. With the same single motor unit data, the PSF technique indicated that the tap stimulus induced only three reflex responses. Similar to the finding using the tap-like stretch stimuli, ramp-and-hold stimuli induced several peaks and troughs in the SEMG and PSTH. The PSF analyses displayed genuine increases in discharge rates underlying the peaks but not underlying the troughs. Half-sine stretch stimuli induced a long-lasting excitation followed by a long-lasting silent period in SEMG and PSTH. The increase in the discharge rate, however, lasted for the entire duration of the stimulus and continued during the silent period. The results are discussed in the light of the fact that the discharge rate of a motoneuron has a strong positive linear association with the effective synaptic current it receives and hence represents changes in the membrane potential more directly and accurately than the other indirect measures. This study suggests that the neuronal pathway of the human stretch reflex does not include inhibitory pathways. PMID:24225537

  18. Cyclic stretch induces alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction via calpain-mediated degradation of p120-catenin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuelan; Minshall, Richard D; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2011-08-01

    Lung hyperinflation is known to be an important contributing factor in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Mechanical stretch causes epithelial barrier dysfunction and an increase in alveolar permeability, although the precise mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. p120-catenin is an adherens junction-associated protein that regulates cell-cell adhesion. In this study, we determined the role of p120-catenin in cyclic stretch-induced alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction. Cultured alveolar epithelial cells (MLE-12) were subjected to uniform cyclic (0.5 Hz) biaxial stretch from 0 to 8 or 20% change in surface area for 0, 1, 2, or 4 h. At the end of the experiments, cells were lysed to determine p120-catenin expression by Western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence staining of p120-catenin and F-actin was performed to assess the integrity of monolayers and interepithelial gap formation. Compared with unstretched control cells, 20% stretch caused a significant loss in p120-catenin expression, which was coupled to interepithelial gap formation. p120-Catenin knockdown with small interfering RNA (siRNA) dose dependently increased stretch-induced gap formation, whereas overexpression of p120-catenin abolished stretch-induced gap formation. Furthermore, pharmacological calpain inhibition or depletion of calpain-1 with a specific siRNA prevented p120-catenin loss and subsequent stretch-induced gap formation. Our findings demonstrate that p120-catenin plays a critical protective role in cyclic stretch-induced alveolar barrier dysfunction, and, thus, maintenance of p120-catenin expression may be a novel therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:21571907

  19. Role of stretch on tight junction structure in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, K J; Oswari, J; Margulies, S S

    2001-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high tidal volumes can cause interstitial and alveolar edema, with degradation of pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity. Separate studies have shown that F-actin disruption and decreased intracellular ATP (ATP(i)) levels in the nonpulmonary epithelium can increase tight junction (TJ) permeability. We hypothesized that large epithelial stretch perturbs ATP(i) and actin architecture, each of which adversely affects TJ structure, and thus increases TJ permeability. Primary alveolar epithelial cells were subjected to a uniform 25% or 37% change in surface area (DeltaSA), cyclic biaxial stretch (15 cycles/min) for 1 h, or treated with either glycolytic metabolic inhibitors or cytoskeletal disrupting agents. Unstretched, untreated cells served as controls. Changes in the TJ proteins occludin and ZO-1 were determined by immunocytochemical evaluation. A stretch amplitude of 25% DeltaSA did not produce any significant cytologic changes compared with controls, but an amplitude of 37% DeltaSA stretch resulted in significant decreases in the intensity of the peripheral occludin band, the degree of cell-cell attachment (CCA), and total cellular occludin content. ATP depletion significantly diminished the occludin band intensity and decreased CCA. Actin disruption did not affect TJ protein band intensities (although the occludin distribution became punctate) but altered CCA. Untreated cells stretched cyclically at 25% or 50% DeltaSA for 1 h had significantly decreased ATP(i) compared with unstretched controls. These results suggest that stretch-induced ATP(i) reduction and actin perturbation disrupt TJ structure and CCA, which may lead to the alveolar flooding associated with high tidal volumes. PMID:11713100

  20. A novel control algorithm for interaction between surface waves and a permeable floating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Pei-Wei; Alsaedi, A.; Hayat, T.; Chen, Cheng-Wu

    2016-04-01

    An analytical solution is undertaken to describe the wave-induced flow field and the surge motion of a permeable platform structure with fuzzy controllers in an oceanic environment. In the design procedure of the controller, a parallel distributed compensation (PDC) scheme is utilized to construct a global fuzzy logic controller by blending all local state feedback controllers. A stability analysis is carried out for a real structure system by using Lyapunov method. The corresponding boundary value problems are then incorporated into scattering and radiation problems. They are analytically solved, based on separation of variables, to obtain series solutions in terms of the harmonic incident wave motion and surge motion. The dependence of the wave-induced flow field and its resonant frequency on wave characteristics and structure properties including platform width, thickness and mass has been thus drawn with a parametric approach. From which mathematical models are applied for the wave-induced displacement of the surge motion. A nonlinearly inverted pendulum system is employed to demonstrate that the controller tuned by swarm intelligence method can not only stabilize the nonlinear system, but has the robustness against external disturbance.

  1. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  2. Springback prediction and optimization of variable stretch force trajectory in three-dimensional stretch bending process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Zhang, Wanxi; Liang, Jicai; Gao, Song

    2015-11-01

    Most of the existing studies use constant force to reduce springback while researching stretch force. However, variable stretch force can reduce springback more efficiently. The current research on springback prediction in stretch bending forming mainly focuses on artificial neural networks combined with the finite element simulation. There is a lack of springback prediction by support vector regression (SVR). In this paper, SVR is applied to predict springback in the three-dimensional stretch bending forming process, and variable stretch force trajectory is optimized. Six parameters of variable stretch force trajectory are chosen as the input parameters of the SVR model. Sixty experiments generated by design of experiments (DOE) are carried out to train and test the SVR model. The experimental results confirm that the accuracy of the SVR model is higher than that of artificial neural networks. Based on this model, an optimization algorithm of variable stretch force trajectory using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is proposed. The springback amount is used as the objective function. Changes of local thickness are applied as the criterion of forming constraints. The objection and constraints are formulated by response surface models. The precision of response surface models is examined. Six different stretch force trajectories are employed to certify springback reduction in the optimum stretch force trajectory, which can efficiently reduce springback. This research proposes a new method of springback prediction using SVR and optimizes variable stretch force trajectory to reduce springback.

  3. Similarity solution to three dimensional boundary layer flow of second grade nanofluid past a stretching surface with thermal radiation and heat source/sink

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, T.; Muhammad, Taseer; Shehzad, S. A.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-01-15

    Development of human society greatly depends upon solar energy. Heat, electricity and water from nature can be obtained through solar power. Sustainable energy generation at present is a critical issue in human society development. Solar energy is regarded one of the best sources of renewable energy. Hence the purpose of present study is to construct a model for radiative effects in three-dimensional of nanofluid. Flow of second grade fluid by an exponentially stretching surface is considered. Thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects are taken into account in presence of heat source/sink and chemical reaction. Results are derived for the dimensionless velocities, temperature and concentration. Graphs are plotted to examine the impacts of physical parameters on the temperature and concentration. Numerical computations are presented to examine the values of skin-friction coefficients, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. It is observed that the values of skin-friction coefficients are more for larger values of second grade parameter. Moreover the radiative effects on the temperature and concentration are quite reverse.

  4. Stretching: Does It Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  5. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  6. An in situ study of the role of surface films on granular iron in the permeable iron wall technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, K.; Odziemkowski, M. S.; Gillham, R. W.

    2002-03-01

    Permeable walls of granular iron are a new technology developed for the treatment of groundwater contaminated with dissolved chlorinated solvents. Degradation of the chlorinated solvents involves a charge transfer process in which they are reductively dechlorinated, and the iron is oxidized. The iron used in the walls is an impure commercial material that is covered with a passive layer of Fe 2O 3, formed as a result of a high-temperature oxidation process used in the production of iron. Understanding the behaviour of this layer upon contact with solution is important, because Fe 2O 3 inhibits mechanisms involved in contaminant reduction, including electron transfer and catalytic hydrogenation. Using a glass column specially designed to allow for in situ Raman spectroscopic and open circuit potential measurements, the passive layer of Fe 2O 3 was observed to be largely removed from the commercial product, Connelly iron, upon contact with Millipore water and with a solution of Millipore water containing 1.5 mg/l trichloroethylene (TCE). It has been previously shown that Fe 2O 3 is removed from iron surfaces upon contact with solution by an autoreduction reaction; however, prior to this work, the reaction has not been shown to occur on the impure commercial iron products used in permeable granular iron walls. The rate of removal was sufficiently rapid such that the initial presence of Fe 2O 3 at the iron surface would have no consequence with respect to the performance of an in situ wall. Subsequent to the removal of Fe 2O 3 layer, magnetite and green rust formed at the iron surface as a result of corrosion in both the Millipore water and the solution containing TCE. The formation of these two species, rather than higher valency iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, is significant for the technology. The former can interfere with contaminant degradation because they inhibit electron transfer and catalytic hydrogenation. Magnetite and green rust, in contrast, will not

  7. Selective Permeability of Uranyl Peroxide Nanocages to Different Alkali Ions: Influences from Surface Pores and Hydration Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunyi; Szymanowski, Jennifer; Burns, Peter; Liu, Tianbo

    The precise guidance to different ions across the biological channels is essential for many biological processes. An artificial nanopore system will facilitate the study of ion transport mechanism through nanosized channels and offer new views for designing nanodevices. Here we reveal that a 2.5-nm-size, fullerene-shaped molecular cluster Li48+mK12(OH)m[UO2(O2) (OH)]60-(H2O)n (m ~20 and n ~310) (U60) shows selective permeability to different alkali ions. The sub-nanometer pores on the water-ligand-rich surface of U60 are able to block Rb+ and Cs+ ions from passing through, while allow Na+ and K+ ions, which possess larger hydrated sizes, to enter the interior space of U60. An interestingly high entropy gain during the binding process between U60 and alkali ions suggest that the hydration shells of Na+i/K+ and U60 are damaged during the interaction. The ion selectivity of U60 is greatly influenced by both the morphologies of surface nanopores and the dynamics of the hydration shells. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Materials Science of Actinides Center, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001089.

  8. Influence of Crassostrea gigas on the permeability and microstructure of the surface layer of concrete exposed to the tidal zone of the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Lv, JianFu; Mao, JiZe; Ba, HengJing

    2015-01-01

    Concrete exposed to the tidal zone of the Yellow Sea and bearing Crassostrea gigas (CG) with differing areal coverages was investigated for evidence of biologically induced corrosion prevention. The experimental results indicated that both the chloride ion profile and the neutralization depth of the concrete decreased with increasing CG coverage. Moreover, the water absorption rate and the chloride ion permeability of concrete with the original surface intact also declined with increasing degrees of CG coverage. However, the water absorption rates of three concrete samples with 2 mm of the surface layer removed were similar, as was their chloride ion permeability. Mercury intrusion porosimetry tests indicated that CG significantly reduced the pore structure of the concrete surface layer. SEM observation revealed that the CG cementation membrane and left valve were tightly glued to the concrete surface and had a dense structure. Concrete durability indices showed that high CG coverage greatly improved concrete durability. PMID:25584410

  9. Probing the role of P dbnd O stretching mode enhancement in nerve-agent sensors: Simulation of the adsorption of diisopropylfluorophosphate on the model MgO and CaO surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejczyk, Wojciech; Majumdar, D.; Roszak, Szczepan; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2007-12-01

    The interactions of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) with model MgO and CaO surfaces have been investigated using density functional (DFT) and Møller-Plesset second order perturbation techniques. The geometries were fully optimized at the DFT level. The calculated interaction energies and the corresponding thermodynamic properties show that DFP is physisorbed on these two model oxide surfaces and adsorption on the MgO surface is stronger. Analyses of the calculated IR and Raman spectra point to the enhancement of the P dbnd O stretching mode with respect to the isolated DFP and this property could be used to detect nerve-agents using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  10. The Magnetohydrodynamic Stagnation Point Flow of a Nanofluid over a Stretching/Shrinking Sheet with Suction

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Syahira; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stagnation point flow of a nanofluid over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet is studied. Numerical results are obtained using boundary value problem solver bvp4c in MATLAB for several values of parameters. The numerical results show that dual solutions exist for the shrinking case, while for the stretching case, the solution is unique. A stability analysis is performed to determine the stability of the dual solutions. For the stable solution, the skin friction is higher in the presence of magnetic field and increases when the suction effect is increased. It is also found that increasing the Brownian motion parameter and the thermophoresis parameter reduces the heat transfer rate at the surface. PMID:25760733

  11. The magnetohydrodynamic stagnation point flow of a nanofluid over a stretching/shrinking sheet with suction.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Syahira; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stagnation point flow of a nanofluid over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet is studied. Numerical results are obtained using boundary value problem solver bvp4c in MATLAB for several values of parameters. The numerical results show that dual solutions exist for the shrinking case, while for the stretching case, the solution is unique. A stability analysis is performed to determine the stability of the dual solutions. For the stable solution, the skin friction is higher in the presence of magnetic field and increases when the suction effect is increased. It is also found that increasing the Brownian motion parameter and the thermophoresis parameter reduces the heat transfer rate at the surface. PMID:25760733

  12. Simulation of single DNA molecule stretching and immobilization in a de-wetting two-phase flow over micropillar-patterned surface

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Ching; Hu, Xin; Wang, Weixiong; James Lee, L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate single DNA stretching dynamics in a de-wetting flow over micropillars using Brownian dynamics simulation. The Brownian dynamics simulation is coupled with transient flow field computation through a numerical particle tracking algorithm. The droplet formation on the top of the micropillar during the de-wetting process creates a flow pattern that allows DNA to stretch across the micropillars. It is found that DNA nanowire forms if DNA molecules could extend across the stagnation point inside the connecting water filament before its breakup. It also shows that DNA locates closer to the top wall of the micropillar has higher chance to enter the flow pattern of droplet formation and thus has higher chance to be stretched across the micropillars. Our simulation tool has the potential to become a design tool for DNA manipulation in complex biomicrofluidic devices. PMID:24404023

  13. Crustal Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebritsen, S.; Gleeson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Existing data and models support a distinction between the hydrodynamics of the brittle upper crust, where topography, permeability contrasts, and magmatic heat sources dominate patterns of flow and externally derived (meteoric) fluids are common, and the ductile lower crust, dominated by devolatilization reactions and internally derived fluids. The permeability structure of the uppermost (~<1 km) crust is highly heterogeneous, and controls include primary lithology, porosity, rheology, geochemistry, and tectonic and time-temperature histories of the rocks. Systematic permeability differences among original lithologies persist to contact-metamorphic depths of 3-10 km, but are not evident at regional-metamorphic depths of 10-30+ km - presumably because, at such depths, metamorphic textures become largely independent of the original lithology. Permeability can vary in time as well as space, and its temporal evolution may be gradual or abrupt: streamflow responses to moderate to large earthquakes demonstrate that dynamic stresses can instantaneously change permeability by factors of up to 20 on a regional scale, whereas a 10-fold decrease in the permeability of a package of shale in a compacting basin may require 107years. Temporal variation is enhanced by strong chemical and thermal disequilibrium; thus lab experiments involving hydrothermal flow in crystalline rocks under pressure, temperature, and chemistry gradients often result in 10-fold permeability decreases over daily to sub-annual time scales. Recent research on enhanced geothermal reservoirs, ore-forming systems, and the hydrologic effects of earthquakes consistently shows that shear dislocation caused by tectonic forcing or fluid injection can increase near-to intermediate-field permeability by factors of 100 to 1000. Nonetheless, considering permeability as static parameter is often a reasonable assumption for low-temperature hydrogeologic investigations with time scales of days to decades.

  14. Permeability and relative permeability in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Berryman, J.G.

    1990-10-01

    Important features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical correlation functions using modern image processing techniques. These correlation functions contain information about porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity, formation factor, and elastic constants, as well as the fluid permeability and relative permeability. The physical basis of this approach is discussed and examples of the results for various sandstones are presented. The analysis shows that Kozeny-Carman relations and Archie's empirical laws must be modified to account for finite percolation thresholds in order to avoid unphysical behavior in the calculated relative permeabilities. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Maintenance measures for preservation and recovery of permeable pavement surface infiltration rate--The effects of street sweeping, vacuum cleaning, high pressure washing, and milling.

    PubMed

    Winston, Ryan J; Al-Rubaei, Ahmed M; Blecken, Godecke T; Viklander, Maria; Hunt, William F

    2016-03-15

    The surface infiltration rates (SIR) of permeable pavements decline with time as sediment and debris clog pore spaces. Effective maintenance techniques are needed to ensure the hydraulic functionality and water quality benefits of this stormwater control. Eight different small-scale and full-scale maintenance techniques aimed at recovering pavement permeability were evaluated at ten different permeable pavement sites in the USA and Sweden. Maintenance techniques included manual removal of the upper 2 cm of fill material, mechanical street sweeping, regenerative-air street sweeping, vacuum street sweeping, hand-held vacuuming, high pressure washing, and milling of porous asphalt. The removal of the upper 2 cm of clogging material did not significantly improve the SIR of concrete grid paves (CGP) and permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP) due to the inclusion of fines in the joint and bedding stone during construction, suggesting routine maintenance cannot overcome improper construction. For porous asphalt maintenance, industrial hand-held vacuum cleaning, pressure washing, and milling were increasingly successful at recovering the SIR. Milling to a depth of 2.5 cm nearly restored the SIR for a 21-year old porous asphalt pavement to like-new conditions. For PICP, street sweepers employing suction were shown to be preferable to mechanical sweepers; additionally, maintenance efforts may become more intensive over time to maintain a threshold SIR, as maintenance was not 100% effective at removing clogging material. PMID:26735865

  16. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  17. Stretched homoporous composite membranes with elliptic nanopores for external-energy-free ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Leiming; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yong

    2016-05-25

    Extremely permeable ultrafiltration membranes with elongated elliptical pores are fabricated by stretching composite membranes with homoporous selective layers and macroporous supports. With simultaneously increased porosities both for the selective layers and supports and the thinned selective layers, the stretched membranes exhibit multifold-enhanced permeability with little sacrifice in selectivities. Thus the produced membranes enable, for the first time, gravity-driven ultrafiltration and discrimination of similarly sized nanoparticles with diameters down to 30 nm. PMID:27141976

  18. Groin stretch (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Stand with your legs wide apart. Shift your weight to one side, bending your knee somewhat. Do not let your knee bend beyond your ankle; in other words, you should be able to look down and still see your toes. You should feel the stretch in your opposite ...

  19. Stretching to Understand Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2007-03-01

    Mechanical stretching of single proteins has been studied experimentally for about 50 proteins yielding a variety of force patterns and values of the peak forces. We have performed a theoretical survey of 7749 proteins of known native structure and map out the landscape of possible dynamical behaviors unders stretching at constant speed. The model used is constructed based on the native geometry. It is solved by methods of molecular dynamics and validated by comparing the theoretical predictions to experimental results. We characterize the distribution of peak forces and on correlations with the system size and with the structure classification as characterized by the CATH scheme. We identify proteins with the biggest forces and show that they belong to few topology classes. We determine which protein segments act as mechanical clamps and show that, in most cases, they correspond to long stretches of parallel beta-strands, but other mechanisms are also possible. We then consider stretching by fluid flows. We show that unfolding induced by a uniform flow shows a richer behavior than that in the force clamp. The dynamics of unfolding is found to depend strongly on the selection of the amino acid, usually one of the termini, which is anchored. These features offer potentially wider diagnostic tools to investigate structure of proteins compared to experiments based on the atomic force microscopy.

  20. Stretch That Budget!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John R.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses ways in which industrial education teachers can stretch their budgets, which include reducing waste to a minimum, keeping an accurate and up-to-date inventory, trading surplus or excess materials with neighboring schools, and planning programs more carefully. Money-saving tips concerned with metals, plastics, woods, and printing are also…

  1. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  2. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  3. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  4. Stretch-Oriented Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Klinedinst, D.; Feuz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Two thermoplastic polyimides - one amorphous, the other crystallizable -- were subjected to isothermal stretching just above their glass transition temperatures. Room-temperature strengths in the stretch direction were greatly improved and, moduli increased up to 3.6-fold. Optimum stretching conditions were determined.

  5. System performance analysis of stretched membrane heliostats

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J V; Murphy, L M; Short, W; Wendelin, T

    1985-12-01

    The optical performance of both focused and unfocused stretched membrane heliostats was examined in the context of the overall cost and performance of central receiver systems. The sensitivity of optical performance to variations in design parameters such as the system size (capacity), delivery temperature, heliostat size, and heliostat surface quality was also examined. The results support the conclusion that focused stretched membrane systems provide an economically attractive alternative to current glass/metal heliostats over essentially the entire range of design parameters studied. In addition, unfocused stretched membrane heliostats may be attractive for a somewhat more limited range of applications, which would include the larger plant sizes (e.g., 450 MW) and lower delivery temperatures (e.g., 450/sup 0/C), or situations in which the heliostat size could economically be reduced.

  6. Anisotropic dewetting on stretched elastomeric substrates.

    PubMed

    Qiao, L; He, L H

    2008-08-01

    We study the instability of a very thin liquid film resting on a uniformly stretched soft elastomeric substrate driven by van der Waals forces. A linear stability analysis shows that the critical fluctuation wavelength in the tensile direction is larger than those in the other directions. The magnitudes of the critical wavelengths are adjustable in the sense that they depend on the principal stretch of the substrate. For example, when the principal stretch of the substrate varies from 1.0 (unstretched) to 3.0, the range of the critical wavelength in the tensile direction increases by 7.0% while that normal to the tensile direction decreases by 8.7%. Therefore, the phenomenon may find potential applications in creating tunable topographically patterned surfaces with nano- to microscale features. PMID:19230211

  7. Glutathione permeability of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1998-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) forms an ion channel that is permeable both to Cl- and to larger organic anions. Here we show, using macroscopic current recording from excised membrane patches, that the anionic antioxidant tripeptide glutathione is permeant in the CFTR channel. This permeability may account for the high concentrations of glutathione that have been measured in the surface fluid that coats airway epithelial cells. Furthermore, loss of this pathway for glutathione transport may contribute to the reduced levels of glutathione observed in airway surface fluid of cystic fibrosis patients, which has been suggested to contribute to the oxidative stress observed in the lung in cystic fibrosis. We suggest that release of glutathione into airway surface fluid may be a novel function of CFTR. PMID:9688865

  8. Stretching cells with DEAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, S.; Rosset, S.; Shea, H. R.

    2012-04-01

    Biological cells regulate their biochemical behavior in response to mechanical stress present in their organism. Most of the available cell cultures designed to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on cells are cm2 area, far too large to monitor single cell response or have a very low throughput. We have developed two sets of high throughput single cell stretcher devices based on dielectric elastomer microactuators to stretch groups of individual cells with various strain levels in a single experiment. The first device consists of an array of 100 μm x 200 μm actuators on a non-stretched PDMS membrane bonded to a Pyrex chip, showing up to 4.7% strain at the electric field of 96 V/μm. The second device contains an array of 100 μm x 100 μm actuators on a 160% uniaxially prestretched PDMS membrane suspended over a frame. 37% strain is recorded at the nominal electric field of 114 V/μm. The performance of these devices as a cell stretcher is assessed by comparing their static and dynamic behavior.

  9. Liquid-permeable electrode

    DOEpatents

    Folser, George R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

  10. Mathematical Analysis of Hall Effect on Transient Hartman Flow about a Rotating Horizontal Permeable Surface in a Porous Medium under Inclined Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, M.; Manglik, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the exact solution for unsteady flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past a impulsively started infinite horizontal surface which is rotating with an angular velocity embedded in a saturated porous medium under the influence of strong magnetic field with hall effect. Our study focuses on the change of direction of the external magnetic field on the flow system which leads to change in the flow behavior and skin frictional forces at the boundary. Systems of flow equations are solved using Laplace transform technique. The impacts of control parameters Hartman number, rotation of the system, hall effect, inclination of the magnetic field, and Darcy number on primary and secondary velocities are shown graphically, skin friction at horizontal boundary in tabular form. For validating our results, in the absence of permeability of the porous medium and inclination of the magnetic field the results are in good agreement with the published results.

  11. BSDB: the biomolecule stretching database

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Mateusz; Sułkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S.; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    We describe the Biomolecule Stretching Data Base that has been recently set up at http://www.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. It provides information about mechanostability of proteins. Its core is based on simulations of stretching of 17 134 proteins within a structure-based model. The primary information is about the heights of the maximal force peaks, the force–displacement patterns, and the sequencing of the contact-rupturing events. We also summarize the possible types of the mechanical clamps, i.e. the motifs which are responsible for a protein's resistance to stretching. PMID:20929872

  12. BSDB: the biomolecule stretching database.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I; Witkowski, Bartlomiej S; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    We describe the Biomolecule Stretching Data Base that has been recently set up at http://www.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. It provides information about mechanostability of proteins. Its core is based on simulations of stretching of 17 134 proteins within a structure-based model. The primary information is about the heights of the maximal force peaks, the force-displacement patterns, and the sequencing of the contact-rupturing events. We also summarize the possible types of the mechanical clamps, i.e. the motifs which are responsible for a protein's resistance to stretching. PMID:20929872

  13. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  14. Optimization of dielectrophoretic DNA stretching in microfabricated devices

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyung Eun; Burns, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    We have found that the surface and bulk solution properties in a microfabricated device affect the degree and probability of electrostretching of DNA molecules. Using lambda phage DNA, we found that significantly hydrophilic surfaces between the electrodes decreases the efficiency of stretching. Surfaces treated with higher silane (trimethyl chlorosilane) concentrations performed better presumably due to the decreased non-specific adsorption of DNA on these surfaces compared to their more hydrophilic counterparts. The shape and dimensions of the electrodes also affected the efficiency of stretching. Both lift-off and metal etching methods produced electrodes with random microscopic peaks along the electrode’s edge and were poorly suited for stretching. Annealing the electrodes (450°C for 10 min) removed most of these peaks and allowed for more controlled stretching to be obtained. We also found that thin electrodes (65nm) gave close to a 90% success rate of DNA stretching but stretching with thick electrodes (350nm) produced only a 20% success rate. PMID:16642979

  15. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  16. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching.

    PubMed

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells' cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics. PMID:25664452

  17. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    PubMed Central

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression maneuvers. After pressure equilibration cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics. PMID:25664452

  18. In-situ monitoring of flow-permeable surface area of high explosive powder using small sample masses

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Amitesh; Han, Yong; Zaka, Fowzia; Gee, Richard H.

    2015-02-17

    To ensure good performance of high explosive devices over long periods of time, initiating powders need to maintain their specific surface area within allowed margins during the entire duration of deployment. A common diagnostic used in this context is the Fisher sub-sieve surface area (FSSA). Furthermore, commercial permeametry instruments measuring the FSSA requires the utilization of a sample mass equal to the crystal density of the sample material, an amount that is often one or two orders of magnitude larger than the typical masses found in standard detonator applications. Here we develop a customization of the standard device that can utilize just tens of milligram samples, and with simple calibration yield FSSA values at ac curacy levels comparable to the standard apparatus. This necessitated a newly designed sample holder, made from a material of low coefficient of thermal expansion, which is conveniently transferred between an aging chamber and a re-designed permeametry tube. This improves the fidelity of accelerated aging studies by allowing measurement on the same physical sample at various time - instants during the aging process, and by obviating the need for a potentially FSSA-altering powder re-compaction step. We used the customized apparatus to monitor the FSSA evolution of a number of undoped and homolog-doped PETN powder samples that were subjected to artificial aging for several months at elevated temperatures. These results, in conjunction with an Arrhenius-based aging model were used to assess powder-coarsening - rates under long-term storage.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Identifiability of the Land Surface Model JULES at the point scale in permeable catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakopoulou, C.; Bulygina, N.; Butler, A. P.; McIntyre, N. R.

    2012-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are recognised as important components of Global Circulation Models (GCMs). Simulating exchanges of the moisture, carbon and energy between land surface and atmosphere in a consistent manner requires physics-based LSMs of high complexity, fine vertical resolution and a large number of parameters that need to be estimated. The "physics" that is incorporated in such models is generally based on our knowledge of point (or very small) scale hydrological processes. Therefore, while larger GCM grid-scale performance may be the ultimate goal, the ability of the model to simulate the point-scale processes is, intuitively, a pre-requisite for its reliable use at larger scales. Critical evaluation of model performance and parameter uncertainty at point scales is therefore a rational starting point for critical evaluation of LSMs; and identification of optimal parameter sets at the point scale is a significant stage of the model evaluation at larger scales. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is a complex LSM, which is used to represent surface exchanges in the UK Met Office's forecast and climate change models. This complexity necessitates a large number of model parameters (in total 108) some of which are incapable of being measured directly at large (i.e. kilometer) scales. For this reason, a parameter sensitivity analysis is a vital confidence building process within the framework of every LSM, and as a part of the calibration strategy. The problem of JULES parameter estimation and uncertainty at the point scale with a view to assessing the accuracy and the uncertainty in the default parameter values is addressed. The sensitivity of the JULES output of soil moisture is examined using parameter response surface analysis. The implemented technique is based on the Regional Sensitivity Analysis method (RSA), which evaluates the model response surface over a region of parameter space using Monte Carlo sampling. The modified version of RSA

  20. In-situ monitoring of flow-permeable surface area of high explosive powder using small sample masses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maiti, Amitesh; Han, Yong; Zaka, Fowzia; Gee, Richard H.

    2015-02-17

    To ensure good performance of high explosive devices over long periods of time, initiating powders need to maintain their specific surface area within allowed margins during the entire duration of deployment. A common diagnostic used in this context is the Fisher sub-sieve surface area (FSSA). Furthermore, commercial permeametry instruments measuring the FSSA requires the utilization of a sample mass equal to the crystal density of the sample material, an amount that is often one or two orders of magnitude larger than the typical masses found in standard detonator applications. Here we develop a customization of the standard device that canmore » utilize just tens of milligram samples, and with simple calibration yield FSSA values at ac curacy levels comparable to the standard apparatus. This necessitated a newly designed sample holder, made from a material of low coefficient of thermal expansion, which is conveniently transferred between an aging chamber and a re-designed permeametry tube. This improves the fidelity of accelerated aging studies by allowing measurement on the same physical sample at various time - instants during the aging process, and by obviating the need for a potentially FSSA-altering powder re-compaction step. We used the customized apparatus to monitor the FSSA evolution of a number of undoped and homolog-doped PETN powder samples that were subjected to artificial aging for several months at elevated temperatures. These results, in conjunction with an Arrhenius-based aging model were used to assess powder-coarsening - rates under long-term storage.« less

  1. Mechanical stretch induces lung α-epithelial Na(+) channel expression.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Isaac, John; Seidner, Steven R; Dixon, Patricia S; Henson, Barbara M; DiGeronimo, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT During fetal development physiological stretching helps drive lung growth and maturation. At birth, the α-subunit of the alveolar epithelial sodium channel (α-ENaC) is a critical factor in helping to facilitate clearance of lung fluid during the perinatal period. The effects of stretch, however, on α-ENaC expression in the fetal lung have yet to be elucidated. In an effort to explore this question, we used both an in vitro cell culture model that exposes cells to repetitive cyclic stretch (CS) as well as an in vivo preterm animal model of mechanical ventilation (MV). We found that murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells exposed to repetitive CS showed a significant rise in α-ENaC mRNA expression. Total and cell-surface protein abundance of α-ENaC were also elevated after 24 h of CS. Stretch-induced increases in α-ENaC expression were suppressed in the presence of either actinomycin D or cycloheximide. Pharmacological inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) did not attenuate stretch-induced increases in α-ENaC protein, whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK or c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) did. In 29-day preterm rabbits, alveolar stretching secondary to postnatal MV markedly elevated fetal lung α-ENaC expression compared to spontaneously breathing counterparts. In summary, our findings indicate that mechanical stretch promotes α-ENaC expression. PMID:25058750

  2. Low Stretch Diffusion Flames Over a Solid Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; T'ien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    A unique new way to study low gravity flames in normal gravity has been developed. To study flame structure and extinction characteristics in low stretch environments, a normal gravity low-stretch diffusion flame is generated using a cylindrical PMMA sample of varying large radii. Foutch and T'ien used the radiative loss as well as a densimetric Froude number to characterize the blowoff (small Da) and quenching extinction (large Da) boundaries in stagnation-point diffusion flames under various convective conditions. An important conclusion of this study was that the shape and location of the extinction boundary, as well as a number of important flame characteristics, were almost identical for the buoyant, forced, and mixed convective environments they modeled. This theory indicates it should be possible to understand a material's burning characteristics in the low stretch environment of spacecraft (induced by fans and crew movements) by understanding its burning characteristics in an equivalent Earth-based stretch environment (induced by normal gravity buoyancy). Similarly, the material's burning characteristics in Lunar or Martian stretch environments (induced by partial gravity buoyancy) can be assessed. Equivalent stretch rates can be determined as a function of gravity, imposed flow, and geometry. A generalized expression for stretch rate which captures mixed convection includes both buoyant and forced stretch is defined as a = a(sub f) ((1 + (a(sub b))exp 2/(a(sub b))exp 2))exp 1/2. For purely buoyant flow, the equivalent stretch rate is a(sub b) = [(rho(exp e)-rho(exp *)/rho(sub e)][g/R](exp 1/2). For purely forced flow, the equivalent stretch rate is characterized by either a(sub f)= 2U(sub infinity)/R for a cylinder, or a(sub f)=U(sub jet)/d(sub jet) for a jet impinging on a planar surface. In these experiments, the buoyant stretch is varied through R, the radius of curvature, but the buoyant stretch could also be varied through g, the gravity level. In

  3. Lassen's equation is a good approximation of permeability-surface model: new α values for 99mTc-HMPAO and 99mTc-ECD

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Brain perfusion tracers like [99mTc] d,l-hexamethyl-propyeneamine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) and [99mTc] ethyl-cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD) underestimate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) at high flow values. To improve linearity between tracer accumulation and rCBF, two different models have been proposed. One is Lassen's correction algorithm for back-diffusion of tracer, and the other is based on the permeability-surface (PS) model for correction of low first-pass extraction. Although both these models have the same goal, they have completely different forms of equation. It was demonstrated that mathematical approximation of the PS model equation leads to Lassen's equation. In this process, the relationship between PS, CBF values and Lassen's parameter was acquired, and how to correct both the back-diffusion and low first-pass extraction was also demonstrated. A computer simulation confirmed that the two models provided similar consequences when the parameter value is chosen according to the relationship found. Lassen's equation can be used to correct not only back-diffusion but also low first-pass extraction. To perform overall correction, the parameter value we have been using for decades may be too weak. I estimated that the parameter value for overall correction of HMPAO would be around 0.5, and that of ECD would be around 0.65. PMID:24736892

  4. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling.

    PubMed

    Grey, M J; Pierce, C W; Milner, T E; Sinkjaer, T

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions during the crank cycle, producing ankle dorsiflexion perturbations of similar trajectory. The stretch reflex was greatest during the power phase of the crank cycle and was decreased to the level of background EMG during recovery. Matched perturbations were induced under static conditions at the same crank angle and background soleus EMG as recorded during the power phase of active pedaling. The magnitude of the stretch reflex was not statistically different from that during the static condition throughout the power phase of the movement. The results of this study indicate that the stretch reflex is not depressed during active cycling as has been shown with the H-reflex. This lack of depression may reflect a decreased susceptibility of the stretch reflex to inhibition, possibly originating from presynaptic mechanisms. PMID:11232549

  5. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  6. Positron emission tomographic measurement of cerebral blood flow and permeability-surface area product of water using (/sup 15/O)water and (/sup 11/C)butanol

    SciTech Connect

    Herscovitch, P.; Raichle, M.E.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Welch, M.J.

    1987-10-01

    We have previously adapted Kety's tissue autoradiographic method for measuring regional CBF in laboratory animals to the measurement of CBF in humans with positron emission tomography (PET) and H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O. Because this model assumes diffusion equilibrium between tissue and venous blood, the use of a diffusion-limited tracer, such as H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O, may lead to an underestimation of CBF. We therefore validated the use of (/sup 11/C)butanol as an alternative freely diffusible tracer for PET. We then used it in humans to determine the underestimation of CBF that occurs with H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O, and thereby were able to calculate the extraction Ew and permeability-surface area product PSw of H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O. Measurements of the permeability of rhesus monkey brain to (/sup 11/C)butanol, obtained by means of an intracarotid injection, external detection technique, demonstrated that this tracer is freely diffusible up to a CBF of at least 170 ml/min-100 g. CBF measured in baboons with the PET autoradiographic method and (/sup 11/C)butanol was then compared with CBF measured in the same animals with a standard residue detection method. An excellent correspondence was obtained between both of these measurements. Finally, paired PET measurements of CBF were made with both H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O and (/sup 11/C)butanol in 17 normal human subjects. Average global CBF was significantly greater when measured with (/sup 11/C)butanol (53.1 ml/min-100 g) than with H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O (44.4 ml/min-100 g). Average global Ew was 0.84 and global PSw was 104 ml/min-100 g. Regional measurements showed a linear relationship between local PSw and CBF, while Ew was relatively uniform throughout the brain. Simulations were used to determine the potential error associated with the use of an incorrect value for the brain-blood partition coefficient for (/sup 11/C)butanol and to calculate the effect of tissue heterogeneity and errors in flow measurement on the calculation of PSw.

  7. Incorporating surface indicators of reservoir permeability into reservoir volume calculations: Application to the Colli Albani caldera and the Central Italy Geothermal Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Guido; De Benedetti, Arnaldo Angelo; Bonamico, Andrea; Ramazzotti, Paolo; Mattei, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The Quaternary Roman Volcanic Province extends for over 200 km along the Tyrrhenian margin of the Italian peninsula and is composed of several caldera complexes with significant associated geothermal potential. In spite of the massive programs of explorations conducted by the then state-owned ENEL and AGIP companies between the 1970s and 1990s, and the identification of several high enthalpy fields, this resource remains so far unexploited, although it occurs right below the densely populated metropolitan area of Roma capital city. The main reason for this failure is that deep geothermal reservoirs are associated with fractured rocks, the secondary permeability of which has been difficult to predict making the identification of the most productive volumes of the reservoirs and the localisation of productive wells uncertain. As a consequence, almost half of the many exploration deep bore-holes drilled in the area reached a dry target. This work reviews available data and re-assesses the geothermal potential of caldera-related systems in Central Italy, by analysing in detail the case of the Colli Albani caldera system, the closest to Roma capital city. A GIS based approach identifies the most promising reservoir volumes for geothermal exploitation and uses an improved volume method approach for the evaluation of geothermal potential. The approach is based on a three dimensional matrix of georeferenced spatial data; the A axis accounts for the modelling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data; the B axis accounts for the thermal modelling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are necessary but not sufficient to identify rock volumes actually permeated by geothermal fluids in fractured reservoirs. We discuss the implementation of a C axis that evaluates all surface data indicating permeability in the reservoir and actual geothermal fluid circulation. We consider datasets on: i

  8. Adhesion of malignant mammary tumor cells MDA-MB-231 to microvessel wall increases microvascular permeability via degradation of endothelial surface glycocalyx

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of tumor cell adhesion on microvascular permeability (P) in intact microvessels, we measured the adhesion rate of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231, the hydraulic conductivity (Lp), the P, and reflection coefficient (σ) to albumin of the microvessels at the initial tumor cell adhesion and after ∼45 min cell perfusion in the postcapillary venules of rat mesentery in vivo. Rats (Sprague-Dawley, 250–300 g) were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium given subcutaneously. A midline incision was made in the abdominal wall, and the mesentery was gently taken out and arranged on the surface of a glass coverslip for the measurement. An individual postcapillary venule was perfused with cells at a rate of ∼1 mm/s, which is the mean blood flow velocity in this type of microvessels. At the initial tumor cell adhesion, which was defined as one adherent cell in ∼100- to 145-μm vessel segment, Lp was 1.5-fold and P was 2.3-fold of their controls, and σ decreased from 0.92 to 0.64; after ∼45-min perfusion, the adhesion increased to ∼5 adherent cells in ∼100- to 145-μm vessel segment, while Lp increased to 2.8-fold, P to 5.7-fold of their controls, and σ decreased from 0.92 to 0.42. Combining these measured data with the predictions from a mathematical model for the interendothelial transport suggests that tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall degrades the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) layer. This suggestion was confirmed by immunostaining of heparan sulfate of the ESG on the microvessel wall. Preserving of the ESG by a plasma glycoprotein orosomucoid decreased the P to albumin and reduced the tumor cell adhesion. PMID:22858626

  9. The skin migratory stage of the schistosomulum of Schistosoma mansoni has a surface showing greater permeability and activity in membrane internalisation than other forms of skin or mechanical schistosomula.

    PubMed

    DE Jesus Jeremias, Wander; DA Cunha Melo, Jose Renan; Baba, Elio Hideo; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech; Kusel, John Robert

    2015-08-01

    Skin schistosomula can be prepared by collecting them after isolated mouse skin have been penetrated by cercariae in vitro. The schistosomula can also migrate out of isolated mouse skin penetrated by cercariae in vitro and from mouse skin penetrated by cercariae in vivo. Schistosomula can also be produced from cercariae applied through a syringe or in a vortex. When certain surface properties of the different forms of schistosomula were compared, those migrating from mouse skin penetrated by cercariae in vivo or in vitro had greatly increased permeability to membrane impermeant molecules such as Lucifer yellow and high molecular weight dextrans. These migrating forms also possessed surfaces which showed greatly enhanced uptake into internal membrane vesicles of the dye FM 143, a marker for endocytosis. This greatly enhanced activity and permeability of the surfaces of tissue migrating schistosomula is likely to be of great importance in the adaptation to the new host. PMID:26028506

  10. A Purposeful Dynamic Stretching Routine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Craig; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stretching, which involves moving parts of the body and gradually increases range of motion, speed of movement, or both through controlled, sport-specific movements, has become the popular choice of pre-exercise warm-up. This type of warm-up has evolved to encompass several variations, but at its core is the principle theme that preparing…

  11. Three Fresh Exposures, Stretched Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been processed using a technique known as a decorrelation stretch to exaggerate the colors. The area in the image includes three holes created inside 'Endurance Crater' by Opportunity's rock abrasion tool between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 and June 23, 2004). Because color variations are so subtle in the pictured area, stretched images are useful for discriminating color differences that can alert scientists to compositional and textural variations. For example, without the exaggeration, no color difference would be discernable among the tailings left behind after the grinding of these holes, but in this stretched image, the tailings around 'London' (top) appear more red than those of the other holes ('Virginia,' middle, and 'Cobble Hill,' bottom). Scientists believe that is because the rock abrasion tool sliced through two 'blueberries,' or spherules (visible on the upper left and upper right sides of the circle). When the blades break up these spherules, composed of mostly gray hematite, the result is a bright red powder. In this image, you can see the rock layers that made the team want to grind holes in each identified layer. The top layer is yellowish red, the middle is yellowish green and the lower layer is green. Another advantage to viewing this stretched image is the clear detail of the distribution of the rock abrasion tool tailings (heading down-slope) and the differences in rock texture. This image was created using the 753-, 535- and 432-nanometer filters.

  12. Design of Warped Stretch Transform.

    PubMed

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire Lifan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch dispersive Fourier transform enables real-time spectroscopy at the repetition rate of million scans per second. High-speed real-time instruments ranging from analog-to-digital converters to cameras and single-shot rare-phenomena capture equipment with record performance have been empowered by it. Its warped stretch variant, realized with nonlinear group delay dispersion, offers variable-rate spectral domain sampling, as well as the ability to engineer the time-bandwidth product of the signal's envelope to match that of the data acquisition systems. To be able to reconstruct the signal with low loss, the spectrotemporal distribution of the signal spectrum needs to be sparse. Here, for the first time, we show how to design the kernel of the transform and specifically, the nonlinear group delay profile dictated by the signal sparsity. Such a kernel leads to smart stretching with nonuniform spectral resolution, having direct utility in improvement of data acquisition rate, real-time data compression, and enhancement of ultrafast data capture accuracy. We also discuss the application of warped stretch transform in spectrotemporal analysis of continuous-time signals. PMID:26602458

  13. Design of Warped Stretch Transform

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire Lifan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch dispersive Fourier transform enables real-time spectroscopy at the repetition rate of million scans per second. High-speed real-time instruments ranging from analog-to-digital converters to cameras and single-shot rare-phenomena capture equipment with record performance have been empowered by it. Its warped stretch variant, realized with nonlinear group delay dispersion, offers variable-rate spectral domain sampling, as well as the ability to engineer the time-bandwidth product of the signal’s envelope to match that of the data acquisition systems. To be able to reconstruct the signal with low loss, the spectrotemporal distribution of the signal spectrum needs to be sparse. Here, for the first time, we show how to design the kernel of the transform and specifically, the nonlinear group delay profile dictated by the signal sparsity. Such a kernel leads to smart stretching with nonuniform spectral resolution, having direct utility in improvement of data acquisition rate, real-time data compression, and enhancement of ultrafast data capture accuracy. We also discuss the application of warped stretch transform in spectrotemporal analysis of continuous-time signals. PMID:26602458

  14. Design of Warped Stretch Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire Lifan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-11-01

    Time stretch dispersive Fourier transform enables real-time spectroscopy at the repetition rate of million scans per second. High-speed real-time instruments ranging from analog-to-digital converters to cameras and single-shot rare-phenomena capture equipment with record performance have been empowered by it. Its warped stretch variant, realized with nonlinear group delay dispersion, offers variable-rate spectral domain sampling, as well as the ability to engineer the time-bandwidth product of the signal’s envelope to match that of the data acquisition systems. To be able to reconstruct the signal with low loss, the spectrotemporal distribution of the signal spectrum needs to be sparse. Here, for the first time, we show how to design the kernel of the transform and specifically, the nonlinear group delay profile dictated by the signal sparsity. Such a kernel leads to smart stretching with nonuniform spectral resolution, having direct utility in improvement of data acquisition rate, real-time data compression, and enhancement of ultrafast data capture accuracy. We also discuss the application of warped stretch transform in spectrotemporal analysis of continuous-time signals.

  15. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  16. Studying the Variation in Gas Permeability of Porous Building Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L.; Savidge, C. R.; Hu, L.; Rizzo, D. M.; Hayden, N. J.; Dewoolkar, M.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding permeability of building materials is important for problems involving studies of contaminant transport. Examples include contamination from fire, acid rain, and chemical and biological weapons. Our research investigates the gas permeability of porous building substrates such as concretes, limestones, sandstones, and bricks. Each sample was cored to produce 70 mm (2.75”) diameter cores approximately 75-130 mm (3-5”) tall. The surface gas permeability was measured on the top surface of these specimens using the AutoScan II device manufactured by New England Research, Inc. The measurements were taken along a 3 mm grid producing a map of surface gas permeability. An example map is shown in Figure 1. The macroscopic measurements were performed along the entire cored specimen. A second set of measurements were made on a 5 mm thick slice cut from the top of each specimen to examine whether these measurements compare better with the surface measurements. The macroscopic gas permeability was measured for all specimens using ASTM D 4525. The results are summarized in Table 1. In general, the surface and macroscopic gas permeability measurements (Table 1) compare reasonably well (within one order of magnitude). The permeability of the 5 mm slices is not significantly different from the entire core for the specimens tested. Figure 1. Results of surface permeability mappingof Ohio Sandstone using the AutoScan II device. a) Map of gas permeability b) Range of gas permeability c) Density function of permeability. Table 1. Gas permeability values (mD)

  17. Permeability of gloves used in nuclear medicine departments to [(99m)Tc]-pertechnetate and [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose: radiation protection considerations.

    PubMed

    Ridone, S; Matheoud, R; Valzano, S; Di Martino, R; Vigna, L; Brambilla, M

    2013-09-01

    In order to evaluate the safety of the individual protection devices, the permeability of four different types of disposable gloves, commonly used in hospitals, was tested in relation to [(99m)Tc]-pertechnetate and to [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]-FDG). From these radiopharmaceutical solutions, a drop was deposited on the external surface of the glove which was opened and stretched with the external surface placed upward. The smear test technique permitted to evaluate the activity onto the inner surface of the glove at different times. The smear tests were measured in a well sodium iodide detector calibrated in efficiency for (99m)Tc and (18)F. The permeability was tested on ten samples of each type of gloves and was expressed as the ratio of the activity onto the inner surface at each time interval to the activity deposited on the external surface of the glove. For each type of gloves and for each sampling time, mean value, standard deviation and percentage coefficient of variation of permeability were evaluated. One type of gloves showed a low resistance to permeation of both radiopharmaceuticals, while another one only to pertechnetate. The other gloves were good performers. The results of this study suggest to test permeability for gloves used for handling radiopharmaceuticals, before their adoption in the clinical routine. This practice will provide a more careful service of radiation protection for nuclear medicine department staff. PMID:23419926

  18. Stretching-induced nanostructures on shape memory polyurethane films and their regulation to osteoblasts morphology.

    PubMed

    Xing, Juan; Ma, Yufei; Lin, Manping; Wang, Yuanliang; Pan, Haobo; Ruan, Changshun; Luo, Yanfeng

    2016-10-01

    Programming such as stretching, compression and bending is indispensible to endow polyurethanes with shape memory effects. Despite extensive investigations on the contributions of programming processes to the shape memory effects of polyurethane, less attention has been paid to the nanostructures of shape memory polyurethanes surface during the programming process. Here we found that stretching could induce the reassembly of hard domains and thereby change the nanostructures on the film surfaces with dependence on the stretching ratios (0%, 50%, 100%, and 200%). In as-cast polyurethane films, hard segments sequentially assembled into nano-scale hard domains, round or fibrillar islands, and fibrillar apophyses. Upon stretching, the islands packed along the stretching axis to form reoriented fibrillar apophyses along the stretching direction. Stretching only changed the chemical patterns on polyurethane films without significantly altering surface roughness, with the primary composition of fibrillar apophyses being hydrophilic hard domains. Further analysis of osteoblasts morphology revealed that the focal adhesion formation and osteoblasts orientation were in accordance with the chemical patterns of the underlying stretched films, which corroborates the vital roles of stretching-induced nanostructures in regulating osteoblasts morphology. These novel findings suggest that programming might hold great potential for patterning polyurethane surfaces so as to direct cellular behavior. In addition, this work lays groundwork for guiding the programming of shape memory polyurethanes to produce appropriate nanostructures for predetermined medical applications. PMID:27395036

  19. Permeability across lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Wataru

    2016-10-01

    Molecular permeation through lipid membranes is a fundamental biological process that is important for small neutral molecules and drug molecules. Precise characterization of free energy surface and diffusion coefficients along the permeation pathway is required in order to predict molecular permeability and elucidate the molecular mechanisms of permeation. Several recent technical developments, including improved molecular models and efficient sampling schemes, are illustrated in this review. For larger penetrants, explicit consideration of multiple collective variables, including orientational, conformational degrees of freedom, are required to be considered in addition to the distance from the membrane center along the membrane normal. Although computationally demanding, this method can provide significant insights into the molecular mechanisms of permeation for molecules of medical and pharmaceutical importance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:27085977

  20. Method for determining permeability in hydrocarbon wells

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, D.E.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes a method of determining at the earth's surface the permeability of a subsurface earth formation having a known nominal hydrocarbon pore saturation value. The formation is tranversed by a borehole resulting from drilling with a drill bit.

  1. Stretching dynamics of semiflexible polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermayer, B.; Hallatschek, O.; Frey, E.; Kroy, K.

    2007-08-01

    We analyze the nonequilibrium dynamics of single inextensible semiflexible biopolymers as stretching forces are applied at the ends. Based on different (contradicting) heuristic arguments, various scaling laws have been proposed for the propagation speed of the backbone tension which is induced in response to stretching. Here, we employ a newly developed unified theory to systematically substantiate, restrict, and extend these approaches. Introducing the practically relevant scenario of a chain equilibrated under some prestretching force fpre that is suddenly exposed to a different external force fext at the ends, we give a concise physical explanation of the underlying relaxation processes by means of an intuitive blob picture. We discuss the corresponding intermediate asymptotics, derive results for experimentally relevant observables, and support our conclusions by numerical solutions of the coarse-grained equations of motion for the tension.

  2. Stretching short DNAs in electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jizeng; Fan, Xiaojun; Gao, Huajian

    2006-03-01

    This paper is aimed at a combined theoretical and numerical study of the force-extension relation of a short DNA molecule stretched in an electrolyte. A theoretical formula based on a recent discrete wormlike chain (WLC) model of Kierfeld et al. (Eur Phys. J. E, Vol. 14, pp.17-34, 2004) and the classical OSF mean-field theory on electrostatic stiffening of a charged polymer is numerically verified by a set of Brownian dynamics simulations based on a generalized bead-rod (GBR) model incorporating long-ranged electrostatic interactions via the Debye-Hueckel potential (DH). The analysis indicates that the stretching of a short DNA can be well described as a WLC with a constant effective persistent length. This contrasts the behavior of long DNA chains that are known to exhibit variable persistent lengths depending on the ion concentration levels and force magnitudes. PMID:16711068

  3. Stretching

    MedlinePlus

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  4. Buoyant Low Stretch Diffusion Flames Beneath Cylindrical PMMA Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    A unique new way to study low gravity flames in normal gravity has been developed. To study flame structure and extinction characteristics in low stretch environments, a normal gravity low-stretch diffusion flame is generated using a cylindrical PMMA sample of varying large radii. Burning rates, visible flame thickness, visible flame standoff distance, temperature profiles in the solid and gas, and radiative loss from the system were measured. A transition from the blowoff side of the flammability map to the quenching side of the flammability map is observed at approximately 6-7/ sec, as determined by curvefits to the non-monotonic trends in peak temperatures, solid and gas-phase temperature gradients, and non-dimensional standoff distances. A surface energy balance reveals that the fraction of heat transfer from the flame that is lost to in-depth conduction and surface radiation increases with decreasing stretch until quenching extinction is observed. This is primarily due to decreased heat transfer from the flame, while the magnitude of the losses remains the same. A unique local extinction flamelet phenomena and associated pre-extinction oscillations are observed at very low stretch. An ultimate quenching extinction limit is found at low stretch with sufficiently high induced heat losses.

  5. BSDB: the Biomolecule Stretching Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartlomiej

    2011-03-01

    Despite more than a decade of experiments on single biomolecule manipulation, mechanical properties of only several scores of proteins have been measured. A characteristic scale of the force of resistance to stretching, Fmax , has been found to range between ~ 10 and 480 pN. The Biomolecule Stretching Data Base (BSDB) described here provides information about expected values of Fmax for, currently, 17 134 proteins. The values and other characteristics of the unfolding proces, including the nature of identified mechanical clamps, are available at www://info.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. They have been obtained through simulations within a structure-based model which correlates satisfactorily with the available experimental data on stretching. BSDB also lists experimental data and results of the existing all-atom simulations. The database offers a Protein-Data-Bank-wide guide to mechano-stability of proteins. Its description is provided by a forthcoming Nucleic Acids Research paper. Supported by EC FUNMOL project FP7-NMP-2007-SMALL-1, and European Regional Development Fund: Innovative Economy (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08).

  6. Biaxially Stretched Polycarbonate Film For Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shaio-Ping S.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Bankston, Clyde P.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments on effects of biaxial stretching on crystal structures, dielectric properties, and sellected thermal and mechanical properties of biaxially stretched polycarbonate films. Highest stretch ratios produce highest degree of crystallinity, with single crystalline phase and distribution of crystallites more nearly isotropic than uniaxially oriented film. Electrical properties at high temperatures improved.

  7. Laser-induced structure formation on stretched polymer foils

    SciTech Connect

    Bityurin, Nikita; Arnold, Nikita; Baeuerle, Dieter; Arenholz, Enno

    2007-04-15

    Noncoherent structures that develop during UV laser ablation of stretched semicrystalline polymer foils are a very general phenomenon. A thermodynamic model based on stress relaxation within the modified layer of the polymer surface describes the main features of the observed phenomena, and, in particular, the dependence of the period of structures on laser wavelength, fluence, and number of laser pulses.

  8. MHD Flow Of Walters' Liquid B Over A Nonlinearly Stretching Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddheshwar, P. G.; Mahabaleshwar, U. S.; Chan, A.

    2015-08-01

    The paper discusses the boundary layer flow of a weak electrically conducting viscoelastic Walters' liquid B over a nonlinearly stretching sheet subjected to an applied transverse magnetic field, when the liquid far away from the surface is at rest. The stretching is assumed to be a quadratic function of the coordinate along the direction of stretching. An analytical expression is obtained for the stream function and velocity components as a function of the viscoelastic parameter, the Chandrasekhar number and stretching related parameters. The results have possible technological applications in liquid based systems involving stretchable materials.

  9. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. PMID:23434738

  10. Vibrational transitions of coupled stretching and bending overtones in chloroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Kai; Gerhards, Markus; Kleist, Einhard; Bettermann, Hans

    1995-08-01

    The intensities and frequencies of Fermi-coupled stretching and bending overtone transitions in CHCl3 were calculated by means of a variational method. Symmetrized two-dimensional ab initio potential and dipole moment surfaces were determined at the MP2 level using the 6-31G** basis set. The Hamiltonian for the CH- stretching motion and the simultaneously excited twofold degenerate CH- bending vibration is expressed most easily in cylindrical coordinates. Absorption intensities up to the Δv=7 CH-stretching overtone above 16 300 cm-1 are calculated and are compared to former experimental values and theoretical results. New quantitative intracavity measurements for the N=6 polyad are presented. Relative errors between absolute experimental intensities and the calculated values are less than 30%.

  11. Permeable membrane experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Thomas J.; Cao, Tuan Q.; Kliss, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Permeable Membrane Experiment is to gather flight data on three areas of membrane performance that are influenced by the presence of gravity. These areas are: (1) Liquid/gas phase separation, (2) gas bubble interference with diffusion through porous membranes and (3) wetting characteristics of hydrophilic membrane surfaces. These data are important in understaning the behavior of membrane/liquid/gas interfaces where surface tension forces predominate. The data will be compared with 1-g data already obtained and with predicted micrograviity behavior. The data will be used to develop designs for phase separation and plant nutrient delivery systems and will be available to the life support community for use in developing technologies which employ membranes. A conceptual design has been developed to conduct three membrane experiments, in sequence, aboard a single Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) carrier to be carried in the Shuttle Orbiter payload bay. One experiment is conducted for each of the three membrane performance areas under study. These experiments are discussed in this paper.

  12. Structure of low-stretch methane nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bai; Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Sung, Chih-Jen; T'ien, James S.

    2007-04-15

    The present study experimentally and numerically investigates the structure associated with extremely low-stretch ({proportional_to}2 s{sup -1}) gaseous nonpremixed flames. The study of low-stretch flames aims to improve our fundamental understanding of the flame radiation effects on flame response and extinction limits. Low-stretch flames are also relevant to fire safety in reduced-gravity environments and to large buoyant fires, where localized areas of low stretch are attainable. In this work, ultra-low-stretch flames are established in normal gravity by bottom burning of a methane/nitrogen mixture discharged from a porous spherically symmetric burner of large radius of curvature. The large thickness of the resulting nonpremixed flame allows detailed mapping of the flame structure. Several advanced nonintrusive optical diagnostics are used to study the flame structure. Gas phase temperatures are measured by Raman scattering, while the burner surface temperatures are obtained by IR imaging. In addition, OH-PLIF and chemiluminescence imaging techniques are used to help characterize the extent of the flame reaction zone. These experimental results allow direct comparison with a quasi-one-dimensional numerical model including detailed chemistry, thermodynamic/transport properties, and radiation treatment. In addition, the radiative interactions between the flame and porous burner (modeled as a gray surface) are accounted for in the present model. The numerical modeling is demonstrated to be able to simulate the low-stretch flame structure. Using the current model, the extinction limits under different conditions are also examined. The computational results are consistent with experimental observations. (author)

  13. Aerothermodynamic properties of stretched flames in enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, D. A.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    Flames are stretched by being pulled along their frontal surface by the flow field in which they reside. Their trajectories tend to approach particle paths, acquiring eventually the role of contact boundaries, -interfaces between the burnt and unburnt medium that may broaden solely as a consequence of diffusion. Fundamental properties of flow fields governing such flames are determined here on the basis of the zero Mach number model, providng a rational method of approach to the computational analysis of combustion fields in enclosures where, besides the aerodynamic properties flow, the thermodynamic process of compression must be taken into account. To illustrate its application, the method is used to reveal the mechanism of formation of a tulip-shape flame in a rectangular enclosure under nonturbulent flow conditions.

  14. Constraint effects observed in crack initiation stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.M.; Ernst, H.A.

    1995-12-31

    The current paper characterizes constraint in fracture: J-modified resistance (Jr) curves were developed for two tough structural materials, 6061-T651 (aluminum) and IN718-STA1 (nickel-base superalloy). A wide variety of configurations was tested to consider load configurations from bending to tension including three specimen types (compact tension, center-crack tension, and single-edge notched tension), and a range of ligament lengths and thicknesses, as well as side-grooved and smooth-sided ligaments. The Jr curves exhibited an inflection point after some crack extension, and the data were excluded beyond the inflection. Qualified Jr curves for the two materials showed similar behavior, but R-curves were identical for equal ligament length-to-thickness ratio (RL), for the aluminum alloy, with increasing slope for increasing RL, while for the nickel, the resistance curves aligned for equal ligament thickness, B, and the slope increased for decreasing B. Displacements at the original crack tip (CToD) were recorded throughout the test for several specimens. CToD-versus-crack extension curves were developed, and data were excluded beyond the inflection point (as with the Jr curves). The data collapsed into two distinct curves, thought to represent the surface, plane stress effect and the central, plane strain effect. This was observed for both materials. A technique called profiling is presented for the aluminum alloy only, where the crack face displacements are recorded at the final point of the test as a function of the position throughout the crack cavity, along with an effort to extract the observations in a usable form. Displacements were consistent throughout the cross-section at and behind the original crack tip. In the region where the crack grew, this displacement was developed by a combination of stretch and crack growth. The stretch required to initiate crack extension was a function of the depth beneath the surface into the cross-section.

  15. Detachment of stretched viscoelastic fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmaker, N. J.; Hui, C. Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Creton, C.

    2008-03-01

    New experimental results are presented about the final stage of failure of soft viscoelastic adhesives. A microscopic view of the detachment of the adhesive shows that after cavity growth and expansion, well adhered soft adhesives form a network of fibrils connected to expanded contacting feet which fail via a sliding mechanism, sensitive to interfacial shear stresses rather than by a fracture mechanism as sometimes suggested in earlier work. A mechanical model of this stretching and sliding failure phenomenon is presented which treats the fibril as a nonlinear elastic or viscoelastic rod and the foot as an elastic layer subject to a friction force proportional to the local displacement rate. The force on the stretched rod drives the sliding of the foot against the substrate. The main experimental parameter controlling the failure strain and stress during the sliding process is identified by the model as the normalized probe pull speed, which also depends on the magnitude of the friction and PSA modulus. In addition, the material properties, viscoelasticity and finite extensibility of the polymer chains, are shown to have an important effect on both the details of the sliding process and the ultimate failure strain and stress. Appendix B is only available in electronic form at 10.1140/epje/i2007-10287-y and are accessible for authorised users.

  16. Permeability of Dentine

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Farid Bin Che

    2003-01-01

    This is an update on the present integrated knowledge regarding dentine permeability that assumed a role in dentine sensitivity and contribute clinically to the effective bonding properties of restorative dental materials. This paper will attempt to refer to in vivo and in vitro studies of dentine permeability and the various interrelated factors governing it. PMID:23365497

  17. Single, stretched membrane, structural module experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.L.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes tests done on stretched-membrane heliostats used to reflect solar radiation onto a central receiver. The tests were used to validate prior analysis and mathematical models developed to describe module performance. The modules tested were three meters in diameter and had reflective polymer film laminated to the membrane. The frames were supported at three points equally spaced around the ring. Three modules were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended at the bottom support, two were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended from the upper mounts, and one was rigidly attached with its weight suspended at the bottom mount. By varying the membrane tension we could simulate a uniform wind loading normal to the mirror's surface. A video camera 15+ meters away from the mirror recorded the virtual image of a target grid as reflected by the mirrors' surface. The image was digitized and stored on a microcomputer. Using the law of reflection and analytic geometry, we computed the surface slopes of a sampling of points on the surface. The dominant module response was consistent with prior SERI analyses. The simple analytical model is quite adequate for designing and sizing single-membrane modules if the initial imperfections and their amplification are appropriately controlled. To avoid potential problems resulting from the fundamentally n = 2 deformation phenomena, we advise using either relatively stiffer ring frames or more than three support points.

  18. Decorrelation Stretch Near Cerberus Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 25, 2004 On this image you can see two infrared frames of the same area on Mars. One of the images (in black and white) represents a single wavelength or band of the THEMIS IR instrument, while the other image (in false color) represents 3 different bands. The image with the various colors was created with a technique called Decorrelation Stretch (DCS). In this technique individual bands of the THEMIS IR instrument are stretched to better show compositional variations throughout the whole range. After the bands are stretched they are overlayed on one another and colors are assigned to each band. This makes up the colors in the image.

    As you can see, there is a difference in what is noticable in the single band IR image versus the false-colored one. On the color image the pink/magenta colors usually represent basaltic content, cyan often indicates the presence of water ice clouds, while green can represent dust.

    The bright purple and pink colors associated with the valley are due to basalt. There may be a thin veneer of dust present in the region (it was a dark colored region during the Viking mission in the 1970's) through which the basaltic material pokes out along the edges of the valley and the nearby knobby terrain.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 10.7, Longitude 163 East (197 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  19. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching.

    PubMed

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations--cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell's passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity. PMID:24875391

  20. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations—cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity.

  1. Study on stretching effect of multiple die forming technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-woo; Kim, Jeong; Kang, Beom-soo

    2013-12-01

    The multiple die forming (MDF) technology is suitable for flexible manufacturing, and it affords several advantages including its applicability to various forming processes such as single-curved surface forming, and double-curved surface forming. In sheet metal forming process, the elastic recovery has become a problem. Therefore, the stretch forming process is applied MDF technology to reduce elastic recovery effect. Numerical simulation is carried out for a saddle-type surface forming using ABAQUS. Every simulation case performs spring-back analysis to find elastic recovery effect after forming simulation. In this simulation, urethane pads are defined based on a hyperelastic material model as a cushion for the smoothness of forming surface. The elastic recovery deformation behavior is also investigated to consider the exact result after the last forming process, and then, the actual experiments are performed to confirm the formability of this forming process. By comparing the simulation and the experimental results, the tendency of the decreased amount of elastic recovery from the application of stretch process is verified. Consequently, it is confirmed that the multiple die stretch forming process has the capability and feasibility of being used to manufacture the curved surfaces of sheet metal.

  2. Fluid permeability of deformable fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.R.; Bruhn, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of defining the fracture permeability tensor for each grid lock in a rock mass from maps of natural fractures. For this purpose they implement a statistical model of cracked rock due to M. Oda [1985], where the permeability tensor is related to the crack geometry via a volume average of the contribution from each crack in the population. In this model tectonic stress is implicitly coupled to fluid flow through an assumed relationship between crack aperture and normal stress across the crack. The authors have included the following enhancements to the basic model: (1) a realistic model of crack closure under stress has been added along with the provision to apply tectonic stresses to the fracture system in any orientation, the application of stress results in fracture closure and consequently a reduction in permeability; (2) the fracture permeability can be superimposed onto an arbitrary anisotropic matrix permeability; (3) the fracture surfaces are allowed to slide under the application of shear stress, causing fractures to dilate and result in a permeability increase. Through an example, the authors demonstrate that significant changes in permeability magnitudes and orientations are possible when tectonic stress is applied to a fracture system.

  3. Polymer nanocomposites: permeability, chain dynamics, mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Laxmi

    2005-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites based on dispersion of surfactant treated expandable smectite clays such as montmorillonite layered silicates (MLS) have shown promise as organic-inorganic hybrids with the potential to improve barrier properties. Separately, flexible displays based on plastic substrates have reduced lifetimes tied to the low barrier properties. While there has been a general attribution of improved barrier properties to the tortuous path, this does not consider the influence the introduction of a secondary filler has on the morphology of the host polymer. Here we examine the influence of MLS nanoplatelets on the barrier properties and chain dynamics of polymers. We investigate the potential for host polymer modification by comparing two crystallizable polymers nylon and PET and resulting well dispersed nanocomposites. We study mechanical, cyclic fatigue and permeability of films. Permeability of the biaxially stretched film and when the film undergoes fatigue of 50 and 10000 cycles are also measured. Chain dynamics were modeled based on the Burger model fit to creep-recovery data. A systematic approach to predict the permeability considering amorphous, crystalline and MLS content and comparison with experimental values were done. We also conducted water absorption measurements to highlight the water absorption differences in the two polymers. Dimensional stability of PET was studied by measuring coefficient of thermal expansion of thin film on Si substrate by ellipsometry method.

  4. Reinforcement for Stretch Formed Sheet Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, J. B.; Baxter, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Tearing of aluminum sheet metal durinng stretch forming prevented by flame spraying layer of aluminum on edges held in stretch-forming machine. Technique improves grip of machine on metal and reinforced sheet better able to with stand concentration of force in vicinity of grips.

  5. Stretching Impacts Inflammation Resolution in Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J; Colas, Romain A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-07-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 min twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, 2 weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch versus no stretch for 48 h, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue. PMID:26588184

  6. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the effect of antisymmetric stretch mode excitation on the O({sup 3}P) + CH{sub 4}(ν{sub 3} = 1) → OH + CH{sub 3} reaction on an analytical potential energy surface. Comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Monge-Palacios, M.; González-Lavado, E.; Espinosa-Garcia, J.

    2014-09-07

    Motivated by a recent crossed-beam experiment on the title reaction reported by Pan and Liu [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 191101 (2014)], a detailed dynamics study was performed at three collision energies using quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations based on a full-dimensional potential energy surface recently developed by our group (PES-2014). Although theory/experiment agreement is not yet quantitative, in general the theoretical results reproduce the experimental evidence: the vibrational branching ratio of OH(v = 1)/OH(v = 0) is ∼0.8/0.2, excitation of the antisymmetric CH stretching mode in methane increases reactivity by factor 2.28–1.50, although an equivalent amount as translational energy is more efficient in promoting the reaction and, finally, product angular distribution shifts from backward in the CH{sub 4}(ν = 0) ground-state to sideways when the antisymmetric CH stretching mode is excited. These results give confidence to the PES-2014 surface, depend on the quantization procedure used, are comparable with recent QCT calculations or improve previous theoretical studies using a different surface, and demonstrate the utility of the theory/experiment collaboration.

  7. Mass Spectrometry Imaging Using the Stretched Sample Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can determine tissue localization for a variety of analytes with high sensitivity, chemical specificity, and spatial resolution. MS image quality typically depends on the MALDI matrix application method used, particularly when the matrix solution or powder is applied directly to the tissue surface. Improper matrix application results in spatial redistribution of analytes and reduced MS signal quality. Here we present a stretched sample imaging protocol that removes the dependence of MS image quality on the matrix application process and improves analyte extraction and sample desalting. First, the tissue sample is placed on a monolayer of solid support beads that are embedded in a hydrophobic membrane. Stretching the membrane fragments the tissue into thousands of nearly single-cell sized islands, with the pieces physically isolated from each other by the membrane. This spatial isolation prevents analyte transfer between beads, allowing for longer exposure of the tissue fragments to the MALDI matrix, thereby improving detectability of small analyte quantities without sacrificing spatial resolution. When using this method to reconstruct chemical images, complications result from non-uniform stretching of the supporting membrane. Addressing this concern, several computational tools enable automated data acquisition at individual bead locations and allow reconstruction of ion images corresponding to the original spatial conformation of the tissue section. Using mouse pituitary, we demonstrate the utility of this stretched imaging technique for characterizing peptide distributions in heterogeneous tissues at nearly single-cell resolution. PMID:20680608

  8. Brine network structural metamorphosis and sea ice bottom layer permeability change induced by sea water penetration under a surface pressure field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Sea ice presents two roughness scales: one in the millimetre range and the other up to several meters due to ridging. The larger roughness elements are the result of compression and sheer, causing ice blocks to pile up and down at the line of contact between converging ice floes. In terms of boundary limit dynamic, they create obstacles that induce, in their wake, a pressure gradient at the ice water interface. Sea ice is a porous medium and as such, is permeable when subject to pressure gradients. Models have shown that, at spring, when ice permeability increases, sea water can be forced through the ice water interface into the bottom ice layer while brine is pumped out of it under obstacle induced pressure gradients. These results suggest that ice ocean heat budgets have to include a porous flow component and its associated latent heat import/export caused by through volume melting/thawing inside the bottom ice layer subject to sea water infiltration. With the initiation of a melt/thaw dynamic within the porous bottom ice layer, the porous network restructures. Our research show an enlargement of the larger brine channels while smaller ones close due ice growth. Similarly, ice volume of smaller cross size tend to disappear while larger ones evolve slowly. As heat fluxes due to latent heat exchanges become several orders of magnitude larger than any other exterior forcing, such as radiation, heat budgets within ice individual volumes balance fluxes in and out caused by melting/thaw on channel walls. Our simulations were run from an early spring C shape temperature profile to an isothermal state showing that structural change becomes significant only after the temperature profile becomes positive upward.

  9. Strategy as stretch and leverage.

    PubMed

    Hamel, G; Prahalad, C K

    1993-01-01

    Global competition is not just product versus product or company versus company. It is mind-set versus mind-set. Driven to understand the dynamics of competition, we have learned a lot about what makes one company more successful than another. But to find the root of competitiveness--to understand why some companies create new forms of competitive advantage while others watch and follow--we must look at strategic mind-sets. For many managers, "being strategic" means pursuing opportunities that fit the company's resources. This approach is not wrong, Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad contend, but it obscures an approach in which "stretch" supplements fit and being strategic means creating a chasm between ambition and resources. Toyota, CNN, British Airways, Sony, and others all displaced competitors with stronger reputations and deeper pockets. Their secret? In each case, the winner had greater ambition than its well-endowed rivals. Winners also find less resource-intensive ways of achieving their ambitious goals. This is where leverage complements the strategic allocation of resources. Managers at competitive companies can get a bigger bang for their buck in five basic ways: by concentrating resources around strategic goals; by accumulating resources more efficiently; by complementing one kind of resource with another; by conserving resources whenever they can; and by recovering resources from the market-place as quickly as possible. As recent competitive battles have demonstrated, abundant resources can't guarantee continued industry leadership.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10124635

  10. Mars Under the Microscope (stretched)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured on the 10th day, or sol, of the rover's mission by its microscopic imager, located on the instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This stretched color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover open and closed. The varying hints of orange suggest differences in mineral composition. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  11. Jamming dynamics of stretch-induced surfactant release by alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arnab; Arold, Stephen P; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Suki, Béla

    2012-03-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant by alveolar epithelial type II cells is vital for the reduction of interfacial surface tension, thus preventing lung collapse. To study secretion dynamics, rat alveolar epithelial type II cells were cultured on elastic membranes and cyclically stretched. The amounts of phosphatidylcholine, the primary lipid component of surfactant, inside and outside the cells, were measured using radiolabeled choline. During and immediately after stretch, cells secreted less surfactant than unstretched cells; however, stretched cells secreted significantly more surfactant than unstretched cells after an extended lag period. We developed a model based on the hypothesis that stretching leads to jamming of surfactant traffic escaping the cell, similar to vehicular traffic jams. In the model, stretch increases surfactant transport from the interior to the exterior of the cell. This transport is mediated by a surface layer with a finite capacity due to the limited number of fusion pores through which secretion occurs. When the amount of surfactant in the surface layer approaches this capacity, interference among lamellar bodies carrying surfactant reduces the rate of secretion, effectively creating a jam. When the stretch stops, the jam takes an extended time to clear, and subsequently the amount of secreted surfactant increases. We solved the model analytically and show that its dynamics are consistent with experimental observations, implying that surfactant secretion is a fundamentally nonlinear process with memory representing collective behavior at the level of single cells. Our results thus highlight the importance of a jamming dynamics in stretch-induced cellular secretory processes. PMID:22033531

  12. Seismic waves increase permeability.

    PubMed

    Elkhoury, Jean E; Brodsky, Emily E; Agnew, Duncan C

    2006-06-29

    Earthquakes have been observed to affect hydrological systems in a variety of ways--water well levels can change dramatically, streams can become fuller and spring discharges can increase at the time of earthquakes. Distant earthquakes may even increase the permeability in faults. Most of these hydrological observations can be explained by some form of permeability increase. Here we use the response of water well levels to solid Earth tides to measure permeability over a 20-year period. At the time of each of seven earthquakes in Southern California, we observe transient changes of up to 24 degrees in the phase of the water level response to the dilatational volumetric strain of the semidiurnal tidal components of wells at the Piñon Flat Observatory in Southern California. After the earthquakes, the phase gradually returns to the background value at a rate of less than 0.1 degrees per day. We use a model of axisymmetric flow driven by an imposed head oscillation through a single, laterally extensive, confined, homogeneous and isotropic aquifer to relate the phase response to aquifer properties. We interpret the changes in phase response as due to changes in permeability. At the time of the earthquakes, the permeability at the site increases by a factor as high as three. The permeability increase depends roughly linearly on the amplitude of seismic-wave peak ground velocity in the range of 0.21-2.1 cm s(-1). Such permeability increases are of interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as they affect fluid flow and might determine long-term evolution of hydrological and oil-bearing systems. They may also be interesting to seismologists, as the resulting pore pressure changes can affect earthquakes by changing normal stresses on faults. PMID:16810253

  13. Variable stretch pattern enhances surfactant secretion in alveolar type II cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Arold, Stephen P; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2009-04-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant that maintains low surface tension within the lung is primarily mediated by mechanical stretching of alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells. We have shown that guinea pigs ventilated with random variations in frequency and tidal volume had significantly larger pools of surfactant in the lung than animals ventilated in a monotonous manner. Here, we test the hypothesis that variable stretch patterns imparted on the AEII cells results in enhanced surfactant secretion. AEII cells isolated from rat lungs were exposed to equibiaxial strains of 12.5, 25, or 50% change in surface area (DeltaSA) at 3 cycles/min for 15, 30, or 60 min. (3)H-labeled phosphatidylcholine release and cell viability were measured 60 min following the onset of stretch. Whereas secretion increased following 15-min stretch at 50% DeltaSA and 30-min stretch at 12.5% DeltaSA, 60 min of cyclic stretch diminished surfactant secretion regardless of strain. When cells were stretched using a variable strain profile in which the amplitude of each stretch was randomly pulled from a uniform distribution, surfactant secretion was enhanced both at 25 and 50% mean DeltaSA with no additional cell injury. Furthermore, at 50% mean DeltaSA, there was an optimum level of variability that maximized secretion implying that mechanotransduction in these cells exhibits a phenomenon similar to stochastic resonance. These results suggest that application of variable stretch may enhance surfactant secretion, possibly reducing the risk of ventilator-induced lung injury. Variable stretch-induced mechanotransduction may also have implications for other areas of mechanobiology. PMID:19136581

  14. Unilateral Plantar Flexors Static-Stretching Effects on Ipsilateral and Contralateral Jump Measures

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Josinaldo Jarbas; Behm, David George; Gomes, Willy Andrade; Silva, Fernando Henrique Domingues de Oliveira; Soares, Enrico Gori; Serpa, Érica Paes; Vilela Junior, Guanis de Barros; Lopes, Charles Ricardo; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static-stretching (SS) on the passive range of movement (ROM) of the stretched limb, surface electromyography (sEMG) and single-leg bounce drop jump (SBDJ) performance measures of the ipsilateral stretched and contralateral non-stretched lower limbs. Seventeen young men (24 ± 5 years) performed SBDJ before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch) unilateral ankle plantar flexor SS (6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort). SBDJ performance measures included jump height, impulse, time to reach peak force, contact time as well as the sEMG integral (IEMG) and pre-activation (IEMGpre-activation) of the gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive ROM increased in the stretched limb after the SS (pre-test: 21 ± 4° and post-test: 26.5 ± 5°, p < 0.001). Post-stretching decreases were observed with peak force (p = 0.029), IEMG (P<0.001), and IEMGpre-activation (p = 0.015) in the stretched limb; as well as impulse (p = 0.03), and jump height (p = 0.032) in the non-stretched limb. In conclusion, SS effectively increased passive ankle ROM of the stretched limb, and transiently (less than 10 minutes) decreased muscle peak force and pre-activation. The decrease of jump height and impulse for the non-stretched limb suggests a SS-induced central nervous system inhibitory effect. Key points When considering whether or not to SS prior to athletic activities, one must consider the potential positive effects of increased ankle dorsiflexion motion with the potential deleterious effects of power and muscle activity during a simple jumping task or as part of the rehabilitation process. Since decreased jump performance measures can persist for 10 minutes in the stretched leg, the timing of SS prior to performance must be taken into consideration. Athletes, fitness enthusiasts and therapists should

  15. Nanochannel flow past permeable walls via molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian-Fei; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The nanochannel flow past permeable walls with nanopores is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, including the density distribution, velocity field, molecular penetration mechanism and surface friction coefficient. A low density distribution has been found at the gas-wall interface demonstrating the low pressure region. In addition, there exists a jump of the gas density on the permeable surface, which indicates the discontinuity of the density distribution across the permeable surface. On the other hand, the nanoscale vortices are observed in nanopores of the permeable wall, and the reduced mass flux of the flow in nanopores results in a shifted hydrodynamic boundary above the permeable surface. Particularly the slip length of the gas flow on the permeable surface is pronounced a non-linear function of the molecular mean free path, which produces a large value of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) and a big portion of the diffusive refection. Moreover, the gas-gas interaction and multi-collision among gas molecules may take place in nanopores, which contribute to large values of TMAC. Consequently the boundary friction coefficient on the permeable surface is increased because of the energy dissipation consumed by the nanoscale vortices in nanopores. The molecular boundary condition provides us with a new picture of the nanochannel flow past the permeable wall with nanopores.

  16. Studies on water transport through the sweet cherry fruit surface. 11. FeCl3 decreases water permeability of polar pathways.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Holger; Knoche, Moritz

    2006-08-23

    The effect of FeCl3 (10 mM) on osmotic water uptake into detached sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium L.) and on the (3)H2O permeability (P(d)) of excised exocarp segments (ES) or enzymatically isolated cuticular membranes (CM) was investigated. ES or CM were mounted in an infinite dose diffusion system, where diffusion is monitored from a dilute donor solution through an interfacing ES or CM into a receiver solution under quasi steady-state conditions. In the absence of FeCl3, (3)H2O diffusion through stomatous ES was linear over time, indicating that P(d) was constant. Adding FeCl3 to the donor decreased P(d) by about 60%. P(d) remained at a decreased level when replacing the FeCl3 donor again by deionized water. The decrease in P(d) was positively and linearly related to the stomatal density of the ES. There was no effect of FeCl3 on the P(d) of astomatous sweet cherry fruit ES or CM regardless of the presence of wax (epicuticular or cuticular). FeCl3 decreased P(d) when added to the donor (-63%) or receiver (-16%), but there was no effect when it was added to donor and receiver solutions simultaneously. The decrease in P(d) depended on the pH of the receiver and the presence of citrate buffer. There was no effect of FeCl3 with citrate buffer as a receiver regardless of pH (range 2.0-6.0). When using nonbuffered receiver solutions with pH adjusted to pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.5, or 6.0, FeCl3 markedly decreased (3)H2O diffusion at pH > or = 3 but had no effect at pH 2.0. FeCl3 increased the energy of activation (E(a)) for (3)H2O diffusion (range 15-45 degrees C) through stomatous ES but had no significant effect in astomatous CM. The increase in E(a) by FeCl3 was positively related to stomatal density. FeCl3 decreased the P(d) for 2-(1-naphthyl)[1-(14)C]acetic acid (NAA) and 2,4-dichloro[U-(14)C]phenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in stomatous ES. The magnitude of the effect depended on the degree of dissociation and was larger for the dissociated acids (pH 6.2) than for the

  17. Stretch induced hyperexcitability of mice callosal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Anthony; Stebbings, Kevin A.; Llano, Daniel A.; Saif, Taher

    2015-01-01

    Memory and learning are thought to result from changes in synaptic strength. Previous studies on synaptic physiology in brain slices have traditionally been focused on biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate with experiments on mouse brain slices that central nervous system plasticity is also sensitive to mechanical stretch. This is important, given the host of clinical conditions involving changes in mechanical tension on the brain, and the normal role that mechanical tension plays in brain development. A novel platform is developed to investigate neural responses to mechanical stretching. Flavoprotein autofluoresence (FA) imaging was employed for measuring neural activity. We observed that synaptic excitability substantially increases after a small (2.5%) stretch was held for 10 min and released. The increase is accumulative, i.e., multiple stretch cycles further increase the excitability. We also developed analytical tools to quantify the spatial spread and response strength. Results show that the spatial spread is less stable in slices undergoing the stretch-unstretch cycle. FA amplitude and activation rate decrease as excitability increases in stretch cases but not in electrically enhanced cases. These results collectively demonstrate that a small stretch in physiological range can modulate neural activities significantly, suggesting that mechanical events can be employed as a novel tool for the modulation of neural plasticity. PMID:26300729

  18. Stretch due to Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Migration

    PubMed Central

    Baten, E.; Vandewalle, T.; van Renterghem, K.

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year old patient presented to the emergency department with stretch, due to impossible deflation of the penile prosthesis, 4 years after successful implant. A CT-scan showed migration of the reservoir to the left rectus abdominis muscle. Refilling of the reservoir was inhibited by muscular compression, causing stretch. Removal and replacement of the reservoir was performed, after which the prosthesis was well-functioning again. Migration of the penile prosthesis reservoir is extremely rare but can cause several complications, such as stretch. PMID:26793592

  19. Reflectors Made from Membranes Stretched Between Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Tolomeo, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Lightweight cylindrical reflectors of a proposed type would be made from reflective membranes stretched between pairs of identically curved and identically oriented end rails. In each such reflector, the curvature of the two beams would define the reflector shape required for the intended application. For example, the beams could be curved to define a reflector of parabolic cross section, so that light incident along the axis of symmetry perpendicular to the cylindrical axis would be focused to a line. In addition, by applying suitable forces to the ends of the beams, one could bend the beams to adjust the reflector surface figure to within a precision of the order of the wavelength of the radiation to be reflected. The figure depicts an example of beams shaped so that in the absence of applied forces, each would be flat on one side and would have a radius of curvature R on the opposite side. Alternatively, the curvature of the reflector-membrane side could be other than circular. In general, the initial curvature would be chosen to optimize the final reflector shape. Then by applying forces F between the beam ends in the positions and orientations shown in the figure, one could bend beams to adjust their shape to a closer approximation of the desired precise circular or noncircular curvature.

  20. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups. PMID:25729210

  1. Stretch reflex oscillations and essential tremor.

    PubMed Central

    Elble, R J; Higgins, C; Moody, C J

    1987-01-01

    Using a computer-controlled torque motor and manipulandum, 50 ms torque pulses and 70 second trains of binary pseudorandom torque disturbances were applied to the wrists of 10 adult controls and 22 patients with essential tremor in order to study the interaction between mechanically-induced stretch-reflex oscillations and essential tremor. These two oscillations were separated by applying inertial and spring loads to the wrist. There was no evidence of increased or unstable stretch-reflex activity in the essential tremor patients, and stretch-reflex latencies did not correlate with the frequency of essential tremor. Essential tremor and mechanically-induced stretch-reflex oscillations are separate phenomena capable of complex interaction. PMID:3612149

  2. Investing in a Large Stretch Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M.; Nealson, W.; Jay, G.; Buss, W.

    1986-01-01

    Press for forming large aluminum parts from plates provides substantial economies. Study assessed advantages and disadvantages of investing in large stretch-forming press, and also developed procurement specification for press.

  3. Crack opening stretch in a plate of finite width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Bakioglu, M.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of a uniaxially stressed plate of finite width containing a centrally located damage zone is considered. It is assumed that the flaw may be represented by a part-through crack perpendicular to the plate surface, the net ligaments in the plane of the crack and through-the-thickness narrow strips ahead of the crack ends are fully yielded, and in the yielded sections the material may carry only a constant normal traction with magnitude equal to the yield strength. The problem is solved by neglecting the bending effects and the crack opening stretches at the center and the ends of the crack are obtained. Some applications of the results are indicated by using the concepts of critical crack opening stretch and constant slope plastic instability.

  4. Crack opening stretch in a plate of finite width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Bakioglu, M.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of a uniaxially stressed plate of finite width containing a centrally located damage zone is considered. It is assumed that the flaw may be represented by a part-through crack perpendicular to the plate surface, the net ligaments in the plane of the crack and through-the-thickness narrow strips ahead of the crack ends are fully yielded, and in the yielded sections the material may carry only a constant normal traction with magnitude equal to the yield strength. The problem is solved by neglecting the bending effects and the crack opening stretches at the center and the ends of the crack are obtained. Some applications of the results are indicated by using the concepts of critical crack opening stretch and constant slope plastic instability.

  5. The Permeable Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandy, Leo R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the concept of permeability as knowledge flow into and out of the classroom and applies it to three college courses taught by the author at Plymouth State College (New Hampshire). Experiential knowledge comes into the classroom through interviews, guest speakers, and panel presentations, and flows out through service-learning students…

  6. Reduced hydrogen permeability at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Klopp, W. D.; Misencik, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    CO and CO2 reduce hydrogen loss through iron, nickel, and cobalt based alloy tubes. Method is based on concept that oxide film on metal surface reduces hydrogen permeability through metal; adding CO or CO2 forms oxide films continuously during operation, and hydrogen containment is improved. Innovation enhances prospects for Stirling engine system utilization.

  7. Growth on demand: Reviewing the mechanobiology of stretched skin

    PubMed Central

    Zöllner, Alexander M.; Holland, Maria A.; Honda, Kord S.; Gosain, Arun K.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Skin is a highly dynamic, autoregulated, living system that responds to mechanical stretch through a net gain in skin surface area. Tissue expansion uses the concept of controlled overstretch to grow extra skin for defect repair in situ. While the short-term mechanics of stretched skin have been studied intensely by testing explanted tissue samples ex vivo, we know very little about the long-term biomechanics and mechanobiology of living skin in vivo. redHere we explore the long-term effects of mechanical stretch on the characteristics of living skin using a mathematical model for skin growth. We review the molecular mechanisms by which skin responds to mechanical loading and model their effects collectively in a single scalar-valued internal variable, the surface area growth. redThis allows us to adopt a continuum model for growing skin based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a reversible elastic and an irreversible growth part.redTo demonstrate the inherent modularity of this approach, we implement growth as a user-defined constitutive subroutine into the general purpose implicit finite element program Abaqus/Standard. To illustrate the features of the model, we simulate the controlled area growth of skin in response to tissue expansion with multiple filling points in time. Our results demonstrate that the field theories of continuum mechanics can reliably predict the manipulation of thin biological membranes through mechanical overstretch. Our model could serve as a valuable tool to rationalize clinical process parameters such as expander geometry, expander size, filling volume, filling pressure, and inflation timing to minimize tissue necrosis and maximize patient comfort in plastic and reconstructive surgery. While initially developed for growing skin, our model can easily be generalized to arbitrary biological structures to explore the physiology and pathology of stretch-induced growth of other living systems such as hearts

  8. Scales of rock permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéguen, Y.; Gavrilenko, P.; Le Ravalec, M.

    1996-05-01

    Permeability is a transport property which is currently measured in Darcy units. Although this unit is very convenient for most purposes, its use prevents from recognizing that permeability has units of length squared. Physically, the square root of permeability can thus be seen as a characteristic length or a characteristic pore size. At the laboratory scale, the identification of this characteristic length is a good example of how experimental measurements and theoretical modelling can be integrated. Three distinct identifications are of current use, relying on three different techniques: image analysis of thin sections, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption. In each case, one or several theoretical models allow us to derive permeability from the experimental data (equivalent channel models, statistical models, effective media models, percolation and network models). Permeability varies with pressure and temperature and this is a decisive point for any extrapolation to crustal conditions. As far as pressure is concerned, most of the effect is due to cracks and a model which does not incorporate this fact will miss its goal. Temperature induced modifications can be the result of several processes: thermal cracking (due to thermal expansion mismatch and anisotropy, or to fluid pressure build up), and pressure solution are the two main ones. Experimental data on pressure and temperature effects are difficult to obtain but they are urgently needed. Finally, an important issue is: up to which point are these small scale data and models relevant when considering formations at the oil reservoir scale, or at the crust scale? At larger scales the identification of the characteristic scale is also a major goal which is examined.

  9. Permeability reduction in granite under hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of impermeable fault seals between earthquake events is a feature of many models of earthquake generation, suggesting that earthquake recurrence may depend in part on the rate of permeability reduction of fault zone materials under hydrothermal conditions. In this study, permeability measurements were conducted on intact, fractured, and gouge-bearing Westerly granite at an effective pressure of 50 MPa and at temperatures from 150?? to 500??C, simulating conditions in the earthquake-generating portions of fault zones. Pore fluids were cycled back and forth under a 2 MPa pressure differential for periods of up to 40 days. Permeability of the granite decreased with time t, following the exponential relation k = c(10-rt). For intact samples run between 250?? and 500??C the time constant for permeability decrease r was proportional to temperature and ranged between 0.001 and 0.1 days-1 (i.e., between 0.4 and 40 decades year-1 loss of permeability). Values of r for the lower-temperature experiments differed little from the 250??C runs. In contrast, prefractured samples showed higher rates of permeability decrease at a given temperature. The surfaces of the fractured samples showed evidence of dissolution and mineral growth that increased in abundance with both temperature and time. The experimentally grown mineral assemblages varied with temperature and were consistent with a rock-dominated hydrothermal system. As such mineral deposits progressively seal the fractured samples, their rates of permeability decrease approach the rates for intact rocks at the same temperature. These results place constraints on models of precipitation sealing and suggest that fault rocks may seal at a rate consistent with earthquake recurrence intervals of typical fault zones.

  10. Cyclic stretch disrupts apical junctional complexes in Caco-2 cell monolayers by a JNK-2-, c-Src-, and MLCK-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Geetha; Gangwar, Ruchika; Crosby, Lynn M.; Desai, Leena P.; Wilhelm, Kristina; Waters, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is subjected to various types of mechanical stress. In this study, we investigated the impact of cyclic stretch on tight junction and adherens junction integrity in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Stretch for 2 h resulted in a dramatic modulation of tight junction protein distribution from a linear organization into wavy structure. Continuation of cyclic stretch for 6 h led to redistribution of tight junction proteins from the intercellular junctions into the intracellular compartment. Disruption of tight junctions was associated with redistribution of adherens junction proteins, E-cadherin and β-catenin, and dissociation of the actin cytoskeleton at the actomyosin belt. Stretch activates JNK2, c-Src, and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK). Inhibition of JNK, Src kinase or MLCK activity and knockdown of JNK2 or c-Src attenuated stretch-induced disruption of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and actin cytoskeleton. Paracellular permeability measured by a novel method demonstrated that cyclic stretch increases paracellular permeability by a JNK, Src kinase, and MLCK-dependent mechanism. Stretch increased tyrosine phosphorylation of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, and β-catenin. Inhibition of JNK or Src kinase attenuated stretch-induced occludin phosphorylation. Immunofluorescence localization indicated that phospho-MLC colocalizes with the vesicle-like actin structure at the actomyosin belt in stretched cells. On the other hand, phospho-c-Src colocalizes with the actin at the apical region of cells. This study demonstrates that cyclic stretch disrupts tight junctions and adherens junctions by a JNK2, c-Src, and MLCK-dependent mechanism. PMID:24722904

  11. Design of a new membrane stretching device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yiran

    Cell stretching device has been applied into the lab use for many years to help researchers study about the behavior of cells during the stretching process. Because the cell responses to the different mechanical stimuli, especially in the case of disease, the cell stretching device is a necessary tool to study the cell behavior in a controlled environment. However existing devices have limitations, such as too big to fit the culture chamber, unable to be observed during the stretching process and too expensive to fabricate. In this thesis, a new cell stretcher is designed to resolve these limitations. Many typical cell stretching devices only work under simple conditions. For instance they can only apply the strain on the cell in uniaxial or equibiaxial directions. On the other hand the environment of cells' survival is varying. Many new cell stretchers have been developed, which have the same property that cells can be stretched via the radical deformation of the elastomeric membrane. The aim of this new design is to create a cell stretching device that fits in general lab conditions. This device is designed to fit on a microscope to observe, as well as in the incubator. In addition, two small step motors are used to control the strain, adjust the frequency, and maintain the stability precisely. Problems such as the culture media leakage and the membrane breakage are solved by the usage of multiple materials for both the cell stretcher and the membrane. Based on the experimental results, this device can satisfy the requirements of target users with a reduced manufacturing cost. In the future, an auto-focus tracking function will be developed to allow real time observation of the cells' behavior.

  12. The shape of stretched Spandex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Gary

    2002-10-01

    What is the shape that results when a flat rubber sheet is warped by placing a heavy ball upon it? We show that, at distance R far from the center of a ball of mass M, the height h of the surface above the ball's center is given by h(R) = A*M^1/3*R^2/3, where A is a constant determined by the stretchiness of the rubber and the earth's gravitational constant. This happy result allows one to analyze the orbits of marbles and coins as they roll across the surface in some detail, providing very nice analogues for a wealth of topics in celestial mechanics, from Kepler's Laws to tides and the Roche limit.

  13. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  14. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia. PMID:26529568

  15. Revisiting the Galileo Probe results by a stretched atmospheric mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Janssen, Michael A.

    2015-11-01

    The Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in the late 2016. One of its major scientific target is to measure the deep water abundance through its Microwave Radiometer (MWR). Prior to the arrival of Juno, the only observation of the weather layer of Jupiter was the Galileo probe (Niemann et al. 1996; Wong et al. 2004), which returned puzzling results. In contrast to the detected 2 - 5 times enrichment of CH4, NH3 and H2S with respect to the solar values, the amount of water was severely subsolar. Three dimensional modeling (Showman & Dowling 2000) shows that dynamic dry downdrafts could create a huge trough in the material surface, such that air flowing through the hot spots undergoes a temporary increase in pressure by a factor of 2, though it is still too small to explain the Galileo probe results. Inspired by the 3D modeling result, we constructed a stretched atmospheric model to parameterize the alteration of the thermodynamic state of air parcel by dynamics. In our model, an air parcel is initially in its equilibrium condensation state and later has been dynamically stretched to higher pressure modeled by a multiplicative factor S. When S=1, the atmosphere is unaltered by dynamics, representing the equilibrium condensation model. We found that, when S=4, the mixing ratios of H2O, NH3 and H2S match all observations coming from the Galileo probe site. Thus, this stretch parameter provides a continuous representation of dynamic processes from the equilibrium condensation model to the Galileo probe results. We also show that the strength of stretch (S) can be retrieved from Juno/MWR limb darkening observations.

  16. Mechanical and neural stretch responses of the human soleus muscle at different walking speeds

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Neil J; Ishikawa, Masaki; Grey, Michael J; af Klint, Richard; Komi, Paavo V; Avela, Janne; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Voigt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    During human walking, a sudden trip may elicit a Ia afferent fibre mediated short latency stretch reflex. The aim of this study was to investigate soleus (SOL) muscle mechanical behaviour in response to dorsiflexion perturbations, and to relate this behaviour to short latency stretch reflex responses. Twelve healthy subjects walked on a treadmill with the left leg attached to an actuator capable of rapidly dorsiflexing the ankle joint. Ultrasound was used to measure fascicle lengths in SOL during walking, and surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record muscle activation. Dorsiflexion perturbations of 6 deg were applied during mid-stance at walking speeds of 3, 4 and 5 km h−1. At each walking speed, perturbations were delivered at three different velocities (slow: ∼170 deg s−1, mid: ∼230 deg s−1, fast: ∼280 deg s−1). At 5 km h−1, fascicle stretch amplitude was 34–40% smaller and fascicle stretch velocity 22–28% slower than at 3 km h−1 in response to a constant amplitude perturbation, whilst stretch reflex amplitudes were unchanged. Changes in fascicle stretch parameters can be attributed to an increase in muscle stiffness at faster walking speeds. As stretch velocity is a potent stimulus to muscle spindles, a decrease in the velocity of fascicle stretch at faster walking speeds would be expected to decrease spindle afferent feedback and thus stretch reflex amplitudes, which did not occur. It is therefore postulated that other mechanisms, such as altered fusimotor drive, reduced pre-synaptic inhibition and/or increased descending excitatory input, acted to maintain motoneurone output as walking speed increased, preventing a decrease in short latency reflex amplitudes. PMID:19451207

  17. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a stretching vertical sheet in a thermally stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, Anuar; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2014-06-01

    The steady mixed convection boundary layer flow through a stable stratified medium over a stretching vertical sheet is investigated. The velocity of the stretching sheet, the surface temperature and the ambient temperature are assumed to vary linearly with the distance from the leading edge. The transformed ordinary differential equations are solved numerically by the Keller-box method. The results indicate that the thermal stratification significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the heat transfer rate at the surface. For the opposing flow, solution exists only for small magnitude of the buoyancy parameter.

  18. Effect of mechanical stretching on DNA conductance.

    PubMed

    Bruot, Christopher; Xiang, Limin; Palma, Julio L; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-27

    Studying the structural and charge transport properties in DNA is important for unraveling molecular scale processes and developing device applications of DNA molecules. Here we study the effect of mechanical stretching-induced structural changes on charge transport in single DNA molecules. The charge transport follows the hopping mechanism for DNA molecules with lengths varying from 6 to 26 base pairs, but the conductance is highly sensitive to mechanical stretching, showing an abrupt decrease at surprisingly short stretching distances and weak dependence on DNA length. We attribute this force-induced conductance decrease to the breaking of hydrogen bonds in the base pairs at the end of the sequence and describe the data with a mechanical model. PMID:25530305

  19. Stretching and folding in finite time.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Bollt, Erik M

    2016-02-01

    Complex flows mix efficiently, and this process can be understood by considering the stretching and folding of material volumes. Although many metrics have been devised to characterize stretching, fewer are able to capture folding in a quantitative way in spatiotemporally variable flows. Here, we extend our previous methods based on the finite-time curving of fluid-element trajectories to nonzero scales and show that this finite-scale finite-time curvature contains information about both stretching and folding. We compare this metric to the more commonly used finite-time Lyapunov exponent and illustrate our methods using experimental flow-field data from a quasi-two-dimensional laboratory flow. Our new analysis tools add to the growing set of Lagrangian methods for characterizing mixing in complex, aperiodic fluid flows. PMID:26931593

  20. Stretching and folding in finite time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Bollt, Erik M.

    2016-02-01

    Complex flows mix efficiently, and this process can be understood by considering the stretching and folding of material volumes. Although many metrics have been devised to characterize stretching, fewer are able to capture folding in a quantitative way in spatiotemporally variable flows. Here, we extend our previous methods based on the finite-time curving of fluid-element trajectories to nonzero scales and show that this finite-scale finite-time curvature contains information about both stretching and folding. We compare this metric to the more commonly used finite-time Lyapunov exponent and illustrate our methods using experimental flow-field data from a quasi-two-dimensional laboratory flow. Our new analysis tools add to the growing set of Lagrangian methods for characterizing mixing in complex, aperiodic fluid flows.

  1. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost. PMID:25638080

  2. Live Cell Imaging during Mechanical Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Rápalo, Gabriel; Herwig, Josh D.; Hewitt, Robert; Wilhelm, Kristina R.; Waters, Christopher M.; Roan, Esra

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant interest in understanding how cells and tissues respond to mechanical stimuli, but current approaches are limited in their capability for measuring responses in real time in live cells or viable tissue. A protocol was developed with the use of a cell actuator to distend live cells grown on or tissues attached to an elastic substrate while imaging with confocal and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Preliminary studies show that tonic stretching of human bronchial epithelial cells caused a significant increase in the production of mitochondrial superoxide. Moreover, using this protocol, alveolar epithelial cells were stretched and imaged, which showed direct damage to the epithelial cells by overdistention simulating one form of lung injury in vitro. A protocol to conduct AFM nano-indentation on stretched cells is also provided. PMID:26325607

  3. All-optical time-stretch digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, A. M.; Buckley, B.; Zlatanovic, S.; Brès, C.-S.; Radic, S.; Jalali, B.

    2012-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate an all-optical time-stretch digitizer for real-time capture of ultrafast optical signals, beyond the bandwidths achievable by electronics. This approach uniquely combines four-wave mixing and photonic time-stretch technique to slow down and record high-speed optical signals. As a proof-of-concept, real-time recording of 40-Gb/s non-return-to-zero on-off-keying optical data stream is experimentally demonstrated using a stretch factor of 54 and 1.5-GHz back-end electronic bandwidth. We also report on the observation of dispersion penalty and its mitigation via single-sideband conversion enabled by an optical bandpass filter. Our technique may provide a path to real-time capture of ultrahigh-speed optical data streams.

  4. Stretched arc discharge in produced water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Wright, K. C.; Kim, H. S.; Cho, D. J.; Rabinovich, A.; Fridman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost.

  5. Optical Data Compression in Time Stretch Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch imaging offers real-time image acquisition at millions of frames per second and subnanosecond shutter speed, and has enabled detection of rare cancer cells in blood with record throughput and specificity. An unintended consequence of high throughput image acquisition is the massive amount of digital data generated by the instrument. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of real-time optical image compression applied to time stretch imaging. By exploiting the sparsity of the image, we reduce the number of samples and the amount of data generated by the time stretch camera in our proof-of-concept experiments by about three times. Optical data compression addresses the big data predicament in such systems. PMID:25906244

  6. Gastric mucosal barrier: hydrophobicity of stretched stomach lining.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A; Lichtenberger, L M

    1985-06-01

    Surface hydrophobicity of the luminal lining of the canine stomach has been studied as a very convenient means of following the adsorbed monolayer of surfactant believed to provide the gastric mucosal barrier. Hydrophobicity has been measured as the contact angle (theta) produced when a drop of saline is placed upon the surface. theta was found to decrease from 82 to 62 degrees upon 50% linear extension of samples of oxyntic mucosa from 10 dogs. When the phospholipid believed to cause the hydrophobicity was absorbed to glass slides, the contact angle was found to decrease with lower surface concentration. Thinning or "crazing" of the absorbed surfactant monolayer imparting the very hydrophobic nature of the luminal lining is discussed as a possible reason why ulcers tend to form at the crests of the folds, i.e., at points where the surface has been stretched and the monolayer disrupted. PMID:4003546

  7. Cutaneous thermal injury alters macromolecular permeability of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Carter, E A; Tompkins, R G; Schiffrin, E; Burke, J F

    1990-03-01

    The intestinal epithelium normally provides a barrier function that prevents absorption of potentially harmful materials from the intestinal lumen. It has been postulated but never demonstrated that a cutaneous thermal injury will result in increased small-intestinal permeability. In a standardized 20% body surface area full-thickness scald injury, with polyethylene glycol 3350 and horseradish peroxidase used as permeability probes, small-intestinal permeability was examined regionally in an everted intestinal sac model. In the normal animals, the upper (proximal) and lower (distal) small intestine were less permeable to these probes than the middle segment. Within 6 hours after the injury, an increase in the mucosal uptake and transmural permeability was seen in all three small-intestinal segments; the most dramatic increase in permeability occurred in the ileum, p less than 0.01. The maximum increase in permeability was seen at 18 hours, and permeability was normal by 72 hours after the injury. This increase in intestinal permeability may represent a transient failure of the intestinal barrier function and may allow absorption of potentially toxic macromolecules from the intestinal lumen into the portal circulation early after thermal injury. Absorption of these macromolecules, such as endotoxin, may be potentially harmful by direct toxic actions or potentially helpful by activation of the immune system. PMID:2309150

  8. Near-Limit Flamelet Phenomena in Buoyant Low Stretch Diffusion Flames Beneath a Solid Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; Tien, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    A unique near-limit low stretch multidimensional stable flamelet phenomena has been observed for the first time which extends the material flammability limit beyond the one-dimensional low stretch flammability limit to lower burning rates and higher relative heat losses than is possible with uniform flame coverage. During low stretch experiments burning the underside of very large radii (greater than or = 75 cm stretch rate less than or = 3/s) cylindrical cast PMMA samples, multidimensional flamelets were observed, in contrast with a one-dimensional flame that was found to blanket the surface for smaller radii samples ( higher stretch rate). Flamelets were observed by decreasing the stretch rate or by increasing the conductive heat loss from the flame. Flamelets are defined as flames that cover only part of the burning sample at any given time, but persist for many minutes. Flamelet phenomena is viewed as the flame's method of enhancing oxygen flow to the flame, through oxygen transport into the edges of the flamelet. Flamelets form as heat losses (surface radiation and solid-phase conduction) become large relative to the weakened heat release of the low stretch flame. While heat loss rates remain fairly constant, the limiting factor in the heat release of the flame is hypothesized to be the oxygen transport to the flame in this low stretch (low convective) environment. Flamelet extinction is frequently caused by encroachment of an adjacent flamelet. Large-scale whole-body flamelet oscillations at 1.2 - 1.95 Hz are noted prior to extinction of a flamelet. This oscillation is believed to be due a repeated process of excess fuel leakage through the dark channels between the flamelets, fuel premixing with slow incoming oxidizer, and subsequent rapid flame spread and retreat of the flamelet through the premixed layer. The oscillation frequency is driven by gas-phase diffusive time scales.

  9. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  10. Effect of drying on viscoelasticity and permeability of gel

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.

    1994-12-31

    The beam-bending method was used to measure the effect of partial drying on the viscoelastic relaxation behavior and permeability of a two-step acid-base catalyzed silica gel. Both the elastic modulus (E) and the permeability (D) showed a power-law dependence on density ({rho}): E {approximately} {rho}{sup m} {approx} 3.0; D {approximately} {rho}{sup {minus}n}, n {approx} 2.5. The viscosity of the network rose from {approximately}10{sup 11} to {approximately}10{sup 13} Pa{center_dot}s, and was strongly dependent on age as well as density of the gel. The viscoelastic relaxation function was well described by the stretched exponential function with an exponent of 0.3--0.5.

  11. Cloud Network Helps Stretch IT Dollars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    No matter how many car washes or bake sales schools host to raise money, adding funds to their coffers is a recurring problem. This perpetual financial difficulty makes expansive technology purchases or changes seem like a pipe dream for school CIOs and has education technologists searching for ways to stretch money. In 2005, state K-12 school…

  12. Project Stretch Final Narrative Report. Year III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    In June, 1979, the American Camping Association implemented Project STRETCH (Strategies to Try out Resources to Enhance the Training of Camp Directors serving the Handicapped), a nationwide in-service training program for personnel providing services to handicapped children and youth in regularly and specially designed camping and outdoor…

  13. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a Mbp-long fragment of DNA that is flow-stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field-of-view. Instead we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. Fitted parameters agree well with simplified expressions, where the DNA is modeled as a cylinder in a parallel flow.

  14. Permeability-porosity relationships in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1994-01-01

    In many consolidated sandstone and carbonate formations, plots of core data show that the logarithm of permeability (k) is often linearly proportional to porosity (??). The slope, intercept, and degree of scatter of these log(k)-?? trends vary from formation to formation, and these variations are attributed to differences in initial grain size and sorting, diagenetic history, and compaction history. In unconsolidated sands, better sorting systematically increases both permeability and porosity. In sands and sandstones, an increase in gravel and coarse grain size content causes k to increase even while decreasing ??. Diagenetic minerals in the pore space of sandstones, such as cement and some clay types, tend to decrease log(k) proportionately as ?? decreases. Models to predict permeability from porosity and other measurable rock parameters fall into three classes based on either grain, surface area, or pore dimension considerations. (Models that directly incorporate well log measurements but have no particular theoretical underpinnings from a fourth class.) Grain-based models show permeability proportional to the square of grain size times porosity raised to (roughly) the fifth power, with grain sorting as an additional parameter. Surface-area models show permeability proportional to the inverse square of pore surface area times porosity raised to (roughly) the fourth power; measures of surface area include irreducible water saturation and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pore-dimension models show permeability proportional to the square of a pore dimension times porosity raised to a power of (roughly) two and produce curves of constant pore size that transgress the linear data trends on a log(k)-?? plot. The pore dimension is obtained from mercury injection measurements and is interpreted as the pore opening size of some interconnected fraction of the pore system. The linear log(k)-?? data trends cut the curves of constant pore size from the pore-dimension models

  15. Stretch-induced Intussuceptive and Sprouting Angiogenesis in the Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Janeil; Ysasi, Alexandra; Bennett, Robert; Filipovic, Nenad; Nejad, Mohammad Imani; Trumper, David L.; Ackermann, Max; Wagner, Willi; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular systems grow and remodel in response to not only metabolic needs, but mechanical influences as well. Here, we investigated the influence of tissue-level mechanical forces on the patterning and structure of the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) microcirculation. A dipole stretch field was applied to the CAM using custom computer-controlled servomotors. The topography of the stretch field was mapped using finite element models. After 3 days of stretch, Sholl analysis of the CAM demonstrated a 7-fold increase in conducting vessel intersections within the stretch field (p<0.01). Morphometric analysis of intravital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images demonstrated that the increase vessel density was a result of an increase in interbranch distance (p<0.01) and a decrease in bifurcation angles (p<0.01); there was no significant increase in conducting vessel number (p>0.05). In contrast, corrosion casting and SEM of the stretch field capillary meshwork demonstrated intense sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. Both planar surface area (p<0.05) and pillar density (p<0.01) were significantly increased relative to control regions of the CAM. We conclude that a uniaxial stretch field stimulates the axial growth and realignment of conducting vessels as well as intussusceptive and sprouting angiogenesis within the gas exchange capillaries of the ex ovo CAM. PMID:24984292

  16. Analysis of a strong mass-based flame stretch model for turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastiaans, R. J. M.; van Oijen, J. A.; de Goey, L. P. H.

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper a theory describing effects of strong flame stretch on turbulent flame propagation [L. P. H. de Goey and J. H. M. ten Thije Boonkkamp, "A flamelet description of premixed laminar flames and the relation with flame stretch," Combust. Flame 119, 253 (1999)] is extended to volume averaged quantities and validated with direct numerical simulation (DNS). The extended theory describes the fuel consumption rate in terms of subgrid scale contributions connected to propagation effects including strong flame stretch. In case there is no preferential diffusion present, it is predicted that the total consumption rate is not affected by local stretch at all. Then the total consumption is described by the unstretched mass burning rate multiplied with the flame surface density. DNSs of turbulent flame kernels have been carried out in order to support the results from the theory. The chemistry is described by application of the flamelet generated manifold technique. The strong stretch theory is shown to be valid up to realizations in the thin reaction zone regime by three independent methods. The local effects of stretch are described, evaluated, and interpreted. Locally the mass burning rate changes by fuel leakage tangential to the flame, but this has no integral effect. The method can be used for subgrid scale modeling of turbulent flame propagation.

  17. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a mega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies.

  18. Grafted polymers inside cylindrical tubes: Chain stretching vs layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Tongchuan; Whitmore, Mark D.

    2013-04-01

    We present a study of the detailed structure of grafted polymer chains and the layers they form inside cylindrical tubes, using the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic chain model and numerical self-consistent field theory. For very large tube radius, the chain stretching and layer thicknesses are the same as for polymers grafted to a planar surface. For decreasing radius, our calculations indicate that the layer almost always gets thinner, although there can be situations where it is very slightly thicker. However, we find that this thinning is not necessarily due to changes to the polymers: in fact, the root-mean-squared layer thickness would decrease even if the polymers themselves are completely unchanged. Furthermore, we find that the polymer stretching can increase at the same time that the layer thickness decreases. These apparent paradoxes are resolved by analyzing and distinguishing between the volume fraction profiles and monomer number distributions in these systems, including how they change and why. We also find that, in a given system, parts of each polymer move towards the curved surface and parts away from it, and that these differences are key to understanding the behavior.

  19. Crayfish stretch receptor: an investigation with voltage-clamp and ion-sensitive electrodes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H M; Ottoson, D; Rydqvist, B

    1978-01-01

    1. The membrane characteristics of the slowly adapting stretch receptor from the crayfish, Astacus fluviatilis, were examined with electrophysiological techniques consisting of membrane potential recording, voltage clamp and ion-sensitive microelectrodes. 2. The passive membrane current (Ip) following step changes of the membrane potential to levels above 0 mV required more than a minute to decay to a steady-state level. 3. The stretch-induced current (SIC, where SIC = Itotal--Ipassive) was not fully developed until the Ip had decayed to a steady state. 4. With Ip at the steady state and the stretch-induced current at the O-current potential, a slow stretch-induced inward current was isolated. The latter reaches a maximum after 1 sec of stretch and declines even more slowly after stretch. The I-V relation of the slow current had a negative slope and reversed sign near the resting potential. It is suggested that this current is due to a Cl- conductance change. 5. The stretch-induced current, consisting of a rapid transient phase and a steady component can be isolated from the slow stretch-induced current at a holding potential corresponding to the resting potential. 6. The SIC-Em relation is non-linear and reverses sign at about +15 mV. 7. In a given cell, the reversal potential of the stretch-induced potential change obtained with current clamp coincided with the 0-current potential of the stretch-induced current obtained by voltage clamp. The average value from twenty-six cells was +13 +/- 6.5 mV; cell to cell variability seemed to be correlated with dendrite length. 8. Tris (mol. wt. 121) or arginine (mol. wt. 174) susbstituted for Na+ reduces but does not abolish the stretch-induced current. 9. The permeability ratios of Tris:Na and arginine:Na were estimated from changes in the 0-current potential as these cations replaced Na+ in the external medium. The PTris:PNa was somewhat higher (0.31) than the Parginine:PNa ratio (0.25). 10. Changes in the external Ca2

  20. Stagnation Point Flow and Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction past a Stretching/Shrinking Cylinder

    PubMed Central

    Najib, Najwa; Bachok, Norfifah; Arifin, Norihan Md.; Ishak, Anuar

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about the stagnation point flow and mass transfer with chemical reaction past a stretching/shrinking cylinder. The governing partial differential equations in cylindrical form are transformed into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The transformed equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. Results for the skin friction coefficient, Schmidt number, velocity profiles as well as concentration profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. Effects of the curvature parameter, stretching/shrinking parameter and Schmidt number on the flow and mass transfer characteristics are examined. The study indicates that dual solutions exist for the shrinking cylinder but for the stretching cylinder, the solution is unique. It is observed that the surface shear stress and the mass transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases. PMID:24569547

  1. Patterns of effective permeability of leaf cuticles to acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, H.D.; Walters, K.D.; Berg, V.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Plants in the field are frequently exposed to anthropogenic acid precipitation with pH values of 4 and below. For the acid to directly affect leaf tissues, it must pass through the leaf cuticle, but little is known about the permeability of cuticles to protons, of about the effect of different anions on this permeability. We investigated the movement of protons through isolated astomatous leaf cuticles of grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi Macfady.), rough lemon (Citrus limon [L.] Burm. fils cv Ponderosa), and pear (Pyrus communis L.) using hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids. Cuticles were enzymically isolated from leaves and placed in a diffusion apparatus with pH 4 acid on the morphological outer surface of the cuticle and degassed distilled water on the inner surface. Changes in pH of the solution on the inner surface were used to determine rates of effective permeability of the cuticles to the protons of these acids. Most cuticles exhibited an initial low permeability, lasting hours to days, then after a short transition displayed a significant higher permeability, which persisted until equilibrium was approached. The change in effective permeability appears to be reversible. Effective permeabilities were higher for sulfuric acid than for the others. A model of the movement of protons through the cuticle is presented, proposing that dissociated acid groups in channels within the cutin are first protonated by the acid, accounting for the low initial effective permeability; then protons pass freely through the channels, resulting in a higher effective permeability. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Fine-Scale Road Stretch Forecasting along Main Danish Roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahura, A.; Petersen, C.; Sattler, K.; Sass, B.

    2009-09-01

    The DMI has in collaboration with the Danish Road Directorate (DRD) for almost two decades used a Road Condition Model (RCM) system (based on a dense road observations network and the numerical weather prediction model - HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model, HIRLAM) to provide operational forecasts of main road conditions at selected road stations of the Danish road network. As of Jan 2009, there are 357 road stations (equipped in total with 456 sensors), where measurements and forecasts of road surface temperature, air and dew point temperatures are conducted. Forecasts of other important meteorological parameters such as cloud cover and precipitations as well as radar and satellite images are also distributed to the users through the web-based interface vejvejr.dk and through DMI and DRD web-pages. For icing conditions, new technology has made it easy to vary the dose of spreaded salt, making it possible to use salt only on the parts of the road network where it is really needed. In our study measurements of road surface temperature from road stations and salt spreaders have additionally been used to examine both road stations and road stretches forecasts along the main roads of the Danish Road Network (accounting almost 23 thousand points located at distances of 250 m). These results showed critical importance of availability of detailed characteristics of the roads surroundings. To make local forecasts in a specific point all possible local detailed information is needed. Since high resolution models running at faster supercomputers as well as detailed physiographic datasets now are available, it is possible to improve the modelling and parameterization of significant physical processes influencing the formation of the slippery road conditions. First of all, it is based on a new dataset available from Kort og Matrikel styrelsen, the so-called Danish Height Model (Danmarks Højdemodel) which is a very detailed set of data with horizontal resolution of a few meters

  3. NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW ACROSS CANAL PRISM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW ACROSS CANAL PRISM TO TOWPATH BERM (LATER FILL ENCROACHING LEFT) NEAR CENTER OF THIS STRETCH; VIEW TO SOUTHWEST - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  4. Stretching a self-interacting semiflexible polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, A.; Marenduzzo, D.; Kumar, S.

    2006-09-01

    We present results from three-dimensional off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the stretching response of a semi-flexible polymer subjected to self-attractive interactions. We employ the quasi-static approximation and consider both the fixed elongation and the fixed force ensemble, which can equally well be reproduced in experiments nowadays. The force vs. elongation curves are in general non-monotonic, and the quantity and height of peaks increase with decreasing temperature, and with increasing stiffness. We finally compute the variation of unfolding force with temperature. Our results should be relevant for stretching experimental studies, and for more refined theoretical modeling, taking non-equilibrium and kinetic effects into account.

  5. Stretching cells and delivering drugs with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Li, Fenfang; Chon U, Chan; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we'll review our work on impulsive cell stretching using cavitation bubbles and magnetic microbubbles for drug delivery. For sufficient short times cells can sustain a much larger areal strain than the yield strain obtained from quasi-static stretching. Experiments with red blood cells show that even then the rupture of the cell is slow process; it is caused by diffusive swelling rather than mechanical violation of the plasma membrane. In the second part we'll discuss bubbles coated with magnetic and drug loaded particles. These bubbles offer an interesting vector for on demand delivery of drugs using mild ultrasound and magnetic fields. We report on basic experiments in microfluidic channels revealing the release of the agent during bubble oscillations and first in vivo validation with a mouse tumor model. Singapore National Research Foundations Competitive Research Program funding (NRF-CRP9-2011-04).

  6. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  7. Vibrational overtone stretching transitions in sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Michael W. P.

    2006-10-01

    The CH stretching overtone transitions of the nerve agent sarin (O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) are of interest to the standoff detection of chemical warfare agents, as many of these transitions occur near regions where small, efficient, portable diode lasers (originally developed for use in the telecommunications industry) operate. However, the interpretation of experimental vibrational overtone spectra is often difficult, and the computational simulation of overtone transitions in a molecule is challenging. Presented herein are the simulated CH overtone stretching transitions in sarin. Spectral regions are simulated from overtone transition energies and intensities, both of which are calculated within the harmonically coupled anharmonic oscillator (HCAO) model. Data for HCAO calculations are obtained from ab initio calculations, without any recourse to experimental data.

  8. NASA/MSFC Large Stretch Press Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M. W.; Nealson, W. P.; Jay, G. C.; Buss, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: A. assess and document the advantages/disadvantages of a government agency investment in a large stretch form press on the order of 5000 tons capacity (per jaw); B. develop a procurement specification for the press; and C. provide trade study data that will permit an optimum site location. Tasks were separated into four major elements: cost study, user survey, site selection, and press design/procurement specification.

  9. Stretch-induced cervicobrachial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quintner, J

    1990-01-01

    The case records of 22 patients who presented with severe and persistent cervicobrachial pain were reviewed. The onset of their pain followed the performance of a forceful activity (lifting, pulling or pushing) using one or both arms in the outstretched position. Their symptoms and the findings on physical examination were both consistent with stretch-induced damage to neural tissues related to the painful upper limb. The predominant site of painful neural pathology appeared to be within the cervical spine. PMID:25025877

  10. Image enhancement by local histogram stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparslan, E.; Fuatince, Mr.

    1981-05-01

    An image enhancement algorithm that makes use of local histogram stretching is introduced. This algorithm yields considerable improvements in human observation of details in an image, compared to straightforward histogram equalization and a number of other enhancement techniques. The algorithm is especially suitable for producing hard copies of images on electrostatic plotters with limited gray levels, as shown in applications to the Girl's image and a Landsat image.

  11. Stretch Moduli of Ribonucleotide Embedded Short DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of DNA is essential to comprehending the dynamics of many cellular functions. DNA deformations are involved in many mechanisms when genetic information needs to be stored and used. In addition, recent studies have found that Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are among the most common non-standard nucleotides present in DNA. The presences of rNMPs in DNA might cause mutation, fragility or genotoxicity of chromosome but how they influence the structure and mechanical properties of DNA remains unclear. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based single molecule spectroscopy, we measure the stretch moduli of double stranded DNAs (dsDNA) with 30 base pairs and 5 equally embedded rNMPs. The dsDNAs are anchored on gold substrate via thiol chemistry, while the AFM tip is used to pick up and stretch the dsDNA from its free end through biotin-streptavidin bonding. Our preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of rNMPs in dsDNA might significantly change its stretch modulus, which might be important in some biological processes.

  12. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  13. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G. Berryman, James

    2003-10-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery.

  14. Effects of insoluble surfactants on the nonlinear deformation and breakup of stretching liquid bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambravaneswaran, Bala; Basaran, Osman A.

    1999-05-01

    During the emission of single drops and the atomization of a liquid from a nozzle, threads of liquid are stretched and broken. A convenient setup for studying in a controlled manner the dynamics of liquid threads is the so-called liquid bridge, which is created by holding captive a volume of liquid between two solid disks and pulling apart the two disks at a constant velocity. Although the stability of static bridges and the dynamics of stretching bridges of pure liquids have been extensively studied, even a rudimentary understanding of the dynamics of the stretching and breakup of bridges of surfactant-laden liquids is lacking. In this work, the dynamics of a bridge of a Newtonian liquid containing an insoluble surfactant are analyzed by solving numerically a one-dimensional set of equations that results from a slender-jet approximation of the Navier-Stokes system that governs fluid flow and the convection-diffusion equation that governs surfactant transport. The computational technique is based on the method-of-lines, and uses finite elements for discretization in space and finite differences for discretization in time. The computational results reveal that the presence of an insoluble surfactant can drastically alter the physics of bridge deformation and breakup compared to the situation in which the bridge is surfactant free. They also make clear how the distribution of surfactant along the free surface varies with stretching velocity, bridge geometry, and bulk and surface properties of the liquid bridge. Gradients in surfactant concentration along the interface give rise to Marangoni stresses which can either retard or accelerate the breakup of the liquid bridge. For example, a high-viscosity bridge being stretched at a low velocity is stabilized by the presence of a surfactant of low surface diffusivity (high Peclet number) because of the favorable influence of Marangoni stresses on delaying the rupture of the bridge. This effect, however, can be lessened or

  15. Effect of water on hydrogen permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulligan, David; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    Doping of hydrogen with CO and CO2 was developed to reduce hydrogen permeation in Stirling engines by forming a low permeability oxide coating on the inner surface of the heater head tubes. Although doping worked well, under certain circumstances the protective oxide could be chemically reduced by the hydrogen in the engine. Some oxygen is required in the hydrogen to prevent reduction. Eventually, all the oxygen in the hydrogen gas - whatever its source - shows up as water. This is the result of hydrogen reducing the CO, CO2, or the protective inner surface oxides. This water can condense in the engine system under the right conditions. If the concentration of water vapor is reduced to a low enough level, the hydrogen can chemically reduce the oxide coating, resulting in an increase in permeability. This work was done to define the minimum water content required to avoid this reduction in the oxide coating. The results of this testing show that a minimum of approximately 750 ppm water is required to prevent an increase in permeability of CG-27, a high temperature metal alloy selected for Stirling engine heater tubes.

  16. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  17. Upper Limb Static-Stretching Protocol Decreases Maximal Concentric Jump Performance

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Paulo H.; Silva, Fernando H. D. de Oliveira; Soares, Enrico G.; Serpa, Érica P.; Nardi, Priscyla S. M.; Vilela, Guanis de B.; Behm, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of an upper limb static-stretching (SS) protocol on the maximal concentric jump performance. We recruited 25 young healthy, male, resistance trained individuals (stretched group, n = 15 and control group, n = 10) in this study. The randomized between group experimental protocol consisted of a three trials of maximal concentric jump task, before and after a SS of the upper limb. Vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) and surface electromyography (sEMG) of both gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and vastus lateralis (VL) were acquired. An extensive SS was employed consisting of ten stretches of 30 seconds, with 15 seconds of rest, and 70-90% of the point of discomfort (POD). ANOVA (2x2) (group x condition) was used for shoulder joint range of motion (ROM), vGRF and sEMG. A significant interaction for passive ROM of the shoulder joint revealed significant increases between pre- and post-SS protocol (p < 0.001). A significant interaction demonstrated decreased peak force and an increased peak propulsion duration between pre- and post-stretching only for stretch group (p = 0.021, and p = 0.024, respectively. There was a significant main effect between groups (stretch and control) for peak force for control group (p = 0.045). Regarding sEMG variables, there were no significant differences between groups (control versus stretched) or condition (pre-stretching versus post-stretching) for the peak amplitude of RMS and IEMG for both muscles (VL and GL). In conclusion, an acute extensive SS can increase the shoulder ROM, and negatively affect both the propulsion duration and peak force of the maximal concentric jump, without providing significant changes in muscle activation. Key points The jump performance can be affected negatively by an intense extensive static-stretching protocol. An intense acute extensive SS protocol can affect positively the shoulder ROM. The intense acute extensive SS protocol does not

  18. Hybrid green permeable pave with hexagonal modular pavement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, M. A.; Abustan, I.; Hamzah, M. O.

    2013-06-01

    Modular permeable pavements are alternatives to the traditional impervious asphalt and concrete pavements. Pervious pore spaces in the surface allow for water to infiltrate into the pavement during rainfall events. As of their ability to allow water to quickly infiltrate through the surface, modular permeable pavements allow for reductions in runoff quantity and peak runoff rates. Even in areas where the underlying soil is not ideal for modular permeable pavements, the installation of under drains has still been shown to reflect these reductions. Modular permeable pavements have been regarded as an effective tool in helping with stormwater control. It also affects the water quality of stormwater runoff. Places using modular permeable pavement has been shown to cause a significant decrease in several heavy metal concentrations as well as suspended solids. Removal rates are dependent upon the material used for the pavers and sub-base material, as well as the surface void space. Most heavy metals are captured in the top layers of the void space fill media. Permeable pavements are now considered an effective BMP for reducing stormwater runoff volume and peak flow. This study examines the extent to which such combined pavement systems are capable of handling load from the vehicles. Experimental investigation were undertaken to quantify the compressive characteristics of the modular. Results shows impressive results of achieving high safety factor for daily life vehicles.

  19. Cellular deformation and intracellular stress propagation during optical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Soo-Kng; Goryachev, Andrew B.; Parker, Kim H.; Chiam, K.-H.

    2010-05-01

    Experiments have shown that mechanical stress can regulate many cellular processes. However, in most cases, the exact regulatory mechanisms are still not well understood. One approach in improving our understanding of such mechanically induced regulation is the quantitative study of cell deformation under an externally applied stress. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite-element model is developed and used to study the deformation of single, suspended fibroblasts in an optical stretcher in which a stretching force is applied onto the surface of the cell. A feature of our physical model is a viscoelastic material equation whose parameters vary spatially to mimic the experimentally observed spatial heterogeneity of cellular material properties. Our model suggests that cell size is a more important factor in determining the maximal strain of the optically stretched fibroblasts compared to the thickness of the actin cortical region. This result could explain the higher deformability observed experimentally for malignant fibroblasts in the optical stretcher. Our model also shows that maximal stress propagates into the nuclear region for malignant fibroblasts whereas for normal fibroblasts, it does not. We discuss how this may impact the transduction of cancer signaling pathways.

  20. Low Stretch PMMA Burning in Microgravity: Status of the Ground-Based Program and New ISS Glovebox Experiment SALSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; T'ien, J. S.; Armstrong, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this ground-based program is to study low stretch diffusion flames burning PMMA as the solid fuel to determine the relationship between buoyant low stretch burning in normal gravity and forced flow low stretch burning in microgravity. The low stretch is generated in normal gravity by using the buoyant convection induced by burning the bottom of a large radius of curvature sample. Low stretch is also generated using the Combustion Tunnel drop tower rig (2.2 and 5.2 second facilities), which provides a forced convective low velocity flow past smaller radius of curvature samples. Lastly, an ISS glovebox investigation is being developed to study low stretch burning of PMMA spheres to obtain long duration testing needed to accurately assess the flammability and burning characteristics of the material in microgravity. A comparison of microgravity experiment results with normal gravity test results allows us to establish a direct link between a material's burning characteristics in normal gravity (easily measured) with its burning characteristics in extraterrestrial environments, including microgravity forced convective environments. Theoretical predictions and recent experimental results indicate that it should be possible to understand a material's burning characteristics in the low stretch environment of spacecraft (non-buoyant air movement induced by fans and crew disturbances) by understanding its burning characteristics in an equivalent Earth-based low stretch environment (induced by normal gravity buoyancy). Similarly, Earth-based stretch environments can be made equivalent to those in Lunar- and Martian-surface stretch environments (which would induce partial-gravity buoyancy).

  1. Water permeability of elastomers.

    PubMed

    Held, H R; Landi, S

    1977-01-01

    In a previous study it has been shown that the free moisture content in freeze-dried BCG vaccine dispensed in vials sealed with rubber stoppers increased during storage. The search for the source of this increase led us to explore the possibility that this additional moisture could originate from the rubber stoppers themselves. Therefore, the water permeability of various rubber stoppers has been studied, and the water content of grey butyl stoppers during some operations (autoclaving, oven-drying, freeze-drying, storage) used in the manufacturing of BCG vaccine has been determined. Our experiments showed: rapid water uptake during steam-autoclaving and rapid water release during subsequent oven-drying of the stoppers; a slow water uptake of the stoppers during freeze-drying and a slow water permeation through the stoppers when vials containing Indicating Drierite were stored in a water-saturated atmosphere. Among 12 types of rubber stoppers tested, the grey butyl stoppers and the silicone stoppers showed the lowest water uptake. Moisture-resistant wrappings decreased significantly the moisture uptake of Drierite. To delay moisture from reaching the vaccine it is recommended that the stoppers employed be as dry as possible. PMID:881425

  2. A tunable hemispherical platform for non-stretching curved flexible electronics and optoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Jinda; Ju, Y. Sungtaek

    2014-07-28

    One major challenge in incorporating flexible electronics or optoelectronics on curved surfaces is the requirement of significant stretchability. We report a tunable platform for incorporating flexible and yet non-stretching device layers on a hemisphere. In this configuration, an array of planar petals contractively maps onto the surface of an inflatable hemisphere through elastocapillary interactions mediated by an interface liquid. A mechanical model is developed to elucidate the dependence of the conformality of the petal structures on their elastic modulus and thickness and the liquid surface tension. The modeling results are validated against experimental results obtained using petal structures of different thicknesses, restoring elastic spring elements of different spring constants, and liquids with different surface tension coefficients. Our platform will enable facile integration of non-stretching electronic and optoelectronic components prepared using established planar fabrication techniques on tunable hemispherical surfaces.

  3. Modeling the electrical resistance of gold film conductors on uniaxially stretched elastomeric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenzhe; Görrn, Patrick; Wagner, Sigurd

    2011-05-01

    The electrical resistance of gold film conductors on polydimethyl siloxane substrates at stages of uniaxial stretching is measured and modeled. The surface area of a gold conductor is assumed constant during stretching so that the exposed substrate takes up all strain. Sheet resistances are calculated from frames of scanning electron micrographs by numerically solving for the electrical potentials of all pixels in a frame. These sheet resistances agree sufficiently well with values measured on the same conductors to give credence to the model of a stretchable network of gold links defined by microcracks.

  4. Photoluminescence of zirconium hydroxide: Origin of a chemisorption-induced ‘red-stretch'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, Evan J.; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Whitten, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Zirconium hydroxide particles are reactive and photoluminescent, emitting blue light under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Adsorption-induced changes in the photoluminescence (PL) offer opportunities for gas sensor/filtration applications. The PL of Zr(OH)4 is quenched in the presence of molecular oxygen, likely through trapping of surface electrons via the formation of O2-. Heating the powder high enough to desorb hydroxyl groups broadens the PL spectrum toward longer wavelengths. This ‘red-stretch' also occurs upon reaction with sulfur dioxide, which replaces terminal hydroxyl groups with sulfite ones. Excessive UV irradiation correspondingly induces this effect. A mechanism is proposed to account for the red-stretch.

  5. Secondary structure of double-stranded DNA under stretching: Elucidation of the stretched form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaloum, M.; Beker, A.-F.; Muller, P.

    2011-03-01

    Almost two decades ago, measurements of force versus extension on isolated double-stranded DNA molecules revealed a force plateau. This unusual stretching phenomenon in DNA suggests that the long molecules may be extended from the usual B form into a new conformation. Different models have been proposed to describe the nature of DNA in its stretched form, S-DNA. Using atomic force microscopy combined with a molecular combing method, we identified the structure of λ-phage DNA for different stretching values. We provide strong evidence for the existence of a first-order transition between B form and S form. Beyond a certain extension of the natural length, DNA molecules adopt a new double-helix conformation characterized by a diameter of 1.2 nm and a helical pitch of 18 nm.

  6. Secondary structure of double-stranded DNA under stretching: Elucidation of the stretched form

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloum, M.; Muller, P.; Beker, A-F.

    2011-03-15

    Almost two decades ago, measurements of force versus extension on isolated double-stranded DNA molecules revealed a force plateau. This unusual stretching phenomenon in DNA suggests that the long molecules may be extended from the usual B form into a new conformation. Different models have been proposed to describe the nature of DNA in its stretched form, S-DNA. Using atomic force microscopy combined with a molecular combing method, we identified the structure of {lambda}-phage DNA for different stretching values. We provide strong evidence for the existence of a first-order transition between B form and S form. Beyond a certain extension of the natural length, DNA molecules adopt a new double-helix conformation characterized by a diameter of 1.2 nm and a helical pitch of18 nm.

  7. Permeability alteration induced by drying of brines in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Permeability of reservoir rocks can be strongly altered by salt precipitation induced by drying. Indeed, gas injection in deep saline aquifers leads first to the brine displacement. The liquid saturation decreases near the injection point and reaches a residual water saturation. But at longer time, the water mass transfer to the gas phase by evaporation can become significant and the dissolved salt can precipitate in the porous structure. The solid salts fill the pores and the permeability decreases. Permeability alteration by salting out is a risk of injectivity decline in the context of CO2 geological storage in saline aquifers where high level of gas injection has to be maintained over decades. However, this problem has been poorly investigated. It implies physical processes that are strongly coupled: drying, water and gas flows in the porous structure and precipitation. This work is an experimental investigation aiming at measuring on natural rock samples the permeability alteration induced by convective drying where dry gas is injected through the sample. We show that alteration of permeability is strong and total blockage of the flow is even possible. We also show that the change in porosity due to the solid salt is heterogeneous along the rock samples. A local permeability-porosity relationship has been estimated from the measurements and we could deduce the permeability alteration function of time by modeling the drying dynamic. We show that it starts very early because capillary backflows are extremely efficient in this process to accumulate solid salt near the injection surfaces.

  8. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19–21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity. PMID:26311984

  9. Acute effects of dynamic stretching, static stretching, and light aerobic activity on muscular performance in women.

    PubMed

    Curry, Brad S; Chengkalath, Devendra; Crouch, Gordon J; Romance, Michelle; Manns, Patricia J

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three warm-up protocols--static stretching, dynamic stretching, and light aerobic activity--on selected measures of range of motion and power in untrained females and to investigate the sustained effects at 5 and 30 minutes after warm-up. A total of 24 healthy females (ages 23-29 years) attended one familiarization session and three test sessions on nonconsecutive days within 2 weeks. A within-subject design protocol with the testing investigators blinded to the subjects' warm-up was followed. Each session started with 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling followed by pretest baseline measures. Another 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling was completed and followed by one of the three randomly selected warm-up interventions (static stretching, dynamic stretching, or light aerobic activity). The following posttest outcome measures were collected 5 and 30 minutes following the intervention: modified Thomas test, countermovement jump, and isometric time to peak force knee extension measured by dynamometer. Analysis of the data revealed significant time effects on range of motion and countermovement jump changes. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between the warm-up conditions on any of the variables. The variation in responses to warm-up conditions emphasizes the unique nature of individual reactions to different warm-ups; however, there was a tendency for warm-ups with an active component to have beneficial effects. The data suggests dynamic stretching has greater applicability to enhance performance on power outcomes compared to static stretching. PMID:19675479

  10. Quantifying stretch and secretion in the embryonic lung: Implications for morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    George, Uduak Z; Bokka, Kishore K; Warburton, David; Lubkin, Sharon R

    2015-11-01

    Branching in the embryonic lung is controlled by a variety of morphogens. Mechanics is also believed to play a significant role in lung branching. The relative roles and interactions of these two broad factors are challenging to determine. We considered three hypotheses for explaining why tracheal occlusion triples branching with no overall increase in size. Both hypotheses are based on tracheal occlusion blocking the exit of secretions. (H1) Increased lumen pressure stretches tissues; stretch receptors at shoulders of growing tips increase local rate of branching. (H2) Blocking exit of secretions blocks advective transport of morphogens, leading to (H2a) increased overall concentration of morphogens or (H2b) increased flux of morphogens at specific locations. We constructed and analyzed computational models of tissue stretch and solute transport in a 3D lung geometry. Observed tissue stresses and stretches were predominantly in locations unrelated to subsequent branch locations, suggesting that tissue stretch (H1) is not the mechanism of enhancement of branching. Morphogen concentration in the mesenchyme (H2a) increased with tracheal occlusion, consistent with previously reported results. Morphogen flux at the epithelial surface (H2b) completely changed its distribution pattern when the trachea was occluded, tripling the number of locations at which it was elevated. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that tracheal occlusion blocks outflow of secretions, leading to a higher number of high-flux locations at branching tips, in turn leading to a large increase in number of branching locations. PMID:26189687

  11. DNA stretching on one-sided carbon nanotube (CNT) walls in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Lin, Chih-Yi; Li, Shih-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Completely stretched DNA molecules are becoming an important topic to advance our fundamental understanding of the physical and biological properties of DNA. In this study, λ phage DNA molecules are stretched on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films on the wall surfaces in a microchannel and measured through the total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy visualization/measuring technique. With DNA stretching in a definite direction, it is expected that a higher stretch ratio will be obtained. Real-time images show that the stretch ratio of the λ phage DNA molecules on the MWCNT walls reaches about 0.7 (relative to its contour length) at a low electrical field strength of 5 kV m-1, which is significantly higher than without the MWCNT-deposited film. Special attention is paid to the effect of the MWCNT film thickness, the channel size, in terms of the aspect ratio of the channel cross-section and channel length, and different electrical field strengths.

  12. Radiation effect on viscous flow of a nanofluid and heat transfer over a nonlinearly stretching sheet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we study the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a viscous nanofluid over a nonlinearly stretching sheet in the presence of thermal radiation, included in the energy equation, and variable wall temperature. A similarity transformation was used to transform the governing partial differential equations to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. An efficient numerical shooting technique with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme was used to obtain the solution of the boundary value problem. The variations of dimensionless surface temperature, as well as flow and heat-transfer characteristics with the governing dimensionless parameters of the problem, which include the nanoparticle volume fraction ϕ, the nonlinearly stretching sheet parameter n, the thermal radiation parameter NR, and the viscous dissipation parameter Ec, were graphed and tabulated. Excellent validation of the present numerical results has been achieved with the earlier nonlinearly stretching sheet problem of Cortell for local Nusselt number without taking the effect of nanoparticles. PMID:22520273

  13. The effectiveness of FE model for increasing accuracy in stretch forming simulation of aircraft skin panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, A.; Yamada, T.; Takahashi, S.

    2013-12-01

    In the aerospace industry, stretch forming has been used to form the outer surface parts of aircraft, which are called skin panels. Empirical methods have been used to correct the springback by measuring the formed panels. However, such methods are impractical and cost prohibitive. Therefore, there is a need to develop simulation technologies to predict the springback caused by stretch forming [1]. This paper reports the results of a study on the influences of the modeling conditions and parameters on the accuracy of an FE analysis simulating the stretch forming of aircraft skin panels. The effects of the mesh aspect ratio, convergence criteria, and integration points are investigated, and better simulation conditions and parameters are proposed.

  14. Mitigating methane emissions and air intrusion in heterogeneous landfills with a high permeability layer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yoojin; Imhoff, Paul T; Augenstein, Don; Yazdani, Ramin

    2011-05-01

    Spatially variable refuse gas permeability and landfill gas (LFG) generation rate, cracking of the soil cover, and reduced refuse gas permeability because of liquid addition can all affect CH(4) collection efficiency when intermediate landfill covers are installed. A new gas collection system that includes a near-surface high permeability layer beneath the landfill cover was evaluated for enhancing capture of LFG and mitigating CH(4) emissions. Simulations of gas transport in two-dimensional domains demonstrated that the permeable layer reduces CH(4) emissions up to a factor of 2 for particular spatially variable gas permeability fields. When individual macrocracks formed in the cover soil and the permeable layer was absent, CH(4) emissions increased to as much as 24% of the total CH(4) generated, double the emissions when the permeable layer was installed. CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil was also much more uniform when the permeable layer was present: local percentages of CH(4) oxidized varied between 94% and 100% across the soil cover with the permeable layer, but ranged from 10% to 100% without this layer for some test cases. However, the permeable layer had a minor effect on CH(4) emissions and CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil when the ratio of the gas permeability of the cover soil to the mean refuse gas permeability ≤ 0.05. The modeling approach employed in this study may be used to assess the utility of other LFG collection systems and management practices. PMID:20880688

  15. Monitoring Strategies in Permeable Pavement Systems to Optimize Maintenance Scheduling

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the surface in a permeable pavement system clogs and performance decreases, maintenance is required to preserve the design function. Currently, guidance is limited for scheduling maintenance on an as needed basis. Previous research has shown that surface clogging in a permea...

  16. Measuring Clogging with Pressure Transducers in Permeable Pavement Strips

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two issues that have a negative affect on the long term hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems are surface clogging and clogging at the interface with the underlying soil. Surface clogging limits infiltration capacity and results in bypass if runoff rate exceeds in...

  17. Uni-Directional Cell Stretching Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L. (Inventor); Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus and method for applying various degrees of linear, mechanical loads on mammalian tissues, and in particular, for effecting linear stretching of tissue and simulating changes in hydrostatic pressures encountered during tissue contraction in vivo. The apparatus is useful for the study of mechanical loading in human tissue, and specifically, for permitting the evaluation of the effects of mechanical loading of skeletal or cardiac tissue and of the effects of removal of mechanical loading due to inactivity or the like, and the subsequent reapplication of load to these tissues.

  18. To Stretch and Search for Better Ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2000-06-01

    There's a lot to do to get each issue of this Journal ready for publication, and there's a lot that can go awry during that process. We the editorial staff do our utmost to make certain that each issue is the best it can possibly be, but, of necessity, a lot of our effort is focused on solving problems, correcting errors, and avoiding pitfalls. It is not surprising that we sometimes lose sight of the bigger picture--all of the things that came out as well as or better than we hoped they would. Therefore it gives us great pleasure when a reader applauds (and thereby rewards) our efforts. One such communication inspired this editorial.

    I have appreciated the extra effort put forward by the staff to make the Journal really come alive. The high quality of the Journal serves as an incentive to chemical educators to stretch and search for better ways to inspire our students.
    I fervently hope that we do encourage you "to stretch and search for better ways", not only to inspire students but in everything you do. Stretching and searching for better ways is what life, science, chemistry, and teaching are all about, and it is a wonderfully stimulating and exciting way to approach anything and everything. Sometimes, though, one's ability to stretch is akin to that of a rubber band exposed too long to sunlight. Change becomes a threat or a burden instead of an opportunity. This often happens in one area but not others, as in the case of someone doing original research but whose lecture notes are yellow with age, or someone who experiments with new teaching approaches but neglects the latest chemical discoveries. Whatever its manifestation, failure to stretch and search for better ways is a great loss, both for the individual directly involved and for others. Fortunately there are many who continually stretch and search, often in conjunction with JCE. For example, some time ago the Chair of the Board of Publication, Jerry Bell, challenged Journal

  19. Stretching of proteins in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, P.; Cieplak, Marek

    2006-10-01

    Stretching of a protein by a fluid flow is compared to that in a force-clamp apparatus. The comparison is made within a simple topology-based dynamical model of a protein in which the effects of the flow are implemented using Langevin dynamics. We demonstrate that unfolding induced by a uniform flow shows a richer behavior than that in the force clamp. The dynamics of unfolding is found to depend strongly on the selection of the amino acid, usually one of the termini, which is anchored. These features offer potentially wider diagnostic tools to investigate structure of proteins compared to experiments based on the atomic force microscopy.

  20. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  1. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  2. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  3. Respiratory mucosal permeability in asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Elwood, R.K.; Kennedy, S.; Belzberg, A.; Hogg, J.C.; Pare, P.D.

    1983-09-01

    The permeability of respiratory mucosa to technetium-labeled diethylenetriamine pentacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) was measured in 10 clinically stable chronic asthmatics and the results were compared with those in 9 nonasthmatic control subjects. Nonspecific bronchial reactivity was measured using methacholine, and the PC20 was calculated. The intrapulmonary distribution and dose of the inhaled /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA was determined by a gamma camera and the half-life of the aerosolized label in the lung was calculated. The accumulation of radioactivity in the blood was monitored and a permeability index was calculated at 10, 25, and 60 min after aerosolization. Despite marked differences in airway reactivity, no differences in either parameter of permeability could be detected between the asthmatics and the control group. It is concluded that clinically stable asthmatics do not demonstrate increase mucosal permeability to small solutes when compared with normal subjects.

  4. Study on Stretching Methods of Biaxially Stretched Co-polyester Film with Has Uniaxially Heat Shrinkage Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruta, Masayuki; Mukouyama, Yukinobu; Tabota, Norimi; Ito, Katsuya; Nonomura, Chisato

    Heat shrinkable film made of stretched film is widely used for decorative labels by attaching on PET bottles with heat shrinkage by steam or dry heating. Trouble cancellation in the installation process of the PET bottle is necessary. The purpose of this study is development of uniaxially heat shrinkable co-polyester film that has strength both in the machine direction (MD) and transverse direction (TD). The film production was performed using sequential biaxial stretched process that combined roll stretching with TD stretching. Cast film was processed in the order of TD stretching-Anneal 1-MD stretching-Anneal 2. As a result, the heat shrinkable film that shrunk only in MD got high tensile strength both in MD and TD. The anneal 1 temperature over Tg (Glass transition temperature) of material resin was needed to obtain the heat shrinkable film shrunk in MD after TD stretching.

  5. Direct observation of amyloid nucleation under nanomechanical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varongchayakul, Nitinun

    Self-assembly of amyloid nanofiber is associated with functional and pathological processes such as in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite intensive studies, stochastic nature of the process has made it difficult to elucidate molecular mechanisms for the key amyloid nucleation. Here, we investigated the amyloid nucleation of silk-elastin-like peptide (SELP) using time-lapse lateral force microscopy (LFM). By repeated scanning a single line on a SELP-coated mica surface, we observed sudden stepwise height increases, corresponds to nucleation of an amyloid fiber. The lateral force profiles followed either a worm-like chain model or an exponential function, suggesting that the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip stretches a single or multiple SELP molecules along the scanning direction, serves as the template for further self-assembly perpendicular to the scan direction. Such mechanically induced nucleation of amyloid fibrils allows positional and directional control of amyloid assembly in vitro , which we demonstrate by generating single nanofibers at predetermined nucleation sites.

  6. Permeability within basaltic oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Andrew T.

    1998-05-01

    Water-rock interactions within the seafloor are responsible for significant energy and solute fluxes between basaltic oceanic crust and the overlying ocean. Permeability is the primary hydrologic property controlling the form, intensity, and duration of seafloor fluid circulation, but after several decades of characterizing shallow oceanic basement, we are still learning how permeability is created and distributed and how it changes as the crust ages. Core-scale measurements of basaltic oceanic crust yield permeabilities that are quite low (generally 10-22 to 10-17 m²), while in situ measurements in boreholes suggest an overlapping range of values extending several orders of magnitude higher (10-18 to 10-13 m²). Additional indirect estimates include calculations made from borehole temperature and flow meter logs (10-16 to 10-11 m²), numerical models of coupled heat and fluid flow at the ridge crest and within ridge flanks (10-16 to 10-9 m²), and several other methods. Qualitative indications of permeability within the basaltic oceanic crust come from an improved understanding of crustal stratigraphy and patterns of alteration and tectonic modification seen in ophiolites, seafloor samples and boreholes. Difficulties in reconciling the wide range of estimated permeabilities arise from differences in experimental scale and critical assumptions regarding the nature and distribution of fluid flow. Many observations and experimental and modeling results are consistent with permeability varying with depth into basement and with primary basement lithology. Permeability also seems to be highly heterogeneous and anisotropic throughout much of the basaltic crust, as within crystalline rocks in general. A series of focused experiments is required to resolve permeability in shallow oceanic basement and to directly couple upper crustal hydrogeology to magmatic, tectonic, and geochemical crustal evolution.

  7. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  8. Filament-stretching rheometry of complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, Gareth H.; Sridhar, Tamarapu

    Filament-stretching rheometers are devices for measuring the extensional viscosity of moderately viscous non-Newtonian fluids such as polymer solutions. In these devices, a cylindrical liquid bridge is initially formed between two circular end-plates. The plates are then moved apart in a prescribed manner such that the fluid sample is subjected to a strong extensional deformation. Asymptotic analysis and numerical computation show that the resulting kinematics closely approximate those of an ideal homogeneous uniaxial elongation. The evolution in the tensile stress (measured mechanically) and the molecular conformation (measured optically) can be followed as functions of the rate of stretching and the total strain imposed. The resulting rheological measurements are a sensitive discriminant of molecularly based constitutive equations proposed for complex fluids. The dynamical response of the elongating filament is also coupled to the extensional rheology of the polymeric test fluid, and this can lead to complex viscoelastic-flow instabilities such as filament necking and rupture or elastic peeling from the rigid end-plates.

  9. Characteristic infrared intensities of carbonyl stretching vibrations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Wagner E; Silva, Arnaldo F; Vidal, Luciano N; Bruns, Roy E

    2016-07-14

    The experimental infrared fundamental intensities of gas phase carbonyl compounds obtained by the integration of spectral bands in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) spectral database are in good agreement with the intensities reported by other laboratories having a root mean square error of 27 km mol(-1) or about 13% of the average intensity value. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules/Charge-Charge Transfer-Counterpolarization (QTAIM/CCTCP) model indicates that the large intensity variation from 61.7 to 415.4 km mol(-1) is largely due to static atomic charge contributions, whereas charge transfer and counterpolarization effects essentially cancel one another leaving only a small net effect. The Characteristic Substituent Shift Model estimates the atomic charge contributions to the carbonyl stretching intensities within 30 km mol(-1) or 10% of the average contribution. However, owing to the size of the 2 × C × CTCP interaction contribution, the total intensities cannot be estimated with this degree of accuracy. The dynamic intensity contributions of the carbon and oxygen atoms account for almost all of the total stretching intensities. These contributions vary over large ranges with the dynamic contributions of carbon being about twice the size of the oxygen ones for a large majority of carbonyls. Although the carbon monoxide molecule has an almost null dipole moment contrary to the very polar bond of the characteristic carbonyl group, its QTAIM/CCTCP model is very similar to those found for the carbonyl compounds. PMID:27306140

  10. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  11. Stretched Exponential relaxation in pure Se glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Ravindren, S.; Boolchand, P.

    A universal feature of glasses is the stretched exponential relaxation, f (t) = exp[ - t / τ ] β . The model of diffusion of excitations to randomly distributed traps in a glass by Phillips1 yields the stretched exponent β = d[d +2] where d, the effective dimensionality. We have measured the enthalpy of relaxation ΔHnr (tw) at Tg of Se glass in modulated DSC experiments as glasses age at 300K and find β = 0.43(2) for tw in the 0

  12. Patents for stretching and shaping meats.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Johanne M; Hopkins, David L

    2011-05-01

    Attempts over the years to speed up the slaughter and processing of meat have been limited by the impact on important meat quality traits, such as tenderness. A number of methods and equipment have been developed for stretching and/or shaping to enhance the tenderness of meat, reducing the need for long term storage and ageing of meat. The more successful methods and equipment to improve the tenderness of meat - Tenderstretch (pelvic suspension), Tendercut (skeletal separation), SmartStretch™/Smartshape™ and Tenderbound (Pi-Vac Elasto-Pack system) are the subject of this review. Minimal research has been performed to compare these methods of tenderising meat. Tenderstretch and Tendercut are relatively easy to implement and require no specialised equipment, but they are relatively inflexible and only impact on a small number of muscles. The adoption of Tenderstretch has also been limited by increased resource requirements (chiller space and labour). SmartStretch™/Smartshape™ and Tenderbound, which wrap hot-boned pre-rigor muscles to prevent muscle contraction and shortening during rigor, are systems that do require specialised equipment. The major advantage of these systems is that they are very flexible and can be applied to any target muscle. Further research needs to be undertaken to compare these methods to better facilitate their commercial adoption. The article presents some promising patents on stretching and shaping meats. PMID:21428872

  13. Stretch sensors for human body motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Ben; Gisby, Todd; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Sensing motion of the human body is a difficult task. From an engineers' perspective people are soft highly mobile objects that move in and out of complex environments. As well as the technical challenge of sensing, concepts such as comfort, social intrusion, usability, and aesthetics are paramount in determining whether someone will adopt a sensing solution or not. At the same time the demands for human body motion sensing are growing fast. Athletes want feedback on posture and technique, consumers need new ways to interact with augmented reality devices, and healthcare providers wish to track recovery of a patient. Dielectric elastomer stretch sensors are ideal for bridging this gap. They are soft, flexible, and precise. They are low power, lightweight, and can be easily mounted on the body or embedded into clothing. From a commercialisation point of view stretch sensing is easier than actuation or generation - such sensors can be low voltage and integrated with conventional microelectronics. This paper takes a birds-eye view of the use of these sensors to measure human body motion. A holistic description of sensor operation and guidelines for sensor design will be presented to help technologists and developers in the space.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of chromatin stretching.

    PubMed

    Aumann, Frank; Lankas, Filip; Caudron, Maïwen; Langowski, Jörg

    2006-04-01

    We present Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the stretching of a single chromatin fiber. The model approximates the DNA by a flexible polymer chain with Debye-Hückel electrostatics and uses a two-angle zigzag model for the geometry of the linker DNA connecting the nucleosomes. The latter are represented by flat disks interacting via an attractive Gay-Berne potential. Our results show that the stiffness of the chromatin fiber strongly depends on the linker DNA length. Furthermore, changing the twisting angle between nucleosomes from 90 degrees to 130 degrees increases the stiffness significantly. An increase in the opening angle from 22 degrees to 34 degrees leads to softer fibers for small linker lengths. We observe that fibers containing a linker histone at each nucleosome are stiffer compared to those without the linker histone. The simulated persistence lengths and elastic moduli agree with experimental data. Finally, we show that the chromatin fiber does not behave as an isotropic elastic rod, but its rigidity depends on the direction of deformation: Chromatin is much more resistant to stretching than to bending. PMID:16711856

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of chromatin stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, Frank; Lankas, Filip; Caudron, Maïwen; Langowski, Jörg

    2006-04-01

    We present Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the stretching of a single 30nm chromatin fiber. The model approximates the DNA by a flexible polymer chain with Debye-Hückel electrostatics and uses a two-angle zigzag model for the geometry of the linker DNA connecting the nucleosomes. The latter are represented by flat disks interacting via an attractive Gay-Berne potential. Our results show that the stiffness of the chromatin fiber strongly depends on the linker DNA length. Furthermore, changing the twisting angle between nucleosomes from 90° to 130° increases the stiffness significantly. An increase in the opening angle from 22° to 34° leads to softer fibers for small linker lengths. We observe that fibers containing a linker histone at each nucleosome are stiffer compared to those without the linker histone. The simulated persistence lengths and elastic moduli agree with experimental data. Finally, we show that the chromatin fiber does not behave as an isotropic elastic rod, but its rigidity depends on the direction of deformation: Chromatin is much more resistant to stretching than to bending.

  16. Stretching the Spines of Gymnasts: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sands, William A; McNeal, Jeni R; Penitente, Gabriella; Murray, Steven Ross; Nassar, Lawrence; Jemni, Monèm; Mizuguchi, Satoshi; Stone, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Gymnastics is noted for involving highly specialized strength, power, agility and flexibility. Flexibility is perhaps the single greatest discriminator of gymnastics from other sports. The extreme ranges of motion achieved by gymnasts require long periods of training, often occupying more than a decade. Gymnasts also start training at an early age (particularly female gymnasts), and the effect of gymnastics training on these young athletes is poorly understood. One of the concerns of many gymnastics professionals is the training of the spine in hyperextension-the ubiquitous 'arch' seen in many gymnastics positions and movements. Training in spine hyperextension usually begins in early childhood through performance of a skill known as a back-bend. Does practising a back-bend and other hyperextension exercises harm young gymnasts? Current information on spine stretching among gymnasts indicates that, within reason, spine stretching does not appear to be an unusual threat to gymnasts' health. However, the paucity of information demands that further study be undertaken. PMID:26581832

  17. Levator Ani Muscle Stretch Induced by Simulated Vaginal Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Kuo-Cheng; Mooney, Brian; DeLancey, John O. L.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a three-dimensional computer model to predict levator ani muscle stretch during vaginal birth. METHODS: Serial magnetic resonance images from a healthy nulliparous 34-year-old woman, published anatomic data, and engineering graphics software were used to construct a structural model of the levator ani muscles along with related passive tissues. The model was used to quantify pelvic floor muscle stretch induced during the second stage of labor as a model fetal head progressively engaged and then stretched the iliococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles. RESULTS: The largest tissue strain reached a stretch ratio (tissue length under stretch/original tissue length) of 3.26 in medial pubococcygeus muscle, the shortest, most medial and ventral levator ani muscle. Regions of the ileococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles reached maximal stretch ratios of 2.73, 2.50, and 2.28, respectively. Tissue stretch ratios were proportional to fetal head size: For example, increasing fetal head diameter by 9% increased medial pubococcygeus stretch by the same amount. CONCLUSION: The medial pubococcygeus muscles undergo the largest stretch of any levator ani muscles during vaginal birth. They are therefore at the greatest risk for stretch-related injury. PMID:14704241

  18. Membrane stretch and cytoplasmic Ca2+ independently modulate stretch-activated BK channel activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hu-Cheng; Agula, Hasi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Fa; Sokabe, Masahiro; Li, Lu-Ming

    2010-11-16

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels are responsible for changes in chemical and physical signals such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and membrane potentials. Previously, we reported that a BK channel cloned from chick heart (SAKCaC) is activated by membrane stretch. Molecular cloning and subsequent functional characterization of SAKCaC have shown that both the membrane stretch and intracellular Ca(2+) signal allosterically regulate the channel activity via the linker of the gating ring complex. Here we investigate how these two gating principles interact with each other. We found that stretch force activated SAKCaC in the absence of cytoplasmic Ca(2+). Lack of Ca(2+) bowl (a calcium binding motif) in SAKCaC diminished the Ca(2+)-dependent activation, but the mechanosensitivity of channel was intact. We also found that the abrogation of STREX (a proposed mechanosensing apparatus) in SAKCaC abolished the mechanosensitivity without altering the Ca(2+) sensitivity of channels. These observations indicate that membrane stretch and intracellular Ca(2+) could independently modulate SAKCaC activity. PMID:20673577

  19. The origin of stretched exponential function in dynamic response of photodarkening in amorphous chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimakawa, K.; Nakagawa, N.; Itoh, T.

    2009-08-01

    An increase in the optical absorption coefficient during illumination [photodarkening (PD)] is known to be described by a stretched exponential function (SEF) 1-exp[-(t/τ)β], where τ and β, respectively, are the effective response time and the dispersion parameter. τ and β deduced experimentally depend on the thickness of films. A model calculation, assuming a series sequence of PD along the thickness direction from the illuminated surface to the back surface, produces the SEF and replicates well the experimental results.

  20. The geometric mean concept for interpreting the permeability of heterogeneous geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, Patrick; Selvadurai, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Naturally occurring geomaterials are heterogeneous and the estimation of the effective permeability characteristics of such geomaterials presents a challenge not only in terms of the experimental procedures that should be used to ensure flow through the porous medium but also in the correct use of the theoretical concepts needed to accurately interpret the data. The general consensus is that the flow path in a test needs to be drastically reduced if steady state tests are considered as a suitable experimental technique. The disadvantage of flow path reduction is that the tested volume may not be altogether representative of the rock, particularly if it displays heterogeneity in the scale of the sample being tested. Also, if the sample is not correctly restrained, the differential pressures needed to initiate steady flow can introduce damage in the sample leading to erroneous estimates of permeability. The alternative approach is to use large enough samples that can capture the spatial heterogeneity but develop testing procedures that can test examine the steady state flow process as a problem in three-dimensional fluid flow that can capture the spatial distribution of permeability. The paper discusses theoretical and computational approaches that have been developed for the estimation of the spatial distribution of permeability in a cuboidal Indiana Limestone sample measuring 450 mm. The "Patch Permeability Test" developed in connection with the research allows the measurements of the surface permeability of the block and through kriging techniques estimate the permeability within the block sample. The research promotes the use of the "Geometric Mean" concept for the description of the effective permeability of the heterogeneous porous medium where the spatial distribution conforms to a lognormal pattern. The effectiveness of the approach is that the techniques can be applied to examine the effective permeability of heterogeneous low permeability materials such as

  1. Timescales for permeability reduction and strength recovery in densifying magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Farquharson, J. I.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    likely persistently re-fracture and keep the conduit margin permeable. The modelling therefore supports the notion that repeated fracture-healing cycles are responsible for the successive low-magnitude earthquakes associated with silicic dome extrusion. Taken together, our results indicate that the transition from effusive to explosive behaviour may rest on the competition between permeability reduction within the conduit and outgassing through fractures at the conduit margin. If the conditions for explosive behaviour are satisfied, the magma densification clock will be reset and the process will start again. The timescales of permeability reduction and strength recovery presented in this study may aid our understanding of the permeability evolution of conduit margin fractures, magma fracture-healing cycles, surface outgassing cycles, and the timescales required for pore pressure augmentation and the initiation of explosive eruptions.

  2. Shear-induced permeability anisotropy of simulated serpentinite gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, K.; Katayama, I.; Noda, H.; Takahashi, M.

    2012-12-01

    Fluids in fault zone play an important role on mechanical weakening of fault strength due to elevated pore fluid pressures and absorbed on the crystal surface. The heterogeneous occurrence of earthquake in subduction zone are probably linked to the heterogeneous distribution of fluids that have significant influence on the fault instability. Permeability in fault zone control fluid flow in In this study, permeability in three orthogonal directions of antigorite serpentinite gouge was measured during pre-cut frictional experiments using triaxial gas apparatus in Hiroshima University. kx, ky, and kz denote permeabilities in the slip direction, normal to the slip direction in the fault, and normal to the fault. All experiments were conducted at a room temperature, a confining pressure of 150 MPa, a pore pressure of 100 MPa, and a constant slip rate of 0.575 μm/s while the initial gouge thickness is about 1.2 mm. Permeabilities in different directrions are measured for different but similar samples continuously during shear deformation by the pore pressure oscillation method [e.g., Fischer and Paterson, 1992]. The friction coefficient reached its maximum value at a slip displacement of about 0.8 mm. Permeabilities in all directions decreases by one order of magnitude until this point without showing significant anisotropy. After the shear stress reaches steady-state, anisotropy of permeability becomes remarkable. At the steady state in terms of shear stress, permeability anisotropies kx/kz and ky/kz stayed at their steady state value as high as nearly one order magnitude. Microstructures of recovered samples suggest that the permeability anisotropy is caused by developments of R- and P-shear band structures that may act as fluid conduits and encourage fluid flow parallel to the fault in serpentinite gouge. These permeability anisotropies may enhance fluid flow along subduction plate interface and active fault zones. In addition, this anisotropic permeability structure

  3. Techniques to Determine Maintenace Frequency of Permeable Pavement Systems with Time Domain Reflectometers (TDRs

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the surface clogs in permeable pavement systems, they lose effectiveness and require maintenance. There is limited direct guidance for determining when maintenance is needed to prevent surface runoff bypass. Research is being conducted using multiple time domain reflectomete...

  4. Use of Time Domain Reflectometers (TDRs) in Permeable Pavement Systems to Predict Maintenance Needs and Effectiveness

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the surface in permeable pavement systems clogs, infiltration capacity decreases, so maintenance is required to maintain hydrologic performance. There is limited direct guidance for determining when maintenance is needed to prevent surface runoff bypass. Research is being co...

  5. The influence of passive stretch on muscle oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kevin K

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that chronic stretch might be able to produce skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, stretching might also restrict blood flow, which could in turn influence any stretch-training program. This study evaluated the influence of muscle stretch on muscle oxygen saturation using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A 16 channel NIRS probes were placed on the medial gastrocnemius, quadriceps, and hamstring muscles of young healthy adults. Oxygen saturation during maximal tolerated stretch was measured and normalized with cuff-induced ischemia and reperfusion. Oxygen saturation decreased in the gastrocnemius and quadriceps in a position dependent fashion, but did not change in the hamstring muscles. Passive stretching may also have a significant hypoxic component in some muscles but not others. PMID:20204809

  6. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study's methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC. PMID:27390425

  7. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study’s methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC. PMID:27390425

  8. System performance and cost sensitivity comparisons of stretched membrane heliostat reflectors with current generation glass/metal concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.M.; Anderson, J.V.; Short, W.; Wendelin, T.

    1985-12-01

    Heliostat costs have long been recognized as a major factor in the cost of solar central receiver plants. Research on stretched membrane heliostats has been emphasized because of their potential as a cost-effective alternative to current glass/metal designs. However, the cost and performance potential of stretched membrane heliostats from a system perspective has not been studied until this time. The optical performance of individual heliostats is predicted here using results established in previous structural studies. These performance predictions are used to compare both focused and unfocused stretched membrane heliostats with state-of-the-art glass/metal heliostats from a systems perspective. We investigated the sensitivity of the relative cost and performance of fields of heliostats to a large number of parameter variations, including system size, delivery temperature, heliostat module size, surface specularity, hemispherical reflectance, and macroscopic surface quality. The results indicate that focused stretched membrane systems should have comparable performance levels to those of current glass/metal heliostat systems. Further, because of their relatively lower cost, stretched membrane heliostats should provide an economically attractive alternative to current glass/metal heliostats over essentially the entire range of design parameters studied. Unfocused stretched membrane heliostats may also be attractive for a somewhat more limited range of applications, including the larger plant sizes and lower delivery temperatures.

  9. Fractured-rock permeability-versus-stress relationships from in situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this presentation is (1) to review field data on stress-induced permeability changes in fractured rock, (2) to describe back-analysis of fractured rock stress-versus-permeability relationships through model calibration against such field data, and (3) to discuss observations of chemically mediated fracture surface compaction and its effect on fractured rock permeability. Reviewed field data on stress-induced permeability changes, some of which are used for model calibration, includes in situ block experiments, borehole injection experiments, observations of depth dependent permeability, studies of excavation-induced changes in permeability around tunnels, and permeability changes associated with a large-scale rock mass heating experiment. It is suggested that model calibration of stress-versus-permeability relationships against field experiments involving simultaneously elevated stress and temperature may be strongly affected by additional temperature dependent fracture closure and fracture surface interlocking. This is a phenomenon that has been observed both in the lab and the field and has been described as thermal over-closure related to better fit of opposing fracture surfaces at high temperatures. The same phenomenon has also been described as chemically mediated fracture closure related to pressure solution of fracture surface asperities. The back-calculated stress-versus-permeability relationship may implicitly account for such effects, but the relative contribution of purely mechanical versus chemically mediated mechanical changes is difficult to isolate.

  10. Permeability extraction: A sonic log inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, N.; Kim, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors provide the missing important link between permeability and acoustic velocities by generating a permeability-dependent synthetic sonic log in a carbonate reservoir. The computations are based on Akbar`s theory that relates wave velocity to frequency, rock properties (e.g., lithology, permeability, and porosity), and fluid saturation and properties (viscosity, density, and compressibility). An inverted analytical expression of the theory is used to extract permeability from sonic velocity. The synthetic sonic and the computed permeability are compared with the observed sonic log and with plug permeability, respectively. The results demonstrate, as predicted by theory, that permeability can be related directly to acoustic velocities.

  11. Liquid filament instability due to stretch-induced phase separation in polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arinstein, Arkadii; Kulichikhin, Valery; Malkin, Alexander; Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Collaboration; Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Russian Academy of Sciences Team

    2015-03-01

    The instability in a jet of a viscoelastic semi-dilute entangled polymer solution under high stretching is discussed. Initially, the variation in osmotic pressure can compensate for decrease in the capillary force, and the jet is stable. The further evolution of the polymer solution along the jet results in formation of a filament in the jet center and of a near-surface solvent layer. Such a redistribution of polymer seems like a ``phase separation'', but it is related to stretching of the jet. The viscous liquid shell demonstrates Raleigh-type instability resulting in the formation of individual droplets on the oriented filament. Experimental observations showed that this separation is starting during few first seconds, and continues of about 10 -15 seconds. The modeling shows that a jet stretching results in a radial gradient in the polymer distribution: the polymer is concentrated in the jet center, whereas the solvent is remaining near the surface. The key point of this model is that a large longitudinal stretching of a polymer network results in its lateral contraction, so a solvent is pressed out of this polymer network because of the decrease in its volume. V.K. and A.M. acknowledge the financial support of the Russian Scientific Foundation (Grant 4-23-00003).

  12. Infusing Stretch Goal Requirements into the Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Young H.; Galpin, Roger A.; Ingoldsby, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) was announced by the United States President's Administration in an effort to explore space and to extend a human presence across our solar system. Subsequently, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) established the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) to develop a constellation of new capabilities, supporting technologies, and foundational research that allows for the sustained and affordable exploration of space. Then, ESMD specified the primary mission for the Constellation Program to carry out a series of human expeditions, ranging from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to the surface of Moon, Mars, and beyond for the purposes of conducting human exploration of space. Thus, the Constellation Program was established at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) to manage the development of the flight and ground infrastructure and systems that can enable continued and extended human access to space. Constellation Program's "Design Objectives" call for an early attention to the program's life cycle costs management through the Program's Need, Goals, and Objectives (NGO) document, which provides the vision, scope, and key areas of focus for the Program. One general policy of the Constellation Program, found in the Constellation Architecture Requirements Document (CARD), states: "A sustainable program hinges on how effectively total life cycle costs are managed. Developmental costs are a key consideration, but total life cycle costs related to the production, processing, and operation of the entire architecture must be accounted for in design decisions sufficiently to ensure future resources are available for ever more ambitious missions into the solar system....It is the intent of the Constellation Program to aggressively manage this aspect of the program using the design policies and simplicity." To respond to the Program's strong desire to manage the program life cycle costs, special efforts were

  13. Polarized ATP distribution in urothelial mucosal and serosal space is differentially regulated by stretch and ectonucleotidases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiqun

    2015-11-15

    Purinergic signaling is a major pathway in regulating bladder function, and mechanical force stimulates urothelial ATP release, which plays an important role in bladder mechanotransduction. Although urothelial ATP release was first reported almost 20 years ago, the way in which release is regulated by mechanical force, and the presence of ATP-converting enzymes in regulating the availability of released ATP is still not well understood. Using a set of custom-designed Ussing chambers with the ability to manipulate mechanical forces applied on the urothelial tissue, we have demonstrated that it is stretch and not hydrostatic pressure that induces urothelial ATP release. The experiments reveal that urothelial ATP release is tightly controlled by stretch speed, magnitude, and direction. We have further shown that stretch-induced urothelial ATP release is insensitive to temperature (4°C). Interestingly, stretch-induced ATP release shows polarized distribution, with the ATP concentration in mucosal chamber (nanomolar level) about 10 times higher than the ATP concentration in serosal chamber (subnanomolar level). Furthermore, we have consistently observed differential ATP lifetime kinetics in the mucosal and serosal chambers, which is consistent with our immunofluorescent localization data, showing that ATP-converting enzymes ENTPD3 and alkaline phosphatase are expressed on urothelial basal surface, but not on the apical membrane. In summary, our data indicate that urothelial ATP release is finely regulated by stretch speed, magnitude, and direction, and extracellular ATP signaling is likely to be differentially regulated by ectonucleotidase, which results in temporally and spatially distinct ATP kinetics in response to mechanical stretch. PMID:26336160

  14. Whole-body vibration-induced muscular reflex: Is it a stretch-induced reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Cidem, Muharrem; Sebik, Oguz; Yilmaz, Gizem; Karamehmetoglu, Safak Sahir; Kara, Sadik; Karacan, Ilhan; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole-body vibration (WBV) can induce reflex responses in muscles. A number of studies have reported that the physiological mechanisms underlying this type of reflex activity can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to test whether the WBV-induced muscular reflex (WBV-IMR) can be explained as a stretch-induced reflex. [Subjects and Methods] The present study assessed 20 healthy males using surface electrodes placed on their right soleus muscle. The latency of the tendon reflex (T-reflex) as a stretch-induced reflex was compared with the reflex latency of the WBV-IMR. In addition, simulations were performed at 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 Hz to determine the stretch frequency of the muscle during WBV. [Results] WBV-IMR latency (40.5 ± 0.8 ms; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39.0–41.9 ms) was significantly longer than T-reflex latency (34.6 ± 0.5 ms; 95% CI: 33.6–35.5 ms) and the mean difference was 6.2 ms (95% CI of the difference: 4.7–7.7 ms). The simulations performed in the present study demonstrated that the frequency of the stretch signal would be twice the frequency of the vibration. [Conclusion] These findings do not support the notion that WBV-IMR can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. PMID:26310784

  15. Universal stretched exponential relaxation in nanoconfined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Adarsh; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Alm, Camilla K.; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the behavior of water confined at the nanometer scale is a fundamental problem not only in physics but also in life sciences, geosciences, and atmospheric sciences. Here, we examine spatial and dynamic heterogeneities in water confined in nanoporous silica using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The simulations reveal intermixed low-density water and high-density water with distinct local structures in nanopores of silica. The MD simulations also show dynamic heterogeneities in nanoconfined water. The temporal decay of cage correlation functions for room temperature and supercooled, nanoconfined water is very well described by stretched exponential relaxation, exp(-(t/τ)β). The exponent β has a unique value, d/(d + 2), which agrees with an exact result for diffusion in systems with static, random traps in d = 3 dimensions.

  16. Stretched Lens Array Photovoltaic Concentrator Technology Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Solar arrays have been and continue to be the mainstay in providing power to nearly all commercial and government spacecraft. Light from the Sun is directly converted into electrical energy using solar cells. One way to reduce the cost of future space power systems is by minimizing the size and number of expensive solar cells by focusing the sunlight onto smaller cells using concentrator optics. The stretched lens array (SLA) is a unique concept that uses arched Fresnel lens concentrators to focus sunlight onto a line of high-efficiency solar cells located directly beneath. The SLA concept is based on the Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET) design that was used on NASA's New Millennium Deep Space 1 mission. The highly successful asteroid/comet rendezvous mission (1998 to 2001) demonstrated the performance and long-term durability of the SCARLET/SLA solar array design and set the foundation for further improvements to optimize its performance.

  17. Force fluctuations in stretching a tethered polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Anoop; Vemparala, Satyavani; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    The recently proposed fluctuation relation in unfolding forces [Phys. Rev. E1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.84.060101 84, 060101(R) (2011)] is reexamined taking into account the explicit time dependence of the force distribution. The stretching of a tethered Rouse polymer is exactly solved and the ratio of the probabilities of positive to negative forces is shown to be an exponential in force. Extensive steered molecular dynamics simulations of unfolding of deca alanine peptide confirm the form of fluctuation relation proposed earlier, but with explicit correct time dependence of unfolding forces taken into account. From exact calculations and simulations, a linear dependence of the constant in the exponential of the fluctuation relation on average unfolding forces and inverse temperature is proposed.

  18. Mechanical stretching of proteins: calmodulin and titin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2005-07-01

    Mechanical unfolding of several domains of calmodulin and titin is studied using a Go-like model with a realistic contact map and Lennard-Jones contact interactions. It is shown that this simple model captures the experimentally observed difference between the two proteins: titin is a spring that is tough and strong whereas calmodulin acts like a weak spring with featureless force-displacement curves. The difference is related to the dominance of the α secondary structures in the native structure of calmodulin. The tandem arrangements of calmodulin unwind simultaneously in each domain whereas the domains in titin unravel in a serial fashion. The sequences of contact events during unravelling are correlated with the contact order, i.e., with the separation between contact making amino acids along the backbone in the native state. Temperature is found to affect stretching in a profound way.

  19. Constellation Stretch Goals: Review of Industry Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, John

    2006-01-01

    Many good ideas received based on industry experience: a) Shuttle operations; b) Commercial aircraft production; c) NASA's historical way of doing business; d) Military and commercial programs. Aerospace performed preliminary analysis: a) Potential savings; b) Cost of implementation; c) Performance or other impact/penalties; d) Roadblocks; e) Unintended consequences; f) Bottom line. Significant work ahead for a "Stretch Goal"to become a good, documented requirement: 1) As a group, the relative "value" of goals are uneven; 2) Focused analysis on each goal is required: a) Need to ensure that a new requirement produces the desired consequence; b) It is not certain that some goals will not create problems elsewhere. 3) Individual implementation path needs to be studied: a) Best place to insert requirement (what level, which document); b) Appropriate wording for the requirement. Many goals reflect "best practices" based on lessons learned and may have value beyond near-term CxP requirements process.

  20. Implicit learning and generalization of stretch response modulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Nicolas A; Levin, Mindy F; Feldman, Anatol G

    2016-06-01

    Adaptation of neural responses to repeated muscle stretching likely represents implicit learning to minimize muscle resistance to perturbations. To test this hypothesis, the forearm was placed on a horizontal manipulandum. Elbow flexors or extensors compensated an external load and were stretched by 20° or 70° rotations. Participants were instructed not to intervene by intentionally modifying the muscle resistance elicited by stretching. In addition to phasic stretch reflexes (SRs), muscle stretching was associated with inhibitory periods (IPs) in the ongoing muscle activity starting at minimal latencies of ∼35 ms. The SR amplitude decreased dramatically across 5-12 trials and was not restored after a resting period of 3-5 min, despite the increase in stretch amplitude from 20° to 70°, but IPs remained present. When SRs were suppressed, stretching of originally nonstretched, antagonist muscles initiated after the rest period showed immediate SR suppression while IPs remained present in the first and subsequent trials. Adaptation to muscle stretching thus includes features characteristic of implicit learning such as memory consolidation and generalization. Adaptation may be achieved by central shifts in the threshold positions at which muscles begin to be activated. Shifts are thought to be prepared in advance and triggered with stretch onset. Threshold position resetting provides a comprehensive explanation of the results in the broader context of the control of posture, movement, and motor learning in the healthy and damaged nervous system. PMID:27052586

  1. Sh-Stretching Intensities and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Alkanethiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. J.; Lane, J. R.; Sodergren, A. H.; Kjaergaard, H. G.; Dunn, M. E.; Vaida, V.

    2009-06-01

    The SH-stretching overtone transitions of tert-butylthiol and ethanethiol are observed using FT-IR, NIR and photoacoustic spectroscopies. The intensities of these are compared with OH-stretching overtones from the corresponding alcohols. We explain the paucity of SH-stretching intensity using an anharmonic oscillator local mode model. SH- and OH-stretching overtone spectra of 1,2-ethanedithiol and 2-mercaptoethanol are recorded to observe the different effects that hydrogen bonding involving SH - - - S, SH - - - O and OH - - - S have on the spectra. We discuss these effects with the help of high level ab initio calculations.

  2. Do Stretch Durations Affect Muscle Mechanical and Neurophysiological Properties?

    PubMed

    Opplert, J; Genty, J-B; Babault, N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether stretching durations influence acute changes of mechanical and neurophysiological properties of plantar flexor muscles. Plantar flexors of 10 active males were stretched in passive conditions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Different durations of static stretching were tested in 5 randomly ordered experimental trials (1, 2, 3, 4 and 10×30-s). Fascicle stiffness index, evoked contractile properties and spinal excitability (Hmax/Mmax) were examined before (PRE), immediately after (POST0) and 5 min after (POST5) stretching. No stretch duration effect was recorded for any variable. Moreover, whatever the stretching duration, stiffness index, peak twitch torque and rate of force development were significantly lower at POST0 and POST5 as compared to PRE (P<0.05). Electromechanical delay was longer at POST0 and POST5 as compared to PRE (P<0.05). Whatever the stretch duration, no significant changes of Hmax/Mmax ratio were recorded. In conclusion, 30 s of static stretching to maximum tolerated discomfort is sufficient enough to alter mechanical properties of plantar flexor muscles, but 10×30 s does not significantly affect these properties further. Stretching does not impair spinal excitability. PMID:27191211

  3. Large Deviation Statistics of Vorticity Stretching in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    A key feature of 3D fluid turbulence is the stretching/re-alignment of vorticity by the action of the strain-rate. It is shown using the cumulant-generating function that cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence behaves statistically like a sum of i.i.d. variables. The Cramer function for vorticity stretching is computed from the JHTDB isotropic DNS (Reλ = 430) and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain-rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramer functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of largest FTLE. A model Fokker-Planck equation is constructed by approximating the viscous destruction of vorticity with a deterministic non-linear relaxation law matching conditional statistics, while the fluctuations in vorticity stretching are modelled by stochastic noise matching the statistics encoded in the Cramer function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude PDF, with good agreement for the exponent but significant error (30-40%) in the pre-factor. Supported by NSF Graduate Fellowship (DGE-1232825) and NSF Grant CMMI-0941530.

  4. Enhancement of multispectral thermal infrared images - Decorrelation contrast stretching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Decorrelation contrast stretching is an effective method for displaying information from multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images. The technique involves transformation of the data to principle components ('decorrelation'), independent contrast 'stretching' of data from the new 'decorrelated' image bands, and retransformation of the stretched data back to the approximate original axes, based on the inverse of the principle component rotation. The enhancement is robust in that colors of the same scene components are similar in enhanced images of similar scenes, or the same scene imaged at different times. Decorrelation contrast stretching is reviewed in the context of other enhancements applied to TIR images.

  5. Development of a stretched-membrane dish

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    Solar Kinetics, Inc., successfully designed and constructed the optical element of a 7-meter diameter stretched-membrane dish as Task 2 of the second phase of a contract directed by Sandia National Laboratories. Earlier work on this project defined the configuration of the optical element and demonstrated the membrane-forming process on 1.4- and 3.7-meter diameter membranes. In Task 2, the membrane-forming process was successfully scaled to 7-meters in diameter, and an innovative hub-and-spoke structure optical element was fabricated. The slope error, as measured with Solar Kinetics' laser-ray-trace system, was within 3.6 mrad of a perfect parabola. Four major technical issues were successfully addressed in this work: (1) The technique of large-scale membrane forming was shown to be predictable, accurate, and repeatable. Three 7-meter membranes were formed without any contoured tooling. (2) A tensioned hub-and-spoke structure was demonstrated to be practical to fabricate. This innovative structure, like a bicycle wheel, was shown to be very stiff. Optical effects from ring distortion were not apparent. (3) The use of field-replaceable, unattached polymer reflective membrane was demonstrated. This approach allows for the practical field replacement of the reflective membrane when it has degraded due to weathering. (4) A technique was developed and demonstrated to ship the formed membranes from the factory to the dish-installation site. This allows the critical forming of the membrane to be performed in a controlled factory environment, and the membrane then to be shipped using standard-dimension shipping containers. This development further reduces manufacturing and installation costs of the completed dish. This effort indicates that the stretch-membrane dish concept is a promising approach for solar concentration. The prototype optical element is a significant step in the development of the complete, full-sized dish. 9 refs., 53 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Permeability parameter as a function of population density in classical infiltration equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Nor Hafizah; Ahmad, Rohanin; Nordin, Syarifah Zyurina

    2014-12-01

    Rapid development of urban areas has caused many problems especially related to water issues. The increase in urban development also means the increase in impervious surfaces due to expansion of buildings, roads, parking lots to name a few. Impervious surfaces have low water permeability compared to pervious surfaces. Also, infiltration capacity is dependent on the permeability of the area and subsequently permeability is dependent on the surface conditions. In this paper, we study the infiltration capacity with the assumption that permeability parameter can be described in the term of the population density of the area. The modified model is based on the original form of Green-Ampt equation. The new model with population density is able to describe permeability, hence the infiltration capacity of an area.

  7. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  8. Fibrinogen induces endothelial cell permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Neetu; Roberts, Andrew M.; Dean, William L.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2010-01-01

    Many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders are accompanied by an increased blood content of fibrinogen (Fg), a high molecular weight plasma adhesion protein. Fg is a biomarker of inflammation and its degradation products have been associated with microvascular leakage. We tested the hypothesis that at pathologically high levels, Fg increases endothelial cell (EC) permeability through extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and by inducing F-actin formation. In cultured ECs, Fg binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and to α5β1 integrin, caused phosphorylation of ERK. Subsequently, F-actin formation increased and coincided with formation of gaps between ECs, which corresponded with increased permeability of ECs to albumin. Our data suggest that formation of F-actin and gaps may be the mechanism for increased albumin leakage through the EC monolayer. The present study indicates that elevated un-degraded Fg may be a factor causing microvascular permeability that typically accompanies cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:17849175

  9. PERMEABILITY OF BACTERIAL SPORES I.

    PubMed Central

    Black, S. H.; Gerhardt, Philipp

    1961-01-01

    Black, S. H. (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and Philipp Gerhardt. Permeability of bacterial spores. I. Characterization of glucose uptake. J. Bacteriol. 82:743–749. 1961.—The total uptake of glucose by masses of clean, dormant spores was measured to assess their permeability. After correction for intercellular space, packed spores of Bacillus cereus strain terminalis were found in 87 determinations to be permeated by glucose to 40% of their weight. The glucose uptake was relatively independent of environmental variables, and thus was concluded to occur principally through a process of passive diffusion. PMID:13869665

  10. Effects of heat generation or absorption on mixed convection flow over a stretching porous wedge with convective boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, M.; Narahari, M.; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram

    2014-10-01

    The series solution of the boundary layer flow over a permeable stretching wedge with convective boundary condition has been investigated in the presence of heat generation or absorption effects. The governing coupled non-linear partial differential equations are transformed to dimensionless system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations using the similarity variables and then solved by Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM). An analysis of the results shows that the velocity and temperature fields are significantly influenced by the velocity ratio parameter, wedge angle parameter, suction/injection parameter, heat generation/absorption parameter and convective heat transfer parameter.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic stagnation point flow and heat transfer in a nanofluid towards a stretching sheet with suction/injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaimi, Khairy; Bakar, Nor Ashikin Abu

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stagnation point flow and heat transfer towards a permeable stretching sheet in a nanofluid. By using a similarity transformation, the governing equations of fluid flow are reduced into ordinary differential equation, which are then solved numerically using a shooting method. The effects of suction/injection parameter on the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles and heat transfer characteristics are obtained and graphically presented. It is found that skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase with suction, while it acts in opposite manner with injection.

  12. Flow and Heat Transfer of Powell-Eyring Fluid due to an Exponential Stretching Sheet with Heat Flux and Variable Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megahed, Ahmed M.

    2015-03-01

    An analysis was carried out to describe the problem of flow and heat transfer of Powell-Eyring fluid in boundary layers on an exponentially stretching continuous permeable surface with an exponential temperature distribution in the presence of heat flux and variable thermal conductivity. The governing partial differential equations describing the problem were transformed into a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved with a numerical technique using appropriate boundary conditions for various physical parameters. The numerical solution for the governing non-linear boundary value problem is based on applying the shooting method over the entire range of physical parameters. The effects of various parameters like the thermal conductivity parameter, suction parameter, dimensionless Powell-Eyring parameters and the Prandtl number on the flow and temperature profiles as well as on the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are presented and discussed. In this work, special attention was given to investigate the effect of the thermal conductivity parameter on the velocity and temperature fields above the sheet in the presence of heat flux. The numerical results were also validated with results from a previously published work on various special cases of the problem, and good agreements were seen.

  13. An ESL Instructor's Perspective on the Stretch Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todorovska, Viktorija

    Stretch 107 is a version of English 107 (a first-year composition course for international students at Arizona State University), designed to provide those with low proficiency in English with various strategies for writing acceptable prose in English. Since it is a 2-semester course, Stretch 107 gives students more time to work on their…

  14. Does Postexercise Static Stretching Alleviate Delayed Muscle Soreness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buroker, Katherine C.; Schwane, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Because many experts recommend stretching after exercise to relieve muscle soreness, 23 subjects performed a 30-minute step test to induce delayed muscle soreness. There was neither temporary relief of pain immediately after stretching nor a reduction in pain during the 3-day postexercise period. (Author/SM)

  15. Cyclic stretch of airway epithelium inhibits prostanoid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Savla, U; Sporn, P H; Waters, C M

    1997-11-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to biologically active eicosanoids, which contribute to regulation of airway smooth muscle tone and inflammatory responses. Although in vivo the airways undergo cyclical stretching during ventilation, the effect of cyclic stretch on airway epithelial AA metabolism is unknown. In this study, cat and human AEC were grown on flexible membranes and were subjected to cyclic stretch using the Flexercell strain unit. Cyclic stretch downregulated synthesis of prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGI2, and thromboxane A2 by both cell types in a frequency-dependent manner. The percent inhibition of prostanoid synthesis in both cell types ranged from 53 +/- 7 to 75 +/- 8% (SE; n = 4 and 5, respectively). Treatment of cat AEC with exogenous AA (10 micrograms/ml) had no effect on the stretch-induced inhibition of PGE2 synthesis, whereas treatment with exogenous PGH2 (10 micrograms/ml) overcame the stretch-induced decrease in PGE2 production. These results indicate that stretch inhibits prostanoid synthesis by inactivating cyclooxygenase. When cells were pretreated with the antioxidants catalase (100 micrograms/ml, 150 U/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (1 mM), there was a partial recovery of eicosanoid production, suggesting that cyclic stretch-induced inactivation of cyclooxygenase is oxidant mediated. These results may have important implications for inflammatory diseases in which airway mechanics are altered. PMID:9374729

  16. A Stretching Device for High Resolution Live-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lawrence; Mathieu, Pattie S.; Helmke, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Several custom-built and commercially available devices are available to investigate cellular responses to substrate strain. However, analysis of structural dynamics by microscopy in living cells during stretch is not readily feasible. We describe a novel stretch device optimized for high-resolution live-cell imaging. The unit assembles onto standard inverted microscopes and applies constant magnitude or cyclic stretch at physiological magnitudes to cultured cells on elastic membranes. Interchangeable modular indenters enable delivery of equibiaxial and uniaxial stretch profiles. Strain analysis performed by tracking fluorescent microspheres adhered onto the substrate demonstrated reproducible application of stretch profiles. In endothelial cells transiently expressing EGFP-vimentin and paxillin-DsRed2 and subjected to constant magnitude equibiaxial stretch, the 2-D strain tensor demonstrated efficient transmission through the extracellular matrix and focal adhesions. Decreased transmission to the intermediate filament network was measured, and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of maximum stretch magnitude revealed discrete sites of strain focusing. Spatial correlation of vimentin and paxillin displacement vectors provided an estimate of the extent of mechanical coupling between the structures. Interestingly, switching the spatial profile of substrate strain reveals that actin-mediated edge ruffling is not desensitized to repeated mechano-stimulation. These initial observations show that the stretch device is compatible with live-cell microscopy and is a novel tool for measuring dynamic structural remodeling under mechanical strain. PMID:20195762

  17. Design of a new stretching apparatus and the effects of cyclic strain and substratum on mouse lung epithelial-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Arold, Stephen P; Wong, Joyce Y; Suki, Bela

    2007-07-01

    The pulmonary epithelium is exposed to mechanical strains during normal breathing or mechanical ventilation. While important for the regulation of cellular processes, excessive strains damage epithelial cells. To investigate the effects of strain on the epithelium, we developed a stretching device to apply equi-biaxial strains to cells cultured on elastic membranes. Following device validation, we exposed a murine epithelial cell line (MLE-12) to 30 min of cyclic stretch with 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% change in surface area on pronectin or type I collagen coated membranes. Following stretch, we assessed cell viability using fluorescent immunocytochemisty and surfactant secretion using [(3)H] labeled phosphatidylcholine (PC). Cell injury increased with increasing strain with cells on pronectin showing more injury than on type I collagen. Stretching had no effect on surfactant secretion on either substratum suggesting MLE-12 cells are a poor model for stretch-induced surfactant secretion. The cells grown on pronectin, however, demonstrated a 3-fold increase in surfactant secretion compared to those grown on type I collagen at all strains. This suggests that, while this cell line does not demonstrate stretch-induced surfactant secretion, the underlying extracellular matrix plays a crucial factor in both cell death and signal transduction in response to strain. PMID:17578668

  18. Design and Construction of an Equibiaxial Cell Stretching System That Is Improved for Biochemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ursekar, Chaitanya Prashant; Teo, Soo-Kng; Hirata, Hiroaki; Harada, Ichiro; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    We describe the design and validation of an equibiaxial stretching device in which cells are confined to regions of homogeneous strain. Using this device, we seek to overcome a significant limitation of existing equibiaxial stretching devices, in which strains are not homogeneous over the entire region of cell culture. We cast PDMS in a mold to produce a membrane with a cylindrical wall incorporated in the center, which was used to confine cell monolayers to the central membrane region subjected to homogeneous equibiaxial strain. We demonstrated that the presence of the wall to hold the culture medium did not affect strain homogeneity over the majority of the culture surface and also showed that cells adhered well onto the PDMS membranes. We used our device in cyclic strain experiments and demonstrated strain-dependent changes in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and tyrosine phosphorylation upon cell stretching. Furthermore, we examined cell responses to very small magnitudes of strain ranging from 1% to 6% and were able to observe a graduated increase in ERK phosphorylation in response to these strains. Collectively, we were able to study cellular biochemical response with a high degree of accuracy and sensitivity to fine changes in substrate strain. Because we have designed our device along the lines of existing equibiaxial stretching technologies, we believe that our innovations can be incorporated into existing systems. This device would provide a useful addition to the set of tools applied for in vitro studies of cell mechanobiology. PMID:24626190

  19. Stretching of hydrogen-bonded OH in the lowest singlet excited electronic state of water dimer.

    PubMed

    Chipman, Daniel M

    2006-01-28

    The lowest singlet excited electronic state of water monomer in the gas phase is strictly dissociative along a OH stretch coordinate but changes its nature when the stretched OH moiety is hydrogen bonded to a neighboring water molecule. This work extends previous exploration of the water dimer excited singlet potential-energy surface, using computational methods that are reliable even at geometries well removed from the ground-state equilibrium. First, the hydrogen-bonded OH moiety is stretched far enough to establish the existence of a barrier that is sufficient to support a quasibound vibrational state of the OH oscillator near the Franck-Condon region. Second, the constraint of an icelike structure is relaxed, and it is found that a substantial fraction of liquidlike structures also supports a quasibound vibrational state. These potential-energy explorations on stretching of the hydrogen-bonded OH moiety in a water dimer are discussed as a model for understanding the initial dynamics upon excitation into the lowest excited singlet state of condensed water. The possibility is raised that the excited-state lifetime may be long enough to allow for exciton migration, which would provide a mechanism for energy transport in condensed water phases. PMID:16460160

  20. Dielectrophoretic stretching of DNA tethered to a fiber tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S.; Li, Jiali

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under ac electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, ac frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the DEP force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules.

  1. Dielectrophoretic Stretching of DNA Tethered to a Fiber Tip

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S.; Li, Jiali

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under AC electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, AC frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the dielectrophoretic force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules. PMID:25741602

  2. High membrane permeability for melatonin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su; Hille, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be "secreted" from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  3. Permeability of compacting porous lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, P. A.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hess, K.-U.; Aulock, F. W.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Vasseur, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-03-01

    The highly transient nature of outgassing commonly observed at volcanoes is in part controlled by the permeability of lava domes and shallow conduits. Lava domes generally consist of a porous outer carapace surrounding a denser lava core with internal shear zones of variable porosity. Here we examine densification using uniaxial compression experiments on variably crystalline and porous rhyolitic dome lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Experiments were conducted at 900°C and an applied stress of 3 MPa to 60% strain, while monitoring acoustic emissions to track cracking. The evolution of the porous network was assessed via X-ray computed tomography, He-pycnometry, and relative gas permeability. High starting connected porosities led to low apparent viscosities and high strain rates, initially accompanied by abundant acoustic emissions. As compaction ensued, the lavas evolved; apparent viscosity increased and strain rate decreased due to strain hardening of the suspensions. Permeability fluctuations resulted from the interplay between viscous flow and brittle failure. Where phenocrysts were abundant, cracks had limited spatial extent, and pore closure decreased axial and radial permeability proportionally, maintaining the initial anisotropy. In crystal-poor lavas, axial cracks had a more profound effect, and permeability anisotropy switched to favor axial flow. Irrespective of porosity, both crystalline samples compacted to a threshold minimum porosity of 17-19%, whereas the crystal-poor sample did not achieve its compaction limit. This indicates that unconfined loading of porous dome lavas does not necessarily form an impermeable plug and may be hindered, in part by the presence of crystals.

  4. High membrane permeability for melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be “secreted” from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  5. Stretched Lens Array Squarerigger (SLASR) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A.J.; Howell, Joe; Lollar, Louis; Carrington, Connie; Hoppe, David; Piszczor, Michael; Suszuki, Nantel; Eskenazi, Michael; Aiken, Dan; Fulton, Michael; Brandhorst, Henry; Schuller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Since April 2005, our team has been underway on a competitively awarded program sponsored by NASA s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop, refine, and mature the unique solar array technology known as Stretched Lens Array SquareRigger (SLASR). SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, including the following: Areal Power Density = 300 W/m2 (2005) - 400 W/m2 (2008 Target) Specific Power = 300 W/kg (2005) - 500 W/kg (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Stowed Power = 80 kW/cu m (2005) - 120 kW/m3 (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Scalable Array Capacity = 100 s of W s to 100 s of kW s Super-Insulated Small Cell Circuit = High-Voltage (300-600 V) Operation at Low Mass Penalty Super-Shielded Small Cell Circuit = Excellent Radiation Hardness at Low Mass Penalty 85% Cell Area Savings = 75% Lower Array Cost per Watt than One-Sun Array Modular, Scalable, & Mass-Producible at MW s per Year Using Existing Processes and Capacities

  6. Calu-3 model under AIC and LCC conditions and application for protein permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Marušić, Maja; Djurdjevič, Ida; Drašlar, Kazimir; Caserman, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Broad area of respiratory epithelium with mild surface conditions is an attractive possibility when trans-mucosal delivery of protein drugs is considered. A mucus and cellular barrier of respiratory epithelium can be modelled in vitro by Calu-3 cell line. We have monitored morphology and barrier properties of Calu-3 culture on permeable supports while developing into liquid covered or air interfaced and mucus lined cellular barrier. Besides morphological differences, cultures differed in electrical resistance and permeability to proteins as well. The accelerated permeability to proteins in these models, due to permeability modulator MP C16, was examined. The effect on electrical resistance of cellular layer was rapid in both cultures suggesting easy access of MP C16 to cells even though its overall impact on cell permeability was strongly reduced in mucus covered culture. Differences in properties of the two models enable better understanding of protein transmucosal permeability, suggesting route of transport and MP C16 modulator action. PMID:24664333

  7. On the effective permeability of a heterogeneous porous medium: the role of the geometric mean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Selvadurai, A. P. S.

    2014-07-01

    This paper uses experimental data derived from surface permeability tests conducted on a bench-scale 508 mm cuboidal sample of Indiana Limestone. These results are used in combination with computational modelling to test the hypothesis that the geometric mean is a good proxy to represent permeability when the spatial distribution of the permeability for the heterogeneous rock, with no evidence of hydraulic anisotropy or fractures, is log-normal. The predictive capabilities of the geometric mean as a measure of the effective permeability are further assessed by examining specific examples where three-dimensional flows are initiated in the heterogeneous domain and where the equivalent homogeneous problem gives rise to purely circular flows that have exact solutions. The approach is also applied to examine a hypothetical hydraulic pulse test that is conducted on a cuboidal region with sealed lateral boundaries, consisting of the experimentally measured heterogeneous distribution of permeability and an equivalent homogeneous region where the permeability corresponds to the geometric mean.

  8. Scale Dependence of Soil Permeability to Air: Measurement Method and Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, K.; Sextro, R.G.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Wooley, J.D.; Owens, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1995-11-01

    This work investigates the dependence soil air-permeability on sampling scale in near-surface unsaturated soils. A new dual-probe dynamic pressure technique was developed to measure permeability in situ over different length scales and different spatial orientations in the soil. Soils at three sites were studied using the new technique. Each soil was found to have higher horizontal than vertical permeability. Significant scale dependence of permeability was also observed at each site. Permeability increased by a factor of 20 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 2 m in a sand soil vegetated with dry grass, and by a factor of 15 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 3.5 m in a sandy loam with mature Coast Live Oak trees (Quercus agrifolia). The results indicate that standard methods of permeability assessment can grossly underestimate advective transport of gas-phase contaminants through soils.

  9. Heat transfer in a micropolar fluid over a stretching sheet with Newtonian heating.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at the steady flow of Micropolar fluid over a stretching surface with heat transfer in the presence of Newtonian heating. The relevant partial differential equations have been reduced to ordinary differential equations. The reduced ordinary differential equation system has been numerically solved by Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method. Influence of different involved parameters on dimensionless velocity, microrotation and temperature is examined. An excellent agreement is found between the present and previous limiting results. PMID:23565151

  10. Heat Transfer in a Micropolar Fluid over a Stretching Sheet with Newtonian Heating

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at the steady flow of Micropolar fluid over a stretching surface with heat transfer in the presence of Newtonian heating. The relevant partial differential equations have been reduced to ordinary differential equations. The reduced ordinary differential equation system has been numerically solved by Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method. Influence of different involved parameters on dimensionless velocity, microrotation and temperature is examined. An excellent agreement is found between the present and previous limiting results. PMID:23565151

  11. Some Recent Laboratory Measurements of Fault Zone Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.; Lockner, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    The permeability of fault zone material is key to understanding fluid circulation and the role of pore fluids in earthquake generation and rupture dynamics. Permeability results of core samples from several scientific drillholes are presented, including new results from the SAFOD drillsite in California and the Chelungpu Fault in Taiwan. Permeability values at simulated in situ pressures range from 10-18 to 10-23 m2, a broad range reflecting differences in rock type, proximity to the fault (i.e., fault core, damage zone or country rock), and degree of interseismic healing and sealing. In addition to these natural characteristics, stress-relief and thermal cracking damage resulting from core retrieval will tend to increase the permeability of some of the deepest crystalline rock samples, although testing under in situ conditions can reduce these errors. Recently active fault rocks, with an interconnected network of fractures, tend toward the higher end of the permeability range, whereas fault rocks that have had time to heal through hydrothermal processes tend to have lower permeabilities. In addition, the permeability of borehole-derived core samples was found to be more sensitive to applied pressure than equivalent rocks obtained from surface outcrops because of weathering and other processes. Thus, permeability values of surface samples can not be adequately extrapolated to depth, highlighting the importance of deep drilling studies in determining in situ transport properties. Permeability studies also reveal the storage capacity of the fault rocks, an important parameter in the determination of excess fluid pressure potential. Storage capacity was found to be 10-10 to 10-11/Pa in the Chelungpu Fault cores. Typical down-hole permeability measurements are generally 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than laboratory-derived values because they sample joints and fractures in the damage zone that are larger in scale than the core samples. Consequently, most fluid flow at

  12. Permeability and structure of resorcinol-formaldehyde gels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.; Alviso, C.; Pekala, R.; Gross, J.

    1996-12-31

    The permeability (D) of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gels was measured using a beam-bending technique. For gels made at various solids contents and with different catalyst contents, the permeabilities ranged over a factor of {approximately} 50; the pore radii inferred from D varied from {approximately}3 to 30 nm. Pore radii obtained on RF aerogels using nitrogen desorption were severely affected by compression of the aerogel by capillary forces (resulting from the surface tension of liquid nitrogen). After correction for that effect, the desorption data were found to be in very good agreement with the pore sizes calculated from D.

  13. Urban land use: Remote sensing of ground-basin permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinney, L. R.; Jensen, J. R.; Estes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A remote sensing analysis of the amount and type of permeable and impermeable surfaces overlying an urban recharge basin is discussed. An effective methodology for accurately generating this data as input to a safe yield study is detailed and compared to more conventional alternative approaches. The amount of area inventoried, approximately 10 sq. miles, should provide a reliable base against which automatic pattern recognition algorithms, currently under investigation for this task, can be evaluated. If successful, such approaches can significantly reduce the time and effort involved in obtaining permeability data, an important aspect of urban hydrology dynamics.

  14. Cell alignment is induced by cyclic changes in cell length: studies of cells grown in cyclically stretched substrates.

    PubMed

    Neidlinger-Wilke, C; Grood, E S; Wang JH-C; Brand, R A; Claes, L

    2001-03-01

    Many types of cells, when grown on the surface of a cyclically stretched substrate, align away from the stretch direction. Although cell alignment has been described as an avoidance response to stretch, the specific deformation signal that causes a cell population to become aligned has not been identified. Planar surface deformation is characterized by three strains: two normal strains describe the length changes of two initially perpendicular lines and one shear strain describes the change in the angle between the two lines. The present study was designed to determine which, if any, of the three strains was the signal for cell alignment. Human fibroblasts and osteoblasts were grown in deformable, rectangular, silicone culture dishes coated with ProNectin, a biosynthetic polymer containing the RGD ligand of fibronectin. 24 h after plating the cells, the dishes were cyclically stretched at 1 Hz to peak dish stretches of 0% (control), 4%, 8%, and 12%. After 24 h of stretching, the cells were fixed, stained, and their orientations measured. The cell orientation distribution was determined by calculating the percent of cells whose orientation was within each of eighteen 5 degrees angular intervals. We found that the alignment response was primarily driven by the substrate strain which tended to lengthen the cell (axial strain). We also found that for each cell type there was an axial strain limit above which few cells were found. The axial strain limit for fibroblasts, 4.2 +/- 0.4%, (mean +/- 95% confidence), was lower than for osteoblasts, 6.4 +/- 0.6%. We suggest that the fibroblasts are more responsive to stretch because of their more highly developed actin cytoskeleton. PMID:11347703

  15. Smartly aligning nanowires by a stretching strategy and their application as encoded sensors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuchen; Su, Bin; Jiang, Lei

    2012-10-23

    The nanotechnology world is being more and more attracted toward high aspect ratio one-dimensional nanostructures due to their potentials as building blocks for electronic/optical devices. Here, we propose a novel method to generate nanowire patterns with assistance of superhydrophobic flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. Micropillar gaps are tunable via a stretching process of the PDMS surface; thus, diverse nanowire patterns can be formed by stretching the same PDMS surface in various ways. Importantly, square nanowire loops with alternative compositions can be generated through a double-stretching process, showing an advanced methodology in controlling the alignment of nanowires. Since alternative fluorescent molecules will be quenched by diverse chemical substances, this alternative nanowire loop shows a selective detection for diverse target compounds, which greatly improves the application of this nanowire patterning approach. Furthermore, such alternative nanowire patterns can be transferred from pillar-structured surfaces to flat films, indicating further potentials in microcircuits, sensitive sensors, and other organic functional nanodevices. PMID:22984829

  16. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  17. Influence of wall permeability on turbulent boundary-layer properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental boundary-layer studies of a series of low pressure drop, permeable surfaces have been conducted to characterize their surface interaction with a turbulent boundary layer. The models were flat and tested at nominally zero pressure gradient in low speed air. The surfaces were thin metal sheets with discrete perforations. Direct drag balance measurements of skin friction indicate that the general effect of surface permeability is to increase drag above that of a smooth plate reference level. Heuristic arguments are presented to show that this type of behavior is to be expected. Other boundary-layer data are also presented including mean velocity profiles and conditionally sampled streamwise velocity fluctuations (hot wire) for selected models.

  18. A Large Block Experiment for Measurement of the Effective Permeability of Indiana Limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Selvadurai, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    The measurement of permeability of large specimens of a rock specimen is bound to provide a clearer picture of the distribution of permeability of predominantly sedimentary rocks. Such distributions can be the basis for evaluating the effective permeability of the rock specimen in the presence of permeability inhomogeneity. This paper discusses the development of a patch permeability test that can be used to measure the near surface permeability characteristics of a large cuboidal block of Indiana Limestone measuring 508 mm. The test is used to generate the near surface permeability of six faces of the cuboid and these estimates are used to generate, via a kriging procedure, the interior permeability distributions of permeability. These permeability distributions are used to examine the validity of theoretical estimates that have been developed in the literature to determine the effective permeability of the material. The classical Wiener (1912) bounds, the estimates provided by Matheron (1967) and Journel et al. (1993) are developed using the experimentally derived data. The procedure is also validated by conducting computational experiments involving one-dimensional flow along three orthogonal directions. References: Wiener, O. (1912) Die Theorie des Mischkörpers für das Feld des stationaären Strömung. Erste Abhandlung die Mittelswertesätsze für Kraft, Polarisation und Energie. Abh. Math.-Physischen Klasse Königl. Säcsh Gesell. Wissen, 32: 509-604. Matheron, G. (1967) Eléments pour une Théorie des Milieux Poroeux, Masson, Paris. Journel, A.G, Deutsch, C.V. and Desbrats, A.J. (1986) Power averaging for block effective permeability, SPE 15128, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

  19. Strain Analysis of Stretched Tourmaline Crystals Using ImageJ, Microsoft Excel and PowerPoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosbyshell, H.

    2012-12-01

    This poster describes an undergraduate structural geology lab exercise utilizing the Mohr's circle diagram for finite strain, constructed using measurements obtained from stretched tourmaline crystals. A small building housing HVAC equipment at the south end of West Chester University's Recitation Hall (itself made of serpentinite) is constructed of early-Cambrian Chickies Quartzite. Stretched tourmaline crystals, with segments joined by fibrous quartz, are visible on many surfaces (presumably originally bedding). While the original orientation of any stone is unknown, these rocks provide an opportunity for a short field exercise during a two-hour lab period and a great base for conducting strain analysis. It is always fun to ask how many in the class have ever noticed the tourmaline (few have). Students take photos using their cell phones or cameras. Since strain is a ratio the absolute size of the tourmaline crystals is immaterial. Nonetheless, this is a good opportunity to remind students of the importance of including a scale in their photographs. The photos are opened in ImageJ and the line tool is used to determine the original and final lengths of selected crystals. Students calculate strain parameters using Microsoft Excel. Then, we use Adobe Illustrator or the drafting capabilities of Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 to follow Ramsay and Huber's techniques using a Mohr's circle construction to determine the finite strain ellipse. If a stretching direction can be estimated, elongation of two crystals is all that is required to determine the strain ratio. If no stretching direction is apparent, three crystals are required for a more complicated analysis that allows for determination of the stretching direction, as well as the strain ratio.

  20. High throughput web inspection system using time-stretch real-time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanju

    Photonic time-stretch is a novel technology that enables capturing of fast, rare and non-repetitive events. Therefore, it operates in real-time with ability to record over long period of time while having fine temporal resolution. The powerful property of photonic time-stretch has already been employed in various fields of application such as analog-to-digital conversion, spectroscopy, laser scanner and microscopy. Further expanding the scope, we fully exploit the time-stretch technology to demonstrate a high throughput web inspection system. Web inspection, namely surface inspection is a nondestructive evaluation method which is crucial for semiconductor wafer and thin film production. We successfully report a dark-field web inspection system with line scan speed of 90.9 MHz which is up to 1000 times faster than conventional inspection instruments. The manufacturing of high quality semiconductor wafer and thin film may directly benefit from this technology as it can easily locate defects with area of less than 10 microm x 10 microm where it allows maximum web flow speed of 1.8 km/s. The thesis provides an overview of our web inspection technique, followed by description of the photonic time-stretch technique which is the keystone in our system. A detailed explanation of each component is covered to provide quantitative understanding of the system. Finally, imaging results from a hard-disk sample and flexible films are presented along with performance analysis of the system. This project was the first application of time-stretch to industrial inspection, and was conducted under financial support and with close involvement by Hitachi, Ltd.

  1. Turbulent Hyporheic Exchange in Permeable Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, K. R.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Li, A.; Packman, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Solute delivery from the water column into a streambed strongly influences metabolism in rivers. Current hydrological models simplify surface-subsurface (hyporheic) exchange by treating each domain separately, constraining turbulent flows to the water column. Studies have shown, however, that turbulence penetrates into permeable sediments. Evidence is lacking for how this highly coupled flow regime influences hyporheic exchange. We characterized the dynamics of turbulent exchange between surface and porewaters in a 2.5 m recirculating flume. The channel was packed with 3.8 cm PVC spheres to form a coarse gravel bed, with a total depth of 21 cm. We implanted microsensors onto an array of spheres to measure in situsalt concentrations within the streambed. Water was recirculated in the channel, and concentrated salt solution was continuously injected upstream of the sensor array. We observed solute exchange increased with free-stream Reynolds number and decreased with depth in the sediment bed. Mass of injected solute remaining in the bed decreased rapidly in all cases, with only 10-30% of mass recovered 50 cm downstream of the injection point at Re = 25,000. We observed high-frequency (1-10 Hz) concentration fluctuations at bed depths of at least 4.75 cm, and sporadic low-frequency fluctuations at depths of 12.5 cm. Spectral analysis revealed increased filtering of high frequencies with depth. We used particle-tracking simulations to fit depth-dependent turbulent diffusion profiles to experimental results. These results demonstrate that free-stream turbulence impacts hyporheic mixing deep into permeable streambeds, and mixing is strongly influenced by the coupled surface-subsurface flow field.

  2. No difference in pre- and postexercise stretching on flexibility.

    PubMed

    Beedle, Barry B; Leydig, Summer N; Carnucci, Jennifer M

    2007-08-01

    According to the American College of Sports Medicine (1), there is limited information about when to stretch during an exercise session. The purpose of this study was to determine if the placement of static stretching, either before or after a workout, would affect flexibility in the hip, knee, and ankle. Thirty college-age men (n = 12) and women (n = 18) volunteered to participate. Nine were highly trained, 13 were moderately trained, and 8 were sedentary. Subjects participated in both treatments, which were randomly assigned and were 48-72 hours apart. In one treatment, subjects warmed-up first by walking on a treadmill for 5 minutes at approximately 50% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, and then performed 3 static stretches: quadriceps, hamstrings, and calf muscles. Each stretch was held 3 times, 15 seconds each. Next, flexibility measurements were determined for the hip, hamstrings, and ankle using a goniometer. The other treatment consisted of performing 20 minutes of walking or jogging at a moderate intensity, then the same stretching exercises were performed and the same flexibility measurements were taken. Reliability coefficients ranged from 0.90-0.96. There were no significant differences in any of the flexibility measurements except for hip flexibility, which approached significance (p = 0.06) and therefore favored stretching after the workout. The placement of stretching, before or after a workout, does not make a difference in its effect on flexibility. PMID:17685710

  3. Elucidating the Coupling in the CH Stretch Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; Zwier, Timothy S.; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2012-06-01

    An important aspect of single conformation spectroscopy, aided by vibrational frequency calculations, is analyzing and assigning observed spectra to particular conformational isomers. However, certain infrared spectral regions have traditionally been considered less diagnostic, even ambiguous, despite the rich information content contained in the chromophores. One such chromophore, prevalent in most molecules, is the CH stretch vibration, where the CH stretch and bend overtone often participate in Fermi resonance. We have employed a parameterized reduced dimension Hamiltonian that incorporates cubic terms due to stretch/bend coupling, using the comparison with single-conformation spectra on a series of test molecules which include 1,2-diphenylethane, 2,2,2-tricyclophane, 1,2-diphenoxyethane, and dibenzo-15-crown-5 ether. This has led to excellent fits of the alkyl CH stretch region, particularly for tricyclophane, leading to a firm assignment for the conformations observed, and to a quantitative determination of the stretch-stretch and stretch-bend coupling present in the molecules. Details specific to the methodology as well as the success of the strategy will be discussed.

  4. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M.; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1–5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01–10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth. PMID:25704457

  5. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1-5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01-10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth. PMID:25704457

  6. Membrane stretching triggers mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel activation in Chara.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Naoya; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to confirm that mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels are activated by membrane stretching, we stretched or compressed the plasma membrane of Chara by applying osmotic shrinkage or swelling of the cell by varying the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. Aequorin studies revealed that treatments causing membrane stretching induced a transient but large increase in cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) (Delta[Ca(2+)](c)). However, the observed Delta[Ca(2+)](c) decreased during the treatments, resulting in membrane compression. A second experiment was carried out to study the relationship between changes in membrane potential (DeltaE(m)) and stretching or compression of the plasma membrane. Significant DeltaE(m) values, often accompanied by an action potential, were observed during the initial exchange of the bathing medium from a hypotonic medium to a hypertonic one (plasmolysis). DeltaE(m) appears to be triggered by a partial stretching of the membrane as it was peeled from the cell wall. After plasmolysis, other exchanges from hypertonic to hypotonic media, with their accompanying membrane stretching, always induced large DeltaE(m) values and were often accompanied by an action potential. By contrast, action potentials were scarcely observed during other exchanges from hypotonic to hypertonic solutions (=membrane compression). Thus, we concluded that activation of the mechanosensitive channels is triggered by membrane stretching in Chara. PMID:19234734

  7. Cutoffs, stretched horizons, and black hole radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2012-11-01

    We argue that if the UV cutoff of an effective field theory with many low energy degrees of freedom is of the order, or below, the scale of the stretched horizon in a black hole background, which in turn is significantly lower than the Planck scale, the black hole radiance rate may not be enhanced by the emission of all the light IR modes. Instead, there may be additional suppressions hidden in the UV completion of the field theory, which really control which light modes can be emitted by the black hole. It could turn out that many degrees of freedom cannot be efficiently emitted by the black hole, and so the radiance rate may be much smaller than its estimate based on the counting of the light IR degrees of freedom. If we apply this argument to the Randall-Sundrum II (RS2) brane world, it implies that the emission rates of the low energy conformal field theory modes will be dramatically suppressed: its UV completion is given by the bulk gravity on AdS5×S5, and the only bulk modes which could be emitted by a black hole are the 4-dimensional (4D) s waves of bulk modes with small 5-dimensional momentum, or equivalently, small 4D masses. Further, their emission is suppressed by bulk warping, which lowers the radiation rate much below the IR estimate, yielding a radiation flux ˜(TBHL)2LHawking˜(TBH/MPl)2NLHawking, where LHawking is the Hawking radiation rate of a single light species. This follows directly from low conformal field theory cutoff μ˜L-1≪MPl, a large number of modes N≫1 and the fact that 4D gravity in RS2 is induced, MPl2≃Nμ2.

  8. Structural Transitions in Supercoiled Stretched DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v, Croquette

    1998-03-01

    Using magnetic micromanipulation techniques [Strick 96]( uc(T.R.) Strick, J.-F. Allemand, D. Bensimon, A. Bensimon) and uc(V.) Croquette, "The elasticity of a single supercoiled DNA molecule", Science, 271, 1835 (1996)., we have studied the mechanical properties (force versus extension) of single DNA molecules under a wide range of torsional stresses (supercoiling). We show that unwinding the DNA double helix leads to a phase separation between regular B-DNA and denaturation bubbles. The fraction of denatured molecule increases linearly with the degree of unwinding, beginning at a value of 1% unwinding. We have confirmed this denatured state by hybridization of homologous single-stranded DNA probes and by a chemical attack of the exposed bases. Surprisingly, when we overwind the molecule, the elasticity curves we obtain may also be interpreted by the coexistence of two phases, B-DNA and a new phase which we note P-DNA. The fraction of this new phase increases smoothly with overwinding, beginning at 3 % and continuing up to 300 %. Our results indicate that this new phase is four times more twisted that the standard B-DNA and is 1.75 times longer. Although the structure of this phase is not yet known, such a high twisting can only be attained if the sugar-phosphate backbones of the two strands are twisted closely while the bases are expelled outside of the molecule's core, in a structure reminiscent of the one proposed by Pauling. Indeed we have shown that this new phase is sensitive to chemical attack whereas the B-DNA is not. This new phase begins to appear on a molecule overwound by 3 % and stretched by a force of 5 pN, conditions typically encountered in vivo during gene transcription. This new phase may thus play a biological role (for more details).

  9. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Reλ=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  10. Novel additives to retard permeable flow

    SciTech Connect

    Golombok, Michael; Crane, Carel; Ineke, Erik; Welling, Marco; Harris, Jon

    2008-09-15

    Low concentrations of surfactant and cosolute in water, can selectively retard permeable flow in high permeability rocks compared to low permeability ones. This represents a way forward for more efficient areal sweep efficiency when water flooding a reservoir during improved oil recovery. (author)

  11. Review of hydrogen isotope permeability through materials

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, S.A.

    1983-08-15

    This report is the first part of a comprehensive summary of the literature on hydrogen isotope permeability through materials that do not readily form hydrides. While we mainly focus on pure metals with low permeabilities because of their importance to tritium containment, we also give data on higher-permeability materials such as iron, nickel, steels, and glasses.

  12. Vapor-liquid phase separator permeability results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Continued studies are described in the area of vapor-liquid phase separator work with emphasis on permeabilities of porous sintered plugs (stainless steel, nominal pore size 2 micrometer). The temperature dependence of the permeability has been evaluated in classical fluid using He-4 gas at atmospheric pressure and in He-2 on the basis of a modified, thermosmotic permeability of the normal fluid.

  13. Structure/Permeability Relationships Of Polyimide Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; Yamamoto, H.; Mi, Y.; Stern, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of permeabilities, by each of five gases, of membranes made of four different polyimides. Conducted to gain understanding of effects of molecular structures of membranes on permeabilities and to assess potential for exploitation of selective permeability in gas-separation processes. Gases used: H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4.

  14. Hydrodynamic Forcing Mobilizes Cu in Low-Permeability Estuarine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Xie, Minwei; Wang, Ning; Gaillard, Jean-François; Packman, Aaron I

    2016-05-01

    Overlying hydrodynamics play critical roles in controlling surface-porewater exchanges in permeable sediments, but these effects have rarely been characterized in low-permeability sediments. We conducted a series of laboratory experiments to evaluate the effects of varied hydrodynamic conditions on the efflux of metals from low-permeability estuarine sediments. Two Cu-contaminated sediments obtained from the Piscataqua River were subject to controlled levels of hydrodynamic shear in Gust mesocosms, including episodic sediment resuspension. Overlying water and porewater samples were collected over the course of experiments and analyzed for metal concentrations. The two sediments had similar permeability (∼10(-15) m(2)), but different particle size distributions. Hydrodynamic forcing enhanced the mobilization and efflux of Cu from the coarser-grained sediments, but not the finer-grained sediments. Sediment resuspension caused additional transitory perturbations in Cu concentrations in the water column. Particulate metal concentrations increased significantly during resuspension, but then rapidly decreased to preresuspension levels following cessation of sediment transport. Overall, these results show that the mobility and efflux of metals are likely to be influenced by overlying hydrodynamics even in low-permeability sediments, and these effects are mediated by sediment heterogeneity and resuspension. PMID:27054802

  15. Simulating bioclogging effects on dynamic riverbed permeability and infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomer, Michelle E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Maier, Ulrich; Schmidt, Christian; Thullner, Martin; Ulrich, Craig; Flipo, Nicolas; Rubin, Yoram

    2016-04-01

    Bioclogging in rivers can detrimentally impact aquifer recharge. This is particularly so in dry regions, where losing rivers are common, and where disconnection between surface water and groundwater (leading to the development of an unsaturated zone) can occur. Reduction in riverbed permeability due to biomass growth is a time-variable parameter that is often neglected, yet permeability reduction from bioclogging can introduce order of magnitude changes in seepage fluxes from rivers over short (i.e., monthly) timescales. To address the combined effects of bioclogging and disconnection on infiltration, we developed numerical representations of bioclogging processes within a one-dimensional, variably saturated flow model representing losing-connected and losing-disconnected rivers. We tested these formulations using a synthetic case study informed with biological data obtained from the Russian River, California, USA. Our findings show that modeled biomass growth reduced seepage for losing-connected and losing-disconnected rivers. However, for rivers undergoing disconnection, infiltration declines occurred only after the system was fully disconnected. Before full disconnection, biologically induced permeability declines were not significant enough to offset the infiltration gains introduced by disconnection. The two effects combine to lead to a characteristic infiltration curve where peak infiltration magnitude and timing is controlled by permeability declines relative to hydraulic gradient gains. Biomass growth was found to hasten the onset of full disconnection; a condition we term `effective disconnection'. Our results show that river infiltration can respond dynamically to bioclogging and subsequent permeability declines that are highly dependent on river connection status.

  16. Acetazolamide inhibits osmotic water permeability by interaction with aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junwei; Wang, Xiaohua; Chang, Yongjie; Zhang, Jianzhao; Song, Qianliu; Yu, Heming; Li, Xuejun

    2006-03-15

    Water channel proteins, known as aquaporins, are transmembrane proteins that mediate osmotic water permeability. In a previous study, we found that acetazolamide could inhibit osmotic water transportation across Xenopus oocytes by blocking the function of aquaporin-1 (AQP1). The purpose of the current study was to confirm the effect of acetazolamide on water osmotic permeability using the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1 and to investigate the interaction between acetazolamide and AQP1. The fluorescence intensity of HEK293 cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1, which corresponds to the cell volume when the cells swell in a hyposmotic solution, was recorded under confocal laser fluorescence microscopy. The osmotic water permeability was assessed by the change in the ratio of cell fluorescence to certain cell area. Acetazolamide, at concentrations of 1 and 10muM, inhibited the osmotic water permeability in HEK293 cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1. The direct binding between acetazolamide and AQP1 was detected by surface plasmon resonance. AQP1 was prepared from rat red blood cells and immobilized on a CM5 chip. The binding assay showed that acetazolamide could directly interact with AQP1. This study demonstrated that acetazolamide inhibited osmotic water permeability through interaction with AQP1. PMID:16480680

  17. Determination of hydrogen permeability in commercial and modified superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.

    1983-01-01

    The results of hydrogen permeability measurements on several iron- and cobalt-base alloys as well as on two long-ranged ordered alloys over the range of 705 to 870 C (1300 to 1600 F) are summarized. The test alloys included wrought alloys N-155, IN 800, A-286, 19-9DL, and 19-9DL modifications with aluminum, niobium, and misch metal. In addition, XF-818, CRM-6D, SA-F11, and HS-31 were evaluated. Two wrought long-range ordered alloys, Ni3Al and (Fe,Ni)3(V,Al) were also evaluated. All tests were conducted at 20.7 MPa pressure in either pure and/or 1% CO2-doped H2 for test periods as long as 133 h. Detailed analyses were conducted to determine the relative permeability rankings of these alloys and the effect of doping, exit surface oxidation, specimen design variations, and test duration on permeability coefficient, and permeation activation energies were determined. The two long-range ordered alloys had the lowest permeability coefficients in pure H2 when compared with the eight commercial alloys and their modifications. With CO2 doping, significant decrease in permeability was observed in commercial alloys--no doped tests were conducted with the long-range ordered alloys.

  18. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  19. Permeability effects on the seismic response of gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, J. Germán.; Velis, Danilo R.; Holliger, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we analyse the role of permeability on the seismic response of sandstone reservoirs characterized by patchy gas-water saturation. We do this in the framework of Johnson's model, which is a generalization of White's seminal model allowing for patches of arbitrary geometry. We first assess the seismic attenuation and velocity dispersion characteristics in response to wave-induced fluid flow. To this end, we perform an exhaustive analysis of the sensitivity of attenuation and velocity dispersion of compressional body waves to permeability and explore the roles played by the Johnson parameters T and S/V, which characterize the shape and size of the gas-water patches. Our results indicate that, within the typical frequency range of exploration seismic data, this sensitivity may indeed be particularly strong for a variety of realistic and relevant scenarios. Next, we extend our analysis to the corresponding effects on surface-based reflection seismic data for two pertinent models of typical sandstone reservoirs. In the case of softer and more porous formations and in the presence of relatively low levels of gas saturation we observe that the effects of permeability on seismic reflection data are indeed significant. These prominent permeability effects prevail for normal-incidence and non-normal-incidence seismic data and for a very wide range of sizes and shapes of the gas-water patches. For harder and less porous reservoirs, the normal-incidence seismic responses exhibit little or no sensitivity to permeability, but the corresponding non-normal-incidence responses show a clear dependence on this parameter, again especially so for low gas saturations. The results of this study therefore suggest that, for a range of fairly common and realistic conditions, surface-based seismic reflection data are indeed remarkably sensitive to the permeability of gas reservoirs and thus have the potential of providing corresponding first-order constraints.

  20. Effects of Active Individual Muscle Stretching on Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kouichi; Kodama, Takayuki; Mukaino, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect of active individual muscle stretching (AID) on muscle function. [Subjects] We used the right legs of 40 healthy male students. [Methods] Subjects were divided into an AID group, which performed stretching, and a control group, which did not. We examined and compared muscle function before and after stretching in the AID and control groups using a goniometer and Cybex equipment. [Results] A significant increase in flexibility and a significant decrease in muscle strength output were observed in the AID group after the intervention. [Conclusion] These results suggest that AID induces an increase in flexibility and a temporary decrease in muscle output strength. PMID:24707080

  1. Characterizing the stretch-flangeability of hot rolled multiphase steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, N.; Butcher, C.; Worswick, M.; Gao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hole expansion tests are commonly used to characterize the edge stretching limit of a material. Traditionally, a conical punch is used to expand a punched hole until a through-thickness crack appears. However, many automotive stretch flanging operations involve in-plane edge stretching that is best captured with a flat punch. In this paper, hole expansion tests were carried out on two different hot-rolled multiphase steels using both flat and conical punches. The fracture mechanisms for both punch types were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  2. Characterizing the stretch-flangeability of hot rolled multiphase steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, N.; Butcher, C.; Worswick, M.; Gao, J.

    2013-12-16

    Hole expansion tests are commonly used to characterize the edge stretching limit of a material. Traditionally, a conical punch is used to expand a punched hole until a through-thickness crack appears. However, many automotive stretch flanging operations involve in-plane edge stretching that is best captured with a flat punch. In this paper, hole expansion tests were carried out on two different hot-rolled multiphase steels using both flat and conical punches. The fracture mechanisms for both punch types were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  3. Buckling dynamics of a solvent-stimulated stretched elastomeric sheet.

    PubMed

    Lucantonio, Alessandro; Roché, Matthieu; Nardinocchi, Paola; Stone, Howard A

    2014-04-28

    When stretched uniaxially, a thin elastic sheet may exhibit buckling. The occurrence of buckling depends on the geometrical properties of the sheet and the magnitude of the applied strain. Here we show that an elastomeric sheet initially stable under uniaxial stretching can destabilize when exposed to a solvent that swells the elastomer. We demonstrate experimentally and computationally that the features of the buckling pattern depend on the magnitude of stretching, and this observation offers a new way for controlling the shape of a swollen homogeneous thin sheet. PMID:24668079

  4. Scale-dependent permeability of fractured andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Kennedy, Ben

    2016-04-01

    Extension fractures in volcanic systems exist on all scales, from microscopic fractures to large fissures. They play a fundamental role in the movement of fluids and distribution of pore pressure, and therefore exert considerable influence over volcanic eruption recurrence. We present here laboratory permeability measurements for porous (porosity = 0.03-0.6) andesites before (i.e. intact) and after failure in tension (i.e., the samples host a throughgoing tensile fracture). The permeability of the intact andesites increases with increasing porosity, from 2 × 10-17 to 5 × 10-11 m2. Following fracture formation, the permeability of the samples (the effective permeability) falls within a narrow range regardless of their initial porosity: 2-6 × 10-11 m2. However, laboratory measurements of fractured samples likely overestimate the effective permeability due to the inherent scale-dependence of permeability. To better understand this scale-dependence, we first determined the permeability of the tensile fractures using a two-dimensional model that considers flow in parallel layers. Our calculations highlight that tensile fractures in low-porosity samples are more permeable (as high as 2.3 × 10-9 m2) than those in high-porosity samples (as low as 3.0 × 10-10 m2), a difference that can be explained by an increase in fracture tortuosity with porosity. We then use our fracture permeability data to model the effective permeability of rock with different host rock permeabilities (10-17 to 10-11 m2) populated by tensile fractures over a wide range of lengthscale. We find that the effective permeability of fractured andesite depends heavily on the initial host rock permeability and the scale of interest. At a given lengthscale, the effective permeability of high-permeability rock (10-12 to 10-11 m2) is essentially unaffected by the presence of numerous tensile fractures. By contrast, a single tensile fracture increases the effective permeability of low-permeability rock

  5. Microstructural evolution of PET under stretching and during stretch blow moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Martine; Billon, Noëlle

    2007-04-01

    Strain induced crystallisation of PET designed for stretch blow molding is studied combining well-controlled tensile tests and free blowing on a stretch blow prototype. Microstructure evolution is followed by WAXS and SAXS. Observations on blown parts clearly show that the microstructure can differ along the bottle and from processing conditions to another. Difference can be observed on crystalline orientation, periodic arrangement at the level of lamellae and long period. Range of long period, 8.5 to 13 nm is in agreement with literature. In certain case lamellar organisation disappears. Despite of high level of strain and evidence for strain hardening to occur during blowing no perfect crystalline pattern is observed, except in very thick zones. Interrupted tensile tests followed by quenching demonstrates that strain hardening is not correlated to prefect crystallisation. Microstructure clearly depends on the three parameters: temperature, strain rate and strain. It is concluded that strain hardening is mainly controlled by first stages of crystallisation and that actual crystallisation occurs during a following relaxation step. This later is then highly dependent upon cooling step.

  6. Up-Regulation of Pressure-activated Ca2+-permeable Cation Channel in Intact Vascular Endothelium of Hypertensive Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, J.; Kohler, R.; Haase, W.; Distler, A.

    1996-10-01

    In endothelial cells, stretch-activated cation channels have been proposed to act as mechanosensors for changes in hemodynamic forces. We have identified a novel mechanosensitive pressure-activated channel in intact endothelium from rat aorta and mesenteric artery. The 18-pS cation channel responded with a multifold increase in channel activity when positive pressure was applied to the luminal cell surface with the patch pipette and inactivated at negative pipette pressure. Channel permeability ratio for K+, Na+, and Ca2+ ions was 1:0.98:0.23. Ca2+ influx through the channel was sufficient to activate a neighboring Ca2+-dependent K+ channel. Hemodynamic forces are chronically disturbed in arterial hypertension. Endothelial cell dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension. In two comparative studies, density of the pressure-activated channel was found to be significantly higher in spontaneously hypertensive rats and renovascular hypertensive rats compared with their respective normotensive controls. Channel activity presumably leads to mechanosensitive Ca2+ influx and induces cell hyperpolarization by K+ channel activity. Both Ca2+ influx and hyperpolarization are known to induce a vasodilatory endothelial response by stimulating endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production. Up-regulation of channel density in hypertension could, therefore, represent a counterregulatory mechanism of vascular endothelium.

  7. Composite binders for concrete with reduced permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R.; Yushin, A.

    2016-02-01

    Composite binder consisting of cement (55%), acid fly ash (40%) and limestone (5%) has been designed. It is obtained by co-milling to a specific surface of 550 kg/m2, it has an activity of 77.3 MPa and can produce a more dense cement stone structure. Integrated study revealed that the concrete on the composite binder basis provides an effective diffusion coefficient D. So we can conclude that the concrete layer protects buildings from toxic effects of expanded polystyrene. Low water absorption of the material (2.5% by weight) is due to the structure of its cement stone pore space. Besides lime powder prevents the penetration of moisture, reduces water saturation of the coverage that has a positive effect on useful life period. It also explains rather low water vapor permeability of the material - 0.021 mg/(m- hour-Pa).

  8. Osmotic flow through fully permeable nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Cottin-Bizonne, C; Biance, A-L; Joseph, P; Bocquet, L; Ybert, C

    2014-06-20

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes. PMID:24996091

  9. Osmotic Flow through Fully Permeable Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Cottin-Bizonne, C.; Biance, A.-L.; Joseph, P.; Bocquet, L.; Ybert, C.

    2014-06-01

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes.

  10. [Sciatica. From stretch rack to microdiscectomy].

    PubMed

    Gruber, P; Böni, T

    2015-12-01

    In ancient times as well as in the Middle Ages treatment options for discogenic nerve compression syndrome were limited and usually not very specific because of low anatomical and pathophysiological knowledge. The stretch rack (scamnum Hippocratis) was particularly prominent but was widely used as a therapeutic device for very different spinal disorders. Since the beginning of the nineteenth century anatomical knowledge increased and the advances in the fields of asepsis, anesthesia and surgery resulted in an increase in surgical interventions on the spine. In 1908 the first successful lumbar discectomy was initiated and performed by the German neurologist Heinrich O. Oppenheim (1858-1919) and the surgeon Fedor Krause (1857-1937); however, neither recognized the true pathological condition of discogenic nerve compression syndrome. With the landmark report in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1934, the two American surgeons William Jason Mixter (1880-1958) and Joseph Seaton Barr (1901-1963) finally clarified the pathomechanism of lumbar disc herniation and furthermore, propagated discectomy as the standard therapy. Since then interventions on intervertebral discs rapidly increased and the treatment options for lumbar disc surgery quickly evolved. The surgical procedures changed over time and were continuously being refined. In the late 1960s the surgical microscope was introduced for spinal surgery by the work of the famous neurosurgeon Mahmut Gazi Yasargil and his colleague Wolfhard Caspar and so-called microdiscectomy was introduced. Besides open discectomy other interventional techniques were developed to overcome the side effects of surgical procedures. In 1964 the American orthopedic surgeon Lyman Smith (1912-1991) introduced chemonucleolysis, a minimally invasive technique consisting only of a cannula and the proteolytic enzyme chymopapain, which is injected into the disc compartment to dissolve the displaced disc material. In 1975 the Japanese orthopedic

  11. Experimental investigation of turbulent flow over a permeable rough wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Permeable walls are encountered in a variety of geophysical flows, including alluvial river beds, canopies and urban environments. Permeable walls possess very different boundary conditions as compared to classic impermeable walls (i.e. the slip condition and penetration of flow into the bed). Permeability allows flow interactions across the wall interface, resulting in notable mass, momentum and energy exchange. Such exchange takes place in the so-called transition layer and often occurs through turbulent flow mechanisms. It is increasingly recognized that turbulence plays a key role in a number of important natural functions, including biogeochemical as well as geomorphological processes. However, the flow physics of the transition layer are still poorly understood due to a lack of quantitative investigation of these permeable systems within which physical and optical access are severely compromised. This is particularly true for state-of-the-art flow measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) that require unaberrated optical access to the measurement locations. To overcome optical limitations, a refractive index matching (RIM) technique was employed herein to gain full optical access to the transition layer. Sodium Iodide aqueous solution (63% by weight and RI ~ 1.496 at 20°C) served as a working fluid, and an acrylic resin (RI ~ 1.499) was chosen for fabricating wall models. Measurements were performed using high-resolution planar PIV in different configurations to characterize the turbulent boundary layer and the transition layer. The wall models comprised uniform spheres packed in a cubic arrangement, and two cases were modeled - impermeable and permeable walls that were both rough. To eliminate the effect of roughness, and thus isolate the effect of permeability, the surface roughness of the two wall models was kept identical. This allowed us to obtain a more meaningful comparison and highlight the impact of wall permeability in natural

  12. Design/Construction of a Permeable Pavement Demonstration Site at the Edison Environmental Center (EEC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will provide a scientifically defensible estimate of the performance of the three permeable surfaces: porous concrete, porous asphalt, and interlocking concrete pavers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can provide the results to municipalities enabling...

  13. Generating enhanced site topography data to improve permeable pavement performance assessment methods - presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable pavement surfaces are infiltration based stormwater control measures (SCM) commonly applied in parking lots to decrease impervious area and reduce runoff volume. Many are not optimally designed however, as little attention is given to draining a large enough contributin...

  14. Myoelectric silence following unopposed passive stretch in normal man.

    PubMed Central

    Angel, R W; Waxman, S G; Kocsis, J D

    1980-01-01

    The response to unopposed passive muscle stretch applied during sustained contraction was studied in normal man. When the subject did not resist the stretching force, the initial response was a brief cessation of EMG activity in the elongated muscle. The myoelectric silence was observed repeatedly in muscles of the upper and lower limbs. The response to passive stretch is discussed in relation to the lengthening reaction and the inverse myotatic reflex. The silent period observed under these experimental conditions is unlikely to be caused by Renshaw inhibition, a pause in spindle afferent discharge, or activity of the group II afferent reflex pathway. Possible mechanisms include autogenetic inhibition and a stretch-evoked decrease of fusimotor activity. PMID:7431031

  15. Stretched cavity soliton in dispersion-managed Kerr resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Chengying; Yang, Changxi

    2015-08-01

    Stretched cavity soliton (SCS) in dispersion-managed nonlinear resonators is numerically investigated. SCS is found to stretch and compress twice during a round-trip propagation inside the dispersion-managed resonator, exhibiting a pulse dynamics similar to dispersion-managed mode-locked femtosecond lasers. Even though the breathing ratio is relatively small, the characteristics of SCS are significantly modified by the pulse stretching dynamics in the resonator. The output pulse will have a flatter spectrum around the center frequency. However, the power for the comb lines at the wing of the spectrum decays faster than the conventional sech-shaped CS, making dispersion wave emission harder to be excited in dispersion-managed resonators. Furthermore, stretching of the pulse lowers the nonlinear phase shift and makes it more resistant towards breather soliton instability. When shortening the cavity length to the microresonator scale, we find that ultrashort pulses can be generated through dispersion management, even in a low Q -factor cavity.

  16. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PITS CENTER, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PIT IN BACKGROUND, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Cell stretching devices as research tools: engineering and biological considerations.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Harshad; Barton, Matthew J; Jun, Myeongjun; Park, Sungsu; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-08-16

    Cells within the human body are subjected to continuous, cyclic mechanical strain caused by various organ functions, movement, and growth. Cells are well known to have the ability to sense and respond to mechanical stimuli. This process is referred to as mechanotransduction. A better understanding of mechanotransduction is of great interest to clinicians and scientists alike to improve clinical diagnosis and understanding of medical pathology. However, the complexity involved in in vivo biological systems creates a need for better in vitro technologies, which can closely mimic the cells' microenvironment using induced mechanical strain. This technology gap motivates the development of cell stretching devices for better understanding of the cell response to mechanical stimuli. This review focuses on the engineering and biological considerations for the development of such cell stretching devices. The paper discusses different types of stretching concepts, major design consideration and biological aspects of cell stretching and provides a perspective for future development in this research area. PMID:27440436

  19. Development of Internal Fine Structure in Stretched Rubber Vulcanizates

    SciTech Connect

    M Tosaka; S Toki; J Che; L Rong; B Hsiao

    2011-12-31

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) pattern and tensile stress during relaxation of stretched rubber vulcanizates (synthetic polyisoprene) were measured simultaneously at room temperature and at 0 C. The samples were quickly stretched to the prefixed strain and then allowed to relax for 1 h. In every SAXS pattern, the intensity distribution was elongated along the equator, indicating the formation of structures elongated in the stretching direction. The so-called two-spots pattern corresponding to the long period of stacked lamellar crystals did not appear even when the critical strain to induce crystallization was exceeded. On the other hand, even below the critical strain, additional development of equatorial streaks was detected in the differential SAXS patterns. This result suggests the growth of the density fluctuation elongated in the stretching direction, which is not directly related to strain-induced crystallization.

  20. Saturation of Zeldovich stretch-twist-fold map dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seta, Amit; Bhat, Pallavi; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2015-10-01

    > value is determined by the relative importance of the increased diffusion versus the reduced stretching. These saturation properties are akin to the range of possibilities that have been discussed in the context of fluctuation dynamos.

  1. Stretching Response of Knotted and Unknotted Polymer Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraglio, Michele; Micheletti, Cristian; Orlandini, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental advances have clarified the major effects of knotting on the properties of stretched chains. Yet, how knotted chains respond to weak mechanical stretching and how this behavior differs from the unknotted case are still open questions and we address them here by profiling the complete stretching response of chains of hundreds of monomers and different topology. We find that the ratio of the knotted and unknotted chain extensions varies nonmonotonically with the applied force. This surprising feature is shown to be a signature of the crossover between the well-known high-force stretching regime and the previously uncharacterized low-force one. The observed differences of knotted and unknotted chain response increases with knot complexity and are sufficiently marked that they could be harnessed in single-molecule contexts to infer the presence and complexity of physical knots in micron-long biomolecules.

  2. Numerical and Experimental Studies on Strain Distribution and Weld Line Movement in Stretch Forming of Tailor Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Sushanta Kumar; Kumar, D. Ravi

    2007-05-17

    Use of laser welded blanks of multiple sheets of material which are referred to as Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) is one of the current interests for automotive industries as it reduces manufacturing cost, weight of the vehicle and also improves the quality of the component. As the varieties of TWB applications are increasing, the effects of the difference in material properties, surface properties, weld and its orientation on blank formability have become important both in deep-drawing and stretch forming. In this work, formability of two types of TWBs has been studied experimentally by performing out-of-plane stretch forming tests using a 101.6 mm diameter hemispherical punch. The materials used in this study were Interstitial-Free (IF) steel sheet samples of different thickness (1.0mm and 1.5 mm) and samples of same thickness (1.5 mm) but with different surface characteristics (galvanized and ungalvanized). In the stretch forming experiments, the limiting dome height (LDH) and strain distribution were measured. The influence of weld orientation with respect to major surface strain on formability was studied by conducting experiments in or close to plane strain condition. It has been found that thickness ratio and difference in properties have significant influence on major and minor strain distributions and weld line movement, but the difference in surface characteristics has a minor effect. The simulations results agreed well with the observations from the experimental work conducted on stretch forming of TWBs.

  3. Turbulent structures and budgets behind permeable ribs

    SciTech Connect

    Panigrahi, P.K.; Schroeder, A.; Kompenhans, J.

    2008-02-15

    Different rib geometries are traditionally used to improve heat transfer and enhance mixing in different industrial applications, i.e. heat exchangers, cooling passages of gas turbine blades and fuel elements of nuclear reactors, etc. Permeable ribs have been proposed in literature for passive control of the reattaching flow past surface mounted ribs leading to superior performance. The flow past different surface mounted permeable rib geometries, i.e. solid, slit, split-slit and inclined split-slit ribs have been investigated in this study. Both two components and stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) have been used in streamwise and cross stream planes to study the underlying flow structures. The detailed turbulent statistics, i.e. mean and rms velocity, higher order moments, quadrant decomposition of turbulent shear stress producing motions, skewness and components of the turbulent kinetic energy budgets have been compared for different rib geometries. Coherent structures are identified based on the invariant of velocity gradient tensor invariant and wavelet transform. The skewness results demonstrate the intermittency of quadrant motions. The reattachment length of the inclined split-slit rib is lowest among all rib geometries. The average Reynolds stresses and the production of turbulent kinetic energy are highest for the inclined split-slit rib. The pressure transport calculated as residual of the turbulent kinetic energy budget equation is highest for the inclined split-slit rib. This is attributed to the smaller reattachment length leading to greater adverse pressure gradient for the inclined split-slit rib. The quadrant motions, turbulent fluxes, skewness and kinetic energy budgets at post reattachment region compares well with that of flat plate turbulent boundary layer from hot wire measurements in literature. Overall, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of PIV technique for the detailed turbulent structures characterization of complex flows

  4. Regional Data Assimilation Using a Stretched-Grid Approach and Ensemble Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Takacs, L. L.; Govindaraju, R. C.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The global variable resolution stretched grid (SG) version of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System (DAS) incorporating the GEOS SG-GCM (Fox-Rabinovitz 2000, Fox-Rabinovitz et al. 2001a,b), has been developed and tested as an efficient tool for producing regional analyses and diagnostics with enhanced mesoscale resolution. The major area of interest with enhanced regional resolution used in different SG-DAS experiments includes a rectangle over the U.S. with 50 or 60 km horizontal resolution. The analyses and diagnostics are produced for all mandatory levels from the surface to 0.2 hPa. The assimilated regional mesoscale products are consistent with global scale circulation characteristics due to using the SG-approach. Both the stretched grid and basic uniform grid DASs use the same amount of global grid-points and are compared in terms of regional product quality.

  5. Heat and mass transfer in nanofluid thin film over an unsteady stretching sheet using Buongiorno's model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, M.; Khan, Z. H.; Lopez, R. J.; Khan, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    The heat and mass transport of a nanofluid thin film over an unsteady stretching sheet has been investigated. This is the first paper on nanofluid thin film flow caused by unsteady stretching sheet using Buongiorno's model. The model used for the nanofluid film incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The self-similar non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved using Maple's built-in BVP solver. The results for pure fluid are found to be in good agreement with the literature. Present analysis shows that free surface temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction increase with both unsteadiness and magnetic parameters. The results reveal that effect of both nanofluid parameters and viscous dissipation is to reduce the heat transfer rate.

  6. The effect of substrate stretching on the thin-film distribution near an alveolar corner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Greg; Jensen, Oliver

    2003-11-01

    Because the lung contains an extensive and highly-curved air--liquid interface, surface tension forces play a central role in respiration. Anatomical studies have shown that the lung's liquid-film lining accumulates in the corners of polyhedral alveoli (the terminal airway units). We study the thin-film distribution near an alveolar corner by numerically integrating a model equation. In the absence of substrate stretching, the film attains a quasi-steady form in which a satellite drop drains slowly into a corner puddle. Canonical `Hammond draining' dynamics are observed, with the (perturbation) pressure varying rapidly and monotonically between the puddle and droplet. When the substrate is stretched, to mimic the effect of breathing, the pressure variation is no longer monotonic. We discuss the origin and implications of the modified pressure distribution and attempt to identify asymptotic scaling regimes.

  7. Tuning the Thermoelectric Properties of a Single-Molecule Junction by Mechanical Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, Renato; Torres, Alberto; da Silva, Antonio J. R.; Fazzio, Adalberto

    2015-03-01

    We theoretically investigate, as a function of the stretching, the behaviour of the thermoelectric properties - Seebeck coefficient (S), the electronic heat conductance (κel) and the figure of merit (ZT) - of a molecule-based junction composed by benzene-1,4-dithiol molecule (BDT) coupled to Au(111) surfaces at room temperature. We show that the thermoelectric properties of a single molecule junction can be tuned by mechanic stretching. The Seebeck coefficient is positive, indicating that it is dominated by the HOMO. Furthermore, it increases as the HOMO level, which is associated to the sulphur atom, goes to energies close to the Fermi energy. By modelling the transmission coefficient of the system as a single lorentzian peak, we propose a scheme to obtain the maximum ZT of any molecular junction. The authors thank the Brazilian funding agencies CNPq, CAPES and FAPESP. We also thank CENAPAD-SP for the computational facilities.

  8. Stretching and bending dynamics in triatomic ultralong-range Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fey, Christian; Kurz, Markus; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-07-01

    We investigate polyatomic ultralong-range Rydberg molecules consisting of three ground-state atoms bound to a Rydberg atom via s - and p -wave interactions. By employing the finite basis set representation of the unperturbed Rydberg electron Green's function we reduce the computational effort to solve the electronic problem substantially. This method is subsequently applied to determine the potential energy surfaces of triatomic systems in electronic s - and p -Rydberg states. Their molecular geometry and resulting vibrational structure are analyzed within an adiabatic approach that separates the vibrational bending and stretching dynamics. This procedure yields information on the radial and angular arrangement of the nuclei and indicates in particular that kinetic couplings between bending and stretching modes induce a linear structure in triatomic l =0 ultralong-range Rydberg molecules.

  9. Transition saddle points and associated defects for a triaxially stretched FCC crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, T. J.; Zimmerman, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the use of a single-ended method for locating saddle points on the potential energy surface for a triaxially stretched FCC crystal governed by a Lennard-Jones potential. Single-ended methods require no prior knowledge of the defected state and are shown to have powerful advantages in this application, principally because the nature of the associated defects can be quite complicated and hence extremely difficult to predict ab initio. We find that while classical spherical cavitation occurs for high stretch values, for lower values the defect mode transitions to a non-spherical pattern without any apparent symmetries. This non-spherical mode plays the primary role in harmonic transition state theory predictions that are used to examine how instabilities vary with applied loading rate. Such a defect mode would be difficult to determine using double-ended methods for finding saddle points.

  10. Short-stretch compression bandages and the foot pump.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Ellie; Muldoon, Jeanette; Hampton, Sylvie

    Short-stretch compression bandages have been shown to be as cost-effective and efficient as other compression systems in healing venous ulcers, independent of associated factors (Scriven et al, 1998; Nelson, 1996). However, as they do not contract around a limb they do not exert pressure during inactivity (resting pressure) (Klose Norton, 2003). But their stability creates a high resistance to stretch when pressure is applied through internal muscle contraction and joint movement (working pressure) (Tuckwood, 1996). PMID:12861646

  11. STATIC STRETCHING DOES NOT REDUCE VARIABILITY, JUMP AND SPEED PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Luís Manuel Pinto Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Background Stretching is often part of the warm-up routine prior to athletic participation; however, controversial evidence exists on the effects of stretching on countermovement jump (CMJ) and sprint performance. Additionally, analysis of variability between repeated tasks is useful for monitoring players, to analyze factors that could affect the performance, and to guide clinical decisions for training strategies. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether static stretching (SS) prior to CMJ and 20-meter (20-m) sprint would affect performance, and to investigate whether SS affects an athlete's ability to perform these tasks consistently. Methods Twenty-two trained healthy athletes (23.2 ± 5.0 years) attended, randomly, two testing sessions, separated by 48 hours. At session one, all participants underwent 10 minutes of dynamic running warm-up followed by the experimental tasks (three CMJ and three 20-m sprint), whereas five minutes of stretching was added after the warm-up routine at session two. All participants performed the same experimental tasks in both sessions. The stretching protocol consisted of five stretching exercises for each lower limb. Results The paired-samples t-test revealed no significant differences between the stretching protocol condition and no stretching condition for the 20-m sprint (t(21)=.920; p=.368) and CMJ (t(21)=.709; p=.486). There were no significant differences in trial-by-trial variability on 20-m sprint (t(21)=1.934; p=.067) and CMJ scores (t(21)=.793; p=.437) as result of SS. Conclusion The SS protocol did not modify jumping and running ability in trained healthy athletes. The SS prior to training or competition may not cause detrimental effects to athletic performance. Level of evidence Level III, Nonrandomized controlled trial. PMID:27104057

  12. Laboratory evidence for particle mobilization as a mechanism for permeability enhancement via dynamic stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Thibault; Brodsky, Emily E.; Marone, Chris; Elsworth, Derek

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that seismic waves can increase the permeability in natural systems, yet the mechanism remains poorly understood. We investigate the underlying mechanics by generating well-controlled, repeatable permeability enhancement in laboratory experiments. Pore pressure oscillations, simulating dynamic stresses, were applied to intact and fractured Berea sandstone samples under confining stresses of tens of MPa. Dynamic stressing produces an immediate permeability enhancement ranging from 1 to 60%, which scales with the amplitude of the dynamic strain (7×10-7 to 7×10-6) followed by a gradual permeability recovery. We investigated the mechanism by: (1) recording deformation of samples both before and after fracturing during the experiment, (2) varying the chemistry of the water and therefore particle mobility, (3) evaluating the dependence of permeability enhancement and recovery on dynamic stress amplitude, and (4) examining micro-scale pore textures of the rock samples before and after experiments. We find that dynamic stressing does not produce permanent deformation in our samples. Water chemistry has a pronounced effect on the sensitivity to dynamic stressing, with the magnitude of permeability enhancement and the rate of permeability recovery varying with ionic strength of the pore fluid. Permeability recovery rates generally correlate with the permeability enhancement sensitivity. Microstructural observations of our samples show clearing of clay particulates from fracture surfaces during the experiment. From these four lines of evidence, we conclude that a flow-dependent mechanism associated with mobilization of fines controls both the magnitude of the permeability enhancement and the recovery rate in our experiments. We also find that permeability sensitivity to dynamic stressing increases after fracturing, which is a process that generates abundant particulate matter in situ. Our results suggest that fluid permeability in many areas of the

  13. Rheological observation of glassy dynamics of dilute polymer solutions near the coil-stretch transition in elongational flows.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, T; Nguyen, D A; Prabhakar, R; Prakash, J Ravi

    2007-04-20

    It has long been conjectured that the macroscopic dynamics of dilute polymer solutions may exhibit a glasslike slowdown caused by ergodicity breaking, in the vicinity of the coil-stretch transition in elongational flows. We report experimental observations using a filament stretching rheometer that confirm the existence of such glassy states. It is observed that different time-dependent elongational strain-rate profiles lead to a pronounced history dependence and aging effects within a narrow range of strain rates. The results have a direct bearing on the analysis and design of processes employing dilute polymer solutions, such as ink-jet printing, surface coating, and turbulent-drag reduction. PMID:17501464

  14. Effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes: evidence for increased muscle spindle sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Horslen, Brian C; Murnaghan, Chantelle D; Inglis, J Timothy; Chua, Romeo; Carpenter, Mark G

    2013-08-01

    Standing balance is often threatened in everyday life. These threats typically involve scenarios in which either the likelihood or the consequence of falling is higher than normal. When cats are placed in these scenarios they respond by increasing the sensitivity of muscle spindles imbedded in the leg muscles, presumably to increase balance-relevant afferent information available to the nervous system. At present, it is unknown whether humans also respond to such postural threats by altering muscle spindle sensitivity. Here we present two studies that probed the effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes. In study 1 we manipulated the threat associated with an increased consequence of a fall by having subjects stand at the edge of an elevated surface (3.2 m). In study 2 we manipulated the threat by increasing the likelihood of a fall by occasionally tilting the support surface on which subjects stood. In both scenarios we used Hoffmann (H) and tendon stretch (T) reflexes to probe the spinal stretch reflex circuit of the soleus muscle. We observed increased T-reflex amplitudes and unchanged H-reflex amplitudes in both threat scenarios. These results suggest that the synaptic state of the spinal stretch reflex is unaffected by postural threat and that therefore the muscle spindles activated in the T-reflexes must be more sensitive in the threatening conditions. We propose that this increase in sensitivity may function to satisfy the conflicting needs to restrict movement with threat, while maintaining a certain amount of sensory information related to postural control. PMID:23719208

  15. Permeability of the San Andreas Fault Zone at Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, A. P.; Song, I.; Saffer, D.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying fault rock permeability is important toward understanding both the regional hydrologic behavior of fault zones, and poro-elastic processes that affect fault mechanics by mediating effective stress. These include long-term fault strength as well as dynamic processes that may occur during earthquake slip, including thermal pressurization and dilatancy hardening. Despite its importance, measurements of fault zone permeability for relevant natural materials are scarce, owing to the difficulty of coring through active fault zones seismogenic depths. Most existing measurements of fault zone permeability are from altered surface samples or from thinner, lower displacement faults than the SAF. Here, we report on permeability measurements conducted on gouge from the actively creeping Central Deformation Zone (CDZ) of the San Andreas Fault, sampled in the SAFOD borehole at a depth of ~2.7 km (Hole G, Run 4, sections 4,5). The matrix of the gouge in this interval is predominantly composed of particles <10 µm, with ~5 vol% clasts of serpentinite, very fine-grained sandstone, and siltstone. The 2.6 m-thick CDZ represents the main fault trace and hosts ~90% of the active slip on the SAF at this location, as documented by repeated casing deformation surveys. We measured permeability in two different configurations: (1) in a uniaxial pressure cell, in which a sample is placed into a rigid steel ring which imposes a zero lateral strain condition and subjected to axial load, and (2) in a standard triaxial system under isostatic stress conditions. In the uniaxial configuration, we obtained permeabilities at axial effective stresses up to 90 MPa, and in the triaxial system up to 10 MPa. All experiments were conducted on cylindrical subsamples of the SAFOD core 25 mm in diameter, with lengths ranging from 18mm to 40mm, oriented for flow approximately perpendicular to the fault. In uniaxial tests, permeability is determined by running constant rate of strain (CRS) tests up

  16. A Highly Permeable Aligned Montmorillonite Mixed-Matrix Membrane for CO2 Separation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhihua; Zhao, Song; Wang, Jixiao; Wang, Shichang; Wang, Zhi; Guiver, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Highly permeable montmorillonite layers bonded and aligned with the chain stretching orientation of polyvinylamineacid are immobilized onto a porous polysulfone substrate to fabricate aligned montmorillonite/polysulfone mixed-matrix membranes for CO2 separation. High-speed gas-transport channels are formed by the aligned interlayer gaps of the modified montmorillonite, through which CO2 transport primarily occurs. High CO2 permeance of about 800 GPU is achieved combined with a high mixed-gas selectivity for CO2 that is stable over a period of 600 h and independent of the water content in the feed. PMID:27312314

  17. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mira Stone; Tillman, Fred D.; Choi, Jee-Won; Smith, James A.

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10 -14 to 10 -9 m 2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3×10 -13 m 2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8×10 -10 m 2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2×10 -9 to 1.5×10 -9 m 2, and ranged from 3.6×10 -9 to 6.8×10 -9 m 2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0×10 -14 m 2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3×10 -14 m 2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit was achieved

  18. Heterogeneity, permeability patterns, and permeability upscaling: Physical characterization of a block of Massillon sandstone exhibiting nested scales of heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    TIDWELL,VINCENT C.; WILSON,JOHN L.

    2000-04-20

    Over 75,000 permeability measurements were collected from a meter-scale block of Massillon sandstone, characterized by conspicuous cross bedding that forms two distinct nested-scales of heterogeneity. With the aid of a gas minipermeameter, spatially exhaustive fields of permeability data were acquired at each of five different sample supports (i.e. sample volumes) from each block face. These data provide a unique opportunity to physically investigate the relationship between the multi-scale cross-stratified attributes of the sandstone and the corresponding statistical characteristics of the permeability. These data also provide quantitative physical information concerning the permeability upscaling of a complex heterogeneous medium. Here, a portion of the data taken from a single block face cut normal to stratification is analyzed. Results indicate a strong relationship between the calculated summary statistics and the cross-stratified structural features visible evident in the sandstone sample. Specifically, the permeability fields and semivariograms are characterized by two nested scales of heterogeneity, including a large-scale structure defined by the cross-stratified sets (delineated by distinct bounding surfaces) and a small-scale structure defined by the low-angle cross-stratification within each set. The permeability data also provide clear evidence of upscaling. That is, each calculated summary statistic exhibits distinct and consistent trends with increasing sample support. Among these trends are an increasing mean, decreasing variance, and an increasing semivariogram range. Results also clearly indicate that the different scales of heterogeneity upscale differently, with the small-scale structure being preferentially filtered from the data while the large-scale structure is preserved. Finally, the statistical and upscaling characteristics of individual cross-stratified sets were found to be very similar owing to their shared depositional environment

  19. Deformation bands at andesitic stratovolcanoes and their impact on permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael; Varley, Nick; Baud, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The edifice-forming andesitic rocks at Volcán de Colima (Mexico) host a multitude of curious planar to subplanar deformation features. During a recent field campaign (May/June 2014) we collected 14 blocks from different localities around the volcano (from debris-flow tracks and parasitic dome "Volcancito"), chosen to represent the variety of observable features. First order observations suggest that, while some of these bands (usually distinguished by a difference in colour) are essentially planar, others have undergone various degrees of post-formation viscous deformation. In the most extreme cases, the bands have been twisted and stretched to the point were they are preserved as wispy lenses. Scanning electron microscopy has shown that the different bands are characterised by very different microstructural textures, suggesting fundamentally different mechanisms of genesis. For example, some features are bands of higher porosity than the surrounding host rock in which the groundmass appears to have been removed by the movement of hydrothermal fluids along pre-existing cracks or in thicker (1-2 cm) zones now characterised by pervasive microporous textures. Some bands, observable because macropores (1 mm) have been filled by secondary mineralisation, contain a lower porosity than the adjacent host rock. We also find evidence of variably efficient bubble elongation, possibly indicating "frozen" decompression events within pumiceous samples. We cored cylindrical samples from the blocks to contain bands either parallel or perpendicular to the fluid (gas) flow direction in our laboratory permeameter setup (other samples were cored to contain no bands; i.e., the host rock). Our permeability measurements show that some features act as conduits while others serve as barriers to fluid flow. The importance of such features is emphasised by their large impact on permeability; changes in permeability can be as high as two orders of magnitude for certain bands. These data do

  20. Steam-water relative permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  1. Simple method of DNA stretching on glass substrate for fluorescence image and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Guru P.; Dhakal, Krishna P.; Lee, Hyunsoo; Guthold, Martin; Joseph, Vincent S.; Hong, Jong-Dal; Kim, Jeongyong

    2013-05-01

    Study of biological molecule DNA has contributed to developing many breaking thoughts and wide applications in multidisciplinary fields, such as genomic, medical, sensing and forensic fields. Stretching of DNA molecules is an important supportive tool for AFM or spectroscopic studies of DNA in a single molecular level. In this article, we established a simple method of DNA stretching (to its full length) that occurred on a rotating negatively-charged surface of glass substrate. The isolation of a single DNA molecule was attained by the two competitive forces on DNA molecules, that is, the electrostatic attraction developed between the positively charged YOYO-1 stained DNA and the negatively charged substrate, and the centrifugal force of the rotating substrate, which separates the DNA aggregates into the single molecule. Density of stretched DNA molecules was controlled by selecting the specific parameters such as spinning time and rates, loading volume of DNA-dye complex solution etc. The atomic force microscopy image exhibited a single DNA molecule on the negatively-charged substrate in an isolated state. Further, the photoluminescence spectra of a single DNA molecule stained with YOYO-1 were achieved using the method developed in the present study, which is strongly believed to effectively support the spectroscopic analysis of DNA in a single molecular level.

  2. Field panel method with grid stretching technique for solving transonic potential flow around arbitrary airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.-L.; Röttgermann, A.; Wagner, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Field Panel Method (FPM) with grid stretching technique, presented in this paper, was developed for solving transonic full potential flow around arbitrary airfoils at incidence. In this method, the total potential values are represented by boundary integrals together with a volume integral. The volume integral domain includes both inside and finite outside of the configuration and can be discretisized in a Cartesian grid which may penetrate into the configuration surface. Thus, we avoid the very difficult task of generating body-fitted grids around complex configurations. The boundary potential values are obtained by implementing a standard panel method (symmetrical singularity model), whereas the field potential values are estimated by solving the full potential equation (using AF3 scheme in a Cartesian grid) with approximate inner and proper outer boundary conditions. Furthermore, the grid stretching technique has been utilized that allows to capture the shock waves in a much better quality. It is also shown that both field grid and panel distribution have to be stretched at the same time. Results for transonic potential flows about NACA0012 and RAE2822 airfoils at different Mach numbers and incidences are obtained and compared with other numerical solutions. Great improvement in shock wave quality was achieved by using the present method.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic stagnation-point flow and heat transfer over an exponentially stretching/shrinking sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafar, Khamisah; Nazar, Roslinda; Ishak, Anuar; Hamzah, Firdaus Mohamad

    2015-09-01

    This paper considers a numerical investigation on the steady laminar two-dimensional MHD stagnation-point flow and heat transfer of an incompressible viscous fluid impinging normal to an exponentially stretching/shrinking flat sheet in the presence of a non-uniform magnetic field applied in a direction normal to the flat sheet. The sheet surface temperature is assumed to also vary exponentially with the distance from the stagnation-point. The governing system of partial differential equations is first transformed into ordinary differential equations, and solved numerically using an implicit finite-difference scheme known as the Keller-box method. The effects of the stretching/shrinking parameter ɛ and the magnetic parameter on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. It is found that the magnitude of the skin friction coefficient |f″(o ) | , and the local Nusselt number -θ'(0 ) increase with both the magnetic parameter M and the stretching/shrinking parameter ɛ. For the shrinking case, it is found that there is a minimum value ɛc of the shrinking parameter ɛ for which solution exists, and its value is dependent on the value of M, and dual solutions exist for some range of values of the shrinking parameter ɛ.

  4. A general route to nanocrystal kebabs periodically assembled on stretched flexible polymer shish

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Xu, Yuci; Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jung, Jaehan; Xia, Haiping; Lin, Zhiqun

    2015-01-01

    Assembling nanoparticles into one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with precisely controlled size and shape renders the exploration of new properties and construction of 1D miniaturized devices possible. The physical properties of such nanostructures depend heavily on the size, chemical composition, and surface chemistry of nanoparticle constituents, as well as the close proximity of adjacent nanoparticles within the 1D nanostructure. Chemical synthesis provides an intriguing alternative means of creating 1D nanostructures composed of self-assembled nanoparticles in terms of material diversity, size controllability, shape regularity, and low-cost production. However, this is an area where progress has been slower. We report an unconventional yet general strategy to craft an exciting variety of 1D nanonecklace-like nanostructures comprising uniform functional nanodiscs periodically assembled along a stretched flexible polymer chain by capitalizing on judiciously designed amphiphilic worm-like diblock copolymers as nanoreactors. These nanostructures can be regarded as organic-inorganic shish-kebabs, in which nanodisc kebabs are periodically situated on a stretched polymer shish. Simulations based on self-consistent field theory reveal that the formation of organic-inorganic shish-kebabs is guided by the self-assembled elongated star-like diblock copolymer constituents constrained on the highly stretched polymer chain. PMID:26601151

  5. Tubular hydrogen permeable metal foil membrane and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Paglieri, Stephen N.; Birdsell, Stephen A.; Barbero, Robert S.; Snow, Ronny C.; Smith, Frank M.

    2006-04-04

    A tubular hydrogen permeable metal membrane and fabrication process comprises obtaining a metal alloy foil having two surfaces, coating the surfaces with a metal or metal alloy catalytic layer to produce a hydrogen permeable metal membrane, sizing the membrane into a sheet with two long edges, wrapping the membrane around an elongated expandable rod with the two long edges aligned and overlapping to facilitate welding of the two together, placing the foil wrapped rod into a surrounding fixture housing with the two aligned and overlapping foil edges accessible through an elongated aperture in the surrounding fixture housing, expanding the elongated expandable rod within the surrounding fixture housing to tighten the foil about the expanded rod, welding the two long overlapping foil edges to one another generating a tubular membrane, and removing the tubular membrane from within the surrounding fixture housing and the expandable rod from with the tubular membrane.

  6. Combining SIP and NMR Measurements to Develop Improved Estimates of Permeability in Sandstone Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, K.; Binley, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Permeability is traditionally measured in-situ by inducing groundwater flow using pumping, slug, or packer tests; however, these methods require the existence of wells, can be labor intensive and can be constrained by measurement support volumes. Indirect estimates of permeability based on geophysical techniques benefit from relatively short measurement times, do not require fluid extraction, and are non-invasive when made from the surface (or minimally invasive when made in a borehole). However, estimates of permeability based on a single geophysical method often require calibration for rock type, and cannot be used to uniquely determine all of the physical properties required to accurately determine permeability. In this laboratory study we present the first critical step towards developing a method for estimating permeability based on the synergistic coupling of two complementary geophysical methods: spectral induced polarization (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). To develop an improved model for estimating permeability, laboratory SIP and NMR measurements were collected on a series of sandstone cores, covering a wide range of permeabilities. Current models for estimating permeability from each individual geophysical measurement were compared to independently obtained estimates of permeability. The comparison confirmed previous research showing that estimates from SIP or NMR alone only yield the permeability within order of magnitude accuracy and must be calibrated for rock type. Next, the geophysical parameters determined from SIP and NMR were compared to independent measurements the physical properties of the sandstone cores including gravimetric porosity and pores-size distributions (obtained from mercury injection porosimetry); this comparison was used to evaluate which geophysical parameter more consistently and accurately predicted each physical property. Finally, we present an improved method for estimating permeability in sandstone cores based

  7. Controlled cyclic stretch bioreactor for tissue-engineered heart valves.

    PubMed

    Syedain, Zeeshan H; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2009-09-01

    A tissue-engineered heart valve (TEHV) represents the ultimate valve replacement, especially for juvenile patients given its growth potential. To date, most TEHV bioreactors have been developed based on pulsed flow of culture medium through the valve lumen to induce strain in the leaflets. Using a strategy for controlled cyclic stretching of tubular constructs reported previously, we developed a controlled cyclic stretch bioreactor for TEHVs that leads to improved tensile and compositional properties. The TEHV is mounted inside a latex tube, which is then cyclically pressurized with culture medium. The root and leaflets stretch commensurately with the latex, the stretching being dictated by the stiffer latex and thus controllable. Medium is also perfused through the lumen at a slow rate in a flow loop to provide nutrient delivery. Fibrin-based TEHVs prepared with human dermal fibroblasts were subjected to three weeks of cyclic stretching with incrementally increasing strain amplitude. The TEHV possessed the tensile stiffness and stiffness anisotropy of leaflets from sheep pulmonary valves and could withstand cyclic pulmonary pressures with similar distension as for a sheep pulmonary artery. PMID:19473698

  8. Dielectrophoretic stretching of DNA tethered to a fiber tip.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S; Li, Jiali

    2015-03-27

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under ac electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, ac frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the DEP force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules. PMID:25741602

  9. Physiological tremor enhanced by manoeuvres affecting the segmental stretch reflex.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R R; Hagbarth, K E

    1980-01-01

    In view of recent evidence that physiological tremor can be enhanced by positive feedback via the segmental stretch reflex, several manoeuvres and procedures were employed to enhance the finger and hand tremor of healthy subjects--the purpose being to determine if tremorogenic effects, at least in part, are due to increase efficacy of the stretch reflex servo. Mechanical events during tremor (and during voluntary or electrically induced muscle twitches) were recorded together with EMG activity from wrist and finger flexor muscles and discharges from primary spindle endings in these muscles. Physiological tremor can be enhanced not only by manoeuvres which increase the gain of segmental stretch reflexes (Jendrassik manoeuvre) but also by manoeuvres which increase the contrast in spindle firing during stretch versus shortening phases of tremor, thus enhancing reflex modulation. Effects of the latter type can be achieved by procedures which alter mechanical twitch properties of extrafusal fibres (isoproterenol infusions and fatigue) and by procedures which involve application of spindle stimuli acting preferentially during stretch phases of tremor movements (muscle vibrations). Physiological tremor, which can be temporarily enhanced by an externally applied muscle perturbation, also becomes accentuated by those small "pseudo-myoclonic" jerks which occur in all normal subjects attempting to perform slow, smooth movements. PMID:7373322

  10. Stretching Fibroblasts Remodels Fibronectin and Alters Cancer Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Mingfang; Brewer, Bryson M.; Yang, Lijie; Franco Coronel, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2015-02-01

    Most investigations of cancer-stroma interactions have focused on biochemical signaling effects, with much less attention being paid to biophysical factors. In this study, we investigated the role of mechanical stimuli on human prostatic fibroblasts using a microfluidic platform that was adapted for our experiments and further developed for both repeatable performance among multiple assays and for compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy. Results show that mechanical stretching of normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) alters the structure of secreted fibronectin. Specifically, unstretched NAFs deposit and assemble fibronectin in a random, mesh-like arrangement, while stretched NAFs produce matrix with a more organized, linearly aligned structure. Moreover, the stretched NAFs exhibited an enhanced capability for directing co-cultured cancer cell migration in a persistent manner. Furthermore, we show that stretching NAFs triggers complex biochemical signaling events through the observation of increased expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). A comparison of these behaviors with those of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) indicates that the observed phenotypes of stretched NAFs are similar to those associated with CAFs, suggesting that mechanical stress is a critical factor in NAF activation and CAF genesis.

  11. Stretch activates myosin light chain kinase in arterial smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Barany, K.; Rokolya, A.; Barany, M. )

    1990-11-30

    Stretching of porcine carotid arterial muscle increased the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain from 0.23 to 0.68 mol (32P)phosphate/mol light chain, whereas stretching of phorbol dibutyrate treated muscle increased the phosphorylation from 0.30 to 0.91 mol/mol. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping was used to identify the enzyme involved in the stretch-induced phosphorylation. Quantitation of the (32P)phosphate content of the peptides revealed considerable light chain phosphorylation by protein kinase C only in the phorbol dibutyrate treated arterial muscle, whereas most of the light chain phosphorylation was attributable to myosin light chain kinase. Upon stretch of either the untreated or treated muscle, the total increment in (32P)phosphate incorporation into the light chain could be accounted for by peptides characteristic for myosin light chain kinase catalyzed phosphorylation, demonstrating that the stretch-induced phosphorylation is caused by this enzyme exclusively.

  12. Stretching Fibroblasts Remodels Fibronectin and Alters Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Mingfang; Brewer, Bryson M.; Yang, Lijie; Franco Coronel, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2015-01-01

    Most investigations of cancer-stroma interactions have focused on biochemical signaling effects, with much less attention being paid to biophysical factors. In this study, we investigated the role of mechanical stimuli on human prostatic fibroblasts using a microfluidic platform that was adapted for our experiments and further developed for both repeatable performance among multiple assays and for compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy. Results show that mechanical stretching of normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) alters the structure of secreted fibronectin. Specifically, unstretched NAFs deposit and assemble fibronectin in a random, mesh-like arrangement, while stretched NAFs produce matrix with a more organized, linearly aligned structure. Moreover, the stretched NAFs exhibited an enhanced capability for directing co-cultured cancer cell migration in a persistent manner. Furthermore, we show that stretching NAFs triggers complex biochemical signaling events through the observation of increased expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). A comparison of these behaviors with those of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) indicates that the observed phenotypes of stretched NAFs are similar to those associated with CAFs, suggesting that mechanical stress is a critical factor in NAF activation and CAF genesis. PMID:25660754

  13. Printable low-cost, sustained and dynamic cell stretching apparatus.

    PubMed

    Toume, Samer; Gefen, Amit; Weihs, Daphne

    2016-05-24

    Deformations that are applied on body tissues during daily activities, as a result of morbid conditions, or during various medical treatments, affect cell viability and biological function. Such mechanobiological phenomena are often studied in vitro, in monolayer cultures. To facilitate such studies cost effectively, we have developed a novel, printable cell stretching apparatus. The apparatus is used to apply tensile strains on cells cultured on elastic, stretchable substrata, either by sustained or by dynamic-cyclic application. Most of the apparatus parts are three-dimensionally printed (excluding motors), and stretching is automatically performed by two direct current geared motors that are controlled by a programmable microcontroller platform. To demonstrate functionality of this novel printable device, which can be produced in multiple copies in research labs at a cost of under 100 US$ per unit, including motors and controller, we performed cell culture studies monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Specifically, we have applied sustained and cyclic, radial stretching at large strains to NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts, and have demonstrated that cell viability, adhesion and morphology were maintained following stretching. Our apparatus is designed to be low-cost, rapidly manufactured at a university or small-company setting, and simple to use and control, where its flexible, versatile design allows users to experimentally induce different stretching regimes with varying amplitudes and frequencies. PMID:27038541

  14. Data on calcium increases depending on stretch in dystrophic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Aguettaz, E; Lopez, J J; Krzesiak, A; Constantin, B; Cognard, C; Sebille, S

    2016-09-01

    In this data article, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured in isolated ventricular Wild Type (WT) and mdx cardiomyocytes in two different conditions: at rest and during the application of an axial stretch. Using a carbon microfibers technique, axial stretch was applied to mimic effects of physiological conditions of ventricular filling. A study of cation entry with the same experimental model and the manganese quenching method reported (i) a constitutive cation entry in mdx cardiomyocytes and (ii) the involvement of TRPV2 channels in axial-stretch dependant cation entry, "Axial stretch-dependent cation entry in dystrophic cardiomyopathy: involvement of several TRPs channels" (Aguettaz et al., 2016) [1]. Here, the Ca(2+) dye fluo-8 was used for [Ca(2+)]i measurement, in both resting and stretching conditions, using a perfusion protocol starting initially with a calcium free Tyrode solution followed by the perfusion of 1.8 mM Ca(2+) Tyrode solution. The variation of [Ca(2+)]i was found higher in mdx cardiomyocytes. PMID:27617280

  15. Permeability and corrosion behavior of phenoxy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tiburcio, A.C.; Manson, J.A.

    1993-12-31

    The corrosion behavior of a glass-bead-filled phenoxy coating system was studied by correlating permeability and electrochemical measurements with actual corrosion performance. The study emphasized the effects of filler and filler/polymer matrix interactions on corrosion behavior. Water vapor permeability, dissolved oxygen permeability and conductivity measurements were made to determine the rate of transport of the three key ingredients in cathodic delamination and corrosion process (H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and cation). The glass bead filler had a greater effect on both cathodic delamination and corrosion behavior than filler/polymer matrix interaction. Overall, the permeability behavior controlled the delamination and corrosion performance.

  16. The effect of rotary instrumentation on the permeability of dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, D.B.; Svare, C.W.

    1981-06-01

    The filtration and diffusion of tritiated water through dentin disks were measured ina split-chamber diffusion cell. The dentin had been cut with a diamond disk and the surfaces modified with a carbide fissure bur or diamond bur. Disks were given a secondary burnishing treatment with a blank bur or a modified blank bur. Burnishing reduced the permeability of dentin cut with a fissure bur.

  17. Photoresponsive vesicle permeability based on intramolecular host-guest inclusion.

    PubMed

    Kauscher, Ulrike; Samanta, Avik; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-01-28

    This article describes light-responsive vesicles that can release their contents in response to a light-sensitive molecular trigger. To this end, liposomes were equipped with amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin that was covalently labeled with azobenzene. Using dye encapsulation and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show that the permeability of these vesicles strongly increases upon UV irradiation (λ = 350 nm) with concomitant isomerization of apolar trans-azobenzene to polar cis-azobenzene on the liposome surface. PMID:24287588

  18. The hydrogen permeability of Pd{sub 4}S

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Casey; Miller, James; Gellman, Andrew; Morreale, Bryan

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogen permeates rapidly through pure Pd membranes, but H{sub 2}S, a common minor component in hydrogen-containing streams, produces a Pd{sub 4}S film on the Pd surface that severely retards hydrogen permeation. Hydrogen still permeates through the bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd structure, indicating that the Pd{sub 4}S surface is active for H{sub 2} dissociation; the low hydrogen permeability of the Pd4S film is responsible for the decreased rate of hydrogen transport. In this work, the hydrogen permeability of Pd{sub 4}S was determined experimentally in the 623-773 K temperature range. Bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd foils were produced by exposing pure Pd foils to H{sub 2}S. H{sub 2} fluxes through the bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd foils were measured during exposure to both pure H{sub 2} and a 1000 ppm H{sub 2}S in H{sub 2} gas mixture. Our results show that H{sub 2}S slows hydrogen permeation through Pd mainly by producing a Pd{sub 4}S film on the Pd surface that is roughly an order-of-magnitude less permeable to hydrogen (k{sub Pd{sub 4}S} = 10{sup −7.5} exp(−0.22 eV/k{sub B}T) molH{sub 2}/m/s/Pa{sup 1/2}) than pure Pd. The presence of H{sub 2}S in the gas stream results in greater inhibition of hydrogen transport than can be explained by the very low permeability of Pd{sub 4}S. H{sub 2}S may block H2 dissociation sites at the Pd{sub 4}S surface.

  19. Stretch induced endothelin-1 secretion by adult rat astrocytes involves calcium influx via stretch-activated ion channels (SACs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrow, Lyle W.; Suchyna, Thomas M.; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Endothelin-1 expression by adult rat astrocytes correlates with cell proliferation. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 is inhibited by GsMtx-4, a specific inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+} permeant SACs. {yields} The less specific SAC inhibitor streptomycin also inhibits ET-1 secretion. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 production depends on a calcium influx. {yields} SAC pharmacology may provide a new class of therapeutic agents for CNS pathology. -- Abstract: The expression of endothelins (ETs) and ET-receptors is often upregulated in brain pathology. ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, also inhibits the expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters and is mitogenic for astrocytes, glioma cells, neurons, and brain capillary endothelia. We have previously shown that mechanical stress stimulates ET-1 production by adult rat astrocytes. We now show in adult astrocytes that ET-1 production is driven by calcium influx through stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the ET-1 production correlates with cell proliferation. Mechanical stimulation using biaxial stretch (<20%) of a rubber substrate increased ET-1 secretion, and 4 {mu}M GsMTx-4 (a specific inhibitor of SACs) inhibited secretion by 30%. GsMTx-4 did not alter basal ET-1 levels in the absence of stretch. Decreasing the calcium influx by lowering extracellular calcium also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion without effecting ET-1 secretion in unstretched controls. Furthermore, inhibiting SACs with the less specific inhibitor streptomycin also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion. The data can be explained with a simple model in which ET-1 secretion depends on an internal Ca{sup 2+} threshold. This coupling of mechanical stress to the astrocyte endothelin system through SACs has treatment implications, since all pathology deforms the surrounding parenchyma.

  20. Iron abundance and magnetic permeability of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.; Dyal, P.

    1974-01-01

    A set of simultaneous data from the Apollo 12 lunar surface magnetometer and the Explorer 35 Ames magnetometer are used to construct a whole-moon hysteresis curve, from which a new value of global lunar permeability is determined to be mu = 1.012 + or - 0.006. The corresponding global induced dipole moment is 2.1 x 10 to the 18th power gauss-cucm for typical inducing fields of .1000 gauss in the lunar environment. From the permeability measurement, lunar free iron abundance is determined to be 2.5 + or - 2.0 wt. %. Total iron abundance is calculated for two assumed compositional models of the lunar interior: a free iron/orthopyroxene lunar composition and a free iron/olivine composition. The overall lunar total iron abundance is determined to be 9.0 + or - 4.7 wt. %. Other lunar models with a small iron core and with a shallow iron-rich layer are discussed in light of the measured global permeability. Effects on permeability and iron content calculations due to a possible lunar ionosphere are also considered.

  1. Iron abundance and magnetic permeability of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.; Dyal, P.

    1974-01-01

    A larger set of simultaneous data from the Apollo 12 lunar surface magnetometer and the Explorer 35 Ames magnetometer are used to construct a whole-moon hysteresis curve, from which a new value of global lunar permeability is determined to be mu = 1.012 + or - 0.006. The corresponding global induced dipole moment is 2.1 times ten to the eighteenth power gauss-cu cm for typical inducing fields of one ten-thousandth gauss in the lunar environment. From the permeability measurement, lunar free iron abundance is determined to be 2.5 + or - 2.0 wt %. Total iron abundance (sum of iron in the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states) is calculated for two assumed compositional models of the lunar interior: a free iron/orthopyroxene lunar composition and a free iron/olivine composition. The overall lunar total iron abundance is determined to be 9.0 + or - 4.7 wt %. Other lunar models with a small iron core and with a shallow iron-rich layer are discussed in light of the measured global permeability. Effects on permeability and iron content calculations due to a possible lunar ionosphere are also considered.

  2. Biofilm growth and the related changes in the physical properties of a porous medium: 2. Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stewart W.; Milly, P. C. D.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1990-09-01

    Growth of a biofilm in a porous medium reduces the total volume and the average size of the pores. The change in the pore size distributions is easily quantified when certain geometric assumptions are made. Existing models of permeability or of relative permeability can be manipulated to yield estimates of the resulting reduction in permeability as a function of biofilm thickness. The associated reductions in porosity and specific surface can be estimated as well. Based on a sphere model of the medium, the Kozeny-Carman permeability model predicts physically realistic results for this problem. Using a cut-and-random-rejoin-type model of the medium, the permeability model of Childs and Collis-George yields qualitatively reasonable results for this problem, as does a generalization of the relative permeability model of Mualem. Permeability models of Kozeny-Carman and of Millington and Quirk lead to unrealistic results for a cut-and-random-rejoin-type medium. The Childs and Collis-George and the Mualem models predict that the permeability reduction for a given volume of biomass is greatest when the porous medium has uniform pore sizes.

  3. Stretch increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate concentration in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Felix, J A; Woodruff, M L; Dirksen, E R

    1996-03-01

    Mechanical stimulation of airway epithelial cells with a microprobe leads to an increase in cytoplasmic [Ca2+] that appears to be due, in part, to release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores (Boitano et al., Science 258:292[1992]). To investigate whether intracellular IP3 concentration ([IP3]i) increases in response to mechanical stimulation, we grew confluent monolayers from rabbit tracheal mucosal explants on flexible substrates and measured [IP3]i after stretching the substrate. The effect of stretch on [IP3]i was measured in the presence of Li+, an inhibitor of IP3 degradation. In unstretched cells, IP3 measured approximately 5.1 pmol/10(6) cells, from which we estimated [IP3]i to be 1.8 microM. Addition of Li+ had no effect on resting [IP3]i. When the flexible cell support was stretched to increase its surface area by 13%, mean [IP3]i increased about 3-fold with a half-time of approximately 1 s. The increased [IP3]i was maintained in a plateau phase for approximately 8 s and then decayed to near the unstretched level over the next 10 s, despite the sustained application of stretch. A transient stretch (0.5 s) induced a similar rate of increase and peak [IP3]i; however, [IP3]i subsided without a plateau phase. The magnitude of the [IP3]i increase was proportional to stimulus intensity between 0 and 13% increase in substrate surface area. In addition, dissociated airway epithelial cells were exposed to hypotonic solution to induce cell swelling. [IP3]i increased about 4-fold above control levels after 10 s of exposure to hypotonic solution. Basal [IP3]i of dissociated cells in isotonic solution was estimated to be 0.7 microM. These results are consistent with mechanical stimulation leading to phospholipase C synthesis of IP3, which mediates intracellular and intercellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:8845181

  4. Drainage hydraulics of permeable friction courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbeneau, Randall J.; Barrett, Michael E.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes solutions to the hydraulic equations that govern flow in permeable friction courses (PFC). PFC is a layer of porous asphalt approximately 50 mm thick that is placed as an overlay on top of an existing conventional concrete or asphalt road surface to help control splash and hydroplaning, reduce noise, and enhance quality of storm water runoff. The primary objective of this manuscript is to present an analytical system of equations that can be used in design and analysis of PFC systems. The primary assumptions used in this analysis are that the flow can be modeled as one-dimensional, steady state Darcy-type flow and that slopes are sufficiently small so that the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumptions apply. Solutions are derived for cases where storm water drainage is confined to the PFC bed and for conditions where the PFC drainage capacity is exceeded and ponded sheet flow occurs across the pavement surface. The mathematical solutions provide the drainage characteristics (depth and residence time) as a function of rainfall intensity, PFC hydraulic conductivity, pavement slope, and maximum drainage path length.

  5. A closer examination of the coupling between ionic hydrogen bond (IHB) stretching and flanking group motions in (CH3OH)2H(+): the strong isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jake A; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2016-06-01

    The intermode coupling between shared proton (O-H(+)-O) fundamental stretching and flanking modes in (CH3OH)2H(+) was revisited in the following contexts: (1) evaluation of Hamiltonian matrix elements represented in a "pure state" (PS) basis and (2) tuning of coupling strengths using H/D isotopic substitution. We considered four experimentally accessible isotopologues for this study. These are: (CH3OH)2H(+), (CD3OH)2H(+), (CH3OD)2D(+), and (CD3OD)2D(+). Potential energy surfaces (PESs), as well as dipole moment surfaces (DMSs), were constructed at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level. Multidimensional vibrational calculations were conducted by solving a reduced dimensional Schrödinger equation using a discrete variable representation (DVR). We found that vibrational states in (CH3OH)2H(+) and (CD3OH)2H(+) are much more heavily mixed than those in (CH3OD)2D(+) and (CD3OD)2D(+). Furthermore, each isotopologue chooses to strongly couple between out-of-phase in-plane CH3 rocking and its out-of-plane counterpart. Lastly, the interaction between O-O stretching and O-H(+)-O stretching was explored. We found that between the first overtone of O-O stretching and its combination tone with O-H(+)-O fundamental stretching, only the second couples with O-H(+)-O fundamental stretching. We hope that our isotopologue calculations would motivate experimentalists to measure them in the future. PMID:27173598

  6. Determination of the stretch tensor for structural transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Song, Yintao; Tamura, Nobumichi; James, Richard D.

    2016-08-01

    Structural transformations in crystalline solids are increasingly the basis of the functional behavior of materials. Recently, in diverse alloy systems, both low hysteresis and reversibility of phase transformations have been linked to the satisfaction of the nongeneric conditions of compatibility between phases. According to the Cauchy-Born rule, these conditions are expressed as properties of transformation stretch tensor. The transformation stretch tensor is difficult to measure directly due to the lack of knowledge about the exact transforming pathway during the structural change, and the complicating effects of microstructure. In this paper we give a rigorous algorithmic approach for determining the transformation stretch tensor from X-ray measurements of structure and lattice parameters. For some traditional and emerging phase transformations, the results given by the algorithm suggest unexpected transformation mechanisms.

  7. TRP Channels in Insect Stretch Receptors as Insecticide Targets.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Alexandre; Spalthoff, Christian; Kandasamy, Ramani; Katana, Radoslav; Rankl, Nancy B; Andrés, Marta; Jähde, Philipp; Dorsch, John A; Stam, Lynn F; Braun, Franz-Josef; Warren, Ben; Salgado, Vincent L; Göpfert, Martin C

    2015-05-01

    Defining the molecular targets of insecticides is crucial for assessing their selectivity and potential impact on environment and health. Two commercial insecticides are now shown to target a transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel complex that is unique to insect stretch receptor cells. Pymetrozine and pyrifluquinazon disturbed Drosophila coordination and hearing by acting on chordotonal stretch receptor neurons. This action required the two TRPs Nanchung (Nan) and Inactive (Iav), which co-occur exclusively within these cells. Nan and Iav together sufficed to confer cellular insecticide responses in vivo and in vitro, and the two insecticides were identified as specific agonists of Nan-Iav complexes that, by promoting cellular calcium influx, silence the stretch receptor cells. This establishes TRPs as insecticide targets and defines specific agonists of insect TRPs. It also shows that TRPs can render insecticides cell-type selective and puts forward TRP targets to reduce side effects on non-target species. PMID:25950634

  8. Polymer stretching in the inertial range of turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Adeel; Vincenzi, Dario

    2016-05-01

    We study the deformation of flexible polymers whose contour length lies in the inertial range of a homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow. By using the elastic dumbbell model and a stochastic velocity field with nonsmooth spatial correlations, we obtain the probability density function of the extension as a function of the Weissenberg number and of the scaling exponent of the velocity structure functions. In a spatially rough flow, as in the inertial range of turbulence, the statistics of polymer stretching differs from that observed in laminar flows or in smooth chaotic flows. In particular, the probability distribution of polymer extensions decays as a stretched exponential, and the most probable extension grows as a power law of the Weissenberg number. Furthermore, the ability of the flow to stretch polymers weakens as the flow becomes rougher in space. PMID:27300949

  9. Single particle measurements of material line stretching in turbulence: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramel, Stefan; Tympel, Saskia; Toschi, Federico; Voth, Greg

    2015-11-01

    We find that particles in the shape of chiral dipoles display a preferential rotation direction in three dimensional isotropic turbulence. The particles consist of two helical ends with opposite chirality that are connected by a straight rod. They are fabricated using 3D printing and have an aspect ratio of 10 and a length in the inertial range of our flow between oscillating grids. Due to their high aspect ratio, they move like material lines. Because material lines align with the extentional eigenvectors of the velocity gradient tensor they experience a mean stretching in turbulence. The stretching of a chiral dipole produces a rotation about the dipole axis and so chiral dipoles experience a non-zero mean spinning rate in turbulence. These results provide a first direct experimental measurement of the rate of material line stretching in turbulence.

  10. Polymer stretching in the inertial range of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Adeel; Vincenzi, Dario

    2016-05-01

    We study the deformation of flexible polymers whose contour length lies in the inertial range of a homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow. By using the elastic dumbbell model and a stochastic velocity field with nonsmooth spatial correlations, we obtain the probability density function of the extension as a function of the Weissenberg number and of the scaling exponent of the velocity structure functions. In a spatially rough flow, as in the inertial range of turbulence, the statistics of polymer stretching differs from that observed in laminar flows or in smooth chaotic flows. In particular, the probability distribution of polymer extensions decays as a stretched exponential, and the most probable extension grows as a power law of the Weissenberg number. Furthermore, the ability of the flow to stretch polymers weakens as the flow becomes rougher in space.

  11. Simple assembly of long nanowires through substrate stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianjin; Mohieddin Abukhdeir, Nasser; Goldthorpe, Irene A.

    2015-12-01

    Although nanowire (NW) alignment has been previously investigated, minimizing limitations such as process complexity and NW breakage, as well as quantifying the quality of alignment, have not been sufficiently addressed. A simple, low cost, large-area, and versatile alignment method is reported that is applicable for NWs either grown on a substrate or synthesized in solution. Metal and semiconductor NWs with average lengths of up to 16 μm are aligned through the stretching of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films, which compared to other stretching methods results in superior alignment because of the large stretching ratio of PVA. Poly[oxy(methyl-1,2-ethanediyl)] is employed as lubricant to prevent NW breakage. To quantify NW alignment, a simple and effective image processing method is presented. The alignment process results in an order parameter (S) of NW alignment as high as 0.97.

  12. EMG and peak force responses to PNF stretching and the relationship between stretching-induced force deficits and bilateral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Asim

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of an interaction between stretching induced deficit (SFD) and bilateral deficits (BLD) during maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion under PNF stretch and no-stretch conditions through measurement of EMG and force production. [Subjects and Methods] Ten physically active male Caucasian students (age, 24.1±2.38 years; body mass, 79.48±11.40 kg; height, 174.15±0.8 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. EMG and force measurements of the subjects were recorded during either unilateral or bilateral 3-second maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion (MVC) against a force transducer. The paired sample t-test was used to examine the significance of differences among several conditions. Pearson product-moment correlation was used to evaluate the associations between different parameters. [Results] Stretching-induced deficits correlated with bilateral deficits in both force (r=0.85) and iEMG (r=0.89). PNF stretching caused significant decrements in the bilateral and unilateral conditions for both the right and left sides. [Conclusion] Since both force and iEMG decreases were observed in most measurements; it suggests there is a neural mechanism behinnd both the BLD and the SFD. PMID:25931696

  13. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Sloot, Lizeth H.; van den Noort, Josien C.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163–191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  14. Implementation of Biofilm Permeability Models for Mineral Reactions in Saturated Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Saripalli, Kanaka P.; Bacon, Diana H.; Meyer, Philip D.

    2005-02-22

    An approach based on continuous biofilm models is proposed for modeling permeability changes due to mineral precipitation and dissolution in saturated porous media. In contrast to the biofilm approach, implementation of the film depositional models within a reactive transport code requires a time-dependent calculation of the mineral films in the pore space. Two different methods for this calculation are investigated. The first method assumes a direct relationship between changes in mineral radii (i.e., surface area) and changes in the pore space. In the second method, an effective change in pore radii is calculated based on the relationship between permeability and grain size. Porous media permeability is determined by coupling the film permeability models (Mualem and Childs and Collis-George) to a volumetric model that incorporates both mineral density and reactive surface area. Results from single mineral dissolution and single mineral precipitation simulations provide reasonable estimates of permeability, though they under predict the magnitude of permeability changes relative to the Kozeny and Carmen model. However, a comparison of experimental and simulated data show that the Mualem film model is the only one that can replicate the oscillations in permeability that occur as a result of simultaneous dissolution and precipitation reactions occurring within the porous media.

  15. Variation of Permeability with Porosity in Sandstone Diagenesis Interpreted with a Fractal Pore Space Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, H.; Clauser, C.; Iffland, J.

    Permeability is one of the key rock properties for the management of hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs as well as for aquifers. The fundamental equation for estimating permeability is the Kozeny-Carman equation. It is based on a capillary bundle model and relates permeability to porosity, tortuosity and an effective hydraulic pore radius which is defined by this equation. Whereas in clean sands the effective pore radius can be replaced by the specific surface or by the grain radius in a simple way, the resulting equations for permeability cannot be applied to consolidated rocks. Based on a fractal model for porous media, equations were therefore developed which adjust the measure of the specific surface and of the grain radius to the resolution length appropriate for the hydraulic process. These equations are calibrated by a large data set for permeability, formation factor, and porosity determined on sedimentary rocks. This fractal model yields tortuosity and effective pore radius as functions of porosity as well as a general permeability-porosity relationship, the coefficients of which are characteristic for different rock types. It can be applied to interpret the diagenetic evolution of the pore space of sedimentary rocks due to mechanical and chemical compaction with respect to porosity and permeability.

  16. Stretched Exponential Relaxation of Glasses at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingtian; Wang, Mengyi; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Bu; Sant, Gaurav; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    The question of whether glass continues to relax at low temperature is of fundamental and practical interest. Here, we report a novel atomistic simulation method allowing us to directly access the long-term dynamics of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that the potential energy relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay, with a stretching exponent β =3 /5 , as predicted by Phillips's diffusion-trap model. Interestingly, volume relaxation is also found. However, it is not correlated to the energy relaxation, but it is rather a manifestation of the mixed alkali effect.

  17. Interventions for the treatment of stretch marks: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liping; Ma, Hong; Li, Yumei

    2014-08-01

    Stretch marks are a common disfiguring skin condition that can have a deep psychological impact on affected patients. Although there are a variety of treatments available, no consistently effective therapies have been established. In this systematic review, we evaluate 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the efficacy and safety of currently available therapies for the treatment of stretch marks. Due to the limited number of patients and high or unclear risk of bias in the studies included in this assessment, the evidence from this review is insufficient to provide clear guidelines for practice. Therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID:25184641

  18. Stretching the HM200 series SES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattersall, E. G.; Gee, N. I.

    The HM200 series SESs are discussed and compared with respect to design specifications, cost, and performance specifications such as speed loss in waves, and vertical accelerations. Structural modifications for the HM221, demonstrating a capacity increases of 33 percent over the HM218 for only a 22 percent increase in first cost, include small increases on bottom shell thickness and a 30 percent lift power increase (by using the turbo charged version of the HM218 naturally aspirated engine). It is shown that the HM200 series requires about half the HP and fuel consumption of the catamaran, and about 30 percent less than the surface piercing hydrofoils, in the same speed range.

  19. Functional finishes of stretch cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N A; Amr, A; Eid, B M; Almetwally, A A; Mourad, M M

    2013-11-01

    Functionalized cotton cellulose/spandex woven fabrics with different structures namely plain (1/1), twill (2/2) and satin were produced. Factors affecting the imparted functional properties such as weave structure and constituents of the finishing formulations including ether or ester cross-linker and catalyst type, silicone-micro-emulsion, water/oil repellent, Ag-NP(,)s and TiO2-NP(,)s were studied. The treated fabrics were found to have easy care property together with one or more of the imparted functional properties such as soft-handle, water/oil repellence, antibacterial, UV-protection and self cleaning. The effectiveness of the imparted properties is not seriously affected even after 10 washing cycles. Surface modifications as well as the composition of certain samples were confirmed by SEM images and EDX spectra. Mode of interactions was also suggested. PMID:24053846

  20. Instabilities in the asymptotic suction boundary layer over a permeable, compliant wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluvinage, Franck; Kourta, Azeddine; Bottaro, Alessandro

    2015-05-01

    The spatial, linear stability of an incompressible parallel boundary layer flow with uniform suction through the wall is studied for the case of rigid and flexible bounding surfaces. It is demonstrated, first, that the effect of the plate's permeability is crucial in defining the disturbance boundary conditions at the wall, and that stability limits depend strongly on it. Next, the combined effect of plate's permeability and compliance on the onset of Tollmien-Schlichting modes is assessed. Finally, the possible insurgence of an absolute instability mode is studied, as function of the Reynolds number, the modulus of elasticity of the plate, and its permeability.