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Sample records for permeables al gas

  1. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  2. Gas Permeability in Rubbery Polyphosphazene Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme; John R. Klaehn; Mason K. Harrup; Thomas A. Luther; Eric S. Peterson

    2006-09-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and gas permeability of ten new polyphosphazenes has been studied. Additionally, the first gas permeation data has been collected on hydrolytically unstable poly[bis-(chloro)phosphazene]. Gases used in this study include CO2, CH4, O2, N2, H2, and Ar. CO2 was the most permeable gas through any of the phosphazenes and a direct correlation between the Tg of the polymer and CO2 transport was noted with permeability increasing with decreasing polymer Tg. To a lesser degree, permeability of all the other gases studied also yielded increases with decreasing polymer Tg. The trend observed for these new polymers was further supported by published data for other phosphazenes. Furthermore, permeability data for all gases were found to correlate to the gas condensability and the gas critical pressures, except for hydrogen, suggesting that the nature of the gas is also a significant factor for permeation through rubbery phosphazene membranes. Ideal separation factors (á) for the CO2/H2 and CO2/CH4 gas pairs were calculated. For CO2/CH4, no increase in á was observed with decreasing Tg, however increases in á were noted for the CO2/H2 pair.

  3. Compact rock material gas permeability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Zuo, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Natural compact rocks, such as sandstone, granite, and rock salt, are the main materials and geological environment for storing underground oil, gas, CO2, shale gas, and radioactive waste because they have extremely low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Using the inert gas argon as the fluid medium, the stress-dependent permeability and porosity of monzonitic granite and granite gneiss from an underground oil storage depot were measured using a permeability and porosity measurement system. Based on the test results, models for describing the relationships among the permeability, porosity, and confining pressure of rock specimens were analyzed and are discussed. A power law is suggested to describe the relationship between the stress-dependent porosity and permeability; for the monzonitic granite and granite gneiss (for monzonitic granite (A-2), the initial porosity is approximately 4.05%, and the permeability is approximately 10-19 m2; for the granite gneiss (B-2), the initial porosity is approximately 7.09%, the permeability is approximately 10-17 m2; and the porosity-sensitivity exponents that link porosity and permeability are 0.98 and 3.11, respectively). Compared with moderate-porosity and high-porosity rocks, for which φ > 15%, low-porosity rock permeability has a relatively lower sensitivity to stress, but the porosity is more sensitive to stress, and different types of rocks show similar trends. From the test results, it can be inferred that the test rock specimens' permeability evolution is related to the relative particle movements and microcrack closure.

  4. Permeable Gas Flow Influences Magma Fragmentation Speed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, D.; Scheu, B.; Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D.

    2008-12-01

    Highly viscous magmas undergo fragmentation in order to produce the pyroclastic deposits that we observe, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. The overpressure required to initiate fragmentation depends on a number of physical parameters, such as the magma's vesicularity, permeability, tensile strength and textural properties. It is clear that these same parameters control also the speed at which a fragmentation front travels through magma when fragmentation occurs. Recent mathematical models of fragmentation processes consider most of these factors, but permeable gas flow has not yet been included in these models. However, it has been shown that permeable gas flow through a porous rock during a sudden decompression event increases the fragmentation threshold. Fragmentation experiments on natural samples from Bezymianny (Russia), Colima (Mexico), Krakatau (Indonesia) and Augustine (USA) volcanoes confirm these results and suggest in addition that high permeable flow rates may increase the speed of fragmentation. Permeability from the investigated samples ranges from as low as 5 x 10-14 to higher than 9 x 10- 12 m2 and open porosity ranges from 16 % to 48 %. Experiments were performed for each sample series at applied pressures up to 35 MPa. Our results indicate that the rate of increase of fragmentation speed is higher when the permeability is above 10-12 m2. We confirm that it is necessary to include the influence of permeable flow on fragmentation dynamics.

  5. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  6. Gas permeable electrode for electrochemical system

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Townsend, Carl W.

    1989-01-01

    An electrode apparatus adapted for use in electrochemical systems having an anode compartment and a cathode compartment in which gas and ions are produced and consumed in the compartments during generation of electrical current. The electrode apparatus includes a membrane for separating the anode compartment from the cathode compartment wherein the membrane is permeable to both ions and gas. The cathode and anode for the assembly are provided on opposite sides of the membrane. During use of the membrane-electrode apparatus in electrochemical cells, the gas and ions generated at the cathode or anode migrate through the membrane to provide efficient transfer of gas and ions between the anode and cathode compartments.

  7. Gas permeable electrode for electrochemical system

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, F.A.; Townsend, C.W.

    1989-09-12

    An electrode apparatus is described which is adapted for use in electrochemical systems having an anode compartment and a cathode compartment in which gas and ions are produced and consumed in the compartments during generation of electrical current. The electrode apparatus includes a membrane for separating the anode compartment from the cathode compartment wherein the membrane is permeable to both ions and gas. The cathode and anode for the assembly are provided on opposite sides of the membrane. During use of the membrane-electrode apparatus in electrochemical cells, the gas and ions generated at the cathode or anode migrate through the membrane to provide efficient transfer of gas and ions between the anode and cathode compartments. 3 figs.

  8. Studying the Variation in Gas Permeability of Porous Building Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L.; Savidge, C. R.; Hu, L.; Rizzo, D. M.; Hayden, N. J.; Dewoolkar, M.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding permeability of building materials is important for problems involving studies of contaminant transport. Examples include contamination from fire, acid rain, and chemical and biological weapons. Our research investigates the gas permeability of porous building substrates such as concretes, limestones, sandstones, and bricks. Each sample was cored to produce 70 mm (2.75”) diameter cores approximately 75-130 mm (3-5”) tall. The surface gas permeability was measured on the top surface of these specimens using the AutoScan II device manufactured by New England Research, Inc. The measurements were taken along a 3 mm grid producing a map of surface gas permeability. An example map is shown in Figure 1. The macroscopic measurements were performed along the entire cored specimen. A second set of measurements were made on a 5 mm thick slice cut from the top of each specimen to examine whether these measurements compare better with the surface measurements. The macroscopic gas permeability was measured for all specimens using ASTM D 4525. The results are summarized in Table 1. In general, the surface and macroscopic gas permeability measurements (Table 1) compare reasonably well (within one order of magnitude). The permeability of the 5 mm slices is not significantly different from the entire core for the specimens tested. Figure 1. Results of surface permeability mappingof Ohio Sandstone using the AutoScan II device. a) Map of gas permeability b) Range of gas permeability c) Density function of permeability. Table 1. Gas permeability values (mD)

  9. Laser Additive Manufacturing of Gas Permeable Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahn, C.; Bechmann, F.; Hofmann, S.; Dinkel, M.; Emmelmann, C.

    Laser additive manufacturing offers a variety of new design possibilities. In mold making laser additive manufactured inserts with conformal cooling channels are already state of the art. Pneumatic ejectors for injection molds are a new application for laser additive manufacturing. The pneumatic ejectors require a durable gas permeable material. This material is produced by placing the scan vectors for the laser additive manufacturing process in a defined pattern. Trials with different plastics proofed the function and reliability of the pneumatic ejector concept in the injection molding cycle.

  10. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  11. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  12. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  13. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  14. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  15. Characterizing average permeability in oil and gas formations

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, J.B. ); Holditch, S.A.; Lee, W.J. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper reports that permeability in a formation frequently follows a unimodal probability distribution. In many formations, particularly sedimentary ones, the permeability distribution is similar to the log-normal distribution. Theoretical considerations, field cases, and a reservoir simulation example show that the median, rather than the arithmetic mean, is the appropriate measure of central tendency or average value of the permeability distribution in a formation. Use of the correct estimate of average permeability is of particular importance in the classification of tight gas formations under statues in the 1978 Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA).

  16. Permeability of stemming materials for prompt gas sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Beiriger, J.; Trimmer, D.

    1982-01-01

    The permeability and porosity of a suite of man-made granular aggregates and stemming materials currently in use at NTS was measured in 1-D loading as a function of stress. In all cases, the gas permeability was measured at 22 MPa after cycling up and down from 100 to 1200 MPa. Depending on stress and material, permeability decreased up to three orders of magnitude, porosity up to 63% and the sample compacted by as much as 35%. Steel ball bearings were found to retain the highest permeability of all the materials tested. The enhancement of prompt gas sampling through alternate stemming material in the column above the nuclear device is discussed.

  17. Instrumentation for Measurement of Gas Permeability of Polymeric Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Wood, George M.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Burns, Karen S.

    1993-01-01

    A mass spectrometric 'Dynamic Delta' method for the measurement of gas permeability of polymeric membranes has been developed. The method is universally applicable for measurement of the permeability of any gas through polymeric membrane materials. The usual large sample size of more than 100 square centimeters required for other methods is not necessary for this new method which requires a size less than one square centimeter. The new method should fulfill requirements and find applicability for industrial materials such as food packaging, contact lenses and other commercial materials where gas permeability or permselectivity properties are important.

  18. A new quasi-steady method to measure gas permeability of weakly permeable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannot, Yves; Lasseux, Didier

    2012-01-01

    A new quasi-steady method for the determination of the apparent gas permeability of porous materials is presented in this paper along with the corresponding interpretative physical model derived from the unsteady flow equations. This method is mainly dedicated to the measurement of very low permeability of thin porous media, although thicker but more permeable samples may also be analyzed. The method relies on quasi-steady flow resulting from a (quasi) constant pressure maintained at the inlet face of the sample. Gas flow-rate, as low as 3 × 10-10 m3/s, is determined from the record of pressure increase in a reservoir connected to the outlet face of the sample. An estimate of the characteristic time, tc, to reach quasi-steady flow after imposing a constant pressure at the inlet is derived. It is validated by direct numerical simulations of the complete unsteady flow, clearly defining the required experimental duration for the method to apply. Experimental results obtained on rather permeable and thick rock samples are reported showing an excellent agreement of the measured permeability with that determined independently on the same sample whereas the experimental value of tc is also in very good agreement with the predicted one. The method is further employed on a composite material sheet allowing the identification of an apparent gas permeability of about 10-23 m2.

  19. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Research continued on the study of coal permeability and gas desorption. This quarter, most of the effort involved identifying problems with the microbalance and then getting it repaired. Measurement of the amount of gas adsorbed with the microbalance involved corrections for the buoyancy change with pressure and several experiments with helium were made to determine this correction.

  20. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

    1998-05-12

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

  1. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Watkin, David C.; Walton, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the "body-filled panel". Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials.

  2. Permeability effects on the seismic response of gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, J. Germán.; Velis, Danilo R.; Holliger, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we analyse the role of permeability on the seismic response of sandstone reservoirs characterized by patchy gas-water saturation. We do this in the framework of Johnson's model, which is a generalization of White's seminal model allowing for patches of arbitrary geometry. We first assess the seismic attenuation and velocity dispersion characteristics in response to wave-induced fluid flow. To this end, we perform an exhaustive analysis of the sensitivity of attenuation and velocity dispersion of compressional body waves to permeability and explore the roles played by the Johnson parameters T and S/V, which characterize the shape and size of the gas-water patches. Our results indicate that, within the typical frequency range of exploration seismic data, this sensitivity may indeed be particularly strong for a variety of realistic and relevant scenarios. Next, we extend our analysis to the corresponding effects on surface-based reflection seismic data for two pertinent models of typical sandstone reservoirs. In the case of softer and more porous formations and in the presence of relatively low levels of gas saturation we observe that the effects of permeability on seismic reflection data are indeed significant. These prominent permeability effects prevail for normal-incidence and non-normal-incidence seismic data and for a very wide range of sizes and shapes of the gas-water patches. For harder and less porous reservoirs, the normal-incidence seismic responses exhibit little or no sensitivity to permeability, but the corresponding non-normal-incidence responses show a clear dependence on this parameter, again especially so for low gas saturations. The results of this study therefore suggest that, for a range of fairly common and realistic conditions, surface-based seismic reflection data are indeed remarkably sensitive to the permeability of gas reservoirs and thus have the potential of providing corresponding first-order constraints.

  3. Quantifying tight-gas sandstone permeability via critical path analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Torres-Verdín, Carlos; Skaggs, Todd H.

    2016-06-01

    Rock permeability has been actively investigated over the past several decades by the geosciences community. However, its accurate estimation still presents significant technical challenges, particularly in spatially complex rocks. In this short communication, we apply critical path analysis (CPA) to estimate permeability in porous rocks from measured mercury intrusion porosimetry and electrical conductivity data. Theoretical estimations of various CPA-based models are then compared to experimental measurements using eighteen tight-gas sandstones. Except for two of the samples, we find permeability estimations performed with the Skaggs model (assuming pore diameter independent of its length) more accurate than other models, within a factor of two of the measured permeabilities. We discuss some plausible sources of the uncertainties.

  4. Reduction of gas and water permeabilities using gels

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.

    1995-05-01

    The authors investigated how different types of gels reduce permeability to water and gases in porous rock. Five types of gels were studied, including (1) a ``weak`` resorcinol-formaldehyde gel, (2) a ``strong`` resorcinol-formaldehyde gel, (3) a Cr(III)-xanthan gel, (4) a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel, and (5) a colloidal-silica gel. For all gels, extensive coreflood experiments were performed to assess the permeability-reduction characteristics and the stability to repeated water-alternating-gas (WAG) cycles. Studies were performed at pressures up to 1,500 psi using either nitrogen or carbon dioxide as the compressed gas. They developed a coreflood apparatus with an inline high-pressure spectrophotometer that allowed tracer studies to be performed without depressurizing the core. They noted several analogies between the results reported here and those observed during a parallel study of the effects of gel on oil and water permeabilities.

  5. Permeability enhancement using high energy gas fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Cuderman, J.F.; Jung, J.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study of using High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF) techniques for geothermal well stimulation. Experiments conducted in the G-tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) showed that multiple fractures could be created in water-filled boreholes using HEGF. Therefore, the method is potentially useful for geothermal well stimulation. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Ammonia recovery from livestock waste using gas permeable membrane technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation shows new methods and systems being developed for reducing ammonia emissions from livestock waste and recovering concentrated liquid nitrogen that could be sold as fertilizer. These systems use gas-permeable membranes as components of new processes to capture and recover the ammoni...

  7. Ammonia recovery from livestock wastewater with gas permeable membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation shows new methods and systems being developed for reducing ammonia emissions from livestock waste and recovering concentrated liquid nitrogen that could be sold as fertilizer. These systems use gas-permeable membranes as components of new processes to capture and recover the ammoni...

  8. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

    2009-07-21

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  9. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

    2004-09-28

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  10. Discovery sequence and the nature of low permeability gas accumulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.

    2005-01-01

    There is an ongoing discussion regarding the geologic nature of accumulations that host gas in low-permeability sandstone environments. This note examines the discovery sequence of the accumulations in low permeability sandstone plays that were classified as continuous-type by the U.S. Geological Survey for the 1995 National Oil and Gas Assessment. It compares the statistical character of historical discovery sequences of accumulations associated with continuous-type sandstone gas plays to those of conventional plays. The seven sandstone plays with sufficient data exhibit declining size with sequence order, on average, and in three of the seven the trend is statistically significant. Simulation experiments show that both a skewed endowment size distribution and a discovery process that mimics sampling proportional to size are necessary to generate a discovery sequence that consistently produces a statistically significant negative size order relationship. The empirical findings suggest that discovery sequence could be used to constrain assessed gas in untested areas. The plays examined represent 134 of the 265 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas assessed in undeveloped areas of continuous-type gas plays in low permeability sandstone environments reported in the 1995 National Assessment. ?? 2005 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  11. Estimation of gas permeability of a zeolite membrane, based on a molecular simulation technique and permeation model

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shigejirou; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Yamaguchi, Takeo; Nakao, Shinichi

    2000-03-09

    A method for estimating gas permeability through a zeolite membrane, using a molecular simulation technique and a theoretical permeation model, is presented. The estimate of permeability is derived from a combination of an absorption isotherm and self-diffusion coefficient based on the adsorption-diffusion model. The adsorption isotherm and self-diffusion coefficients needed for the estimation were calculated using conventional Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated self-diffusion coefficient was converted to the mutual diffusion coefficient and the permeability estimated using the Fickian equation. The method was applied to the prediction of permeabilities of methane and ethylene in silicalite at 301 K. Calculated permeabilities were larger than the experimental values by more than an order of magnitude. However, the anisotropic permeability was consistent with the experimental data and the results obtained using a grand canonical ensemble molecular dynamics technique (Pohl et al., Mol.Phys. 1996, 89(6), 1725--1731).

  12. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  13. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  14. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  15. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  16. Identification of productive layers in low-permeability gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, J.L.; Lee, W.J. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper presents new guidelines for determining net pay thickness in low-permeability, multilayered gas wells. These criteria were developed from a sensitivity study performed with an analytical solution for complex multilayered reservoirs. The purpose of this study is to determine whether many layers now considered to contribute to net pay actually have transmissibilities too low for the layer to be productive, causing performance projections from current singly-layer descriptive models to be too optimistic.

  17. Oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P.S.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Picciolo, J.J.

    1998-02-01

    Mixed-conducting oxides have a wide range of applications, including fuel cells, gas separation systems, sensors, and electrocatalytic equipment. Dense ceramic membranes made of mixed-conducting oxides are particularly attractive for gas separation and methane conversion processes. Membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide, which exhibits high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductivities, can be used to selectively transport oxygen during the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, i.e., CO + H{sub 2}). The authors have fabricated tubular Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes and tested them (some for more than 1,000 h) in a methane conversion reactor that was operating at 850--950 C. An oxygen permeation flux of {approx} 10 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained at 900 C in a tubular membrane with a wall thickness of 0.75 mm. Using a gas-tight electrochemical cell, the authors have also measured the steady-state oxygen permeability of flat Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure(pO{sub 2}). Steady-state oxygen permeability increases with increasing temperature and with the difference in pO{sub 2} on the two sides of the membrane. At 900 C, an oxygen permeability of {approx} 2.5 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained in a 2.9-mm-thick membrane. This value agrees with that obtained in methane conversion reactor experiments. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics determined in the gas-tight cell indicate that bulk effect, rather than surface exchange effect, is the main limiting factor for oxygen permeation of {approx} 1-mm-thick Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes at elevated temperatures (> 650 C).

  18. Porosity and permeability of eastern Devonian gas shale

    SciTech Connect

    Soeder, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight samples of Devonian gas shale from the Appalachian Basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian age Huron Member of the Ohio Shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eighth core sample consists of Middle Devonian age Marcellus Shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, West Virginia. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the results have also shown that there are a number of previously unknown factors which influence or control gas production from organic-rich shales of the Appalachian Basin. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron Shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and permeability of the rock matrix to gas is less than 0.1 microdarcy at reservoir stress. The Marcellus Shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10% under stress with a fairly strong ''adsorption'' component. Permeability to gas (K/sub infinity/ was highly stress-dependent, ranging from about 20 microdarcies at a net stress of 3000 psi down to about 5 microdarcies at a net stress of 6000 psi. The conclusion reached from this study is that Devonian shale in the Appalachian Basin is a considerably more complex natural gas resource than previously thought. Production potential varies widely with geographic location and stratigraphy, just as it does with other gas and oil resources. 15 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Liquid and gas permeabilities of unsaturated municipal solid waste under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, Guillaume; Gourc, Jean-Pierre; Oxarango, Laurent

    2010-10-01

    A novel set of experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to study the changes in the fluid-flow properties of municipal solid waste (MSW) related to the physical evolution of its structure under compression. The vertical liquid and gas permeabilities of MSW samples were measured in a laboratory-constructed cell termed an oedopermeameter. Another original device, a gas pycnometer, was employed to assess the volumetric gas content of the porous medium. Finally, the horizontal gas permeability of the compressed MSW sample was measured using another laboratory-constructed cell called a transmissivimeter. The results made it possible to characterise the intrinsic gas permeability as a function of porosity. Additionally, gas permeability measurements of samples with different liquid contents allowed the derivation of gas permeability correlations as functions of the physical parameters of the medium. A unique relationship was found between the gas permeability and the volumetric gas content.

  20. Effective gas permeability of Tight Gas Sandstones as function of capillary pressure - a non-steady state approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann-Hildenbrand, Alexandra; Dietrichs, Joyce P.; Krooss, Bernhard M.

    2014-05-01

    Single- and two-phase (gas/water) fluid transport in tight sandstones has been studied by conducting series of permeability tests on core plugs of nine tight sandstones of the Southern North Sea. Experiments comprised 1) steady state single-phase gas permeability tests, yielding absolute (Klinkenberg-corrected) permeability coefficients between 1E-17 and 1E-19 m ^ 2, 2) steady state permeability tests with water yielding absolute permeability coefficients from 1E-16 to 1E-19 m ^ 2 3) dynamic gas breakthrough (drainage and imbibition) experiments yielding effective gas permeability coefficients between 1E-17 and 1E-22 m ^ 2. Petrophysical standard methods (He-pycnometry, Archimedes method, NMR, Hg-injection porosimetry) were used to assess the porosity and characterize the pore structure of the samples. The key-results are as follows: - Permeability coefficients decrease with increasing confining pressure (10 to 30 MPa) by less than one order of magnitude. - Intrinsic permeability coefficients determined with water are always lower than Klinkenberg-corrected gas permeability coefficients. - Gas permeability coefficients after capillary breakthrough clearly increase with increasing pressure difference, confirming capillary pressure-controlled change in gas saturation. For all samples several repetitive drainage/imbibition cycles were conducted to monitor the dynamic process of water displacement and gas transport. At any given pressure difference, the effective gas permeability is higher during spontaneous imbibition than during drainage. - For all samples a maximum drainage/desaturation-curve was defined, yielding the maximum effective (apparent) gas permeability as function of the initial pressure difference. - An exponential relationship was obtained between the intrinsic (water) permeability and maximum effective gas permeability for pressure differences from 1 to 10 MPa. - A weak relationship exists between the capillary displacement pressure determined from

  1. Efficacy of multipurpose solutions for rigid gas permeable lenses.

    PubMed

    Boost, Maureen; Cho, Pauline; Lai, Sindy

    2006-09-01

    The use of multipurpose solutions for cleaning and disinfecting rigid gas permeable lenses has replaced single purpose solutions, but there are no reports of the efficacy of these multipurpose solutions, or of the effects of storage conditions on their disinfecting capacities. This study investigated activity against four bacterial and two fungal species, and the effects of storage in a refrigerator, at room temperature, at elevated temperature in both dry and humid conditions and with exposure to sunlight. The disinfecting solutions were challenged with the micro-organisms initially upon opening and then at 2-weekly intervals up to 12 weeks after being stored under the different conditions. Solutions were opened daily to simulate use. One solution failed to meet Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria to reduce numbers of bacteria by three log dilutions and of fungi by one log dilution. Storage reduced activity of all solutions over the 12-week period, but not below the requirements of the FDA. Storage in the refrigerator tended to reduce disinfecting capacity more quickly. Multipurpose solutions for rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses lose activity over the 3 months recommended time of use but remain satisfactory for use over this time in the conditions tested. Practitioners need to remind patients to replace their solutions regularly and should advise against storage in the refrigerator. Multipurpose solutions for RGP lenses have simplified cleaning and disinfecting processes and the current formulations have improved disinfecting capacity compared to former disinfecting solutions, which is particularly important for wearers of orthokeratology lenses. PMID:16918771

  2. Gas permeable materials improve safety of life saving appliances.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Rolf; Low, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Spray-hoods are additional items of life jackets. They are very effective in reducing water contact of the breathing openings when victims have to stay in rough seas without boat or life raft. A life raft is also a very important life saving device. But both have a system problem. They consist of a more or less encapsulated space in which humans have to breathe. To ensure a sufficient amount of oxygen and to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide, spray-hoods have ventilation openings which reduce the efficiency of this equipment, but most of the life rafts have no ventilation. In a series of tests we used a new gas permeable material for the hoods. This reduced the flooding of victims to a very little amount, while O2 and CO2 stayed at acceptable levels. Our experiments with conventional rafts showed that the O2 level went down to less than 15% within 50 minutes while CO2 went up to 6%. These are dangerous levels. The canopy of some of the life rafts were modified with the above mentioned new gas permeable material. Identical rafts were used in comparative trials. The tests showed positive results for the new material. The minimum O2 level stayed at 20.2% and CO2 reached a maximum of 0.52%. The results prove that this material can lead to a much safer rescue system than the systems used so far. PMID:12608585

  3. Natural Hydrofracturing, Dynamic Permeability, and Gas recovery (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathles, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrofracturing has suddenly transformed the hydrocarbon industry, turning even quite recent supply projections upside down. The miracle is that it can work so well. It will take time to understand the processes which allow oil and gas to be so effectively recovered from extremely impermeable carbonate and shale formations. Two factors seem particularly important: First, nature has already gas-fractured the shales during hydrocarbon generation. In the case of the Marcellus, the maturation process left the residual organic matter a froth of very small (2-5 nm) connected gas pockets, which drained into larger (perhaps now closed) fractures, and then into the surrounding formations where they produced joints. Second, the organic surfaces tend to be gas-wet and hydrophobic, whereas the silicate surfaces in the shale tend to be the reverse (hydrophilic and gas-phobic). The fluid phase interactions are thus complicated. The talk will briefly review these aspects of the complex hydrofracturing environment, and then explore whether the dynamic permeability produced when the hydrocarbons were expelled could be retained or recovered during a second, human, hydrofracturing.

  4. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  5. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  6. Spatial resolution of gas hydrate and permeability changes from ERT data in LARS simulating the Mallik gas hydrate production test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priegnitz, Mike; Thaler, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Abendroth, Sven

    2014-05-01

    The German gas hydrate project SUGAR studies innovative methods and approaches to be applied in the production of methane from hydrate-bearing reservoirs. To enable laboratory studies in pilot scale, a large reservoir simulator (LARS) was realized allowing for the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates under simulated in-situ conditions. LARS is equipped with a series of sensors. This includes a cylindrical electrical resistance tomography (ERT) array composed of 25 electrode rings featuring 15 electrodes each. The high-resolution ERT array is used to monitor the spatial distribution of the electrical resistivity during hydrate formation and dissociation experiments over time. As the present phases of poorly conducting sediment, well conducting pore fluid, non-conducting hydrates, and isolating free gas cover a wide range of electrical properties, ERT measurements enable us to monitor the spatial distribution of these phases during the experiments. In order to investigate the hydrate dissociation and the resulting fluid flow, we simulated a hydrate production test in LARS that was based on the Mallik gas hydrate production test (see abstract Heeschen et al., this volume). At first, a hydrate phase was produced from methane saturated saline water. During the two months of gas hydrate production we measured the electrical properties within the sediment sample every four hours. These data were used to establish a routine estimating both the local degrees of hydrate saturation and the resulting local permeabilities in the sediment's pore space from the measured resistivity data. The final gas hydrate saturation filled 89.5% of the total pore space. During hydrate dissociation, ERT data do not allow for a quantitative determination of free gas and remaining gas hydrates since both phases are electrically isolating. However, changes are resolved in the spatial distribution of the conducting liquid and the isolating phase with gas being the only mobile isolating phase

  7. Experimental Investigation on Sandstone Rock Permeability of Pakistan Gas Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Arshad; Bing, Chua Han; Nagarajan, Ramasamy; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    Permeability is the ability of formation to produce hydrocarbon which is affected by compaction, pore size, sorting, cementation, layering and clay swelling. The effect of texture on permeability in term of grain size, sorting, sphericity, degree of cementing has been reported in literature. Also, the effect of permeability on capillary pressure, irreducible water saturation, displacement pressure and pore geometry constant has been studied separately. This preliminary study presents the experimental results of eight samples to understand the effect of similar factors of texture on permeability. With the knowledge of the results, it can be said that the effect of grain size, cementation, texture material, sphericity, and porosity can't be observed on permeability except sorting when less than ten samples are considered from different depositional environment. The results also show the impact of permeability on capillary pressure, irreducible water saturation, and displacement pressure and pore geometry index as similar as published in the literature.

  8. Scaling behavior of gas permeability measurements in volcanic tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, V.C.

    1994-12-31

    One of the critical issues facing the Yucca Mountain site characterization and performance assessment programs is the manner in which property scaling is addressed. Property scaling becomes an issue whenever heterogeneous media properties are measured at one scale but applied at another. A research program has been established to challenge current understanding of property scaling with the aim of developing and testing models that describe scaling behavior in a quantitative manner. Scaling of constitutive rock properties is investigated through physical experimentation involving the collection of suites of gas-permeability data measured over a range of discrete scales. The approach is to systematically isolate those factors believed to influence property scaling and investigate their relative contributions to overall scaling behavior. Two blocks of tuff, each exhibiting differing heterogeneity structure, have recently been examined. Results of the investigation show very different scaling behavior, as exhibited by changes in the distribution functions and variograms, for the two tuff samples. Even for the relatively narrow range of measurement scales employed significant changes in the distribution functions, variograms, and summary statistics occurred. Because such data descriptors will likely play an important role in calculating effective media properties, these results demonstrate both the need to understand and accurately model scaling behavior.

  9. Hydrogen production from simulated hot coke oven gas by using oxygen-permeable ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hongwei Cheng; Yuwen Zhang; Xionggang Lu; Weizhong Ding; Qian Li

    2009-01-15

    Hydrogen production from simulated hot coke oven gas (HCOG) was investigated in a BaCo{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BCFNO) membrane reactor combined with a Ni/Mg(Al)O catalyst by the partial oxidation with toluene as a model tar compound under atmospheric pressure. The reaction results indicated that toluene was completely converted to H{sub 2} and CO in the catalytic reforming of the simulated HCOG in the temperature range from 825 to 875{sup o}C. Both thermodynamically predicated values and experimental data showed that the selective oxidation of toluene took precedence over that of CH{sub 4} in the reforming reaction. At optimized reaction conditions, the dense oxygen-permeable membrane has an oxygen permeation flux around 12.3 mL cm{sup -2} min{sup -1}, and a CH{sub 4} conversion of 86%, a CO{sub 2} conversion of 99%, a H{sub 2} yield of 88%, and a CO yield of 87% have been achieved. When the toluene and methane were reformed, the amount of H{sub 2} in the reaction effluent gas was about 2 times more than that of original H{sub 2} in simulated HCOG. The results reveal that it is feasible for hydrogen production from HCOG by reforming hydrocarbon compounds in a ceramic oxygen-permeable membrane reactor. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 abs.

  10. LEAK AND GAS PERMEABILITY TESTING DURING SOIL-GAS SAMPLING AT HAL'S CHEVRON LUST SITE IN GREEN RIVER, UTAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of gas permeability and leak testing during active soil-gas sampling at Hal’s Chevron LUST Site in Green River, Utah are presented. This study was conducted to support development of a passive soil-gas sampling method. Gas mixtures containing helium and methane were...

  11. CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR ORIGIN OF ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN LOW-PERMEABILITY RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Dickinson, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper suggests that overpressured and underpressured gas accumulations of this type have a common origin. In basins containing overpressured gas accumulations, rates of thermogenic gas accumulation exceed gas loss, causing fluid (gas) pressure to rise above the regional hydrostatic pressure. Free water in the larger pores is forced out of the gas generation zone into overlying and updip, normally pressured, water-bearing rocks. While other diagenetic processes continue, a pore network with very low permeability develops. As a result, gas accumulates in these low-permeability reservoirs at rates higher than it is lost. In basins containing underpressured gas accumulations, rates of gas generation and accumulation are less than gas loss. The basin-center gas accumulation persists, but because of changes in the basin dynamics, the overpressured accumulation evolves into an underpressured system.

  12. Gas permeability of biochar-amended clay: potential alternative landfill final cover material.

    PubMed

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2016-04-01

    Compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as an alternative landfill final cover material in this study. Biochar has long been proposed to promote crop growth, mitigate odor emission, and promote methane oxidation in field soils. However, previous studies showed that soil-gas permeability was increased upon biochar application, which will promote landfill gas emission. The objective of the present study is to investigate the possibility of using compacted BAC as an alternative material in landfill final cover by evaluating its gas permeability. BAC samples were prepared by mixing 425-μm-sieved peanut shell biochar with kaolin clay in different ratios (0, 5, 10, and 15 %, w/w) and compacting at different degrees of compactions (DOC) (80, 85, and 90 %) with an optimum water content of 35 %. The gas permeability of the BACs was measured by flexible wall gas permeameter and the microstructure of the BACs was analyzed by SEM with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that the effects of biochar content on BAC gas permeability is highly dependent on the DOC. At high DOC (90 %), the gas permeability of BAC decreases with increasing biochar content due to the combined effect of the clay aggregation and the inhibition of biochar in the gas flow. However, at low DOC (80 %), biochar incorporation has no effects on gas permeability because it no longer acts as a filling material to the retard gas flow. The results from the present study imply that compacted BAC can be used as an alternative final cover material with decreased gas permeability when compared with clay. PMID:26092359

  13. Estimation of Permeability from NMR Logs Based on Formation Classification Method in Tight Gas Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Deng-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Peng; Hu, Xiao-Xin; Xu, Rui; Zhu, Ling-Ling

    2015-10-01

    The Schlumberger Doll Research (SDR) model and cross plot of porosity versus permeability cannot be directly used in tight gas sands. In this study, the HFU approach is introduced to classify rocks, and determine the involved parameters in the SDR model. Based on the difference of FZI, 87 core samples, drilled from tight gas sandstones reservoirs of E basin in northwest China and applied for laboratory NMR measurements, were classified into three types, and the involved parameters in the SDR model are calibrated separately. Meanwhile, relationships of porosity versus permeability are also established. The statistical model is used to calculate consecutive FZI from conventional logs. Field examples illustrate that the calibrated SDR models are applicable in permeability estimation; models established from routine core analyzed results are effective in reservoirs with permeability lower than 0.3 mD, while the unified SDR model is only valid in reservoirs with permeability ranges from 0.1 to 0.3 mD.

  14. Water Retention Curve and Relative Permeability for Gas Production from Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabadi, N.; Dai, S.; Seol, Y.; Jang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Water retention curve (soil water characteristic curve SWCC) and relative permeability equations are important to determine gas and water production for gas hydrate development. However, experimental studies to determine fitting parameters of those equations are not available in the literature. The objective of this research is to obtain reliable parameters for capillary pressure functions and relative permeability equations applicable to hydrate dissociation and gas production. In order to achieve this goal, (1) micro X-ray Computer Tomography (CT) is used to scan the specimen under 10MPa effective stress, (2) a pore network model is extracted from the CT image, (3) hydrate dissociation and gas expansion are simulated in the pore network model, (4) the parameters for the van Genuchten-type soil water characteristic curve and relative permeability equation during gas expansion are suggested. The research outcome will enhance the ability of numerical simulators to predict gas and water production rate.

  15. Shallow, low-permeability reservoirs of northern Great Plains - assessment of their natural gas resources.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, D.D.; Shurr, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Major resources of natural gas are entrapped in low-permeability, low-pressure reservoirs at depths less than 1200m in the N.Great Plains. This shallow gas is the product of the immature stage of hydrocarbon generation and is referred to as biogenic gas. Prospective low-permeability, gas-bearing reservoirs range in age from late Early to Late Cretaceous. The following facies were identified and mapped: nonmarine rocks, coastal sandstones, shelf sandstones, siltstones, shales, and chalks. The most promising low-permeability reservoirs are developed in the shelf sandstone, siltstone, and chalk facies. Reservoirs within these facies are particularly attractive because they are enveloped by thick sequences of shale which serve as both a source and a seal for the gas.-from Author

  16. Quantifying tight-gas sandstone permeability via critical path analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rock permeability has been actively investigated over the past several decades by the geosciences community. However, its accurate estimation still presents significant technical challenges, especially in spatially complex rocks. In this letter, we apply critical path analysis (CPA) to estimate perm...

  17. Mapping the Fluid Pathways and Permeability Barriers of a Large Gas Hydrate Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A.; Zhang, Y. L.; Sun, L. F.; Saleh, R.; Pun, W.; Bellefleur, G.; Milkereit, B.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the relationship between the physical properties of gas hydrate saturated sedimentary basins aids in the detection, exploration and monitoring one of the world's upcoming energy resources. A large gas hydrate reservoir is located in the MacKenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic and geophysical logs from the Mallik test site are available for the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) between depths of approximately 850 m to 1100 m. The geophysical data sets from two neighboring boreholes at the Mallik test site are analyzed. Commonly used porosity logs, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance, compressional and Stoneley wave velocity dispersion logs are used to map zones of elevated and severely reduced porosity and permeability respectively. The lateral continuity of horizontal permeability barriers can be further understood with the aid of surface seismic modeling studies. In this integrated study, the behavior of compressional and Stoneley wave velocity dispersion and surface seismic modeling studies are used to identify the fluid pathways and permeability barriers of the gas hydrate reservoir. The results are compared with known nuclear magnetic resonance-derived permeability values. The aim of investigating this heterogeneous medium is to map the fluid pathways and the associated permeability barriers throughout the gas hydrate stability zone. This provides a framework for an understanding of the long-term dissociation of gas hydrates along vertical and horizontal pathways, and will improve the knowledge pertaining to the production of such a promising energy source.

  18. General slip regime permeability model for gas flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Jiang, Peixue; Xu, Ruina; Ouyang, Xiaolong

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical effective gas permeability model was developed for rarefied gas flow in porous media, which holds over the entire slip regime with the permeability derived as a function of the Knudsen number. This general slip regime model (GSR model) is derived from the pore-scale Navier-Stokes equations subject to the first-order wall slip boundary condition using the volume-averaging method. The local closure problem for the volume-averaged equations is studied analytically and numerically using a periodic sphere array geometry. The GSR model includes a rational fraction function of the Knudsen number which leads to a limit effective permeability as the Knudsen number increases. The mechanism for this behavior is the viscous fluid inner friction caused by converging-diverging flow channels in porous media. A linearization of the GSR model leads to the Klinkenberg equation for slightly rarefied gas flows. Finite element simulations show that the Klinkenberg model overestimates the effective permeability by as much as 33% when a flow approaches the transition regime. The GSR model reduces to the unified permeability model [F. Civan, "Effective correlation of apparent gas permeability in tight porous media," Transp. Porous Media 82, 375 (2010)] for the flow in the slip regime and clarifies the physical significance of the empirical parameter b in the unified model.

  19. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  20. Thermal Damage on LX-04 Mock Material and Gas Permeability Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; Dehaven, M; McClelland, M; Maienschein, J

    2004-11-15

    RM-04-BR, a mock material for the plastic-bonded HMX-based explosive LX-04, is characterized after being thermally damaged at 140 C and 190 C. We measured the following material properties before and after the thermal experiments: sample volume, density, sound speed, and gas permeability in the material. Thermal treatment of the mock material leads to de-coloring and insignificant weight loss. Sample expanded, resulting in density reductions of 1.0% to 2.5% at 140 C and 190 C, respectively. Permeability in the mock samples was found to increase from 10{sup -15} to 10{sup -16} m{sup 2}, as the porosity increased. The permeability measurements are well represented by the Blake-Kozeny equation for laminar flow through porous media. The results are similar to the gas permeability in PBX-9501 obtained by other researchers.

  1. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gas causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design production

  2. Analysis of the flow of gas through low-permeability porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, M.A.; Arastoopour, H.

    1986-11-01

    A computer program based on the continuity and momentum equations for prediction of the flow of gas through low-permeability porous media was developed. This program uses the FORSIM code, which is based on the method of lines and several integration algorithms. Transient gas flow rates predicted with the computer program were compared with Inst. of Gas Technology's (IGT's) data for both partially water-saturated and dry tight-sand core samples.

  3. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gasmore » causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design

  4. Gas permeability measurements on asphalts using the electrodynamic balance

    SciTech Connect

    Periasamy, R.; Newsome, J.R.; Andrady, A.L.; Ensor, D.S. )

    1990-07-01

    Volatilization, oxide degradation, and steric hardening are the degradation processes believed to be responsible for the weathering of asphalts. The fundamental mechanisms that govern the rates at which these degradation processes occur are not understood, but the transport of oxygen through the asphalt matrix is an important aspect of the weathering of asphalts under field conditions. Therefore, the measurement of diffusion, solubility, and permeability constants for oxygen in asphalts is crucial to better understand the long-term weathering of the asphalt materials. A novel and precise gravimetric technique, hitherto not applied in asphalt research is described here: an electrodynamic balance is used in this technique for the measurement of key transport properties for oxygen in micrometer-size asphalt particle samples.

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring the gas permeability of a solid sample

    DOEpatents

    Carstens, D.H.W.

    1984-01-27

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the permeability of a gas in a sample. The gas is allowed to reach a steady flow rate through the sample. A measurable amount of the gas is collected during a given time period and then delivered to a sensitive quadrupole. The quadrupole signal, adjusted for background, is proportional to the amount of gas collected during the time period. The quadrupole can be calibrated with a standard helium leak. The gas can be deuterium and the sample can be polyvinyl alcohol.

  6. An Integrated Geophysical Strategy for the Characterization of a Gas Permeable Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinelli, E.; Zaja, A.; Menghini, A.; Cecchini, F.; Margottini, S.; di Filippo, M.; Beaubien, S. E.; Annunziatellis, A.; Citotoli, G.; Lombardi, S.

    2009-04-01

    was studied, first with gas geochemical methods (CO2 soil concentration and flux) to define its extent and form, and then with a number of geophysical methods (hammer seismic, microgravity, ground penetrating radar, time domain reflectometry, frequency domain electromagnetic and 2D and 3D electrical resistivity tomography) to test their response and sensitivity, and to extend previous work conducted on this site (e.g. Annunziatellis et al., 2008; Pettinelli et al., 2008). The various datasets were merged and compared, with the combined results giving a coherent picture of the gas permeable structure. In fact, all methods are in good agreement, and show lateral variations in the soil physical properties which are related to the influence of the gas vent on the mineralogy and the water content of the shallow sediments and soil. In particular, the electrical and electromagnetic techniques put in evidence that the non-vegetated central part of the gas vent has extremely conductive. Finally, the results obtained with the different methods allowed us to define the orientation of the buried fault which causes the CO2 migration at surface. References Annunziatellis, A., Beaubien, S.E., Bigi, S., Ciotoli, G., Coltella, M., Lombardi, S. (2008) Gas migration along fault systems and through the vadose zone in the Latera caldera (central Italy): Implications for CO2 geological storage. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control, 2/3, 353-372, doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2008.02.003. Pettinelli E., S.E. Beaubien, S. Lombardi, and A.P. Annan (2008) GPR, TDR and geochemistry for the characterization of an active gas vent: development of monitoring strategies for CO2 geological sequestration sites Geophysics, 73(1), pp. A11-A15.

  7. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Tsay, F.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of sorption capacity of coals by microbalance in a high pressure environment requires that corrections be made for the buoyancy of the gas that is displaced by the solid coal. As the pressure increases, the gas density increases, requiring that a correction factor be applied to the weight of the sample as measured by microbalance. A brief report summarizing this correction is attached as Appendix A.

  8. A fractal permeability model for gas flow through dual-porosity media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qian; Yu, Boming

    2012-01-01

    The dual-porosity medium, i.e., a matrix porous medium coupled with fractured networks, extensively exists in fissured rocks, natural gas reservoirs, and other natural underground reservoirs or in resolving subsurface contamination problems. This work investigates gas permeability through matrix porous media embedded with randomly distributed fractal-like tree networks. The analytical expression for gas permeability in dual-porosity media is derived based on both the pore size of matrix and the mother channel diameter of embedded fractal-like tree networks having fractal distribution. It is found that gas permeability is a function of structural parameters (the fractal dimensions for pore area and tortuous capillaries, porosity and the maximum diameter of matrix, the length ratio, the diameter ratio, the branching levels and angle of the embedded networks) for dual-porosity media. The proposed model does not contain any empirical constant. The model predictions are compared with the available experimental data and simulating results, a fair agreement among them is found. The influences of geometrical parameters on the gas permeability in the media are also analyzed.

  9. Magnetic anisotropy and high frequency permeability of multilayered nanocomposite FeAlO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y. G.; Liu, Y.; Tan, C. Y.; Liu, Z. W.; Ong, C. K.

    2006-09-01

    A cool-down step deposition process (multistep deposition with cool-down interval) was used to grow nanocomposite FeAlO thin films of various thicknesses up to 440 nm by magnetron sputtering at a substrate temperature of 15 deg. C. The effect of the number of cool-down steps on the soft magnetic properties and high frequency characteristics of the nanocomposite FeAlO films were investigated. The deposition process was proved very effective in improving the soft magnetic properties and high frequency characteristics of the films. The eight-layered samples, fabricated by eight cool-down step deposition process, of thicknesses of 220 and 440 nm had obvious in-plane uniaxial anisotropies while the single-layered films were nearly isotropic. The resulting real permeability value of the eight-layered films was larger than 300 for the 220 nm film and between 200 and 300 for the 440 nm film.

  10. Recovery of ammonia from anaerobically digested manure using gas-permeable membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gas-permeable membrane process can recover ammonia from wastewater with high nitrogen load, reducing pollution whilst converting ammonia into an ammonium salt fertilizer. The process involves manure pH control to increase ammonium (NH4) recovery rate that is normally carried out using an alkali....

  11. Recovery of ammonia from swine manure using gas-permeable membranes: Effect of aeration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gas-permeable membranes can recover ammonia from manure, reducing pollution whilst converting ammonia into ammonium salt fertilizer. The process involves manure pH control to increase ammonium (NH4) recovery rate that is normally carried out using an alkali. In this study a new strategy to avoid the...

  12. Enhancing recovery of ammonia from swine manure anaerobic digester effluent using gas-permeable membrane technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gas-permeable membrane technology is useful to recover ammonia from manure. In this study, the technology was enhanced using aeration instead of alkali chemicals to increase pH and the ammonia recovery rate. Digested effluents from covered anaerobic swine lagoons containing 1375 to 2089 milligram am...

  13. Recovery of ammonia nitrogen in livestock and industrial wastes using gas permeable membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New waste management methods are needed that can protect the environment and allow manure management to switch back to a recycling view of manure handling. We investigated the use of gas-permeable membranes as components of new processes to capture and recover the ammonia in the liquid manures or in...

  14. Removal and recovery of ammonia from liquid manure using gas-permeable membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the use of gas-permeable membranes as components of a new process to capture and recover ammonia from liquid manures and other concentrated effluents. The process includes the passage of gaseous ammonia through a microporous hydrophobic membrane and capture and concentration with cir...

  15. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products. 886.5918 Section 886.5918 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Industry Premarket Notification (510(k)) Guidance Document for Contact Lens Care Products.”...

  16. Recovery of ammonia from poultry litter using flat gas permeable membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of flat gas-permeable membranes was investigated as components of a new process to capture and recover ammonia (NH3) in poultry houses. This process includes the passage of gaseous NH3 through a microporous hydrophobic membrane, capture with a circulating dilute acid on the other side of the...

  17. Removal and recovery of ammonia from liquid swine manure and poultry litter using gas permeable membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the use of gas-permeable membranes as components of new processes to capture and recover ammonia from liquid manures and other concentrated effluents as well as from the air in poultry houses. The basic process includes the passage of gaseous ammonia through a microporous hydrophobic...

  18. CORRELATION OF FLORIDA SOIL-GAS PERMEABILITIES WITH GRAIN SIZE, MOISTURE, AND POROSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a new correlation or predicting gas permeabilities of undisturbed or recompacted soils from their average grain diameter (d), moisture saturation factor (m), and porosity (p). he correlation exhibits a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of only 1.27 between m...

  19. An explanation of large-scale coal and gas outbursts in underground coal mines: the effect of low-permeability zones on abnormally abundant gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. H.; Cheng, Y. P.

    2013-09-01

    Large-scale coal and gas outbursts post a risk of fatal disasters in underground mines. Large-scale outbursts (outburst of coal and rock greater than 500 t) in recent years in China indicate that there is abundant gas in areas of outbursts containing large amounts of potential energy. The adequate sealing properties of the roof and floor of a coal seam are required for local abundant gas around the site of an outburst, but an annular low-permeability zone in a coal seam, which prevents the loss by gas migration through the coal seam itself, is also required. The distribution of coal gas with this annular zone of low permeability is described, and it is proposed that the annular zone of low permeability creates conditions for confining the coal gas. The effect of this low-permeability zone on the gas distribution is analyzed after allowing for simplifications in the model. The results show that the permeability and length of the low-permeability zone have a great impact on the gas distribution. A steep gradient of gas pressure in the low-permeability zone and the high gas pressure in the abundant zone of gas can promote coal mass failure and coal wall deformation, thereby accelerating the coal and gas outburst. The high pressure gas in abundant zone of gas will lead to a large-scale outburst if an outburst occurs.

  20. Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase Transformation and Surface Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Chih-Ying Chen

    2005-06-30

    and between smooth-walled and rough-walled fractures. We then used these experimental data to verify and calibrate a field-scale method for inferring steam-water relative permeabilities from production data. After that, actual production data from active geothermal fields at The Geysers and Salton Sea in California were used to calculate the relative permeabilities of steam and water. These theoretical, experimental, and in-situ results provide better understanding of the likely behavior of geothermal, gascondensate, and steam injection reservoirs. From this work, the main conclusions are: (1) the liquid-gas relative permeabilities in fractures can be modeled by characterizing the flow structures which reflect the interactions among fluids and the rough fracture surface; (2) the steam-water flow behavior in fractures is different from air-water flow in the aspects of relative permeability, flow structure and residual/immobile phase saturations.

  1. Recovery of ammonia from swine manure using gas-permeable membranes: Effect of waste strength and pH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen recovery of swine manure was investigated using gas-permeable membranes. The process involved a continuous recirculation of an acidic solution through a tubular gas-permeable membrane submerged in a manure filled vessel. Ammonia contained in manure was concentrated in the acidic solution ...

  2. Enhanced recovery of ammonia from swine manure anaerobic digester effluent using gas-permeable membranes and aeration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric ammonia pollution from livestock wastes can be reduced using gas-permeable membrane technology by converting ammonia contained in the manure into ammonium salt for use in fertilizers. In this study, gas-permeable membrane technology was enhanced using aeration combined with nitrificatio...

  3. Numerical investigations on mapping permeability heterogeneity in coal seam gas reservoirs using seismo-electric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, L.; Shaw, S.

    2016-04-01

    Mapping the horizontal distribution of permeability is a key problem for the coal seam gas industry. Poststack seismic data with anisotropy attributes provide estimates for fracture density and orientation which are then interpreted in terms of permeability. This approach delivers an indirect measure of permeability and can fail if other sources of anisotropy (for instance stress) come into play. Seismo-electric methods, based on recording the electric signal from pore fluid movements stimulated through a seismic wave, measure permeability directly. In this paper we use numerical simulations to demonstrate that the seismo-electric method is potentially suitable to map the horizontal distribution of permeability changes across coal seams. We propose the use of an amplitude to offset (AVO) analysis of the electrical signal in combination with poststack seismic data collected during the exploration phase. Recording of electrical signals from a simple seismic source can be closer to production planning and operations. The numerical model is based on a sonic wave propagation model under the low frequency, saturated media assumption and uses a coupled high order spectral element and low order finite element solver. We investigate the impact of seam thickness, coal seam layering, layering in the overburden and horizontal heterogeneity of permeability.

  4. A novel method for measuring hollow fiber membrane permeability in a gas-liquid system.

    PubMed

    Lund, L W; Federspiel, W J; Walters, F R; Hattler, B G

    1996-01-01

    Designing an effective intravenous membrane oxygenator requires selecting hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) that present minimal resistance to gas exchange over extended periods of time. Microporous fiber membranes, as used in extracorporeal oxygenators, offer a minimal exchange resistance, but one that diminishes with time because of fiber wetting and subsequent serum leakage. Potentially attractive alternatives are composite HFMs, which inhibit fiber wetting and serum leakage by incorporating a true membrane layer within their porous walls. To evaluate composite and other HFMs, the authors developed a simple apparatus and method for measuring HFM permeability in a gas-liquid system under conditions relevant to intravenous oxygenation. The system requires only a small volume of liquid that is mixed with a pitched blade impeller driven by a direct current motor at controlled rates. Mass flux is measured from the gas flow exiting the fibers, eliminating the necessity of measuring any liquid side conditions. The authors measured the CO2 exchange permeabilities of Mitsubishi MHF 200L composite HFMs, KPF 280E microporous HFMs, and KPF 190 microporous HFMs. The membrane permeabilities to CO2 were 9.3 x 10(-5) ml/cm2/sec/cmHg for the MHF 200L fiber, 4.7 x 10(-4) ml/cm2/sec/cmHg for the KPF 280E fiber, and 2.8 x 10(-4) ml/cm2/sec/cmHg for the KPF 190 fiber. From these results it is concluded that 1) because of liquid-fiber surface interactions, the permeabilities of the microporous fibers are several orders of magnitude less than would be measured for completely gas filled pores, emphasizing the importance of measuring microporous fiber permeability in a gas-liquid system; and 2) the liquid diffusional boundary layer adjacent to the fibers generated by the pitched blade impeller is unique to each fiber, resulting in different boundary layer characterizations. PMID:8944921

  5. Filtration drying kinetics of gas-permeable articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksel'Rud, G. A.; Khanyk, Ya. N.; Strepko, M. P.

    1992-12-01

    The drying process under conditions of filtration of a drying agent through a porous structure of a moist article is considered. The existence of three dehydration stages is established: 1) mechanical displacement of water; 2) elimination of moisture in the form of a gas-liquid emulsion; 3) drying. A kinetics equation is derived for each stage. Combination of all the three stages provides a high rate of the total process exceeding the drying rate by tens of times when flowing around an object as a unit.

  6. The Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore in Motor Neurons: Involvement in the Pathobiology of ALS Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lee J.; Gertz, Barry; Pan, Yan; Price, Ann C.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Chang, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons (MNs) that causes paralysis. Some forms of ALS are inherited, caused by mutations in the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) gene. The mechanisms of human mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) toxicity to MNs are unresolved. Mitochondria in MNs might be key sites for ALS pathogenesis, but cause-effect relationships between mSOD1 and mitochrondiopathy need further study. We used transgenic mSOD1 mice to test the hypothesis that the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) is involved in the MN degeneration of ALS. Components of the multi-protein mPTP are expressed highly in mouse MNs, including the voltage-dependent anion channel, adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), and cyclophilin D (CyPD), and are present in mitochondria marked by manganese SOD. MNs in pre-symptomatic mSOD1-G93A mice form swollen megamitochondria with CyPD immunoreactivity. Early disease is associated with mitochondrial cristae remodeling and matrix vesiculation in ventral horn neuron dendrites. MN cell bodies accumulate mitochondria derived from the distal axons projecting to skeletal muscle. Incipient disease in spinal cord is associated with increased oxidative and nitrative stress, indicated by protein carbonyls and nitration of CyPD and ANT. Reducing the levels of CyPD by genetic ablation significantly delays disease onset and extends the lifespan of G93A-mSOD1 mice expressing high and low levels of mutant protein in a gender-dependent pattern. These results demonstrate that mitochondria have causal roles in the disease mechanisms in MNs in ALS mice. This work defines a new mitochondrial mechanism for MN degeneration in ALS. PMID:19272377

  7. Estimating permeability in the Wilcox G' sandstone in the Lake Creek Gas unit well No. 48 using data from logging measurements. The evaluation of formation permeability using time lapse measurements during and after drilling. Topical report, September 1991-August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Holditch, S.A.; Yao, C.Y.

    1993-08-01

    In this research, the authors have developed technology that allows an engineer to better understand mud filtration in low to medium permeability gas reservoirs. They use this knowledge to analyze log data to improve our estimates of formation permeability by layer. By developing accurate permeability profiles of the reservoir layers, they can optimize well completions in layered complex gas reservoirs.

  8. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Eventually, the weight stabilized and the measurements commenced. Helium pressure was increased slowly and carefully, first to 15 psig then to 28 psig. The readout for the balance unit continued to exhibit unexplained fluctuation and output. Buoyancy of the empty pan was measured at pressures ranging up to 800 psig measured at approximately 100 psig increments. The balance weighing unit exhibited a progressive increase in weight with increasing pressure demonstrating that the displacement volume of the tare weight side of the balance was greater than the displacement volume of the weighing pan side of the balance. Therefore, the increased gas pressure produced a greater buoyancy of the tare side, producing a net increase in weight. The carefully collected data showed a linear change in weight with pressure (see accompanying diagram). A schematic diagram of the new configuration of the sorption apparatus is depicted in the accompanying figure.

  9. Dispersion and dissolution of a buoyancy driven gas plume in a layered permeable rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Andrew W.; Norris, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Using a series of simplified models, we explore the controls on the migration, dispersion and eventual dissolution of a plume of hydrogen gas which may, in principle, rise under buoyancy through a layered permeable rock if released from a Geological Disposal Facility (GDF). We show that the presence of low permeability shale barriers causes the gas to spread laterally as it rises. Averaging over the length scale of the barriers, we use expressions for the Darcy velocity of the gas to describe the dispersion of a tracer and illustrate the effect with a new experiment using a baffled Hele-Shaw cell. While the plume is flowing, a large volume of gas may build up beneath the barriers. If the gas flux subsequently wanes, much of the gas will drain upward through the formation and spread on the upper impermeable boundary of the formation. However, a significant capillary-trapped wake of gas may develop beneath each barrier. Owing to the low solubility of hydrogen in water and assuming relatively slow groundwater flow rates, this trapped hydrogen may require a period of tens to hundreds of thousands of years to dissolve and form a cloud of hydrogen rich water. Although simplified, these models provide a framework to assess the possible travel times and pathways of such a gas plume.

  10. Interfacial nanobubbles are leaky: permeability of the gas/water interface.

    PubMed

    German, Sean R; Wu, Xi; An, Hongjie; Craig, Vincent S J; Mega, Tony L; Zhang, Xuehua

    2014-06-24

    Currently there is no widespread agreement on an explanation for the stability of surface nanobubbles. One means by which several explanations can be differentiated is through the predictions they make about the degree of permeability of the gas-solution interface. Here we test the hypothesis that the gas-solution interface of surface nanobubbles is permeable by experimental measurements of the exchange of carbon dioxide. We present measurements by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), demonstrating that the gas inside surface nanobubbles is not sealed inside the bubbles, but rather exchanges with the dissolved gas in the liquid phase. Such gas transfer is measurable by using the infrared active gas CO2. We find that bubbles formed in air-saturated water that is then perfused with CO2-saturated water give rise to distinctive gaseous CO2 signals in ATR-FTIR measurements. Also the CO2 gas inside nanobubbles quickly dissolves into the surrounding air-saturated water. AFM images before and after fluid exchange show that CO2 bubbles shrink upon exposure to air-equilibrated liquid but remain stable for hours. Also air bubbles in contact with CO2-saturated water increase in size and Ostwald ripening occurs more rapidly due to the relatively high gas solubility of CO2 in water. PMID:24863586

  11. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this task is to accurately measure the elongation and shrinkage exhibited by coal as it sorbs and desorbs methane gas at elevated pressure. Our research group has discussed several possible methods to measure this strain, including: optical microscopy, laser interferometry, conventional strain gauges, and LVDT strain gauges. There are advantages and disadvantages of each method. We had planned to use optical microscopy but, on further investigation, this approach will be less satisfactory than the strain gauge method. Accordingly, we have switched our focws to the use of strain gauges. Conventional strain gauges also involve potential problems which must be overcome, including: (1) Contrast in strength between the coal and the strain gauge must be minimized, (2) The proper glue that is neither too strong or too weak must be used to affix the strain gauge to the coal or the strain in the coal will not be accurately transmitted to the gauge, and (3) We must be aware that the total strain in the coal may not be homogeneously distributed through the specimen (due either either to boundary effects or contrast in composition of the coal layers). A high pressure chamber for sorption-strain experiments is currently being tested an modified and tested. The chamber will accommodate several small blocks of coal simultaneously. This will optimize efficiency, owing to the long times required to reequilibrate the coal blocks to changes in methane pressure.

  12. Simultaneous gas-chromatographic urinary measurement of sugar probes to assess intestinal permeability: use of time course analysis to optimize its use to assess regional gut permeability

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Maliha; Rajan, Kumar; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Measurement of intestinal permeability is important in several diseases but currently several methods are employed. We sought to: (1) develop a new GC based method to measure urinary mannitol, lactulose and sucralose to assess regional and total gut permeability; (2) analyze the kinetics of these sugars in the urine to determine which ratio is useful to represent intestinal permeability; and (3) determine whether age, gender, race and BMI impact these values. Methods Subjects drank a cocktail of sucrose, lactulose, mannitol and sucralose and these sugars were measured in the urine at 5, 12 and 24 h with gas chromatography. Results Urinary mannitol exhibited significantly different kinetics than lactulose and sucralose which were similar to each other and varied little over the 24 h. No permeability differences were observed for renal function, age, race, sex, or BMI. Conclusions Our data do not support the use of the widely used L/M ratio as an accurate estimate of intestinal permeability. Our data support the use of: The sucralose/lactulose (S/M) ratio to measure: small intestine permeability (first 5 h); small and large intestine (first 12 hours), and total gut permeability (24 h). This was also found to be true in a Parkinson’s disease model. PMID:25591964

  13. Effective permeabilities of abandoned oil and gas wells: analysis of data from Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mary; Baik, Ejeong; Miller, Alana R; Bandilla, Karl W; Celia, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Abandoned oil and gas (AOG) wells can provide pathways for subsurface fluid migration, which can lead to groundwater contamination and gas emissions to the atmosphere. Little is known about the millions of AOG wells in the U.S. and abroad. Recently, we acquired data on methane emissions from 42 plugged and unplugged AOG wells in five different counties across western Pennsylvania. We used historical documents to estimate well depths and used these depths with the emissions data to estimate the wells' effective permeabilities, which capture the combined effects of all leakage pathways within and around the wellbores. We find effective permeabilities to range from 10(-6) to 10(2) millidarcies, which are within the range of previous estimates. The effective permeability data presented here provide perspective on older AOG wells and are valuable when considering the leakage potential of AOG wells in a wide range of applications, including geologic storage of carbon dioxide, natural gas storage, and oil and gas development. PMID:25768798

  14. First gas flux measurements of conduit permeability decrease prior to Strombolian eruption at Stromboli volcano (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, Giancarlo; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Lo Coco, Eleonora; Delle Donne, Dario; Ripepe, Maurizio; Bitetto, Marcello; D'Aleo, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Strombolian eruptions can be described in terms of growth, coalescence, and rise of a gas pocket (aka slug) bursting at the surface of a vent. This model overlooks that the transition to explosive regimes is mostly controlled by the permeability in the upper part of a volcanic conduit. We report here on the first gas flux measurements of Strombolian explosions from a vent that exhibited a significant decrease of passive degassing tens of second prior to the onset of the explosion. This particular explosive activity took place during the July 2014 lava overflows, when the magma level inside the conduit rose up to the crater terrace. The amount of gas that accumulated before the eruption is incredibly similar to the amount of gas ejected during the explosion. This similarity suggests a mechanism of decrease of the shallow conduit permeability and a subsequent accumulation of gas behind a cap of cold magma. The accumulated gas is then released when the over-pressure can open a leak on the cap of cold magma. Our unprecedented results offer key and novel insights into the explosive degassing dynamics within the shallow conduit systems of this open-vent volcano and probably at many other basaltic volcanoes.

  15. An explanation of large-scale coal and gas outbursts in underground coal mines: the effect of low-permeability zones on abnormally abundant gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. H.; Cheng, Y. P.

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale coal and gas outbursts pose a risk of fatal disasters in underground mines. Large-scale outbursts (outburst of coal and rock greater than 500 t) in recent years in China indicate that there is abundant gas in areas of outbursts containing large amounts of potential energy. The adequate sealing properties of the roof and floor of a coal seam are required for local abundant gas around the site of an outburst, but an annular low-permeability zone in a coal seam, which prevents the loss by gas migration through the coal seam itself, is also required. The distribution of coal gas with this annular zone of low permeability is described, and it is proposed that the annular zone of low permeability creates conditions for confining the coal gas. The effect of this low-permeability zone on the gas distribution is analyzed after allowing for simplifications in the model. The results show that the permeability and length of the low-permeability zone have a great impact on the gas distribution, and the permeability is required to be several orders of magnitude less than that of normal coal and enough length is also in demand. A steep gradient of gas pressure in the low-permeability zone and the high-pressure gas in the abundant zone of gas can promote coal mass failure and coal wall deformation, thereby accelerating the coal and gas outburst. The high-pressure gas in abundant zone of gas will lead to a large-scale outburst if an outburst occurs.

  16. Polymer/Silicate Nanocomposites Used to Manufacture Gas Storage Tanks With Reduced Permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi G.; Johnston, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been considerable research in the area of polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. This research has shown that the dispersion of small amounts of an organically modified layered silicate improves the polymer strength, modulus, thermal stability, and barrier properties. There have been several reports on the dispersion of layered silicates in an epoxy matrix. Potential enhancements to the barrier properties of epoxy/silicate nanocomposites make this material attractive for low permeability tankage. Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) have several advantages for cryogenic storage tanks. They are lightweight, strong, and stiff; therefore, a smaller fraction of a vehicle's potential payload capacity is used for propellant storage. Unfortunately, the resins typically used to make PMC tanks have higher gas permeability than metals. This can lead to hydrogen loss through the body of the tank instead of just at welds and fittings. One approach to eliminate this problem is to build composite tanks with thin metal liners. However, although these tanks provide good permeability performance, they suffer from a substantial mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion, which can lead to failure of the bond between the liner and the body of the tank. Both problems could be addressed with polymersilicate nanocomposites, which exhibit reduced hydrogen permeability, making them potential candidates for linerless PMC tanks. Through collaboration with Northrop Grumman and Michigan State University, nanocomposite test tanks were manufactured for the NASA Glenn Research Center, and the helium permeability was measured. An organically modified silicate was prepared at Michigan State University and dispersed in an epoxy matrix (EPON 826/JeffamineD230). The epoxy/silicate nanocomposites contained either 0 or 5 wt% of the organically modified silicate. The tanks were made by filament winding carbon fibers with the nanocomposite resin. Helium permeability

  17. Captura de amonio procedente de estiercol mediante membranas permeables de gases (capture of ammonnia from turkey manure using gas-permeable membranes)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper, written in Spanish, describes the capture and recovery of gaseous ammonia from turkey manure using gas-permeable membranes technology with formation of stabilized ammonium salts. Bench experiments were carried out in Maryland using a pilot prototype system with turkey litter inside contr...

  18. Helium Gas Permeability of SiC/SiC Composite Developed for Blanket Component

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Tomoaki; Jinushi, Takahiro; Hirohata, Yuko; Hashiba, Masao; Yamauchi, Yuji; Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira

    2003-03-15

    To employ SiC/SiC composite as blanket components of a fusion reactor, permeation behavior of helium gas has to be investigated since the helium is used as the coolant. For this purpose, a vacuum system consisting of upstream and downstream chambers was fabricated for the measurement of permeability, and the permeability was measured for several SiC/SiC composite materials recently developed. For the pressure range from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 5} Pa in the upstream chamber, the pressure rise due to the permeation of helium in the downstream chamber linearly increased with the pressure of the upstream chamber. Then, the permeability was roughly constant for the pressure range of the upstream chamber.The permeabilities of SiC/SiC composites produced by polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP), hot pressing (HP) and melt-infiltration-finished PIP were 5 x 10{sup -5}, 4 x 10{sup -6}, and 9 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. In the matrix structure of the SiC/SiC composite made by the PIP method with a high permeability, cracking in the matrix and pores of micron size were observed. Compared to these materials, SiC/SiC composites produced by liquid phase sintering using submicron or nanopowder of {beta}-SiC and the HP method had extremely low permeabilities. The permeability of the SiC/SiC composite made by using submicron or nanopowder of {beta}-SiC became 1.5 x 10{sup -9} or 4 x 10{sup -11} m{sup 2}/s.Based upon the present data, the helium gas flow was analyzed for a blanket module consisting of only SiC/SiC composite. If a vacuum pump is attached to the module, the helium leak into a plasma can be ignored, compared to the heliums produced by fusion reactions. Hence, the entire module can be made by only SiC/SiC composite, from a viewpoint of helium permeation.

  19. The effect of surface active agents on the relative permeability of brine and gas in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, M.W.; Schraufnagel, R.A.; Smith, K.; Thomas, T.

    1995-11-01

    All oil and gas producing wells produce hydrocarbon at some residual water saturation. Therefore, the relative permeability to the hydrocarbon at the effective water saturation dictates performance and not the absolute permeability of the formation. Surface active agents are included in most aqueous treating fluids to improve the compatibility of aqueous fluids with the hydrocarbon containing reservoir. A review of the literature indicates very little core flow data to describe the effects to be expected. Traditionally, it is believed that the reduced surface tension will reduce capillary pressure and enhance the recovery of water after the treatment. The reduced water saturation is then believed to result in higher effective gas saturation and higher relative permeability to gas after the treatment. The principal emphasis of this study has been the development of non-damaging stimulation fluids to improve the production of methane from coalbed methane and other low permeability gas reservoirs.

  20. Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to

  1. Mechanical properties and permeability of hydrogen isotopes through CrNi35WTiAl alloy, containing radiogenic helium

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimkin, I.P.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Boitsov, I.Y.; Malkov, I.L.; Musyaev, R.K.; Baurin, A.Y.; Shevnin, E.V.; Vertey, A.V.

    2015-03-15

    The long-term contact of structural materials (SM) with tritium-containing media makes their properties in terms of kinetic permeability of hydrogen isotopes change. This change is the consequence of the defect formation in SM due to the result of {sup 3}He build-up generated by the radioactive decay of tritium dissolved in SM. This paper presents the experimental results concerning the permeability of hydrogen isotopes through CrNi35WTiAl alloy containing {sup 3}He and the impact of the presence of {sup 3}He and H on its mechanical properties. Tensile tests of cylindrical samples containing various concentrations of {sup 3}He (90, 230 and 560 appm) have been performed in inert and hydrogen atmospheres. The build-up of {sup 3}He has been made using the 'helium trick' technique. The maximal decrease in the plastic characteristics of the CrNi35WTiAl alloy occurs in samples with the highest {sup 3}He (560 appm) content at 873 K. The permeability of deuterium through the CrNi35WTiAl alloy in the initial state and that with 560 appm of {sup 3}He content was explored. The presence of this {sup 3}He concentration has shown an increase in deuterium permeability, evidently due to structural changes in the material under the impact of radiogenic helium.

  2. System for exposing cultured cells to intermittent hypoxia utilizing gas permeable cultureware.

    PubMed

    Polak, Jan; Studer-Rabeler, Karen; McHugh, Holly; Hussain, Mehboob A; Shimoda, Larissa A

    2015-07-01

    Tissue intermittent hypoxia (IH) occurs in obstructive sleep apnea, sickle cell anemia, physical exercise and other conditions. Poor gas solubility and slow diffusion through culture media hampers mimicking IH-induced transitions of O(2) in vitro. We aimed to develop a system enabling exposure of cultured cells to IH and to validate such exposure by real-time O(2) measurements and cellular responses. Standard 24-well culture plates and plates with bottoms made from a gas permeable film were placed in a heated cabinet. Desired cycling of O(2) levels was induced using programmable solenoids to purge mixtures of 95% N(2) + 5% CO(2) or 95% O(2) + 5% CO(2). Dissolved oxygen, gas pressure, temperature, and water evaporation were measured during cycling. IH-induced cellular effects were evaluated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and NF-κB luciferase reporters in HEK296 cells and by insulin secretion in rat insulinoma cells. Oxygen cycling in the cabinet was translated into identical changes of O(2) at the well bottom in gas permeable, but not in standard cultureware. Twenty-four hours of IH exposure increased HIF (112%), NF-κB (111%) and insulin secretion (44%). Described system enables reproducible and prolonged IH exposure in cultured cells while controlling for important environmental factors. PMID:25816360

  3. Closed System Cell Culture Protocol Using HYPERStack Vessels with Gas Permeable Material Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Mark; Martin, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Large volume adherent cell culture is currently standardized on stacked plate cell growth products when microcarrier beads are not an optimal choice. HYPERStack vessels allow closed system scale up from the current stacked plate products and delivers >2.5X more cells in the same volumetric footprint. The HYPERStack vessels function via gas permeable material which allows gas exchange to occur, therefore eliminating the need for internal headspace within a vessel. The elimination of headspace allows the compartment where cell growth occurs to be minimized to reduce space, allowing more layers of cell growth surface area within the same volumetric footprint. For many applications such as cell therapy or vaccine production, a closed system is required for cell growth and harvesting. The HYPERStack vessel allows cell and reagent addition and removal via tubing from media bags or other methods. This protocol will explain the technology behind the gas permeable material used in the HYPERStack vessels, gas diffusion results to meet the metabolic needs of cells, closed system cell growth protocols, and various harvesting methods. PMID:21189467

  4. A Hand-made Gas Permeameter for Permeability Measurement of Small Samples of Natural and Experimental Volcanic Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, S.; Nakashima, S.

    2004-12-01

    Gas permeability in vesiculating magma, in which connected bubble network is developing, is an essential physical property controlling behavior of volcanic eruptions, since the gas permeability varies drastically in vesiculating processes during magma ascent. Although there are several studies on gas permeability of vesiculating magma, they have been limited in permeability measurements of natural samples, and their numerical simulations. For further understanding of gas permeability development in vesiculating magma, the permeability measurement on experimental products produced by vesiculating experiments is an effective approach. However, since the size of experimental run products is generally from 1 mm to 1 cm scale, they are too small to be measured by using commercial gas permeameter. In this study, we constructed a hand-made gas permeameter to measure permeability of small samples such as experimental run products. The hand-made permeameter can measure permeability in the wide range from 10-17 to 10-10 m 2 within the precision of one order for mm scale samples. Nitrogen gas is used as a working gas in this measurement system. The permeability is calculated by steady gas flow rate at fixed pressure difference up to 15000 Pa (ca. 0.15 atm). The pressure difference is measured with accuracy of 10 Pa by a water column manometer. Gas flow rate is converted to water flow rate in an acrylic container and the water flow seeping from the tube into a beaker is monitored by an electric balance. We confirmed the accuracy in permeability values by measuring gas flow in stainless capillary tube (15 mm in length and 100 mm in inner diameter). We carried out flow measurement at 1.8\\times102-1.4\\times104 Pa in pressure difference and 3.0\\times10-10-3.6\\times10-8 m3/s in flow rate. For this flow rate, Reynolds number of the gas flow is estimated to be 10-2-100. Therefore, the gas flow can be assumed to be Poiseuille flow. Although the difference between the measured and

  5. Oxygen-Permeable, Hydrophobic Membranes of Silanized alpha-Al2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Membranes made of silanized alumina have been prepared and tested as prototypes of derivatized ceramic membranes that are both highly permeable to oxygen and hydrophobic. Improved oxygen-permeable, hydrophobic membranes would be attractive for use in several technological disciplines, including supporting high-temperature aqueousphase oxidation in industrial production of chemicals, oxygenation of aqueous streams for bioreactors, and oxygenation of blood during open-heart surgery and in cases of extreme pulmonary dysfunction. In comparison with organic polymeric oxygen-permeable membranes now commercially available, the derivatized ceramic membranes are more chemically robust, are capable of withstanding higher temperatures, and exhibit higher oxygen-diffusion coefficients.

  6. The generation and evolution of anisotropic gas-permeability during viscous deformation in conduit-filling ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, Stephan; Russell, Kelly

    2015-04-01

    Gas-permeability plays a governing role in the pre-explosive pressurization of volcanic edifices. Pressurization may only occur once the total volume flux of gases emitted by an underlying magmatic or hydrothermal source exceeds the flow capacity of the permeable pathways present in the edifice. We have measured the physical properties (strain, porosity, permeability and ultrasonic wave velocities) of breadcrust bombs recovered from the deposits of the 2350 B.P. eruption of Mt Meager, BC, Canada. These rocks represent a conduit-infilling pyroclastic breccia that underwent various degrees of welding and deformation and present a remarkable opportunity to constrain the nature and timescale of mechanical processes operating within explosive volcanic conduits during repose periods between eruptive cycles. Here we present data from permeability measurements along the directions of maximum and minimum shortening which help quantifying the effect of vesicle microstructure on permeability. Permeability is measured by applying a range of confining pressures (between 3.4 and 17.2 MPa) to each sample and imposing a constant head (of 0.2 to 3.5 MPa) across the sample. The permeability is then determined using a modified version of Darcy's law applicable to compressible fluids. These rocks display a profound directionality in the measured physical properties resulting from the deformation-induced fabric. For all samples the permeability across the elongation fabric is highly correlated to the sample porosity whereas along the elongation fabric there is little effect of porosity on permeability. At porosity values of about 20% the permeability seems to reach a minimum at 10-16 m2 and does not change significantly with further reduction of porosity. Further, the effect of confining pressure on the permeability of these samples appears to be more pronounced across the elongation fabric than along the elongation fabric. The deformation fabric has a significant effect on the gas-permeability

  7. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Tenth quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.M.

    1992-12-31

    Research continued on the study of coal permeability and gas desorption. This quarter, most of the effort involved identifying problems with the microbalance and then getting it repaired. Measurement of the amount of gas adsorbed with the microbalance involved corrections for the buoyancy change with pressure and several experiments with helium were made to determine this correction.

  8. Synthesis and analysis of novel polymers with high permselectivity and permeability in gas separation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Koros, W.J.; Paul, D.R.

    1991-11-15

    We have synthesized and completed characterization of permeability and selectivity properties of a group of polysulfones and polyether ketones with the potential for higher use temperatures, as well as members of a series of polyesters derived from spirobiindane bisphenol monomer in conjunction with meta and para substituted diacid chlorides. We have also synthesized and characterized the gas transport and thermal properties of diphenyl substituted polyphenylene oxide. The diphenyl substituted material has a potential for higher temperature applications than the standard dimethyl substituted polymer. The temperature dependence of the gas transport properties for the oxygen/nitrogen system was characterized over the range from 35 to 65{degree}C for both of these analog materials.

  9. Stress-dependence of Porosity and Permeability of Upper Jurassic Bossier Shale: Implications for Gas in Place Calculations and Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Reinhard; Merkel, Alexej; Krooss, Bernhard; Amann-Hildenbrand, Alexandra; Gensterblum, Yves

    2015-04-01

    Information on porosity and permeability at realistic sub-surface (in situ) stress conditions is a prerequisite for successful exploration and production of shale gas. In order to study the effects of elastic pore compressibility on these parameters, porosity and permeability coefficients of three Upper Jurassic Bossier Shale samples were determined at stress levels up to 40 MPa. Pore volume compressibility α was measured using a gas expansion technique by helium (He) expansion from a calibrated volume into the pore system of the confined sample. The recorded decrease in specific pore volume (Vp) with increasing effective stress was fitted by an exponential function: Vp = Vp,0 e (-α σ') Unstressed specific pore volume Vp,0 of the samples corresponds to an unstressed porosity (φ0) between 3 - 7 %. At the in situ effective stress value (σ') of ~60 MPa, Vp had decreased between 8 - 13 %. Steady-state permeability tests were performed with six different gases and external stress levels up to 40 MPa. Apparent gas permeability coefficients (kgas) increase with decreasing mean pore pressure (pm) due to slip flow (Klinkenberg-effect): kgas = k∞ (1 + b/pm) Klinkenberg-corrected (intrinsic) permeability coefficients (k∞) decrease with increasing effective stress while slip factors (b) increase. The experimental results were fitted by exponential expressions: k∞ = k∞,0 e (-αk σ') b = b0 e (-αb σ') Increasing slip factors indicate that the average effective pore diameters of the shale sample are significantly reduced with increasing effective stress. During production of a shale gas reservoir the pore pressure is reduced. Apparent permeability coefficients will increase due to slip flow whereas poro-elastic deformation will lead to a decrease in permeability during production. Based on the parameters derived from the experimental data the permeability coefficients for CH4 were tentatively modelled for a hypothetical production history of a Bossier shale

  10. Planar battery comprising a terminal plate having gas venting orifice covered with a layer of gas permeable material

    SciTech Connect

    Land, E.H.

    1984-01-24

    A relatively thin, flat or planar battery is disclosed which includes one or more cells in series relationship each comprising a planar anode in superposed relationship with a planar cathode and a separator disposed intermediate and extending substantially coextensive the facing surfaces of the anode and cathode possessing marginal portions and an aqueous electrolyte permeable central portion. Each cell includes an aqueous electrolyte disposed in the central portion of the separator and in contact with the facing surfaces of both the anode and the cathode and an electrically nonconducting, sealant extending intermediate and providing adhesive contact between the marginal portions of the separatos and next adjacent facing surfaces. Each battery is designed to include a planar anode and/or cathode next adjacent a surface of the battery which electrode includes a conductive metal sheet; a gas permeable, water-vapor impermeable plastic sheet and an electrochemically active negative or positive material. At least one of the conductive metal sheets is designed to specifically include one or more orifices extending through the sheet to conduct from the battery gas generated within its cells.

  11. Effects of ambient air particulate exposure on blood-gas barrier permeability and lung function.

    PubMed

    Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Mortensen, Jann; Møller, Peter; Bernard, Alfred; Vinzents, Peter; Wåhlin, Peter; Glasius, Marianne; Loft, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of pulmonary diseases and detrimental outcomes related to the cardiovascular system, including altered vessel functions. This study's objective was too evaluate the effects of ambient particle exposure on the blood-gas permeability, lung function and Clara cell 16 (CC16) protein release in healthy young subjects. Twenty-nine nonsmokers participated in a randomized, two-factor crossover study with or without biking exercise for 180 min and with 24-h exposure to particle-rich (6169-15,362 particles/cm(3); 7.0-11.6 microg/m(3) PM(2.5); 7.5-15.8 microg/m(3) PM(10-2.5)) or filtered (91-542 particles/cm(3)) air collected above a busy street. The clearance rate of aerosolized (99m)Tc-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ((99m)Tc-DTPA) was measured as an index for the alveolar epithelial membrane integrity and permeability of the lung blood-gas barrier after rush-hour exposure. Lung function was assessed using body plethysmography, flow-volume curves, and measurements of the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. CC16 was measured in plasma and urine as another marker of alveolar integrity. Particulate matter exposure had no significant effect on the epithelial membrane integrity using the methods available in this study. Exercise increased the clearance rate of (99m)Tc-DTPA indicated by a 6.8% (95% CI: 0.4-12.8%) shorter half-life and this was more pronounced in men than women. Neither particulate matter exposure nor exercise had an effect on the concentration of CC16 in plasma and urine or on the static and dynamic volumes or ventilation distribution of the lungs. The study thus demonstrates increased permeability of the alveolar blood-gas barrier following moderate exercise, whereas exposure to ambient levels of urban air particles has no detectable effects on the alveolar blood-gas barrier or lung function. PMID:18752169

  12. Permeable weak layer in the gas hydrate reservoir presumed by logging-while-drilling log data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Fujii, T.; Takayama, T.

    2015-12-01

    One of the specific intervals attracted attention to analyze the 2012 gas-production test from methane-hydrate reservoir, because its pressure and temperature behavior was different from other intervals of the production zone. The pressure and temperature behavior implied the interval should be high permeability. We analyzed the interval to characterize the properties before gas-production test; i.e. the original properties of the interval. We checked the data of the logging-while-drilling data of AT1-MC, which was one of the monitoring wells at the gas-production test. The specific interval was described as 1290-1298m, where was boundary between upper sand and mud alteration layer and middle clayey zone. The first, we noticed that there were several layers that showed broad T2 distributions of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the basis of the T2 distributions and the resistivity data of the interval, there were large pores that showed the T2 distribution around 100ms, even though some amount of methane hydrate were contained. This result could be explained the interval showed high permeability below the 1294m. After checking their ultra-sonic caliper data in detail, we found interesting difference in the interval. The specific interval of 1294-1295m had different borehole-enlargement direction from other intervals of the methane-hydrate bearing zone, even though diameter of borehole was slightly enlarged. Other layers in the methane hydrate reservoir showed NW-SE directions of enlargement, however, the specific interval had NE-SW direction of enlargement. Hence, H-max stress and H-min stress of this specific interval could be very close values. Thus, near the 1294m, the lithology of the layer was permeable and weak. It might be useful to understand many phenomena occured during the gas-production test. This research was conducted as a part of the MH21 research, and the authors would like to express their sincere appreciation to MH21 and the Ministry of Economy

  13. Inhibition effect of a non-permeating component on gas permeability of nanoporous graphene membranes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Boyao; Sun, Chengzhen; Bai, Bofeng

    2015-09-28

    We identify the inhibition effect of a non-permeating gas component on gases permeating through the nanoporous graphene membranes and reveal its mechanisms from molecular dynamics insights. The membrane separation process involves the gas mixtures of CH4/H2 and CH4/N2 with different partial pressures of the non-permeating gas component (CH4). The results show that the permeance of the H2 and N2 molecules decreases sharply in the presence of the CH4 molecules. The permeance of the N2 molecules can be reduced to as much as 64.5%. The adsorption of the CH4 molecules on the graphene surface weakens the surface adsorption of the H2 and N2 molecules due to a competitive mechanism, accordingly reducing the permeability of the H2 and N2 molecules. For the N2 molecules with stronger adsorption ability, the reduction of the permeance is greater. On the other hand, the CH4 molecules near the nanopore have a blocking effect, which further inhibits the permeation of the H2 and N2 molecules. In addition, we predict the selectivity of the nanopore by using density functional theory calculations. This work can provide valuable guidance for the application of nanoporous graphene membranes in the separation of the gas mixtures consisting of permeating and non-permeating components with different adsorption abilities. PMID:26299564

  14. The influence of few-layer graphene on the gas permeability of the high-free-volume polymer PIM-1

    PubMed Central

    Althumayri, Khalid; Harrison, Wayne J.; Shin, Yuyoung; Gardiner, John M.; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Bernardo, Paola; Clarizia, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Gas permeability data are presented for mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) of few-layer graphene in the polymer of intrinsic microporosity PIM-1, and the results compared with previously reported data for two other nanofillers in PIM-1: multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (f-MWCNTs) and fused silica. For few-layer graphene, a significant enhancement in permeability is observed at very low graphene content (0.05 vol.%), which may be attributed to the effect of the nanofiller on the packing of the polymer chains. At higher graphene content permeability decreases, as expected for the addition of an impermeable filler. Other nanofillers, reported in the literature, also give rise to enhancements in permeability, but at substantially higher loadings, the highest measured permeabilities being at 1 vol.% for f-MWCNTs and 24 vol.% for fused silica. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that packing of the polymer chains is influenced by the curvature of the nanofiller surface at the nanoscale, with an increasingly pronounced effect on moving from a more-or-less spherical nanoparticle morphology (fused silica) to a cylindrical morphology (f-MWCNT) to a planar morphology (graphene). While the permeability of a high-free-volume polymer such as PIM-1 decreases over time through physical ageing, for the PIM-1/graphene MMMs a significant permeability enhancement was retained after eight months storage. PMID:26712643

  15. The influence of few-layer graphene on the gas permeability of the high-free-volume polymer PIM-1.

    PubMed

    Althumayri, Khalid; Harrison, Wayne J; Shin, Yuyoung; Gardiner, John M; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Budd, Peter M; Bernardo, Paola; Clarizia, Gabriele; Jansen, Johannes C

    2016-02-13

    Gas permeability data are presented for mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) of few-layer graphene in the polymer of intrinsic microporosity PIM-1, and the results compared with previously reported data for two other nanofillers in PIM-1: multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (f-MWCNTs) and fused silica. For few-layer graphene, a significant enhancement in permeability is observed at very low graphene content (0.05 vol.%), which may be attributed to the effect of the nanofiller on the packing of the polymer chains. At higher graphene content permeability decreases, as expected for the addition of an impermeable filler. Other nanofillers, reported in the literature, also give rise to enhancements in permeability, but at substantially higher loadings, the highest measured permeabilities being at 1 vol.% for f-MWCNTs and 24 vol.% for fused silica. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that packing of the polymer chains is influenced by the curvature of the nanofiller surface at the nanoscale, with an increasingly pronounced effect on moving from a more-or-less spherical nanoparticle morphology (fused silica) to a cylindrical morphology (f-MWCNT) to a planar morphology (graphene). While the permeability of a high-free-volume polymer such as PIM-1 decreases over time through physical ageing, for the PIM-1/graphene MMMs a significant permeability enhancement was retained after eight months storage. PMID:26712643

  16. Use of gas-permeable membranes for the removal and recovery of ammonia from high strength livestock wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recovery of nitrogen (N) from wastes is important in agriculture because of the high cost of commercial N fertilizers. We investigated the use of gas-permeable membranes to capture and recover ammonia from high strength swine wastewaters. The new process includes the passage of gaseous ammonia t...

  17. Recovery of nitrogen from swine manure containing high-ammonia using gas-permeable membrane technology and reduced chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are presenting a new and effective way of recovering ammonia from liquid manures. The recovery of nutrients from wastes for re-use as concentrated plant fertilizers is a new paradigm in manure management. In the work presented in this paper a new process using gas-permeable membranes at low press...

  18. Absorbance characteristics of a liquid-phase gas sensor based on gas-permeable liquid core waveguides.

    PubMed

    Peng, Pei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li; Su, Shiguang; Wang, Jiahui

    2013-12-01

    The absorbance characteristics and influential factors on these characteristics for a liquid-phase gas sensor, which is based on gas-permeable liquid core waveguides (LCWs), are studied from theoretical and experimental viewpoints in this paper. According to theory, it is predicted that absorbance is proportional to the analyte concentration, sampling time, analyte diffusion coefficient, and geometric factor of this device when the depletion layer of the analyte is ignored. The experimental results are in agreement with the theoretical hypothesis. According to the experimental results, absorbance is time-dependent and increasing linearly over time after the requisite response time with a linear correlation coefficient r(2)>0.999. In the linear region, the rate of absorbance change (RAC) indicates improved linearity with sample concentration and a relative higher sensitivity than instantaneous absorbance does. By using a core liquid that is more affinitive to the analyte, reducing wall thickness and the inner diameter of the tubing, or increasing sample flow rate limitedly, the response time can be decreased and the sensitivity can be increased. However, increasing the LCW length can only enhance sensitivity and has no effect on response time. For liquid phase detection, there is a maximum flow rate, and the absorbance will decrease beyond the stated limit. Under experimental conditions, hexane as the LCW core solvent, a tubing wall thickness of 0.1 mm, a length of 10 cm, and a flow rate of 12 mL min(-1), the detection results for the aqueous benzene sample demonstrate a response time of 4 min. Additionally, the standard curve for the RAC versus concentration is RAC=0.0267c+0.0351 (AU min(-1)), with r(2)=0.9922 within concentrations of 0.5-3.0 mg L(-1). The relative error for 0.5 mg L(-1) benzene (n=6) is 7.4±3.7%, and the LOD is 0.04 mg L(-1). This research can provide theoretical and practical guides for liquid-phase gas sensor design and development based on a

  19. Novel Model for Multispecies Biofilms That Uses Rigid Gas-Permeable Lenses ▿

    PubMed Central

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Novak, Karen F.

    2011-01-01

    Oral biofilms comprise complex multispecies consortia aided by specific inter- and intraspecies interactions occurring among commensals and pathogenic bacterial species. Oral biofilms are primary initiating factors of periodontal disease, although complex multifactorial biological influences, including host cell responses, contribute to the individual outcome of the disease. To provide a system to study initial stages of interaction between oral biofilms and the host cells that contribute to the disease process, we developed a novel in vitro model system to grow biofilms on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses (RGPLs), which enable oxygen to permeate through the lens material. Bacterial species belonging to early- and late-colonizing groups were successfully established as single- or three-species biofilms, with each group comprising Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguinis; S. gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum; or S. gordonii, F. nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Quantification of biofilm numbers by quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed substantial differences in the magnitude of bacterial numbers in single-species and multispecies biofilms. We evaluated cell-permeable conventional nucleic acid stains acridine orange, hexidium iodide, and Hoechst 33258 and novel SYTO red, blue, and green fluorochromes for their effect on bacterial viability and fluorescence yield to allow visualization of the aggregates of individual bacterial species by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Substantial differences in the quantity and distribution of the species in the multispecies biofilms were identified. The specific features of these biofilms may help us better understand the role of various bacteria in local challenge of oral tissues. PMID:21421785

  20. Natural and Induced Fracture Diagnostics from 4-D VSP Low Permeability Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mark E. Willis; Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2008-09-30

    Tight gas sand reservoirs generally contain thick gas-charged intervals that often have low porosity and very low permeability. Natural and induced fractures provide the only means of production. The objective of this work is to locate and characterize natural and induced fractures from analysis of scattered waves recorded on 4-D (time lapse) VSP data in order to optimize well placement and well spacing in these gas reservoirs. Using model data simulating the scattering of seismic energy from hydraulic fractures, we first show that it is possible to characterize the quality of fracturing based upon the amount of scattering. In addition, the picked arrival times of recorded microseismic events provide the velocity moveout for isolating the scattered energy on the 4-D VSP data. This concept is applied to a field dataset from the Jonah Field in Wyoming to characterize the quality of the induced hydraulic fractures. The time lapse (4D) VSP data from this field are imaged using a migration algorithm that utilizes shot travel time tables derived from the first breaks of the 3D VSPs and receiver travel time tables based on the microseismic arrival times and a regional velocity model. Four azimuthally varying shot tables are derived from picks of the first breaks of over 200 VSP records. We create images of the fracture planes through two of the hydraulically fractured wells in the field. The scattered energy shows correlation with the locations of the microseismic events. In addition, the azimuthal scattering is different from the azimuthal reflectivity of the reservoir, giving us more confidence that we have separated the scattered signal from simple formation reflectivity. Variation of the scattered energy along the image planes suggests variability in the quality of the fractures in three distinct zones.

  1. REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Surdam

    2003-12-29

    An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide

  2. Determining the gas permeability coefficient of a porous medium by means of the bubble-counting flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoczylas, Norbert

    2015-08-01

    In this paper the conception of a low-cost device to determine the coefficient of permeability was presented. In the apparatus a non-typical source of gas and gas flow meter has been used. A used flow meter allows us to measure very low gas flow rates. The upper measurement range limit of the constructed device was about 20 cm3 min-1, whereas the lower measurement range limit was estimated to be approximately 0.01 cm3 min-1.

  3. Enhancing recovery of ammonia from swine manure anaerobic digester effluent using gas-permeable membrane technology.

    PubMed

    Dube, P J; Vanotti, M B; Szogi, A A; García-González, M C

    2016-03-01

    Gas-permeable membrane technology is useful to recover ammonia from manure. In this study, the technology was enhanced using aeration instead of alkali chemicals to increase pH and the ammonium (NH4(+)) recovery rate. Digested effluents from covered anaerobic swine lagoons containing 1465-2097 mg NH4(+)-N L(-1) were treated using submerged membranes (0.13 cm(2) cm(-3)), low-rate aeration (120 mL air L-manure(-1) min(-1)) and nitrification inhibitor (22 mg L(-1)) to prevent nitrification. The experiment included a control without aeration. The pH of the manure with aeration rose from 8.6 to 9.2 while the manure without aeration decreased from 8.6 to 8.1. With aeration, 97-99% of the NH4(+) was removed in about 5 days of operation with 96-98% recovery efficiency. In contrast, without aeration it took 25 days to treat the NH4(+). Therefore, the recovery of NH4(+) was five times faster with the low-rate aeration treatment. This enhancement could reduce costs by 70%. PMID:26739456

  4. Regional geology of the low-permeability, gas-bearing Cleveland Formation, western Anadarko Basin, Texas Panhandle: Lithologic and depositional facies, structure, and sequence stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentz, Tucker F.

    1992-09-01

    The Upper Pennsylvania (lower Missourian) Cleveland formation produces gas from low-permeability ('tight') sandstone reservoirs in the western Anadarko Basin of the northeastern Texas Panhandle. In the six-county region, these reservoirs had produced more than 412 Bcf of natural gas through December 31, 1989. Because of their typically low permeability, the Cleveland sandstones require acidizing and hydraulic fracture treatment to produce gas at economic rates. Since 1982, the Gas Research Institute has supported geological investigations throughout the United States to develop the scientific and technological knowledge for producing from low-permeability, gas-bearing sandstones. As part of the program and the GRI Tight Gas Sands project, the Bureau of Economic Geology has been conducting research on low-permeability sandstones in the Cleveland formation and on several other sandstone units of similar character in Texas and Wyoming.

  5. An assessment of oxygen transfer efficiency in a gas permeable hollow fibre membrane biological reactor.

    PubMed

    Soreanu, G; Lishman, L; Dunlop, S; Behmann, H; Seto, P

    2010-01-01

    The clean water oxygen transfer efficiency (OTE) of a full scale non-porous hollow fibre gas permeable (GP) membrane (surface area of 500 m(2)) was evaluated at inlet air pressures of 1.2, 1.4, and 1.8 atm using two established testing methods. To form a basis of comparison with traditional aeration technologies, additional testing was done with conventional aerators (fine bubble and coarse bubble diffusers) replacing the GP membrane. OTE can be established based on the re-aeration of deoxygenated water or by monitoring the catalytic oxidation of a sodium sulphite (Na(2)SO(3)) solution. In this study, OTE values determined by sulphite oxidation (SOTE(S)) were consistently higher than those established during re-aeration (SOTE(R)) suggesting that the chemical reaction was enhancing the mass transfer. The chemical reaction was sufficiently fast in the case of the GP membrane, that the gas phase limited the mass transfer. The GP membrane operating at 1.2 atm had a SOTE(S) of 70.6% and a SOTER of 52.2%. SOTE(R) for the coarse bubble and fine bubble diffusers were 3.8% and 23.6%, respectively. This is comparable to the manufacturer's values, corrected for depth of 3.4% and 18.3%, respectively. Particularly, the derived OTE values were used to evaluate differences in energy consumption for a conventional treatment plant achieving carbon removal and nitrification. This analysis highlights the potential energy efficiency of GP membranes, which could be considered for the design of the membrane modules. PMID:20220238

  6. Free and Forced Convection in High Permeability Porous Media: Impact on Gas Flux at the Earth-atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Levintal, E.; Dragila, M. I.; Kamai, T.

    2015-12-01

    Gas movement within the earth's subsurface and its exchange with the atmosphere is one of the principal elements contributing to soil and atmospheric function. As the soil permeability increases, gas circulation by convective mechanisms becomes significantly greater than the diffusion. Two of the convective mechanisms, which can be of great importance, are being explored in this research. The first one is thermal convection venting (TCV), which develops when there are unstable density gradients. The second mechanism is wind induced convection (WIC), which develops due to surface winds that drive air movement. Here, we report the results of a study on the relationships between the porous media permeability and particle size, and the development and magnitude of TCV and WIC with the development of thermal differences and surface winds. The research included large high-permeability column experiments carried out under highly controlled laboratory conditions, using well-defined single-sized spherical particles while surface winds and thermal differences were forced and monitored. CO2 enriched air, functioned as a tracer, was used to quantify the impact of TCV and WIC on gas migration in the porous media. Results show that in homogenous porous media a permeability range of 10-7 to 10-6 m2 is the threshold value for TCV onset under standard atmospheric conditions. Adding surface wind with an average velocity of 1.5 m s-1 resulted in WIC effect to a depth of -0.3 m in most experimental settings; however, it did not caused additional air circulation at the reference depth of -0.9 m. Furthermore, given the appropriate conditions, a combined effect of TCV and WIC did significantly increase the overall media ventilation. Simulations of temperature profiles in soil under that permeability, showed that as the thermal gradient changes with depth and is a continuous function, TCV cells can be developed in local sections of the profile, not necessarily reaching the atmosphere.

  7. Recovery of ammonia from swine manure using gas-permeable membranes: effect of waste strength and pH.

    PubMed

    Garcia-González, M C; Vanotti, M B

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen recovery from swine manure was investigated using gas-permeable membranes. The process involved a continuous recirculation of an acidic solution through a gas-permeable membrane submerged in manure. Ammonia from manure was concentrated in the acidic solution increasing its pH, while pH decreased in manure. In the first set of experiments, nitrogen recovery efficiency was evaluated with no pH adjustment of manure; whereas in the second, manure with three different ammonia (NH3) concentrations (from 1070 to 2290 mg/L) was used adjusting their pH to 9 whenever pH decreased below 7.7. With no pH adjustment, NH3 recovery from manure was 55%, while NH3 recovery averaged 81% when pH of manure was adjusted. This work showed that as waste strength and available NH3 content increased in manure, more N was captured by the membrane. These results suggested that the gas-permeable membranes are a useful technology for NH3 recovery from manure, reducing environmental pollution whilst converting NH3 into a valuable ammonium (NH4(+)) salt fertilizer. PMID:25687948

  8. Gas diffusivity and permeability through the firn column at Summit, Greenland: measurements and comparison to microstructural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, A. C.; Albert, M. R.

    2014-02-01

    The physical structure of polar firn plays a key role in the mechanisms by which glaciers and ice sheets preserve a natural archive of past atmospheric composition. This study presents the first measurements of gas diffusivity and permeability along with microstructural information measured from the near-surface firn through the firn column to pore close-off. Both fine- and coarse-grained firn from Summit, Greenland are included in this study to investigate the variability in firn caused by seasonal and storm-event layering. Our measurements reveal that the porosity of firn (derived from density) is insufficient to describe the full profiles of diffusivity and permeability, particularly at porosity values above 0.5. Thus, even a model that could perfectly predict the density profile would be insufficient for application to issues involving gas transport. The measured diffusivity profile presented here is compared to two diffusivity profiles modeled from firn air measurements from Summit. Because of differences in scale and in firn processes between the true field situation, firn modeling, and laboratory measurements, the results follow a similar overall pattern but do not align; our results constitute a lower bound on diffusive transport. In comparing our measurements of both diffusivity and permeability to previous parameterizations from numerical 3-D lattice-Boltzmann modeling, it is evident that the previous relationships to porosity are likely site-specific. We present parameterizations relating diffusivity and permeability to porosity as a possible tool, though use of direct measurements would be far more accurate when feasible. The relationships between gas transport properties and microstructural properties are characterized and compared to existing relationships for general porous media, specifically the Katz-Thompson (KT), Kozeny-Carman (KC), and Archie's law approximations. While those approximations can capture the general trend of gas transport

  9. Direct numerical simulation of supercritical gas flow in complex nanoporous media: Elucidating the relationship between permeability and pore space geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, C. J.; Prodanovic, M.; Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mudrocks and shales are currently a significant source of natural gas and understanding the basic transport properties of these formations is critical to predicting long-term production, however, the nanoporous nature of mudrocks presents a unique challenge. Mudrock pores are predominantly in the range of 1-100 nm, and within this size range the flow of gas at reservoir conditions will fall within the slip-flow and early transition-flow regime (0.001 < Kn < 1.0). Therefore, flow-rates will significantly deviate from Navier-Stokes predictions. Currently, the study of slip-flows is mostly limited to simple tube and channel geometries, but the geometry of mudrock pores is often sponge-like (organic matter) and/or platy (clays). Here we present a local effective viscosity lattice Boltzmann model (LEV-LBM) constructed for flow simulation in the slip- and early-transition flow regimes, adapted here for complex geometries. At the macroscopic scale the LEV-LBM is parameterized with local effective viscosities at each node to capture the variance of the mean free path of gas molecules in a bounded system. The LEV-LBM is first validated in simple tube geometries, where excellent agreement with linearized Boltzmann solutions is found for Knudsen numbers up to 1.0. The LEV-LBM is then employed to quantify the length effect on the apparent permeability of tubes, which suggests pore network modeling of flow in the slip and early-transition regime will result in overestimation unless the length effect is considered. Furthermore, the LEV-LBM is used to evaluate the predictive value of commonly measured pore geometry characteristics such as porosity, pore size distribution, and specific solid surface area for the calculation of permeability. We show that bundle of tubes models grossly overestimate apparent permeability, as well as underestimate the increase in apparent permeability with decreasing pressure as a result of excluding topology and pore shape from calculations.

  10. Local permeability changes, passive degassing and related gas hazard at the Baia di Levante area (Vulcano island, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diliberto, Iole Serena; Cangemi, Marianna; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Madonia, Paolo; Pedone, Maria; Fabio Pisciotta, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Vulcano, the southernmost island of the Aeolian archipelago (Italy), is presently characterized by active fumarolic fields located along the rim of La Fossa cone and the shoreline of the Baia di Levante beach, in the northern portion of the island.The Baia di Levante fumarolic vents are fed by a shallow hydrothermal aquifer heated by magmatic gases rising from the deep down, with a spatial distribution strongly affected by the local fracture network. These fractures are the expression of a deformation field, dominated by a northward motion to Lipari, abruptly decaying to the Vulcanello peninsula, immediately northward of the Baia di Levante beach. Variable rates of fluid transfer to the surface, following permeability changes affecting the fracture network are among the results of stress field variations over time which induce fluctuations in the pressure state of the hydrothermal system. Under these conditions, increments in hydrothermal gas flow, able to cause an increase of gas hazard, could be determined by a rearrangement of the shallow permeability distribution induced by changes in the deformation field. In this case not associated to any variation in the volcanic activity state. Since 2009 an huge gas flow increment has been noticed in some undersea vents of the Baia di Levante area, leading to increase of gas hazard in their immediate surroundings. On the contrary, the acquired data from the INGV volcanic surveillance program didn't suggest any correlated increase of the magmatic fluid component in the degassing activity.In July 2015, we carried out multi-parametric geochemical surveys in this area, based on direct (thermocouple) and indirect (thermal infrared camera and pyrometer) soil temperature, soil CO2 flux, atmospheric concentration of CO2 and H2S measurements at low elevation (one meter a.s.l.). The chemical and isotopic composition of low temperature fumarole gases was determined too.The comparison of the new data with previous surveys carried out

  11. Device and method for the measurement of gas permeability through membranes

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.; Ackerman, John; Borgialli, Ron; Hamann, Jerry; Muknahalliptna, Suresh

    2006-08-08

    A device for the measuring membrane permeability in electrical/electrochemical/photo-electrochemical fields is provided. The device is a permeation cell and a tube mounted within the cell. An electrode is mounted at one end of the tube. A membrane is mounted within the cell wherein a corona is discharged from the electrode in a general direction toward the membrane thereby generating heated hydrogen atoms adjacent the membrane. A method for measuring the effects of temperature and pressure on membrane permeability and selectivity is also provided.

  12. In Silico Determination of Gas Permeabilities by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics: CO2 and He through PIM-1

    PubMed Central

    Frentrup, Hendrik; Hart, Kyle E.; Colina, Coray M.; Müller, Erich A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the permeation dynamics of helium and carbon dioxide through an atomistically detailed model of a polymer of intrinsic microporosity, PIM-1, via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. This work presents the first explicit molecular modeling of gas permeation through a high free-volume polymer sample, and it demonstrates how permeability and solubility can be obtained coherently from a single simulation. Solubilities in particular can be obtained to a very high degree of confidence and within experimental inaccuracies. Furthermore, the simulations make it possible to obtain very specific information on the diffusion dynamics of penetrant molecules and yield detailed maps of gas occupancy, which are akin to a digital tomographic scan of the polymer network. In addition to determining permeability and solubility directly from NEMD simulations, the results shed light on the permeation mechanism of the penetrant gases, suggesting that the relative openness of the microporous topology promotes the anomalous diffusion of penetrant gases, which entails a deviation from the pore hopping mechanism usually observed in gas diffusion in polymers. PMID:25764366

  13. Assessment of gas resources in low-permeability sandstones of Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.; Crovelli, R.A.; Spencer, C.W.; Mast, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    A modified volumetric approach is used to estimate gas resources in the low-permeability sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Piceance basin of western Colorado. The Mesaverde Group was divided into three plays based on stratigraphy - the Williams Fork Formation, the Iles Formation, and the Rollins Sandstone Member (Mesaverde Formation) or Trout Creek Sandstone Member (Iles Formation). Each of these plays was subdivided into a deep-gas play and a shallower gas-water transition play. Variations in thermal maturity were used to define the boundaries of the plays. The aggregated mean in-place gas for all six plays is 419.55 tcf. The mean in-place resource numbers were run through probability programs, which assign estimates of the gas potential at the 95%, 75%, 50%, 25%, and 5% probability levels both for individual plays and for the aggregate of all six plays. Assuming a 75% degree of dependency between the plays, there is a 95% chance of at least 274.45 tcf of total inplace gas, a 50% chance of 407.60 tcf, and a 5% chance of 605.33 tcf. Next, six different recovery factors were used. The first three assume current technology and a gas price of $5/mcf, and the second three assume future advanced technology without a gas price specified. The most likely estimated recoverable gas figures for the six plays at the 95%, 50%, and 5% probability levels using current technology are 8.75, 13.03, and 19.41 tcf, and using future advanced technology are 44.23, 65.97, and 98.39 tcf.

  14. Bifunctionalized Intrinsically Microporous Polyimides with Simultaneously Enhanced Gas Permeability and Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaohua; Mukaddam, Mohsin; Pinnau, Ingo

    2016-06-01

    Two novel intrinsically microporous copolyimides synthesized by condensation reaction of 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) diphthalic anhydride (6FDA), 3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-1,1'-spirobisindane-5,5'-diamino-6,6'-diol, and 3,5-diaminobenzoic acid with diamine ratios of 80/20 (Co-80/20) and 50/50 (Co-50/50) are reported. Unexpectedly, the Co-80/20 not only demonstrates higher microporosity (300 m(2) g(-1) ) than the PIM-6FDA-OH homopolymer (190 m(2) g(-1) ) but also exhibits simultaneously enhanced CO2 permeability (from 119 to 171 Barrer) and CO2 /CH4 selectivity (from 35 to 41) after thermal annealing at 250 °C. This higher permeability originates from enhanced diffusivity (D CO2 ) and the higher selectivity results from its increased diffusion selectivity (D CO2 /D CH4 ). After crosslinking at 300 °C, the Co-80/20 exhibits an even higher CO2 permeability (261 Barrer) and almost unchanged CO2 /CH4 selectivity. PMID:27027259

  15. Compaction and gas loss in welded pyroclastic deposits as revealed by porosity, permeability, and electrical conductivity measurements of the Shevlin Park Tuff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2014-01-01

    Pyroclastic flows produced by large volcanic eruptions commonly densify after emplacement. Processes of gas escape, compaction, and welding in pyroclastic-flow deposits are controlled by the physical and thermal properties of constituent material. Through measurements of matrix porosity, permeability, and electrical conductivity, we provide a framework for understanding the evolution of pore structure during these processes. Using data from the Shevlin Park Tuff in central Oregon, United States, and from the literature, we find that over a porosity range of 0%–70%, matrix permeability varies by almost 10 orders of magnitude (from 10–20 to 10–11 m2), with over three orders of magnitude variation at any given porosity. Part of the variation at a given porosity is due to permeability anisotropy, where oriented core samples indicate higher permeabilities parallel to foliation (horizontally) than perpendicular to foliation (vertically). This suggests that pore space is flattened during compaction, creating anisotropic crack-like networks, a geometry that is supported by electrical conductivity measurements. We find that the power law equation: k1 = 1.3 × 10–21 × ϕ5.2 provides the best approximation of dominant horizontal gas loss, where k1 = permeability, and ϕ = porosity. Application of Kozeny-Carman fluid-flow approximations suggests that permeability in the Shevlin Park Tuff is controlled by crack- or disk-like pore apertures with minimum widths of 0.3 and 7.5 μm. We find that matrix permeability limits compaction over short times, but deformation is then controlled by competition among cooling, compaction, water resorption, and permeable gas escape. These competing processes control the potential for development of overpressure (and secondary explosions) and the degree of welding in the deposit, processes that are applicable to viscous densification of volcanic deposits in general. Further, the general relationships among porosity, permeability, and

  16. Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Curtis M; Freifeld, Barry M; Pruess, Karsten; Pan, Lehua; Finsterle, Stefan; Moridis, George J

    2012-12-11

    In response to the urgent need for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondo well MC252-1 blowout, we assembled a small team and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using the TOUGH2 codes over two weeks in mid-2010. The conceptual model included the oil reservoir and the well with a top boundary condition located at the bottom of the blowout preventer. We developed a fluid properties module (Eoil) applicable to a simple two-phase and two-component oil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using T2Well, a coupled reservoir-wellbore flow model, along with iTOUGH2 for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. The most likely oil flow rate estimated from simulations based on the data available in early June 2010 was about 100,000 bbl/d (barrels per day) with a corresponding gas flow rate of 300 MMscf/d (million standard cubic feet per day) assuming the well was open to the reservoir over 30 m of thickness. A Monte Carlo analysis of reservoir and fluid properties provided an uncertainty distribution with a long tail extending down to 60,000 bbl/d of oil (170 MMscf/d of gas). The flow rate was most strongly sensitive to reservoir permeability. Conceptual model uncertainty was also significant, particularly with regard to the length of the well that was open to the reservoir. For fluid-entry interval length of 1.5 m, the oil flow rate was about 56,000 bbl/d. Sensitivity analyses showed that flow rate was not very sensitive to pressure-drop across the blowout preventer due to the interplay between gas exsolution and oil flow rate. PMID:21730177

  17. Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Pruess, Karsten; Pan, Lehua; Finsterle, Stefan; Moridis, George J.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the urgent need for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondo well MC252-1 blowout, we assembled a small team and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using the TOUGH2 codes over two weeks in mid-2010. The conceptual model included the oil reservoir and the well with a top boundary condition located at the bottom of the blowout preventer. We developed a fluid properties module (Eoil) applicable to a simple two-phase and two-component oil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using T2Well, a coupled reservoir-wellbore flow model, along with iTOUGH2 for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. The most likely oil flow rate estimated from simulations based on the data available in early June 2010 was about 100,000 bbl/d (barrels per day) with a corresponding gas flow rate of 300 MMscf/d (million standard cubic feet per day) assuming the well was open to the reservoir over 30 m of thickness. A Monte Carlo analysis of reservoir and fluid properties provided an uncertainty distribution with a long tail extending down to 60,000 bbl/d of oil (170 MMscf/d of gas). The flow rate was most strongly sensitive to reservoir permeability. Conceptual model uncertainty was also significant, particularly with regard to the length of the well that was open to the reservoir. For fluid-entry interval length of 1.5 m, the oil flow rate was about 56,000 bbl/d. Sensitivity analyses showed that flow rate was not very sensitive to pressure-drop across the blowout preventer due to the interplay between gas exsolution and oil flow rate. PMID:21730177

  18. Faulting of gas-hydrate-bearing marine sediments - contribution to permeability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Holbrook, W.S.; Drury, Rebecca; Gettrust, Joseph; Hutchinson, Deborah; Booth, James; Taylor, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Extensive faulting is observed in sediments containing high concentrations of methane hydrate off the southeastern coast of the United States. Faults that break the sea floor show evidence of both extension and shortening; mud diapirs are also present. The zone of recent faulting apparently extends from the ocean floor down to the base of gas-hydrate stability. We infer that the faulting resulted from excess pore pressure in gas trapped beneath the gas hydrate-beating layer and/or weakening and mobilization of sediments in the region just below the gas-hydrate stability zone. In addition to the zone of surface faults, we identified two buried zones of faulting, that may have similar origins. Subsurface faulted zones appear to act as gas traps.

  19. Micromechanics, fracture mechanics and gas permeability of composite laminates for cryogenic storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukjoo

    effect of cryogenic cycling on permeability for various composite material systems. The textile composite has lower permeability than laminated composites as cryogenic cycle increases. The nano-particles embedded on laminated composites do not show improvement on permeability. The optical inspection on composite materials is performed to investigate the microcrack propagation and compared the microscopic results before and after cryogenic cycling.

  20. Micromechanics, Fracture Mechanics and Gas Permeability of Composite Laminates for Cryogenic Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sukjoo; Sankar, Bhavani; Ebaugh, Newton C.

    2005-01-01

    investigate the effect of cryogenic cycling on permeability for various composite material systems. Textile composites have lower permeability than laminated composites even with increasing number of cryogenic cycle. Nano-particles dispersed in laminated composites do not show improvement on permeability. The optical inspection is performed to investigate the microcrack propagation and void content in laminated composites and compared the microscopic results before and after cryogenic cycling.

  1. Soil features and indoor radon concentration prediction: radon in soil gas, pedology, permeability and 226Ra content.

    PubMed

    Lara, E; Rocha, Z; Santos, T O; Rios, F J; Oliveira, A H

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at relating some physicochemical features of soils and their use as a tool for prediction of indoor radon concentrations of the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte (RMBH), Minas Gerais, Brazil. The measurements of soil gas radon concentrations were performed by using an AlphaGUARD monitor. The (226)Ra content analysis was performed by gamma spectrometry (high pure germanium) and permeabilities were performed by using the RADON-JOK permeameter. The GEORP indicator and soil radon index (RI) were also calculated. Approximately 53 % of the Perferric Red Latosols measurement site could be classified as 'high risk' (Swedish criteria). The Litholic Neosols presented the lowest radon concentration mean in soil gas. The Perferric Red Latosols presented significantly high radon concentration mean in soil gas (60.6 ± 8.7 kBq m(-3)), high indoor radon concentration, high RI, (226)Ra content and GEORP. The preliminary results may indicate an influence of iron formations present very close to the Perferric Red Latosols in the retention of uranium minerals. PMID:25920786

  2. Radionuclide Migration at the Rio Blanco Site, A Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Clay A. Cooper; Ming Ye; Jenny Chapman; Craig Shirley

    2005-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability gas reservoirs. The third and final project in the program, Project Rio Blanco, was conducted in Rio Blanco County, in northwestern Colorado. In this experiment, three 33-kiloton nuclear explosives were simultaneously detonated in a single emplacement well in the Mesaverde Group and Fort Union Formation, at depths of 1,780, 1,899, and 2,039 m below land surface on May 17, 1973. The objective of this work is to estimate lateral distances that tritium released from the detonations may have traveled in the subsurface and evaluate the possible effect of postulated natural-gas development on radionuclide migration. Other radionuclides were considered in the analysis, but the majority occur in relatively immobile forms (such as nuclear melt glass). Of the radionuclides present in the gas phase, tritium dominates in terms of quantity of radioactivity in the long term and contribution to possible whole body exposure. One simulation is performed for {sup 85}Kr, the second most abundant gaseous radionuclide produced after tritium.

  3. Development of vinylic and acetylenic functionalized structures based on high permeable glassy polymers as membrane materials for gas mixtures separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roizard, D.; Kiryukhina, Y.; Masalev, A.; Khotimskiy, V.; Teplyakov, V.; Barth, D.

    2013-03-01

    There are several challenging separation problems in industries which can be solved with the help of membrane technologies. It is the case for instance of the purification of gas energy carriers (i.e. H2, CH4) from CO2 as well as the CO2 recovery from flue gas. Glassy polymers containing trimethylsilyl residues like poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) [PTMSP] and polyvinyltrimethylsilane [PVTMS] are known to exhibit good membrane properties for gas separation. This paper reports two ways of improving their performances based on the controlled introduction of selective groups - alkyl imidazomium salts (C4I) and polyethyleneglycol (M-PEG)- able to enhance CO2 selectivity. CO2 Isotherm sorption data and permeability measurements have shown that the membrane performances could be significantly improved when C4I and M-PEG were introduced as residues covalently bounded to the main polymer chain. Moreover the introduced bromine reactive centres could also be used to induce chemical crosslinking giving rise to more resistant and stable membranes to organic vapours. With the C4I groups, the CO2 sorption could be enhanced by a factor 4.4.

  4. Structural tailoring of hydrogen-bonded poly(acrylic acid)/poly(ethylene oxide) multilayer thin films for reduced gas permeability.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Fangming; Ward, Sarah M; Givens, Tara M; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen bonded poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)/poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) layer-by-layer assemblies are highly elastomeric, but more permeable than ionically bonded thin films. In order to expand the use of hydrogen-bonded assemblies to applications that require a better gas barrier, the effect of assembling pH on the oxygen permeability of PAA/PEO multilayer thin films was investigated. Altering the assembling pH leads to significant changes in phase morphology and bonding. The amount of intermolecular hydrogen bonding between PAA and PEO is found to increase with increasing pH due to reduction of COOH dimers between PAA chains. This improved bonding leads to smaller PEO domains and lower gas permeability. Further increasing the pH beyond 2.75 results in higher oxygen permeability due to partial deprotonation of PAA. By setting the assembling pH at 2.75, the negative impacts of COOH dimer formation and PAA ionization on intermolecular hydrogen bonding can be minimized, leading to a 50% reduction in the oxygen permeability of the PAA/PEO thin film. A 20 bilayer coating reduces the oxygen transmission rate of a 1.58 mm natural rubber substrate by 20 ×. These unique nanocoatings provide the opportunity to impart a gas barrier to elastomeric substrates without altering their mechanical behavior. PMID:25519816

  5. Depositional systems and productive characteristics of major low-permeability gas sandstones in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Finely, R.J.; Seni, S.J.; Tyler, N.; Lin, Z.S.

    1984-04-01

    Major tight gas sandstones in Texas range from lenticular to blanket geometry, from hydropressured to geopressured, and from Pennsylvanian to Eocene in age. The Cotton Valley sandstone (East Texas basin) includes barrier- and marine-bar sandstones (blanket) derived from prograding fan deltas with associated braided stream, delta-front, and prodelta deposits. Estimated gas in place varies from 53 tcf (Cotton Valley) to 25 tcf (Travis Peak); most wells initially produce from 500 to 1500 mcf and few wells produce 2500 mcf. Tight gas sandstones in the Wilcox and Vicksburg Groups (Gulf Coast basin) are mostly geopressured delta-front, shelf, and slope deposits. Initial well yields are most 300 to 2400 mcfd; resource estimates for tight Wilcox and Vicksburg trends are not available. Canyon Group sandstones of the Sonora basin (parts of the Ozona arch, Concho platform and Val Verde basin) contain 24 tcf of estimated gas in place and initial flow rates are commonly 100 to 1000 mcf. These sandstones are broadly lenticular and are interpreted to be submarine fan and possibly shelf-margin deposits. The Olmos Formation (Maverick basin) contains gas within broadly lenticular delta-front deposits of high-constructive delta systems; liquid hydrocarbons in the Olmos are trapped in more proximal facies. Gas in place in the Olmos is estimated to be 5 tcf and initial well yields are 300 to 3000 mcf. In 1980, 893 wells were completed in formations designated as partially or completely tight by the Railroad Commission of Texas. These completions represent 2.5% of new gas wells in the state, but 28.0% of those completed in the 5000 to 15,000-ft depth range in that year.

  6. Increasing Production from Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs by Optimizing Zone Isolation for Successful Stimulation Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2005-03-31

    Maximizing production from wells drilled in low-permeability reservoirs, such as the Barnett Shale, is determined by cementing, stimulation, and production techniques employed. Studies show that cementing can be effective in terms of improving fracture effectiveness by 'focusing' the frac in the desired zone and improving penetration. Additionally, a method is presented for determining the required properties of the set cement at various places in the well, with the surprising result that uphole cement properties in wells destined for multiple-zone fracturing is more critical than those applied to downhole zones. Stimulation studies show that measuring pressure profiles and response during Pre-Frac Injection Test procedures prior to the frac job are critical in determining if a frac is indicated at all, as well as the type and size of the frac job. This result is contrary to current industry practice, in which frac jobs are designed well before the execution, and carried out as designed on location. Finally, studies show that most wells in the Barnett Shale are production limited by liquid invasion into the wellbore, and determinants are presented for when rod or downhole pumps are indicated.

  7. Removal and recovery of ammonia from livestock wastewater using hydrophobic gas-permeable membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The costs of fertilizers have rapidly increased in recent years, especially nitrogen fertilizer such as anhydrous ammonia which is made from natural gas. Thus, new treatment technologies for abatement of ammonia emissions in livestock operations are being focused on nitrogern (N) recovery in additio...

  8. Improved recovery of ammonia from swine manure using gas-permeable membrane technology and aeration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant efforts are required to abate ammonia emissions from livestock operations. In addition, the costs of fertilizers have rapidly increased in recent years, especially nitrogen fertilizer such as anhydrous ammonia which is made from natural gas. Thus, new technologies for abatement of ammoni...

  9. Post-synthetic Ti Exchanged UiO-66 Metal-Organic Frameworks that Deliver Exceptional Gas Permeability in Mixed Matrix Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stefan J. D.; Ladewig, Bradley P.; Hill, Anita J.; Lau, Cher Hon; Hill, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Gas separation membranes are one of the lowest energy technologies available for the separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Key to handling the immense scale of this separation is maximised membrane permeability at sufficient selectivity for CO2 over N2. For the first time it is revealed that metals can be post-synthetically exchanged in MOFs to drastically enhance gas transport performance in membranes. Ti-exchanged UiO-66 MOFs have been found to triple the gas permeability without a loss in selectivity due to several effects that include increased affinity for CO2 and stronger interactions between the polymer matrix and the Ti-MOFs. As a result, it is also shown that MOFs optimized in previous works for batch-wise adsorption applications can be applied to membranes, which have lower demands on material quantities. These membranes exhibit exceptional CO2 permeability enhancement of as much as 153% when compared to the non-exchanged UiO-66 mixed-matrix controls, which places them well above the Robeson upper bound at just a 5 wt.% loading. The fact that maximum permeability enhancement occurs at such low loadings, significantly less than the optimum for other MMMs, is a major advantage in large-scale application due to the more attainable quantities of MOF needed. PMID:25592747

  10. Synthesis and analysis of novel polymers with high permselectivity and permeability in gas separation applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Koros, W.J.; Paul, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    During the three years of support under this grant, ten novel polymer structures have been synthesized and characterized in detail in terms of sorption and transport properties to test the hypotheses on strategies to develop advanced materials for gas separation membranes. The extremely important O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} systems have been the focus of this work. Data for permeabilities and permselectivities for O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} at 35 C at approximately 2 atm feed pressure for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} and 10 atm for CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} are reported in two tables and will be discussed in two parts, one related to each of the groups of structures in these two tables. For the sake of efficiency, the author will only consider the O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} data; however, similar trends apply for the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} system as well. This gas pair is useful, since solubility selectivity effects are generally of much smaller importance than for the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} pair, so even without detailed solubility and diffusivity data, mobility selectivity based arguments tend to be adequate.

  11. Synthesis and analysis of novel polymers with high permselectivity and permeability in gas separation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Koros, W.J.; Paul, D.R.

    1991-12-31

    Significant progress was made toward developing advanced materials for gas separation membrane applications and rationalizing molecular structure and efficacy: Synthesized and tested polyarylates based on terephthalic or isophthalic acid or a tertiary butyl derivative of the isophthalic acid with different diols to illustrate the effects of: opening'' the matrix by incorporation of bulky packing inhibiting groups such as the tertiary butyl moiety inhibition of backbone motion via meta connected backbone connections and tightening'' of the matrix by incorporation of polar halogens. Completed high temperature characterization of sorption and transport properties for novel materials. Continued studies of the phenyl-substituted polymers aimed at producing super stable high temperature useful polymers for gas separations. Synthesized a polyarylate based on the spirobiindane diol and bibenzoyl acid chloride to incorporate long flat packable bibenzoyl units between packing disruptive spirobiindane units in an attempt to control the segmental level morphology to produce highly selective bottleneck'' regions between highly open regions.

  12. Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

  13. Results of high resolution seismic imaging experiments for defining permeable pathways in fractured gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Daley, T.

    1997-10-01

    As part of its Department of Energy (DOE) Industry cooperative program in oil and gas, Berkeley Lab has an ongoing effort in cooperation with Industry partners to develop equipment, field techniques, and interpretational methods to further the practice of characterizing fractured heterogeneous reservoirs. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the combined use of state-of-the-art technology in fluid flow modeling and geophysical imaging into an interdisciplinary approach for predicting the behavior of heterogeneous fractured gas reservoirs. The efforts in this program have mainly focused on using seismic methods linked with geologic and reservoir engineering analysis for the detection and characterization of fracture systems in tight gas formations, i.e., where and how to detect the fractures, what are the characteristics of the fractures, and how the fractures interact with the natural stresses, lithology, and their effect on reservoir performance. The project has also integrated advanced reservoir engineering methods for analyzing flow in fractured systems such that reservoir management strategies can be optimized. The work at Berkeley Lab focuses on integrating high resolution seismic imaging, (VSP, crosswell, and single well imaging), geologic information and well test data to invert for flow paths in fractured systems.

  14. Simplified Method of the Growth of Human Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TIL) in Gas-Permeable Flasks to Numbers Needed for Patient Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jianjian; Sabatino, Marianna; Somerville, Robert; Wilson, John R.; Dudley, Mark E.; Stroncek, David F.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) of metastatic melanoma with autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is clinically effective, but TIL production can be challenging. Here we describe a simplified method for initial TIL culture and rapid expansion in gas-permeable flasks. TIL were initially cultured from tumor digests and fragments in 40 mL capacity flasks with a 10 cm2 gas-permeable silicone bottom, G-Rex10. A TIL rapid expansion protocol (REP) was developed using 500 mL capacity flasks with a 100 cm2 gas-permeable silicone bottom, G-Rex100. TIL growth was successfully initiated in G-Rex10 flasks from tumor digests from 13 of 14 patients and from tumor fragments in all 11 tumor samples tested. TIL could then be expanded to 8–10×109 cells in a two-step REP which began by seeding 5 × 106 TIL into a G-Rex100 flask, followed by expansion at day 7 into 3 G-Rex100 flasks. To obtain the 30 to 60 × 109 cells used for patient treatment we seeded 6 G-Rex100 flasks with 5×106 cells and expanded into 18 G-Rex100 flasks. Large scale TIL REP in gas-permeable flasks requires approximately 9 to 10 liters of media, about 3 to 4 times less than other methods. In conclusion, TIL initiation and REP in gas-permeable G-Rex flasks require fewer total vessels, less media, less incubator space and less labor than initiation and REP in 24-well plates, tissue culture flasks and bags. TIL culture in G-Rex flasks will facilitate the production of TIL at the numbers required for patient treatment at most cell processing laboratories. PMID:22421946

  15. Fluid-dynamical and poro-elastic coupling of gas permeability of inert and sorbing gases on an Australian sub-bituminous coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Krooss, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction and the coupling of slip-flow, a fluid dynamic phenomenon, and the cleat volume compressibility which is a poroelastic phenomenon has been investigated on two samples from the Taroom coal measure, Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. Measurements were performed using inert (helium and argon) and sorbing gases (nitrogen, methane and carbon dioxide) at controlled effective stress. We observed the following regular sequence of permeability coefficients for the different gases: Helium >> argon => nitrogen > methane >> CO2 Even after slip-flow correction, different intrinsic permeability coefficients are obtained for the same sample if different gases are used in the tests. The permeability values determined with helium are largest while those measured with CO2 are lowest. Inert gases like helium and argon show higher apparent- and even slip flow-corrected permeability coefficients than sorbing gases like methane or carbon dioxide. This observation is contrary to the prediction that the slip-flow corrected permeability have to be the same for all gases. The cleat volume compressibility cf was evaluated using the 'matchstick approach' [1, 2]. The cleat volume compressibility coefficients cf are almost identical for the two samples taken from the same well. However, for one sample a strong dependence of the cf with the mean pore pressure was observed. This is attributed to a strong slip-flow effect caused by a narrow cleat system as compared to the sister sample. The cleat volume compressibility coefficient cf is almost the same for inert and sorbing gases. We conclude that the occurrence of slip-flow in coals is able to compensate the permeability reduction resulting from increasing effective stress. This should lead to a much higher productivity of coal bed methane reservoirs in the third production phase (pseudo-steady state phase; [3]). This conclusion appears to be also valid for shale gas and tight gas reservoirs, where the gas transport takes place in

  16. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass

  17. Lox breathing system with gas permeable-liquid impermeable heat exchange and delivery hose

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Mark N.

    1996-01-01

    Life support apparatus composed of: a garment (2): for completely enclosing a wearer and constructed for preventing passage of gas from the environment surrounding the garment (2); a portable receptacle (6) holding a quantity of an oxygen-containing fluid in liquid state, the fluid being in a breathable gaseous; state when at standard temperature and pressure; a fluid flow member (16) secured within the garment (2) and coupled to the receptacle (6) for conducting the fluid in liquid state from the receptacle (6) to the interior of the garment (2); and a fluid flow control device (14) connected for causing fluid to flow from the receptacle (6) to the fluid flow member (16) at a rate determined by the breathable air requirement of the wearer, wherein fluid in liquid state is conducted into the interior of the garment (2) at a rate to be vaporized and heated to a breathable temperature by body heat produced by the wearer.

  18. LOx breathing system with gas permeable-liquid impermeable heat exchange and delivery hose

    DOEpatents

    Hall, M.N.

    1996-04-30

    Life support apparatus is composed of: a garment for completely enclosing a wearer and constructed for preventing passage of gas from the environment surrounding the garment; a portable receptacle holding a quantity of an oxygen-containing fluid in liquid state, the fluid being in a breathable gaseous state when at standard temperature and pressure; a fluid flow member secured within the garment and coupled to the receptacle for conducting the fluid in liquid state from the receptacle to the interior of the garment; and a fluid flow control device connected for causing fluid to flow from the receptacle to the fluid flow member at a rate determined by the breathable air requirement of the wearer, wherein fluid in liquid state is conducted into the interior of the garment at a rate to be vaporized and heated to a breathable temperature by body heat produced by the wearer. 6 figs.

  19. Formation of intermetallic phases in AlSi7Fe1 alloy processed under microgravity and forced fluid flow conditions and their influence on the permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, S.; Ratke, L.; Zimmermann, G.; Budenkova, O.

    2016-03-01

    Ternary Al-6.5wt.%Si-0.93wt.%Fe alloy samples were directionally solidified on-board of the International Space Station ISS in the ESA payload Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) equipped with Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) under both purely diffusive and stimulated convective conditions induced by a rotating magnetic field. Using different analysis techniques the shape and distribution of the intermetallic phase β-Al5SiFe in the dendritic microstructure was investigated, to study the influence of solidification velocity and fluid flow on the size and spatial arrangement of intermetallics. Deep etching as well as 3-dimensional computer tomography measurements characterized the size and the shape of β-Al5SiFe platelets: Diffusive growth results in a rather homogeneous distribution of intermetallic phases, whereas forced flow promotes an increase in the amount and the size of β-Al5SiFe platelets in the centre region of the samples. The β-Al5SiFe intermetallics can form not only simple platelets, but also be curved, branched, crossed, interacting with dendrites and porosity located. This leads to formation of large and complex groups of Fe-rich intermetallics, which reduce the melt flow between dendrites leading to lower permeability of the mushy zone and might significantly decrease feeding ability in castings.

  20. Does low gas permeability of rigid-shelled gekkotan eggs affect embryonic development?

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robin M; Thompson, Michael B; Greene, Virginia W

    2013-06-01

    Parchment-shelled eggs are characteristic of most squamates, including the basal clades of gekkotan lizards. The majority of gekkotan lizards, however, produce rigid-shelled eggs that are highly impermeable to gas exchange; eggs are laid in dry sites and experience a net loss of water during incubation. We tested the hypothesis that the 1,000-fold lower rate of oxygen diffusion through the shells of rigid- compared to parchment-shelled eggs imposes a physiological cost on development. To do this, we contrasted species with rigid and with parchment shells with regards to (1) rates of embryonic metabolism and (2) rates and patterns of development of the yolk sac and chorioallantois, the vascularized extra-embryonic membranes that transport oxygen to embryonic tissues. Metabolic rates of embryos from the rigid-shelled eggs of Gehyra variegata did not differ from those of the parchment-shelled eggs of Oedura lesueurii. Moreover, maximum metabolic rates of gekkotans with rigid shells did not differ from those of gekkotan or scincid lizards with parchment shells. In contrast, the yolk sac covered more of the surface area of the egg at oviposition, and the chorioallantois reached its full extent earlier for the species with rigid shelled eggs (Chondrodactylus turneri, G. variegata) than for the species with parchment-shelled eggs (Eublepharis macularius, O. lesueurii). Differences in the temporal patterns of yolk sac and chorioallantois development would thus serve to compensate for low rates of oxygen diffusion through rigid shells of gekkotans. PMID:23495191

  1. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Quarterly report, August 16, 1989--November 15, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The goal of this task is to accurately measure the elongation and shrinkage exhibited by coal as it sorbs and desorbs methane gas at elevated pressure. Our research group has discussed several possible methods to measure this strain, including: optical microscopy, laser interferometry, conventional strain gauges, and LVDT strain gauges. There are advantages and disadvantages of each method. We had planned to use optical microscopy but, on further investigation, this approach will be less satisfactory than the strain gauge method. Accordingly, we have switched our focws to the use of strain gauges. Conventional strain gauges also involve potential problems which must be overcome, including: (1) Contrast in strength between the coal and the strain gauge must be minimized, (2) The proper glue that is neither too strong or too weak must be used to affix the strain gauge to the coal or the strain in the coal will not be accurately transmitted to the gauge, and (3) We must be aware that the total strain in the coal may not be homogeneously distributed through the specimen (due either either to boundary effects or contrast in composition of the coal layers). A high pressure chamber for sorption-strain experiments is currently being tested an modified and tested. The chamber will accommodate several small blocks of coal simultaneously. This will optimize efficiency, owing to the long times required to reequilibrate the coal blocks to changes in methane pressure.

  2. Radon concentration in soil gas and its correlations with pedologies, permeabilities and 226Ra content in the soil of the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte - RMBH, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, E.; Rocha, Z.; Palmieri, H. E. L.; Santos, T. O.; Rios, F. J.; Oliveira, A. H.

    2015-11-01

    The radon concentration in soil gas is directly dependent on the geological characteristics of the area, such as lithology, pedology and on geochemicals, physicals and mineralogicals parameters of the soil. This paper looks for correlations between radon concentrations in soil gas and its soil permeability, 238U, 232Th and 226Ra contents in the soil groups classified by pedologies of Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte (RMBH), Minas Gerais, Brazil. The soil gas radon concentrations were determined by using an AlphaGUARD® monitor at about 150 measurement points. In soil samples of the same measurement points, the concentrations of 226Ra were determined by gamma spectrometry (HPGe), and 238U and 232Th by ICP-MS. The soil permeabilities were determined by using the RADON-JOK® permeameter. The mean concentrations of radon in soil gas ranged from 13.6±3.0 kBq m-3 for Litholic Neosols until 60.6±8.7 kBq m-3 for Perferric Red Latosols. The mean of 226Ra activity concentrations presented variation of 12.4±2.5 Bq kg-1 for Litholic Neosols until 50.3±13 Bq kg-1 for Perferric Red Latosols. Approximately 40% of the soils presented high permeability. The areas of different pedologies were classified by Soil Radon Index (SRI), determined by the soil gas radon concentration and permeability. Approximately 53% of the Perferric Red Latosols measurement site could be classified as "High Risk" (Swedish criteria). The preliminary results may indicate an influence of iron formations present very close to the Perferric Red Latosols in the retention of uranium minerals, and hence an increase in the concentration of radon and radium, whereas the series are in equilibrium in the environment.

  3. Development of a cell permeable red-shifted CHEF-based chemosensor for Al3 + ion by controlling PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Manjira; Sen, Buddhadeb; Pal, Siddhartha; Maji, Abhishek; Budhadev, Darshita; Chattopadhyay, Pabitra

    2016-03-01

    A structurally modified quinazoline derivative (L) acts as highly selective chemosensor for Al3 + ions in DMSO-H2O (1:9, v/v) over the other competitive metal ions. L shows a red shifted fluorescence after the addition of Al3 + ions and later the further fluorescence enhancement is due to chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) through inhibition of photoinduced electron transfer (PET). This probe (L) detects Al3 + ions as low as 9 nM in DMSO-H2O (1:9, v/v) at biological pH. The non-cytotoxic probe (L) can efficiently detect the intercellular distribution of Al3 + ions in living cells under a fluorescence microscope to exhibit its sensible applications in the biological systems.

  4. Dynamics of soil gas radon concentration in a highly permeable soil based on a long-term high temporal resolution observation series.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Katalin Zsuzsanna; Jordan, Gyozo; Horváth, Ákos; Szabó, Csaba

    2013-10-01

    This paper studies the temporal variation of soil gas radon activity concentration in a highly permeable (k = 2.0E-11 m(2)) sandy-gravelly soil in order to understand if temporal variation of soil gas radon activity concentration can affect geogenic radon potential determination. Geogenic radon potential provides information about the potential risk from radon. Its calculation takes into account the equilibrium, saturated at infinite depth, soil gas radon activity concentration (c∞). This concentration may vary at annual time scale due to the environmental conditions. A long-term (yearly) and high temporal resolution (15 min) observation, applied in this study, reveal various temporal features such as long-term trend, seasonality, daily periodicity and sudden events in soil gas radon time series. Results show seasonal and daily periodical variation of the measured soil gas radon activity concentration (csoilRn) in a highly permeable sandy-gravelly soil with definite seasons without obvious long transitional periods. The winter (from October 2010 to April 2011) is characterized by 2.5 times higher average soil gas radon activity concentration (median is 7.0 kBq m(-3)) than the summer (August, September 2010 and May, June, July 2011) (median is 2.8 kBq m(-3)). Daily periodicity, which is much less than the seasonal one, controls the soil gas radon activity concentration mainly in the summer season. Average (AM) value of csoilRn is higher at night than in the daytime with about 18% and 3.8% in summer and in winter, respectively. As a conclusion, in case of single csoilRn measurement on a highly permeable (k ≥ 2.0E-11 m(2)) soil, similar to our test site, csoilRn should be corrected according to the seasons for calculating the equilibrium activity concentration c∞ value. PMID:23669415

  5. Contact lens impact on quality of life in keratoconus patients: rigid gas permeable versus soft silicone-hydrogel keratoconus lenses

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Elvin Hatice; Erdurmus, Mesut; Elibol, Emine Savran; Acar, Banu; Vural, Ece Turan

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the impact of rigid gas permeable (RGP) and silicone-hydrogel keratoconus lenses on the quality of life (QoL) in keratoconus (KCN) patients using the self-reported results from the Contact Lens Impact on Quality of Life (CLIQ) Questionnaire. METHODS From January 2013 to April 2013, 27 consecutive KCN patients who wore RGP contact lenses (conflexair100 UV KE Zeiss-Wöhlk) or soft silicone-hydrogel contact lenses (SHCLs) for KCN (KeraSoft IC- Bausch&Lomb or Hydrocone Toris K–Swiss lens) completed the CLIQ questionnaire. RESULTS The mean age of 27 patients was 29.6±8.0y. Fifteen patients were RGP user. The groups were comparable with respect to the mean patient age, sex, and mean K values (P=0.1, P=0.8 and P=0.1, respectively). The mean CLIQperson measure was 42.8±5.5 in RGP group and 39.6±5.5 in SHCLs for KCN group (P=0.06). CLIQperson measure was positively correlated with steep K value (r=0.301, P=0.04). When eyes were stratified by visual acuity with contact lenses, the mean CLIQperson measure was 42.01±5.6 in eyes with a visual acuity of 20/20-20/25 (n=44) and 38.4±5.26 in eyes with a visual acuity of 20/32 or less (n=10; P=0.097). CONCLUSION RGP lenses and SHCLs for KCN have similar impact on QoL. PMID:26558228

  6. Development of modified flyash as a permeable reactive barrier medium for a former manufactured gas plant site, Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, R.; Phillips, D. H.; McGeough, K. L.; Walsh, K. P.; Kalin, R. M.

    2006-05-01

    A sequential biological permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was determined to be the best option for remediating groundwater that has become contaminated with a wide range of organic contaminants (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and polyaromatic hydrocarbons), heavy metals (i.e., lead and arsenic), and cyanide at a former manufactured gas plant after 150 years of operation in Portadown, Northern Ireland. The objective of this study was to develop a modified flyash that could be used in the initial cell within a sequential biological PRB to filter complex contaminated groundwater containing ammonium. Flyash modified with lime (CaOH) and alum was subjected to a series of batch tests which investigated the modified cation exchange capacity (CEC) and rate of removal of anions and cations from the solution. These tests showed that a high flyash composition medium (80%) could remove 8.65 mol of ammonium contaminant for every kilogram of medium. The modified CEC procedure ruled out the possibility of cation exchange as the major removal mechanism. The medium could also adsorb anions as well as cations (i.e., Pb and Cr), but not with the same capacity. The initial mechanism for Pb and Cr removal is probably precipitation. This is followed by sorption, which is possibly the only mechanism for the removal of dichromate anions. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed very small (<1 μm) cubic highly crystalline precipitates on the flyash, although this new crystalline zeolite growth did not occur rapidly enough to enable productive zeolite formation. Surface area measurements showed that biofilm growth on the medium could be a major factor in the comparative reduction of surface area between real and synthetic contaminant groundwaters. The modified flyash was found to be a highly sorptive granular material that did not inhibit microbiological activity, however, leaching tests revealed that the medium would fail as a long-term barrier material.

  7. Kinky vitrinite reflectance well profiles: evidence of paleopore pressure in low-permeability, gas-bearing sequences in Rocky Mountain foreland basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Nuccio, V.F.; Barker, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Vitrinite reflectance (Rm) profiles of wells drilled in abnormally pressured, low-permeability gas-bearing sequences in Rocky Mountain foreland basins are commonly non-linear with two or more nonparallel segments. These kinky profiles are most likely due to perturbations of the thermal gradient caused by contrasting heat transfer processes associated with the development of abnormally high pressures. We interpret the intersection of the shallow and intermediate Rm segments to mark the approximate original boundary between normal-pressured, water-bearing rocks and underlying overpressured gas- and water-bearing rocks. The intersection of the intermediate and deep Rm segments marks the approximate original boundary between overpressured gas- and water-bearing rocks and underlying overpressured gas-bearing rocks. However, because overpressuring is a transient condition that eventually evolves into normal pressuring or underpressuring, these intersections may not coincide with the present top of abnormal pressuring. -from Authors

  8. Permeability anisotropy of serpentinite and fluid migration in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, S.; Katayama, I.; Okazaki, K.

    2010-12-01

    Subduction zones are the place where water is transported into the Earth's interior and causes arc volcanism and seismic activities. Subducting slabs release most of the water to the mantle wedge by the dehydration reactions, and the expelled water reacts with mantle rocks, forming serpentinite at the plate interface. The existence of hydrous layer has been detected by low- velocity anomaly and high-Poison's ratio in several subduction zones (Kamiya and Kobayashi 2000 ; Brocher et al. 2003). The migration of water is generally considered to move upward by buoyancy in the mantle. However, if the hydrous layer is extensively deformed, the migration of water can be controlled by the deformation plane within such layer. In order to test this hypothesis, we analyzed the permeability anisotropy of serpentinite with a strongly-developed schistosity and discuss fluid migration in the subduction systems. Serpentinite samples were collected from Nishisonogi metamorphic terrane in Nagasaki, which schistosity is well-defined developed. Two types of experimental samples were prepared: one is parallel to schistosity and the other is perpendicular. We used intra-vessel deformation and fluid- flow apparatus (IVA) in Hiroshima University to measure the permeability. In this study, we measured gas permeability using nitrogen gas and water permeability under isotropic pressure. Gas permeability was measured using the constant flow method, and water permeability was similar to gas and the transient pulse method was also used. The experiments were conducted at confining pressures up to 50 MPa, pore pressures up to 8 MPa at room temperature. We converted gas permeability to intrinsic permeability with Klinkenberg effect. The permeability decreased with increasing confining pressure, and intrinsic permeability of samples parallel to schistosity were about 10^-20 m2 at confining pressure of 50 MPa. We observed two types of pressure effect: one is significant decline due to crack filling

  9. Monitoring water stable isotope composition in soils using gas-permeable tubing and infrared laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfuss, Youri; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The water stable isotopologues 1H2H16O and 1H218O are powerful tracers of processes occurring in nature. Their slightly different masses as compared to the most abundant water isotopologue (1H216O) affect their thermodynamic (e.g. during chemical equilibrium reactions or physical phase transitions with equilibration) and kinetic (liquid and vapor phases transport processes and chemical reactions without equilibration) properties. This results in measurable differences of the isotopic composition of water within or between the different terrestrial ecosystem compartments (i.e. sub-soil, soil, surface waters, plant, and atmosphere). These differences can help addressing a number of issues, among them water balance closure and flux partitioning from the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum at the field to regional scales. In soils particularly, the isotopic composition of water (δ2H and δ18O) provides qualitative information about whether water has only infiltrated or already been re-evaporated since the last rainfall event or about the location of the evaporation front. From water stable isotope composition profiles measured in soils, it is also possible, under certain hypotheses, to derive quantitative information such as soil evaporation flux and the identification of root water uptake depths. In addition, water stable isotopologues have been well implemented into physically based Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer models (e.g. SiSPAT-Isotope; Soil-Litter iso; TOUGHREACT) and have demonstrated their potential. However, the main disadvantage of the isotope methodology is that, contrary to other soil state variables that can be monitored over long time periods, δ2H and δ18O are typically analyzed following destructive sampling. Here, we present a non-destructive method for monitoring soil liquid water δ2H and δ18O over a wide range of water availability conditions and temperatures by sampling and measuring water vapor equilibrated with soil water using gas-permeable

  10. Crustal Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebritsen, S.; Gleeson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Existing data and models support a distinction between the hydrodynamics of the brittle upper crust, where topography, permeability contrasts, and magmatic heat sources dominate patterns of flow and externally derived (meteoric) fluids are common, and the ductile lower crust, dominated by devolatilization reactions and internally derived fluids. The permeability structure of the uppermost (~<1 km) crust is highly heterogeneous, and controls include primary lithology, porosity, rheology, geochemistry, and tectonic and time-temperature histories of the rocks. Systematic permeability differences among original lithologies persist to contact-metamorphic depths of 3-10 km, but are not evident at regional-metamorphic depths of 10-30+ km - presumably because, at such depths, metamorphic textures become largely independent of the original lithology. Permeability can vary in time as well as space, and its temporal evolution may be gradual or abrupt: streamflow responses to moderate to large earthquakes demonstrate that dynamic stresses can instantaneously change permeability by factors of up to 20 on a regional scale, whereas a 10-fold decrease in the permeability of a package of shale in a compacting basin may require 107years. Temporal variation is enhanced by strong chemical and thermal disequilibrium; thus lab experiments involving hydrothermal flow in crystalline rocks under pressure, temperature, and chemistry gradients often result in 10-fold permeability decreases over daily to sub-annual time scales. Recent research on enhanced geothermal reservoirs, ore-forming systems, and the hydrologic effects of earthquakes consistently shows that shear dislocation caused by tectonic forcing or fluid injection can increase near-to intermediate-field permeability by factors of 100 to 1000. Nonetheless, considering permeability as static parameter is often a reasonable assumption for low-temperature hydrogeologic investigations with time scales of days to decades.

  11. Sub-70 nm resolution patterning of high etch-resistant epoxy novolac resins using gas permeable templates in ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to expand the resolution limits of epoxy novolac resins that have enhanced etch resistance as one of the desirable resist properties for next-generation devices. Epoxy novolac resins have high etch resistance. However, because epoxy novolac resins are either solid or semisolid at room temperature, and because the use of volatile solvents in resist can be a cause of pattern failure in nanoimprint lithography, epoxy novolac resins have been of limited utility as resist. Excellent sub-70 nm resolution patterning can be achieved by diluting 15 wt % acetone in an ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography using gas-permeable templates.

  12. Growth of AlGaN epilayers related gas-phase reactions using TPIS-MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunwoon; Seo, Junho; Lee, Kyuhan; Lee, Haeseok; Park, Keunseop; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2002-11-01

    AlGaN epilayers on GaN/sapphire were successfully grown under various growth conditions using a thermally pre-cracked ion-supplied metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The Al composition in the solid was affected by the gas-phase parasitic reaction between NH 3 and trimethylaluminum (TMAl). As the operating pressure decreased, the Al composition in the solid increased over the ideal incorporation efficiency. This is due to a scavenging effect and a site-blocking effect. As the TMAl flow rate increased with fixed flow rates of NH 3 and trimethylgallium (TMGa), the Al concentration in the solid increased but started to saturate. As the TMGa flow rate decreased, the solid Al composition increased linearly, which means different parasitic reactions between TMGa:NH 3 and TMAl:NH 3. In addition, we found that the separating plate that was inserted to the reactor in front of the heated susceptor to separate ammonia gas flow from MO source input played an important role in the AlGaN growth. Particularly, the separating plate was more attractive under high operating pressure. When it was inserted, a white crystalline solid formed by the adduct (TMAl:NH 3) of parasitic reaction in the gas phase disappeared. It also increased the Al concentration in the solid. SEM images of AlGaN epilayer's surface showed many small islands due to the lack of surface mobility of adatoms.

  13. Synthesis and analysis of novel polymers with high permselectivity and permeability in gas separation applications. Progress report, December 1990--November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Koros, W.J.; Paul, D.R.

    1991-11-15

    We have synthesized and completed characterization of permeability and selectivity properties of a group of polysulfones and polyether ketones with the potential for higher use temperatures, as well as members of a series of polyesters derived from spirobiindane bisphenol monomer in conjunction with meta and para substituted diacid chlorides. We have also synthesized and characterized the gas transport and thermal properties of diphenyl substituted polyphenylene oxide. The diphenyl substituted material has a potential for higher temperature applications than the standard dimethyl substituted polymer. The temperature dependence of the gas transport properties for the oxygen/nitrogen system was characterized over the range from 35 to 65{degree}C for both of these analog materials.

  14. The Impacts of Rock Composition and Properties on the Ability to Stimulate Production of Ultra-Low Permeability Oil and Gas Reservoirs Through Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoback, M. D.; Sone, H.; Kohli, A. H.; Heller, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, we present the results of several research projects investigating how rock properties, natural fractures and the state of stress affect the success of hydraulic fracturing operations during stimulation of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs. First, through laboratory measurements on samples of the Barnett, Eagle Ford, Haynesville and Horn River shales, we discuss pore structure, adsorption and permeability as well as the importance of clay content on the viscoplastic behavior of shale formations. Second, we present several lines of evidence that indicates that the principal way in which hydraulic fracturing stimulates production from shale gas reservoirs is by inducing slow slip on pre-existing fractures and faults, which are not detected by conventional microseismic monitoring, Finally, we discuss how hydraulic fracturing can be optimized in response to variations of rock properties.

  15. Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

  16. Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

  17. Splat Formation and Adhesion Mechanisms of Cold Gas-Sprayed Al Coatings on Al2O3 Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.; Wielage, B.; Manygoats, K.; Schucknecht, T.; Rafaja, D.

    2014-01-01

    The metallization of ceramics by means of cold gas spraying (CGS) has been in the focus of numerous publications in the recent past. However, the bonding mechanism of metallic coatings on non-ductile substrates is still not fully understood. Former investigations of titanium coatings deposited on corundum revealed that a combination of recrystallization induced by adiabatic shear processes and hetero-epitaxial growth might be responsible for the high adhesion strengths of coatings applied on smooth ceramic surfaces. In the present work, the interface formation between CGS aluminum and alumina substrates is examined for different particle sizes and substrate temperatures. Furthermore, the influence of subsequent heat treatment on tensile strength and hardness is investigated. The splat formation of single particles is examined by means of scanning electron microscopy, while a high resolution transmission electron microscope is used to study the Al/Al2O3 interface. First results suggest that mechanical interlocking is the primary adhesion mechanism on polycrystalline substrates having the roughness in sub-micrometer range, while the heteroepitaxy between Al and Al2O3 can be considered as the main bonding mechanism for single-crystalline sapphire (α-Al2O3) substrates with the surface roughness in nanometer range. The heteroepitaxial growth is facilitated by deformation-induced recrystallisation of CGS aluminum.

  18. Vapor-liquid phase separator permeability results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Continued studies are described in the area of vapor-liquid phase separator work with emphasis on permeabilities of porous sintered plugs (stainless steel, nominal pore size 2 micrometer). The temperature dependence of the permeability has been evaluated in classical fluid using He-4 gas at atmospheric pressure and in He-2 on the basis of a modified, thermosmotic permeability of the normal fluid.

  19. Structure/Permeability Relationships Of Polyimide Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; Yamamoto, H.; Mi, Y.; Stern, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of permeabilities, by each of five gases, of membranes made of four different polyimides. Conducted to gain understanding of effects of molecular structures of membranes on permeabilities and to assess potential for exploitation of selective permeability in gas-separation processes. Gases used: H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4.

  20. Production of Mg and Al Auger electrons by noble gas ion bombardment of Mg and Al surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Pepper, S. V.

    1976-01-01

    Relative production efficiencies of Mg and Al Auger electrons by He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe ion bombardment are reported as a function of ion energy for energies not exceeding 3 keV. The experimental apparatus employed consisted of a LEED-Auger system equipped with an ion gun and a four-grid retarding-potential analyzer. It is found that: (1) the shape of the ion-excited Auger signal was independent of the rare gas and quite symmetric; (2) the Al signal was about an order of magnitude smaller than the Mg signal for a given bombarding species and ion-gun voltage; (3) no signal was observed for He(+) bombardment under any of the experimental conditions; (4) signal strengths were independent of temperature and ion dose; (5) the Auger production efficiencies differed by no more than a factor of two among the different gases - except for He(+) - on a given metal; (6) all the signal strengths increased with increasing ion-gun voltage, with no maximum exhibited; and (7) the apparent threshold energy for the Al signal was higher than that for the Mg signal. The differences between the results for the two metals are attributed to the fact that the Al 2p orbital lies deeper in energy and closer to the nucleus than the corresponding Mg orbital.

  1. Numerical investigation of permeability models for low viscosity magmas: application to the 2007 Stromboli effusive eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spina, Giuseppe; Burton, Mike; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Landi, Patrizia; Polacci, Margherita

    2016-04-01

    Magma permeability is the most important factor controlling the transition between effusive and explosive activity of a basaltic eruption. Indeed, when low viscosity magmas are not permeable enough, volatiles stay trapped into the melt, expanding and pushing up more and more magma as the pressure decreases. As soon as the volume fraction of the gas, or the overpressure of the bubbles, or the strain rate of the melt becomes too large, magma fragments, generating an explosive eruption. On the contrary, if magma is sufficiently permeable, gas is able to decouple from the melt and fragmentation does not occur, causing, thus, an effusive eruption. A correct modelisation of gas/magma decoupling is, therefore, fundamental to properly understand the ascent dynamics occurring during an eruption. Here we study several permeability models for a low viscosity magma using a 1D steady-state model for magma ascent dynamics, focussing, in particular, on the 2007 effusive eruption at Stromboli volcano, Italy. We compare the numerical solutions computed using respectively Darcy's and Forchheimer's law. We also take into account the different expressions for Darcian permeability introduced by Bai et al. (2010, 2011) for Stromboli volcano, comparing them against a new expression for permeability derived from the data collected by Polacci et al. (2009) on Stromboli scoria. The numerical results show that using the permeability expressions of Bai et al. (2010, 2011) with Darcy's law, magma fragments into an explosive eruption. Using the new permeability model, instead, the decoupling between gas and magma is sufficient to generate an effusive eruption. However, when Forchheimer's law is adopted, fragmentation is always achieved, even with our new permeability. For a broader investigation on permeability, we also adopt the permeability relation introduced by Degruyter et al. (2012) as a function of three parameters: bubble number density, throat-bubble size ratio, and tortuosity factor

  2. A Fast Network Flow Model is used in conjunction with Measurements of Filter Permeability to calculate the Performance of Hot Gas Filters

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, J.G.; Chiang, T-K.

    2002-09-19

    Two different technologies that are being considered for generating electric power on a large scale by burning coal are Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems and Integrated Gasification and Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Particulate emission regulations that have been proposed for future systems may require that these systems be fitted with large scale Hot Gas Clean-Up (HGCU) filtration systems that would remove the fine particulate matter from the hot gas streams that are generated by PFBC and IGCC systems. These hot gas filtration systems are geometrically and aerodynamically complex. They typically are constructed with large arrays of ceramic candle filter elements (CFE). The successful design of these systems require an accurate assessment of the rate at which mechanical energy of the gas flow is dissipated as it passes through the filter containment vessel and the individual candle filter elements that make up the system. Because the filtration medium is typically made of a porous ceramic material having open pore sizes that are much smaller than the dimensions of the containment vessel, the filtration medium is usually considered to be a permeable medium that follows Darcy's law. The permeability constant that is measured in the lab is considered to be a function of the filtration medium only and is usually assumed to apply equally to all the filters in the vessel as if the flow were divided evenly among all the filter elements. In general, the flow of gas through each individual CFE will depend not only on the geometrical characteristics of the filtration medium, but also on the local mean flows in the filter containment vessel that a particular filter element sees. The flow inside the CFE core, through the system manifolds, and inside the containment vessel itself will be coupled to the flow in the filter medium by various Reynolds number effects. For any given filter containment vessel, since the mean flows are different in different locations

  3. Electrodeposited MCrAlY Coatings for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Electrolytic codeposition is a promising alternative process for fabricating MCrAlY coatings. The coating process involves two steps, i.e., codeposition of CrAlY-based particles and a metal matrix of Ni, Co, or (Ni,Co), followed by a diffusion heat treatment to convert the composite coating to the desired MCrAlY microstructure. Despite the advantages such as low cost and non-line-of-sight, this coating process is less known than electron beam-physical vapor deposition and thermal spray processes for manufacturing high-temperature coatings. This article provides an overview of the electro-codeposited MCrAlY coatings for gas turbine engine applications, highlighting the unique features of this coating process and some important findings in the past 30 years. Challenges and research opportunities for further optimization of this type of MCrAlY coatings are also discussed.

  4. Simplified gas sensor model based on AlGaN/GaN heterostructure Schottky diode

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Subhashis Majumdar, S.; Kumar, R.; Bag, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Biswas, D.

    2015-08-28

    Physics based modeling of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure Schottky diode gas sensor has been investigated for high sensitivity and linearity of the device. Here the surface and heterointerface properties are greatly exploited. The dependence of two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) upon the surface charges is mainly utilized. The simulation of Schottky diode has been done in Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool and I-V curves are generated, from the I-V curves 76% response has been recorded in presence of 500 ppm gas at a biasing voltage of 0.95 Volt.

  5. Simplified gas sensor model based on AlGaN/GaN heterostructure Schottky diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subhashis; Majumdar, S.; Kumar, R.; Chakraborty, A.; Bag, A.; Biswas, D.

    2015-08-01

    Physics based modeling of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure Schottky diode gas sensor has been investigated for high sensitivity and linearity of the device. Here the surface and heterointerface properties are greatly exploited. The dependence of two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) upon the surface charges is mainly utilized. The simulation of Schottky diode has been done in Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool and I-V curves are generated, from the I-V curves 76% response has been recorded in presence of 500 ppm gas at a biasing voltage of 0.95 Volt.

  6. Chemically Designed Molecular Interfaces in Cross-Linked Poly(ethylene glycol)/Silica Nanocomposites Reveal Strong Size-Dependent Trends in Gas Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Norman; Urban, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposite membranes can exhibit gas separation performance that surpasses conventional polymeric membranes. While promising, the optimization of nanocomposite membranes requires a fundamental understanding of the transport mechanism and interfacial effects between the inorganic and polymer phase that is currently limited to empirical relationships. Synthesized nanocomposites often consist of poorly distributed and polydisperse inorganic nanomaterials. It is known that polymer dynamics can change drastically upon introduction of an inorganic phase, which can dramatically alter molecular transport behavior. Here, we systematically explore the role of nanoparticle sizes from 12 to 130 nm on polymer dynamics and permeability in a series of cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol)/silica nanocomposite membranes. The nanocomposites are well-dispersed and display excellent homogeneity throughout. Size-dependent broadening of the Tg indicates strong attractive interactions especially at high surface area loadings, which lead to deviations in permeability not captured by Maxwell's model. Chemical modifications of silica at this interface can yield significantly different polymer dynamics than previously observed with enhanced transport and mechanical properties.

  7. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Second quarterly report, November 15, 1989--February 15, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Tsay, F.

    1990-12-31

    Measurement of sorption capacity of coals by microbalance in a high pressure environment requires that corrections be made for the buoyancy of the gas that is displaced by the solid coal. As the pressure increases, the gas density increases, requiring that a correction factor be applied to the weight of the sample as measured by microbalance. A brief report summarizing this correction is attached as Appendix A.

  8. Determination of permeability index using Stoneley slowness analysis, NMR models, and formation evaluations: a case study from a gas reservoir, south of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Mirhasan; Javaherian, Abdolrahim; Movahed, Bahram

    2014-10-01

    In hydrocarbon reservoirs, permeability is one of the most critical parameters with a significant role in the production of hydrocarbon resources. Direct determination of permeability using Stoneley waves has always had some difficulties. In addition, some un-calibrated empirical models such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) models and petrophysical evaluation model (intrinsic permeability) do not provide reliable estimates of permeability in carbonate formations. Therefore, utilizing an appropriate numerical method for direct determination of permeability using Stoneley waves as well as an appropriate calibration method for the empirical models is necessary to have reliable results. This paper shows the application of a numerical method, called bisection method, in the direct determination of permeability from Stoneley wave slowness. In addition, a linear regression (least squares) method was used to calibrate the NMR models including Schlumberger Doll Research (SDR) and Timur-Coates models as well as the intrinsic permeability equation (permeability from petrophysical evaluations). The Express Pressure Tester (XPT) permeability was considered as an option for the reference permeability. Therefore, all permeability models were validated for the Stoneley permeability and calibrated for the empirical models with the XPT permeability. In order to have a quantitative assessment on the results and compare the results before and after the calibration, the Root Mean Squares Error (RMSE) was calculated for each of the used models. The results for the Stoneley permeability showed that, in many points there was not much difference between the Stoneley permeability calculated by the bisection method and the XPT permeability. Comparing the results showed that the calibration of the empirical models reduced their RMSE values. As a result of the calibration, the RMSE was decreased by about 39% for the SDR model, 18% for the Timur-Coates model, and 91% for the petrophysical

  9. Study of the gas inclusions in Al 2O 3/Y 3Al 5O 12 and Al 2O 3/Y 3Al 5O 12/ZrO 2 eutectic fibers grown by laser floating zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliete, Patricia B.; Peña, José I.

    2007-06-01

    Gas bubbles appear in some metal oxides grown by directional solidification in air when high growth rates are used. The incorporation of bubbles in Al 2O 3-YAG (AY) and Al 2O 3-YAG-ZrO 2 (AYZ) eutectic crystals grown using the laser floating zone method was investigated. The effect of different growth experimental parameters was considered. Growth rate, rod diameter and growth atmosphere were found to be determinant in order to reduce the gas inclusions. The optimization of the growth parameters allowed to grow AY and AYZ eutectic crystals free of bubbles at very high growth rates at which interphase spacings smaller than 300 nm were obtained.

  10. Ammonia quantitative analysis model based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rongfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ammonia quantitative analysis based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model was proposed. Al plate anodic gas-ionization sensor was used to obtain the current-voltage (I-V) data. Measurement data was processed by non-linear bistable dynamics model. Results showed that the proposed method quantitatively determined ammonia concentrations. PMID:25975362

  11. Nitrogen recovery from liquid manure using gas-permeable membranes: Effect of wastewater strength and pH control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The costs of fertilizers have rapidly increased in recent years, especially nitrogen (N) fertilizer such as anhydrous ammonia which is made from natural gas. Thus, new treatment technologies for abatement of ammonia emissions in livestock operations are being focused on N recovery in addition to the...

  12. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)–Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    PubMed Central

    Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model. PMID:24957061

  13. PAH assessment in the main Brazilian offshore oil and gas production area using semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMD) and transplanted bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André Lourenço, Rafael; Francisco de Oliveira, Fábio; Haddad Nudi, Adriana; Rebello Wagener, Ângela de Luca; Guadalupe Meniconi, Maria de Fátima; Francioni, Eleine

    2015-06-01

    The Campos Basin is Brazil's main oil and gas production area. In 2013, more than 50 million cubic meters of produced water (PW) was discharged into these offshore waters. Despite the large volumes of PW that are discharged in the Campos Basin each day, the ecological concern of the chemicals in the PW are not completely understood. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are the most important contributors to the ecological hazards that are posed by discharged PW. This study aimed to evaluate the potential bioaccumulation of PAH using transplanted bivalves (Nodipecten nodosus) and semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMD). The study was conducted in two platforms that discharge PW (P19 and P40). Another platform that does not discharge PW (P25) was investigated for comparison with the obtained results. Time-integrated hydrocarbon concentrations using SPMD and transplanted bivalves were estimated from the seawater near the three platforms. The bioaccumulation of the PAH in the transplanted bivalves at platforms P19 and P40 were up to fivefold greater than the bioaccumulation of the PAH at platform P25. The lowest PAH concentrations were estimated for platform P25 (4.3-6.2 ng L-1), and the highest PAH concentrations were estimated for platform P19 (9.2-37.3 ng L-1). Both techniques were effective for determining the bioavailability of the PAH and for providing time-integrated hydrocarbon concentrations regarding oil and gas production activities.

  14. The Effect of Pericellular Oxygen Levels on Proteomic Profile and Lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Differentiated Preadipocytes Cultured on Gas-Permeable Cultureware.

    PubMed

    Weiszenstein, Martin; Pavlikova, Nela; Elkalaf, Moustafa; Halada, Petr; Seda, Ondrej; Trnka, Jan; Kovar, Jan; Polak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pericellular oxygen concentration represents an important factor in the regulation of cell functions, including cell differentiation, growth and mitochondrial energy metabolism. Hypoxia in adipose tissue has been associated with altered adipokine secretion profile and suggested as a possible factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments provide an indispensable tool in metabolic research, however, physical laws of gas diffusion make prolonged exposure of adherent cells to desired pericellular O2 concentrations questionable. The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effect of various O2 levels (1%, 4% and 20% O2) on the proteomic profile and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 differentiated preadipocytes using gas-permeable cultureware. Following differentiation of cells under desired pericellular O2 concentrations, cell lysates were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and protein visualization using Coomassie blue staining. Spots showing differential expression under hypoxia were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. All identified proteins were subjected to pathway analysis. We observed that protein expression of 26 spots was reproducibly affected by 4% and 1% O2 (17 upregulated and 9 downregulated). Pathway analysis showed that mitochondrial energy metabolism and triglyceride synthesis were significantly upregulated by hypoxia. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the direct effects of pericellular O2 levels on adipocyte energy metabolism and triglyceride synthesis, probably mediated through the reversed tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. PMID:27023342

  15. The Effect of Pericellular Oxygen Levels on Proteomic Profile and Lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Differentiated Preadipocytes Cultured on Gas-Permeable Cultureware

    PubMed Central

    Weiszenstein, Martin; Pavlikova, Nela; Elkalaf, Moustafa; Halada, Petr; Seda, Ondrej; Trnka, Jan; Kovar, Jan; Polak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pericellular oxygen concentration represents an important factor in the regulation of cell functions, including cell differentiation, growth and mitochondrial energy metabolism. Hypoxia in adipose tissue has been associated with altered adipokine secretion profile and suggested as a possible factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments provide an indispensable tool in metabolic research, however, physical laws of gas diffusion make prolonged exposure of adherent cells to desired pericellular O2 concentrations questionable. The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effect of various O2 levels (1%, 4% and 20% O2) on the proteomic profile and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 differentiated preadipocytes using gas-permeable cultureware. Following differentiation of cells under desired pericellular O2 concentrations, cell lysates were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and protein visualization using Coomassie blue staining. Spots showing differential expression under hypoxia were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. All identified proteins were subjected to pathway analysis. We observed that protein expression of 26 spots was reproducibly affected by 4% and 1% O2 (17 upregulated and 9 downregulated). Pathway analysis showed that mitochondrial energy metabolism and triglyceride synthesis were significantly upregulated by hypoxia. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the direct effects of pericellular O2 levels on adipocyte energy metabolism and triglyceride synthesis, probably mediated through the reversed tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. PMID:27023342

  16. Joint modeling of thermal creep and radiation damage interaction with gas permeability and release dynamics: The role of percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovaska, M.; Alava, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear fuel material is an example of a sintered, porous ceramic material. We formulate a two-dimensional model which couples three physical mechanisms in the material: (scalar) damage accumulation by thermal creep and radiation effects, porosity changes due to the damage, and the time-dependent diffusion of (radiation-induced) gases in the pore system thus created. The most important effect in the dynamics arises from the process where the pore system is swept through the percolation transition. The main conclusions that can be drawn concern the fractional gas release and its dependence on the three effects present in the damage dynamics: creep, radiation-induced bubble formation, and recovery due to bubble closure. In the main, the model reproduces the experimentally observed quick gas release phenomenon qualitatively.

  17. Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Al/Al2O3 Duplex Coating on Pipeline Steel X80 in Simulated Oil and Gas Well Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min; Wang, Yu; Wang, Ping-Gu; Shi, Qin-Yi; Zhang, Meng-Xian

    2015-04-01

    Corrosion resistant Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating for pipeline steel X80 was prepared by a combined treatment of low-temperature aluminizing and micro-arc oxidation (MAO). Phase composition and microstructure of mono-layer Fe-Al coating and Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Corrosion resistance of the coated pipeline steel X80 in a simulated oil and gas well condition was also investigated. Mono-layer Fe-Al coating consists of Fe2Al5 and FeAl, which is a suitable transitional layer for the preparation of ceramic coating by MAO on the surface of pipeline steel X80. Under the same corrosion condition at 373 K for 168 h with 1 MPa CO2 and 0.1 MPa H2S, corrosion weight loss rate of pipeline steel X80 with Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating decreased to 23% of original pipeline steel X80, which improved by 10% than that of pipeline steel X80 with mono-layer Fe-Al coating. It cannot find obvious cracks and pits on the corrosion surface of pipeline steel X80 with Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating.

  18. Increasing development efficiency in low-permeability gas reservoirs: A synopsis of tight gas sands project research, November 1982-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Laubach, S.E.

    1993-04-01

    To enhance the application of research results by industry, the report provides a guide to the literature developed at the Bureau of Economic Geology in the Geological Analysis of Primary and Secondary Tight Gas Sands Objectives Project as part of the Gas Research Institute (GRI) Tight Gas Sands Research Program during the period 1982 through 1992. The authors review some of the key findings of the geologic studies published in 17 GRI topical reports and more than 90 Bureau of Economic Geology monographs, refereed journal papers, contributions to other GRI reports, and papers and abstracts in meeting transaction volumes. The report is intended to be a directory to this literature.

  19. Gas sensing properties of Al-doped ZnO for UV-activated CO detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhahri, R.; Hjiri, M.; El Mir, L.; Bonavita, A.; Iannazzo, D.; Latino, M.; Donato, N.; Leonardi, S. G.; Neri, G.

    2016-04-01

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) samples were prepared using a modified sol-gel route and charaterized by means of trasmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analysis. Resistive planar devices based on thick films of AZO deposited on interdigitated alumina substrates were fabricated and investigated as UV light activated CO sensors. CO sensing tests were performed in both dark and illumination condition by exposing the samples to UV radiation (λ  =  400 nm).Under UV light, Al-doped ZnO gas sensors operated at lower temperature than in dark. Furthermore, by photoactivation we also promoted CO sensitivity and made signal recovery of AZO sensors faster. Results demonstrate that Al-doped ZnO might be a promising sensing material for the detection of CO under UV illumination.

  20. Mineral displacement and -dissolution processes and their relevance to rock porosity and permeability in Rotliegend sandstones of the Altmark natural gas field (central Germany) - results from CO2 laboratory batch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudlo, Dieter; Enzmann, Frieder; Heister, Katja; Werner, Lars; Ganzer, Leonhard; Reitenbach, Viktor; Henkel, Steven; Albrecht, Daniel; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    The Rotliegend reservoir sandstones of the Altmark area (central Germany) comprise the second largest natural gas field of Europe. These sandstones were deposited on a playa-like continental platform with braided river systems, ephemeral lakes and aeolian dunes under semi-arid conditions. Some of the pristine, red coloured deposits suffered intensive late diagenetic alteration and are now preserved as bleached, high porous and permeable sandstones. To evaluate the relevance of distinct fluids and their fluid-rock alteration reactions on such bleaching processes we performed laboratory static batch experiments on the Altmark sandstones. These 4-6 week lasting runs were conducted with CO2 saturated synthetic brines under typical Altmark reservoir conditions (p= 20 MPa, T= 125°C). Thereby mineralogical, petrophysical and (hydro- and geo-) chemical rock features were maintained prior and after the experiments. Chemical data proved the dissolution of carbonate and sulphate minerals during the runs, whereas the variation in abundance of further elements was within the detection limit of analytical accuracy. However, FE-SEM investigations on used, evaporated brines reveal the presence of illite and chlorite minerals within a matrix of Ca-, Si-, Fe, Al-, Na- and S components (carbonate, anhydrite, albite and Fe-(hydr-) oxides ?). By porosity and relative permeability measurements an increase in both rock features was observed after the runs, indicating that mineral dissolution and/or (clay) fine migration/detachment occurred during the experiments. Mineral dissolution, especially of pore-filling cements (e.g. carbonate-, sulphate minerals) is also deduced by BET analysis, in determining the specific surface of the sandstones. The size of these reactive surfaces increased after the experiments, suggesting that after the dissolution of pore-filling cements, formerly armoured grain rimming clay cutans were exposed to potential migrating fluids. These findings are also

  1. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Ninth quarterly report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Eventually, the weight stabilized and the measurements commenced. Helium pressure was increased slowly and carefully, first to 15 psig then to 28 psig. The readout for the balance unit continued to exhibit unexplained fluctuation and output. Buoyancy of the empty pan was measured at pressures ranging up to 800 psig measured at approximately 100 psig increments. The balance weighing unit exhibited a progressive increase in weight with increasing pressure demonstrating that the displacement volume of the tare weight side of the balance was greater than the displacement volume of the weighing pan side of the balance. Therefore, the increased gas pressure produced a greater buoyancy of the tare side, producing a net increase in weight. The carefully collected data showed a linear change in weight with pressure (see accompanying diagram). A schematic diagram of the new configuration of the sorption apparatus is depicted in the accompanying figure.

  2. Gas-tight triblock-copolymer membranes are converted to CO2 permeable by insertion of plant aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Uehlein, Norbert; Otto, Beate; Eilingsfeld, Adrian; Itel, Fabian; Meier, Wolfgang; Kaldenhoff, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that membranes consisting of certain triblock-copolymers were tight for CO2. Using a novel approach, we provide evidence for aquaporin facilitated CO2 diffusion. Plant aquaporins obtained from heterologous expression were inserted into triblock copolymer membranes. These were employed to separate a chamber with a solution maintaining high CO2 concentrations from one with depleted CO2 concentrations. CO2 diffusion was detected by measuring the pH change resulting from membrane CO2 diffusion from one chamber to the other. An up to 21 fold increase in diffusion rate was determined. Besides the supply of this proof of principle, we could provide additional arguments in favour of protein facilitated CO2 diffusion to the vivid on-going debate about the principles of membrane gas diffusion in living cells. PMID:22844579

  3. Effect of substrate temperature and gas flow ratio on the nanocomposite TiAlBN coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Z. M.; Kwan, W. L.; Juoi, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Nanocomposite TiAlBN (nc-TiAlBN) coatings were successfully deposited via RF magnetron sputtering by varying the nitrogen-to-total gas flow ratio (RN), and substrate temperature (TS). All coatings were deposited on AISI 316 substrates using single Ti-Al-BN hot-pressed disc as a target. The grain size, phases, and chemical composition of the coatings were evaluated using glancing angle X-ray diffraction analysis (GAXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that the grains size of the deposited nc-TiAlBN coatings were in the range of 3.5 to 5.7 nm and reached a nitride saturation state as early as 15 % RN. As the nitrogen concentration decreases, boron concentration increased from 9 at.% to 16.17 at.%. and thus, increase the TiB2 phase within the coatings. The TS, however, showed no significant effect either on the crystallographic structure, grain size, or in the chemical composition of the deposited nc-TiAlBN coating.

  4. Ultraporous superhydrophobic gas-permeable nano-layers by scalable solvent-free one-step self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guanyu; Wong, William S. Y.; Nasiri, Noushin; Tricoli, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic materials with excellent humidity tolerance, high porosity and light transmittance are being investigated for numerous applications including moisture-sensitive catalysts and perovskite solar cells. Here, we report the one-step solvent-free synthesis of ultraporous superhydrophobic nano-layers by the on-the-fly functionalization of nanoparticle aerosols. Short exposure of surfaces to hot Mn3O4, ZnO and TiO2 aerosols results in ultraporous nanoparticle networks with repulsive dewetting state approaching ideal Cassie-Baxter superhydrophobicity. In addition to showcasing sliding angles of ca. 0° and very low contact angle hysteresis of 3° +/- 2°, these optimal nano-layers have up to 98% porosity and pore size of several micrometres, a key feature to enable efficient penetration of gases to the substrate surface. The stability of this ultraporous superhydrophobic morphology is demonstrated by rapidly applying Moses effect-functionality to substrates that parts water up to 5 mm high. This scalable synthesis method offers a flexible and rapid approach for the production of numerous moisture-resistant devices including gas sensors, catalysts and perovskite solar cells.Superhydrophobic materials with excellent humidity tolerance, high porosity and light transmittance are being investigated for numerous applications including moisture-sensitive catalysts and perovskite solar cells. Here, we report the one-step solvent-free synthesis of ultraporous superhydrophobic nano-layers by the on-the-fly functionalization of nanoparticle aerosols. Short exposure of surfaces to hot Mn3O4, ZnO and TiO2 aerosols results in ultraporous nanoparticle networks with repulsive dewetting state approaching ideal Cassie-Baxter superhydrophobicity. In addition to showcasing sliding angles of ca. 0° and very low contact angle hysteresis of 3° +/- 2°, these optimal nano-layers have up to 98% porosity and pore size of several micrometres, a key feature to enable efficient

  5. Ultraporous superhydrophobic gas-permeable nano-layers by scalable solvent-free one-step self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanyu; Wong, William S Y; Nasiri, Noushin; Tricoli, Antonio

    2016-03-10

    Superhydrophobic materials with excellent humidity tolerance, high porosity and light transmittance are being investigated for numerous applications including moisture-sensitive catalysts and perovskite solar cells. Here, we report the one-step solvent-free synthesis of ultraporous superhydrophobic nano-layers by the on-the-fly functionalization of nanoparticle aerosols. Short exposure of surfaces to hot Mn3O4, ZnO and TiO2 aerosols results in ultraporous nanoparticle networks with repulsive dewetting state approaching ideal Cassie-Baxter superhydrophobicity. In addition to showcasing sliding angles of ca. 0° and very low contact angle hysteresis of 3° ± 2°, these optimal nano-layers have up to 98% porosity and pore size of several micrometres, a key feature to enable efficient penetration of gases to the substrate surface. The stability of this ultraporous superhydrophobic morphology is demonstrated by rapidly applying Moses effect-functionality to substrates that parts water up to 5 mm high. This scalable synthesis method offers a flexible and rapid approach for the production of numerous moisture-resistant devices including gas sensors, catalysts and perovskite solar cells. PMID:26932674

  6. A cost-efficient and portable sulfide device with in situ integrating gas-permeable porous tube isolation and long path absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuemei; Du, Jianxiu; Li, Yinhuan

    2015-08-15

    A cost-efficient and portable device for detecting sulfide at submicromolar level was fabricated by in situ integrating gas-permeable porous tube isolation and long path absorbance detection. The device consisted of a pair of petri dish, having a diametrically strung porous membrane tube in the top cover. The ends of the tube were terminated by a light emitting diode and a photodiode via plugging acrylic optical fiber into the light input/output of tees. Sulfide put in the bottom dish was liberated by addition of diluted acid through a port on the cover. The liberated hydrogen sulfide diffused into the porous membrane tube and reacted with alkaline nitroprusside acceptor in the tube. The color change in the long path porous membrane tube cell was real-time monitored in the transmission mode. The device responded linearly to sulfide concentration over the range of 0.5-150.0μmol/L with relative standard deviations less than 5% in all cases. The limits of detection for sulfide were within the range 0.2-1.5μmol/L in aqueous standard and newborn calf serum. The device was successfully applied to the determination of sulfide in human serum samples. PMID:25966404

  7. Paleotectonic controls on sandstone trends and depositional facies distribution of the low-permeability, gas-bearing Cleveland Formation (Upper Pennsylvanian), Texas panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Hentz, T.F. )

    1992-04-01

    Low-permeability ('tight') reservoir sandstones of the Cleveland Formation have produced over 412 bcf of natural gas through January 1990, mostly from Ochiltree and Lipscomb counties in the northeastern Texas panhandle. Although large-scale gas production started in 1956, the regional stratigraphic, depositional, and structural settings of the Cleveland are poorly known. A study was conducted in a 5100-mi{sup 2}, seven-county area in the western Anadarko basin using log suites from over 860 evenly spaced wells, three cores, and numerous sample logs. Reservoir facies of the predominantly siliciclastic Cleveland Formation, in part, were deposited as a series of three eastward-prograding, probably wave-dominated deltas composed of (in ascending sequence) prodelta, distal delta-front, and proximal delta-front deposits. An upward-fining fluvial sandstone occurs in one stratigraphic zone in the middle Cleveland throughout most of the study area. Distinctive trends of thickness variation record elements of the paleophysiography of the Cleveland depositional area and evidence of syndepositional faulting, flexure, and marked differential subsidence. Depositional patterns were controlled by (1) a paleohigh in the western part of the study area (eastern flank of Cimarron arch) that separates siliciclastic facies from carbonate-dominate Cleveland of the Kansas shelf, (2) subsidence of two subbasins within a northwest-trending half-graben bounded by a syndepositional fault on its southern edge and a monoclinal flexure on the north, and (3) a two-tiered depositional shelf that reflects differential subsidence of an underlying Oswego Limestone buildup.

  8. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  9. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  10. Interface Characterization and Bonding Mechanisms of Cold Gas-Sprayed Al Coatings on Ceramic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.; Wielage, B.; Manygoats, K.; Schucknecht, T.; Rafaja, D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to contribute to the understanding of the adhesion mechanisms, which take effect at the interface of cold gas-sprayed metallic coatings on ceramic substrates. Former investigations revealed that it is possible to deposit well-adhering metallic coatings on atomically smooth ceramics. This led to the conclusion that mechanical interlocking is not always a necessary precondition for bonding. A combination of recrystallization processes induced by adiabatic shear processes and heteroepitaxial growth might be an explanation for the high observed adhesion strengths. The present work focuses on the examination of the interface area of cold gas-sprayed aluminum on various ceramic substrates by means of SEM and HRTEM. Beside sintered corundum plates, single-crystalline sapphire substrates with defined lattice orientations were used as substrates for the deposition of the coatings. In addition to Al2O3 substrates, aluminum coatings were also deposited on AlN, Si3N4, and SiC in order to investigate, whether the different amounts of ionic bonds in these substrate materials have an influence on the substrate/coating interface formation. Additional information about the local heteroepitaxy and its effect on the adhesion of Al coatings was obtained from experiments performed on coatings produced by means of physical vapor deposition.

  11. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of gas nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloys.

    PubMed

    Mitelea, I; Dimian, E; Bordeaşu, I; Crăciunescu, C

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments were performed on Ti-6Al-4V alloys samples in annealed, nitrided and nitrided and subsequently heat treated state. The protective oxide layer formed as a result of annealing and heat treatment after nitriding is eliminated after less than 30 min cavitation time, while the nitride layer lasts up to 90 min cavitation time. Once the protective layer is removed, the cavitation process develops by grain boundary erosion, leading to the expulsion of grains from the surface. The gas nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloy, forming a TixN surface layer, proved to be a better solution to improve the cavitation erosion resistance, compared to the annealed and nitrided and heat treated state, respectively. The analysis of the mean depth of erosion rate at 165 min cavitation time showed an improvement of the cavitation erosion resistance of the nitrided samples of up to 77% higher compared to the one of the annealed samples. PMID:24500067

  12. Two-dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.Z.; Lin, J.Y.; Jiang, H.X.; Khan, M.A.; Chen, Q.

    1997-07-01

    The formation of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system by an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure has been further confirmed by measuring its electrical properties. The effect of persistent photoconductivity (PPC) has been observed and its unique features have been utilized to study the properties of 2DEG formed by the AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Sharp electronic transitions from the first to the second subbands in the 2DEG channel have been observed by monitoring the 2DEG carrier mobility as a function of carrier concentration through the use of PPC. These results are expected to have significant implications on field-effect transistor and high electron mobility transistor applications based on the GaN system. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  13. An Analysis of Gas Pressure Forming of Superplastic AL 5083 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C K; O'Brien, M J; Lesuer, D R; Sherby, O D

    2001-05-04

    Al 5083 disks of a superplastic forming grade were gas-pressure formed to hemispheres and cones at constant forming pressures with and without back pressure. The forming operation was performed using an in-house designed and built biaxial forming apparatus. The temporal change of dome heights of the hemispheres and cones were measured for the different forming and back pressures applied. The flow stresses and strain rates developed at the top of the dome during the forming step were shown to closely follow the flow stress-strain rate relationship obtained from the strain rate change tests performed at the same temperature using uniaxial tensile samples.

  14. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  15. A method of determination of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S.V.; Trofimov, V.A.

    2007-11-15

    A method is proposed for determining permeability of coals under conditions of steady-state deformation and stationary filtration mode by employing a reference core made of gas-non-sorbing material with a known permeability. The approach has been developed to assess the time of transition to the stable filtration.

  16. Changes in rock salt permeability due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J C; Howard, C L

    1991-07-01

    Changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation (mine-by) have been measured from the underground workings of the WIPP facility. Prior to the mine-by, the formation responds as a porous medium with a very low brine permeability, a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The mine-by excavation creates a dilated, partially saturated zone in the immediate vicinity of the excavation with an increased permeability to brine and a measurable permeability to gas. The changes in hydrologic properties are discussed in the context of pore structure changes.

  17. Evaluation of organic matter, subsurface temperature and pressure with regard to gas generation in low-permeability Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary sandstones in Pacific Creek area, Sublette and Sweetwater Counties, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.; Bostick, N.H.

    1980-01-01

    The onset of overpressuring occurs at c.3,500 m, near the base of the U. Cretaceous Lance Formation. The development of overpressuring may involve several processes; however, interpretation of the available information indicates that active generation of large amounts of wet gas is one of the more important processes. The present minimum temperature at the top of overpressuring is at least 88oC. The preservation of abnormally high pressures is due to presently active generation of gas in a thick interval of discontinuous, very low-permeability shales, siltstones, and sandstones. - from Authors

  18. Permeability of rayon based polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    Several types of anomalous rayon based phenolic behavior have been observed in post-fired nozzles and exit cones. Many of these events have been shown to be related to the development of internal gas pressure within the material. The development of internal gas pressure is a function of the amount of gas produced within the material and the rate at which that gas is allowed to escape. The latter property of the material is referred to as the material's permeability. The permeability of two dimensional carbonized rayon based phenolic composites is a function of material direction, temperature, and stress/strain state. Recently significant differences in the permeability of these materials has been uncovered which may explain their inconsistent performance. This paper summarizes what is known about the permeability of these materials to date and gives possible implications of these finding to the performance of these materials in an ablative environment.

  19. PERMEABILITY OF POLYMERIC MEMBRANE LINING MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeabilities to three gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrogen), water vapor, and five solvents (methanol, acetone, cyclohexane, xylene, and chloroform) are reported for a broad range of commercial polymeric membranes. Gas and water vapor transmission (WVT) data were determ...

  20. Corrosion performance of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe aluminide alloys in complex gas environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Johnson, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    Alumina-forming structural alloys can offer superior resistance to corrosion in the presence of sulfur-containing environments, which are prevalent in coal-fired fossil energy systems. Further, Fe aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in these systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. In addition, surface coatings of Fe aluminide are being developed to impart corrosion resistance to structural alloys. This paper describes results from an ongoing program that is evaluating the corrosion performance of alumina-forming structural alloys, Fe-Al and Fe aluminide bulk alloys, and Fe aluminide coatings in environments typical of coal-gasification and combustion atmospheres. Experiments were conducted at 650-1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HCl-containing gases. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales and to determine the modes of corrosion degradation that occur in the materials when they are exposed to S/Cl-containing gaseous environments.

  1. High-frequency permeability spectra of FeCoSiN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laminated films: Tuning of damping by magnetic couplings dependent on the thickness of each ferromagnetic layer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng; Zhang Xiaoyu; Nguyen Nguyen Phuoc; Ma Yungui; Ong, C. K.

    2009-02-15

    In this work, we investigate the high-frequency permeability spectra of as-sputtered FeCoSiN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laminated films, and discuss their dependence on the thickness of each FeCoSiN layer, based on the phenomenological Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The damping factor and coercivity show their minima with lamination, deviating from the expectation based on the grain size confinement effect. Such dependences on the layer thickness indicate the influence of magnetic coupling. The decreases in the damping factor and the coercivities with lamination can be partially attributed to the decrease in the magnetostatic coupling induced by ripple structures. The enhanced damping and enlarged coercivity values obtained with further lamination are ascribed to the enhanced Neel couplings. The dependences show that the lamination can be effective in tuning the magnetization dynamics by changing the magnetic couplings.

  2. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  3. The effects of HIP processing in Ti-48Al-2Mn-2Nb gas atomized powder

    SciTech Connect

    Gouma, P.I.; Loretto, M.H.; Davey, S.; Ashworth, M.A.; Blenkinsop, P.A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with the examination of a {gamma}-titanium aluminide powder produced by gas atomization. The as-solidified microstructure was found to be a function of the powder particle size. The influence of as-solidified microstructural variations on the final HIP product were investigated for both the complete size range and selected individual size fractions. The HIPed microstructures are compared. The effects of different HIP process parameters (i.e., temperatures corresponding to the various phase fields of the TiAl system) were also investigated and the resulting microstructures are discussed. SEM analysis of the surfaces of in-situ Auger fracture specimens, of different size fractions, has provided information on the effect of HIPed microstructures on fracture mechanisms.

  4. Gas nitriding of Ti-6Al-4V by induction heating

    SciTech Connect

    Grosch, J.; Saglitz, M.

    1995-12-31

    The usually poor wear behavior of titanium materials can be improved by thermochemical surface heat treatment. In contrast to conventional procedures, which necessitate prolonged treatment, it is possible to reduce the heat treatment period considerably by means of HF induction. Serving as an example in this context is a Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy that is to demonstrate the possibilities of induction gas nitriding. Temperature variations between 900 C and 1,600 C have resulted in homogeneous surface structures whose microstructures can basically be explained by the titanium-nitrogen diagram. In particular with the 1,600 C variant, the wear resistance has been improved, compared with the untreated titanium material there is a seventyfold increase in wear resistance.

  5. The CO2 permeability and mixed gas CO2/H2 selectivity of membranes composed of CO2-philic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Barillas, Mary Katharine; Enick, Robert M.; O’Brien, Michael; Perry, Robert; Luebke, David R.; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this work was to design polymeric membranes that have very high CO2 permeability and high mixed gas selectivity toward CO2 rather than hydrogen. Therefore the membranes were based on "CO2-philic" polymers that exhibit thermodynamically favorable Lewis acid:Lewis base and hydrogen bonding interactions with CO2. CO2-philic polymers that are solid at ambient temperature include polyfluoroacrylate (PFA); polyvinyl acetate (PVAc); and amorphous polylactic acid (PLA). Literature CO2 permeability values for PVAc and PLA are disappointingly low. The cast PFA membranes from this study had low permeabilities (45 barrers at 25º C) and very low CO2/H2 selectivity of 1.4. CO2-philic polymers that are liquid at ambient conditions include polyethylene glycol (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG), polybutylene glycol with a linear -((CH2)4O)-repeat unit (i.e., polytetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG)), polybutylene glycol (PBG) with a branched repeat unit, perfluoropolyether (PFPE), poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS), and polyacetoxy oxetane (PAO). A small compound, glycerol triacetate (GTA) was also considered because it is similar in chemical structure to a trimer of PVAc. These liquids were tested as supported liquid membranes (SLM) and also (with the exception of PAD and GTA) as rubbery, crosslinked materials. Mixed gas permeability was measured using equimolar mixtures of CO2 and H2 feed streams at one atmosphere total pressure in steady-state flux experiments over the 298-423 K temperature range. The most promising SLMs were those composed of PEG, PTMEG, GTA, and PDMS. For example, at 37º C the PEG-, PTMEG-, GTA- and PDMS-based SLMs exhibited CO2/H2 selectivity values of ~11, 9, 9, and 3.5, respectively, and CO2 permeability values of ~800, 900, 1900, and 2000 barrers, respectively

  6. Transient pressure-pulse decay permeability measurements in the Barnett shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, A. R.; Reece, J.; Cronin, M. B.; Flemings, P. B.; Polito, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted transient pressure-pulse decay permeability measurements on core plugs of the Barnett shale using a hydrostatic pressure cell. Core plugs, 3.8 cm in diameter and less than 2.5 cm in length, were prepared from a core obtained at a depth of approximately 2330 m from the Mitchel Energy 2 T. P. Sims well in the Mississippian Barnett Formation (Loucks and Ruppel, 2007). We performed permeability measurements of the core plugs using argon at varying confining pressures in two different directions (perpendicular and parallel to bedding planes). We calculate gas permeability from changes in pressure with time using the analytical solution of the pressure diffusion equation with appropriate boundary conditions for our test setup (Dicker and Smits, 1988). Based on our limited results, we interpret 2 × 10-18 m2 for vertical permeability and 156 × 10-18 m2 for horizontal permeability. We demonstrate an extreme stress dependence of the horizontal flow permeability where permeability decreases from 156 × 10-18 m2 to 2.5 × 10-18 m2 as the confining stress is increased from 3.5 to 35 MPa. These permeability measurements are at the high side of other pulsed permeability measurements in the Barnett shale (Bustin et al. 2008; Vermylen, 2011). Permeabilities calculated from mercury injection capillary pressure curves, using theoretically derived permeability-capillary pressure models based on parallel tubes assumption, are orders of magnitude less than our transient pressure-pulse decay permeability measurements (for example, 3.7×10-21 m2 (this study), 10-21 -10-20 m2 (Sigal, 2007), 10-20 -10-17 m2 (Prince et al., 2010)). We interpret that the high measured permeabilities are due to microfractures in the sample. At this point, we do not know if the microfractures are due to sampling disturbance (stress-relief induced) or represent an in-situ fracture network. Our study illustrates the importance of characterization of microfractures at the core scale to understand

  7. Characteristics of Nb/Al superconducting tunnel junctions fabricated using ozone gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masahiro, Ukibe; Go, Fujii; Masataka, Ohkubo

    2015-09-01

    To improve the energy resolution (ΔE) of Nb/Al superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), an ozone (O3) oxidation process has been developed to fabricate a thin defect-free tunnel barrier that simultaneously shows high critical current JC > 1000 A/cm2 and high normalized dynamic resistance RDA > 100 MΩ · μm2, where A is the size of the STJ. The 50-μm2 STJs produced by O3 exposure of 0.26 Pa· min with an indirect spray of O3 gas, which is a much lower level of exposure than the O2 exposure used in a conventional O2 oxidation process, exhibit a maximum JC = 800 A/cm2 and a high RDA = 372 MΩ · μm2. The 100-pixel array of the 100-μm2 STJs produced using the same O3 oxidation conditions exhibits a constant leak current Ileak = 14.9 ± 3.2 nA at a bias point around Δ /e (where e is half the energy gap of an STJ), and a high fabrication yield of 87%. Although the Ileak values are slightly larger than those of STJs produced using the conventional O2 oxidation process, the STJ produced using O3 oxidation shows a ΔE = 10 eV for the C-Kα line, which is the best value of our Nb/Al STJ x-ray detectors.

  8. Optimization of an oxide dispersion strengthened Ni-Cr-Al alloy for gas turbine engine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klarstrom, D. L.; Grierson, R.

    1975-01-01

    The investigation was carried out to determine the optimum alloy within the Ni-16Cr-Al-Y2O3 system for use as a vane material in advanced aircraft gas turbine engines. Six alloys containing nominally 4%, 5% and 6% Al with Y2O3 levels of 0.8% and 1.2% were prepared by mechanical attrition. Six small-scale, rectangular extrusions were produced from each powder lot for property evaluation. The approximate temperatures for incipient melting were found to be 1658 K (2525 F), 1644 K (2500 F) and 1630 K (2475 F) for the 4%, 5% and 6% aluminum levels, respectively. With the exception of longitudinal crystallographic texture, the eight extrusions selected for extensive evaluation either exceeded or were close to mechanical property goals. Major differences between the alloys became apparent during dynamic oxidation testing, and in particular during the 1366 K (2000 F)/500 hour Mach 1 tests carried out by NASA-Lewis. An aluminum level of 4.75% was subsequently judged to be optimum based on considerations of dynamic oxidation resistance, susceptibility to thermal fatigue cracking and melting point.

  9. Permeable membrane experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Thomas J.; Cao, Tuan Q.; Kliss, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Permeable Membrane Experiment is to gather flight data on three areas of membrane performance that are influenced by the presence of gravity. These areas are: (1) Liquid/gas phase separation, (2) gas bubble interference with diffusion through porous membranes and (3) wetting characteristics of hydrophilic membrane surfaces. These data are important in understaning the behavior of membrane/liquid/gas interfaces where surface tension forces predominate. The data will be compared with 1-g data already obtained and with predicted micrograviity behavior. The data will be used to develop designs for phase separation and plant nutrient delivery systems and will be available to the life support community for use in developing technologies which employ membranes. A conceptual design has been developed to conduct three membrane experiments, in sequence, aboard a single Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) carrier to be carried in the Shuttle Orbiter payload bay. One experiment is conducted for each of the three membrane performance areas under study. These experiments are discussed in this paper.

  10. Enhanced Barrier Performance of Engineered Paper by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Mirvakili, Mehr Negar; Van Bui, Hao; van Ommen, J Ruud; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G; Englezos, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Surface modification of cellulosic paper is demonstrated by employing plasma assisted atomic layer deposition. Al2O3 thin films are deposited on paper substrates, prepared with different fiber sizes, to improve their barrier properties. Thus, a hydrophobic paper is created with low gas permeability by combining the control of fiber size (and structure) with atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 films. Papers are prepared using Kraft softwood pulp and thermomechanical pulp. The cellulosic wood fibers are refined to obtain fibers with smaller length and diameter. Films of Al2O3, 10, 25, and 45 nm in thickness, are deposited on the paper surface. The work demonstrates that coating of papers prepared with long fibers efficiently reduces wettability with slight enhancement in gas permeability, whereas on shorter fibers, it results in significantly lower gas permeability. Wettability studies on Al2O3 deposited paper substrates have shown water wicking and absorption over time only in papers prepared with highly refined fibers. It is also shown that there is a certain fiber size at which the gas permeability assumes its minimum value, and further decrease in fiber size will reverse the effect on gas permeability. PMID:27165172

  11. Nanocomposite Fe-Al Intermetallic Coating Obtained by Gas Detonation Spraying of Milled Self-Decomposing Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderowski, Cezary

    2014-10-01

    The nanocomposite structure of Fe-Al intermetallic coating, created in situ during gas detonation spraying (GDS) of as-milled self-decomposing powder and containing disordered 8 nm FeAl nanocrystals, was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and x-ray diffraction methods. It is found that the Fe-Al coating is characterized by a sublayer morphology consisting of flattened and partially melted splats containing a wide Al range from about 26 to 52 at.%, as well as Al2O3 oxides, created in situ at the internal interfaces of splats during the GDS process. The complex oxide films, identified as amorphous Al2O3, which are formed in the nanocrystalline Fe-Al matrix of the GDS coating behave like a composite reinforcement in the intermetallic Fe-Al coating. The combined presence of nanosized subgrains in the Fe-Al matrix and the Al2O3 nanoceramic dispersoids significantly increases the microhardness of the coating.

  12. Control of MgO·Al2O3 Spinel Inclusions during Protective Gas Electroslag Remelting of Die Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cheng-Bin; Chen, Xi-Chun; Guo, Han-Jie; Zhu, Zi-Jiang; Sun, Xiao-Lin

    2013-04-01

    The effect of calcium treatment and/or aluminum-based deoxidant addition on the oxygen control and modification of MgO·Al2O3 spinel inclusions during protective gas electroslag remelting (P-ESR) of H13 die steel with low oxygen content was experimentally studied. It is found that all the inclusions in the consumable electrode are MgO·Al2O3 spinels, besides a few MgO·Al2O3 spinels surrounded by an outer (Ti,V)N or MnS layer. After P-ESR refining combined with proper calcium treatment, all the original MgO·Al2O3 spinels in the electrode (except for the original MgO·Al2O3 spinels having been removed in the P-ESR process) were modified to mainly CaO-MgO-Al2O3 and some CaO-Al2O3 inclusions, both of which have a low melting point and homogeneous compositions. In the case of only Al-based deoxidant addition, all the oxide inclusions remaining in ESR ingots are MgO·Al2O3 spinels. The operation of Al-based deoxidant addition and/or calcium treatment during P-ESR of electrode steel containing low oxygen content is invalid to further reduce the oxygen content and oxide inclusions amount compared with remelting only under protective gas atmosphere. All the original sulfide inclusions were removed after the P-ESR process. Most of the inclusions in ESR ingots are about 2 μm in size. The mechanisms of non-metallic inclusions evolution and modification of MgO·Al2O3 spinels by calcium treatment during the P-ESR process were proposed.

  13. Permeability of the San Andreas Fault Zone at Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, A. P.; Song, I.; Saffer, D.

    2010-12-01

    to 90 MPa axial stress. In these tests, axial stress is increased via a constant rate of displacement, and the excess pore pressure build up at the base of the sample is measured. Stress, pore pressure and strain are monitored to calculate coefficient of consolidation and volumetric compressibility in addition to permeability. In triaxial experiments, permeability is measured from by flow through tests under constant head boundary conditions. Permeability of the CDZ rapidly decreases to ~10-19 m2 by 20 MPa axial stress in our CRS tests. Over axial stresses from 20-85 MPa, permeability decreases log-linearly with effective stress from 8x10-20 m2 to 1x10-20 m2. Flow-through tests in the triaxial system under isostatic conditions yield permeabilities of 2.2x10-19 m2 and 1x10-20 m2 at 5 and 10 MPa, respectively. Our results are consistent with published geochemical data from SAFOD mud gas samples and inferred pore pressures during drilling [Zoback et al., 2010], which together suggest that the fault is a barrier to regional fluid flow. Our results indicate that the permeability of the fault core is sufficiently low to result in effectively undrained behavior during slip, thus allowing dynamic processes including thermal pressurization and dilatancy hardening to affect slip behavior.

  14. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  15. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  16. Gas Gun Driven Dynamic Fracture and Fragmentation of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David; Chapman, David; Eakins, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    The dynamic fracture and fragmentation of a material is a complex late stage phenomenon occurring in many shock loading scenarios. Improving our predictive capability depends upon exercising our current failure models against new loading schemes and data. We present a series of experiments creating axially symmetric high strain rate (104 s-1) expansion of Ti-6Al-4V cylinders under controlled loading achieved using the ogive based gas gun technique. A steel ogive is located inside the cylinder, into which a polymer rod is launched. Deformation of the rod around the insert drives the cylinder into rapid expansion. This technique facilitates repeatable loading independent of the sample temperature and straightforward adjustment of radial strain rate. Expansion velocity was measured at multiple points along the cylinder outer wall using PDV. Two high speed imaging systems are used to track the overall expansion process to record strain at failure. Optical and SEM imaging is used to measure fragment size and mass distributions and examine the fracture surfaces to reveal the failure mechanism. For a peak radial strain rate of (1.1 +/- 0.1) x 104 s-1 strain localisation initiates on the outer surface at a radial strain of around 12%, with cracks fully penetrating the cylinder wall at around 22%. Hydrocode modelling has been completed with very strong agreement in predicting the expansion velocity and profile but further work is needed to develop an accurate representation of the fracture and fragmentation.

  17. Pneumatic fracturing of low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Schuring, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    Pneumatic fracturing of soils to enhance the removal and treatment of dense nonaqueous phase liquids is described. The process involves gas injection at a pressure exceeding the natural stresses and at a flow rate exceeding the permeability of the formation. The paper outlines geologic considerations, advantages and disadvantages, general technology considerations, low permeability media considerations, commercial availability, efficiency, and costs. Five case histories of remediation using pneumatic fracturing are briefly summarized. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  19. Permeability of compacting porous lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, P. A.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hess, K.-U.; Aulock, F. W.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Vasseur, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-03-01

    The highly transient nature of outgassing commonly observed at volcanoes is in part controlled by the permeability of lava domes and shallow conduits. Lava domes generally consist of a porous outer carapace surrounding a denser lava core with internal shear zones of variable porosity. Here we examine densification using uniaxial compression experiments on variably crystalline and porous rhyolitic dome lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Experiments were conducted at 900°C and an applied stress of 3 MPa to 60% strain, while monitoring acoustic emissions to track cracking. The evolution of the porous network was assessed via X-ray computed tomography, He-pycnometry, and relative gas permeability. High starting connected porosities led to low apparent viscosities and high strain rates, initially accompanied by abundant acoustic emissions. As compaction ensued, the lavas evolved; apparent viscosity increased and strain rate decreased due to strain hardening of the suspensions. Permeability fluctuations resulted from the interplay between viscous flow and brittle failure. Where phenocrysts were abundant, cracks had limited spatial extent, and pore closure decreased axial and radial permeability proportionally, maintaining the initial anisotropy. In crystal-poor lavas, axial cracks had a more profound effect, and permeability anisotropy switched to favor axial flow. Irrespective of porosity, both crystalline samples compacted to a threshold minimum porosity of 17-19%, whereas the crystal-poor sample did not achieve its compaction limit. This indicates that unconfined loading of porous dome lavas does not necessarily form an impermeable plug and may be hindered, in part by the presence of crystals.

  20. Origin of Permeability and Structure of Flows in Fractured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dreuzy, J.; Darcel, C.; Davy, P.; Erhel, J.; Le Goc, R.; Maillot, J.; Meheust, Y.; Pichot, G.; Poirriez, B.

    2013-12-01

    After more than three decades of research, flows in fractured media have been shown to result from multi-scale geological structures. Flows result non-exclusively from the damage zone of the large faults, from the percolation within denser networks of smaller fractures, from the aperture heterogeneity within the fracture planes and from some remaining permeability within the matrix. While the effect of each of these causes has been studied independently, global assessments of the main determinisms is still needed. We propose a general approach to determine the geological structures responsible for flows, their permeability and their organization based on field data and numerical modeling [de Dreuzy et al., 2012b]. Multi-scale synthetic networks are reconstructed from field data and simplified mechanical modeling [Davy et al., 2010]. High-performance numerical methods are developed to comply with the specificities of the geometry and physical properties of the fractured media [Pichot et al., 2010; Pichot et al., 2012]. And, based on a large Monte-Carlo sampling, we determine the key determinisms of fractured permeability and flows (Figure). We illustrate our approach on the respective influence of fracture apertures and fracture correlation patterns at large scale. We show the potential role of fracture intersections, so far overlooked between the fracture and the network scales. We also demonstrate how fracture correlations reduce the bulk fracture permeability. Using this analysis, we highlight the need for more specific in-situ characterization of fracture flow structures. Fracture modeling and characterization are necessary to meet the new requirements of a growing number of applications where fractures appear both as potential advantages to enhance permeability and drawbacks for safety, e.g. in energy storage, stimulated geothermal energy and non-conventional gas productions. References Davy, P., et al. (2010), A likely universal model of fracture scaling and

  1. Permeability of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marschall, J.; Milos, F. S.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Rigid fibrous refractory insulations (TPS tiles) are integral components of many spacecraft thermal protection systems. These materials are composed of refractory fibers With diameters on the order of 1 to 15 micrometers. They are lightweight and have an open, highly porous microstructure. Typical densities are less than 500 kilograms per cubic meters, and porosities generally exceed 0.8. Because of their open porosity, these materials are permeable to gas glow. There are numerous instances in which internal gas transport in a thermal protection system could be important; examples include the penetration of hot boundary-layer gases into the insulation, the flow of decomposition (pyrolysis) products from the interior, the use of convective flows to mitigate ice formation caused by cryopumping, and the design of refractory vents for pressure equilibration during atmospheric entry. Computational analysis of gas flow through porous media requires values of permeability which have not previously been available for the rigid fibrous insulations used in thermal protection systems. This paper will document measurements of permeability for a variety of insulations from NASA's LI, FRCI, and AETB families of lightweight ceramic ablators. The directional anisotropy of permeability and its dependence on gas pressure and material density will be presented. It will be shown that rarified-flow effects are significant in the flow through such materials. Connections will be drawn between the insulation microstructure and permeability. The paper will also include representative computations of flow through rigid fibrous insulations.

  2. Permeability and relative permeability in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Berryman, J.G.

    1990-10-01

    Important features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical correlation functions using modern image processing techniques. These correlation functions contain information about porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity, formation factor, and elastic constants, as well as the fluid permeability and relative permeability. The physical basis of this approach is discussed and examples of the results for various sandstones are presented. The analysis shows that Kozeny-Carman relations and Archie's empirical laws must be modified to account for finite percolation thresholds in order to avoid unphysical behavior in the calculated relative permeabilities. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Nanochannel flow past permeable walls via molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian-Fei; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The nanochannel flow past permeable walls with nanopores is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, including the density distribution, velocity field, molecular penetration mechanism and surface friction coefficient. A low density distribution has been found at the gas-wall interface demonstrating the low pressure region. In addition, there exists a jump of the gas density on the permeable surface, which indicates the discontinuity of the density distribution across the permeable surface. On the other hand, the nanoscale vortices are observed in nanopores of the permeable wall, and the reduced mass flux of the flow in nanopores results in a shifted hydrodynamic boundary above the permeable surface. Particularly the slip length of the gas flow on the permeable surface is pronounced a non-linear function of the molecular mean free path, which produces a large value of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) and a big portion of the diffusive refection. Moreover, the gas-gas interaction and multi-collision among gas molecules may take place in nanopores, which contribute to large values of TMAC. Consequently the boundary friction coefficient on the permeable surface is increased because of the energy dissipation consumed by the nanoscale vortices in nanopores. The molecular boundary condition provides us with a new picture of the nanochannel flow past the permeable wall with nanopores.

  4. Mitigating methane emissions and air intrusion in heterogeneous landfills with a high permeability layer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yoojin; Imhoff, Paul T; Augenstein, Don; Yazdani, Ramin

    2011-05-01

    Spatially variable refuse gas permeability and landfill gas (LFG) generation rate, cracking of the soil cover, and reduced refuse gas permeability because of liquid addition can all affect CH(4) collection efficiency when intermediate landfill covers are installed. A new gas collection system that includes a near-surface high permeability layer beneath the landfill cover was evaluated for enhancing capture of LFG and mitigating CH(4) emissions. Simulations of gas transport in two-dimensional domains demonstrated that the permeable layer reduces CH(4) emissions up to a factor of 2 for particular spatially variable gas permeability fields. When individual macrocracks formed in the cover soil and the permeable layer was absent, CH(4) emissions increased to as much as 24% of the total CH(4) generated, double the emissions when the permeable layer was installed. CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil was also much more uniform when the permeable layer was present: local percentages of CH(4) oxidized varied between 94% and 100% across the soil cover with the permeable layer, but ranged from 10% to 100% without this layer for some test cases. However, the permeable layer had a minor effect on CH(4) emissions and CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil when the ratio of the gas permeability of the cover soil to the mean refuse gas permeability ≤ 0.05. The modeling approach employed in this study may be used to assess the utility of other LFG collection systems and management practices. PMID:20880688

  5. Effect of Monomer Structure on Curing Behavior, CO2 Solubility, and Gas Permeability of Ionic Liquid-Based Epoxy-Amine Resins and Ion-Gels

    SciTech Connect

    McDanel, WM; Cowan, MG; Barton, JA; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2015-04-29

    New imidazolium- and pyrrolidinium-based bis(epoxide)-functionalized ionic liquid (IL) monorners were synthesized: and reacted with multifunctional amine monomers to produce cross-linked, epoxy-amine poly(ionic liquid) (PIL) resins and PIL/IL ion-gel membranes. The length and chemical nature (i.e., alkyl versus ether) between the irrildazolium group and epokitie groups were studied to determine their effects on CO2 affinity. The CO2 uptake (millimoles per gram) of the epoxy amine resins (between 0.1 and 1 mmol/g) was found to depend predominately on the epoxide-to-amine ratio and the bis(epoxide) IL molecular weight. The effect of using a primary versus a secondary amine-containing multifunctional monoiner was also assessed for the resin-synthesis. Secondary amines can increase CO2 permeability but also increase the iime required for biS(epoxide) coriversion. When either the epoxide or athine monomer structure is changed, the CO2 solubility and permeability of the resulting PIL resins and ion-sel membranes can be tuned.

  6. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition to the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.

  7. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition tomore » the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.« less

  8. Improved plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings for aircraft gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennisi, F. J.; Gupta, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Eighteen plasma sprayed coating systems, nine based on the NiCoCrAlY chemistry and nine based on the CoCrAlY composition, were evaluated to identify coating systems which will provide equivalent or superior life to that shown by the electron beam physical vapor deposited NiCoCrAlY and CoCrAlY coatings respectively. NiCoCrAlY-type coatings were examined on a single crystal alloy and the CoCrAlY based coatings were optimized on the B1900 + Hf alloy. Cyclic burner rig oxidation and hot corrosion and tensile ductility tests were used to evaluate the various coating candidates. For the single crystal alloy, a low pressure chamber plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY + Si coating exhibited a 2X oxidation life improvement at 1121 C (2050 F) over the vapor deposited NiCoCrAlY material while showing equivalent tensile ductility. A silicon modified low pressure chamber plasma sprayed CoCrAlY coating was found to be more durable than the baseline vapor deposited CoCrAlY coating on the B1900 + Hf alloy.

  9. Specific surface area model for foam permeability.

    PubMed

    Pitois, O; Lorenceau, E; Louvet, N; Rouyer, F

    2009-01-01

    Liquid foams were recognized early to be porous materials, as liquid flowed between the gas bubbles. Drainage theories have been established, and foam permeability has been modeled from the microscopic description of the equivalent pores geometry, emphasizing similarities with their solid counterparts. But to what extent can the theoretical work devoted to the permeability of solid porous materials be useful to liquid foams? In this article, the applicability of the Carman-Kozeny model on foam is investigated. We performed measurements of the permeability of foams with nonmobile surfactants, and we show that, in introducing an equivalent specific surface area for the foam, the model accurately describes the experimental data over two orders of magnitude for the foam liquid fraction, without any additional parameters. Finally, it is shown that this model includes the previous permeability models derived for foams in the dry foams limit. PMID:19032030

  10. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.