Science.gov

Sample records for persistent enos activation

  1. Stromal cell–derived factor 2 is critical for Hsp90-dependent eNOS activation

    PubMed Central

    Siragusa, Mauro; Fröhlich, Florian; Park, Eon Joo; Schleicher, Michael; Walther, Tobias C.; Sessa, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) catalyzes the conversion of l-arginine and molecular oxygen into l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous second messenger that influences cardiovascular physiology and disease. Several mechanisms regulate eNOS activity and function, including phosphorylation at Ser and Thr residues and protein-protein interactions. Combining a tandem affinity purification approach and mass spectrometry, we identified stromal cell–derived factor 2 (SDF2) as a component of the eNOS macromolecular complex in endothelial cells. SDF2 knockdown impaired agonist-stimulated NO synthesis and decreased the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177, a key event required for maximal activation of eNOS. Conversely, SDF2 overexpression dose-dependently increased NO synthesis through a mechanism involving Akt and calcium (induced with ionomycin), which increased the phosphorylation of Ser1177 in eNOS. NO synthesis by iNOS (inducible NOS) and nNOS (neuronal NOS) was also enhanced upon SDF2 overexpression. We found that SDF2 was a client protein of the chaperone protein Hsp90, interacting preferentially with the M domain of Hsp90, which is the same domain that binds to eNOS. In endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), SDF2 was required for the binding of Hsp90 and calmodulin to eNOS, resulting in eNOS phosphorylation and activation. Thus, our data describe a function for SDF2 as a component of the Hsp90-eNOS complex that is critical for signal transduction in endothelial cells. PMID:26286023

  2. Fenofibrate activates AMPK and increases eNOS phosphorylation in HUVEC

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Hisashi; Murakami, Ryuichiro . E-mail: ryuichi@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kambe, Fukushi; Cao, Xia; Takahashi, Ryotaro; Asai, Toru; Hirai, Toshihisa; Numaguchi, Yasushi; Okumura, Kenji; Seo, Hisao; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2006-03-24

    Fenofibrate improves endothelial function by lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects. Additionally, fenofibrate has been demonstrated to upregulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been reported to phosphorylate eNOS at Ser-1177 and stimulate vascular endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) production. We report here that fenofibrate activates AMPK and increases eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of HUVEC with fenofibrate increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Fenofibrate simultaneously increased eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Inhibitors of protein kinase A and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase failed to suppress the fenofibrate-induced eNOS phosphorylation. Neither bezafibrate nor WY-14643 activated AMPK in HUVEC. Furthermore, fenofibrate activated AMPK without requiring any transcriptional activities. These results indicate that fenofibrate stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production through AMPK activation, which is suggested to be a novel characteristic of this agonist and unrelated to its effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}.

  3. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R.; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells. PMID:26977592

  4. TNFα reduces eNOS activity in endothelial cells through serine 116 phosphorylation and Pin1 binding: Confirmation of a direct, inhibitory interaction of Pin1 with eNOS.

    PubMed

    Kennard, Simone; Ruan, Ling; Buffett, Ryan J; Fulton, David; Venema, Richard C

    2016-06-01

    Production of NO by the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has a major role in blood pressure control and suppression of atherosclerosis. In a previous study, we presented evidence implicating the Pin1 prolyl isomerase in negative modulation of eNOS activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Pin1 recognizes phosphoserine/phosphothreonine-proline motifs in target proteins and catalyzes prolyl isomerization at the peptide bond. In the present study, we show, first, with purified proteins, that Pin1 binds to eNOS directly via the Pin1 WW domain. Binding is enhanced by mimicking phosphorylation of eNOS at S116. Interaction of Pin1 with eNOS markedly reduces eNOS enzymatic activity. Second, in BAECs, we show that TNFα induces ERK 1/2-mediated S116 phosphorylation of eNOS, accompanied by Pin1 binding. TNFα treatment of BAECs results in a reduction in NO release from the cells in a manner that depends on the activities of both Pin1 and ERK 1/2. Evidence is also presented that this mechanism of eNOS regulation cannot occur in rat and mouse cells because there is no proline residue in the mouse and rat amino acid sequences adjacent to the putative phosphorylation site. Moreover, we find that phosphorylation of this site is not detectable in mouse eNOS. PMID:27073025

  5. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kondo, Takashi; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. • ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. • HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  6. Altered VEGF-stimulated Ca2+ signaling in part underlies pregnancy-adapted eNOS activity in UAEC.

    PubMed

    Boeldt, Derek S; Grummer, Mary A; Magness, Ronald R; Bird, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    In pregnancy, the uterine vasculature undergoes dramatic vasodilatory adaptations. Previously, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to stimulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in uterine artery endothelial cells (UAECs) derived from pregnant ewes to a greater extent than those from non-pregnant ewes in a manner not fully explained by changes in the phosphorylation of eNOS. In this study, we used Fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging and arginine-to-citrulline conversion eNOS activity assays to assess the importance of VEGF-stimulated Ca(2+) responses in pregnancy-related changes in NO production in UAEC. In this study, we show that pregnancy-induced changes in VEGF-stimulated Ca(2+) responses could account in part for the greater capacity of VEGF to stimulate eNOS in UAECs from pregnant versus non-pregnant animals. VEGF-stimulated Ca(2+) responses in UAECs from pregnant and non-pregnant animals were mediated through VEGF receptor 2 and were detected in roughly 15% of all cells. There were no pregnancy-specific differences in area under the curve or peak height. UAECs from pregnant animals were more consistent in the time to response initiation, had a larger component of extracellular Ca(2+) entry, and were more sensitive to a submaximal dose of VEGF. In UAECs from pregnant and non-pregnant animals Ca(2+) responses and eNOS activation were sensitive to the phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway inhibitors 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane and U73122. Thus, changes in VEGF-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i are necessary for eNOS activation in UAECs, and pregnancy-induced changes in Ca(2+) responses could also in part explain the pregnancy-specific adaptive increase in eNOS activity in UAECs. PMID:25063757

  7. ICAM-1-activated Src and eNOS signaling increase endothelial cell surface PECAM-1 adhesivity and neutrophil transmigration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoquan; Place, Aaron T; Chen, Zhenlong; Brovkovych, Viktor M; Vogel, Stephen M; Muller, William A; Skidgel, Randal A; Malik, Asrar B; Minshall, Richard D

    2012-08-30

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) extravasation requires selectin-mediated tethering, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-dependent firm adhesion, and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1)-mediated transendothelial migration. An important unanswered question is whether ICAM-1-activated signaling contributes to PMN transmigration mediated by PECAM-1. We tested this concept and the roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Src activated by PMN ligation of ICAM-1 in mediating PECAM-1-dependent PMN transmigration. We observed that lung PMN infiltration in vivo induced in carrageenan-injected WT mice was significantly reduced in ICAM-1(-/-) and eNOS(-/-) mice. Crosslinking WT mouse ICAM-1 expressed in human endothelial cells (ECs), but not the phospho-defective Tyr(518)Phe ICAM-1 mutant, induced SHP-2-dependent Src Tyr530 dephosphorylation that resulted in Src activation. ICAM-1 activation also stimulated phosphorylation of Akt (p-Ser473) and eNOS (p-Ser1177), thereby increasing NO production. PMN migration across EC monolayers was abolished in cells expressing the Tyr(518)Phe ICAM-1 mutant or by pretreatment with either the Src inhibitor PP2 or eNOS inhibitor L-NAME. Importantly, phospho-ICAM-1 induction of Src signaling induced PECAM-1 Tyr686 phosphorylation and increased EC surface anti-PECAM-1 mAb-binding activity. These results collectively show that ICAM-1-activated Src and eNOS signaling sequentially induce PECAM-1-mediated PMN transendothelial migration. Both Src and eNOS inhibition may be important therapeutic targets to prevent or limit vascular inflammation. PMID:22806890

  8. Triterpenoic Acids from Apple Pomace Enhance the Activity of the Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS).

    PubMed

    Waldbauer, Katharina; Seiringer, Günter; Nguyen, Dieu Linh; Winkler, Johannes; Blaschke, Michael; McKinnon, Ruxandra; Urban, Ernst; Ladurner, Angela; Dirsch, Verena M; Zehl, Martin; Kopp, Brigitte

    2016-01-13

    Pomace is an easy-accessible raw material for the isolation of fruit-derived compounds. Fruit consumption is associated with health-promoting effects, such as the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Increased vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, for example, due to an enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, could be one molecular mechanism mediating this effect. To identify compounds from apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) pomace that have the potential to amplify NO bioavailability via eNOS activation, a bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol/water (70:30) extract has been performed using the (14)C-L-arginine to (14)C-L-citrulline conversion assay (ACCA) in the human endothelium-derived cell line EA.hy926. Phytochemical characterization of the active fractions was performed using the spectrophotometric assessment of the total phenolic content, as well as TLC, HPLC-DAD-ELSD, and HPLC-MS analyses. Eleven triterpenoic acids, of which one is a newly discovered compound, were identified as the main constituents in the most active fraction, accompanied by only minor contents of phenolic compounds. When tested individually, none of the tested compounds exhibited significant eNOS activation. Nevertheless, cell stimulation with the reconstituted compound mixture restored eNOS activation, validating the potential of apple pomace as a source of bioactive components. PMID:26682617

  9. Enhancing eNOS activity with simultaneous inhibition of IKKβ restores vascular function in Ins2(Akita+/-) type-1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Manickam; Janardhanan, Preethi; Roman, Linda; Reddick, Robert L; Natarajan, Mohan; van Haperen, Rien; Habib, Samy L; de Crom, Rini; Mohan, Sumathy

    2015-10-01

    The balance of nitric oxide (NO) versus superoxide generation has a major role in the initiation and progression of endothelial dysfunction. Under conditions of high glucose, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) functions as a chief source of superoxide rather than NO. In order to improve NO bioavailability within the vessel wall in type-1 diabetes, we investigated treatment strategies that improve eNOS phosphorylation and NO-dependent vasorelaxation. We evaluated methods to increase the eNOS activity by (1) feeding Ins2(Akita) spontaneously diabetic (type-1) mice with l-arginine in the presence of sepiapterin, a precursor of tetrahydrobiopterin; (2) preventing eNOS/NO deregulation by the inclusion of inhibitor kappa B kinase beta (IKKβ) inhibitor, salsalate, in the diet regimen in combination with l-arginine and sepiapterin; and (3) independently increasing eNOS expression to improve eNOS activity and associated NO production through generating Ins2(Akita) diabetic mice that overexpress human eNOS predominantly in vascular endothelial cells. Our results clearly demonstrated that diet supplementation with l-arginine, sepiapterin along with salsalate improved phosphorylation of eNOS and enhanced vasorelaxation of thoracic/abdominal aorta in type-1 diabetic mice. More interestingly, despite the overexpression of eNOS, the in-house generated transgenic eNOS-GFP (TgeNOS-GFP)-Ins2(Akita) cross mice showed an unanticipated effect of reduced eNOS phosphorylation and enhanced superoxide production. Our results demonstrate that enhancement of endogenous eNOS activity by nutritional modulation is more beneficial than increasing the endogenous expression of eNOS by gene therapy modalities. PMID:26214584

  10. Regulation of Endothelial Glutathione by ICAM-1 governs VEGF-A mediated eNOS Activity and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Langston, Will; Chidlow, John H.; Booth, Blake A.; Barlow, Shayne C.; Lefer, David J.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that inflammatory cell adhesion molecules may modulate endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis through unknown mechanisms. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, herein we reveal a novel redox sensitive mechanism by which ICAM-1 modulates endothelial GSH that controls VEGF-A induced eNOS activity, endothelial chemotaxis, and angiogenesis. In vivo disk angiogenesis assays showed attenuated VEGF-A mediated angiogenesis in ICAM-1−/− mice. Moreover, VEGF-A dependent chemotaxis, eNOS phosphorylation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were impaired in ICAM-1−/− MAEC compared to WT MAEC. Decreasing intracellular GSH in ICAM-1−/− MAEC to levels observed in WT MAEC with 150 μM buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) restored VEGF-A responses. Conversely, GSH supplementation of WT MAEC with 5 mM glutathione ethyl ester (GEE) mimicked defects observed in ICAM-1−/− cells. Deficient angiogenic responses in ICAM-1−/− cells were associated with increased expression of the lipid phosphatase, PTEN, consistent with antagonism of signaling pathways leading to eNOS activation. PTEN expression was also sensitive to GSH status, decreasing or increasing in proportion to intracellular GSH concentrations. These data suggest a novel role for ICAM-1 in modulating VEGF-A induced angiogenesis and eNOS activity through regulation of PTEN expression via modulation of intracellular GSH status. PMID:17291995

  11. Pretreatment with β-Boswellic Acid Improves Blood Stasis Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Role of eNOS Activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingming; Chen, Minchun; Ding, Yi; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhang, Yikai; Wei, Peifeng; Wang, Jingwen; Qiao, Yi; Li, Liang; Li, Yuwen; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells play an important role in modulating anti-thrombus and maintaining the natural function of vascular by secreting many active substances. β-boswellic acid (β-BA) is an active triterpenoid compound from the extract of boswellia serrate. In this study, it is demonstrated that β-BA ameliorates plasma coagulation parameters, protects endothelium from blood stasis induced injury and prevents blood stasis induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Moreover, it is found that β-BA significantly increases nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels in carotid aortas of blood stasis rats. To stimulate blood stasis-like conditions in vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Treatment of β-BA significantly increased intracellular NO level. Western blot and immunofluorescence as well as immunohistochemistry reveal that β-BA increases phosphorylation of enzyme nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser1177. In addition, β-BA mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation can be markedly blocked by eNOS inhibitor L-NAME in blood stasis rats. In OGD treated HUEVCs, the protective effect of β-BA is attenuated by knockdown of eNOS. In conclusion, the above findings provide convincing evidence for the protective effects of β-BA on blood stasis induced endothelial dysfunction by eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:26482008

  12. Pretreatment with β-Boswellic Acid Improves Blood Stasis Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Role of eNOS Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingming; Chen, Minchun; Ding, Yi; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhang, Yikai; Wei, Peifeng; Wang, Jingwen; Qiao, Yi; Li, Liang; Li, Yuwen; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells play an important role in modulating anti-thrombus and maintaining the natural function of vascular by secreting many active substances. β-boswellic acid (β-BA) is an active triterpenoid compound from the extract of boswellia serrate. In this study, it is demonstrated that β-BA ameliorates plasma coagulation parameters, protects endothelium from blood stasis induced injury and prevents blood stasis induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Moreover, it is found that β-BA significantly increases nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cGMP) levels in carotid aortas of blood stasis rats. To stimulate blood stasis-like conditions in vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Treatment of β-BA significantly increased intracellular NO level. Western blot and immunofluorescence as well as immunohistochemistry reveal that β-BA increases phosphorylation of enzyme nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser1177. In addition, β-BA mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation can be markedly blocked by eNOS inhibitor L-NAME in blood stasis rats. In OGD treated HUEVCs, the protective effect of β-BA is attenuated by knockdown of eNOS. In conclusion, the above findings provide convincing evidence for the protective effects of β-BA on blood stasis induced endothelial dysfunction by eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:26482008

  13. Obligatory Role for Endothelial Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Caveolae Internalization in Catestatin-Dependent eNOS Activation

    PubMed Central

    Fornero, Sara; Bassino, Eleonora; Ramella, Roberta; Mahata, Sushil K.; Tota, Bruno; Alloatti, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The chromogranin-A peptide catestatin modulates a wide range of processes, such as cardiovascular functions, innate immunity, inflammation, and metabolism. We recently found that the cardiac antiadrenergic action of catestatin requires a PI3K-dependent NO release from endothelial cells, although the receptor involved is yet to be identified. In the present work, based on the cationic properties of catestatin, we tested the hypothesis of its interaction with membrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans, resulting in the activation of a caveolae-dependent endocytosis. Experiments were performed on bovine aortic endothelial cells. Endocytotic vesicles trafficking was quantified by confocal microscopy using a water-soluble membrane dye; catestatin colocalization with heparan sulphate proteoglycans and caveolin 1 internalization were studied by fluorimetric measurements in live cells. Modulation of the catestatin-dependent eNOS activation was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis. Our results demonstrate that catestatin (5 nM) colocalizes with heparan sulphate proteoglycans and induces a remarkable increase in the caveolae-dependent endocytosis and caveolin 1 internalization, which were significantly reduced by both heparinase and wortmannin. Moreover, catestatin was unable to induce Ser1179 eNOS phosphorylation after pretreatments with heparinase and methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Taken together, these results highlight the obligatory role for proteoglycans and caveolae internalization in the catestatin-dependent eNOS activation in endothelial cells. PMID:25136621

  14. Role of PECAM-1 in the shear-stress-induced activation of Akt and the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Fisslthaler, Beate; Dixit, Madhulika; Busse, Rudi

    2005-09-15

    The application of fluid shear stress to endothelial cells elicits the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and phosphorylation of the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Shear stress also elicits the enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of endothelial proteins, especially of those situated in the vicinity of cell-cell contacts. Since a major constituent of these endothelial cell-cell contacts is the platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) we assessed the role of PECAM-1 in the activation of eNOS. In human endothelial cells, shear stress induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and enhanced the association of PECAM-1 with eNOS. Endothelial cell stimulation with shear stress elicited the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS as well as of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). While the shear-stress-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 as well as the serine phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were abolished by the pre-treatment of cells with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP1 the phosphorylation of AMPK was unaffected. Down-regulation of PECAM-1 using a siRNA approach attenuated the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS, as well as the shear-stress-induced accumulation of cyclic GMP levels while the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of AMPK remained intact. A comparable attenuation of Akt and eNOS (but not AMPK) phosphorylation and NO production was also observed in endothelial cells generated from PECAM-1-deficient mice. These data indicate that the shear-stress-induced activation of Akt and eNOS in endothelial cells is modulated by the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 whereas the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of AMPK is controlled by an alternative signaling pathway. PMID:16118242

  15. Sympathetic activation increases NO release from eNOS but neither eNOS nor nNOS play an essential role in exercise hyperemia in the human forearm

    PubMed Central

    Shabeeh, Husain; Seddon, Michael; Brett, Sally; Melikian, Narbeh; Casadei, Barbara; Shah, Ajay M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) release from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and/or neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) could be modulated by sympathetic nerve activity and contribute to increased blood flow after exercise. We examined the effects of brachial-arterial infusion of the nNOS selective inhibitor S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline (SMTC) and the nonselective NOS inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) on forearm arm blood flow at rest, during sympathetic activation by lower body negative pressure, and during lower body negative pressure immediately after handgrip exercise. Reduction in forearm blood flow by lower body negative pressure during infusion of SMTC was not significantly different from that during vehicle (−28.5 ± 4.02 vs. −34.1 ± 2.96%, respectively; P = 0.32; n = 8). However, l-NMMA augmented the reduction in forearm blood flow by lower body negative pressure (−44.2 ± 3.53 vs. −23.4 ± 5.71%; n = 8; P < 0.01). When lower body negative pressure was continued after handgrip exercise, there was no significant effect of either l-NMMA or SMTC on forearm blood flow immediately after low-intensity exercise (P = 0.91 and P = 0.44 for l-NMMA vs. saline and SMTC vs. saline, respectively; each n = 10) or high-intensity exercise (P = 0.46 and P = 0.68 for l-NMMA vs. saline and SMTC vs. saline, respectively; each n = 10). These results suggest that sympathetic activation increases NO release from eNOS, attenuating vasoconstriction. Dysfunction of eNOS could augment vasoconstrictor and blood pressure responses to sympathetic activation. However, neither eNOS nor nNOS plays an essential role in postexercise hyperaemia, even in the presence of increased sympathetic activation. PMID:23436331

  16. Purinergic glio-endothelial coupling during neuronal activity: role of P2Y1 receptors and eNOS in functional hyperemia in the mouse somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Davila, Antonio; Valcarcel-Ares, M Noa; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Varamini, Behzad; Ballabh, Praveen; Sonntag, William E; Baur, Joseph A; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-12-01

    Impairment of moment-to-moment adjustment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) via neurovascular coupling is thought to play a critical role in the genesis of cognitive impairment associated with aging and pathological conditions associated with accelerated cerebromicrovascular aging (e.g., hypertension, obesity). Although previous studies demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction plays a critical role in neurovascular uncoupling in these conditions, the role of endothelial NO mediation in neurovascular coupling responses is not well understood. To establish the link between endothelial function and functional hyperemia, neurovascular coupling responses were studied in mutant mice overexpressing or deficient in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), and the role of P2Y1 receptors in purinergic glioendothelial coupling was assessed. We found that genetic depletion of eNOS (eNOS(-/-)) and pharmacological inhibition of NO synthesis significantly decreased the CBF responses in the somatosensory cortex evoked by whisker stimulation and by administration of ATP. Overexpression of eNOS enhanced NO mediation of functional hyperemia. In control mice, the selective and potent P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2179 attenuated both whisker stimulation-induced and ATP-mediated CBF responses, whereas, in eNOS(-/-) mice, the inhibitory effects of MRS2179 were blunted. Collectively, our findings provide additional evidence for purinergic glio-endothelial coupling during neuronal activity, highlighting the role of ATP-mediated activation of eNOS via P2Y1 receptors in functional hyperemia. PMID:26453330

  17. Roles of ROS and PKC-βII in ionizing radiation-induced eNOS activation in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Kimimasa; Kondo, Takashi; Mizuno, Natsumi; Shoji, Miki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Inanami, Osamu; Yokoo, Hiroki; Yoshimura, Naoki; Hattori, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    Vascular endothelial cells can absorb higher radiation doses than any other tissue in the body, and post-radiation impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function may be developed as a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular injury. In this study, we investigated early alterations of eNOS signaling in human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to X-ray radiation. We found that ionizing radiation increased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 and dephosphorylation at Thr-495 in HUVECs in a dose-dependent (≤ 20 Gy) and time-dependent (6-72 h) manner. The total expression levels of eNOS were unchanged by radiation. Although a transient but significant increase in extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and a biphasic decline in Akt phosphorylation were observed after irradiation, these inhibitors were without effect on the radiation-induced changes in eNOS phosphorylation. There was an increase in protein kinase C-βII (PKC-βII) expression and the ablation of PKC-βII by small interfering RNA (siRNA) negated the radiation effect on the two eNOS phosphorylation events. Furthermore, when the radiation-induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was prevented by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, eNOS Ser-1177 phosphorylation and Thr-495 dephosphorylation in irradiated HUVECs were significantly reduced. However, transfection of PKC-β siRNA did not alter ROS production after irradiation, and NAC failed to block the radiation-induced increase in PKC-βII expression. Taken together, our results suggest that ionizing radiation-induced eNOS activation in human vascular endothelial cells is attributed to both the up-regulation of PKC-βII and the increase in ROS generation which were independent of each other. PMID:25869503

  18. Sodium nitrite exerts an antihypertensive effect and improves endothelial function through activation of eNOS in the SHR.

    PubMed

    Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Lau, Yeh Siang; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2016-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) induces relaxation in isolated arteries partly through an endothelium-dependent mechanism involving NO-eNOS-sGC-cGMP pathway. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic NaNO2 administration on arterial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular function in hypertensive rats. NaNO2 (150 mg L-1) was given in drinking water for four weeks to spontaneously (SHR) and Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) treated hypertensive SD rats. Arterial SBP and vascular function in isolated aortae were studied. Total plasma nitrate/nitrite and vascular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels were measured using commercially available assay kits. Vascular nitric oxide (NO) levels were evaluated by DAF-FM fluorescence while the proteins involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was determined by Western blotting. NaNO2 treatment reduced SBP, improved the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased plasma total nitrate/nitrite level and vascular tissue NO and cGMP levels in SHR. Furthermore, increased presence of phosphorylated eNOS and Hsp-90 was observed in NaNO2-treated SHR. The beneficial effect of nitrite treatment was not observed in L-NAME treated hypertensive SD rats. The present study provides evidence that chronic treatment of genetically hypertensive rats with NaNO2 improves endothelium-dependent relaxation in addition to its antihypertensive effect, partly through mechanisms involving activation of eNOS. PMID:27616322

  19. Insulin resistance reduces arterial prostacyclin synthase and eNOS activities by increasing endothelial fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xueliang; Edelstein, Diane; Obici, Silvana; Higham, Ninon; Zou, Ming-Hui; Brownlee, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Insulin resistance markedly increases cardiovascular disease risk in people with normal glucose tolerance, even after adjustment for known risk factors such as LDL, triglycerides, HDL, and systolic blood pressure. In this report, we show that increased oxidation of FFAs in aortic endothelial cells without added insulin causes increased production of superoxide by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. FFA-induced overproduction of superoxide activated a variety of proinflammatory signals previously implicated in hyperglycemia-induced vascular damage and inactivated 2 important antiatherogenic enzymes, prostacyclin synthase and eNOS. In 2 nondiabetic rodent models — insulin-resistant, obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats and high-fat diet–induced insulin-resistant mice — inactivation of prostacyclin synthase and eNOS was prevented by inhibition of FFA release from adipose tissue; by inhibition of the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I; and by reduction of superoxide levels. These studies identify what we believe to be a novel mechanism contributing to the accelerated atherogenesis and increased cardiovascular disease risk occurring in people with insulin resistance. PMID:16528409

  20. Ubiad1 Is an Antioxidant Enzyme that Regulates eNOS Activity by CoQ10 Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mugoni, Vera; Postel, Ruben; Catanzaro, Valeria; De Luca, Elisa; Turco, Emilia; Digilio, Giuseppe; Silengo, Lorenzo; Murphy, Michael P.; Medana, Claudio; Stainier, Didier Y.R.; Bakkers, Jeroen; Santoro, Massimo M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Protection against oxidative damage caused by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) by an antioxidant network is essential for the health of tissues, especially in the cardiovascular system. Here, we identified a gene with important antioxidant features by analyzing a null allele of zebrafish ubiad1, called barolo (bar). bar mutants show specific cardiovascular failure due to oxidative stress and ROS-mediated cellular damage. Human UBIAD1 is a nonmitochondrial prenyltransferase that synthesizes CoQ10 in the Golgi membrane compartment. Loss of UBIAD1 reduces the cytosolic pool of the antioxidant CoQ10 and leads to ROS-mediated lipid peroxidation in vascular cells. Surprisingly, inhibition of eNOS prevents Ubiad1-dependent cardiovascular oxidative damage, suggesting a crucial role for this enzyme and nonmitochondrial CoQ10 in NO signaling. These findings identify UBIAD1 as a nonmitochondrial CoQ10-forming enzyme with specific cardiovascular protective function via the modulation of eNOS activity. PMID:23374346

  1. Persistent active longitudes in sunspot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S.; Usoskin, I.

    It has been recently shown that spot activity of cool stars including solar analogues, is grouped in two clearly distinguished active longitudes which are persistent within at least one starspot cycle. Solar data including positional information of individual sunspots / groups extends back for about 130 years covering 12 solar cycles. Here we present the results of our research of longitudinal distribution of sunspot activity using an analysis similar to that applied to the stars. First, we synthesized, from the actual sunspot data, the sun's light curve as if it was defined only by spots. Then solar images were calculated from this light curve, giving a natural smoothing of the spot pattern. For each Carrington rotation, longitudinal position of these smoothed spot regions was calculated. The analysis reveals the following main features: - Sunspot activity is grouped in two active longitudes (with the differential rotation taken into account) 180o apart from each other which are persistent through the entire studied period of 12 cycles, similarly to stars. - The longitude migration is determined by changing the mean latitude of sunspot activity (the Maunder butterfly) and differential rotation. - The two longitudes periodically alternate the dominant activity with about 3.7 year period implying for the existence of the Sflip-flopT phenomenon known in - starspot activity.

  2. A2B adenosine receptor contributes to penile erection via PI3K/AKT signaling cascade-mediated eNOS activation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiaming; Grenz, Almut; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Xia, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Normal penile erection is under the control of multiple factors and signaling pathways. Although adenosine signaling is implicated in normal and abnormal penile erection, the exact role and the underlying mechanism for adenosine signaling in penile physiology remain elusive. Here we report that shear stress leads to increased adenosine release from endothelial cells. Subsequently, we determined that ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) is a key enzyme required for the production of elevated adenosine from ATP released by shear-stressed endothelial cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that shear stress-mediated elevated adenosine functions through the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) to activate the PI3K/AKT signaling cascade and subsequent increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation. These in vitro studies led us to discover further that adenosine was induced during sustained penile erection and contributes to PI3K/AKT activation and subsequent eNOS phosphorylation via A2BR signaling in intact animal. Finally, we demonstrate that lowering adenosine in wild-type mice or genetic deletion of A2BR in mutant mice significantly attenuated PI3K/AKT activation, eNOS phosphorylation, and subsequent impaired penile erection featured with the reduction of ratio of maximal intracavernosal pressure to systemic arterial pressure from 0.49 ± 0.03 to 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.38 ± 0.04, respectively (both P<0.05). Overall, using biochemical, cellular, genetic, and physiological approaches, our findings reveal that adenosine is a novel molecule signaling via A2BR activation, contributing to penile erection via PI3K/AKT-dependent eNOS activation. These studies suggest that this signaling pathway may be a novel therapeutic target for erectile disorders.—Wen, J., Grenz, A., Zhang, Y., Dai, Y., Kellems, R. E., Blackburn, M. R., Eltzschig, H. K., Xia, Y. A2B adenosine receptor contributes to penile erection via PI3K/AKT signaling cascade-mediated eNOS activation. PMID

  3. MiR-21 is induced in endothelial cells by shear stress and modulates apoptosis and eNOS activity

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Martina; Baker, Meredith B.; Moore, Jeffrey P.; Searles, Charles D.

    2010-03-19

    Mechanical forces associated with blood flow play an important role in regulating vascular signaling and gene expression in endothelial cells (ECs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of genes involved in diverse cell functions, including differentiation, growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. miRNAs are known to have an important role in modulating EC biology, but their expression and functions in cells subjected to shear stress conditions are unknown. We sought to determine the miRNA expression profile in human ECs subjected to unidirectional shear stress and define the role of miR-21 in shear stress-induced changes in EC function. TLDA array and qRT-PCR analysis performed on HUVECs exposed to prolonged unidirectional shear stress (USS, 24 h, 15 dynes/cm{sup 2}) identified 13 miRNAs whose expression was significantly upregulated (p < 0.05). The miRNA with the greatest change was miR-21; it was increased 5.2-fold (p = 0.002) in USS-treated versus control cells. Western analysis demonstrated that PTEN, a known target of miR-21, was downregulated in HUVECs exposed to USS or transfected with pre-miR-21. Importantly, HUVECs overexpressing miR-21 had decreased apoptosis and increased eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO{sup {center_dot}}) production. These data demonstrate that shear stress forces regulate the expression of miRNAs in ECs, and that miR-21 influences endothelial biology by decreasing apoptosis and activating the NO{sup {center_dot}} pathway. These studies advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which shear stress forces modulate vascular homeostasis.

  4. eNOS activation and NO function: pregnancy adaptive programming of capacitative entry responses alters nitric oxide (NO) output in vascular endothelium--new insights into eNOS regulation through adaptive cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Boeldt, D S; Yi, F X; Bird, I M

    2011-09-01

    In pregnancy, vascular nitric oxide (NO) production is increased in the systemic and more so in the uterine vasculature, thereby supporting maximal perfusion of the uterus. This high level of functionality is matched in the umbilical vein, and in corresponding disease states such as pre-eclampsia, reduced vascular responses are seen in both uterine artery and umbilical vein. In any endothelial cell, NO actually produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) is determined by the maximum capacity of the cell (eNOS expression levels), eNOS phosphorylation state, and the intracellular [Ca(2+)](i) concentration in response to circulating hormones or physical forces. Herein, we discuss how pregnancy-specific reprogramming of NO output is determined as much by pregnancy adaptation of [Ca(2+)](i) signaling responses as it is by eNOS expression and phosphorylation. By examining the changes in [Ca(2+)](i) signaling responses from human hand vein endothelial cells, uterine artery endothelial cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells in (where appropriate) nonpregnant, normal pregnant, and pathological pregnant (pre-eclamptic) state, it is clear that pregnancy adaptation of NO output occurs at the level of sustained phase 'capacitative entry' [Ca(2+)](i) response, and the adapted response is lacking in pre-eclamptic pregnancies. Moreover, gap junction function is an essential permissive regulator of the capacitative response and impairment of NO output results from any inhibitor of gap junction function, or capacitative entry using TRPC channels. Identifying these [Ca(2+)](i) signaling mechanisms underlying normal pregnancy adaptation of NO output not only provides novel targets for future treatment of diseases of pregnancy but may also apply to other common forms of hypertension. PMID:21555345

  5. Wall stretch and thromboxane A2 activate NO synthase (eNOS) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via H2O2 and Akt-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Yoo, Hae Young; Jang, Ji Hyun; Lin, Hai Yue; Seo, Eun Yeong; Zhang, Yin Hua; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary arteries (PAs) have high compliance, buffering the wide ranges of blood flow. Here, we addressed a hypothesis that PA smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) express nitric oxide synthases (NOS) that might be activated by mechanical stress and vasoactive agonists. In the myograph study of endothelium-denuded rat PAs, NOS inhibition (L-NAME) induced strong contraction (96 % of 80 mM KCl-induced contraction (80K)) in the presence of 5 nM U46619 (thromboxane A2 (TXA2) analogue) with relatively high basal stretch (2.94 mN, S(+)). With lower basal stretch (0.98 mN, S(-)), however, L-NAME application following U46619 (TXA2/L-NAME) induced weak contraction (27 % of 80K). Inhibitors of nNOS and iNOS had no such effect in S(+) PAs. In endothelium-denuded S(+) mesenteric and renal arteries, TXA2/L-NAME-induced contraction was only 18 and 21 % of 80K, respectively. Expression of endothelial-type NOS (eNOS) in rat PASMCs was confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Even in S(-) PAs, pretreatment with H2O2 (0.1-10 μM) effectively increased the sensitivity to TXA2/L-NAME (105 % of 80K). Vice versa, NADPH oxidase inhibitors, reactive oxygen species scavengers, or an Akt inhibitor (SC-66) suppressed TXA2/L-NAME-induced contraction in S(+) PAs. In a human PASMC line, immunoblot analysis showed the following: (1) eNOS expression, (2) Ser(1177) phosphorylation by U46619 and H2O2, and (3) Akt activation (Ser(473) phosphorylation) by U46619. In the cell-attached patch clamp study, H2O2 facilitated membrane stretch-activated cation channels in rat PASMCs. Taken together, the muscular eNOS in PAs can be activated by TXA2 and mechanical stress via H2O2 and Akt-mediated signaling, which may counterbalance the contractile signals from TXA2 and mechanical stimuli. PMID:26729266

  6. Extract from Ribes nigrum leaves in vitro activates nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and increases CD39 expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luzak, Boguslawa; Boncler, Magdalena; Rywaniak, Joanna; Dudzinska, Dominika; Rozalski, Marek; Krajewska, Urszula; Balcerczak, Ewa; Podsedek, Anna; Redzynia, Malgorzata; Watala, Cezary

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether blackcurrant leaf extract (BLE) modulates endothelium antithrombotic function, namely increases the expression/activity of ADPase (CD39) and augments the production of nitric oxide in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). It was found that BLE with proanthocyanidins (60 % of the total polyphenol content) increased the CD39-positive endothelial cell fraction (up to 10 % for 2.5 μg/ml, and up to 33 % for 15 μg/ml, p < 0.05 or less) in a concentration-dependent manner, and enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation (T495 phosphorylation decreased by 31 ± 6 % for 2.5 μg/ml and 48 ± 6 % for 15 μg/ml; S1177 phosphorylation increased by 13 ± 3 % for 2.5 μg/ml and 18 ± 7 % for 15 μg/ml, compared to untreated cells, p < 0.05 or less). Additionally, incubation for 24 or 48 h with BLE at a lower range of polyphenol concentrations, significantly increased cell viability with a maximal effect at 2.5 μg/ml (viability increased by 24.8 ± 1.0 % for 24 h and by 32.5 ± 2.7 % for 48-h time incubation, p < 0.0001). The increased CD39 expression and the increased eNOS activation in HUVEC can be regarded as the beneficial markers of the improvement of antiplatelet action of endothelial cells. Unexpectedly, these assumptions were not confirmed in the experimental model of platelet-endothelial cell interactions. These observations lead to the conclusion that BLE may improve endothelial cell viability at low physiological concentrations without affecting the antiplatelet action of endothelium. PMID:25407137

  7. Synaptic reverberation underlying mnemonic persistent activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, X J

    2001-08-01

    Stimulus-specific persistent neural activity is the neural process underlying active (working) memory. Since its discovery 30 years ago, mnemonic activity has been hypothesized to be sustained by synaptic reverberation in a recurrent circuit. Recently, experimental and modeling work has begun to test the reverberation hypothesis at the cellular level. Moreover, theory has been developed to describe memory storage of an analog stimulus (such as spatial location or eye position), in terms of continuous 'bump attractors' and 'line attractors'. This review summarizes new studies, and discusses insights and predictions from biophysically based models. The stability of a working memory network is recognized as a serious problem; stability can be achieved if reverberation is largely mediated by NMDA receptors at recurrent synapses. PMID:11476885

  8. Resonant activation: a strategy against bacterial persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yan; Zhu, Meng; Xing, Jianhua

    2010-03-01

    A bacterial colony may develop a small number of cells genetically identical to, but phenotypically different from, other normally growing bacteria. These so-called persister cells keep themselves in a dormant state and thus are insensitive to antibiotic treatment, resulting in serious problems of drug resistance. In this paper, we proposed a novel strategy to 'kill' persister cells by triggering them to switch, in a fast and synchronized way, into normally growing cells that are susceptible to antibiotics. The strategy is based on resonant activation (RA), a well-studied phenomenon in physics where the internal noise of a system can constructively facilitate fast and synchronized barrier crossings. Through stochastic Gilliespie simulation with a generic toggle switch model, we demonstrated that RA exists in the phenotypic switching of a single bacterium. Further, by coupling single cell level and population level simulations, we showed that with RA, one can greatly reduce the time and total amount of antibiotics needed to sterilize a bacterial population. We suggest that resonant activation is a general phenomenon in phenotypic transition, and can find other applications such as cancer therapy.

  9. Long-term persistence of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Feynman, Joan; Robinson, Paul

    1994-01-01

    We examine the question of whether or not the non-periodic variations in solar activity are caused by a white-noise, random process. The Hurst exponent, which characterizes the persistence of a time series, is evaluated for the series of C-14 data for the time interval from about 6000 BC to 1950 AD. We find a constant Hurst exponent, suggesting that solar activity in the frequency range from 100 to 3000 years includes an important continuum component in addition to the well-known periodic variations. The value we calculate, H approximately 0.8, is significantly larger than the value of 0.5 that would correspond to variations produced by a white-noise process. This value is in good agreement with the results for the monthly sunspot data reported elsewhere, indicating that the physics that produces the continuum is a correlated random process and that it is the same type of process over a wide range of time interval lengths.

  10. Degassing Processes at Persistently Active Explosive Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, Jean-Francois

    Among volcanic gases, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is by far the most commonly measured. More than a monitoring proxy for volcanic degassing, SO 2 has the potential to alter climate patterns. Persistently active explosive volcanoes are characterized by short explosive bursts, which often occur at periodic intervals numerous times per day, spanning years to decades. SO 2 emissions at those volcanoes are poorly constrained, in large part because the current satellite monitoring techniques are unable to detect or quantify plumes of low concentration in the troposphere. Eruption plumes also often show high concentrations of ash and/or aerosols, which further inhibit the detection methods. In this work I focus on quantifying volcanic gas emissions at persistently active explosive volcanoes and their variations over short timescales (minutes to hours), in order to document their contribution to natural SO2 flux as well as investigate the physical processes that control their behavior. In order to make these measurements, I first develop and assemble a UV ground-based instrument, and validate it against an independently measured source of SO2 at a coal-burning power plant in Arizona. I establish a measurement protocol and demonstrate that the instrument measures SO 2 fluxes with < 20 % error. Using the same protocol, I establish a record of the degassing patterns at Semeru volcano (Indonesia), a volcano that has been producing cycles of repeated explosions with periods of minutes to hours for the past several decades. Semeru produces an average of 21-71 tons of SO2 per day, amounting to a yearly output of 8-26 Mt. Using the Semeru data, along with a 1-D transient numerical model of magma ascent, I test the validity of a model in which a viscous plug at the top of the conduit produces cycles of eruption and gas release. I find that it can be a valid hypothesis to explain the observed patterns of degassing at Semeru. Periodic behavior in such a system occurs for a very narrow range

  11. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  12. BET Bromodomain Suppression Inhibits VEGF-induced Angiogenesis and Vascular Permeability by Blocking VEGFR2-mediated Activation of PAK1 and eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingcheng; Qiu, Qian; Xiao, Youjun; Zeng, Shan; Zhan, Mingying; Shi, Maohua; Zou, Yaoyao; Ye, Yujin; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan; Xu, Hanshi

    2016-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is a critical modulator of angiogenesis. Increasing evidence indicate the important role of bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) of chromatin adaptors in regulating tumor growth and inflammatory response. However, whether BET proteins have a role in angiogenesis and endothelial permeability is unclear. In this study, we observed that treatment with JQ1, a specific BET inhibitor, suppressed in vitro tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in vivo angiogenesis in a Matrigel plug and oxygen-induced retinopathy neovascularization. JQ1 attenuated the VEGF-induced decrease in TEER in HUVECs and prevented Evans blue dye leakage in the VEGF-induced Miles assay in athymic Balb/c nude mice. BET inhibition with JQ1 or shRNA for Brd2 or Brd4 suppressed VEGF-induced migration, proliferation, and stress fiber formation of HUVECs. Furthermore, BET inhibition suppressed phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and PAK1, as well as eNOS activation in VEGF-stimulated HUVECs. Inhibition with VEGFR2 and PAK1 also reduced migration and proliferation, and attenuated the VEGF-induced decrease in TEER. Thus, our observations suggest the important role of BET bromodomain in regulating VEGF-induced angiogenesis. Strategies that target the BET bromodomain may provide a new therapeutic approach for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:27044328

  13. Immune Activation and HIV Persistence: Considerations for Novel Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Hiroyu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review One of the potential barriers to current HIV cure strategies is the persistence of elevated levels of immune activation despite otherwise effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). The purpose of this review is to examine the relationship between immune activation and HIV persistence, and to review novel therapeutic interventions that are currently being pursued to target immune activation in treated HIV disease. Recent findings Multiple groups have consistently observed that elevated levels of inflammation, immune activation, and immune dysfunction persist in ART-treated individuals, despite successful suppression of plasma viremia. Increased immune activation may lead to viral persistence through multiple mechanisms. Several novel interventions aimed at decreasing persistent immune activation are being pursued and include studies aimed at decreasing low-level viral replication, approaches aimed at decreasing microbial translocation, interventions to treat co-infections, and therapies that directly target immune activation. Summary There appears to be a clear and consistent relationship between immune activation and viral persistence in treated HIV disease. Whether this relationship is causal or mediated through other mechanisms is still unknown. Small-scale, pathogenesis-oriented interventional studies are necessary to further evaluate this relationship and the effect of potential interventions. PMID:23454864

  14. Disturbance effects of PM₁₀ on iNOS and eNOS mRNA expression levels and antioxidant activity induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated rat heart: protective role of vanillic acid.

    PubMed

    Dianat, Mahin; Radmanesh, Esmat; Badavi, Mohammad; Mard, Seyed Ali; Goudarzi, Gholamraza

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial infarction is the acute condition of myocardial necrosis that occurs as a result of imbalance between coronary blood supply and myocardial demand. Air pollution increases the risk of death from cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of particulate matter (PM) on oxidative stress, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) messenger RNA (mRNA) level induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury, and the protective effects of vanillic acid (VA) in the isolated rat heart. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10), namely control, VAc, sham, VA, PMa (0.5 mg/kg), PMb (2.5 mg/kg), PMc (5 mg/kg), and PMc + VA groups. Particles with an aerodynamic diameter <10 μm (PM10) was instilled into the trachea through a fine intubation tube. Two days following the PM10 instillation, the animal's hearts were isolated and transferred to a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 60 min of reperfusion. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), xanthine oxidase (XOX), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured using special kits. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine levels of iNOS and eNOS mRNA. An increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), S-T elevation, and oxidative stress in PM10 groups was observed. Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) induction showed a significant augment in the expression of iNOS mRNA level and a significant decrease in the expression eNOS mRNA level. This effect was more pronounced in the PM groups than in the control and sham groups. Vanillic acid caused a significant decrease in LVEDP, S-T elevation, and also a significant difference in eNOS mRNA expression level, antioxidant enzymes, iNOS mRNA expression level, and oxidative stress occurred on myocardial dysfunction

  15. Persistent Focal Behavior and Physical Activity Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the proclivity and performance attributes of focal students across time and activities using data from 9,345 students. Three systematic focal behavior partitions are examined: Across activities, across time, and across activities and time. A student's performance is focal if it ends in 0 or 5 for push-ups and 0 for…

  16. Persistent Aeolian Activity at Endeavour Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnacki, M.; Michaels, T. I.; Fenton, L. K.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term monitoring of sites that are known to have active dunes and ripples is generally limited to 3 Mars-Years (MY). Here, we discuss new results of dune activity and albedo change in Endeavour crater (EC), Meridiani Planum (MP) that record eight MY of aeolian activity. MP dune fields often show large yearly variations in albedo; EC darkened by ~12% in TES albedo between MY 24 and 26 (from 0.14 to 0.12). THEMIS VIS albedo of dunes did not change significantly from MY 26 to 29, but did decrease notably (~15 %) in MY 30. These darkening events are most likely related to aeolian-driven dust cleaning (e.g., removal by saltating sand, dust devils). For example, the Opportunity rover (poised on the western rim of EC) observed evidence for a MY 31 dune field dust-clearing event. HiRISE monitoring of MP has shown it be one of the most active regions outside of north polar latitudes. Paired images of western EC taken 3 MY apart show clear evidence for dune modification that include: ripple migration, change in dune perimeters, exposure of previously buried light-toned rock, and/or burial of rock by sand (Fig. 1a-1b). Dune slip face movement is evident for most dunes, where crests and aprons advanced (2-7 m) in the downwind direction (to the SSE) at rates of 0.7-2.3 m per MY. Small dome dunes in the eastern EC were found to have a large degree of aeolian activity (e.g., deflation and/or translation) by an earlier study that used MGS-MRO images (MY 24-30). New MY 31 images validate earlier observations, showing clear evidence for bedform deflation where dunes often occupy less area (~50%) than in earlier MY 29 images (Fig. 1c-1d). Areal removal rates are on par with earlier estimates. Bedform modification and sand streamer orientation appear to be caused by a NNW wind regime, consistent with earlier observations, mesoscale modeling, and the transport direction of barchans to the west. Dunes in EC are now known to be periodically (consistently?) active from over a decade

  17. MicroRNA-27b plays a role in pulmonary arterial hypertension by modulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ dependent Hsp90-eNOS signaling and nitric oxide production

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Rui; Bao, Chunrong; Jiang, Lianyong; Liu, Hao; Yang, Yang; Mei, Ju; Ding, Fangbao

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary artery endothelial dysfunction is associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Based on recent studies showing that microRNA (miR)-27b is aberrantly expressed in PAH, we hypothesized that miR-27b may contribute to pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling in PAH. The effect of miR-27b on pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and the underlying mechanism were investigated in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) in vitro and in a monocrotaline (MCT)-induced model of PAH in vivo. miR-27b expression was upregulated in MCT-induced PAH and inversely correlated with the levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, and miR-27b inhibition attenuated MCT-induced endothelial dysfunction and remodeling and prevented PAH associated right ventricular hypertrophy and systolic pressure in rats. PPARγ was confirmed as a direct target of miR-27b in HPAECs and shown to mediate the effect of miR-27b on the disruption of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) coupling to Hsp90 and the suppression of NO production associated with the PAH phenotype. We showed that miR-27b plays a role endothelial function and NO release and elucidated a potential mechanism by which miR-27b regulates Hsp90-eNOS and NO signaling by modulating PPARγ expression, providing potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAH. - Highlights: • miR-27b plays a role in endothelial function and NO release. • miR-27b inhibition ameliorates MCT-induced endothelial dysfunction and PAH. • miR-27b targets PPARγ in HPAECs. • miR-27b regulates PPARγ dependent Hsp90-eNOS and NO signaling.

  18. Persistent Activity in Neural Networks with Dynamic Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Omri; Tsodyks, Misha

    2007-01-01

    Persistent activity states (attractors), observed in several neocortical areas after the removal of a sensory stimulus, are believed to be the neuronal basis of working memory. One of the possible mechanisms that can underlie persistent activity is recurrent excitation mediated by intracortical synaptic connections. A recent experimental study revealed that connections between pyramidal cells in prefrontal cortex exhibit various degrees of synaptic depression and facilitation. Here we analyze the effect of synaptic dynamics on the emergence and persistence of attractor states in interconnected neural networks. We show that different combinations of synaptic depression and facilitation result in qualitatively different network dynamics with respect to the emergence of the attractor states. This analysis raises the possibility that the framework of attractor neural networks can be extended to represent time-dependent stimuli. PMID:17319739

  19. Role of Prefrontal Persistent Activity in Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Mitchell R.; Constantinidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex is activated during working memory, as evidenced by fMRI results in human studies and neurophysiological recordings in animal models. Persistent activity during the delay period of working memory tasks, after the offset of stimuli that subjects are required to remember, has traditionally been thought of as the neural correlate of working memory. In the last few years several findings have cast doubt on the role of this activity. By some accounts, activity in other brain areas, such as the primary visual and posterior parietal cortex, is a better predictor of information maintained in visual working memory and working memory performance; dynamic patterns of activity may convey information without requiring persistent activity at all; and prefrontal neurons may be ill-suited to represent non-spatial information about the features and identity of remembered stimuli. Alternative interpretations about the role of the prefrontal cortex have thus been suggested, such as that it provides a top-down control of information represented in other brain areas, rather than maintaining a working memory trace itself. Here we review evidence for and against the role of prefrontal persistent activity, with a focus on visual neurophysiology. We show that persistent activity predicts behavioral parameters precisely in working memory tasks. We illustrate that prefrontal cortex represents features of stimuli other than their spatial location, and that this information is largely absent from early cortical areas during working memory. We examine memory models not dependent on persistent activity, and conclude that each of those models could mediate only a limited range of memory-dependent behaviors. We review activity decoded from brain areas other than the prefrontal cortex during working memory and demonstrate that these areas alone cannot mediate working memory maintenance, particularly in the presence of distractors. We finally discuss the discrepancy between

  20. Reversal of SIN-1-induced eNOS dysfunction by the spin trap, DMPO, in bovine aortic endothelial cells via eNOS phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amlan; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Druhan, Lawrence J; Wang, Tse-Yao; De Pascali, Francesco; Rockenbauer, Antal; Racoma, Ira; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Zweier, Jay L; Cardounel, Arturo J; Villamena, Frederick A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nitric oxide (NO) derived from eNOS is mostly responsible for the maintenance of vascular homeostasis and its decreased bioavailability is characteristic of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced endothelial dysfunction (ED). Because 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), a commonly used spin trap, can control intracellular nitroso-redox balance by scavenging ROS and donating NO, it was employed as a cardioprotective agent against ED but the mechanism of its protection is still not clear. This study elucidated the mechanism of protection by DMPO against SIN-1-induced oxidative injury to bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Experimental Approach BAEC were treated with SIN-1, as a source of peroxynitrite anion (ONOO−), and then incubated with DMPO. Cytotoxicity following SIN-1 alone and cytoprotection by adding DMPO was assessed by MTT assay. Levels of ROS and NO generation from HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type and mutant eNOS cDNAs, tetrahydrobiopterin bioavailability, eNOS activity, eNOS and Akt kinase phosphorylation were measured. Key Results Post-treatment of cells with DMPO attenuated SIN-1-mediated cytotoxicity and ROS generation, restoration of NO levels via increased in eNOS activity and phospho-eNOS levels. Treatment with DMPO alone significantly increased NO levels and induced phosphorylation of eNOS Ser1179 via Akt kinase. Transfection studies with wild-type and mutant human eNOS confirmed the dual role of eNOS as a producer of superoxide anion (O2−) with SIN-1 treatment, and a producer of NO in the presence of DMPO. Conclusion and Implications Post-treatment with DMPO of oxidatively challenged cells reversed eNOS dysfunction and could have pharmacological implications in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24405159

  1. Bezafibrate enhances proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells via AMPK and eNOS activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xing; Xiu, Ling-ling; Wei, Guo-hong; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Su, Lei; Cao, Xiao-pei; Li, Yan-bing; Xiao, Hai-peng

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of bezafibrate on the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, and to determine the signaling pathway underlying the effects. Methods: MC3T3-E1 cells, a mouse osteoblastic cell line, were used. Cell viability and proliferation were examined using MTT assay and colorimetric BrdU incorporation assay, respectively. NO production was evaluated using the Griess reagent. The mRNA expression of ALP, collagen I, osteocalcin, BMP-2, and Runx-2 was measured using real-time PCR. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of AMPK and eNOS proteins. Results: Bezafibrate increased the viability and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Bezafibrate (100 μmol/L) significantly enhanced osteoblastic mineralization and expression of the differentiation markers ALP, collagen I and osteocalcin. Bezafibrate (100 μmol/L) increased phosphorylation of AMPK and eNOS, which led to an increase of NO production by 4.08-fold, and upregulating BMP-2 and Runx-2 mRNA expression. These effects could be blocked by AMPK inhibitor compound C (5 μmol/L), or the PPARβ inhibitor GSK0660 (0.5 μmol/L), but not by the PPARα inhibitor MK886 (10 μmol/L). Furthermore, GSK0660, compound C, or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, 1 mmol/L) could reverse the stimulatory effects of bezafibrate (100 μmol/L) on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, whereas MK886 only inhibited bezafibrate-induced osteoblast proliferation. Conclusion: Bezafibrate stimulates proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells, mainly via a PPARβ-dependent mechanism. The drug might be beneficial for osteoporosis by promoting bone formation. PMID:21499286

  2. Persistent Asymmetric Brain MIBG Activity Related to a Cerebrovascular Infarct.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xia; Zhuang, Hongming

    2016-04-01

    A 13-year-old woman with a history of left malignant carotid body paraganglioma status postsurgical resection underwent I-MIBG scan for staging. The images demonstrated no definite evidence of MIBG-avid disease. However, there was asymmetric activity in the region of the brain with relatively less activity on the left compared with the contralateral right side on the head images, which was related to prior infarct revealed from the patient's history. This asymmetric MIBG activity persisted 8 years later. PMID:26571441

  3. Pathologic Heterogeneity Persists in Early Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Imke; Weigand, Stephen D; Popescu, Bogdan F G; Frischer, Josa M; Parisi, Joseph E; Guo, Yong; Lassmann, Hans; Brück, Wolfgang; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions demonstrate immunopathological heterogeneity in patterns of demyelination. Previous cross-sectional studies reported immunopatterns of demyelination were identical among multiple active demyelinating lesions from the same individual, but differed between individuals, leading to the hypothesis of intraindividual pathological homogeneity and interindividual heterogeneity. Other groups suggested a time-dependent heterogeneity of lesions. The objective of our present study was to analyze tissue samples collected longitudinally to determine whether patterns of demyelination persist over time within a given patient. Methods Archival tissue samples derived from patients with pathologically confirmed CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease who had undergone either diagnostic serial biopsy or biopsy followed by autopsy, were analyzed immunohistochemically. Inclusion criteria was the presence of early active demyelinating lesions - required for immunopattern classification - obtained from the same patient at two or more time points. Results Among 1321 surgical biopsies consistent with MS, 22 cases met study inclusion criteria. Twenty-one patients (95%) showed a persistence of immunopathological patterns in tissue sampled from different time points. This persistence was demonstrated for all major patterns of demyelination. A single patient showed features suggestive of both pattern II and pattern III on biopsy, but only pattern II among all active lesions examined at autopsy. Interpretation These findings continue to support the concept of patient-dependent immunopathological heterogeneity in early MS and suggest that the mechanisms and targets of tissue injury may differ among patient subgroups. These observations have potentially significant implications for individualized therapeutic approaches. PMID:24771535

  4. Persistence of high intestinal lactase activity in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Abbas, H; Ahmad, M

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine the incidence of persistence of high intestinal lactase activity (PLA) in a Pakistani human population, 53 probands belonging to the Punjabi ethnic group were examined using a lactose tolerance test. The incidence of PLA in the sample was found to be 55%, which has been compared with the incidence in other ethnic groups racially or geographically related to the Pakistani population. Various possible explanations for the fairly high incidence of PLA in the Punjabi ethnic group have been discussed. PMID:6885071

  5. Ca2+-activated K+ channels of small and intermediate conductance control eNOS activation through NAD(P)H oxidase.

    PubMed

    Gaete, Pablo S; Lillo, Mauricio A; Ardiles, Nicolás M; Pérez, Francisco R; Figueroa, Xavier F

    2012-03-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca)) and NO play a central role in the endothelium-dependent control of vasomotor tone. We evaluated the interaction of K(Ca) with NO production in isolated arterial mesenteric beds of the rat. In phenylephrine-contracted mesenteries, acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasodilation was reduced by NO synthase (NOS) inhibition with N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA), but in the presence of tetraethylammonium, L-NA did not further affect the response. In KCl-contracted mesenteries, the relaxation elicited by 100 nM ACh or 1 μM ionomycin was abolished by L-NA, tetraethylammonium, or simultaneous blockade of small-conductance K(Ca) (SK(Ca)) channels with apamin and intermediate-conductance K(Ca) (IK(Ca)) channels with triarylmethane-34 (TRAM-34). Apamin-TRAM-34 treatment also abolished 100 nM ACh-activated NO production, which was associated with an increase in superoxide formation. Endothelial cell Ca(2+) buffering with BAPTA elicited a similar increment in superoxide. Apamin-TRAM-34 treatment increased endothelial NOS phosphorylation at threonine 495 (P-eNOS(Thr495)). Blockade of NAD(P)H oxidase with apocynin or superoxide dismutation with PEG-SOD prevented the increment in superoxide and changes in P-eNOS(Thr495) observed during apamin and TRAM-34 application. Our results indicate that blockade of SK(Ca) and IK(Ca) activates NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent superoxide formation, which leads to inhibition of NO release through P-eNOS(Thr495). These findings disclose a novel mechanism involved in the control of NO production. PMID:22210378

  6. NF-κB activation was involved in reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis and autophagy in 1-oxoeudesm-11(13)-eno-12,8α-lactone-treated human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shanshan; Wu, Di; Li, Lin; Sun, Xiao; Xie, Weidong; Li, Xia

    2014-08-01

    1-oxoeudesm-11(13)-eno-12,8α-lactone (OEL), a novel eudesmane-type sesquiterpene compound, has been shown to inhibit the growth of some cancer cell lines and induce significant apoptosis. Here, we investigated the anti-cancer activities of OEL in human lung cancer cells. Our studies demonstrated that OEL induced both apoptosis and autophagy in A549 and H460 cells. OEL-induced autophagy was assessed by appearance of autophagic vacuoles, formation of acidic vesicular organelles, conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, recruitment of LC3-II to the autophagosomes, and activation of autophagy genes. Furthermore, administration of autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine augments OEL-induced apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy and apoptosis by OEL links to NF-κB activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interruption of NF-κB activation by specific inhibitor promotes apoptosis, but decreases autophagy. ROS antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine) attenuated both OEL-induced autophagy and apoptosis. Further experiments confirmed that OEL-induced activation of ROS was increased by NF-κB inhibitor whereas NF-κB activation was not affected by ROS inhibition. These findings suggest that OEL-elicited autophagic response plays a protective role that impedes cell death, and inhibition of autophagy could be an adjunctive strategy for enhancing the chemotherapeutic effect of OEL as an antitumor agent. PMID:24194260

  7. Long-term persistence of solar activity. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Feynman, Joan; Robinson, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The solar irradiance has been found to change by 0.1% over the recent solar cycle. A change of irradiance of about 0.5% is required to effect the Earth's climate. How frequently can a variation of this size be expected? We examine the question of the persistence of non-periodic variations in solar activity. The Huerst exponent, which characterizes the persistence of a time series (Mandelbrot and Wallis, 1969), is evaluated for the series of C-14 data for the time interval from about 6000 BC to 1950 AD (Stuiver and Pearson, 1986). We find a constant Huerst exponent, suggesting that solar activity in the frequency range of from 100 to 3000 years includes an important continuum component in addition to the well-known periodic variations. The value we calculate, H approximately equal to 0.8, is significantly larger than the value of 0.5 that would correspond to variations produced by a white-noise process. This value is in good agreement with the results for the monthly sunspot data reported elsewhere, indicating that the physics that produces the continuum is a correlated random process (Ruzmaikin et al., 1992), and that is is the same type of process over a wide range of time interval lengths. We conclude that the time period over which an irradiance change of 0.5% can be expected to occur is significantly shorter than that which would be expected for variations produced by a white-noise process.

  8. Persistence of high intestinal lactase activity (lactose tolerance) in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, A G; Delbrück, H; Haeckel, R; Goedde, H W; Flatz, G

    1976-09-10

    Two hundred and seventy apparently healthy adult subjects from Afghanistan, mainly from the central and eastern parts of the country, were subjected to a lactose tolerance test. The change of blood glucose from the fasting concentration at 20 min after the administration of lactose showed a bimodal distribution. Forty-seven subjects had a rise of blood glucose concentration of more than 1.1 mmol/l and were classified as persistence of high intestinal lactase activity (PHILA), a term which lays emphasis on the fact that high lactase activity in the adult is an unusual state whose prevalence in some populations requires explanation. In the Afghan sample there were no significant differences of the frequency of PHILA in different ethnic groups. PMID:965005

  9. Effect of Learning Activity on Students' Motivation, Physical Activity Levels and Effort/Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Lee, Amelia M.; Xiang, Ping; Kosma, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The type of learning activity offered in physical education may influence students' motivational beliefs, physical activity participation and effort/persistence in class. However, most empirical studies have focused on the individual level rather than on the learner-content interactions. Accordingly, the potential effects of learning activities on…

  10. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingzi; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-10-01

    As the first discovered gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) affects a number of cellular processes, including those involving vascular cells. This brief review summarizes the contribution of NO to the regulation of vascular tone and its sources in the blood vessel wall. NO regulates the degree of contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), although cGMP-independent signaling [S-nitrosylation of target proteins, activation of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) or production of cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP)] also can be involved. In the blood vessel wall, NO is produced mainly from l-arginine by the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but it can also be released non-enzymatically from S-nitrosothiols or from nitrate/nitrite. Dysfunction in the production and/or the bioavailability of NO characterizes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:26499181

  11. Vanadyl sulfate inhibits NO production via threonine phosphorylation of eNOS.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuowei; Carter, Jacqueline D; Dailey, Lisa A; Huang, Yuh-Chin T

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to excessive vanadium occurs in some occupations and with consumption of some dietary regimens for weight reduction and body building. Because vanadium is vasoactive, individuals exposed to excessive vanadium may develop adverse vascular effects. We have previously shown that vanadyl sulfate causes acute pulmonary vasoconstriction, which could be attributed in part to inhibition of nitric oxide production. In the present study we investigated whether NO inhibition was related to phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). VOSO4 produced dose-dependent constriction of pulmonary arteries in isolated perfused lungs and pulmonary arterial rings and a right shift of the acetylcholine-dependent vasorelaxation curve. VOSO4 inhibited constitutive as well as A23187-stimulated NO production. Constitutive NO inhibition was accompanied by increased Thr495 (threonine at codon 495) phosphorylation of eNOS, which would inhibit eNOS activity. Thr495 phosphorylation of eNOS and inhibition of NO were partially reversed by pretreatment with calphostin C, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor. There were no changes in Ser1177 (serine at codon 1177) or tyrosine phosphorylation of eNOS. These results indicate that VOSO4 induced acute pulmonary vasoconstriction that was mediated in part by the inhibition of endothelial NO production via PKC-dependent phosphorylation of Thr495 of eNOS. Exposure to excessive vanadium may contribute to pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:14754574

  12. Essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) reconstructions via extrapolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, Ambady; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the algorithm for determining the stencil of a one-dimensional Essentially Nonoscillatory (ENO) reconstruction scheme on a uniform grid is reinterpreted as being based on extrapolation. This view leads to another extension of ENO reconstruction schemes to two-dimensional unstructured triangular meshes. The key idea here is to select several cells of the stencil in one step based on extrapolation rather than one cell at a time. Numerical experiments confirm that the new scheme yields sharp nonoscillatory reconstructions and that it is about five times faster than previous schemes.

  13. Space chimp Enos returns to Patrick Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Enos the chimpanzee that orbited the earth twice in a Mercury spacecraft arrives back at Patrick Air Force Base. Enos landed some 220 nautical miles south of Bermuda and was picked up up by the U.S.S. Stormes.

  14. Persistence of endometrial activity after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, D.; Heller, P.; Dames, J.; Hoskins, W.; Gallup, D.; Park, R.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation therapy is a proved treatment for cervical carcinoma; however, it destroys ovarian function and has been thought to ablate the endometrium. Estrogen replacement therapy is often prescribed for patients with cervical carcinoma after radiation therapy. A review of records of six teaching hospitals revealed 16 patients who had endometrial sampling for uterine bleeding after standard radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. Fifteen patients underwent dilatation and curettage, and one patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy when a dilatation and curettage was unsuccessful. Six patients had fibrosis and inflammation of the endometrial cavity, seven had proliferative endometrium, one had cystic hyperplasia, one had atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, and one had adenocarcinoma. Although the number of patients who have an active endometrium after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma is not known, this report demonstrates that proliferative endometrium may persist, and these patients may develop endometrial hyperplasia or adenocarcinoma. Studies have indicated that patients with normal endometrial glands have an increased risk of developing endometrial adenocarcinoma if they are treated with unopposed estrogen. Patients who have had radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma should be treated with estrogen and a progestational agent to avoid endometrial stimulation from unopposed estrogen therapy.

  15. Soil activity and persistence of sulcotrione and mesotrione.

    PubMed

    Maeghe, L; Desmet, E M; Bulcke, R

    2004-01-01

    clearly sensitive to mesotrione and sulcotrione whereas sugar beet, red clover and lettuce are extremely sensitive to both herbicides in both experiment types. Bioassays and field experiments provide a detailed and complete information about soil activity and persistence of both herbicides. PMID:15759393

  16. The persistence of equatorial spread F - an analysis on seasonal, solar activity and geomagnetic activity aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, Sudha; Sridharan, R.

    2009-02-01

    The persistence (duration) of Equatorial Spread F (ESF), which has significant impact on communication systems, is addressed. Its behavior during different seasons and geomagnetic activity levels under the solar maximum (2001) and minimum (2006) conditions, is reported using the data from the magnetic equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5° N; 77° E; dip 0.5° N) in India. The study reveals that the persistence of the irregularities can be estimated to a reasonable extent by knowing the post sunset F region vertical drift velocity (Vz) and the magnetic activity index Kp. Any sort of advance information on the possible persistence of the ionospheric irregularities responsible for ESF is important for understanding the scintillation morphology, and the results which form the first step in this direction are presented and discussed.

  17. Removal of Persistent Organic Contaminants by Electrochemically Activated Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Ali; Keller, Jurg; Tait, Stephan; Radjenovic, Jelena

    2015-12-15

    Solutions of sulfate have often been used as background electrolytes in the electrochemical degradation of contaminants and have been generally considered inert even when high-oxidation-power anodes such as boron-doped diamond (BDD) were employed. This study examines the role of sulfate by comparing electro-oxidation rates for seven persistent organic contaminants at BDD anodes in sulfate and inert nitrate anolytes. Sulfate yielded electro-oxidation rates 10-15 times higher for all target contaminants compared to the rates of nitrate anolyte. This electrochemical activation of sulfate was also observed at concentrations as low as 1.6 mM, which is relevant for many wastewaters. Electrolysis of diatrizoate in the presence of specific radical quenchers (tert-butanol and methanol) had a similar effect on electro-oxidation rates, illustrating a possible role of the hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) in the anodic formation of sulfate radical (SO4(•-)) species. The addition of 0.55 mM persulfate increased the electro-oxidation rate of diatrizoate in nitrate from 0.94 to 9.97 h(-1), suggesting a nonradical activation of persulfate. Overall findings indicate the formation of strong sulfate-derived oxidant species at BDD anodes when polarized at high potentials. This may have positive implications in the electro-oxidation of wastewaters containing sulfate. For example, the energy required for the 10-fold removal of diatrizoate was decreased from 45.6 to 2.44 kWh m(-3) by switching from nitrate to sulfate anolyte. PMID:26572594

  18. S-glutathionylation uncouples eNOS and regulates its cellular and vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-An; Wang, Tse-Yao; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Reyes, Levy A.; Hemann, Craig; Hassan Talukder, M. A.; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Druhan, Lawrence J.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is critical in the regulation of vascular function, and can generate both nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2•−), which are key mediators of cellular signalling. In the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin, eNOS produces NO, endothelial-derived relaxing factor, from L-arginine (L-Arg) by means of electron transfer from NADPH through a flavin containing reductase domain to oxygen bound at the haem of an oxygenase domain, which also contains binding sites for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-Arg1–3. In the absence of BH4, NO synthesis is abrogated and instead O2•− is generated4–7. While NOS dysfunction occurs in diseases with redox stress, BH4 repletion only partly restores NOS activity and NOS-dependent vasodilation7. This suggests that there is an as yet unidentified redox-regulated mechanism controlling NOS function. Protein thiols can undergo S-glutathionylation, a reversible protein modification involved in cellular signalling and adaptation8,9. Under oxidative stress, S-glutathionylation occurs through thiol–disulphide exchange with oxidized glutathione or reaction of oxidant-induced protein thiyl radicals with reduced glutathione10,11. Cysteine residues are critical for the maintenance of eNOS function12,13; we therefore speculated that oxidative stress could alter eNOS activity through S-glutathionylation. Here we show that S-glutathionylation of eNOS reversibly decreases NOS activity with an increase in O2•− generation primarily from the reductase, in which two highly conserved cysteine residues are identified as sites of S-glutathionylation and found to be critical for redox-regulation of eNOS function. We show that eNOS S-glutathionylation in endothelial cells, with loss of NO and gain of O2•− generation, is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation. In hypertensive vessels, eNOS S-glutathionylation is increased with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation that is restored by thiol

  19. In Vitro Activation of eNOS by Mangifera indica (Careless™) and Determination of an Effective Dosage in a Randomized, Double-Blind, Human Pilot Study on Microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Gerstgrasser, Alexandra; Röchter, Sigrid; Dressler, Dirk; Schön, Christiane; Reule, Claudia; Buchwald-Werner, Sybille

    2016-03-01

    Mangifera indica fruit preparation (Careless™) activates the evolutionary conserved metabolic sensors sirtuin 1 and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, which have been identified as playing a key role in microcirculation and endothelial function. Here, an acute effect of a single dose of 100 mg or 300 mg Careless™ on microcirculation was investigated in a randomized, double-blind, crossover pilot study in ten healthy women to determine the effective dosage. Microcirculation and endothelial function were assessed by the Oxygen-to-see system and pulse amplitude tonometry (EndoPAT™), respectively. Cutaneous blood flow was increased over time by 100 mg (54% over pre-values, p = 0.0157) and 300 mg (35% over pre-value, p = 0.209) Careless™. The EndoPAT™ reactive hyperemia response was slightly improved 3 h after intake compared to pretesting with 300 mg Careless™. Furthermore, activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, as an important regulator for endothelial function, was tested in vitro in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Careless™, after simulation of digestion, increased the activated form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase dose-dependently by 23% (300 µg/mL), 42% (1500 µg/mL), and 60% (3000 µg/mL) compared to the untreated control. In conclusion, the study suggests moderate beneficial effects of Careless™ on microcirculation, which is at least partly mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation. PMID:26584454

  20. Persistent active avoidance correlates with activity in prelimbic cortex and ventral striatum.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Rivera, Christian; Roman-Ortiz, Ciorana; Montesinos-Cartagena, Marlian; Quirk, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Persistent avoidance is a prominent symptom of anxiety disorders and is often resistant to extinction-based therapies. Little is known about the circuitry mediating persistent avoidance. Using a recently described platform-mediated active avoidance task, we assessed activity in several structures with c-Fos immuno-labeling. In Task 1, rats were conditioned to avoid a tone-signaled shock by moving to a safe platform, and then were extinguished over two days. One day later, failure to retrieve extinction correlated with increased activity in the prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PL), ventral striatum (VS), and basal amygdala (BA), and decreased activity in infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL), consistent with pharmacological inactivation studies. In Task 2, the platform was removed during extinction training and fear (suppression of bar pressing) was extinguished to criterion over 3-5 days. The platform was then returned in a post-extinction test. Under these conditions, avoidance levels were equivalent to Experiment 1 and correlated with increased activity in PL and VS, but there was no correlation with activity in IL or BA. Thus, persistent avoidance can occur independently of deficits in fear extinction and its associated structures. PMID:26236209

  1. Persistent active avoidance correlates with activity in prelimbic cortex and ventral striatum

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Rivera, Christian; Roman-Ortiz, Ciorana; Montesinos-Cartagena, Marlian; Quirk, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent avoidance is a prominent symptom of anxiety disorders and is often resistant to extinction-based therapies. Little is known about the circuitry mediating persistent avoidance. Using a recently described platform-mediated active avoidance task, we assessed activity in several structures with c-Fos immuno-labeling. In Task 1, rats were conditioned to avoid a tone-signaled shock by moving to a safe platform, and then were extinguished over two days. One day later, failure to retrieve extinction correlated with increased activity in the prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PL), ventral striatum (VS), and basal amygdala (BA), and decreased activity in infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL), consistent with pharmacological inactivation studies. In Task 2, the platform was removed during extinction training and fear (suppression of bar pressing) was extinguished to criterion over 3–5 days. The platform was then returned in a post-extinction test. Under these conditions, avoidance levels were equivalent to Experiment 1 and correlated with increased activity in PL and VS, but there was no correlation with activity in IL or BA. Thus, persistent avoidance can occur independently of deficits in fear extinction and its associated structures. PMID:26236209

  2. PGC-1α ameliorates AngiotensinII-induced eNOS dysfunction in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Geng, Xiao-Yong; Cong, Xiao-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Increasing evidences support that PGC-1α participates in regulating endothelial homeostasis, in part by mediating endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PGC-1α regulates eNOS activity are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PGC-1α on eNOS dysfunction and further explore the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that PGC-1α expression was downregulated after AngiotensinII (AngII) treatment and paralleled with the decreased NO generation in human aortic endothelial cells. Overexpression of PGC-1α with adenovirus or pharmacological agonist ameliorated AngII-induced the decrease of NO generation, evidenced by the restoration of cGMP and nitrite concentration. Rather than affecting eNOS expression and uncoupling, PGC-1α inhibited AngII-induced decrease of eNOS serine 1177 phosphorylation through activation of PI3K/Akt signaling. In addition, PGC-1α overexpression suppressed AngII-induced the increase of PP2A-A/eNOS interaction and PP2A phosphatase activity, with a concomitant decrease in PP2A phosphorylation, leading to eNOS serine 1177 phosphorylation. However, pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling blunted the observed effect of PGC-1α on PP2A activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that PGC-1α overexpression improves AngII-induced eNOS dysfunction and that improved eNOS dysfunction is associated with activated PI3K/Akt pathway, impaired PP2A activity and reduced PP2A-A/eNOS association. These date indicate that forced PGC-1α expression may be a novel therapeutic approach for endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27235860

  3. Modulation of cardiac contraction, relaxation and rate by the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS): lessons from genetically modified mice

    PubMed Central

    Massion, P B; Balligand, J-L

    2003-01-01

    The modulatory role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) on heart contraction, relaxation and rate is examined in light of recent studies using genetic deletion or overexpression in mice under specific conditions. Unstressed eNOS-/- hearts in basal conditions exhibit a normal inotropic and lusitropic function, with either decreased or unchanged heart rate. Under stimulation with catecholamines, eNOS-/- mice predominantly show a potentiation in their β-adrenergic inotropic and lusitropic responsiveness. A similar phenotype is observed in β3-adrenoceptor deficient mice, pointing to a key role of this receptor subtype for eNOS coupling. The effect of eNOS on the muscarinic cholinergic modulation of cardiac function probably operates in conjunction with other NO-independent mechanisms, the persistence of which may explain the apparent dispensability of this isoform for the effect of acetylcholine in some eNOS-/- mouse strains. eNOS-/- hearts submitted to short term ischaemia-reperfusion exhibit variable alterations in systolic and diastolic function and infarct size, while those submitted to myocardial infarction present a worsened ventricular remodelling, increased 1 month mortality and loss of benefit from ACE inhibitor or angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist therapy. Although non-conditional eNOS gene deletion may engender phenotypic adaptations (e.g. ventricular hypertrophy resulting from chronic hypertension, or upregulation of the other NOS isoforms) potentially confounding the interpretation of comparative studies, the use of eNOS-/- mice has undoubtedly advanced (and will probably continue to improve) our understanding of the complex role of eNOS (in conjunction with the other NOSs) in the regulation of cardiac function. The challenge is now to confirm the emerging paradigms in human cardiac physiology and hopefully translate them into therapy. PMID:12509479

  4. Adenoviral gene transfer of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) partially restores normal pulmonary arterial pressure in eNOS-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Hunter C.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Greenberg, Stanley S.; Giles, Thomas D.; Hyman, Albert L.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that mice deficient in the gene coding for endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) have increased pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. In the present study, the effect of transfer to the lung of an adenoviral vector encoding the eNOS gene (AdCMVeNOS) on pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance was investigated in eNOS-deficient mice. One day after intratracheal administration of AdCMVeNOS to eNOS−/− mice, there was an increase in eNOS protein, cGMP levels, and calcium-dependent conversion of l-arginine to l-citrulline in the lung. The increase in eNOS protein and activity in eNOS−/− mice was associated with a reduction in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance when compared with values in eNOS-deficient mice treated with vehicle or a control adenoviral vector coding for β-galactosidase, AdCMVβgal. These data suggest that in vivo gene transfer of eNOS to the lung in eNOS−/− mice can increase eNOS staining, eNOS protein, calcium-dependent NOS activity, and cGMP levels and partially restore pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance to near levels measured in eNOS+/+ mice. Thus, the major finding in this study is that in vivo gene transfer of eNOS to the lung in large part corrects a genetic deficiency resulting from eNOS deletion and may be a useful therapeutic intervention for the treatment of pulmonary hypertensive disorders in which eNOS activity is reduced. PMID:12237402

  5. Possible involvement of PPARγ-associated eNOS signaling activation in rosuvastatin-mediated prevention of nicotine-induced experimental vascular endothelial abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Sonam; Mahadevan, Nanjaian; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2013-02-01

    Nicotine exposure via cigarette smoking and tobacco chewing is associated with vascular complications. The present study investigated the effect of rosuvastatin in nicotine (2 mg/kg/day, i.p., 4 weeks)-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. Further, scanning electron microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin staining of thoracic aorta were performed to assess the vascular endothelial integrity. Moreover, oxidative stress was assessed by estimating aortic superoxide anion generation and serum thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. The nicotine administration produced VED by markedly reducing acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium, decreasing aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentration, increasing oxidative stress, and inducing lipid alteration. However, treatment with rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg/day, i.p., 4 weeks) markedly attenuated nicotine-induced vascular endothelial abnormalities, oxidative stress, and lipid alteration. Interestingly, the co-administration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) antagonist, GW9662 (1 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) submaximally, significantly prevented rosuvastatin-induced improvement in vascular endothelial integrity, endothelium-dependent relaxation, and nitrite/nitrate concentration in rats administered nicotine. However, GW9662 co-administration did not affect rosuvastatin-associated vascular anti-oxidant and lipid-lowering effects. The incubation of aortic ring, isolated from rosuvastatin-treated nicotine-administered rats, with L-NAME (100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), significantly attenuated rosuvastatin-induced improvement in acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation. Rosuvastatin prevents nicotine-induced vascular endothelial abnormalities by activating

  6. Changes in eNOS phosphorylation contribute to increased arteriolar NO release during juvenile growth

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lori S.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediates a major portion of arteriolar endothelium-dependent dilation in adults, but indirect evidence has suggested that NO contributes minimally to these responses in the young. Isolated segments of arterioles were studied in vitro to verify this age-related increase in NO release and investigate the mechanism by which it occurs. Directly measured NO release induced by ACh or the Ca2+ ionophore A-23187 was five- to sixfold higher in gracilis muscle arterioles from 42- to 46-day-old (juvenile) rats than in those from 25- to 28-day-old (weanling) rats. There were no differences between groups in arteriolar endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) expression or tetrahydrobiopterin levels, and arteriolar l-arginine levels were lower in juvenile vessels than in weanling vessels (104 ± 6 vs.126 ± 3 pmol/mg). In contrast, agonist-induced eNOS Thr495 dephosphorylation and eNOS Ser1177 phosphorylation (events required for maximal activity) were up to 30% and 65% greater, respectively, in juvenile vessels. Juvenile vessels did not show increased expression of enzymes that mediate these events [protein phosphatases 1 and 2A and PKA and PKB (Akt)] or heat shock protein 90, which facilitates Ser1177 phosphorylation. However, agonist-induced colocalization of heat shock protein 90 with eNOS was 34–66% greater in juvenile vessels than in weanling vessels, and abolition of this difference with geldanamycin also abolished the difference in Ser1177 phosphorylation between groups. These findings suggest that growth-related increases in arteriolar NO bioavailability may be due at least partially to changes in the regulation of eNOS phosphorylation and increased signaling activity, with no change in the abundance of eNOS signaling proteins. PMID:22140037

  7. eNOS polymorphisms and clinical outcome in advanced HCC patients receiving sorafenib: final results of the ePHAS study.

    PubMed

    Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Marisi, Giorgia; Faloppi, Luca; Scarpi, Emanuela; Foschi, Francesco Giuseppe; Iavarone, Massimo; Lauletta, Gianfranco; Corbelli, Jody; Valgiusti, Martina; Facchetti, Floriana; Della Corte, Cristina; Neri, Luca Maria; Tamberi, Stefano; Cascinu, Stefano; Scartozzi, Mario; Amadori, Dino; Nanni, Oriana; Tenti, Elena; Ulivi, Paola; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca

    2016-05-10

    Sorafenib may reduce endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF-R), leading to a decrease in nitric oxide production. In the Italian multicenter ePHAS (eNOS polymorphisms in HCC and sorafenib) study, we analyzed the role of eNOS polymorphisms in relation to clinical outcome in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) receiving sorafenib. Our retrospective study included a training cohort of 41 HCC patients and a validation cohort of 87 HCC patients, all undergoing sorafenib treatment. Three eNOS polymorphisms (eNOS -786T>C, eNOS VNTR 27bp 4a/b and eNOS+894G>T) were analyzed by direct sequencing or Real Time PCR in relation to progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (log-rank test). In univariate analysis, training cohort patients homozygous for eNOS haplotype (HT1:T-4b at eNOS-786/eNOS VNTR) had a lower median PFS (2.6 vs. 5.8 months, P < 0.0001) and OS (3.2 vs.14.6 months, P = 0.024) than those with other haplotypes. In the validation set, patients homozygous for HT1 had a lower median PFS (2.0 vs. 6.7 months, P < 0.0001) and OS (6.4 vs.18.0 months, P < 0.0001) than those with other haplotypes. Multivariate analysis confirmed this haplotype as the only independent prognostic factor. Our results suggest that haplotype HT1 in the eNOS gene may be capable of identifying a subset of HCC patients who are resistant to sorafenib. PMID:27058899

  8. Uric acid enhances PKC-dependent eNOS phosphorylation and mediates cellular ER stress: A mechanism for uric acid-induced endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    LI, PENG; ZHANG, LINA; ZHANG, MEI; ZHOU, CHANGYONG; LIN, NAN

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which hyperuricemia induced-endothelial dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we used uric acid (UA) to trigger endothelial dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells, and investigated the effects of induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induction, and the protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling pathway. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with 6, 9 or 12 mg/dl UA, ROS scavenger polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), and PKC inhibitor polymyxin B for 6–48 h. Nitric oxide (NO) production, eNOS activity, intracellular ROS, ER stress levels, and the interaction between eNOS and calmodulin (CaM) and cytosolic calcium levels were assessed using fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis. Apoptosis was assessed by annexin V staining. UA increased HUVEC apoptosis and reduced eNOS activity and NO production in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Intracellular ROS was elevated after 3 h, while ER stress level increased after 6 h. UA did not alter intracellular Ca2+, CaM, or eNOS concentration, or eNOS Ser1177 phosphorylation. However, PKC-dependent eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495 was greatly enhanced, and consequently interaction between eNOS and CaM was reduced. Cellular ROS depletion, ER stress inhibition and PKC activity reduction inhibited the effect of UA on eNOS activity, NO release and apoptosis in HUVECs. Thus, we concluded that UA induced HUVEC apoptosis and endothelial dysfunction by triggering oxidative and ER stress through PKC/eNOS-mediated eNOS activity and NO production. PMID:26935704

  9. Identification of Anti-Persister Activity against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from a Clinical Drug Library.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongxia; Cui, Peng; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Jie; Wang, Yong; Sullivan, David; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhu, Bingdong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli is a major cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), but current antibiotics do not always effectively clear the persistent infection. To identify drugs that eliminate uropathogenic E. coli persisters, we screened a clinical drug library consisting of 1524 compounds using high throughput drug exposure assay in 96-well plates. Bacterial survival was assessed by growth on LB plates. We identified 14 drug candidates (tosufloxacin, colistin, sparfloxacin, moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin, enrofloxacin and sarafloxacin, octodrine, clofoctol, dibekacin, cephalosporin C, pazufloxacin, streptomycin and neomycin), which had high anti-persister activity. Among them, tosufloxacin and colistin had the highest anti-persister activity and could completely eradicate E. coli persisters in 3 days in vitro while the current UTI antibiotics failed to do so. Our findings may have implications for the development of a more effective treatment for UTIs. PMID:27025620

  10. Ezetimibe potently reduces vascular inflammation and arteriosclerosis in eNOS deficient ApoE ko mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlencordt, Peter J.; Padmapriya, P.; Rützel, S.; Schödel, J.; Hu, K.; Schäfer, A.; Huang, P.L.; Ertl, G.; Bauersachs, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hypercholesterolemia is associated with decreased vascular nitric oxide bioavailability and deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) markedly accelerates atherosclerosis development in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE ko) mice. The current study tests whether atheroprotection provided by a lipid lowering therapy with Ezetimibe depends on eNOS. Methods/Results ApoE ko and apoE/eNOS double ko (dko) mice received a high fat diet with or without 0.05% Ezetimibe. Ezetimibe significantly reduced plasma cholesterol concentrations and atherogenic lipoproteins in both genotypes to a similar extent. Moreover, the drug reduced vascular inflammation, as it significantly reduced Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression and vascular CD14 expression, a marker for mononuclear cell infiltration, in both genotypes. Neither NOS protein expression nor vascular reactivity of aortic rings were changed in apoE ko mice following Ezetimibe treatment. Significant lesion reduction was seen in Ezetimibe treated male and female apoE ko and apoE/eNOS dko animals (p≤0.05). Interestingly, the drug mediated additional atheroprotection in male apoE ko, compared to male eNOS dko mice, suggesting that lipid lowering does provide additional eNOS dependent atheroprotection in this experimental group. Conclusion Lipid lowering with Ezetimibe potently reduces atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation independent of eNOS. Moreover, Ezetimibe did not exert any effects on eNOS protein expression or enzyme activity. However, additional atheroprotection by Ezetimibe was observed in eNOS competent apoE ko mice, suggesting that some of the drug's antiatherosclerotic effects are mediated by the eNOS pathway. PMID:18479686

  11. The Anti-inflammatory Effect of GV1001 Mediated by the Downregulation of ENO1-induced Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jiyea; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Yejin; Jang, Mirim; Jeon, Jane; Hwang, Young-il; Shon, Won Jun; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Wang Jae

    2015-01-01

    GV1001 is a peptide derived from the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) sequence that is reported to have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects. Enolase1 (ENO1) is a glycolytic enzyme, and stimulation of this enzyme induces high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines from concanavalin A (Con A)-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and ENO1-expressing monocytes in healthy subjects, as well as from macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Therefore, this study investigated whether GV1001 downregulates ENO1-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines as an anti-inflammatory peptide. The results showed that GV1001 does not affect the expression of ENO1 in either Con A-activated PBMCs or RA PBMCs. However, ENO1 stimulation increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6, and these cytokines were downregulated by pretreatment with GV1001. Moreover, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB were activated when ENO1, on the surface of Con A-activated PBMCs and RA PBMCs, was stimulated, and they were successfully suppressed by pre-treatment with GV1001. These results suggest that GV1001 may be an effective anti-inflammatory peptide that downregulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through the suppression of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation following ENO1 stimulation. PMID:26770183

  12. The Anti-inflammatory Effect of GV1001 Mediated by the Downregulation of ENO1-induced Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyea; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Yejin; Jang, Mirim; Jeon, Jane; Hwang, Young-Il; Shon, Won Jun; Song, Yeong Wook; Kang, Jae Seung; Lee, Wang Jae

    2015-12-01

    GV1001 is a peptide derived from the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) sequence that is reported to have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects. Enolase1 (ENO1) is a glycolytic enzyme, and stimulation of this enzyme induces high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines from concanavalin A (Con A)-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and ENO1-expressing monocytes in healthy subjects, as well as from macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Therefore, this study investigated whether GV1001 downregulates ENO1-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines as an anti-inflammatory peptide. The results showed that GV1001 does not affect the expression of ENO1 in either Con A-activated PBMCs or RA PBMCs. However, ENO1 stimulation increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6, and these cytokines were downregulated by pretreatment with GV1001. Moreover, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB were activated when ENO1, on the surface of Con A-activated PBMCs and RA PBMCs, was stimulated, and they were successfully suppressed by pre-treatment with GV1001. These results suggest that GV1001 may be an effective anti-inflammatory peptide that downregulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through the suppression of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation following ENO1 stimulation. PMID:26770183

  13. Spatial Patterns of Persistent Neural Activity Vary with the Behavioral Context of Short-Term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Daie, Kayvon

    2015-01-01

    Summary A short-term memory can be evoked by different inputs and control separate targets in different behavioral contexts. To address the circuit mechanisms underlying context-dependent memory function, we determined through optical imaging how memory is encoded at the whole-network level in two behavioral settings. Persistent neural activity maintaining a memory of desired eye position was imaged throughout the oculomotor integrator after saccadic or optokinetic stimulation. While eye position was encoded by the amplitude of network activity, the spatial patterns of firing were context-dependent: cells located caudally generally were most persistent following saccadic input, whereas cells located rostrally were most persistent following optokinetic input. To explain these data, we computationally identified four independent modes of network activity and found these were differentially accessed by saccadic and optokinetic inputs. These results show how a circuit can simultaneously encode memory value and behavioral context, respectively, in its amplitude and spatial pattern of persistent firing. PMID:25661184

  14. Maintenance of normal blood pressure is dependent on IP3R1-mediated regulation of eNOS.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qi; Yang, Jingyi; Santulli, Gaetano; Reiken, Steven R; Wronska, Anetta; Kim, Mindy M; Osborne, Brent W; Lacampagne, Alain; Yin, Yuxin; Marks, Andrew R

    2016-07-26

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are critical mediators of blood pressure (BP) regulation, primarily via the generation and release of vasorelaxants, including nitric oxide (NO). NO is produced in ECs by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), which is activated by both calcium (Ca(2+))-dependent and independent pathways. Here, we report that intracellular Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) is required for Ca(2+)-dependent eNOS activation. EC-specific type 1 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor knockout (IP3R1(-/-)) mice are hypertensive and display blunted vasodilation in response to acetylcholine (ACh). Moreover, eNOS activity is reduced in both isolated IP3R1-deficient murine ECs and human ECs following IP3R1 knockdown. IP3R1 is upstream of calcineurin, a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated serine/threonine protein phosphatase. We show here that the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway is less active and eNOS levels are decreased in IP3R1-deficient ECs. Furthermore, the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A, whose use has been associated with the development of hypertension, reduces eNOS activity and vasodilation following ACh stimulation. Our results demonstrate that IP3R1 plays a crucial role in the EC-mediated vasorelaxation and the maintenance of normal BP. PMID:27402766

  15. Persistently Active Microbial Molecules Prolong Innate Immune Tolerance In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingfang; Varley, Alan W.; Munford, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Measures that bolster the resolution phase of infectious diseases may offer new opportunities for improving outcome. Here we show that inactivation of microbial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can be required for animals to recover from the innate immune tolerance that follows exposure to Gram-negative bacteria. When wildtype mice are exposed to small parenteral doses of LPS or Gram-negative bacteria, their macrophages become reprogrammed (tolerant) for a few days before they resume normal function. Mice that are unable to inactivate LPS, in contrast, remain tolerant for several months; during this time they respond sluggishly to Gram-negative bacterial challenge, with high mortality. We show here that prolonged macrophage reprogramming is maintained in vivo by the persistence of stimulatory LPS molecules within the cells' in vivo environment, where naïve cells can acquire LPS via cell-cell contact or from the extracellular fluid. The findings provide strong evidence that inactivation of a stimulatory microbial molecule can be required for animals to regain immune homeostasis following parenteral exposure to bacteria. Measures that disable microbial molecules might enhance resolution of tissue inflammation and help restore innate defenses in individuals recovering from many different infectious diseases. PMID:23675296

  16. L-theanine promotes nitric oxide production in endothelial cells through eNOS phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Siamwala, Jamila H; Dias, Paul M; Majumder, Syamantak; Joshi, Manoj K; Sinkar, Vilas P; Banerjee, Gautam; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-03-01

    Consumption of tea (Camellia sinensis) improves vascular function and is linked to lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial nitric oxide is the key regulator of vascular functions in endothelium. In this study, we establish that l-theanine, a non-protein amino-acid found in tea, promotes nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. l-theanine potentiated NO production in endothelial cells was evaluated using Griess reaction, NO sensitive electrode and a NO specific fluorescent probe (4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluororescein diacetate). l-Theanine induced NO production was partially attenuated in presence of l-NAME or l-NIO and completely abolished using eNOS siRNA. eNOS activation was Ca(2+) and Akt independent, as assessed by fluo-4AM and immunoblotting experiments, respectively and was associated with phosphorylation of eNOS Ser 1177. eNOS phosphorylation was inhibited in the presence of ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD-98059 and partially inhibited by PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002 and Wortmanin suggesting PI3K-ERK1/2 dependent pathway. Increased NO production was associated with vasodilation in ex ovo (chorioallantoic membrane) model. These results demonstrated that l-theanine administration in vitro activated ERK/eNOS resulting in enhanced NO production and thereby vasodilation in the artery. The results of our experiments are suggestive of l-theanine mediated vascular health benefits of tea. PMID:22819553

  17. Induction and modulation of persistent activity in a layer V PFC microcircuit model.

    PubMed

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Sidiropoulou, Kyriaki; Cutsuridis, Vassilis; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2013-01-01

    Working memory refers to the temporary storage of information and is strongly associated with the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Persistent activity of cortical neurons, namely the activity that persists beyond the stimulus presentation, is considered the cellular correlate of working memory. Although past studies suggested that this type of activity is characteristic of large scale networks, recent experimental evidence imply that small, tightly interconnected clusters of neurons in the cortex may support similar functionalities. However, very little is known about the biophysical mechanisms giving rise to persistent activity in small-sized microcircuits in the PFC. Here, we present a detailed biophysically-yet morphologically simplified-microcircuit model of layer V PFC neurons that incorporates connectivity constraints and is validated against a multitude of experimental data. We show that (a) a small-sized network can exhibit persistent activity under realistic stimulus conditions. (b) Its emergence depends strongly on the interplay of dADP, NMDA, and GABAB currents. (c) Although increases in stimulus duration increase the probability of persistent activity induction, variability in the stimulus firing frequency does not consistently influence it. (d) Modulation of ionic conductances (I h , I D , I sAHP, I caL, I caN, I caR) differentially controls persistent activity properties in a location dependent manner. These findings suggest that modulation of the microcircuit's firing characteristics is achieved primarily through changes in its intrinsic mechanism makeup, supporting the hypothesis of multiple bi-stable units in the PFC. Overall, the model generates a number of experimentally testable predictions that may lead to a better understanding of the biophysical mechanisms of persistent activity induction and modulation in the PFC. PMID:24130519

  18. Activated ClpP kills persisters and eradicates a chronic biofilm infection.

    PubMed

    Conlon, B P; Nakayasu, E S; Fleck, L E; LaFleur, M D; Isabella, V M; Coleman, K; Leonard, S N; Smith, R D; Adkins, J N; Lewis, K

    2013-11-21

    Chronic infections are difficult to treat with antibiotics but are caused primarily by drug-sensitive pathogens. Dormant persister cells that are tolerant to killing by antibiotics are responsible for this apparent paradox. Persisters are phenotypic variants of normal cells and pathways leading to dormancy are redundant, making it challenging to develop anti-persister compounds. Biofilms shield persisters from the immune system, suggesting that an antibiotic for treating a chronic infection should be able to eradicate the infection on its own. We reasoned that a compound capable of corrupting a target in dormant cells will kill persisters. The acyldepsipeptide antibiotic (ADEP4) has been shown to activate the ClpP protease, resulting in death of growing cells. Here we show that ADEP4-activated ClpP becomes a fairly nonspecific protease and kills persisters by degrading over 400 proteins, forcing cells to self-digest. Null mutants of clpP arise with high probability, but combining ADEP4 with rifampicin produced complete eradication of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in vitro and in a mouse model of a chronic infection. Our findings indicate a general principle for killing dormant cells-activation and corruption of a target, rather than conventional inhibition. Eradication of a biofilm in an animal model by activating a protease suggests a realistic path towards developing therapies to treat chronic infections. PMID:24226776

  19. Ursolic acid from the Chinese herb danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza L.) upregulates eNOS and downregulates Nox4 expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Steinkamp-Fenske, Katja; Bollinger, Larissa; Völler, Natalie; Xu, Hui; Yao, Ying; Bauer, Rudolf; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2007-11-01

    Danshen, the dried root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Lamiaceae), is one of the most commonly used traditional Chinese medicines for cardiovascular indications. In EA.hy 926 cells, a cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), an aqueous extract of danshen, and also a methanol extract of the plant, increased eNOS promoter activity, eNOS mRNA and protein expression, as well as endothelial NO production. A dichloromethane extract, in contrast, did not change eNOS gene expression. Thus, the active danshen constituent(s) responsible for eNOS upregulation is (are) hydrophilic and/or alcohol-soluble. One such compound is ursolic acid that significantly increased eNOS expression in EA.hy 926 cells and native HUVEC, and enhanced bioactive NO production measured in terms of its cGMP increasing activity. Other tested hydrophilic and alcohol-soluble compounds isolated from danshen had no effect on eNOS expression. Interestingly, ursolic acid also reduced the expression of the NADPH oxidase subunit Nox4 and suppressed the production of reactive oxygen species in human endothelial cells. Upregulation of eNOS and a parallel downregulation of Nox4 lead to an increase in bioactive NO. This in turn could mediate some of the beneficial effects of danshen. Ursolic acid is a prototypical compound responsible for this effect of the plant. PMID:17481637

  20. NFκB Is Persistently Activated in Continuously Stimulated Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Miskolci, Veronika; Rollins, Janet; Vu, Hai Yen; Ghosh, Chandra C; Davidson, Dennis; Vancurova, Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Increased activation of the transcription factor NFκB in the neutrophils has been associated with the pathogenesis of sepsis, acute lung injury (ALI), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and other neutrophil-mediated inflammatory disorders. Despite recent progress in analyzing early NFκB activation in human neutrophils, activation of NFκB in persistently stimulated neutrophils has not been previously studied. Because it is the persistent NFκB activation that is thought to be involved in the host response to sepsis and the pathogenesis of ALI and BPD, we hypothesized that continuously stimulated human neutrophils may exhibit a late phase of NFκB activity. The goal of this study was to analyze the NFκB activation and expression of IκB and NFκB proteins during neutrophil stimulation with inflammatory signals for prolonged times. We demonstrate that neutrophil stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) induces, in addition to the early activation at 30–60 min, a previously unrecognized late phase of NFκB activation. In LPS-stimulated neutrophils, this NFκB activity typically had a biphasic character, whereas TNFα-stimulated neutrophils exhibited a continuous NFκB activity peaking around 9 h after stimulation. In contrast to the early NFκB activation that inversely correlates to the nuclear levels of IκBα, however, in continuously stimulated neutrophils, NFκB is persistently activated despite considerable levels of IκBα present in the nucleus. Our data suggest that NFκB is persistently activated in human neutrophils during neutrophil-mediated inflammatory disorders, and this persistent NFκB activity may represent one of the underlying mechanisms for the continuous production of proinflammatory mediators. PMID:17592547

  1. Persistent discharges in dentate gyrus perisoma-inhibiting interneurons require hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel activation.

    PubMed

    Elgueta, Claudio; Köhler, Johannes; Bartos, Marlene

    2015-03-11

    Parvalbumin (PV)-expressing perisoma-inhibiting interneurons (PIIs) of the dentate gyrus integrate rapidly correlated synaptic inputs and generate short-duration action potentials that propagate along the axon to their output synapses, supporting fast inhibitory signaling onto their target cells. Here we show that PV-PIIs in rat and mouse dentate gyrus (DG) integrate their intrinsic activity over time and can turn into a persistent firing mode characterized by the ability to generate long-lasting trains of action potentials at ∼50 Hz in the absence of additional inputs. Persistent firing emerges in the axons remote from the axon initial segment and markedly depends on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCNC) activation. Persistent firing properties are modulated by intracellular Ca(2+) levels and somatic membrane potential. Detailed computational single-cell PIIs models reveal that HCNC-mediated conductances can contribute to persistent firing during conditions of a shift in their voltage activation curve to more depolarized potentials. Paired recordings from PIIs and their target granule cells show that persistent firing supports strong inhibitory output signaling. Thus, persistent firing may emerge during conditions of intense activation of the network, thereby providing silencing to the circuitry and the maintenance of sparse activity in the dentate gyrus. PMID:25762660

  2. Activated ClpP kills persisters and eradicates a chronic biofilm infection.

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Brian P.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Fleck, Laura E.; LaFleur, Michael D.; Isabella, Vincent M.; Coleman, K.; Leonard, Steve N.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lewis, Kim

    2013-11-21

    The current antibiotic crisis stems from two distinct phenomena-drug resistance, and drug tolerance. Resistance mechanisms such as drug efflux or modification prevent antibiotics from binding to their targets 1, allowing pathogens to grow. Antibiotic tolerance is the property of persister cells, phenotypic variants of regular bacteria 2. Antibiotics kill by corrupting targets, but these are inactive in dormant persisters, leading to tolerance. Persisters were first identified by Joseph Bigger in 1944, when he discovered a surviving sub-population of Staphylococcus following treatment with penicillin3. Persisters are largely responsible for recalcitrance of chronic diseases such as tuberculosis, and various infections associated with biofilms - endocarditis, osteomyelitis, infections of catheters and indwelling devices, and deep-seated infections of soft tissues 4. There are a number of redundant pathways involved in persister formation5,6 precluding development of drugs inhibiting their formation. The acyldepsipeptide antibiotic (ADEP 4) has been shown to activate the ClpP protease resulting in death of growing cells 7. Here we show that ADEP4 activated ClpP becomes a fairly non-specific protease and kills persister cells by degradation of over 400 intracellular targets. clpP mutants are resistant to ADEP4 7, but we find that they display increased susceptibility to killing by a range of conventional antibiotics. Combining ADEP4 with rifampicin leads to eradication of persisters, stationary and biofilm populations of Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in a deep-seated murine infection. Target corruption/activation provides an approach to killing persisters and eradicating chronic infections.

  3. Persistence of biologically active compounds in soil: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.E.

    1987-02-01

    This document describes the long-term effects of soil-applied oil shale process water on the VA fungi and Rhizobium bacteria in a native soil. Techniques include assessing the VA fungal activity at field treatment plots and using treated field soils in a bioassay to determine VA infection and Rhizobium-nodulation potentials four years after process water application. 52 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Multi-resolution analysis for ENO schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, Ami

    1991-01-01

    Given an function, u(x), which is represented by its cell-averages in cells which are formed by some unstructured grid, we show how to decompose the function into various scales of variation. This is done by considering a set of nested grids in which the given grid is the finest, and identifying in each locality the coarsest grid in the set from which u(x) can be recovered to a prescribed accuracy. This multi-resolution analysis was applied to essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes in order to advance the solution by one time-step. This is accomplished by decomposing the numerical solution at the beginning of each time-step into levels of resolution, and performing the computation in each locality at the appropriate coarser grid. An efficient algorithm for implementing this program in the 1-D case is presented; this algorithm can be extended to the multi-dimensional case with Cartesian grids.

  5. Efficient implementation of weighted ENO schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Guang-Shan; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we further analyze, test, modify and improve the high order WENO (weighted essentially non-oscillatory) finite difference schemes of Liu, Osher and Chan. It was shown by Liu et al. that WENO schemes constructed from the r-th order (in L1 norm) ENO schemes are (r+1)-th order accurate. We propose a new way of measuring the smoothness of a numerical solution, emulating the idea of minimizing the total variation of the approximation, which results in a 5-th order WENO scheme for the case r = 3, instead of the 4-th order with the original smoothness measurement by Liu et al. This 5-th order WENO scheme is as fast as the 4-th order WENO scheme of Liu et al., and both schemes are about twice as fast as the 4-th order ENO schemes on vector supercomputers and as fast on serial and parallel computers. For Euler systems of gas dynamics, we suggest computing the weights from pressure and entropy instead of the characteristic values to simplify the costly characteristic procedure. The resulting WENO schemes are about twice as fast as the WENO schemes using the characteristic decompositions to compute weights, and work well for problems which do not contain strong shocks or strong reflected waves. We also prove that, for conservation laws with smooth solutions, all WENO schemes are convergent. Many numerical tests, including the 1D steady state nozzle flow problem and 2D shock entropy wave interaction problem, are presented to demonstrate the remarkable capability of the WENO schemes, especially the WENO scheme using the new smoothness measurement, in resolving complicated shock and flow structures. We have also applied Yang's artificial compression method to the WENO schemes to sharpen contact discontinuities.

  6. eNOS3 Genetic Polymorphism Is Related to Post-Ablation Early Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jaemin; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Ji-Young; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated an association between eNOS polymorphisms and atrial fibrillation (AF). We sought to determine whether eNOS polymorphisms are associated with AF recurrence after a radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Materials and Methods A total of 500 consecutive patients (56±11 years, 77% male) with paroxysmal (68%) or persistent (32%) AF who underwent RFCA and 500 age, gender-matched controls were genotyped for the eNOS3 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1799983). AF recurrence was monitored according to 2012 ACC/AHA/ESC guidelines. Results The frequencies of the rs1799983 variant alleles (T) in the case and control group were not significantly different (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.75-1.46, p=0.798). AF patients with rs1799983 variants were more likely to have coronary artery disease or stroke than those without genetic variant at this gene (31.0% vs. 17.3%, p=0.004). During mean 17 months follow-up, early recurrence of AF (ERAF; within 3 months) and clinical recurrence (CR) of AF were 31.8% and 24.8%, respectively. The rs1799983 variant was associated with higher risk of ERAF (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.06-2.79, p=0.028), but not with CR. ERAF occurred earlier (11±16 days) in variant group than those without variant allele (20±25 days, p=0.016). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that presence of the rs1799983 variant (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07-2.86, p=0.026) and persistent AF were independent predictors for ERAF after AF ablation. Conclusion The rs1799983 variant of the eNOS3 gene was associated with ERAF, but not with CR, after RFCA. eNOS3 gene variants may have a potential role for stratification of post-ablation management. PMID:26256966

  7. Persistent complement activation on tumor cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, F.; Rus, H. G.; Retegan, M.; Vlaicu, R.

    1992-01-01

    The neoantigens of the C5b-9 complement complex, IgG, C3, C4, S-protein/vitronectin, fibronectin, and macrophages were localized on 17 samples of breast cancer and on 6 samples of benign breast tumors using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies and the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase technique. All the tissue samples with carcinoma in each the TNM stages presented C5b-9 deposits on the membranes of tumor cells, thin granules on cell remnants, and diffuse deposits in the necrotic areas. When chemotherapy and radiation therapy preceded surgery, C5b-9 deposits were more intense and extended. The C5b-9 deposits were absent in all the samples with benign lesions. S-protein/vitronectin was present as fibrillar deposits in the connective tissue matrix and as diffuse deposits around the tumor cells, less intense and extended than fibronectin. IgG, C3, and C4 deposits were present only in carcinoma samples. The presence of C5b-9 deposits is indicative of complement activation and its subsequent pathogenetic effects in breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:1374587

  8. Calcium regulation of HCN channels supports persistent activity in a multiscale model of neocortex.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, S A; McDougal, R A; Bulanova, A S; Zeki, M; Lakatos, P; Terman, D; Hines, M L; Lytton, W W

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium (Ca(2+)) regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. The network contained 776 compartmental neurons arranged in the cortical layers, connected using synapses containing AMPA/NMDA/GABAA/GABAB receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) produced inositol triphosphate (IP3) which caused the release of Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores, with reuptake by sarco/ER Ca(2+)-ATP-ase pumps (SERCA), and influence on HCN channels. Stimulus-induced depolarization led to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). After a delay, mGluR activation led to ER Ca(2+) release via IP3 receptors. These factors increased HCN channel conductance and produced firing lasting for ∼1min. The model displayed inter-scale synergies among synaptic weights, excitation/inhibition balance, firing rates, membrane depolarization, Ca(2+) levels, regulation of HCN channels, and induction of persistent activity. The interaction between inhibition and Ca(2+) at the HCN channel nexus determined a limited range of inhibition strengths for which intracellular Ca(2+) could prepare population-specific persistent activity. Interactions between metabotropic and ionotropic inputs to the neuron demonstrated how multiple pathways could contribute in a complementary manner to persistent activity. Such redundancy and complementarity via multiple pathways is a critical feature of biological systems. Mediation of activation at different time scales, and through different pathways, would be expected to protect against disruption, in

  9. Modulation of network excitability by persistent activity: how working memory affects the response to incoming stimuli.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Elisa M; Brunel, Nicolas; Mongillo, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    Persistent activity and match effects are widely regarded as neuronal correlates of short-term storage and manipulation of information, with the first serving active maintenance and the latter supporting the comparison between memory contents and incoming sensory information. The mechanistic and functional relationship between these two basic neurophysiological signatures of working memory remains elusive. We propose that match signals are generated as a result of transient changes in local network excitability brought about by persistent activity. Neurons more active will be more excitable, and thus more responsive to external inputs. Accordingly, network responses are jointly determined by the incoming stimulus and the ongoing pattern of persistent activity. Using a spiking model network, we show that this mechanism is able to reproduce most of the experimental phenomenology of match effects as exposed by single-cell recordings during delayed-response tasks. The model provides a unified, parsimonious mechanistic account of the main neuronal correlates of working memory, makes several experimentally testable predictions, and demonstrates a new functional role for persistent activity. PMID:25695777

  10. ET-1 Stimulates Superoxide Production by eNOS Following Exposure of Vascular Endothelial Cells to Endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishna, Deepak; Pennington, Samantha; Karaa, Amel; Clemens, Mark G

    2016-07-01

    It has been shown that microcirculation is hypersensitized to endothelin1 (ET-1) following endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) treatment leading to an increased vasopressor response. This may be related in part to decreased activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by ET-1. eNOS can also be uncoupled to produce superoxide (O2). This aberrant eNOS activity could further contribute to the hyperconstriction and injury caused by ET-1 following LPS. We therefore tested whether LPS affects ROS production by vascular endothelial cells and whether and how this effect is altered by ET-1. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) were subjected to a 6-h treatment with LPS (250 ng/mL) or LPS and sepiapterin (100 μM) followed by a 30-min treatment with 100 μM L-Iminoethyl Ornithine (L-NIO) an irreversible eNOS inhibitor and 30-min treatment with ET-1 (10 nM). Conversion of [H]L-arginine to [H]L-citrulline was used to measure eNOS activity. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitable reduction of Cytochrome-C, dihydro carboxy fluorescein (DCF), and Mitosox was used to estimate ROS. LT-SDS PAGE was used to assess the degree of monomerization of the eNOS homodimer. Stimulation of HUVECs with ET-1 significantly increased NO synthesis by 1.4-fold (P < 0.05). ET-1 stimulation of LPS-treated HUVECs failed to increase NO production. Western blot for eNOS protein showed no change in eNOS protein levels. LPS alone resulted in an insignificant increase in ROS production as measured by cytochrome C that was increased 4.6-fold by ET-1 stimulation (P < 0.05). L-NIO significantly decreased ET-1-induced ROS production (P < 0.05). Sepiapterin significantly decreased ROS production in both; unstimulated and ET-1-stimulated LPS-treated groups, but did not restore NO production. DCF experiments confirmed intracellular ROS while Mitosox suggested a non-mitochondrial source. ET-1 treatment following a chronic LPS stress

  11. Identification of novel activity against Borrelia burgdorferi persisters using an FDA approved drug library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Wang, Ting; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G; Zhang, Ying

    2014-07-01

    Although antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease is effective in the majority of cases, especially during the early phase of the disease, a minority of patients suffer from post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). It is unclear what mechanisms drive this problem, and although slow or ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi has been suggested as an explanation, there is a lack of evidence that viable organisms are present in PTLDS. Although not a clinical surrogate, insight may be gained by examining stationary-phase in vitro Borrelia burgdorferi persisters that survive treatment with the antibiotics doxycycline and amoxicillin. To identify drug candidates that can eliminate B. burgdorferi persisters more effectively, we screened an Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library consisting of 1524 compounds against stationary-phase B. burgdorferi by using a newly developed high throughput SYBR Green I/propidium iodide (PI) assay. We identified 165 agents approved for use in other disease conditions that had more activity than doxycycline and amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi persisters. The top 27 drug candidates from the 165 hits were confirmed to have higher anti-persister activity than the current frontline antibiotics. Among the top 27 confirmed drug candidates from the 165 hits, daptomycin, clofazimine, carbomycin, sulfa drugs (e.g., sulfamethoxazole), and certain cephalosporins (e.g. cefoperazone) had the highest anti-persister activity. In addition, some drug candidates, such as daptomycin and clofazimine (which had the highest activity against non-growing persisters), had relatively poor activity or a high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against growing B. burgdorferi. Our findings may have implications for the development of a more effective treatment for Lyme disease and for the relief of long-term symptoms that afflict some Lyme disease patients. PMID:26038747

  12. Delayed Noradrenergic Activation in the Dorsal Hippocampus Promotes the Long-Term Persistence of Extinguished Fear

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ning; Liu, Jian-Feng; Xue, Yan-Xue; Yang, Chang; Yan, Wei; Wang, Hui-Min; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Shi, Hai-Shui; Wang, Ji-Shi; Bao, Yan-Ping; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Ding, Zeng-Bo; Wang, Xue-Yi; Lu, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Fear extinction has been extensively studied, but little is known about the molecular processes that underlie the persistence of extinction long-term memory (LTM). We found that microinfusion of norepinephrine (NE) into the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus during the early phase (0 h) after extinction enhanced extinction LTM at 2 and 14 days after extinction. Intra-CA1 infusion of NE during the late phase (12 h) after extinction selectively promoted extinction LTM at 14 days after extinction that was blocked by the β-receptor antagonist propranolol, protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor Rp-cAMPS, and protein synthesis inhibitors anisomycin and emetine. The phosphorylation levels of PKA, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB), GluR1, and the membrane GluR1 level were increased by NE during the late phase after extinction that was also blocked by propranolol and Rp-cAMPS. These results suggest that the enhancement of extinction LTM persistence induced by NE requires the activation of the β-receptor/PKA/CREB signaling pathway and membrane GluR1 trafficking. Moreover, extinction increased the phosphorylation levels of Erk1/2, CREB, and GluR1, and the membrane GluR1 level during the late phase, and anisomycin/emetine alone disrupted the persistence of extinction LTM, indicating that the persistence of extinction LTM requires late-phase protein synthesis in the CA1. Propranolol and Rp-cAMPS did not completely disrupt the persistence of extinction LTM, suggesting that another β-receptor/PKA-independent mechanism underlies the persistence of extinction LTM. Altogether, our results showed that enhancing hippocampal noradrenergic activity during the late phase after extinction selectively promotes the persistence of extinction LTM. PMID:24553734

  13. Delayed noradrenergic activation in the dorsal hippocampus promotes the long-term persistence of extinguished fear.

    PubMed

    Chai, Ning; Liu, Jian-Feng; Xue, Yan-Xue; Yang, Chang; Yan, Wei; Wang, Hui-Min; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Shi, Hai-Shui; Wang, Ji-Shi; Bao, Yan-Ping; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Ding, Zeng-Bo; Wang, Xue-Yi; Lu, Lin

    2014-07-01

    Fear extinction has been extensively studied, but little is known about the molecular processes that underlie the persistence of extinction long-term memory (LTM). We found that microinfusion of norepinephrine (NE) into the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus during the early phase (0 h) after extinction enhanced extinction LTM at 2 and 14 days after extinction. Intra-CA1 infusion of NE during the late phase (12 h) after extinction selectively promoted extinction LTM at 14 days after extinction that was blocked by the β-receptor antagonist propranolol, protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor Rp-cAMPS, and protein synthesis inhibitors anisomycin and emetine. The phosphorylation levels of PKA, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB), GluR1, and the membrane GluR1 level were increased by NE during the late phase after extinction that was also blocked by propranolol and Rp-cAMPS. These results suggest that the enhancement of extinction LTM persistence induced by NE requires the activation of the β-receptor/PKA/CREB signaling pathway and membrane GluR1 trafficking. Moreover, extinction increased the phosphorylation levels of Erk1/2, CREB, and GluR1, and the membrane GluR1 level during the late phase, and anisomycin/emetine alone disrupted the persistence of extinction LTM, indicating that the persistence of extinction LTM requires late-phase protein synthesis in the CA1. Propranolol and Rp-cAMPS did not completely disrupt the persistence of extinction LTM, suggesting that another β-receptor/PKA-independent mechanism underlies the persistence of extinction LTM. Altogether, our results showed that enhancing hippocampal noradrenergic activity during the late phase after extinction selectively promotes the persistence of extinction LTM. PMID:24553734

  14. Maternal eNOS deficiency determines a fatty liver phenotype of the offspring in a sex dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hocher, Berthold; Haumann, Hannah; Rahnenführer, Jan; Reichetzeder, Christoph; Kalk, Philipp; Pfab, Thiemo; Tsuprykov, Oleg; Winter, Stefan; Hofmann, Ute; Li, Jian; Püschel, Gerhard P; Lang, Florian; Schuppan, Detlef; Schwab, Matthias; Schaeffeler, Elke

    2016-07-01

    Maternal environmental factors can impact on the phenotype of the offspring via the induction of epigenetic adaptive mechanisms. The advanced fetal programming hypothesis proposes that maternal genetic variants may influence the offspring's phenotype indirectly via epigenetic modification, despite the absence of a primary genetic defect. To test this hypothesis, heterozygous female eNOS knockout mice and wild type mice were bred with male wild type mice. We then assessed the impact of maternal eNOS deficiency on the liver phenotype of wild type offspring. Birth weight of male wild type offspring born to female heterozygous eNOS knockout mice was reduced compared to offspring of wild type mice. Moreover, the offspring displayed a sex specific liver phenotype, with an increased liver weight, due to steatosis. This was accompanied by sex specific differences in expression and DNA methylation of distinct genes. Liver global DNA methylation was significantly enhanced in both male and female offspring. Also, hepatic parameters of carbohydrate metabolism were reduced in male and female offspring. In addition, male mice displayed reductions in various amino acids in the liver. Maternal genetic alterations, such as partial deletion of the eNOS gene, can affect liver metabolism of wild type offspring without transmission of the intrinsic defect. This occurs in a sex specific way, with more detrimental effects in females. This finding demonstrates that a maternal genetic defect can epigenetically alter the phenotype of the offspring, without inheritance of the defect itself. Importantly, these acquired epigenetic phenotypic changes can persist into adulthood. PMID:27175980

  15. Norepinephrine Drives Persistent Activity in Prefrontal Cortex via Synergistic α1 and α2 Adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Jego, Sonia; Adamantidis, Antoine; Séguéla, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Optimal norepinephrine levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) increase delay-related firing and enhance working memory, whereas stress-related or pathologically high levels of norepinephrine are believed to inhibit working memory via α1 adrenoceptors. However, it has been shown that activation of Gq-coupled and phospholipase C-linked receptors can induce persistent firing, a cellular correlate of working memory, in cortical pyramidal neurons. Therefore, despite its importance in stress and cognition, the exact role of norepinephrine in modulating PFC activity remains elusive. Using electrophysiology and optogenetics, we report here that norepinephrine induces persistent firing in pyramidal neurons of the PFC independent of recurrent fast synaptic excitation. This persistent excitatory effect involves presynaptic α1 adrenoceptors facilitating glutamate release and subsequent activation of postsynaptic mGluR5 receptors, and is enhanced by postsynaptic α2 adrenoceptors inhibiting HCN channel activity. Activation of α2 adrenoceptors or inhibition of HCN channels also enhances cholinergic persistent responses in pyramidal neurons, providing a mechanism of crosstalk between noradrenergic and cholinergic inputs. The present study describes a novel cellular basis for the noradrenergic control of cortical information processing and supports a synergistic combination of intrinsic and network mechanisms for the expression of mnemonic properties in pyramidal neurons. PMID:23785477

  16. Activation of respiratory epithelial cells by wood smoke particles persists beyond immediate exposure.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biological effect of particles on epithelial cells involves, in part, oxidant generation and a cascade of reactions culminating in inflammatory mediator release. Whether there is an immediate short-lived activation or continued persistent response of the cells to the particle...

  17. Persistent intense MIBG activity in the liver caused by prior radiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jigang; Codreanu, Ion; Servaes, Sabah; Zhuang, Hongming

    2014-10-01

    The positive predictive value of MIBG scintigraphy in the evaluation of neuroblastoma is very high, and false-positive findings are rare. We present here persistently elevated MIBG activity in the liver caused by external beam radiation, which could be misinterpreted as malignant involvement if history and prior studies were not carefully correlated. PMID:24999695

  18. Evaluation of the persistence of micropollutants through pure-oxygen activated sludge nitrification and denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levine, A.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Kish, G.

    2006-01-01

    The persistence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and household and industrial chemicals through a pure-oxygen activated sludge, nitrification, denitrification wastewater treatment facility was evaluated. Of the 125 micropollutants that were tested in this study, 55 compounds were detected in the untreated wastewater, and 27 compounds were detected in the disinfected effluent. The persistent compounds included surfactants, fire-retardant chemicals, pesticides, fragrance compounds, hormones, and one pharmaceutical. Physical-chemical properties of micropollutants that affected partitioning onto wastewater solids included vapor pressure and octanol-water partition coefficients.

  19. Multi-resolution analysis for ENO schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, Ami

    1993-01-01

    Given a function u(x) which is represented by its cell-averages in cells which are formed by some unstructured grid, we show how to decompose the function into various scales of variation. This is done by considering a set of nested grids in which the given grid is the finest, and identifying in each locality the coarsest grid in the set from which u(x) can be recovered to a prescribed accuracy. We apply this multi-resolution analysis to Essentially Non-oscillatory Schemes (ENO) schemes in order to reduce the number of numerical flux computations which is needed in order to advance the solution by one time-step. This is accomplished by decomposing the numerical solution at the beginning of each time-step into levels of resolution, and performing the computation in each locality at the appropriate coarser grid. We present an efficient algorithm for implementing this program in the one-dimensional case; this algorithm can be extended to the multi-dimensional case with cartesian grids.

  20. Systematic Survey of Serine Hydrolase Activity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Defines Changes Associated with Persistence.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Corrie; Anderson, Lindsey N; Frando, Andrew; Sadler, Natalie C; Brown, Robert W; Smith, Richard D; Wright, Aaron T; Grundner, Christoph

    2016-02-18

    The transition from replication to non-replication underlies much of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) pathogenesis, as non- or slowly replicating Mtb are responsible for persistence and poor treatment outcomes. Therapeutic targeting of non-replicating populations is a priority for tuberculosis treatment, but few drug targets in non-replicating Mtb are currently known. Here, we directly measured the activity of the highly diverse and druggable serine hydrolases (SHs) during active replication and non-replication using activity-based proteomics. We predict SH activity for 78 proteins, including 27 proteins with unknown function, and identify 37 SHs that remain active in the absence of replication, providing a set of candidate persistence targets. Non-replication was associated with major shifts in SH activity. These activity changes were largely independent of SH abundance, indicating extensive post-translational regulation of SHs. By probing a large cross-section of druggable Mtb enzyme space during replication and non-replication, we identify new SHs and suggest new persistence targets. PMID:26853625

  1. Hippocampal subfield and medial temporal cortical persistent activity during working memory reflects ongoing encoding

    PubMed Central

    Nauer, Rachel K.; Whiteman, Andrew S.; Dunne, Matthew F.; Stern, Chantal E.; Schon, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies support a role for the medial temporal lobes in maintaining novel stimuli over brief working memory (WM) delays, and suggest delay period activity predicts subsequent memory. Additionally, slice recording studies have demonstrated neuronal persistent spiking in entorhinal cortex, perirhinal cortex (PrC), and hippocampus (CA1, CA3, subiculum). These data have led to computational models that suggest persistent spiking in parahippocampal regions could sustain neuronal representations of sensory information over many seconds. This mechanism may support both WM maintenance and encoding of information into long term episodic memory. The goal of the current study was to use high-resolution fMRI to elucidate the contributions of the MTL cortices and hippocampal subfields to WM maintenance as it relates to later episodic recognition memory. We scanned participants while they performed a delayed match to sample task with novel scene stimuli, and assessed their memory for these scenes post-scan. We hypothesized stimulus-driven activation that persists into the delay period—a putative correlate of persistent spiking—would predict later recognition memory. Our results suggest sample and delay period activation in the parahippocampal cortex (PHC), PrC, and subiculum (extending into DG/CA3 and CA1) was linearly related to increases in subsequent memory strength. These data extend previous neuroimaging studies that have constrained their analysis to either the sample or delay period by modeling these together as one continuous ongoing encoding process, and support computational frameworks that predict persistent activity underlies both WM and episodic encoding. PMID:25859188

  2. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30 min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3 weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats were scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving

  3. Recoupling of eNOS with Folic Acid Prevents Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation in Angiotensin II-Infused Apolipoprotein E Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Kin Lung; Miao, Xiao Niu; Cai, Hua

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that eNOS uncoupling mediates abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation in hph-1 mice. In the present study we examined whether recoupling of eNOS prevents AAA formation in a well-established model of Angiotensin II-infused apolipoprotein E (apoE) null mice by targeting some common pathologies of AAA. Infusion of Ang II resulted in a 92% incidence rate of AAA in the apoE null animals. In a separate group, animals were treated orally with folic acid (FA), which is known to recouple eNOS through augmentation of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) function. This resulted in a reduction of AAA rate to 19.5%. Imaging with ultrasound showed that FA markedly inhibited expansion of abdominal aorta. FA also abolished elastin breakdown and macrophage infiltration in the AAA animals. The eNOS uncoupling activity, assessed by L-NAME-sensitive superoxide production, was minimal at baseline but greatly exaggerated with Ang II infusion, which was completely attenuated by FA. This was accompanied by markedly improved tetrahydrobiopterin and nitric oxide bioavailability. Furthermore, the expression and activity of DHFR was decreased in Ang II-infused apoE null mice specifically in the endothelial cells, while FA administration resulted in its recovery. Taken together, these data further establish a significant role of uncoupled eNOS in mediating AAA formation, and a universal efficacy of FA in preventing AAA formation via restoration of DHFR to restore eNOS function. PMID:24558445

  4. Identification of Additional Anti-Persister Activity against Borrelia burgdorferi from an FDA Drug Library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Weitner, Megan; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a leading vector-borne disease in the United States. Although the majority of Lyme patients can be cured with standard 2-4 week antibiotic treatment, 10%-20% of patients continue to suffer from prolonged post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). While the cause for this is unclear, persisting organisms not killed by current Lyme antibiotics may be involved. In our previous study, we screened an FDA drug library and reported 27 top hits that showed high activity against Borrelia persisters. In this study, we present the results of an additional 113 active hits that have higher activity against the stationary phase B. burgdorferi than the currently used Lyme antibiotics. Many antimicrobial agents (antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals, anthelmintics or antiparasitics) used for treating other infections were found to have better activity than the current Lyme antibiotics. These include antibacterials such as rifamycins (3-formal-rifamycin, rifaximin, rifamycin SV), thiostrepton, quinolone drugs (sarafloxacin, clinafloxacin, tosufloxacin), and cell wall inhibitors carbenicillin, tazobactam, aztreonam; antifungal agents such as fluconazole, mepartricin, bifonazole, climbazole, oxiconazole, nystatin; antiviral agents zanamivir, nevirapine, tilorone; antimalarial agents artemisinin, methylene blue, and quidaldine blue; antihelmintic and antiparasitic agents toltrazuril, tartar emetic, potassium antimonyl tartrate trihydrate, oxantel, closantel, hycanthone, pyrimethamine, and tetramisole. Interestingly, drugs used for treating other non-infectious conditions including verteporfin, oltipraz, pyroglutamic acid, pidolic acid, and dextrorphan tartrate, that act on the glutathione/γ-glutamyl pathway involved in protection against free radical damage, and also the antidepressant drug indatraline, were found to have high activity against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. Among the active hits, agents that affect cell membranes, energy production, and reactive

  5. Identification of Additional Anti-Persister Activity against Borrelia burgdorferi from an FDA Drug Library

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Weitner, Megan; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a leading vector-borne disease in the United States. Although the majority of Lyme patients can be cured with standard 2–4 week antibiotic treatment, 10%–20% of patients continue to suffer from prolonged post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). While the cause for this is unclear, persisting organisms not killed by current Lyme antibiotics may be involved. In our previous study, we screened an FDA drug library and reported 27 top hits that showed high activity against Borrelia persisters. In this study, we present the results of an additional 113 active hits that have higher activity against the stationary phase B. burgdorferi than the currently used Lyme antibiotics. Many antimicrobial agents (antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals, anthelmintics or antiparasitics) used for treating other infections were found to have better activity than the current Lyme antibiotics. These include antibacterials such as rifamycins (3-formal-rifamycin, rifaximin, rifamycin SV), thiostrepton, quinolone drugs (sarafloxacin, clinafloxacin, tosufloxacin), and cell wall inhibitors carbenicillin, tazobactam, aztreonam; antifungal agents such as fluconazole, mepartricin, bifonazole, climbazole, oxiconazole, nystatin; antiviral agents zanamivir, nevirapine, tilorone; antimalarial agents artemisinin, methylene blue, and quidaldine blue; antihelmintic and antiparasitic agents toltrazuril, tartar emetic, potassium antimonyl tartrate trihydrate, oxantel, closantel, hycanthone, pyrimethamine, and tetramisole. Interestingly, drugs used for treating other non-infectious conditions including verteporfin, oltipraz, pyroglutamic acid, pidolic acid, and dextrorphan tartrate, that act on the glutathione/γ-glutamyl pathway involved in protection against free radical damage, and also the antidepressant drug indatraline, were found to have high activity against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. Among the active hits, agents that affect cell membranes, energy production, and

  6. Ambient ultrafine particles reduce endothelial nitric oxide production via S-glutathionylation of eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yunfeng; Navab, Mohamad; Shen, Melody; Hill, James; Pakbin, Payam; Sioutas, Constantinos; Hsiai, Tzung; Li, Rongsong

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate pollutants is intimately linked to vascular oxidative stress and inflammatory responses with clinical relevance to atherosclerosis. Particulate matter (PM) has been reported to induce endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Here, we tested whether ambient ultrafine particles (UFP, diameter < 200 nm) modulate eNOS activity in terms of nitric oxide (NO) production via protein S-glutathionylation. Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) with UFP significantly reduced NO production. UFP-mediated reduction in NO production was restored in the presence of JNK inhibitor (SP600125), NADPH oxidase inhibitor (Apocynin), anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine), and superoxide dismutase mimetics (Tempol and MnTMPyP). UFP exposure increased the GSSG/GSH ratio and eNOS S-glutathionylation, whereas over-expression of Glutaredoxin-1 (to inhibit S-glutathionylation) restored UFP-mediated reduction in NO production by nearly 80%. Thus, our findings suggest that eNOS S-glutathionylation is a potential mechanism underlying ambient UFP-induced reduction of NO production. PMID:23751346

  7. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombosis in mice by antagonizing eNOS via β2GPI and apoER2.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sangeetha; Morrell, Craig N; Tarango, Cristina; Thomas, Gail D; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Girardi, Guillermina; Herz, Joachim; Urbanus, Rolf T; de Groot, Philip G; Thorpe, Philip E; Salmon, Jane E; Shaul, Philip W; Mineo, Chieko

    2011-01-01

    In antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) binding to β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI) induce endothelial cell-leukocyte adhesion and thrombus formation via unknown mechanisms. Here we show that in mice both of these processes are caused by the inhibition of eNOS. In studies of cultured human, bovine, and mouse endothelial cells, the promotion of monocyte adhesion by aPL entailed decreased bioavailable NO, and aPL fully antagonized eNOS activation by diverse agonists. Similarly, NO-dependent, acetylcholine-induced increases in carotid vascular conductance were impaired in aPL-treated mice. The inhibition of eNOS was caused by antibody recognition of domain I of β2GPI and β2GPI dimerization, and it was due to attenuated eNOS S1179 phosphorylation mediated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Furthermore, LDL receptor family member antagonism with receptor-associated protein (RAP) prevented aPL inhibition of eNOS in cell culture, and ApoER2-/- mice were protected from aPL inhibition of eNOS in vivo. Moreover, both aPL-induced increases in leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombus formation were absent in eNOS-/- and in ApoER2-/- mice. Thus, aPL-induced leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombosis are caused by eNOS antagonism, which is due to impaired S1179 phosphorylation mediated by β2GPI, apoER2, and PP2A. Our results suggest that novel therapies for APS can now be developed targeting these mechanisms. PMID:21123944

  8. Delayed yet persistent effects of daily risperidone on activity in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Rachel M; Gannon, Matthew A; Griffith, Molly S; Bardgett, Mark E

    2016-08-01

    Early-life administration of risperidone, the most widely used antipsychotic drug in children, leads to persistently elevated locomotor activity in adult rats. This study determined whether and when elevated locomotor activity emerges during developmental risperidone administration. Developing and adult rats were administered daily injections of risperidone (1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg) or vehicle for 4 weeks beginning at postnatal days 14 and 74, respectively. Starting with the first injection and every 7 days thereafter, locomotor activity was measured immediately after the injection and 20 min before the next day's injection. Activity was also recorded 1 week after the final injection. Risperidone markedly decreased locomotor activity in developing and adult rats immediately after injection. Within 24 h after their first injection, adult rats administered risperidone showed greater activity levels. In contrast, developing rats did not show compensatory hyperactivity until the beginning of the fourth week of risperidone administration. One week after the final risperidone injection, there was no evidence of hyperactivity in the adult rats maintained on risperidone, but developing rats administered risperidone, especially females, showed greater activity levels relative to vehicle-administered controls. In comparison with adult rats, the emergence of compensatory hyperactivity during long-term antipsychotic drug administration is delayed in developing rats, but persists after treatment cessation. PMID:26960160

  9. Immobilized epidermal growth factor stimulates persistent, directed keratinocyte migration via activation of PLCγ1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chloe S; Mitchell, Isaiah P; Desotell, Anthony W; Kreeger, Pamela K; Masters, Kristyn S

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a critical element in dermal repair, but EGF-containing wound dressings have not been successful clinically. However, these dressings have delivered only soluble EGF, and the native environment provides both soluble and matrix-bound EGF. To address our hypothesis that tethered EGF can stimulate cell behaviors not achievable with soluble EGF, we examined single-cell movement and signaling in human immortalized HaCaT keratinocytes treated with soluble or immobilized EGF. Although both EGF treatments increased collective sheet displacement and individual cell speed, only cells treated with immobilized EGF exhibited directed migration, as well as 2-fold greater persistence compared with soluble EGF. Immunofluorescence showed altered EGF receptor (EGFR) trafficking, where EGFR remained membrane-localized in the immobilized EGF condition. Cells treated with soluble EGF demonstrated higher phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cells on immobilized EGF exhibited higher pPLCγ1, which was localized at the leading edge. Treatment with U0126 inhibited migration in both conditions, demonstrating that ERK1/2 activity was necessary but not responsible for the observed differences. In contrast, PLCγ1 inhibition with U73122 significantly decreased persistence on immobilized EGF. Combined, these results suggest that immobilized EGF increases collective keratinocyte displacement via an increase in single-cell migration persistence resulting from altered EGFR trafficking and PLCγ1 activation.-Kim, C. S., Mitchell, I. P., Desotell, A. W., Kreeger, P. K., Masters, K. S. Immobilized epidermal growth factor stimulates persistent, directed keratinocyte migration via activation of PLCγ1. PMID:27025961

  10. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Tiffany S.; Richardson, Jason R.; Cooper, Keith R.; White, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25–0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3–72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. PMID:25912032

  11. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kung, Tiffany S; Richardson, Jason R; Cooper, Keith R; White, Lori A

    2015-08-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25-0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3-72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. PMID:25912032

  12. Spatial Heterogeneity in Human Activities Favors the Persistence of Wolves in Agroecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mohsen; López-Bao, José Vicente; Kaboli, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    As human populations expand, there is increasing demand and pressure for land. Under this scenario, behavioural flexibility and adaptation become important processes leading to the persistence of large carnivores in human-dominated landscapes such as agroecosystems. A growing interest has recently emerged on the outcome of the coexistence between wolves and humans in these systems. It has been suggested that spatial heterogeneity in human activities would be a major environmental factor modulating vulnerability and persistence of this contentious species in agroecosystems. Here, we combined information from 35 den sites detected between 2011 and 2012 in agroecosystems of western Iran (Hamedan province), a set of environmental variables measured at landscape and fine spatial scales, and generalized linear models to identify patterns of den site selection by wolves in a highly-modified agroecosystem. On a landscape level, wolves selected a mixture of rangelands with scattered dry-farms on hillsides (showing a low human use) to locate their dens, avoiding areas with high densities of settlements and primary roads. On a fine spatial scale, wolves primarily excavated dens into the sides of elevated steep-slope hills with availability of water bodies in the vicinity of den sites, and wolves were relegated to dig in places with coarse-soil particles. Our results suggest that vulnerability of wolves in human-dominated landscapes could be compensated by the existence of spatial heterogeneity in human activities. Such heterogeneity would favor wolf persistence in agroecosystems favoring a land sharing model of coexistence between wolves and people. PMID:25251567

  13. A brief review on red to near-infrared persistent luminescence in transition-metal-activated phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Yixi; Katayama, Yumiko; Ueda, Jumpei; Tanabe, Setsuhisa

    2014-09-01

    In the past few years, red to near-infrared persistent phosphors activated by transition metals (Cr3+ or Mn2+) received much attention. The research was triggered by a recently proposed in vivo imaging application and it may show more significance in the future. In this review, we try to make a full list of known Cr3+ or Mn2+-activated compounds showing red to near-infrared persistent luminescence, which may be useful for further exploration of new compounds. We also notice that radiance (in units of W sr-1 m-2) is even more suitable than luminance (in units of cd m-2) to quantify the brightness of red to near-infrared persistent phosphors for the in vivo imaging application. Finally, we discuss the mechanism of the persistent luminescence by taking an example of Cr3+-activated Zn0.98(Ga1-xAlx)2O3.98 persistent phosphors.

  14. Multi-dimensional ENO schemes for general geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, Ami; Chakravarthy, Sukumar R.

    1991-01-01

    A class of ENO schemes is presented for the numerical solution of multidimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws in structured and unstructured grids. This is a class of shock-capturing schemes which are designed to compute cell-averages to high order accuracy. The ENO scheme is composed of a piecewise-polynomial reconstruction of the solution form its given cell-averages, approximate evolution of the resulting initial value problem, and averaging of this approximate solution over each cell. The reconstruction algorithm is based on an adaptive selection of stencil for each cell so as to avoid spurious oscillations near discontinuities while achieving high order of accuracy away from them.

  15. Longterm persistence of proteolytic activities in frass of Blattella germanica increases its allergenic potential.

    PubMed

    Erban, T; Hubert, J

    2011-06-01

    Chromogenic microplate assays in 96 wells were used to determine the stability of enzyme activity in frass of Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Blattellidae). Frass samples were exposed to controlled conditions [temperature 15-35 °C and/or 53-100% relative humidity (RH)] and to household conditions (apartment). Exposure times were 0 (control), 90, 183 and 276 days. Starch digestion and cellulolytic activities decreased during exposure. Non-specific proteolytic activities were affected by changes in selective proteolytic activities. Activities towards AAPpNA and SA(3) pNA strongly increased at 100% RH, indicating the possible influence of microorganisms growing on frass. Activities towards BApNA and ArgpNA decreased with increasing decomposition time, whereas activity towards ZRRpNA was not influenced by exposure time. The largest decrease in activities towards ArgpNA and BApNA occurred at temperatures of 15 °C, 30 °C and 35 °C and at 100% RH. Activities towards BApNA and ZRRpNA were very stable under different temperature and RH conditions; this was confirmed by findings showing that these activities were stable in the experimental apartment. In comparison with the control, activities towards ZRRpNA and BApNA after 276 days decreased by 1% and 19%, respectively. The longterm persistence of proteolytic activities in cockroach frass increases their allergenic hazard potential. PMID:21198710

  16. Therapeutic effect of enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and preventing eNOS uncoupling

    PubMed Central

    Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelium is an important protective molecule in the vasculature. It is generated by the enzyme endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Similar to all NOS isoforms, functional eNOS transfers electrons from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), via the flavins flavin adenine dinucleotide and flavin mononucleotide in the carboxy-terminal reductase domain, to the heme in the amino-terminal oxygenase domain. Here, the substrate L-arginine is oxidized to L-citrulline and NO. Cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia or cigarette smoking reduce bioactive NO. These risk factors lead to an enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the vessel wall. NADPH oxidases represent major sources of this ROS and have been found upregulated in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. NADPH-oxidase-derived superoxide avidly reacts with eNOS-derived NO to form peroxynitrite (ONOO-). The essential NOS cofactor (6R-)5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is highly sensitive to oxidation by this ONOO-. In BH4 deficiency, oxygen reduction uncouples from NO synthesis, thereby converting NOS to a superoxide-producing enzyme. Among conventional drugs, compounds interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and statins can reduce vascular oxidative stress and increase bioactive NO. In recent years, we have identified a number of small molecules that have the potential to prevent eNOS uncoupling and, at the same time, enhance eNOS expression. These include the protein kinase C inhibitor midostaurin, the pentacyclic triterpenoids ursolic acid and betulinic acid, the eNOS enhancing compounds AVE9488 and AVE3085, and the polyphenolic phytoalexin trans-resveratrol. Such compounds enhance NO production from eNOS also under pathophysiological conditions and may thus have therapeutic potential. PMID:21198553

  17. Active control synthesis for flexible space structures excited by persistent disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Gonzalez, Marcelo

    1990-01-01

    Both classical and state-space synthesis methods for active control of flexible space structures in the presence of persistent disturbances are presented. The methods exploit the so-called internal model principle for asymptotic disturbance rejection. A generic example of flexible space structures is used to illustrate the simplicity of the proposed design methodologies. The concept of a disturbance rejection filter dipole is introduced from a classical control viewpoint. It is shown that the proposed design methods will invariably make use of non-minimum-phase compensation for a class of noncolocated control problems. The need for tradeoffs between performance and parameter robustness is discussed.

  18. CD62L+ NKT cells have prolonged persistence and antitumor activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Gengwen; Courtney, Amy N.; Jena, Bipulendu; Heczey, Andras; Liu, Daofeng; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Xu, Xin; Torikai, Hiroki; Mo, Qianxing; Dotti, Gianpietro; Cooper, Laurence J.; Metelitsa, Leonid S.

    2016-01-01

    Vα24-invariant natural killer T cells (NKTs) localize to tumors and have inherent antitumor properties, making them attractive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) carriers for redirected cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of CAR-NKTs has been impeded, as mechanisms responsible for NKT expansion and the in vivo persistence of these cells are unknown. Here, we demonstrated that antigen-induced expansion of primary NKTs in vitro associates with the accumulation of a CD62L+ subset and exhaustion of CD62L– cells. Only CD62L+ NKTs survived and proliferated in response to secondary stimulation. When transferred to immune-deficient NSG mice, CD62L+ NKTs persisted 5 times longer than CD62L– NKTs. Moreover, CD62L+ cells transduced with a CD19-specific CAR achieved sustained tumor regression in a B cell lymphoma model. Proliferating CD62L+ cells downregulated or maintained CD62L expression when activated via T cell receptor alone or in combination with costimulatory receptors. We generated HLAnull K562 cell clones that were engineered to express CD1d and costimulatory ligands. Clone B-8-2 (HLAnullCD1dmedCD86high4-1BBLmedOX40Lhigh) induced the highest rates of NKT expansion and CD62L expression. B-8-2–expanded CAR-NKTs exhibited prolonged in vivo persistence and superior therapeutic activities in models of lymphoma and neuroblastoma. Therefore, we have identified CD62L as a marker of a distinct NKT subset endowed with high proliferative potential and have developed artificial antigen-presenting cells that generate CD62L-enriched NKTs for effective cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27183388

  19. CD62L+ NKT cells have prolonged persistence and antitumor activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gengwen; Courtney, Amy N; Jena, Bipulendu; Heczey, Andras; Liu, Daofeng; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Xu, Xin; Torikai, Hiroki; Mo, Qianxing; Dotti, Gianpietro; Cooper, Laurence J; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2016-06-01

    Vα24-invariant natural killer T cells (NKTs) localize to tumors and have inherent antitumor properties, making them attractive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) carriers for redirected cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of CAR-NKTs has been impeded, as mechanisms responsible for NKT expansion and the in vivo persistence of these cells are unknown. Here, we demonstrated that antigen-induced expansion of primary NKTs in vitro associates with the accumulation of a CD62L+ subset and exhaustion of CD62L- cells. Only CD62L+ NKTs survived and proliferated in response to secondary stimulation. When transferred to immune-deficient NSG mice, CD62L+ NKTs persisted 5 times longer than CD62L- NKTs. Moreover, CD62L+ cells transduced with a CD19-specific CAR achieved sustained tumor regression in a B cell lymphoma model. Proliferating CD62L+ cells downregulated or maintained CD62L expression when activated via T cell receptor alone or in combination with costimulatory receptors. We generated HLAnull K562 cell clones that were engineered to express CD1d and costimulatory ligands. Clone B-8-2 (HLAnullCD1dmedCD86high4-1BBLmedOX40Lhigh) induced the highest rates of NKT expansion and CD62L expression. B-8-2-expanded CAR-NKTs exhibited prolonged in vivo persistence and superior therapeutic activities in models of lymphoma and neuroblastoma. Therefore, we have identified CD62L as a marker of a distinct NKT subset endowed with high proliferative potential and have developed artificial antigen-presenting cells that generate CD62L-enriched NKTs for effective cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27183388

  20. Maternal eNOS deficiency determines a fatty liver phenotype of the offspring in a sex dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hocher, Berthold; Haumann, Hannah; Rahnenführer, Jan; Reichetzeder, Christoph; Kalk, Philipp; Pfab, Thiemo; Tsuprykov, Oleg; Winter, Stefan; Hofmann, Ute; Li, Jian; Püschel, Gerhard P.; Lang, Florian; Schuppan, Detlef; Schwab, Matthias; Schaeffeler, Elke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Maternal environmental factors can impact on the phenotype of the offspring via the induction of epigenetic adaptive mechanisms. The advanced fetal programming hypothesis proposes that maternal genetic variants may influence the offspring's phenotype indirectly via epigenetic modification, despite the absence of a primary genetic defect. To test this hypothesis, heterozygous female eNOS knockout mice and wild type mice were bred with male wild type mice. We then assessed the impact of maternal eNOS deficiency on the liver phenotype of wild type offspring. Birth weight of male wild type offspring born to female heterozygous eNOS knockout mice was reduced compared to offspring of wild type mice. Moreover, the offspring displayed a sex specific liver phenotype, with an increased liver weight, due to steatosis. This was accompanied by sex specific differences in expression and DNA methylation of distinct genes. Liver global DNA methylation was significantly enhanced in both male and female offspring. Also, hepatic parameters of carbohydrate metabolism were reduced in male and female offspring. In addition, male mice displayed reductions in various amino acids in the liver. Maternal genetic alterations, such as partial deletion of the eNOS gene, can affect liver metabolism of wild type offspring without transmission of the intrinsic defect. This occurs in a sex specific way, with more detrimental effects in females. This finding demonstrates that a maternal genetic defect can epigenetically alter the phenotype of the offspring, without inheritance of the defect itself. Importantly, these acquired epigenetic phenotypic changes can persist into adulthood. PMID:27175980

  1. Activation of persistent Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus in mares with subclinical endometritis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M R; Skive, B; Christoffersen, M; Lu, K; Nielsen, J M; Troedsson, M H T; Bojesen, A M

    2015-08-31

    Endometritis in horses caused by Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) may be underdiagnosed due to traditional diagnostic methods lacking sensitivity and specificity. We serendipitously identified a bacterial growth medium (bActivate) that appeared capable of inducing growth of dormant S. zooepidemicus, which subsequently allowed detection by standard diagnostics. To assess the effect of bActivate we compared its ability to activate dormant S. zooepidemicus in a group of potentially infected subfertile mares with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All mares had to test negative for S. zooepidemicus on a low-volume uterine lavage, be negative on endometrial cytology and without clinical signs of endometritis to be included in the investigation. The mares were instilled with bActivate or PBS in the uterus. Growth of S. zooepidemicus was induced by bActivate in 64% (16/25) and PBS in 8% (1/12) of the mares, respectively (p<0.002). In vitro studies supported that some strains of S. zooepidemicus were able to form persister cells tolerating 32-times of the minimal inhibitory concentration of penicillin compared to normal growing cells. Persister cells had not acquired penicillin resistance, but seemed to tolerate the antimicrobial due to dormancy. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of controlled growth induction of dormant bacteria from a subclinical infection. Moreover we demonstrated how endometritis can origin from a reservoir of dormant bacteria residing within the endometrium, and not only as an ascending infection. Further studies should aim at determining the prevalence of dormant S. zooepidemicus, impact of activation on diagnostic and treatment efficacy, uterine health and mare fertility. PMID:26123371

  2. Dendritic nonlinearities reduce network size requirements and mediate ON and OFF states of persistent activity in a PFC microcircuit model.

    PubMed

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Sidiropoulou, Kyriaki; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-07-01

    Technological advances have unraveled the existence of small clusters of co-active neurons in the neocortex. The functional implications of these microcircuits are in large part unexplored. Using a heavily constrained biophysical model of a L5 PFC microcircuit, we recently showed that these structures act as tunable modules of persistent activity, the cellular correlate of working memory. Here, we investigate the mechanisms that underlie persistent activity emergence (ON) and termination (OFF) and search for the minimum network size required for expressing these states within physiological regimes. We show that (a) NMDA-mediated dendritic spikes gate the induction of persistent firing in the microcircuit. (b) The minimum network size required for persistent activity induction is inversely proportional to the synaptic drive of each excitatory neuron. (c) Relaxation of connectivity and synaptic delay constraints eliminates the gating effect of NMDA spikes, albeit at a cost of much larger networks. (d) Persistent activity termination by increased inhibition depends on the strength of the synaptic input and is negatively modulated by dADP. (e) Slow synaptic mechanisms and network activity contain predictive information regarding the ability of a given stimulus to turn ON and/or OFF persistent firing in the microcircuit model. Overall, this study zooms out from dendrites to cell assemblies and suggests a tight interaction between dendritic non-linearities and network properties (size/connectivity) that may facilitate the short-memory function of the PFC. PMID:25077940

  3. Dendritic Nonlinearities Reduce Network Size Requirements and Mediate ON and OFF States of Persistent Activity in a PFC Microcircuit Model

    PubMed Central

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Sidiropoulou, Kyriaki; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have unraveled the existence of small clusters of co-active neurons in the neocortex. The functional implications of these microcircuits are in large part unexplored. Using a heavily constrained biophysical model of a L5 PFC microcircuit, we recently showed that these structures act as tunable modules of persistent activity, the cellular correlate of working memory. Here, we investigate the mechanisms that underlie persistent activity emergence (ON) and termination (OFF) and search for the minimum network size required for expressing these states within physiological regimes. We show that (a) NMDA-mediated dendritic spikes gate the induction of persistent firing in the microcircuit. (b) The minimum network size required for persistent activity induction is inversely proportional to the synaptic drive of each excitatory neuron. (c) Relaxation of connectivity and synaptic delay constraints eliminates the gating effect of NMDA spikes, albeit at a cost of much larger networks. (d) Persistent activity termination by increased inhibition depends on the strength of the synaptic input and is negatively modulated by dADP. (e) Slow synaptic mechanisms and network activity contain predictive information regarding the ability of a given stimulus to turn ON and/or OFF persistent firing in the microcircuit model. Overall, this study zooms out from dendrites to cell assemblies and suggests a tight interaction between dendritic non-linearities and network properties (size/connectivity) that may facilitate the short-memory function of the PFC. PMID:25077940

  4. Toso regulates differentiation and activation of inflammatory dendritic cells during persistence-prone virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P A; Meryk, A; Pandyra, A A; Brenner, D; Brüstle, A; Xu, H C; Merches, K; Lang, F; Khairnar, V; Sharma, P; Funkner, P; Recher, M; Shaabani, N; Duncan, G S; Duhan, V; Homey, B; Ohashi, P S; Häussinger, D; Knolle, P A; Honke, N; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2015-01-01

    During virus infection and autoimmune disease, inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) differentiate from blood monocytes and infiltrate infected tissue. Following acute infection with hepatotropic viruses, iDCs are essential for re-stimulating virus-specific CD8+ T cells and therefore contribute to virus control. Here we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system to identify novel signals, which influence the recruitment and activation of iDCs in the liver. We observed that intrinsic expression of Toso (Faim3, FcμR) influenced the differentiation and activation of iDCs in vivo and DCs in vitro. Lack of iDCs in Toso-deficient (Toso–/–) mice reduced CD8+ T-cell function in the liver and resulted in virus persistence. Furthermore, Toso–/– DCs failed to induce autoimmune diabetes in the rat insulin promoter-glycoprotein (RIP-GP) autoimmune diabetes model. In conclusion, we found that Toso has an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of iDCs, a process that is required for the control of persistence-prone virus infection. PMID:25257173

  5. Toso regulates differentiation and activation of inflammatory dendritic cells during persistence-prone virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lang, P A; Meryk, A; Pandyra, A A; Brenner, D; Brüstle, A; Xu, H C; Merches, K; Lang, F; Khairnar, V; Sharma, P; Funkner, P; Recher, M; Shaabani, N; Duncan, G S; Duhan, V; Homey, B; Ohashi, P S; Häussinger, D; Knolle, P A; Honke, N; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2015-01-01

    During virus infection and autoimmune disease, inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) differentiate from blood monocytes and infiltrate infected tissue. Following acute infection with hepatotropic viruses, iDCs are essential for re-stimulating virus-specific CD8(+) T cells and therefore contribute to virus control. Here we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system to identify novel signals, which influence the recruitment and activation of iDCs in the liver. We observed that intrinsic expression of Toso (Faim3, FcμR) influenced the differentiation and activation of iDCs in vivo and DCs in vitro. Lack of iDCs in Toso-deficient (Toso(-/-)) mice reduced CD8(+) T-cell function in the liver and resulted in virus persistence. Furthermore, Toso(-/-) DCs failed to induce autoimmune diabetes in the rat insulin promoter-glycoprotein (RIP-GP) autoimmune diabetes model. In conclusion, we found that Toso has an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of iDCs, a process that is required for the control of persistence-prone virus infection. PMID:25257173

  6. Persistent activation of autophagy in kidney tubular cells promotes renal interstitial fibrosis during unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Man J; Ding, Han-Fei; Huang, Shuang; Hill, Joseph A; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Dong, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    Renal fibrosis is the final, common pathway of end-stage renal disease. Whether and how autophagy contributes to renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here we first detected persistent autophagy in kidney proximal tubules in the renal fibrosis model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in mice. UUO-associated fibrosis was suppressed by pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy and also by kidney proximal tubule-specific knockout of autophagy-related 7 (PT-Atg7 KO). Consistently, proliferation and activation of fibroblasts, as indicated by the expression of ACTA2/α-smooth muscle actin and VIM (vimentin), was inhibited in PT-Atg7 KO mice, so was the accumulation of extracellular matrix components including FN1 (fibronectin 1) and collagen fibrils. Tubular atrophy, apoptosis, nephron loss, and interstitial macrophage infiltration were all inhibited in these mice. Moreover, these mice showed a specific suppression of the expression of a profibrotic factor FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2). In vitro, TGFB1 (transforming growth factor β 1) induced autophagy, apoptosis, and FN1 accumulation in primary proximal tubular cells. Inhibition of autophagy suppressed FN1 accumulation and apoptosis, while enhancement of autophagy increased TGFB1-induced-cell death. These results suggest that persistent activation of autophagy in kidney proximal tubules promotes renal interstitial fibrosis during UUO. The profibrotic function of autophagy is related to the regulation on tubular cell death, interstitial inflammation, and the production of profibrotic factors. PMID:27123926

  7. Ramping ensemble activity in dorsal anterior cingulate neurons during persistent commitment to a decision.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Tommy C; Strait, Caleb E; Hayden, Benjamin Y

    2015-10-01

    We frequently need to commit to a choice to achieve our goals; however, the neural processes that keep us motivated in pursuit of delayed goals remain obscure. We examined ensemble responses of neurons in macaque dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), an area previously implicated in self-control and persistence, in a task that requires commitment to a choice to obtain a reward. After reward receipt, dACC neurons signaled reward amount with characteristic ensemble firing rate patterns; during the delay in anticipation of the reward, ensemble activity smoothly and gradually came to resemble the postreward pattern. On the subset of risky trials, in which a reward was anticipated with 50% certainty, ramping ensemble activity evolved to the pattern associated with the anticipated reward (and not with the anticipated loss) and then, on loss trials, took on an inverted form anticorrelated with the form associated with a win. These findings enrich our knowledge of reward processing in dACC and may have broader implications for our understanding of persistence and self-control. PMID:26334016

  8. Activated RSC-nucleosome complex and persistently altered form of the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Y; Cairns, B R; Zhang, M; Kornberg, R D

    1998-07-10

    RSC, an abundant, essential chromatin-remodeling complex, related to SWI/SNF complex, binds nucleosomes and naked DNA with comparable affinities, as shown by gel shift analysis. The RSC-nucleosome complex is converted in the presence of ATP to a slower migrating form. This activated complex exhibits greatly increased susceptibility to endo- and exonucleases but retains a full complement of histones. Activation persists in the absence of ATP, and on removal of RSC, the nucleosome is released in an altered form, with a diminished electrophoretic mobility, greater sedimentation rate, and marked instability at elevated ionic strength. The reaction is reversible in the presence of RSC and ATP, with conversion of the altered form back to the nucleosome. PMID:9674424

  9. Endothelin-1 Impairs Nitric Oxide Signaling in Endothelial Cells Through a Protein Kinase Cδ-Dependent Activation of STAT3 and Decreased Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu

    2009-01-01

    In an ovine model of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression is increased, while endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression is decreased. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ET-1 attenuates eNOS expression in endothelial cells are not completely understood. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine if the overexpression of ET-1 decreases eNOS expression in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells isolated from fetal lambs. To increase the ET-1 expression, cells were transfected with a plasmid coding for Prepro-ET-1, a precursor of ET-1. After overexpression of Prepro-ET-1, ET-1 levels in the culture medium were significantly increased (control = 805.3 ± 69.8; Prepro-ET-1 overexpression = 1351 ± 127.9). eNOS promoter activity, protein levels, and NO generation were all significantly decreased by the overexpression of Prepro-ET-1. The decrease in transcription correlated with increased activity of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) and STAT3. Further, DNA binding activity of STAT3 was also increased by Prepro-ET-1 overexpression. The increase in STAT3 activity and decrease in eNOS promoter activity were inhibited by the overexpression of dominant negative mutants of PKCδ or STAT3. Further, a 2 bp mutation in the STAT3 binding site in the eNOS promoter inhibited STAT3 binding and led to enhanced promoter activity in the presence of Prepro-ET-1 overexpression. In conclusion, ET-1 secretion is increased by Prepro-ET-1 overexpression. This results in activation of PKCδ, which phosphorylates STAT3, increasing its binding to the eNOS promoter. This in turn decreases eNOS promoter activity, protein levels, and NO production. Thus, ET-1 can reduce eNOS expression and NO generation in fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells through PKCδ-mediated activation of STAT3. PMID:19754268

  10. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-06-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  11. Simvastatin induces a central hypotensive effect via Ras-mediated signalling to cause eNOS up-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wen-Han; Ho, Wen-Yu; Chang, Chien-Feng; Lu, Pei-Jung; Cheng, Pei-Wen; Yeh, Tung-Chen; Hong, Ling-Zong; Sun, Gwo-Ching; Hsiao, Michael; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Clinical studies indicate that statins have a BP-lowering effect in hypercholesterolemic individuals with hypertension. Specifically, statins modulate BP through the up-regulation of endothelial NOS (eNOS) activation in the brain. However, the signalling mechanisms through which statins enhance eNOS activation remain unclear. Therefore, we examined the possible signalling pathways involved in statin-mediated BP regulation in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To investigate the involvement of Ras and other signalling pathways in simvastatin-induced effects on BP, BP and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) were determined in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) before and after i.c.v. administration of simvastatin in the absence and presence of a Ras-specific inhibitor (farnesyl thiosalicylic acid, FTS), a geranylgeranyltransferase inhibitor (GGTI-2133), a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) or a MAPK-ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059). KEY RESULTS FTS significantly attenuated the decrease in BP and increased NO evoked by simvastatin and reversed the decrease in basal RSNA induced by simvastatin. Immunoblotting and pharmacological studies showed that inhibition of Ras activity by FTS significantly abolished simvastatin-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK), Akt and decreased eNOS phosphorylation. Likewise, administration of Akt and ERK1/2 signalling inhibitors, LY294002 and PD98059, attenuated the reduction in BP evoked by simvastatin. Furthermore, i.c.v. simvastatin decreased Rac1 activation and the number of ROS-positive cells in the NTS. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Simvastatin modulates central BP control in the NTS of SHRs by increasing Ras-mediated activation of the PI3K-Akt and ERK1/2-RSK signalling pathways, which then up-regulates eNOS activation. PMID:23889671

  12. Activation of Endocannabinoid System Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation in Human Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gestrich, Christopher; Duerr, Georg D.; Heinemann, Jan C.; Meertz, Anne; Probst, Chris; Roell, Wilhelm; Schiller, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Bindila, Laura; Lutz, Beat; Welz, Armin; Dewald, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Human aortic aneurysms have been associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. Since the endocannabinoid system modulates inflammation and tissue remodeling, we investigated its components in human aortic aneurysms. We obtained anterior aortic wall samples from patients undergoing elective surgery for aortic aneurysm or coronary artery disease as controls. Histological and molecular analysis (RT-qPCR) was performed, and endocannabinoid concentration was determined using LC-MRM. Patient characteristics were comparable between the groups except for a higher incidence of arterial hypertension and diabetes in the control group. mRNA level of cannabinoid receptors was significantly higher in aneurysms than in controls. Concentration of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol was significantly higher, while the second endocannabinoid anandamide and its metabolite arachidonic acid and palmitoylethanolamide were significantly lower in aneurysms. Histology revealed persistent infiltration of newly recruited leukocytes and significantly higher mononuclear cell density in adventitia of the aneurysms. Proinflammatory environment in aneurysms was shown by significant upregulation of M-CSF and PPARγ but associated with downregulation of chemokines. We found comparable collagen-stained area between the groups, significantly decreased mRNA level of CTGF, osteopontin-1, and MMP-2, and increased TIMP-4 expression in aneurysms. Our data provides evidence for endocannabinoid system activation in human aortic aneurysms, associated with persistent low-level inflammation and vascular remodeling. PMID:26539497

  13. Biodegradation of persistent organics can overcome adsorption-desorption hysteresis in biological activated carbon systems.

    PubMed

    Abromaitis, V; Racys, V; van der Marel, P; Meulepas, R J W

    2016-04-01

    In Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) systems, persistent organic pollutants can be removed through a combination of adsorption, desorption and biodegradation. These processes might be affected by the presence of other organics, especially by the more abundant easily-biodegradable organics, like acetate. In this research these relations are quantified for the removal of the persistent pharmaceutical metoprolol. Acetate did not affect the adsorption and desorption of metoprolol, but it did greatly enhance the metoprolol biodegradation. At least part of the BAC biomass growing on acetate was also able to metabolise metoprolol, although metoprolol was only converted after the acetate was depleted. The presence of easily-degradable organics like acetate in the feeding water is therefore beneficial for the removal of metoprolol in BAC systems. The isotherms obtained from metoprolol adsorption and desorption experiments showed that BAC systems are subject to hysteresis; for AC bioregeneration to take place the microbial biomass has to reduce the concentration at the AC-biomass interface 2.7 times compared to the concentration at which the carbon was being loaded. However, given the threshold concentration of the MET degrading microorganisms (<0.08 μg/L) versus the average influent concentration (1.3 μg/L), bioregeneration is feasible. PMID:26855223

  14. PECAM-1 Isoforms, eNOS, and Endoglin Axis in Regulation of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, SunYoung; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Vascular development and maintenance of proper vascular function through various regulatory mechanisms are critical to our wellbeing. Delineating the regulatory processes involved in development of vascular system and function is one of the most important topics in human physiology and pathophysiology. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31), a cell adhesion molecule with proangiogenic and proinflammatory activity, has been subject of numerous studies. Here we will review the important roles PECAM-1 and its isoforms play during angiogenesis, and its molecular mechanisms of action in the endothelium. In the endothelium, PECAM-1 not only plays a role as an adhesion molecule but also participates in intracellular signaling pathways which impact various cell adhesive mechanisms and endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) expression and activity. In addition, recent studies from our laboratory have revealed an important relationship between PECAM-1 and endoglin expression. Endoglin is an essential molecule during angiogenesis, vascular development and integrity whose expression and activity are compromised in the absence of PECAM-1. Here we will discuss the roles PECAM-1 isoforms may play in modulation of endothelial cell adhesive mechanisms, eNOS and endoglin expression and activity, and angiogenesis. PMID:25976664

  15. Cicletanine stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via Akt and MAP kinase/Erk signaling in sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Songling; Rockey, Don C

    2013-07-15

    The function of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and production of nitric oxide (NO) is altered in a number of disease states. Pharmacological approaches to enhancing NO synthesis and thus perhaps endothelial function could have substantial benefits in patients. We analyzed the effect of cicletanine, a synthetic pyridine with potent vasodilatory characteristics, on eNOS function and NO production in normal (liver) and injured rat sinusoidal endothelial cells, and we studied the effect of cicletanine-induced NO on stellate cell contraction and portal pressure in an in vivo model of liver injury. Sinusoidal endothelial cells were isolated from normal and injured rat livers. After exposure to cicletanine, eNOS phosphorylation, NO synthesis, and the signaling pathway regulating eNOS activation were measured. Cicletanine led to an increase in eNOS (Ser¹¹⁷⁷) phosphorylation, cytochrome c reductase activity, L-arginine conversion to L-citrulline, as well as NO production. The mechanism of the effect of cicletanine appeared to be via the protein kinase B (Akt) and MAP kinase/Erk signaling pathways. Additionally, cicletanine improved NO synthesis in injured sinusoidal endothelial cells. NO production induced by cicletanine in sinusoidal endothelial cells increased protein kinase G (PKG) activity as well as relaxation of stellate cells. Finally, administration of cicletanine to mice with portal hypertension induced by bile duct ligation led to reduction of portal pressure. The data indicate that cicletanine might improve eNOS activity in injured sinusoidal endothelial cells and likely activates hepatic stellate cell NO/PKG signaling. It raises the possibility that cicletanine could improve intrahepatic vascular function in portal hypertensive patients. PMID:23639812

  16. Endogenous adenosine A3 receptor activation selectively alleviates persistent pain states

    PubMed Central

    Little, Joshua W.; Ford, Amanda; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M.; Chen, Zhoumou; Janes, Kali; Doyle, Timothy; Xie, Jennifer; Luongo, Livio; Tosh, Dillip K.; Maione, Sabatino; Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a global burden that promotes disability and unnecessary suffering. To date, efficacious treatment of chronic pain has not been achieved. Thus, new therapeutic targets are needed. Here, we demonstrate that increasing endogenous adenosine levels through selective adenosine kinase inhibition produces powerful analgesic effects in rodent models of experimental neuropathic pain through the A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR, now known as ADORA3) signalling pathway. Similar results were obtained by the administration of a novel and highly selective A3AR agonist. These effects were prevented by blockade of spinal and supraspinal A3AR, lost in A3AR knock-out mice, and independent of opioid and endocannabinoid mechanisms. A3AR activation also relieved non-evoked spontaneous pain behaviours without promoting analgesic tolerance or inherent reward. Further examination revealed that A3AR activation reduced spinal cord pain processing by decreasing the excitability of spinal wide dynamic range neurons and producing supraspinal inhibition of spinal nociception through activation of serotonergic and noradrenergic bulbospinal circuits. Critically, engaging the A3AR mechanism did not alter nociceptive thresholds in non-neuropathy animals and therefore produced selective alleviation of persistent neuropathic pain states. These studies reveal A3AR activation by adenosine as an endogenous anti-nociceptive pathway and support the development of A3AR agonists as novel therapeutics to treat chronic pain. PMID:25414036

  17. Effect of Exercise Training on Enos Expression, NO Production and Oxygen Metabolism in Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Bustamante, Juanita; Czerniczyniec, Analia; Aguilar de Plata, Ana C.; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training during the second half of pregnancy on endothelial NOS expression (eNOS), nitric oxide (NO) production and oxygen metabolism in human placenta. Methods The study included 20 nulliparous in gestational week 16–20, attending prenatal care at three tertiary hospitals in Colombia who were randomly assigned into one of two groups: The exercise group (n = 10) took part in an exercise session three times a week for 12 weeks which consisted of: aerobic exercise at an intensity of 55–75% of their maximum heart rate for 60 min and 25 mins. Resistance exercise included 5 exercise groups circuit training (50 repetitions of each) using barbells (1–3 kg/exercise) and low-to-medium resistance bands. The control group (n = 10) undertook their usual physical activity. Mitochondrial and cytosol fractions were isolated from human placental tissue by differential centrifugation. A spectrophotometric assay was used to measure NO production in cytosolic samples from placental tissue and Western Blot technique to determine eNOS expression. Mitochondrial superoxide levels and hydrogen peroxide were measured to determine oxygen metabolism. Results Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training during pregnancy leads to a 2-fold increase in eNOS expression and 4-fold increase in NO production in placental cytosol (p = 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide levels and hydrogen peroxide production rate were decreased by 8% and 37% respectively in the placental mitochondria of exercising women (p = 0.05). Conclusion Regular exercise training during the second half of pregnancy increases eNOS expression and NO production and decreases reactive oxygen species generation in human placenta. Collectively, these data demonstrate that chronic exercise increases eNOS/NO production, presumably by increasing endothelial shear stress. This adaptation may contribute to the beneficial effects of

  18. Offline Persistence of Memory-Related Cerebral Activity during Active Wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Orban, Pierre; Balteau, Evelyne; Degueldre, Christian; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven; Maquet, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Much remains to be discovered about the fate of recent memories in the human brain. Several studies have reported the reactivation of learning-related cerebral activity during post-training sleep, suggesting that sleep plays a role in the offline processing and consolidation of memory. However, little is known about how new information is maintained and processed during post-training wakefulness before sleep, while the brain is actively engaged in other cognitive activities. We show, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, that brain activity elicited during a new learning episode modulates brain responses to an unrelated cognitive task, during the waking period following the end of training. This post-training activity evolves in learning-related cerebral structures, in which functional connections with other brain regions are gradually established or reinforced. It also correlates with behavioral performance. These processes follow a different time course for hippocampus-dependent and hippocampus-independent memories. Our experimental approach allowed the characterization of the offline evolution of the cerebral correlates of recent memories, without the confounding effect of concurrent practice of the learned material. Results indicate that the human brain has already extensively processed recent memories during the first hours of post-training wakefulness, even when simultaneously coping with unrelated cognitive demands. PMID:16602824

  19. Identification of a small molecule with activity against drug-resistant and persistent tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Sambandan, Dhinakaran; Halder, Rajkumar; Wang, Jianing; Batt, Sarah M.; Weinrick, Brian; Ahmad, Insha; Yang, Pengyu; Zhang, Yong; Kim, John; Hassani, Morad; Huszar, Stanislav; Trefzer, Claudia; Ma, Zhenkun; Kaneko, Takushi; Mdluli, Khisi E.; Franzblau, Scott; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Johnsson, Kai; Mikusova, Katarina; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Fütterer, Klaus; Robbins, Scott H.; Barnes, S. Whitney; Walker, John R.; Jacobs, William R.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    A cell-based phenotypic screen for inhibitors of biofilm formation in mycobacteria identified the small molecule TCA1, which has bactericidal activity against both drug-susceptible and -resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and sterilizes Mtb in vitro combined with rifampicin or isoniazid. In addition, TCA1 has bactericidal activity against nonreplicating Mtb in vitro and is efficacious in acute and chronic Mtb infection mouse models both alone and combined with rifampicin or isoniazid. Transcriptional analysis revealed that TCA1 down-regulates genes known to be involved in Mtb persistence. Genetic and affinity-based methods identified decaprenyl-phosphoryl-β-D-ribofuranose oxidoreductase DprE1 and MoeW, enzymes involved in cell wall and molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis, respectively, as targets responsible for the activity of TCA1. These in vitro and in vivo results indicate that this compound functions by a unique mechanism and suggest that TCA1 may lead to the development of a class of antituberculosis agents. PMID:23776209

  20. Persistent Immune Activation in CVID and the Role of IVIg in Its Suppression.

    PubMed

    Paquin-Proulx, Dominic; Sandberg, Johan K

    2014-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is one of the most common and clinically important primary immune deficiencies. CVID patients have poor humoral immunity, resulting in recurrent infections of the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts, as well as increased incidence of some forms of cancers and autoimmune diseases. The treatment for CVID is IgG replacement, often given as intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg). IVIg consists of monomeric IgG purified from pooled plasma from healthy donors and is used to treat an increasing number of conditions including autoimmune diseases. In the case of CVID, IVIg has mainly been seen as reconstitution therapy, providing patients with pathogen-specific antibodies. Recent evidence shows that IVIg has diverse effects on the immune system of CVID patients, and one important component is that IVIg alleviates the state of chronic immune activation. In this review, we will discuss causes and consequences of persistent immune activation in CVID, possible underlying mechanisms for how IVIg treatment reduces immune activation, and implications for our understanding of primary as well as acquired immune deficiencies. PMID:25566250

  1. Stable and unstable phases of elevated seismic activity at the persistently restless Telica Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Mel; Roman, Diana C.; Geirsson, Halldor; LaFemina, Peter; McNutt, Stephen R.; Muñoz, Angelica; Tenorio, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, is a persistently restless volcano with daily seismicity rates that can vary by orders of magnitude without apparent connection to eruptive activity. Low-frequency (LF) events are dominant and peaks in seismicity rate show little correlation with eruptive episodes, presenting a challenge for seismic monitoring and eruption forecasting. A short period seismic station (TELN) has been operated on Telica's summit since 1993, and in 2010 the installation of a six-station broadband seismic and eleven-station continuous GPS network (the TESAND network) was completed to document in detail the seismic characteristics of a persistently restless volcano. Between our study period of November 2009 and May 2013, over 400,000 events were detected at the TESAND summit station (TBTN), with daily event rates ranging from 5 to 1400. We present spectral analyses and classifications of ~ 200,000 events recorded by the TESAND network between April 2010 and March 2013, and earthquake locations for a sub-set of events between July 2010 and February 2012. In 2011 Telica erupted in a series of phreatic vulcanian explosions. Six months before the 2011 eruption, we observe a sudden decrease in LF events concurrent with a swarm of high-frequency (HF) events, followed by a decline in overall event rates, which reached a minimum at the eruption onset. We observe repeated periods of high and low seismicity rates and suggest these changes in seismicity represent repeated transitions between open-system and closed-system degassing. We suggest that these short- and long-term transitions between open to closed-system degassing form part of a long-term pattern of stable vs. unstable phases at Telica. Stable phases are characterised by steady high-rate seismicity and represent stable open-system degassing, whereas unstable phases are characterised by highly variable seismicity rates and represent repeated transitions from open to closed-system degassing, where the system is

  2. Two functionally distinct pools of eNOS in endothelium are facilitated by myoendothelial junction lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Biwer, Lauren A; Taddeo, Evan P; Kenwood, Brandon M; Hoehn, Kyle L; Straub, Adam C; Isakson, Brant E

    2016-07-01

    In resistance arteries, endothelial cells (EC) make contact with smooth muscle cells (SMC), forming myoendothelial junctions (MEJ). Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is present in the luminal side of the EC (apical EC) and the basal side of the EC (MEJ). To test if these eNOS pools acted in sync or separately, we co-cultured ECs and SMCs, then stimulated SMCs with phenylephrine (PE). Adrenergic activation causes inositol [1,4,5] triphosphate (IP3) to move from SMC to EC through gap junctions at the MEJ. PE increases MEJ eNOS phosphorylation (eNOS-P) at S1177, but not in EC. Conversely, we used bradykinin (BK) to increase EC calcium; this increased EC eNOS-P but did not affect MEJ eNOS-P. Inhibiting gap junctions abrogated the MEJ eNOS-P after PE, but had no effect on BK eNOS-P. Differential lipid composition between apical EC and MEJ may account for the compartmentalized eNOS-P response. Indeed, DAG and phosphatidylserine are both enriched in MEJ. These lipids are cofactors for PKC activity, which was significantly increased at the MEJ after PE. Because PKC activity also relies on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium release, we used thapsigargin and xestospongin C, BAPTA, and PKC inhibitors, which caused significant decreases in MEJ eNOS-P after PE. Functionally, BK inhibited leukocyte adhesion and PE caused an increase in SMC cGMP. We hypothesize that local lipid composition of the MEJ primes PKC and eNOS-P for stimulation by PE, allowing for compartmentalized function of eNOS in the blood vessel wall. PMID:27106139

  3. Insights into the emission reductions of multiple unintentional persistent organic pollutants from industrial activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Zheng, Minghui; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Jin, Rong; Zhao, Yuyang; Zhan, Jiayu

    2016-02-01

    Industrial activities result in unintentional production of multiple types of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) at various concentrations. Because of the potential adverse effect of these POPs on the environment, biota and human health, methods for controlling emission of POPs are required. Development and application of techniques for controlling emissions of POPs can be a technical and economic burden for the industry involved. Therefore, from the point of view of cost-benefit analysis, reducing emissions of multiple pollutants at the same time is optimal for sustainable industrial development. Although techniques have been developed for reducing the emissions of individual POPs, such as dioxins, further work is required on multi-POP control emissions from industrial activities. This paper discusses three important aspects that need to be taken to achieve multi-POP control. These aspects include the establishment of a comprehensive system for evaluating the risk from emissions of multiple POPs, determination of indicators for total emissions of multiple POPs, and the preparation and application of functional materials to inhibit formation of multiple POPs. These discussion might be helpful for the future research on the multi-POP control in industry. PMID:26386431

  4. Persistent aeolian activity at Endeavour crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars; new observations from orbit and the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Moersch, Jeffrey E.; Fenton, Lori K.; Michaels, Timothy I.; Bell, James F., III

    2015-05-01

    Aeolian-driven bedform activity is now known to occur in many regions of Mars, based on surface and orbital observation of contemporary martian ripple and dune mobility events. Many of these sites have only been monitored with sufficient resolution data for the last few Mars years, when the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) began acquiring images of Mars. One exception is the well-monitored Endeavour crater in Meridiani Planum, which was one of the first known sites of unambiguous dune activity (migration and deflation). However, those early detections used lower resolution images over longer temporal baselines (versus the HIRISE data now available), leaving some measurements poorly constrained. New orbital and surface observations of Endeavour show multiple spatial (cm, m, km) and temporal (seasons, Mars year) scales of aeolian-driven surface change, which confirms earlier reports. Dome dunes in the eastern portion of the crater persistently deflate, disseminating dark sand across lighter-toned regolith and/or eroded bright dust, and likely contribute to the crater interior's episodic decreases in orbital albedo measurements. Other dome dunes are detected with the highest migration rates (4-12 m per Mars year) and volumetric sand fluxes reported yet for Mars. Estimated dune construction times or "turnover times" here and elsewhere on Mars are significantly shorter than martian obliquity cycles, implying that it is not necessary to invoke paleoclimate wind regimes to explain current dune morphologies. Located on the crater rim, the Opportunity rover detected evidence for near- and far-field aeolian-driven activity, with observations of spherules/sand movement in the rover workspace, bedform albedo alteration, and dust-lifting events. Observations of intracrater dunes show periodic shifting dark streaks that significantly constrain local wind regimes (directionality and seasonality). Constraints on wind directions from surface and orbital images

  5. Environmentally persistent free radicals inhibit cytochrome P450 activity in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Reed, James R; Cawley, George F; Ardoin, Taylor G; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Hasan, Farhana; Kiruri, Lucy W; Backes, Wayne L

    2014-06-01

    Combustion processes generate particulate matter that affects human health. When incineration fuels include components that are highly enriched in aromatic hydrocarbons (especially halogenated varieties) and redox-active metals, ultrafine particulate matter containing air-stable, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) is generated. The exposure to fine EPFRs (less than 2.5 μm in diameter) has been shown to negatively influence pulmonary and cardiovascular functions in living organisms. The goal of this study was to determine if these EPFRs have a direct effect on cytochrome P450 function. This was accomplished by direct addition of the EPFRs to rat liver microsomal preparations and measurement of several P450 activities using form-selective substrates. The EPFRs used in this study were formed by heating vapors from an organic compound (either monochlorophenol (MCP230) or 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB230)) and 5% copper oxide supported on silica (approximately 0.2 μm in diameter) to 230°C under vacuum. Both types of EPFRs (but not silica, physisorbed silica, or silica impregnated with copper oxide) dramatically inhibited the activities of CYP1A, CYP2B, CYP2E1, CYP2D2 and CYP3A when incubated at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/ml with microsomes and NADPH. Interestingly, at the same concentrations, the EPFRs did not inhibit HO-1 activity or the reduction of cytochrome c by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. CYP2D2-selective metabolism by rat liver microsomes was examined in more detail. The inhibition of CYP2D2-selective metabolism by both DCB230- and MCP230-EPFRs appeared to be largely noncompetitive and was attenuated in the presence of catalase suggesting that reactive oxygen species may be involved in the mechanism of inhibition. PMID:24713513

  6. Persistance of the insecticidal activity of five essential oils on the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais (Motsch.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Ngamo Tinkeu, L S; Goudoum, A; Ngassoum, M B; Mapongmetsem, P M; Kouninki, H; Hance, T

    2004-01-01

    Essential oils of aromatic plants are popularise as protectant with low persistance. The evaluation of this duration of activity was carried out for five aromatic plants: Annona senegalensis (Annonaceae), Eucalyptus citriodora et Ecalyptus saligna (Myrtaceae), Lippia rugosa (Verbenaceae) and Ocimum gratissimum (Lamiaceae). They have significant insecticidal activity on S. Zeamais, on the first day of application, this activity decreases after 2 or 4 days. After 8 more than 50% of the efficacy is lossed for all the plants excepted A. senegalensis. PMID:15759405

  7. Living Water. Eno River State Park: An Environmental Education Learning Experience Designed for the Middle Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Scott; Woods, Martha

    This learning packet, one in a series of eight, was developed by the Eno River State Park in North Carolina for Grades 5-6 to teach about various aspects of water life on the Eno River. Loose-leaf pages are presented in nine sections that contain: (1) introductions to the North Carolina State Park System, the Eno River State Park, and to the…

  8. The persistence of the NWA effect during the low solar activity period 2007-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakowski, N.; Hoque, M. M.; Kriegel, M.; Patidar, V.

    2015-10-01

    The ionospheric Nighttime Winter Anomaly (NWA) was first reported more than three decades ago based on total electron content (TEC) and vertical sounding data. The aim of this paper is to provide further evidence that the NWA effect is a persistent feature in the Northern Hemisphere at the American and in the Southern Hemisphere at the Asian longitude sector under low solar activity conditions. The analysis of ground-based GPS derived TEC and peak electron density data from radio occultation measurements on Formosat-3/COSMIC satellites confirms and further supports the findings published in earlier NWA papers. So it has been confirmed and further specified that the NWA appears at longitude sectors where the displacement between the geomagnetic and the geographic equator maximizes. Here NWA peaks at around 40°-50° geomagnetic midlatitude supporting the idea that wind-induced plasma uplifting in the conjugated summer hemisphere is the main driving force for the accumulation of ionospheric plasma in the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere. In parallel, the midsummer nighttime anomaly (MSNA) is caused at the local ionosphere. Simultaneously, interhemispheric coupling causes severe downward plasma fluxes in the conjugated winter hemisphere during night causing the NWA at low solar activity. With increasing solar activity, the downward plasma fluxes lose their impact due to the much stronger increasing background ionization that masks the NWA. It is assumed that MSNA and related special anomalies such as the Weddell Sea Anomaly and the Okhotsk Sea Anomaly are closely related to the NWA via enhanced wind-induced uplifting of the ionosphere.

  9. Persistent Receptor Activity Underlies Group I mGluR-Mediated Cellular Plasticity in CA3 Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Young, Steven R.; Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Zhao, Wangfa; Wong, Robert K.S.; Bianchi, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Plastic changes in cortical activities induced by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) stimulation include epileptogenesis, expressed in vitro as the conversion of normal neuronal activity to persistent, prolonged synchronized (ictal) discharges. At present, the mechanism that maintains group I mGluR-induced plasticity is not known. We examined this issue using hippocampal slices from guinea pigs and mice. Agonist [(S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine; DHPG; 30– 50 μM)] stimulation of group I mGluRs induces persistent prolonged synchronized (ictal-like) discharges in CA3 that are associated with three identified excitatory cellular responses – suppression of spike afterhyperpolarizations, activation of a voltage-dependent cationic current, and increase in neuronal input resistance. Persistent prolonged synchronized discharges and the underlying excitatory cellular responses maintained following induction were reversibly blocked by mGluR1 antagonists [LY 367385; (S)-+-α-amino-4-carboxy-2-methylbenzeneacetic acid; 50, 100 μM; CPCCOEt (hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester; 100 μM], and to a lesser extent by the mGluR5 antagonist MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride; 50 μM]. Activation of persistent cellular responses to DHPG were unaffected by tetrodotoxin (0.5–1 μM) or perfusion with low Ca2+(0.2 mM)-Mn2+(0.5 mM) media – conditions that suppress endogenous glutamate release. The pharmacological profile of the blocking action of the group I mGluR antagonist MCPG [(RS)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine; 50–500 μM] on persistent cellular responses was different from that on cellular responses directly activated by DHPG. These data indicate that transient stimulation of group I mGluRs alters receptor properties rendering them persistently active in the absence of applied agonist or endogenous glutamate activation. Persistent receptor activities, primarily involving mGluR1, maintain excitatory cellular

  10. Gravity and deformation changes at two persistently active volcanoes: Insights into magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Jones, G.; Rymer, H.

    2004-05-01

    Insights on some of the mechanisms responsible for persistent volcanism can be best achieved through the synergy of temporal geophysical and geochemical data sets. Gravity changes combined with ground deformation have been shown to provide important information on magma reservoir mass changes while measurements of gas flux have been influential in determining the rate of magma emplacement. The integration of long-term micro-gravity and ground deformation data with SO2 flux and total sulphur budgets collected at Poás and Masaya volcanoes (since 1983 and 1993, respectively) now allows for the identification of significant cycles of activity. Recent eruptive activity at Poás volcano (Costa Rica) has been characterised by the disappearance and subsequent reappearance of the summit crater lake following intrusive episodes in 1980 and 1986-1989. Magma approached the surface on both occasions and was detected by the observation of concurrent increases in micro-gravity. These increases can be best modelled in terms of brittle fracturing of a shallow magma carapace allowing magma ascent through the conduit system to beneath the crater. This process allows for the vertical transfer of heat and gas and is driven by convection of buoyant, volatile-rich magma displacing colder, degassed magma. As magma pressure drops, the connection between the deeper magma reservoir and shallow conduit system is severed allowing the hydrothermal system to resume its role as a cooling mechanism. In contrast, recent activity at Masaya volcano (Nicaragua) has been characterised by repeated periods of significant passive degassing (>2000 t/d SO2) with the eruption of only negligible amounts of juvenile material. The resulting cycle gravity and gas flux variations is clearly not driven by intrusion of additional magma into the shallow system. Rather, it may be due in part to blocking and gas accumulation caused by restrictions in the shallow volcano substructure. However, as with Poás, this

  11. NMDA receptors are the basis for persistent network activity in neocortex slices

    PubMed Central

    Favero, Morgana

    2015-01-01

    During behavioral quiescence the neocortex generates spontaneous slow oscillations that consist of Up and Down states. Up states are short epochs of persistent activity, but their underlying source is unclear. In neocortex slices of adult mice, we monitored several cellular and network variables during the transition between a traditional buffer, which does not cause Up states, and a lower-divalent cation buffer, which leads to the generation of Up states. We found that the resting membrane potential and input resistance of cortical cells did not change with the development of Up states. The synaptic efficacy of excitatory postsynaptic potentials mediated by non-NMDA receptors was slightly reduced, but this is unlikely to facilitate the generation of Up states. On the other hand, we identified two variables that are associated with the generation of Up states: an enhancement of the intrinsic firing excitability of cortical cells and an enhancement of NMDA-mediated responses evoked by electrical or optogenetic stimulation. The fact that blocking NMDA receptors abolishes Up states indicates that the enhancement in intrinsic firing excitability alone is insufficient to generate Up states. NMDA receptors have a crucial role in the generation of Up states in neocortex slices. PMID:25878152

  12. New paradigms for understanding and step changes in treating active and chronic, persistent apicomplexan infections.

    PubMed

    McPhillie, Martin; Zhou, Ying; El Bissati, Kamal; Dubey, Jitender; Lorenzi, Hernan; Capper, Michael; Lukens, Amanda K; Hickman, Mark; Muench, Stephen; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Weber, Christopher R; Wheeler, Kelsey; Gordon, James; Sanders, Justin; Moulton, Hong; Wang, Kai; Kim, Taek-Kyun; He, Yuqing; Santos, Tatiana; Woods, Stuart; Lee, Patty; Donkin, David; Kim, Eric; Fraczek, Laura; Lykins, Joseph; Esaa, Farida; Alibana-Clouser, Fatima; Dovgin, Sarah; Weiss, Louis; Brasseur, Gael; Wirth, Dyann; Kent, Michael; Hood, Leroy; Meunieur, Brigitte; Roberts, Craig W; Hasnain, S Samar; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Fishwick, Colin; McLeod, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the most common parasitic infection of human brain and eye, persists across lifetimes, can progressively damage sight, and is currently incurable. New, curative medicines are needed urgently. Herein, we develop novel models to facilitate drug development: EGS strain T. gondii forms cysts in vitro that induce oocysts in cats, the gold standard criterion for cysts. These cysts highly express cytochrome b. Using these models, we envisioned, and then created, novel 4-(1H)-quinolone scaffolds that target the cytochrome bc1 complex Qi site, of which, a substituted 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinolin-4-one inhibits active infection (IC50, 30 nM) and cysts (IC50, 4 μM) in vitro, and in vivo (25 mg/kg), and drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum (IC50, <30 nM), with clinically relevant synergy. Mutant yeast and co-crystallographic studies demonstrate binding to the bc1 complex Qi site. Our results have direct impact on improving outcomes for those with toxoplasmosis, malaria, and ~2 billion persons chronically infected with encysted bradyzoites. PMID:27412848

  13. New paradigms for understanding and step changes in treating active and chronic, persistent apicomplexan infections

    PubMed Central

    McPhillie, Martin; Zhou, Ying; El Bissati, Kamal; Dubey, Jitender; Lorenzi, Hernan; Capper, Michael; Lukens, Amanda K; Hickman, Mark; Muench, Stephen; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Weber, Christopher R.; Wheeler, Kelsey; Gordon, James; Sanders, Justin; Moulton, Hong; Wang, Kai; Kim, Taek-Kyun; He, Yuqing; Santos, Tatiana; Woods, Stuart; Lee, Patty; Donkin, David; Kim, Eric; Fraczek, Laura; Lykins, Joseph; Esaa, Farida; Alibana-Clouser, Fatima; Dovgin, Sarah; Weiss, Louis; Brasseur, Gael; Wirth, Dyann; Kent, Michael; Hood, Leroy; Meunieur, Brigitte; Roberts, Craig W.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Fishwick, Colin; McLeod, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the most common parasitic infection of human brain and eye, persists across lifetimes, can progressively damage sight, and is currently incurable. New, curative medicines are needed urgently. Herein, we develop novel models to facilitate drug development: EGS strain T. gondii forms cysts in vitro that induce oocysts in cats, the gold standard criterion for cysts. These cysts highly express cytochrome b. Using these models, we envisioned, and then created, novel 4-(1H)-quinolone scaffolds that target the cytochrome bc1 complex Qi site, of which, a substituted 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinolin-4-one inhibits active infection (IC50, 30 nM) and cysts (IC50, 4 μM) in vitro, and in vivo (25 mg/kg), and drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum (IC50, <30 nM), with clinically relevant synergy. Mutant yeast and co-crystallographic studies demonstrate binding to the bc1 complex Qi site. Our results have direct impact on improving outcomes for those with toxoplasmosis, malaria, and ~2 billion persons chronically infected with encysted bradyzoites. PMID:27412848

  14. Semibiotic Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothmann, C.; Zauner, K.-P.

    From observation, we find four different strategies to successfully enable structures to persist over extended periods of time. If functionally relevant features are very large compared to the changes that can be effectuated by entropy, the functional structure itself has a high enough probability to erode only slowly over time. If the functionally relevant features are protected from environmental influence by sacrificial layers that absorb the impinging of the environment, deterioration can be avoided or slowed. Loss of functionality can be delayed, even for complex systems, by keeping alternate options for all required components available. Biological systems also apply information processing to actively counter the impact of entropy by mechanisms such as self-repair. The latter strategy increases the overall persistence of living systems and enables them to maintain a highly complex functional organisation during their lifetime and over generations. In contrast to the other strategies, information processing has only low material overhead. While at present engineered technology is far from achieving the self-repair of evolved systems, the semibiotic combination of biological components with conventionally engineered systems may open a path to long-term persistence of functional devices in harsh environments. We review nature's strategies for persistence, and consider early steps taken in the laboratory to import such capabilities into engineered architectures.

  15. Resveratrol Prevented Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction in Rat Thoracic Aorta Through Increased eNOS Expression

    PubMed Central

    Uğurel, Seda Sultan; Kuşçu, Nilay; Özenci, Çiler Çelik; Dalaklıoğlu, Selvinaz; Taşatargil, Arda

    2016-01-01

    Background: The cardiovascular benefits of Resveratrol (RVT) have been well established by previous experimental and clinical studies. Aims: The goal of this study was to test the effectiveness of RVT administration on the impaired endothelial function induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and to elucidate the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) pathway. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Endotoxemia was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg LPS, and the thoracic aorta was isolated six hours later. RVT was injected intraperitoneally 15 minutes before LPS administration. Six hours after LPS injection, potassium chloride (KCl), phenylephrine (Phe), acetylcholine (ACh), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were used to examine to vascular reactivity and endothelial function. eNOS, phospho-eNOS (p-eNOS) (Ser 1177), and SIRT1 expressions in thoracic aorta were evaluated by Western blot. Results: LPS administration significantly inhibited the relaxation response induced by ACh, while the relaxation to SNP was not significantly altered. Phe- and KCl-induced contractile responses in the thoracic aorta significantly decreased in LPS-injected group. eNOS and p-eNOS expression decreased significantly in arteries obtained from LPS group rats. The impaired vasoreactivity as well as decreased expressions of eNOS, p-eNOS, and SIRT1 in vessels from LPS-injected rats were improved by RVT treatment. Conclusion: The endothelium-dependent vasodilatation of the thoracic aorta was significantly inhibited by LPS administration, and RVT treatment may improve vascular endothelial function. The protective effect of RVT might be associated with increased eNOS expression and activity.

  16. Crustal-scale active deformation along the Ecuadorian Andes using Persistent Scatterers SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champenois, J.; Baize, S.; Audin, L.; Pinel, V.; Alvarado, A.; Jomard, H.; Yepes, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Located in the Northern Andes along the active subduction zone of the Nazca plate beneath the South American continent, Ecuador is highly exposed to seismic hazard. For the last ten years, numerous multidisciplinary studies focused on major seismicity related to the subduction, whereas few investigations concentrated on M>7 crustal seismicity in the upper plate (like 1797 Riobamba earthquake, ML 8.3, 12.000 deaths). The active faults producing these earthquakes are poorly known in term of slip rate and for some cases are even not identified yet. Additionnally, Ecuador is one of the most active volcanic areas of the northern Andean volcanic zone. Three among the nine active volcanoes are actually erupting (Reventador, Tungurahua, and Sangay). For the last 5 years, geodetic networks have been deployed in Ecuador to enhance crustal deformation monitoring, but these point-wise techniques cannot provide spatially dense maps of ground deformation and are quite expensive methods. To address this issue, we applied the Persistent Scatterers SAR Interferometry technique (StaMPS/MTI freeware developed by A. Hooper) to ENVISAT SAR data between 2003 and 2009. Using these cost-effective techniques, we are able to investigate both tectonic and volcanic surface deformations with an unprecedented spatial density of measurements. This study presents new PS-InSAR results along the Ecuadorian Andes, close to the area of Riobamba. We generated average velocity maps and consistent time-series of displacements measured along the radar line of sight. These results evidence large scale deformation localized on the Pallatanga fault system (locked fault) compatible with a model of locked strike slip fault. Moreover, these results show an important growth of the Tungurahua volcanic complex (maximum rate about 9 mm/yr) with a rapid uplift prior and post 2006 explosive eruption. We investigate the time-series of displacement for 22 images. Our results permitted to propose two crustal source

  17. Altered Spontaneous Activity in Patients with Persistent Somatoform Pain Disorder Revealed by Regional Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chao; Lu, Jing; Li, Xuzhou; Tang, Chaozheng; Fan, Mingxia; Luo, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Persistent somatoform pain disorder (PSPD) is a mental disorder un-associated with any somatic injury and can cause severe somatosensory and emotional impairments in patients. However, so far, the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of the functional impairments in PSPD is still unclear. The present study assesses the difference in regional spontaneous activity between PSPD and healthy controls (HC) during a resting state, in order to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD. Resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data were obtained from 13 PSPD patients and 23 age- and gender-matched HC subjects in this study. Kendall’s coefficient of concordance was used to measure regional homogeneity (ReHo), and a two-sample t-test was subsequently performed to investigate the ReHo difference between PSPD and HC. Additionally, the correlations between the mean ReHo of each survived area and the clinical assessments were further analyzed. Compared with the HC group, patients with PSPD exhibited decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex, posterior cerebellum, and occipital lobe, while increased ReHo in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and default mode network (including the medial PFC, right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), and left supramarginal gyrus). In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the mean ReHo of both right IPL and left supramarginal gyrus and participants’ Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) scores, and between the mean ReHo of the left middle frontal gyrus and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores. Our results suggest that abnormal spontaneous brain activity in specific brain regions during a resting state may be associated with the dysfunctions in pain, memory and emotional processing commonly observed in patients with PSPD. These findings help us to understand the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD and suggest that the ReHo metric could be used as a clinical marker for PSPD. PMID:26977802

  18. Altered Spontaneous Activity in Patients with Persistent Somatoform Pain Disorder Revealed by Regional Homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianming; Zhao, Zhiyong; Yan, Chao; Lu, Jing; Li, Xuzhou; Tang, Chaozheng; Fan, Mingxia; Luo, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Persistent somatoform pain disorder (PSPD) is a mental disorder un-associated with any somatic injury and can cause severe somatosensory and emotional impairments in patients. However, so far, the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of the functional impairments in PSPD is still unclear. The present study assesses the difference in regional spontaneous activity between PSPD and healthy controls (HC) during a resting state, in order to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD. Resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data were obtained from 13 PSPD patients and 23 age- and gender-matched HC subjects in this study. Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used to measure regional homogeneity (ReHo), and a two-sample t-test was subsequently performed to investigate the ReHo difference between PSPD and HC. Additionally, the correlations between the mean ReHo of each survived area and the clinical assessments were further analyzed. Compared with the HC group, patients with PSPD exhibited decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex, posterior cerebellum, and occipital lobe, while increased ReHo in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and default mode network (including the medial PFC, right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), and left supramarginal gyrus). In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the mean ReHo of both right IPL and left supramarginal gyrus and participants' Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) scores, and between the mean ReHo of the left middle frontal gyrus and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores. Our results suggest that abnormal spontaneous brain activity in specific brain regions during a resting state may be associated with the dysfunctions in pain, memory and emotional processing commonly observed in patients with PSPD. These findings help us to understand the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD and suggest that the ReHo metric could be used as a clinical marker for PSPD. PMID:26977802

  19. Reconsolidation-induced memory persistence: Participation of late phase hippocampal ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, M C; Navarro, N; Blake, M G; Romano, A; Feld, M; Boccia, M M

    2016-09-01

    Persistence is an attribute of long-term memories (LTM) that has recently caught researcher's attention in search for mechanisms triggered by experience that assure memory perdurability. Up-to-date, scarce evidence of relationship between reconsolidation and persistence has been described. Here, we characterized hippocampal ERK participation in LTM reconsolidation and persistence using an inhibitory avoidance task (IA) at different time points. Intra-dorsal-hippocampal (dHIP) administration of an ERK inhibitor (PD098059, PD, 1.0μg/hippocampus) 3h after retrieval did not affect reconsolidation of a strong IA, when tested 24h apart. However, the same manipulation impaired performance when animals were tested at 7d, regardless of the training's strength; and being specific to memory reactivation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that persistence might be triggered after memory reactivation involving an ERK/MAPK-dependent process. PMID:27321160

  20. Environmentally persistent free radicals inhibit cytochrome P450 activity in rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, James R.; Cawley, George F.; Ardoin, Taylor G.; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M.; Hasan, Farhana; Kiruri, Lucy W.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2014-06-01

    Combustion processes generate particulate matter that affects human health. When incineration fuels include components that are highly enriched in aromatic hydrocarbons (especially halogenated varieties) and redox-active metals, ultrafine particulate matter containing air-stable, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) is generated. The exposure to fine EPFRs (less than 2.5 μm in diameter) has been shown to negatively influence pulmonary and cardiovascular functions in living organisms. The goal of this study was to determine if these EPFRs have a direct effect on cytochrome P450 function. This was accomplished by direct addition of the EPFRs to rat liver microsomal preparations and measurement of several P450 activities using form-selective substrates. The EPFRs used in this study were formed by heating vapors from an organic compound (either monochlorophenol (MCP230) or 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB230)) and 5% copper oxide supported on silica (approximately 0.2 μm in diameter) to 230 °C under vacuum. Both types of EPFRs (but not silica, physisorbed silica, or silica impregnated with copper oxide) dramatically inhibited the activities of CYP1A, CYP2B, CYP2E1, CYP2D2 and CYP3A when incubated at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/ml with microsomes and NADPH. Interestingly, at the same concentrations, the EPFRs did not inhibit HO-1 activity or the reduction of cytochrome c by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. CYP2D2-selective metabolism by rat liver microsomes was examined in more detail. The inhibition of CYP2D2-selective metabolism by both DCB230- and MCP230-EPFRs appeared to be largely noncompetitive and was attenuated in the presence of catalase suggesting that reactive oxygen species may be involved in the mechanism of inhibition. - Highlights: • Combustion of organic pollutants generates long-lived particulate radicals (EPFRs). • EPFRs inhibit metabolism by all cytochromes P450 tested in rat liver microsomes. • EPFR-mediated inhibition is related to

  1. Heat shock protein 90 and tyrosine kinase regulate eNOS NO* generation but not NO* bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Ou, Jingsong; Fontana, Jason T; Ou, Zhijun; Jones, Deron W; Ackerman, Allan W; Oldham, Keith T; Yu, Jun; Sessa, William C; Pritchard, Kirkwood A

    2004-02-01

    An increase in the association of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) with endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) is well recognized for increasing NO (NO*) production. Despite the progress in this field, the mechanisms by which HSP90 modulates eNOS remain unclear due, in part, to the fact that geldanamycin (GA) redox cycles to generate superoxide anion (O(2)(-*) and the fact that inhibiting HSP90 with GA or radicicol (RAD) destabilizes tyrosine kinases that rely on the chaperone for maturation. In this report, we determine the extent to which these side effects alter vascular and endothelial cell function in physiologically relevant systems and in cultured endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated vascular permeability, as measured by Evans blue leakage in the ears of male Swiss mice in vivo, and acetylcholine-induced vasodilation of isolated, pressurized mandibular arterioles from male C57BL6 mice ex vivo were attenuated by N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), GA, and RAD. Z-1[N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonoethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-dioate (DETA-NONOate), a slow releasing NO. donor, increased vasodilation of arterioles pretreated with GA, RAD, and L-NAME equally well except at 10(-5) M, the highest concentration used, where vasodilation was greater in pressurized arterioles treated with L-NAME than in arterioles pretreated with GA or RAD alone. Both GA and RAD reduced NO* release from stimulated endothelial cell cultures and increased O(2)(-*) production in the endothelium of isolated aortas by an L-NAME-inhibitable mechanism. Pretreatment with RAD increased stimulated O(2)(-*) production from eNOS, whereas pretreatment with genistein (GE), a broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor, did not; however, pretreatment with GE + RAD resulted in a super-induced state of uncoupled eNOS activity upon stimulation. These data suggest that the tyrosine kinases, either directly or indirectly, and HSP90-dependent signaling pathways

  2. Persistence or Change in Leisure-Time Physical Activity Habits and Waist Gain During Early Adulthood: A Twin-Study

    PubMed Central

    Rottensteiner, Mirva; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kujala, Urho M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between persistence or change in leisure-time physical activity habits and waist gain among young adults. Design and Methods Population-based cohort study among 3383 Finnish twin individuals (1578 men) from five birth cohorts (1975–1979), who answered questionnaires at mean ages of 24.4 y (SD 0.9) and 33.9 y (SD 1.2), with reported self-measured waist circumference. Persistence or change in leisure-time physical activity habits was defined based on thirds of activity metabolic equivalent h/day during follow-up (mean 9.5 y; SD 0.7). Results Decreased activity was linked to greater waist gain compared to increased activity (3.6 cm, P<0.001 for men; 3.1 cm, P<0.001 for women). Among same-sex activity discordant twin pairs, twins who decreased activity gained an average 2.8 cm (95%CI 0.4 to 5.1, P=0.009) more waist than their co-twins who increased activity (n=85 pairs); among MZ twin pairs (n=43), the difference was 4.2 cm (95%CI 1.2 to 7.2, P=0.008). Conclusions Among young adults, an increase in leisure-time physical activity or staying active during a decade of follow-up was associated with less waist gain, but any decrease in activity level, regardless baseline activity, led to waist gain that was similar to that associated with being persistently inactive. PMID:24839266

  3. Medial prefrontal cortical activity reflects dynamic re-evaluation during voluntary persistence.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Joseph T; Kable, Joseph W

    2015-05-01

    Deciding how long to keep waiting for future rewards is a nontrivial problem, especially when the timing of rewards is uncertain. We carried out an experiment in which human decision makers waited for rewards in two environments in which reward-timing statistics favored either a greater or lesser degree of behavioral persistence. We found that decision makers adaptively calibrated their level of persistence for each environment. Functional neuroimaging revealed signals that evolved differently during physically identical delays in the two environments, consistent with a dynamic and context-sensitive reappraisal of subjective value. This effect was observed in a region of ventromedial prefrontal cortex that is sensitive to subjective value in other contexts, demonstrating continuity between valuation mechanisms involved in discrete choice and in temporally extended decisions analogous to foraging. Our findings support a model in which voluntary persistence emerges from dynamic cost/benefit evaluation rather than from a control process that overrides valuation mechanisms. PMID:25849988

  4. Medial prefrontal cortical activity reflects dynamic re-evaluation during voluntary persistence

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Joseph T.; Kable, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Deciding how long to keep waiting for future rewards is a nontrivial problem, especially when the timing of rewards is uncertain. We report an experiment in which human decision makers waited for rewards in two environments, in which reward-timing statistics favored either a greater or lesser degree of behavioral persistence. We found that decision makers adaptively calibrated their level of persistence for each environment. Functional neuroimaging revealed signals that evolved differently during physically identical delays in the two environments, consistent with a dynamic and context-sensitive reappraisal of subjective value. This effect was observed in a region of ventromedial prefrontal cortex that is sensitive to subjective value in other contexts, demonstrating continuity between valuation mechanisms involved in discrete choice and in temporally extended decisions analogous to foraging. Our findings support a model in which voluntary persistence emerges from dynamic cost/benefit evaluation rather than from a control process that overrides valuation mechanisms. PMID:25849988

  5. Urocortin 2 stimulates nitric oxide production in ventricular myocytes via Akt- and PKA-mediated phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1177

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Stefanie; Pluteanu, Florentina; Renz, Susanne; Nikonova, Yulia; Maxwell, Joshua T.; Yang, Li-Zhen; Schmidt, Kurt; Edwards, Joshua N.; Wakula, Paulina; Groschner, Klaus; Maier, Lars S.; Spiess, Joachim; Blatter, Lothar A.; Pieske, Burkert

    2014-01-01

    Urocortin 2 (Ucn2) is a cardioactive peptide exhibiting beneficial effects in normal and failing heart. In cardiomyocytes, it elicits cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent positive inotropic and lusitropic effects. We tested the hypothesis that, in addition, Ucn2 activates cardiac nitric oxide (NO) signaling and elucidated the underlying signaling pathways and mechanisms. In isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes, Ucn2 caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473, Thr308), endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177), and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not Akt and eNOS phosphorylation, was suppressed by inhibition of MEK1/2. Increased Akt phosphorylation resulted in increased Akt kinase activity and was mediated by corticotropin-releasing factor 2 (CRF2) receptors (astressin-2B sensitive). Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) diminished both Akt as well as eNOS phosphorylation mediated by Ucn2. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) reduced Ucn2-induced phosphorylation of eNOS but did not affect the increase in phosphorylation of Akt. Conversely, direct receptor-independent elevation of cAMP via forskolin increased phosphorylation of eNOS but not of Akt. Ucn2 increased intracellular NO concentration ([NO]i), [cGMP], [cAMP], and cell shortening. Inhibition of eNOS suppressed the increases in [NO]i and cell shortening. When both PI3K-Akt and cAMP-PKA signaling were inhibited, the Ucn2-induced increases in [NO]i and cell shortening were attenuated. Thus, in rabbit ventricular myocytes, Ucn2 causes activation of cAMP-PKA, PI3K-Akt, and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling. The MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathway is not required for stimulation of NO signaling in these cells. The other two pathways, cAMP-PKA and PI3K-Akt, converge on eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 and result in pronounced and sustained cellular NO production with subsequent stimulation of cGMP signaling. PMID:25015964

  6. Urocortin 2 stimulates nitric oxide production in ventricular myocytes via Akt- and PKA-mediated phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1177.

    PubMed

    Walther, Stefanie; Pluteanu, Florentina; Renz, Susanne; Nikonova, Yulia; Maxwell, Joshua T; Yang, Li-Zhen; Schmidt, Kurt; Edwards, Joshua N; Wakula, Paulina; Groschner, Klaus; Maier, Lars S; Spiess, Joachim; Blatter, Lothar A; Pieske, Burkert; Kockskämper, Jens

    2014-09-01

    Urocortin 2 (Ucn2) is a cardioactive peptide exhibiting beneficial effects in normal and failing heart. In cardiomyocytes, it elicits cAMP- and Ca(2+)-dependent positive inotropic and lusitropic effects. We tested the hypothesis that, in addition, Ucn2 activates cardiac nitric oxide (NO) signaling and elucidated the underlying signaling pathways and mechanisms. In isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes, Ucn2 caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473, Thr308), endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177), and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not Akt and eNOS phosphorylation, was suppressed by inhibition of MEK1/2. Increased Akt phosphorylation resulted in increased Akt kinase activity and was mediated by corticotropin-releasing factor 2 (CRF2) receptors (astressin-2B sensitive). Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) diminished both Akt as well as eNOS phosphorylation mediated by Ucn2. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) reduced Ucn2-induced phosphorylation of eNOS but did not affect the increase in phosphorylation of Akt. Conversely, direct receptor-independent elevation of cAMP via forskolin increased phosphorylation of eNOS but not of Akt. Ucn2 increased intracellular NO concentration ([NO]i), [cGMP], [cAMP], and cell shortening. Inhibition of eNOS suppressed the increases in [NO]i and cell shortening. When both PI3K-Akt and cAMP-PKA signaling were inhibited, the Ucn2-induced increases in [NO]i and cell shortening were attenuated. Thus, in rabbit ventricular myocytes, Ucn2 causes activation of cAMP-PKA, PI3K-Akt, and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling. The MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathway is not required for stimulation of NO signaling in these cells. The other two pathways, cAMP-PKA and PI3K-Akt, converge on eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 and result in pronounced and sustained cellular NO production with subsequent stimulation of cGMP signaling. PMID:25015964

  7. Structure-Activity Relationship of Amino Acid Tunable Lipidated Norspermidine Conjugates: Disrupting Biofilms with Potent Activity against Bacterial Persisters.

    PubMed

    Konai, Mohini M; Adhikary, Utsarga; Samaddar, Sandip; Ghosh, Chandradhish; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-12-16

    The emergence of bacterial resistance and biofilm associated infections has created a challenging situation in global health. In this present state of affairs where conventional antibiotics are falling short of being able to provide a solution to these problems, development of novel antibacterial compounds possessing the twin prowess of antibacterial and antibiofilm efficacy is imperative. Herein, we report a library of amino acid tunable lipidated norspermidine conjugates that were prepared by conjugating both amino acids and fatty acids with the amine functionalities of norspermidine through amide bond formation. These lipidated conjugates displayed potent antibacterial activity against various planktonic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria including drug-resistant superbugs such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, and β-lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. This class of nontoxic and fast-acting antibacterial molecules (capable of killing bacteria within 15 min) did not allow bacteria to develop resistance against them after several passages. Most importantly, an optimized compound in the series was also capable of killing metabolically inactive persisters and stationary phase bacteria. Additionally, this compound was capable of disrupting the preformed biofilms of S. aureus and E. coli. Therefore, this class of antibacterial conjugates have potential in tackling the challenging situation posed by both bacterial resistance as well as drug tolerance due to biofilm formation. PMID:26452096

  8. Grape seed extract enhances eNOS expression and NO production through regulating calcium-mediated AKT phosphorylation in H2O2-treated endothelium.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhe; Wei, Ri-Bao; Hong, Quan; Cui, Shao-Yuan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2010-10-01

    GSE (grape seed extract) has been shown to exhibit protective effects against cardiovascular events and atherosclerosis, although the underlying molecular mechanisms of action are unknown. Herein, we assessed the ability of GSE to enhance eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) expression and NO (nitric oxide) production in H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide)-treated HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells). GSE enhanced eNOS expression and NO release in H2O2-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. GSE inhibited intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) and reduced intracellular calcium in a dose-dependent manner in H2O2-treated cells, as shown by confocal microscopy. ROS was inhibited in cells pretreated with 5.0 microM GSE, 2.0 microM TG (thapsigargin) and 20.0 microM 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) instead of 0.25 microM extracellular calcium. In addition, GSE enhanced eNOS expression and reduced ROS production via increasing p-AKT (AKT phosphorylation) with high extracellular calcium (13 mM). In conclusion, GSE protected against endothelial injury by up-regulation of eNOS and NO expression via inhibiting InsP3Rs (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors)-mediated intracellular excessive calcium release and by activating p-AKT in endothelial cells. PMID:20513234

  9. Severity of Dysfluency Correlates with Basal Ganglia Activity in Persistent Developmental Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giraud, Anne-Lise; Neumann, Katrin; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; von Gudenberg, Alexander W.; Euler, Harald A.; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Preibisch, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that anatomical anomalies [Foundas, A. L., Bollich, A. M., Corey, D. M., Hurley, M., & Heilman, K. M. (2001). "Anomalous anatomy of speech-language areas in adults with persistent developmental stuttering." "Neurology," 57, 207-215; Foundas, A. L., Corey, D. M., Angeles, V., Bollich, A. M., Crabtree-Hartman, E., & Heilman,…

  10. The Persistence of Erroneous Familiarity in an Epileptic Male: Challenging Perceptual Theories of Deja Vu Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Akira R.; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old, temporal lobe epileptic male, MH. Prior to complex partial seizure, experienced up to three times a day, MH often experiences an aura experienced as a persistent sensation of deja vu. Data-driven theories of deja vu formation suggest that partial familiarity for the perceived stimulus is responsible for the…

  11. College Students' Goal Orientations, Situational Motivation and Effort/Persistence in Physical Activity Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Podlog, Leslie W.; Harrison, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships among college students' 2 x 2 goal orientations (mastery-approach [MAp], mastery-avoidance [MAv], performance-approach [PAp], performance-avoidance [PAv]), situational motivation (intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, external regulation and amotivation) and effort/persistence in…

  12. Persistence of Cognitive Constructs Fostered by Hands-On Science Activities in Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra; Gibson, David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine whether the changes that were found to occur pre- to post intervention in students' cognitive structures (Mills, 2013; Knezek, Christensen, Tyler-Wood, & Periathiruvadi, 2013) continued to persist two years later. Major findings were: a) semantic perception of science and STEM as a career became more…

  13. Keeping women active: an examination of the impacts of self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and leadership on women's persistence in physical activity.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Kathleen M; Little, Donna E

    2010-10-01

    Physical inactivity in women is a worldwide problem that has not only been well-documented but has provoked much government concern and policy activity. However, an even more important issue is encouraging women's persistence in physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the links between women's experiences of participation in a government-funded physical activity festival, their intentions to continue participation, and their participation behavior six months after the festival. Results from semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 20 women revealed that enhanced self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and supportive leadership had motivated the women's future intentions to participate. Follow-up surveys showed their levels of interest and participation in physical activity had been maintained. These results enhance our understanding of the relationship between key outcomes of women's physical activity participation and their persistence in physical activity. PMID:21104568

  14. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease in a case of persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mitterer, M; Pescosta, N; Fend, F; Larcher, C; Prang, N; Schwarzmann, F; Coser, P; Huemer, H P

    1995-07-01

    Persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (PPBL) is a rare haematological disorder. It is characterized by activated and morphologically atypical B lymphocytes and polyclonal IgM production and has been associated with female sex, cigarette smoking, and HLA-DR7 expression. We report a case of PPBL with intermitting symptoms compatible with a chronic fatigue syndrome, recurrent erythema nodosum and multiforme. Serological findings suggested a chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Messenger RNA of EBV immediate early gene transactivation BZLF1 was detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes by reverse transcriptase PCR indicating a persistent replication of the virus. Over 2 years of observation we detected varying numbers of atypical lymphocytes. These cells hybridized with a probe specific for the EBV internal repeat region (BamHI W) which indicates a productive infection. Of interest, no reaction was observed with a probe specific for the latency-associated small RNAs (EBERs). The immunological phenotype of the polyclonal B cells was similar to B-cell lines immortalized by EBV in vitro, expressing a number of activation molecules (CD23, CD25, CD54) and the bcl-2 protein. In summary, our findings suggest that persistent EBV replication might be crucial in the development of lymphoproliferative disorders such as PPBL. PMID:7646989

  15. Persistent Hepatitis C Virus Infection Impairs Ribavirin Antiviral Activity through Clathrin-Mediated Trafficking of Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Rajesh; Chandra, Partha K.; Ferraris, Pauline; Kurt, Ramazan; Song, Kyoungsub; Garry, Robert F.; Reiss, Krzysztof; Coe, Imogen R.; Furihata, Tomomi; Balart, Luis A.; Wu, Tong

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ribavirin (RBV) continues to be an important component of interferon-free hepatitis C treatment regimens, as RBV alone does not inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication effectively; the reason for this ineffectiveness has not been established. In this study, we investigated the RBV resistance mechanism using a persistently HCV-infected cell culture system. The antiviral activity of RBV against HCV was progressively impaired in the persistently infected culture, whereas interferon lambda 1 (IFN-λ1), a type III IFN, showed a strong antiviral response and induced viral clearance. We found that HCV replication in persistently infected cultures induces an autophagy response that impairs RBV uptake by preventing the expression of equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1). The Huh-7.5 cell line treated with an autophagy inducer, Torin 1, downregulated membrane expression of ENT1 and terminated RBV uptake. In contrast, the autophagy inhibitors hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), 3-methyladenine (3-MA), and bafilomycin A1 (BafA1) prevented ENT1 degradation and enhanced RBV antiviral activity. The HCV-induced autophagy response, as well as treatment with Torin 1, degrades clathrin heavy chain expression in a hepatoma cell line. Reduced expression of the clathrin heavy chain by HCV prevents ENT1 recycling to the plasma membrane and forces ENT1 to the lysosome for degradation. This study provides a potential mechanism for the impairment of RBV antiviral activity in persistently HCV-infected cell cultures and suggests that inhibition of the HCV-induced autophagy response could be used as a strategy for improving RBV antiviral activity against HCV infection. IMPORTANCE The results from this work will allow a review of the competing theories of antiviral therapy development in the field of HCV virology. Ribavirin (RBV) remains an important component of interferon-free hepatitis C treatment regimens. The reason why RBV alone does not inhibit HCV replication effectively has

  16. Persistent neural activity in auditory cortex is related to auditory working memory in humans and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Matysiak, Artur; Heil, Peter; König, Reinhard; Brosch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Working memory is the cognitive capacity of short-term storage of information for goal-directed behaviors. Where and how this capacity is implemented in the brain are unresolved questions. We show that auditory cortex stores information by persistent changes of neural activity. We separated activity related to working memory from activity related to other mental processes by having humans and monkeys perform different tasks with varying working memory demands on the same sound sequences. Working memory was reflected in the spiking activity of individual neurons in auditory cortex and in the activity of neuronal populations, that is, in local field potentials and magnetic fields. Our results provide direct support for the idea that temporary storage of information recruits the same brain areas that also process the information. Because similar activity was observed in the two species, the cellular bases of some auditory working memory processes in humans can be studied in monkeys. PMID:27438411

  17. Phase Resetting Light Pulses Induce Per1 and Persistent Spike Activity in a Subpopulation of Biological Clock Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlman, Sandra J.; Silver, Rae; Le Sauter, Joseph; Bult-Ito, Abel; McMahon, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    The endogenous circadian clock of the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) can be reset by light to synchronize the biological clock of the brain with the external environment. This process involves induction of immediate-early genes such as the circadian clock gene Period1 (Per1) and results in a stable shift in the timing of behavioral and physiological rhythms on subsequent days. The mechanisms by which gene activation permanently alters the phase of clock neuron activity are unknown. To study the relationship between acute gene activation and persistent changes in the neurophysiology of SCN neurons, we recorded from SCN neurons marked with a dynamic green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter of Per1 gene activity. Phase-resetting light pulses resulted in Per1 induction in a distinct subset of SCN neurons that also exhibited a persistent increase in action potential frequency 3–5 hr after a light pulse. By simultaneously quantifying Per1 gene activation and spike frequency in individual neurons, we found that the degree of Per1 induction was highly correlated with neuronal spike frequency on a cell-by-cell basis. Increased neuronal activity was mediated by membrane potential depolarization as a result of a reduction in outward potassium current. Double-label immunocytochemistry revealed that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing cells, but not arginine vasopressin (AVP)-expressing cells, exhibited significant Per1 induction by light pulses. Rhythmic GFP expression occurred in both VIP and AVP neurons. Our results indicate that the steps that link acute molecular events to permanent changes in clock phase involve persistent suppression of potassium current, downstream of Per1 gene induction, in a specific subset of Per1-expressing neurons enriched for VIP. PMID:12598633

  18. Enolase 1 (ENO1) and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3) regulate Wnt/β-catenin-driven trans-differentiation of murine alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mutze, Kathrin; Vierkotten, Sarah; Milosevic, Jadranka; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alveolar epithelium represents a major site of tissue destruction during lung injury. It consists of alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells. ATII cells are capable of self-renewal and exert progenitor function for ATI cells upon alveolar epithelial injury. Cell differentiation pathways enabling this plasticity and allowing for proper repair, however, are poorly understood. Here, we applied proteomics, expression analysis and functional studies in primary murine ATII cells to identify proteins and molecular mechanisms involved in alveolar epithelial plasticity. Mass spectrometry of cultured ATII cells revealed a reduction of carbonyl reductase 2 (CBR2) and an increase in enolase 1 (ENO1) and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3) protein expression during ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation. This was accompanied by increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Notably, ENO1 and PDIA3, along with T1α (podoplanin; an ATI cell marker), exhibited decreased protein expression upon pharmacological and molecular Wnt/β-catenin inhibition in cultured ATII cells, whereas CBR2 levels were stabilized. Moreover, we analyzed primary ATII cells from mice with bleomycin-induced lung injury, a model exhibiting activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vivo. We observed reduced CBR2 significantly correlating with surfactant protein C (SFTPC), whereas ENO1 and PDIA3 along with T1α were increased in injured ATII cells. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENO1, as well as PDIA3, in primary ATII cells led to reduced T1α expression, indicating diminished cell trans-differentiation. Our data thus identified proteins involved in ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation and suggest a Wnt/β-catenin-driven functional role of ENO1 and PDIA3 in alveolar epithelial cell plasticity in lung injury and repair. PMID:26035385

  19. Heme changes HIF-α, eNOS and nitrite production in HUVECs after simvastatin, HU, and ascorbic acid therapies.

    PubMed

    da Guarda, Caroline C; Santiago, Rayra P; Pitanga, Thassila N; Santana, Sanzio S; Zanette, Dalila L; Borges, Valéria M; Goncalves, Marilda S

    2016-07-01

    The sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hemolytic genetic anemia characterized by free heme and hemoglobin release into intravascular spaces, with endothelial activation. Heme is a proinflammatory molecule able to directly activate vascular endothelium, thus, endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease are major chronic events described in SCD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nitrite and hypoxia inducible factor alpha (HIF-α) in HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) activated by heme in response to simvastatin, hydroxyurea (HU), and ascorbic acid therapies. eNOS and HIF-α production were evaluated by ELISA and nitrite was measured by the Griess technique. The production of HIF-α increased when the cells were stimulated by heme (p<0.01), while treatment with HU and simvastatin reduced the production (p<0.01), and treatment with ascorbic acid increased HIF-1a production by the cells (p<0.01). Heme increased eNOS production, (p<0.01) but showed a heterogeneous pattern, and the lowest concentrations of all the treatments reduced the enzyme production (p<0.01). The nitrite production by HUVECs was enhanced by stimulation with heme (p<0.001) and was reduced by treatment with HU (p<0.001), ascorbic acid (p<0.001) and simvastatin (p<0.01). In summary, our results suggest that the hemolytic vascular microenvironment in SCD requires different therapeutic approaches to promote clinical improvement, and that a combination of therapies may be a viable strategy for treating patients. PMID:27089822

  20. Effect of long-term piceatannol treatment on eNOS levels in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yosuke; Kawakami, Shinpei; Yanae, Koji; Sano, Shoko; Uchida, Hiroko; Inagaki, Hiroyuki; Ito, Tatsuhiko

    2013-01-18

    Piceatannol (3, 3', 4, 5'-tetrahydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a naturally occurring phytochemical found in passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) seeds. Previously, we demonstrated that piceatannol has acute vasorelaxant effects in rat thoracic aorta. It was suggested that endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) might be involved in piceatannol-induced acute vasorelaxation. Here, we investigated the expression of eNOS in EA.hy926 human umbilical vein cells after long-term treatment with piceatannol, and compared this effect with that of resveratrol, an analog of piceatannol. Long-term treatment with piceatannol up-regulated eNOS mRNA expression and increased eNOS protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, piceatannol increased the levels of phosphorylated eNOS. Treatment with resveratrol also increased eNOS expression, but to a lesser degree than piceatannol. These findings indicate that piceatannol may improve vascular function by up-regulating eNOS expression. PMID:23246837

  1. On the application of ENO scheme with subcell resolution to conservation laws with stiff source terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Shih-Hung

    1991-01-01

    Two approaches are used to extend the essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes to treat conservation laws with stiff source terms. One approach is the application of the Strang time-splitting method. Here the basic ENO scheme and the Harten modification using subcell resolution (SR), ENO/SR scheme, are extended this way. The other approach is a direct method and a modification of the ENO/SR. Here the technique of ENO reconstruction with subcell resolution is used to locate the discontinuity within a cell and the time evolution is then accomplished by solving the differential equation along characteristics locally and advancing in the characteristic direction. This scheme is denoted ENO/SRCD (subcell resolution - characteristic direction). All the schemes are tested on the equation of LeVeque and Yee (NASA-TM-100075, 1988) modeling reacting flow problems. Numerical results show that these schemes handle this intriguing model problem very well, especially with ENO/SRCD which produces perfect resolution at the discontinuity.

  2. Estimating the persistence of organic contaminants in indirect potable reuse systems using quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR).

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung Joo; Fox, Peter

    2012-09-01

    Predictions from the quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model EPI Suite were modified to estimate the persistence of organic contaminants in indirect potable reuse systems. The modified prediction included the effects of sorption, biodegradation, and oxidation that may occur during sub-surface transport. A retardation factor was used to simulate the mobility of adsorbed compounds during sub-surface transport to a recovery well. A set of compounds with measured persistent properties during sub-surface transport was used to validate the results of the modifications to the predictions of EPI Suite. A comparison of the predicted values and measured values was done and the residual sum of the squares showed the importance of including oxidation and sorption. Sorption was the most important factor to include in predicting the fates of organic chemicals in the sub-surface environment. PMID:22766422

  3. Increased IFNα activity and differential antibody response in patients with a history of Lyme disease and persistent cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Jacek, Elzbieta; Fallon, Brian A; Chandra, Abhishek; Crow, Mary K; Wormser, Gary P; Alaedini, Armin

    2013-02-15

    Following antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease, some patients report persistent or relapsing symptoms of pain, fatigue, and/or cognitive deficits. Factors other than active infection, including immune abnormalities, have been suggested, but few clues regarding mechanism have emerged. Furthermore, the effect of antibiotic treatment on immune response in affected individuals remains unknown. In this study, a longitudinal analysis of specific immune markers of interest was carried out in patients with a history of Lyme disease and persistent objective memory impairment, prior to and following treatment with either ceftriaxone or placebo. IFNα activity was measured by detection of serum-induced changes in specific target genes, using a functional cell-based assay and quantitative real-time PCR. Level and pattern of antibody reactivity to brain antigens and to Borrelia burgdorferi proteins were analyzed by ELISA and immunoblotting. Sera from the patient cohort induced significantly higher expression of IFIT1 and IFI44 target genes than those from healthy controls, indicating increased IFNα activity. Antibody reactivity to specific brain and borrelial proteins was significantly elevated in affected patients. IFNα activity and antibody profile did not change significantly in response to ceftriaxone. The heightened antibody response implies enhanced immune stimulation, possibly due to prolonged exposure to the organism prior to the initial diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease. The increase in IFNα activity is suggestive of a mechanism contributing to the ongoing neuropsychiatric symptoms. PMID:23141748

  4. The Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid Increases Metabolic Activity and Reverts Persister Cells to an Antimicrobial-Susceptible State

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Aleksey; Planzos, Penny; Zelaya, Hector M.

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells, which are tolerant to antimicrobials, contribute to biofilm recalcitrance to therapeutic agents. In turn, the ability to kill persister cells is believed to significantly improve efforts in eradicating biofilm-related, chronic infections. While much research has focused on elucidating the mechanism(s) by which persister cells form, little is known about the mechanism or factors that enable persister cells to revert to an active and susceptible state. Here, we demonstrate that cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA), a fatty acid signaling molecule, is able to change the status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli persister cells from a dormant to a metabolically active state without an increase in cell number. This cell awakening is supported by an increase of the persister cells' respiratory activity together with changes in protein abundance and increases of the transcript expression levels of several metabolic markers, including acpP, 16S rRNA, atpH, and ppx. Given that most antimicrobials target actively growing cells, we also explored the effect of cis-DA on enhancing antibiotic efficacy in killing persister cells due to their inability to keep a persister cell state. Compared to antimicrobial treatment alone, combinational treatments of persister cell subpopulations with antimicrobials and cis-DA resulted in a significantly greater decrease in cell viability. In addition, the presence of cis-DA led to a decrease in the number of persister cells isolated. We thus demonstrate the ability of a fatty acid signaling molecule to revert bacterial cells from a tolerant phenotype to a metabolically active, antimicrobial-sensitive state. PMID:25192989

  5. Enhancement of photoluminescence, persistent luminescence and photocatalytic activity in ZnGa2O4 phosphors by lithium ion doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Darong; Wang, Yinhai; Xu, Ke; Li, Lei; Hu, Zhengfa; Zhao, Hui

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structure, photoluminescence, persistent luminescence and photocatalytic properties of Li0.15Zn0.85Ga2O4 phosphors were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that Li-doped ZnGa2O4 had a spinel phase. The result of Raman spectra showed that the first order Raman active modes in spinel ZnGa2O4 were only attributed to Zn2+ ions in the tetrahedral sites. The Li+ ion doping into ZnGa2O4 led to enhancement of the emission intensity, and improved the persistent luminescence properties. When Li+ ion was incorporated into the ZnGa2O4 lattice, the new cation vacancy formed for the charge compensation and the cation vacancy would capture some of the excited electrons and acted as electron trap. Moreover, photocatalytic activity test shown that Li-doped ZnGa2O4 phosphor exhibited higher catalytic activities than the pure ZnGa2O4 for the degradation of Rhodamine B by the ultraviolet irradiation. It indicated that Li-doped ZnGa2O4 owned more traps to storage the photoinduced carriers, which decreased the combination of electrons and holes, resulting a higher catalytic activity.

  6. Persistent Long-Term Facilitation at an Identified Synapse Becomes Labile with Activation of Short-Term Heterosynaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Schacher, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity are cellular correlates of learning and memory of different durations. Little is known, however, how these two forms of plasticity interact at the same synaptic connection. We examined the reciprocal impact of short-term heterosynaptic or homosynaptic plasticity at sensorimotor synapses of Aplysia in cell culture when expressing persistent long-term facilitation (P-LTF) evoked by serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)]. Short-term heterosynaptic plasticity induced by 5-HT (facilitation) or the neuropeptide FMRFa (depression) and short-term homosynaptic plasticity induced by tetanus [post-tetanic potentiation (PTP)] or low-frequency stimulation [homosynaptic depression (HSD)] of the sensory neuron were expressed in both control synapses and synapses expressing P-LTF in the absence or presence of protein synthesis inhibitors. All forms of short-term plasticity failed to significantly affect ongoing P-LTF in the absence of protein synthesis inhibitors. However, P-LTF reversed to control levels when either 5-HT or FMRFa was applied in the presence of rapamycin. In contrast, P-LTF was unaffected when either PTP or HSD was evoked in the presence of either rapamycin or anisomycin. These results indicate that synapses expressing persistent plasticity acquire a “new” baseline and functionally express short-term changes as naive synapses, but the new baseline becomes labile following selective activations—heterosynaptic stimuli that evoke opposite forms of plasticity—such that when presented in the presence of protein synthesis inhibitors produce a rapid reversal of the persistent plasticity. Activity-selective induction of a labile state at synapses expressing persistent plasticity may facilitate the development of therapies for reversing inappropriate memories. PMID:24695698

  7. Stochastic induction of persister cells by HipA through (p)ppGpp-mediated activation of mRNA endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Elsa; Roghanian, Mohammad; Gerdes, Kenn; Maisonneuve, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    The model organism Escherichia coli codes for at least 11 type II toxin–antitoxin (TA) modules, all implicated in bacterial persistence (multidrug tolerance). Ten of these encode messenger RNA endonucleases (mRNases) inhibiting translation by catalytic degradation of mRNA, and the 11th module, hipBA, encodes HipA (high persister protein A) kinase, which inhibits glutamyl tRNA synthetase (GltX). In turn, inhibition of GltX inhibits translation and induces the stringent response and persistence. Previously, we presented strong support for a model proposing (p)ppGpp (guanosine tetra and penta-phosphate) as the master regulator of persistence. Stochastic variation of [(p)ppGpp] in single cells induced TA-encoded mRNases via a pathway involving polyphosphate and Lon protease. Polyphosphate activated Lon to degrade all known type II antitoxins of E. coli. In turn, the activated mRNases induced persistence and multidrug tolerance. However, even though it was known that activation of HipA stimulated (p)ppGpp synthesis, our model did not explain how hipBA induced persistence. Here we show that, in support of and consistent with our initial model, HipA-induced persistence depends not only on (p)ppGpp but also on the 10 mRNase-encoding TA modules, Lon protease, and polyphosphate. Importantly, observations with single cells convincingly show that the high level of (p)ppGpp caused by activation of HipA does not induce persistence in the absence of TA-encoded mRNases. Thus, slow growth per se does not induce persistence in the absence of TA-encoded toxins, placing these genes as central effectors of bacterial persistence. PMID:25848049

  8. Persistent STAT3 Activation in Colon Cancer Is Associated with Enhanced Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Corvinus, Florian M; Orth, Carina; Moriggl, Richard; Tsareva, Svetlana A; Wagner, Stefan; Pfitzner, Edith B; Baus, Daniela; Kaufmann, Roland; Huberb, Lukas A; Zatloukal, Kurt; Beug, Hartmut; Öhlschläger, Peter; Schütz, Alexander; Halbhuber, Karl-Jürgen; Friedrich, Karlheinz

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries. It has so far been molecularly defined mainly by alterations of the Wnt pathway. We show here for the first time that aberrant activities of the signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT3 actively contribute to this malignancy and, thus, are a potential therapeutic target for CRC. Constitutive STAT3 activity was found to be abundant in dedifferentiated cancer cells and infiltrating lymphocytes of CRC samples, but not in non-neoplastic colon epithelium. Cell lines derived from malignant colorectal tumors lost persistent STAT3 activity in culture. However, implantation of colon carcinoma cells into nude mice resulted in restoration of STAT3 activity, suggesting a role of an extracellular stimulus within the tumor microenvironment as a trigger for STAT activation. STAT3 activity in CRC cells triggered through interleukin-6 or through a constitutively active STAT3 mutant promoted cancer cell multiplication, whereas STAT3 inhibition through a dominant-negative variant impaired IL-6-driven proliferation. Blockade of STAT3 activation in CRC-derived xenograft tumors slowed down their development, arguing for a contribution of STAT3 to colorectal tumor growth. PMID:16036105

  9. The Contribution of Enos Nuttall to the Development of Education in Jamaica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Beryl M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes Enos Nuttall's contribution to educational thought and practice in Jamaica. His beliefs on education for all (but differentiated according to individual needs and capabilities) are discussed, as well as his influence on educational reform and curriculum development. (SK)

  10. Geochemical heterogeneities and dynamics of magmas inside the plumbing system of a persistently active volcano: evidences from Stromboli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompilio, Massimo; Bertagnini, Antonella; Métrich, Nicole; Belhadj, Oulfa

    2010-05-01

    Shallow processes such as degassing, crystallization and magma drain-back commonly operate in the upper parts of the plumbing systems of open-conduit basaltic volcanoes, often hindering the identification of potentially important geochemical changes in the volcano systems. Stromboli, known for its long-lived persistent activity over the last 18 centuries, is a suitable subject of study for addressing this issue, since basaltic magmas presently erupting at in this volcano record both deep and shallow processes. We report petrological and geochemical data on magmas erupted by Stromboli since the beginning of the persistent activity, in order to find a correlation between magma composition and the dynamics of magma in the plumbing system. Geochemical data on deep-derived magmas erupted as pumice during paroxysmal eruptions allowed us to identify two distinct parental melts (1944- and 2003-Type). These magmas, in which geochemical differences are linked to source processes rather than crystal fractionation, have alternately fed the deep reservoir in the last two millennia several times. The chemical heterogeneities recorded in lava flows and the products of Strombolian activity testify to the extent of homogenization after magma recharges at shallow depths. Persistent heterogeneities in the shallow plumbing system have important implications for magma residence times calculated on the basis of time-series analysis. These models are based on the assumptions that the reservoir is well stirred and chemically homogeneous and that the time for the re-homogenization after recharge (or mixing) is shorter than the residence time. We argue that these models do not apply to present-day activity at Stromboli and may not apply to other open-conduit, persistently degassing basaltic volcanoes. Thus compositional variations within the shallow magma bodies provide only a biased signal of ongoing changes within the plumbing system. We conclude that source changes responsible for

  11. Antifungal Activity of the Pradimicin Derivative BMS 181184 in the Treatment of Experimental Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Persistently Neutropenic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Corina E.; Groll, Andreas H.; Giri, Neelam; Shetty, Daiva; Al-Mohsen, Ibrahim; Sein, Tin; Feuerstein, Erwin; Bacher, John; Piscitelli, Stephen; Walsh, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    The activity of the pradimicin derivative BMS 181184 was evaluated in a model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in persistently neutropenic rabbits and compared with that of amphotericin B deoxycholate. BMS 181184 at total daily doses of 50 and 150 mg/kg of body weight was at least as effective as amphotericin B at 1 mg/kg once a day in conferring survival and had comparable activity in reducing organism-mediated tissue injury and excess lung weight. Although treatment at all dosing regimens of BMS 181184 resulted in significant reductions in fungal tissue burden compared to untreated controls, equivalence to amphotericin B occurred only at the higher dosage level. Similar observations were made in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cultures obtained postmortem. Monitoring of the animals through ultrafast computerized tomography scan revealed a marked resolution of pulmonary lesions during treatment with BMS 181184. The compound was well tolerated at all dosing regimens, and no toxicity was noted. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed nonlinear drug disposition with increased clearance at higher dosages and some evidence for extravascular drug accumulation. BMS 181184 had excellent activity in the treatment of experimental invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in persistently neutropenic rabbits, thus underscoring the potential of pradimicin derivatives in therapy of invasive aspergillosis in the neutropenic host. PMID:9736570

  12. The combinatorial activation of the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways is sufficient for aggressive tumor formation, while individual pathway activation supports cell persistence

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Keyata N.; Whipple, Rebecca A.; Yoon, Jennifer R.; Lipsky, Michael; Charpentier, Monica S.; Boggs, Amanda E.; Chakrabarti, Kristi R.; Bhandary, Lekhana; Hessler, Lindsay K.; Martin, Stuart S.; Vitolo, Michele I.

    2015-01-01

    A high proportion of human tumors maintain activation of both the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways. In basal-like breast cancer (BBC), PTEN expression is decreased/lost in over 50% of cases, leading to aberrant activation of the PI3K pathway. Additionally, BBC cell lines and tumor models have been shown to exhibit an oncogenic Ras-like gene transcriptional signature, indicating activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway. To directly test how the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways contribute to tumorigenesis, we deleted PTEN and activated KRas within non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast cells. Neither individual mutation was sufficient to promote tumorigenesis, but the combination promoted robust tumor growth in mice. However, in vivo bioluminescence reveals that each mutation has the ability to promote a persistent phenotype. Inherent in the concept of tumor cell dormancy, a stage in which residual disease is present but remains asymptomatic, viable cells with each individual mutation can persist in vivo during a period of latency. The persistent cells were excised from the mice and showed increased levels of the cell cycle arrest proteins p21 and p27 compared to the aggressively growing PTEN−/−KRAS(G12V) cells. Additionally, when these persistent cells were placed into growth-promoting conditions, they were able to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate. These results highlight the potential for either PTEN loss or KRAS activation to promote cell survival in vivo, and the unique ability of the combined mutations to yield rapid tumor growth. This could have important implications in determining recurrence risk and disease progression in tumor subtypes where these mutations are common. PMID:26497685

  13. Increasing physical activity, but persisting social gaps among middle-aged people: trends in Northern Sweden from 1990 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Nawi; Söderman, Kerstin; Norberg, Margareta; Öhman, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical activity is identified as one important protective factor for chronic diseases. Physical activity surveillance is important in assessing healthy population behaviour over time. Many countries lack population trends on physical activity. Objective To present trends in physical activity levels in Västerbotten County, Sweden and to evaluate physical activity among women and men with various educational levels. Methods opulation-based cross-sectional and panel data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) during 1990–2007 were used. All individuals in Västerbotten County who turned 40, 50, or 60 years old were invited to their local primary health care for a health screening. Physical activity during commuting, recreational activities, physical exercise, and socio-demographic data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Respondents were categorised as sedentary, moderate physically active, or physically active. Results The prevalences of physically active behaviours increased from 16 to 24.2% among men and from 12.6 to 30.4% among women. Increases are observed in all educational groups, but gaps between educational groups widened recently. The level of sedentary behaviour was stable over the time period studied. The 10-year follow-up data show that the prevalences of physically active behaviours increased from 15.8 to 21.4% among men and 12.7 to 23.3% among women. However, 10.2% of men and 3.8% of women remained sedentary. Conclusion Despite the promising evidence of increasing physical activity levels among the population in Västerbotten County, challenges remain for how to reduce the stable levels of sedentary behaviours in some subgroups. Persisting social gaps in physical activity levels should be addressed further. An exploration of people's views on engaging in physical activity and barriers to doing so will allow better formulation of targeted interventions within this population. PMID:21799669

  14. Sildenafil Ameliorates Gentamicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats: Role of iNOS and eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Morsy, Mohamed A.; Ibrahim, Salwa A.; Amin, Entesar F.; Kamel, Maha Y.; Rifaai, Rehab A.; Hassan, Magdy K.

    2014-01-01

    Gentamicin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, is used for the treatment of serious Gram-negative infections. However, its usefulness is limited by its nephrotoxicity. Sildenafil, a selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, was reported to prevent or decrease tissue injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential protective effects of sildenafil on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with gentamicin (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 6 days with and without sildenafil. Sildenafil administration resulted in nephroprotective effect in gentamicin-intoxicated rats as it significantly decreased serum creatinine and urea, urinary albumin, and renal malondialdehyde and nitrite/nitrate levels, with a concomitant increase in renal catalase and superoxide dismutase activities compared to gentamicin-treated rats. Moreover, immunohistochemical examination revealed that sildenafil treatment markedly reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, while expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was markedly enhanced. The protective effects of sildenafil were verified histopathologically. In conclusion, sildenafil protects rats against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity possibly, in part, through its antioxidant activity, inhibition of iNOS expression, and induction of eNOS production. PMID:25120567

  15. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasome Active Site Threonine Is Essential for Persistence Yet Dispensable for Replication and Resistance to Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Gandotra, Sheetal; Lebron, Maria B.; Ehrt, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Previous work revealed that conditional depletion of the core proteasome subunits PrcB and PrcA impaired growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro and in mouse lungs, caused hypersusceptibility to nitric oxide (NO) and impaired persistence of the bacilli during chronic mouse infections. Here, we show that genetic deletion of prcBA led to similar phenotypes. Surprisingly, however, an active site mutant proteasome complemented the in vitro and in vivo growth defects of the prcBA knockout (ΔprcBA) as well as its NO hypersensitivity. In contrast, long-term survival of M. tuberculosis in stationary phase and during starvation in vitro and in the chronic phase of mouse infection required a proteolytically active proteasome. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase did not rescue survival of ΔprcBA, revealing a function beyond NO defense, by which the proteasome contributes to M. tuberculosis fitness during chronic mouse infections. These findings suggest that proteasomal proteolysis facilitates mycobacterial persistence, that M. tuberculosis faces starvation during chronic mouse infections and that the proteasome serves a proteolysis-independent function. PMID:20711362

  16. Interstitial chromatin alteration causes persistent p53 activation involved in the radiation-induced senescence-like growth arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Keiji; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami . E-mail: nabe@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    Various stresses including ionizing radiation give normal human fibroblasts a phenotype of senescence-like growth arrest (SLGA), manifested by p53-dependent irreversible G1 arrest. To determine the mechanism of persistent activation of p53, we examined phosphorylated Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and phosphorylated histone H2AX foci formation after X-irradiation. Although the multiple tiny foci, detected soon after (<30 min) irradiation, gradually disappeared, some of these foci changed to large foci and persisted for 5 days. Large foci containing phosphorylated ATM and {gamma}-H2AX co-localized and foci with p53 phosphorylated at serine 15 also showed the same distribution. Interestingly, the signals obtained by telomere fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay did not co-localize with 90% of the large foci. Our results indicate that chromatin alteration in interstitial chromosomal regions is the most likely cause of continuous activation of p53, which results in the induction of SLGA by ionizing radiation.

  17. Interstitial chromatin alteration causes persistent p53 activation involved in the radiation-induced senescence-like growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Keiji; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-02-01

    Various stresses including ionizing radiation give normal human fibroblasts a phenotype of senescence-like growth arrest (SLGA), manifested by p53-dependent irreversible G1 arrest. To determine the mechanism of persistent activation of p53, we examined phosphorylated Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and phosphorylated histone H2AX foci formation after X-irradiation. Although the multiple tiny foci, detected soon after (<30 min) irradiation, gradually disappeared, some of these foci changed to large foci and persisted for 5 days. Large foci containing phosphorylated ATM and gamma-H2AX co-localized and foci with p53 phosphorylated at serine 15 also showed the same distribution. Interestingly, the signals obtained by telomere fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay did not co-localize with 90% of the large foci. Our results indicate that chromatin alteration in interstitial chromosomal regions is the most likely cause of continuous activation of p53, which results in the induction of SLGA by ionizing radiation. PMID:16360120

  18. Fifth Grade Students' Experiences Participating in Active Gaming in Physical Education: The Persistence to Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Lisa; Sanders, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Although video games are often associated with sedentary behaviors, active gaming is a new genre that requires children to become physically active while playing the games. In this study six fifth grade students' experiences participating in active gaming in eight-week physical education classes were explored. Qualitative methods of interviews,…

  19. Tonic Nanomolar Dopamine Enables an Activity-Dependent Phase Recovery Mechanism That Persistently Alters the Maximal Conductance of the Hyperpolarization-Activated Current in a Rhythmically Active Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Edmund W.; Fu, Jing Jing; Krenz, Wulf-Dieter C.

    2011-01-01

    The phases at which network neurons fire in rhythmic motor outputs are critically important for the proper generation of motor behaviors. The pyloric network in the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion generates a rhythmic motor output wherein neuronal phase relationships are remarkably invariant across individuals and throughout lifetimes. The mechanisms for maintaining these robust phase relationships over the long-term are not well described. Here we show that tonic nanomolar dopamine (DA) acts at type 1 DA receptors (D1Rs) to enable an activity-dependent mechanism that can contribute to phase maintenance in the lateral pyloric (LP) neuron. The LP displays continuous rhythmic bursting. The activity-dependent mechanism was triggered by a prolonged decrease in LP burst duration, and it generated a persistent increase in the maximal conductance (Gmax) of the LP hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih), but only in the presence of steady-state DA. Interestingly, micromolar DA produces an LP phase advance accompanied by a decrease in LP burst duration that abolishes normal LP network function. During a 1 h application of micromolar DA, LP phase recovered over tens of minutes because, the activity-dependent mechanism enabled by steady-state DA was triggered by the micromolar DA-induced decrease in LP burst duration. Presumably, this mechanism restored normal LP network function. These data suggest steady-state DA may enable homeostatic mechanisms that maintain motor network output during protracted neuromodulation. This DA-enabled, activity-dependent mechanism to preserve phase may be broadly relevant, as diminished dopaminergic tone has recently been shown to reduce Ih in rhythmically active neurons in the mammalian brain. PMID:22072689

  20. Positron emission tomography detects tissue metabolic activity in myocardial segments with persistent thallium perfusion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brunken, R.; Schwaiger, M.; Grover-McKay, M.; Phelps, M.E.; Tillisch, J.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1987-09-01

    Positron emission tomography with /sup 13/N-ammonia and /sup 18/F-2-deoxyglucose was used to assess myocardial perfusion and glucose utilization in 51 myocardial segments with a stress thallium defect in 12 patients. Myocardial infarction was defined by a concordant reduction in segmental perfusion and glucose utilization, and myocardial ischemia was identified by preservation of glucose utilization in segments with rest hypoperfusion. Of the 51 segments studied, 36 had a fixed thallium defect, 11 had a partially reversible defect and 4 had a completely reversible defect. Only 15 (42%) of the 36 segments with a fixed defect and 4 (36%) of the 11 segments with a partially reversible defect exhibited myocardial infarction on study with positron tomography. In contrast, residual myocardial glucose utilization was identified in the majority of segments with a fixed (58%) or a partially reversible (64%) thallium defect. All of the segments with a completely reversible defect appeared normal on positron tomography. Apparent improvement in the thallium defect on delayed images did not distinguish segments with ischemia from infarction. Thus, positron emission tomography reveals evidence of persistent tissue metabolism in the majority of segments with a fixed or partially resolving stress thallium defect, implying that markers of perfusion alone may underestimate the extent of viable tissue in hypoperfused myocardial segments.

  1. Intensive instruction affects brain magnetic activity associated with oral word reading in children with persistent reading disabilities.

    PubMed

    Simos, Panagiotis G; Fletcher, Jack M; Sarkari, Shirin; Billingsley-Marshall, Rebecca; Denton, Carolyn A; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen children ages 7 to 9 years who had persistent reading difficulties despite adequate instruction were provided with intensive tutorial interventions. The interventions targeted deficient phonological processing and decoding skills for 8 weeks (2 hours per day) followed by an 8-week, 1-hour-per-day intervention that focused on the development of reading fluency skills. Spatiotemporal brain activation profiles were obtained at baseline and after each 8-week intervention program using magnetoencephalography during the performance of an oral sight-word reading task. Changes in brain activity were found in the posterior part of the middle temporal gyrus (Brodmann's Area [BA] 21: increased degree of activity and reduced onset latency), the lateral occipitotemporal region (BA 19/37: decreased onset latency of activation), and the premotor cortex (increased onset latency). Overall changes associated with the intervention were primarily normalizing, as indicated by (a) increased activity in a region that is typically involved in lexical--semantic processing (BA 21) and (b) a shift in the relative timing of regional activity in temporal and frontal cortices to a pattern typically seen in unimpaired readers. These findings extend previous results in demonstrating significant changes in the spatiotemporal profile of activation associated with word reading in response to reading remediation. PMID:17274546

  2. Protein kinase Cδ regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression via Akt activation and nitric oxide generation

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wedgwood, Stephen; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explore the roles of the delta isoform of PKC (PKCδ) in the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells isolated from fetal lambs (FPAECs). Pharmacological inhibition of PKCδ with either rottlerin or with the peptide, δV1-1, acutely attenuated NO production, and this was associated with a decrease in phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 (S1177). The chronic effects of PKCδ inhibition using either rottlerin or the overexpression of a dominant negative PKCδ mutant included the downregulation of eNOS gene expression that was manifested by a decrease in both eNOS promoter activity and protein expression after 24 h of treatment. We also found that PKCδ inhibition blunted Akt activation as observed by a reduction in phosphorylated Akt at position Ser473. Thus, we conclude that PKCδ is actively involved in the activation of Akt. To determine the effect of Akt on eNOS signaling, we overexpressed a dominant negative mutant of Akt and determined its effect of NO generation, eNOS expression, and phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177. Our results demonstrated that Akt inhibition was associated with decreased NO production that correlated with reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at S1177, and decreased eNOS promoter activity. We next evaluated the effect of endogenously produced NO on eNOS expression by incubating FPAECs with the eNOS inhibitor 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea (ETU). ETU significantly inhibited NO production, eNOS promoter activity, and eNOS protein levels. Together, our data indicate involvement of PKCδ-mediated Akt activation and NO generation in maintaining eNOS expression. PMID:18192589

  3. Increased fermentation activity and persistent methanogenesis in a model aquifer system following source removal of an ethanol blend release.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Rixey, William G; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-01-01

    The increased probability of groundwater contamination by ethanol-blended fuel calls for improved understanding of how remediation efforts affect the fate and transport of constituents of concern, including the generation and fate of fermentation byproducts. A pilot-scale (8 m³) model aquifer was used to investigate changes in the concentrations of ethanol and its metabolites (methane and volatile fatty acids) after removal of the contamination source. Following the shut-off of a continuous release of a dissolved ethanol blend (10% v:v ethanol, 50 mg/L benzene, and 50 mg/L toluene), fermentation activity was surprisingly stimulated and the concentrations of ethanol metabolites increased. A microcosm experiment showed that this result was due to a decrease in the dissolved ethanol concentration below its toxicity threshold (∼2000 mg/L for this system). Methane generation (>1.5 mg/L of dissolved methane) persisted for more than 100 days after the disappearance of ethanol, despite clean air-saturated water flowing continuously through the tank at a relative high seepage velocity (0.76 m/day). Quantitative real-time PCR showed that functional genes associated with methane metabolism (mcrA for methanogenesis and pmoA for methanotrophy) also persisted in the aquifer material. Persistent methanogenesis was apparently due to the anaerobic degradation of soil-bound organic carbon (e.g., biomass grown on ethanol and other substrates). Overall, this study reflects the complex plume dynamics following source removal, and suggests that monitoring for increases in the concentration of ethanol metabolites that impact groundwater quality should be considered. PMID:25462754

  4. Activation of cannabinoid receptors by the pentacyclic triterpene α,β-amyrin inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic persistent pain in mice.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Kathryn A B Simão; Paszcuk, Ana F; Passos, Giselle F; Silva, Eduardo S; Bento, Allisson Freire; Meotti, Flavia C; Calixto, João B

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we report that α,β-amyrin, a plant-derived pentacyclic triterpene, reduced persistent inflammatory and neuropathic hyperalgesia in mice by a direct activation of the CB(1) and CB(2) cannabinoid receptors (CB(1)R and CB(2)R). The oral treatment with α,β-amyrin (30 mg/kg) significantly reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). The pretreatment with either CB(1)R or CB(2)R antagonists and the knockdown gene of the receptors significantly reverted the antinociceptive effect of α,β-amyrin. Of note, binding studies showed that α,β-amyrin directly bound with very high affinity to CB(1)R (K(i)=0.133 nM) and with a lower affinity to CB(2)R (K(i)=1989 nM). Interestingly, α,β-amyrin, ACEA (CB(1)R agonist), or JWH-133 (CB(2)R agonist), at doses that caused antinociception, failed to provoke any behavioral disturbance, as measured in the tetrad assay. In addition, α,β-amyrin largely decreased interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels, and myeloperoxidase activity. Likewise, α,β-amyrin prevented the activation of the transcriptional factors: nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding (CREB) and the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 in mice footpads and spinal cords. The present results demonstrated that α,β-amyrin exhibits long-lasting antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties in 2 models of persistent nociception via activation of cannabinoid receptors and by inhibiting the production of cytokines and expression of NF-κB, CREB and cyclooxygenase 2. PMID:21620566

  5. Persistent neural activity in auditory cortex is related to auditory working memory in humans and nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Matysiak, Artur; Heil, Peter; König, Reinhard; Brosch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Working memory is the cognitive capacity of short-term storage of information for goal-directed behaviors. Where and how this capacity is implemented in the brain are unresolved questions. We show that auditory cortex stores information by persistent changes of neural activity. We separated activity related to working memory from activity related to other mental processes by having humans and monkeys perform different tasks with varying working memory demands on the same sound sequences. Working memory was reflected in the spiking activity of individual neurons in auditory cortex and in the activity of neuronal populations, that is, in local field potentials and magnetic fields. Our results provide direct support for the idea that temporary storage of information recruits the same brain areas that also process the information. Because similar activity was observed in the two species, the cellular bases of some auditory working memory processes in humans can be studied in monkeys. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15441.001 PMID:27438411

  6. Persistent adaptation by chronic alcohol is facilitated by neuroimmune activation linked to stress and CRF.

    PubMed

    Breese, George R; Knapp, Darin J

    2016-05-01

    This review updates the conceptual basis for the association of alcohol abuse with an insidious adaptation that facilitates negative affect during withdrawal from chronic intermittent alcohol (CIA) exposure - a change that later supports sensitization of stress-induced anxiety following alcohol abstinence. The finding that a CRF1-receptor antagonist (CRF1RA) minimized CIA withdrawal-induced negative affect supported an association of alcohol withdrawal with a stress mechanism. The finding that repeated stresses or multiple CRF injections into selected brain sites prior to a single 5-day chronic alcohol (CA) exposure induced anxiety during withdrawal provided critical support for a linkage of CIA withdrawal with stress. The determination that CRF1RA injection into positive CRF-sensitive brain sites prevented CIA withdrawal-induced anxiety provided support that neural path integration maintains the persistent CIA adaptation. Based upon reports that stress increases neuroimmune function, an effort was undertaken to test whether cytokines would support the adaptation induced by stress/CA exposure. Twenty-four hours after withdrawal from CIA, cytokine mRNAs were found to be increased in cortex as well as other sites in brain. Further, repeated cytokine injections into previously identified brain sites substituted for stress and CRF induction of anxiety during CA withdrawal. Discovery that a CRF1RA prevented the brain cytokine mRNA increase induced by CA withdrawal provided critical evidence for CRF involvement in this neuroimmune induction after CA withdrawal. However, the CRF1RA did not block the stress increase in cytokine mRNA increases in controls. The latter data supported the hypothesis that distinct mechanisms linked to stress and CA withdrawal can support common neuroimmune functions within a brain site. As evidence evolves concerning neural involvement in brain neuroimmune function, a better understanding of the progressive adaptation associated with CIA

  7. Fusion Competent Synaptic Vesicles Persist upon Active Zone Disruption and Loss of Vesicle Docking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan Shan H; Held, Richard G; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-08-17

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near-complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane. PMID:27537483

  8. Upregulation of ERK1/2-eNOS via AT2 Receptors Decreases the Contractile Response to Angiotensin II in Resistance Mesenteric Arteries from Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hagihara, Graziela N.; Lobato, Nubia S.; Filgueira, Fernando P.; Akamine, Eliana H.; Aragão, Danielle S.; Casarini, Dulce E.; Carvalho, Maria Helena C.; Fortes, Zuleica B.

    2014-01-01

    It has been clearly established that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKS) are important mediators of angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling via AT1 receptors in the vasculature. However, evidence for a role of these kinases in changes of Ang II-induced vasoconstriction in obesity is still lacking. Here we sought to determine whether vascular MAPKs are differentially activated by Ang II in obese animals. The role of AT2 receptors was also evaluated. Male monosodium glutamate-induced obese (obese) and non-obese Wistar rats (control) were used. The circulating concentrations of Ang I and Ang II, determined by HPLC, were increased in obese rats. Ang II-induced isometric contraction was decreased in endothelium-intact resistance mesenteric arteries from obese compared with control rats and exhibited a retarded AT1 receptor antagonist response. Blocking of AT2 receptors and inhibition of either endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) or extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) restored Ang II-induced contraction in obese rats. Western blot analysis revealed increased protein expression of AT2 receptors in arteries from obese rats. Basal and Ang II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was also increased in obese rats. Blockade of either AT1 or AT2 receptors corrected the increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in arteries from obese rats to levels observed in control preparations. Phosphorylation of eNOS was increased in obese rats. Incubation with the ERK1/2 inhibitor before Ang II stimulation did not affect eNOS phosphorylation in control rats; however, it corrected the increased phosphorylation of eNOS in obese rats. These results clearly demonstrate that enhanced AT2 receptor and ERK1/2-induced, NO-mediated vasodilation reduces Ang II-induced contraction in an endothelium-dependent manner in obese rats. PMID:25170617

  9. Upregulation of ERK1/2-eNOS via AT2 receptors decreases the contractile response to angiotensin II in resistance mesenteric arteries from obese rats.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Graziela N; Lobato, Nubia S; Filgueira, Fernando P; Akamine, Eliana H; Aragão, Danielle S; Casarini, Dulce E; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Fortes, Zuleica B

    2014-01-01

    It has been clearly established that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKS) are important mediators of angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling via AT1 receptors in the vasculature. However, evidence for a role of these kinases in changes of Ang II-induced vasoconstriction in obesity is still lacking. Here we sought to determine whether vascular MAPKs are differentially activated by Ang II in obese animals. The role of AT2 receptors was also evaluated. Male monosodium glutamate-induced obese (obese) and non-obese Wistar rats (control) were used. The circulating concentrations of Ang I and Ang II, determined by HPLC, were increased in obese rats. Ang II-induced isometric contraction was decreased in endothelium-intact resistance mesenteric arteries from obese compared with control rats and exhibited a retarded AT1 receptor antagonist response. Blocking of AT2 receptors and inhibition of either endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) or extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) restored Ang II-induced contraction in obese rats. Western blot analysis revealed increased protein expression of AT2 receptors in arteries from obese rats. Basal and Ang II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was also increased in obese rats. Blockade of either AT1 or AT2 receptors corrected the increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in arteries from obese rats to levels observed in control preparations. Phosphorylation of eNOS was increased in obese rats. Incubation with the ERK1/2 inhibitor before Ang II stimulation did not affect eNOS phosphorylation in control rats; however, it corrected the increased phosphorylation of eNOS in obese rats. These results clearly demonstrate that enhanced AT2 receptor and ERK1/2-induced, NO-mediated vasodilation reduces Ang II-induced contraction in an endothelium-dependent manner in obese rats. PMID:25170617

  10. Influence of coronary artery diameter on eNOS protein content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. H.; Turk, J. R.; Schrage, W. G.; Woodman, C. R.; Price, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the content of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein (eNOS protein/g total artery protein) increases with decreasing artery diameter in the coronary arterial tree. Content of eNOS protein was determined in porcine coronary arteries with immunoblot analysis. Arteries were isolated in six size categories from each heart: large arteries [301- to 2,500-microm internal diameter (ID)], small arteries (201- to 300-microm ID), resistance arteries (151- to 200-microm ID), large arterioles (101- to 150-microm ID), intermediate arterioles (51- to 100-microm ID), and small arterioles(<50-microm ID). To obtain sufficient protein for analysis from small- and intermediate-sized arterioles, five to seven arterioles 1-2 mm in length were pooled into one sample for each animal. Results establish that the number of smooth muscle cells per endothelial cell decreases from a number of 10 to 15 in large coronary arteries to 1 in the smallest arterioles. Immunohistochemistry revealed that eNOS is located only in endothelial cells in all sizes of coronary artery and in coronary capillaries. Contrary to our hypothesis, eNOS protein content did not increase with decreasing size of coronary artery. Indeed, the smallest coronary arterioles had less eNOS protein per gram of total protein than the large coronary arteries. These results indicate that eNOS protein content is greater in the endothelial cells of conduit arteries, resistance arteries, and large arterioles than in small coronary arterioles.

  11. Hindlimb unweighting decreases endothelium-dependent dilation and eNOS expression in soleus not gastrocnemius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, C. R.; Schrage, W. G.; Rush, J. W.; Ray, C. A.; Price, E. M.; Hasser, E. M.; Laughlin, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting (HLU) decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) in arteries of skeletal muscle with reduced blood flow during HLU. Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were exposed to HLU (n = 15) or control (n = 15) conditions for 14 days. ACh-induced dilation was assessed in muscle with reduced [soleus (Sol)] or unchanged [gastrocnemius (Gast)] blood flow during HLU. eNOS and SOD-1 expression were measured in feed arteries (FA) and in first-order (1A), second-order (2A), and third-order (3A) arterioles. Dilation to infusion of ACh in vivo was blunted in Sol but not Gast. In arteries of Sol muscle, HLU decreased eNOS mRNA and protein content. eNOS mRNA content was significantly less in Sol FA (35%), 1A arterioles (25%) and 2A arterioles (18%). eNOS protein content was less in Sol FA (64%) and 1A arterioles (65%) from HLU rats. In arteries of Gast, HLU did not decrease eNOS mRNA or protein. SOD-1 mRNA expression was less in Sol 2A arterioles (31%) and 3A arterioles (29%) of HLU rats. SOD-1 protein content was less in Sol FA (67%) but not arterioles. SOD-1 mRNA and protein content were not decreased in arteries from Gast. These data indicate that HLU decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation, eNOS expression, and SOD-1 expression primarily in arteries of Sol muscle where blood flow is reduced during HLU.

  12. Exacerbation of acute kidney injury by bone marrow stromal cells from rats with persistent renin-angiotensin system activation.

    PubMed

    Kankuri, Esko; Mervaala, Elina E; Storvik, Markus; Ahola, Aija M J; Levijoki, Jouko; Müller, Dominik N; Finckenberg, Piet; Mervaala, Eero M

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension and persistent activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are predisposing factors for the development of acute kidney injury (AKI). Although bone-marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) have shown therapeutic promise in treatment of AKI, the impact of pathological RAS on BMSC functionality has remained unresolved. RAS and its local components in the bone marrow are involved in several key steps of cell maturation processes. This may also render the BMSC population vulnerable to alterations even in the early phases of RAS pathology. We isolated transgenic BMSCs (TG-BMSCs) from young end-organ-disease-free rats with increased RAS activation [human angiotensinogen/renin double transgenic rats (dTGRs)] that eventually develop hypertension and die of end-organ damage and kidney failure at 8 weeks of age. Control cells (SD-BMSCs) were isolated from wild-type Sprague-Dawley rats. Cell phenotype, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and respiration were assessed, and gene expression profiling was carried out using microarrays. Cells' therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in a rat model of acute ischaemia/reperfusion-induced AKI. Serum urea and creatinine were measured at 24 h and 48 h. Acute tubular damage was scored and immunohistochemistry was used for evaluation for markers of inflammation [monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), ED-1], and kidney injury [kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL)]. TG-BMSCs showed distinct mitochondrial morphology, decreased cell respiration and increased production of ROS. Gene expression profiling revealed a pronounced pro-inflammatory phenotype. In contrast with the therapeutic effect of SD-BMSCs, administration of TG-BMSCs in the AKI model resulted in exacerbation of kidney injury and high mortality. Our results demonstrate that early persistent RAS activation can dramatically compromise therapeutic potential of BMSCs by causing a shift into a pro

  13. ENO1 promotes tumor proliferation and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xinghua; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Li, Chunsun; Guo, Yan; Liu, Yushan; Chen, Yali; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2015-07-15

    Enolases are glycolytic enzymes responsible for the ATP-generated conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate. In addition to the glycolytic function, Enolase 1 (ENO1) has been reported up-regulation in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the expression and biologic function of ENO1 in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHLs). Clinically, by western blot analysis we observed that ENO1 expression was apparently higher in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma than in the reactive lymphoid tissues. Subsequently, immunohistochemical staining of 144 NHLs suggested that the expression of ENO1 was significantly lower in the indolent lymphomas compared with the progressive lymphomas. Further, we identified ENO1 as an independent prognostic factor, and it was significantly correlated with overall survival of NHL patients. In addition, we found that ENO1 could promote cell proliferation, regulate cell cycle associated gene and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in NHLs. Finally, we verified that ENO1 participated in the process of lymphoma cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Adhesion to FN or HS5 cells significantly protected OCI-Ly8 and Daudi cells from cytotoxicity compared with those cultured in suspension, and these effects were attenuated when transfected with ENO1-siRNA. Based on the study, we propose that inhibition of ENO1 expression may be a novel strategy for therapy for NHLs patients, and it may be a target for drug resistance. - Highlights: • ENO1 expression is reversely correlated with clinical outcomes of patients with NHLs. • ENO1 promotes the proliferation of NHL cells. • ENO1 regulates cell adhesion mediated drug resistance.

  14. Flare, Persistently Active Disease, and Serologically Active Clinically Quiescent Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Fabrizio; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Miranda, Francesca; Truglia, Simona; Massaro, Laura; Pacucci, Viviana Antonella; Conti, Virginia; Bartosiewicz, Izabella; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Alessandri, Cristiano; Valesini, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Objective Several indices have been proposed to assess disease activity in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Recent studies have showed a prevalence of flare between 28–35.3%, persistently active disease (PAD) between 46%–52% and serologically active clinically quiescent (SACQ) disease ranging from 6 to 15%. Our goal was to evaluate the flare, PAD and SACQ rate incidence in a cohort of SLE patients over a 2-year follow-up. Methods We evaluated 394 SLE patients. Flare was defined as an increase in SLEDAI-2K score of ≥4 from the previous visit; PAD was defined as a SLEDAI-2K score of ≥4, on >2 consecutive visits; SACQ was defined as at least a 2-year period without clinical activity and with persistent serologic activity. Results Among the 95 patients eligible for the analysis in 2009, 7 (7.3%) had ≥1 flare episode, whereas 9 (9.4%) had PAD. Similarly, among the 118 patients selected for the analysis in 2010, 6 (5%) had ≥1 flare episode, whereas 16 (13.5%) had PAD. Only 1/45 patient (2.2%) showed SACQ during the follow-up. Conclusion We showed a low incidence of flare, PAD and SACQ in Italian SLE patients compared with previous studies which could be partly explained by ethnic differences. PMID:23029327

  15. [The influence of persistent crowding on the spontaneous motor activity of the aging rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kment, A; Hofecker, G; Skalicky, M; Niedermüller, H

    1982-07-01

    In the course of a long-term cohort study of stress and aging, the spontaneous activity of 169 male Sprague-Dawley rats was measured at various ages from 9 to 30 months. 84 animals were submitted to crowding from the age of 5 months onwards by housing them in groups of 12 per Makrolon-IV cage. 85 rats, kept as usual in groups of 6 per makrolon-IV cage, served as a control. Spontaneous activity was assessed by an electronic instrument (Animex Activity Meter), which also enabled us to distinguish between total and large movements. During senescence, the spontaneous activity of the control animals decreased slightly by approximately 20% after the age of 18 months. In addition to the quantitative change, a progressive flattening of the activity rhythm was observed. The animals kept under crowded conditions did not reveal any age-related decrease in spontaneous activity. At an advanced age, this resulted in significantly higher activity values in the crowded group as compared with the controls. The differences appeared even earlier and seemed to be more pronounced in the number of large movements. However, the progressive disappearance of the endogenous rhythm was apparent in both the crowded and the control group. It can be concluded that at least two types of change in the central nervous system may be responsible for the aging-changes in spontaneous activity: one which disintegrates the "time structure" of the organism, and a second one which affects motivational centers. Crowded conditions seem to improve the latter, whereas they have no effect on the aging of the "biological clock". PMID:6126135

  16. Non-viral eNOS gene delivery and transfection with stents for the treatment of restenosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In this study, we have examined local non-viral gene delivery, transfection, and therapeutic efficacy of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) encoding plasmid DNA administered using coated stents in a rabbit iliac artery restenosis model. Methods Lipopolyplexes (LPPs) with eNOS expressing plasmid DNA were immobilized on stainless steel stents using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and type B gelatin coatings. The gene-eluting stents were implanted bilaterally in the denuded iliac arteries and eNOS transfection and therapeutic efficacy were examined 14 days after implantation. Results The results show that non-viral lipopolyplex-coated stents can efficiently tranfect eNOS locally in the arterial lumen assessed by PCR and ELISA. Human eNOS ELISA levels were significantly raised 24 hours after transfection compared to controls (125 pg eNOS compared to <50 pg for all controls including naked DNA). Local eNOS production suppressed smooth muscle cell proliferation and promoted re-endothelialization of the artery showing a significant reduction in restenosis of 1.75 neointima/media ratio for stents with lipoplexes encoding eNOS compared with 2.3 neointima/media ratio for stents with lipoplexes encosing an empty vector. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that a potent non-viral gene vector encoding for eNOS coated onto a stent can inhibit restenosis through inhibition of smooth muscle cell growth and promotion of a healthy endothelium. PMID:20875110

  17. On the relationship between persistent delay activity, repetition enhancement and priming

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Elisa M.; Mongillo, Gianluigi; Brunel, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Human efficiency in processing incoming stimuli (in terms of speed and/or accuracy) is typically enhanced by previous exposure to the same, or closely related stimuli—a phenomenon referred to as priming. In spite of the large body of knowledge accumulated in behavioral studies about the conditions conducive to priming, and its relationship with other forms of memory, the underlying neuronal correlates of priming are still under debate. The idea has repeatedly been advanced that a major neuronal mechanism supporting behaviorally-expressed priming is repetition suppression, a widespread reduction of spiking activity upon stimulus repetition which has been routinely exposed by single-unit recordings in non-human primates performing delayed-response, as well as passive fixation tasks. This proposal is mainly motivated by the observation that, in human fMRI studies, priming is associated to a significant reduction of the BOLD signal (widely interpreted as a proxy of the level of spiking activity) upon stimulus repetition. Here, we critically re-examine a large part of the electrophysiological literature on repetition suppression in non-human primates and find that repetition suppression is systematically accompanied by stimulus-selective delay period activity, together with repetition enhancement, an increase of spiking activity upon stimulus repetition in small neuronal populations. We argue that repetition enhancement constitutes a more viable candidate for a putative neuronal substrate of priming, and propose a minimal framework that links together, mechanistically and functionally, repetition suppression, stimulus-selective delay activity and repetition enhancement. PMID:25657630

  18. Persistent activation of microglia and NADPH drive hippocampal dysfunction in experimental multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Filippo, Massimiliano; de Iure, Antonio; Giampà, Carmela; Chiasserini, Davide; Tozzi, Alessandro; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Tantucci, Michela; Durante, Valentina; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Mancini, Andrea; Costa, Cinzia; Sarchielli, Paola; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Calabresi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Unfortunately, the synaptic and molecular mechanisms underlying MS-associated cognitive dysfunction are largely unknown. We explored the presence and the underlying mechanism of cognitive and synaptic hippocampal dysfunction during the remission phase of experimental MS. Experiments were performed in a chronic-relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS, after the resolution of motor deficits. Immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp recordings were performed in the CA1 hippocampal area. The hole-board was utilized as cognitive/behavioural test. In the remission phase of experimental MS, hippocampal microglial cells showed signs of activation, CA1 hippocampal synapses presented an impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and an alteration of spatial tests became evident. The activation of hippocampal microglia mediated synaptic and cognitive/behavioural alterations during EAE. Specifically, LTP blockade was found to be caused by the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. We suggest that in the remission phase of experimental MS microglia remains activated, causing synaptic dysfunctions mediated by NADPH oxidase. Inhibition of microglial activation and NADPH oxidase may represent a promising strategy to prevent neuroplasticity impairment associated with active neuro-inflammation, with the aim to improve cognition and counteract MS disease progression. PMID:26887636

  19. Persistent HIV Type 1 Seronegative Status Is Associated With Lower CD8+ T-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Peter J; Mehrotra, Megha L; Shaw, Brian I; Leadabrand, Kaitlyn S; Milush, Jeffrey M; York, Vanessa A; Defechereux, Patricia; Grant, Robert M; Kallás, Esper G; Nixon, Douglas F

    2016-02-15

    We leveraged data from the Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative (iPrEx), a global trial of preexposure chemoprophylaxis against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, to compare T-cell activation between those who remained negative for HIV-1 and those who became infected during the trial. The frequency of CD38(+)HLA-DR(+) CD8(+) T cells was greater in those who seroconverted, relative to the frequency in those who remained uninfected (1.30% vs 0.82%, respectively; P = .005). This translated to an odds ratio of 4.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.54-11.78) for the association between CD8(+) T-cell activation and infection with HIV-1. T-cell activation may be a biomarker for elevated HIV-1 infection risk. PMID:26310308

  20. Hippocampal noradrenergic activation is necessary for object recognition memory consolidation and can promote BDNF increase and memory persistence.

    PubMed

    Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B; da Silva de Vargas, Liane; Gayer, Mateus Cristofari; Roehrs, Rafael; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Previously we showed that activation of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract (NTS)-Nucleus Paragigantocellularis (PGi)-Locus coeruleus (LC) pathway, which theoretically culminates with norepinephrine (NE) release in dorsal hippocampus (CA1 region) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) is necessary for the consolidation of object recognition (OR) memory. Here we show that, while the microinjection of the beta-noradrenergic receptor blocker timolol into CA1 impairs OR memory consolidation, the microinjection of norepinephrine (NE) promotes the persistence of this type of memory. Further, we show that OR consolidation is attended by an increase of norepinephrine (NE) levels and of the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampus, which are impaired by inactivation of the NTS-PGi-LC pathway by the infusion of muscimol into the NTS. PMID:26691781

  1. Persistent Organic Pollutants Modify Gut Microbiota–Host Metabolic Homeostasis in Mice Through Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Limin; Nichols, Robert G.; Correll, Jared; Murray, Iain A.; Tanaka, Naoki; Smith, Philip B.; Hubbard, Troy D.; Sebastian, Aswathy; Albert, Istvan; Hatzakis, Emmanuel; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Perdew, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alteration of the gut microbiota through diet and environmental contaminants may disturb physiological homeostasis, leading to various diseases including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Because most exposure to environmentally persistent organic pollutants (POPs) occurs through the diet, the host gastrointestinal tract and commensal gut microbiota are likely to be exposed to POPs. Objectives We examined the effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF), a persistent environmental contaminant, on gut microbiota and host metabolism, and we examined correlations between gut microbiota composition and signaling pathways. Methods Six-week-old male wild-type and Ahr–/– mice on the C57BL/6J background were treated with 24 μg/kg TCDF in the diet for 5 days. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics, targeted ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triplequadrupole mass spectrometry, and biochemical assays to determine the microbiota compositions and the physiological and metabolic effects of TCDF. Results Dietary TCDF altered the gut microbiota by shifting the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes. TCDF-treated mouse cecal contents were enriched with Butyrivibrio spp. but depleted in Oscillobacter spp. compared with vehicle-treated mice. These changes in the gut microbiota were associated with altered bile acid metabolism. Further, dietary TCDF inhibited the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway, triggered significant inflammation and host metabolic disorders as a result of activation of bacterial fermentation, and altered hepatic lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogenolysis in an AHR-dependent manner. Conclusion These findings provide new insights into the biochemical consequences of TCDF exposure involving the alteration of the gut microbiota, modulation of nuclear receptor signaling, and disruption of host metabolism. Citation Zhang L, Nichols RG, Correll J, Murray IA, Tanaka N, Smith PB

  2. Cardioprotective effects of luteolin on ischemia/reperfusion injury in diabetic rats are modulated by eNOS and the mitochondrial permeability transition pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Ting; Qian, Ling-Bo; Zhang, Feng-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Ai, Heng; Tang, Li-Hui; Wang, Hui-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in diabetes is associated with oxidative stress, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction, and mitochondrial collapse, whereas luteolin is known to protect the cardiovascular system against diabetes and I/R injury. Here, we investigated whether luteolin pretreatment diminishes myocardial I/R injury in diabetic rats by affecting eNOS and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). After diabetic rats were produced by streptozotocin treatment (65 mg/kg) for 3 weeks, luteolin (100 mg·kg·d) or L-NAME (25 mg·kg·d) was administered intragastrically for 2 weeks. Hearts were then isolated and subjected to 30 minutes of global ischemia followed by 120 minutes of reperfusion. Pretreatment with luteolin significantly improved left ventricular function and coronary flow throughout reperfusion, increased cardiac tissue viability and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity, and reduced coronary lactate dehydrogenase release, and the myocardial malonaldehyde level in diabetic I/R rat hearts. All these improving effects of luteolin were significantly attenuated by L-NAME. Luteolin also significantly upregulated eNOS expression in diabetic rat hearts after I/R. Ca-induced mPTP opening and mitochondrial inner membrane potential reduction were significantly inhibited in ventricular myocytes isolated from luteolin-treated diabetic rats, and this effect was attenuated by L-NAME. These findings indicate that luteolin protects the diabetic heart against I/R injury by upregulating the myocardial eNOS pathway, and downstream effects include the enhancement of MnSOD and inhibition of mPTP. PMID:25502309

  3. Persistent Differences in Patterns of Brain Activation after Sports-Related Concussion: A Longitudinal Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Murugavel, Murali; Putukian, Margot; Cubon, Valerie; Furtado, John; Osherson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Avoiding recurrent injury in sports-related concussion (SRC) requires understanding the neural mechanisms involved during the time of recovery after injury. The decision for return-to-play is one of the most difficult responsibilities facing the physician, and so far this decision has been based primarily on neurological examination, symptom checklists, and neuropsychological (NP) testing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be an additional, more objective tool to assess the severity and recovery of function after concussion. The purpose of this study was to define neural correlates of SRC during the 2 months after injury in varsity contact sport athletes who suffered a SRC. All athletes were scanned as they performed an n-back task, for n=1, 2, 3. Subjects were scanned within 72 hours (session one), at 2 weeks (session two), and 2 months (session three) post-injury. Compared with age and sex matched normal controls, concussed subjects demonstrated persistent, significantly increased activation for the 2 minus 1 n-back contrast in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in all three sessions and in the inferior parietal lobe in session one and two (α≤0.01 corrected). Measures of task performance revealed no significant differences between concussed versus control groups at any of the three time points with respect to any of the three n-back tasks. These findings suggest that functional brain activation differences persist at 2 months after injury in concussed athletes, despite the fact that their performance on a standard working memory task is comparable to normal controls and normalization of clinical and NP test results. These results might indicate a delay between neural and behaviorally assessed recovery after SRC. PMID:23914845

  4. Persistent differences in patterns of brain activation after sports-related concussion: a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Dettwiler, Annegret; Murugavel, Murali; Putukian, Margot; Cubon, Valerie; Furtado, John; Osherson, Daniel

    2014-01-15

    Avoiding recurrent injury in sports-related concussion (SRC) requires understanding the neural mechanisms involved during the time of recovery after injury. The decision for return-to-play is one of the most difficult responsibilities facing the physician, and so far this decision has been based primarily on neurological examination, symptom checklists, and neuropsychological (NP) testing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be an additional, more objective tool to assess the severity and recovery of function after concussion. The purpose of this study was to define neural correlates of SRC during the 2 months after injury in varsity contact sport athletes who suffered a SRC. All athletes were scanned as they performed an n-back task, for n=1, 2, 3. Subjects were scanned within 72 hours (session one), at 2 weeks (session two), and 2 months (session three) post-injury. Compared with age and sex matched normal controls, concussed subjects demonstrated persistent, significantly increased activation for the 2 minus 1 n-back contrast in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in all three sessions and in the inferior parietal lobe in session one and two (α≤0.01 corrected). Measures of task performance revealed no significant differences between concussed versus control groups at any of the three time points with respect to any of the three n-back tasks. These findings suggest that functional brain activation differences persist at 2 months after injury in concussed athletes, despite the fact that their performance on a standard working memory task is comparable to normal controls and normalization of clinical and NP test results. These results might indicate a delay between neural and behaviorally assessed recovery after SRC. PMID:23914845

  5. Persistent Prelimbic Cortex Activity Contributes to Enhanced Learned Fear Expression in Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Georgina E.; Pollard, Amelia K.; Halliday, David M.; Mason, Rob; Bredy, Timothy W.; Stevenson, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress, are more prevalent in women and are characterized by impaired inhibition of learned fear and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dysfunction. Here we examined sex differences in fear extinction and mPFC activity in rats. Females showed more learned fear expression during extinction and its recall, but…

  6. Persistence of anticancer activity in berry extracts after simulated gastrointestinal digestion and colonic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emma M; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Pereira-Caro, Gema; González-Barrio, Rocio; Allsopp, Philip; Magee, Pamela; Crozier, Alan; Rowland, Ian; Gill, Chris I R

    2012-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable consumption is associated at the population level with a protective effect against colorectal cancer. Phenolic compounds, especially abundant in berries, are of interest due to their putative anticancer activity. After consumption, however, phenolic compounds are subject to digestive conditions within the gastrointestinal tract that alter their structures and potentially their function. However, the majority of phenolic compounds are not efficiently absorbed in the small intestine and a substantial portion pass into the colon. We characterized berry extracts (raspberries, strawberries, blackcurrants) produced by in vitro-simulated upper intestinal tract digestion and subsequent fecal fermentation. These extracts and selected individual colonic metabolites were then evaluated for their putative anticancer activities using in vitro models of colorectal cancer, representing the key stages of initiation, promotion and invasion. Over a physiologically-relevant dose range (0-50 µg/ml gallic acid equivalents), the digested and fermented extracts demonstrated significant anti-genotoxic, anti-mutagenic and anti-invasive activity on colonocytes. This work indicates that phenolic compounds from berries undergo considerable structural modifications during their passage through the gastrointestinal tract but their breakdown products and metabolites retain biological activity and can modulate cellular processes associated with colon cancer. PMID:23185422

  7. Histone modifications defining active genes persist after transcriptional and mitotic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Kouskouti, Antigone; Talianidis, Iannis

    2005-01-26

    We examined various histone modifications across the promoter and the coding regions of constitutively active hepatic genes in G0/G1-enriched, mitotically arrested and alpha-amanitin-blocked cells. Gene activation correlated with localized histone hyperacetylation, H3-K4 tri- or dimethylation and H3-K79 dimethylation and localized nucleosome remodeling at the promoter and the 5' portion of the coding regions. Nucleosomes at more downstream locations were monomethylated at H3-K4. CBP, PCAF, Brg-1, SNF2H and FACT were recruited to the coding regions in a gene-specific manner, in a similarly restricted promoter-proximal pattern. Elongator, however, associated with the more downstream regions. While all factors were dissociated from the chromatin after transcriptional inactivation by alpha-amanitin, the histone modifications remained stable. In mitotic cells, histone modifications on parental nucleosomes were preserved and were regenerated in a transcription-dependent manner at the newly deposited nucleosomes, as the cells entered the next G1 phase. The findings suggest that histone modifications may function as molecular memory bookmarks for previously active locations of the genome, thus contributing to the maintenance of active chromatin states through cell division. PMID:15616580

  8. Extensive Ethnogenomic Diversity of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Bolaji N.; Thakur, Tanya J.; Yi, Li; Guindo, Aldiouma; Diallo, Dapa A.; Ott, Jurg

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is highly reactive, produced in endothelial cells by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and has been implicated in sickle cell pathophysiology. We evaluated the distribution of functionally significant eNOS variants (the T786C variant in the promoter region, the Glu298Asp variant in exon 7, and the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in intron 4) in Africans, African Americans and Caucasians. The C-786 variant was more common in Caucasians than in Africans and African Americans. Consistent with other findings, the Asp-298 variant had the highest frequency in Caucasians followed by African Americans, but was completely absent in Africans. The very rare intron 4 allele, eNOS 4c, was found in some Africans and African Americans, but not in Caucasians. eNOS 4d allele was present in 2 Africans. These findings suggest a consistent and widespread genomic diversity in the distribution of eNOS variants in Africans, comparative to African Americans and Caucasians. PMID:23400313

  9. Extensive ethnogenomic diversity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Bolaji N; Thakur, Tanya J; Yi, Li; Guindo, Aldiouma; Diallo, Dapa A; Ott, Jurg

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is highly reactive, produced in endothelial cells by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and has been implicated in sickle cell pathophysiology. We evaluated the distribution of functionally significant eNOS variants (the T786C variant in the promoter region, the Glu298Asp variant in exon 7, and the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in intron 4) in Africans, African Americans and Caucasians. The C-786 variant was more common in Caucasians than in Africans and African Americans. Consistent with other findings, the Asp-298 variant had the highest frequency in Caucasians followed by African Americans, but was completely absent in Africans. The very rare intron 4 allele, eNOS 4c, was found in some Africans and African Americans, but not in Caucasians. eNOS 4d allele was present in 2 Africans. These findings suggest a consistent and widespread genomic diversity in the distribution of eNOS variants in Africans, comparative to African Americans and Caucasians. PMID:23400313

  10. Priming the Holiday Spirit: Persistent Activation due to Extra-Experimental Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Coane, Jennifer H.; Balota, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of activation is a critical component of many models of cognition. A key characteristic of activation is that recent experience with a concept or stimulus increases the accessibility of the corresponding representation. The extent to which increases in accessibility occur as a result of experiences outside of laboratory settings has not been extensively explored. In the present study, we presented lexical stimuli associated to different holidays and festivities over the course of a year in a lexical decision task. When stimulus meaning and time of testing were congruent (e.g., leprechaun in March), response times were faster and accuracy greater than when meaning and time of test were incongruent (e.g., leprechaun in November). Congruency also benefited performance on a surprise free recall task of the items presented earlier in the lexical decision task. Discussion focuses on potential theoretical accounts of this heightened accessibility of time-of-the-year relevant concepts. PMID:19966266

  11. Inappropriate Neural Activity during a Sensitive Period in Embryogenesis Results in Persistent Seizure-like Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Giachello, Carlo N.G.; Baines, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Maturation of neural circuits requires activity-dependent processes that underpin the emergence of appropriate behavior in the adult. It has been proposed that disruption of these events, during specific critical periods when they exert maximal influence, may lead to neurodevelopmental diseases, including epilepsy [1, 2, 3]. However, complexity of neurocircuitry, coupled with the lack of information on network formation in mammals, makes it difficult to directly investigate this hypothesis. Alternative models, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, show remarkable similarities between experimental seizure-like activity and clinical phenotypes [4, 5, 6]. In particular, a group of flies, termed bang-sensitive (bs) mutants have been extensively used to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying seizure [7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12]. Seizure phenotype can be measured in larval stages using an electroshock assay, and this behavior in bs mutants is dramatically reduced following ingestion of typical anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs; [13]). In this study we describe a critical period of embryonic development in Drosophila during which manipulation of neural activity is sufficient to significantly influence seizure behavior at postembryonic stages. We show that inhibition of elevated activity, characteristic of bs seizure models, during the critical period is sufficient to suppress seizure. By contrast, increasing neuronal excitation during the same period in wild-type (WT) is sufficient to permanently induce a seizure behavior. Further, we show that induction of seizure in WT correlates with functional alteration of motoneuron inputs that is a characteristic of bs mutants. Induction of seizure is rescued by prior administration of AEDs, opening a new perspective for early drug intervention in the treatment of genetic epilepsy. PMID:26549258

  12. Cyclothiazide-induced persistent increase in respiratory-related activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Babiec, Walter E; Faull, Kym F; Feldman, Jack L

    2012-01-01

    Hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons (MNs) innervate the genioglossus muscle of the tongue, which plays an important role in maintaining upper airway patency, particularly during sleep, and modulating upper airway resistance. Discovering methods for inducing long-term increases in genioglossal motoneuronal excitability to AMPA-mediated drive may help in the development of therapeutics for upper airway motor disorders such as obstructive sleep apnoea. We show that the diuretic, anti-hypertensive, AMPA receptor modulator cyclothiazide (CTZ) induces a profound and long-lasting increase in the amplitude of respiratory-related XII nerve activity in rhythmically active neonatal rat medullary slices. Treatment of the slice with CTZ (90 μm) for 1 h increased the integrated XII (∫XII) nerve burst amplitude to 262 ± 23% of pre-treatment control at 1 h post-treatment; much of this increase lasted at least 12 h. The amount of CTZ-induced facilitation (CIF) was dependent upon both CTZ dose and exposure time and was accompanied by a long-lasting increase in endogenous AMPA-mediated drive currents to XII MNs. CIF, however, is not a form of plasticity and does not depend on AMPA or NMDA receptor activation for its induction. Nor does it depend on coincident protein kinase A or C activity. Rather, measurement of mEPSCs along with mass spectrometric analysis of CTZ-treated slices indicates that the cause is prolonged bioavailability of CTZ. These results illustrate a latent residual capacity for potentiating AMPA-mediated inspiratory drive to XII MNs that might be applied to the treatment of upper airway motor deficits. PMID:22753547

  13. Activity of spinosad on stored-tobacco insects and persistence on cured tobacco stripst.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Michel P; Panighini, Cécile; Gadani, Ferruccio; Rossi, Luca

    2004-11-01

    Every year raw tobacco and manufactured tobacco products are lost to two major storage pests, the cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne (F) and the tobacco moth, Ephestia elutella (Hiibner). Post-harvest management of both insects is achieved through sanitation, insect monitoring and fumigation with phosphine. However, insect resistance to phosphine and control failures have been reported, and fumigants are under constant regulatory pressure. Here we report the evaluation of spinosad, a bioinsecticide derived from the fermentation of the soil micro-organism Saccharopolyspora spinosa Mertz & Yao. Spinosad was first registered in 1997 and is now widely used as a field pest control agent on many crops, including tobacco. The insecticidal activity of the fermentation product (technical spinosad, TS) was measured by diet incorporation assays against L serricorne and E elutella larvae. Mortality levels were determined on newly hatched larvae and over the whole insect life cycle. For both species, no emergence of adult insects was observed in cured tobacco sprayed with 50mg TS kg(-1) and inoculated with eggs or newly hatched larvae. These results indicated that spinosad has potential for the control of both species in stored tobacco, since 100% control of both pests could be achieved at 50 mg TS kg(-1), and with almost full control (90-95%) at 10 mg kg(-1). We also monitored the stability of the product on cured tobacco. The original concentration of the main active component of TS, spinosyn A, did not change significantly over 18 months, indicating no loss of spinosad during a typical leaf storage period of time. Bioassays against larvae confirmed that the bioinsecticidal activity of spinosad was retained. PMID:15532683

  14. [Persistent diarrhea

    PubMed

    Andrade, J A; Moreira, C; Fagundes Neto, U

    2000-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent diarrhea has high impact on infantile morbidity and mortality rates in developing countries. Several studies have shown that 3 to 20% of acute diarrheal episodes in children under 5 years of age become persistent. DEFINITION: Persistent diarrhea is defined as an episode that lasts more than 14 days. ETIOLOGY: The most important agents isolated in persistent diarrhea are: Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Salmonella, Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Klebisiella and Cryptosporidium. CLINICAL ASPECTS: In general, the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent diarrhea do not change with the pathogenic agent. Persistent diarrhea seems to represent the final result of a several insults a infant suffers that predisposes to a more severe episode of diarrhea due to a combination of host factors and high rates of enviromental contamination. Therefore, efforts should be made to promptly treat all episodes of diarrhea with apropriate follow-up. THERAPY: The aim of the treatment is to restore hydroelectrolytic deficits and to replace losses until the diarrheal ceases. It is possible in the majority of the cases, using oral rehydration therapy and erly an appropriate type of diet. PREVENTION: It is imperative that management strategies also focus on preventive aspects. The most effective diarrheal prevention strategy in young infants worldwide is promotion of exclusive breast feeding. PMID:14676915

  15. Persistent Activation of the Innate Immune Response in Adult Drosophila Following Radiation Exposure During Larval Development

    PubMed Central

    Sudmeier, Lisa J.; Samudrala, Sai-Suma; Howard, Steven P.; Ganetzky, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for pediatric central nervous system malignancies, but survivors often suffer from neurological and neurocognitive side effects that occur many years after radiation exposure. Although the biological mechanisms underlying these deleterious side effects are incompletely understood, radiation exposure triggers an acute inflammatory response that may evolve into chronic inflammation, offering one avenue of investigation. Recently, we developed a Drosophila model of the neurotoxic side effects of radiation exposure. Here we use this model to investigate the role of the innate immune system in response to radiation exposure. We show that the innate immune response and NF-ĸB target gene expression is activated in the adult Drosophila brain following radiation exposure during larval development, and that this response is sustained in adult flies weeks after radiation exposure. We also present preliminary data suggesting that innate immunity is radioprotective during Drosophila development. Together our data suggest that activation of the innate immune response may be beneficial initially for survival following radiation exposure but result in long-term deleterious consequences, with chronic inflammation leading to impaired neuronal function and viability at later stages. This work lays the foundation for future studies of how the innate immune response is triggered by radiation exposure and its role in mediating the biological responses to radiation. These studies may facilitate the development of strategies to reduce the deleterious side effects of CRT. PMID:26333838

  16. Regime shift in Arabian dust activity, triggered by persistent Fertile Crescent drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, Michael; Yu, Yan; Kalashnikova, Olga V.

    2015-10-01

    The Arabian Peninsula has experienced pronounced interannual to decadal variability in dust activity, including an abrupt regime shift around 2006 from an inactive dust period during 1998-2005 to an active period during 2007-2013. Corresponding in time to the onset of this regime shift, the climate state transitioned into a combined La Niña and negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, which incited a hiatus in global warming in the 2000s. Superimposed upon a long-term regional drying trend, synergistic interactions between these teleconnection modes triggered the establishment of a devastating and prolonged drought, which engulfed the Fertile Crescent, namely, Iraq and Syria, and led to crop failure and civil unrest. Dried soils and diminished vegetation cover in the Fertile Crescent, as evident through remotely sensed enhanced vegetation indices, supported greater dust generation and transport to the Arabian Peninsula in 2007-2013, as identified both in increased dust days observed at weather stations and enhanced remotely sensed aerosol optical depth. According to backward trajectory analysis of dust days on the Arabian Peninsula, increased dust lifting and atmospheric dust concentration in the Fertile Crescent during this recent, prolonged drought episode supported a greater frequency of dust events across the peninsula with associated northerly trajectories and led to the dust regime shift. These findings are particularly concerning, considering projections of warming and drying for the eastern Mediterranean region and potential collapse of the Fertile Crescent during this century.

  17. SO2 Emissions at Semeru Volcano, Indonesia: Characterization and Quantification of Persistent and Periodic Explosive Activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, J. F.; Clarke, A. B.; Burton, M. R.; Harijoko, A.; Wibowo, H.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first measurements of SO2 emissions at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, using an SO2 camera. Activity at Semeru is characterized by quiescent degassing interspersed with short-lived explosive events with low ash burden. The interval between explosions was measured at 32.1±15.7 minutes in a webcam survey of the volcano between the months of June and December 2013. We distinguish between two types of events: shorter events (type I: ~5 mins duration) with emissions returning quickly to baseline levels, and longer events (type II: ~15 mins duration) often showing multiple pulses and a longer period of increased emissions before a return to quiescent levels. Type I events represent >90% of the activity and release an average of 200-450 kg of SO2 per event. The single type II event we documented with the SO2 camera released a total of 1300 kg of SO2. We estimate the daily average emissions of Semeru to be 21-60 t d-1 of SO2, amounting to a yearly output of 7.5-22 Gg (7,500 - 22,000 metric tons), with 35-60% released during explosive events. The time series patterns of degassing are consistent with the existence of a viscous plug at the top of the conduit, causing accumulation and pressurization of the magma to produce the explosive events.

  18. SO2 emissions at Semeru volcano, Indonesia: Characterization and quantification of persistent and periodic explosive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, Jean-François; Clarke, Amanda B.; Burton, Michael R.; Harijoko, Agung; Wibowo, Haryo E.

    2015-07-01

    We present the first measurements of SO2 emissions at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, using an SO2 camera. Activity at Semeru is characterized by quiescent degassing interspersed with short-lived explosive events with low ash burden. The interval between explosions was measured at 32.1 ± 15.7 min in a webcam survey of the volcano between the months of June and December 2013. We distinguish between two types of events: shorter events (type I: ~ 5 min duration) with emissions returning quickly to baseline levels, and longer events (type II: ~ 15 min duration) often showing multiple pulses and a longer period of increased emissions before a return to quiescent levels. Type I events represent > 90% of the activity and release an average of 200-500 kg of SO2 per event. The single type II event we documented with the SO2 camera released a total of 1460 kg of SO2. We estimate the daily average emissions of Semeru to be 21-71 t d- 1 of SO2, amounting to a yearly output of 8-26 Gg (8000-26,000 metric tons), with 35-65% released during explosive events. The time series patterns of degassing are consistent with the existence of a viscous plug at the top of the conduit, which seals the conduit immediately prior to explosive events, causing pressurization of the underlying magma followed by a sudden release of gas and fragmented magma.

  19. Flux Tensor Constrained Geodesic Active Contours with Sensor Fusion for Persistent Object Tracking.

    PubMed

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Nath, Sumit Kumar; Seetharaman, Gunasekaran

    2007-08-01

    This paper makes new contributions in motion detection, object segmentation and trajectory estimation to create a successful object tracking system. A new efficient motion detection algorithm referred to as the flux tensor is used to detect moving objects in infrared video without requiring background modeling or contour extraction. The flux tensor-based motion detector when applied to infrared video is more accurate than thresholding "hot-spots", and is insensitive to shadows as well as illumination changes in the visible channel. In real world monitoring tasks fusing scene information from multiple sensors and sources is a useful core mechanism to deal with complex scenes, lighting conditions and environmental variables. The object segmentation algorithm uses level set-based geodesic active contour evolution that incorporates the fusion of visible color and infrared edge informations in a novel manner. Touching or overlapping objects are further refined during the segmentation process using an appropriate shape-based model. Multiple object tracking using correspondence graphs is extended to handle groups of objects and occlusion events by Kalman filter-based cluster trajectory analysis and watershed segmentation. The proposed object tracking algorithm was successfully tested on several difficult outdoor multispectral videos from stationary sensors and is not confounded by shadows or illumination variations. PMID:19096530

  20. Cooperation of Doxycycline with Phytochemicals and Micronutrients Against Active and Persistent Forms of Borrelia sp

    PubMed Central

    Goc, Anna; Niedzwiecki, Alexandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemicals and micronutrients represent a growing theme in antimicrobial defense; however, little is known about their anti-borreliae effects of reciprocal cooperation with antibiotics. A better understanding of this aspect could advance our knowledge and help improve the efficacy of current approaches towards Borrelia sp. In this study, phytochemicals and micronutrients such as baicalein, luteolin, 10-HAD, iodine, rosmarinic acid, and monolaurin, as well as, vitamins D3 and C were tested in a combinations with doxycycline for their in vitro effectiveness against vegetative (spirochetes) and latent (rounded bodies, biofilm) forms of Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia garinii. Anti-borreliae effects were evaluated according to checkerboard assays and supported by statistical analysis. The results showed that combination of doxycycline with flavones such as baicalein and luteolin exhibited additive effects against all morphological forms of studied Borrelia sp. Doxycycline combined with iodine demonstrated additive effects against spirochetes and biofilm, whereas with fatty acids such as monolaurin and 10-HAD it produced FICIs of indifference. Additive anti-spirochetal effects were also observed when doxycycline was used with rosmarinic acid and both vitamins D3 and C. Antagonism was not observed in any of the cases. This data revealed the intrinsic anti-borreliae activity of doxycycline with tested phytochemicals and micronutrients indicating that their addition may enhance efficacy of this antibiotic in combating Borrelia sp. Especially the addition of flavones balcalein and luteolin to a doxycycline regimen could be explored further in defining more effective treatments against these bacteria. PMID:27570483

  1. Flux Tensor Constrained Geodesic Active Contours with Sensor Fusion for Persistent Object Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Nath, Sumit Kumar; Seetharaman, Gunasekaran

    2007-01-01

    This paper makes new contributions in motion detection, object segmentation and trajectory estimation to create a successful object tracking system. A new efficient motion detection algorithm referred to as the flux tensor is used to detect moving objects in infrared video without requiring background modeling or contour extraction. The flux tensor-based motion detector when applied to infrared video is more accurate than thresholding ”hot-spots”, and is insensitive to shadows as well as illumination changes in the visible channel. In real world monitoring tasks fusing scene information from multiple sensors and sources is a useful core mechanism to deal with complex scenes, lighting conditions and environmental variables. The object segmentation algorithm uses level set-based geodesic active contour evolution that incorporates the fusion of visible color and infrared edge informations in a novel manner. Touching or overlapping objects are further refined during the segmentation process using an appropriate shape-based model. Multiple object tracking using correspondence graphs is extended to handle groups of objects and occlusion events by Kalman filter-based cluster trajectory analysis and watershed segmentation. The proposed object tracking algorithm was successfully tested on several difficult outdoor multispectral videos from stationary sensors and is not confounded by shadows or illumination variations. PMID:19096530

  2. Cooperation of Doxycycline with Phytochemicals and Micronutrients Against Active and Persistent Forms of Borrelia sp.

    PubMed

    Goc, Anna; Niedzwiecki, Alexandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemicals and micronutrients represent a growing theme in antimicrobial defense; however, little is known about their anti-borreliae effects of reciprocal cooperation with antibiotics. A better understanding of this aspect could advance our knowledge and help improve the efficacy of current approaches towards Borrelia sp. In this study, phytochemicals and micronutrients such as baicalein, luteolin, 10-HAD, iodine, rosmarinic acid, and monolaurin, as well as, vitamins D3 and C were tested in a combinations with doxycycline for their in vitro effectiveness against vegetative (spirochetes) and latent (rounded bodies, biofilm) forms of Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia garinii. Anti-borreliae effects were evaluated according to checkerboard assays and supported by statistical analysis. The results showed that combination of doxycycline with flavones such as baicalein and luteolin exhibited additive effects against all morphological forms of studied Borrelia sp. Doxycycline combined with iodine demonstrated additive effects against spirochetes and biofilm, whereas with fatty acids such as monolaurin and 10-HAD it produced FICIs of indifference. Additive anti-spirochetal effects were also observed when doxycycline was used with rosmarinic acid and both vitamins D3 and C. Antagonism was not observed in any of the cases. This data revealed the intrinsic anti-borreliae activity of doxycycline with tested phytochemicals and micronutrients indicating that their addition may enhance efficacy of this antibiotic in combating Borrelia sp. Especially the addition of flavones balcalein and luteolin to a doxycycline regimen could be explored further in defining more effective treatments against these bacteria. PMID:27570483

  3. Early Postnatal Exposure to Ultrafine Particulate Matter Air Pollution: Persistent Ventriculomegaly, Neurochemical Disruption, and Glial Activation Preferentially in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Joshua L.; Liu, Xiufang; Pelkowski, Sean; Palmer, Brian; Conrad, Katherine; Oberdörster, Günter; Weston, Douglas; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot

    2014-01-01

    Background: Air pollution has been associated with adverse neurological and behavioral health effects in children and adults. Recent studies link air pollutant exposure to adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes, including increased risk for autism, cognitive decline, ischemic stroke, schizophrenia, and depression. Objectives: We sought to investigate the mechanism(s) by which exposure to ultrafine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) adversely influences central nervous system (CNS) development. Methods: We exposed C57BL6/J mice to ultrafine (< 100 nm) CAPs using the Harvard University Concentrated Ambient Particle System or to filtered air on postnatal days (PNDs) 4–7 and 10–13, and the animals were euthanized either 24 hr or 40 days after cessation of exposure. Another group of males was exposed at PND270, and lateral ventricle area, glial activation, CNS cytokines, and monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters were quantified. Results: We observed ventriculomegaly (i.e., lateral ventricle dilation) preferentially in male mice exposed to CAPs, and it persisted through young adulthood. In addition, CAPs-exposed males generally showed decreases in developmentally important CNS cytokines, whereas in CAPs-exposed females, we observed a neuroinflammatory response as indicated by increases in CNS cytokines. We also saw changes in CNS neurotransmitters and glial activation across multiple brain regions in a sex-dependent manner and increased hippocampal glutamate in CAPs-exposed males. Conclusions: We observed brain region– and sex-dependent alterations in cytokines and neurotransmitters in both male and female CAPs-exposed mice. Lateral ventricle dilation (i.e., ventriculomegaly) was observed only in CAPs-exposed male mice. Ventriculomegaly is a neuropathology that has been associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcome, autism, and schizophrenia. Our findings suggest alteration of developmentally important neurochemicals and lateral ventricle dilation may be

  4. High-order ENO schemes applied to two- and three-dimensional compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang; Erlebacher, Gordon; Zang, Thomas A.; Whitaker, David; Osher, Stanley

    1991-01-01

    High order essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) finite difference schemes are applied to the 2-D and 3-D compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Practical issues, such as vectorization, efficiency of coding, cost comparison with other numerical methods, and accuracy degeneracy effects, are discussed. Numerical examples are provided which are representative of computational problems of current interest in transition and turbulence physics. These require both nonoscillatory shock capturing and high resolution for detailed structures in the smooth regions and demonstrate the advantage of ENO schemes.

  5. Defective disposal of immune complexes and polyclonal B cell activation persist long after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, N.A.; Cavallo, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus experience clinical exacerbation during superimposed bacterial infection. Previous studies in mice indicated that heightened immune phenomena during exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) appear to be related, in part, to polyclonal B cell activation, to abnormal disposal of immune complexes (IC), and to increased localization of IC in tissues. To investigate whether such effects were reversible, we administered bacterial LPS to C57BL/6 mice for 5 weeks. Control mice received vehicle alone. We then discontinued LPS, and 6 weeks later LPS and control mice were challenged with a subsaturating dose of radiolabeled IC; the removal of IC from the circulation, their localization in the liver, spleen, and kidney were determined. In comparison to values in control mice, in mice previously exposed to LPS, serologic features of polyclonal B cell activation persisted; liver uptake of pathogenic IC (greater than Ag2Ab2) was normal, but removal of small size IC (less than or equal to Ag2Ab2) from the circulation was delayed; localization of IC in the kidneys was enhanced, and pathologic proteinuria developed. The effects of repeated exposure to bacterial LPS are partially reversible, but they last long after LPS is discontinued and may contribute to altered disposal of IC, enhanced organ localization of IC, and organ dysfunction.

  6. Persistence of the effect of insulin on pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in rat white and brown adipose tissue during the preparation and subsequent incubation of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Denton, R M; McCormack, J G; Marshall, S E

    1984-01-15

    Increases in the amount of the active non-phosphorylated form of pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat epididymal adipose tissue, as a result of incubation with insulin, persist not only during the preparation of mitochondria but also during subsequent incubation of coupled mitochondria in the presence of respiratory substrates. No effect on insulin was found if the hormone was added directly to mitochondria in the presence or absence of added plasma membranes. Concentrations of several possible regulators of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (ATP, ADP, NADH, NAD+, acetyl-CoA, CoA and potassium) were measured in rat epididymal-adipose-tissue mitochondria incubated under conditions where differences in pyruvate dehydrogenase activity persist as a result of insulin action. No alterations were found, and it is suggested that inhibition of the kinase is not the principal means by which insulin activates pyruvate dehydrogenase. The intramitochondrial concentration of magnesium was also unaffected. Differences in pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in interscapular brown adipose tissue associated with manipulation of plasma insulin concentrations of cold-adapted rats were also shown to persist during the preparation and subsequent incubation of mitochondria in the presence or absence of GDP. It is pointed out that the persistence of the effect of insulin on pyruvate dehydrogenase in incubated mitochondria will facilitate the recognition of the mechanism of this action of the hormone. Evidence that the short-term action of insulin involves an increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase activity rather than inhibition of that of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase is discussed. PMID:6320807

  7. A Drug Combination Screen Identifies Drugs Active against Amoxicillin-Induced Round Bodies of In Vitro Borrelia burgdorferi Persisters from an FDA Drug Library

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Although currently recommended antibiotics for Lyme disease such as doxycycline or amoxicillin cure the majority of the patients, about 10–20% of patients treated for Lyme disease may experience lingering symptoms including fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches. Under experimental stress conditions such as starvation or antibiotic exposure, Borrelia burgdorferi can develop round body forms, which are a type of persister bacteria that appear resistant in vitro to customary first-line antibiotics for Lyme disease. To identify more effective drugs with activity against the round body form of B. burgdorferi, we established a round body persister model induced by exposure to amoxicillin (50 μg/ml) and then screened the Food and Drug Administration drug library consisting of 1581 drug compounds and also 22 drug combinations using the SYBR Green I/propidium iodide viability assay. We identified 23 drug candidates that have higher activity against the round bodies of B. burgdorferi than either amoxicillin or doxycycline. Eleven individual drugs scored better than metronidazole and tinidazole which have been previously described to be active against round bodies. In this amoxicillin-induced round body model, some drug candidates such as daptomycin and clofazimine also displayed enhanced activity which was similar to a previous screen against stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters not exposure to amoxicillin. Additional candidate drugs active against round bodies identified include artemisinin, ciprofloxacin, nifuroxime, fosfomycin, chlortetracycline, sulfacetamide, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfathiozole. Two triple drug combinations had the highest activity against amoxicillin-induced round bodies and stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters: artemisinin/cefoperazone/doxycycline and sulfachlorpyridazine/daptomycin/doxycycline. These findings confirm and extend previous findings that certain drug combinations have superior activity against B. burgdorferi

  8. A Drug Combination Screen Identifies Drugs Active against Amoxicillin-Induced Round Bodies of In Vitro Borrelia burgdorferi Persisters from an FDA Drug Library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Although currently recommended antibiotics for Lyme disease such as doxycycline or amoxicillin cure the majority of the patients, about 10-20% of patients treated for Lyme disease may experience lingering symptoms including fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches. Under experimental stress conditions such as starvation or antibiotic exposure, Borrelia burgdorferi can develop round body forms, which are a type of persister bacteria that appear resistant in vitro to customary first-line antibiotics for Lyme disease. To identify more effective drugs with activity against the round body form of B. burgdorferi, we established a round body persister model induced by exposure to amoxicillin (50 μg/ml) and then screened the Food and Drug Administration drug library consisting of 1581 drug compounds and also 22 drug combinations using the SYBR Green I/propidium iodide viability assay. We identified 23 drug candidates that have higher activity against the round bodies of B. burgdorferi than either amoxicillin or doxycycline. Eleven individual drugs scored better than metronidazole and tinidazole which have been previously described to be active against round bodies. In this amoxicillin-induced round body model, some drug candidates such as daptomycin and clofazimine also displayed enhanced activity which was similar to a previous screen against stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters not exposure to amoxicillin. Additional candidate drugs active against round bodies identified include artemisinin, ciprofloxacin, nifuroxime, fosfomycin, chlortetracycline, sulfacetamide, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfathiozole. Two triple drug combinations had the highest activity against amoxicillin-induced round bodies and stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters: artemisinin/cefoperazone/doxycycline and sulfachlorpyridazine/daptomycin/doxycycline. These findings confirm and extend previous findings that certain drug combinations have superior activity against B. burgdorferi

  9. Distinct expression of alkaline phosphatase activity in epilimnetic bacteria: Implication for persistent DOC consumption in a P-limited reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Y.; Kao, S.; Shiah, F.

    2013-12-01

    In a P-deficient system, P availability usually controls the microbial activity and thus the ecosystem function. Thingstad et al. (1997) first addressed a 'Malfunctioning Microbial-loop' theory, which stated that low bacterial production (BP) caused by insufficient nutrient supply would result in DOC accumulation in an oligotrophic ecosystem. In this study we re-examined the theory by conducting seasonal patterns and correlations among soluble reactive phosphate (SRP) and DOC, microbial abundances (picocyanobacteria, bacteria, and heterotrophic nanoflagellate; HNF) and activities (primary production, bacterial production, and alkaline phosphatase activity; APA) coupled with enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) assays on bacterioplankton in a subtropical reservoir sharing the common features, nitrate-replete and P-deficient, with most natural freshwater system during Oct 2007-Oct 2008. Persistently high APA was recorded during most of time, implying that the system was P-deficient. Size fractionated APA and ELF assay revealed that bacteria were the major APA contributor. However, significantly low epilimnion DOC was recorded during the stratified summer season accompanying with high BP and APA as well as high PP, implying that heterotrophic bacteria can well sustain in P-deficient system by utilizing DOP to rapidly lower down DOC under relatively high PP. Such findings oppose the 'Malfunctioning Microbial-loop' theory. On the other hand, strong epilimnetic DOC accumulation occurred in Oct 2007 under low light and low PP condition accompanying with high abundance of HNF, implying that HNF grazing may contribute to a certain degree of DOC accumulation. Correlation matrix supported our suggestions. This study testified the DOC dynamics in P-deficient ecosystem are tightly coupled with the source (PP and grazing) and sink (BP). We also suggested that in SRP-limited freshwater systems bacteria are capable of breaking down autochthonous DOC to reduce the chance of DOC

  10. Indonesian fire activity and smoke pollution in 2015 show persistent nonlinear sensitivity to El Niño-induced drought.

    PubMed

    Field, Robert D; van der Werf, Guido R; Fanin, Thierry; Fetzer, Eric J; Fuller, Ryan; Jethva, Hiren; Levy, Robert; Livesey, Nathaniel J; Luo, Ming; Torres, Omar; Worden, Helen M

    2016-08-16

    The 2015 fire season and related smoke pollution in Indonesia was more severe than the major 2006 episode, making it the most severe season observed by the NASA Earth Observing System satellites that go back to the early 2000s, namely active fire detections from the Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS), MODIS aerosol optical depth, Terra Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) carbon monoxide (CO), Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) CO, Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aerosol index, and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) CO. The MLS CO in the upper troposphere showed a plume of pollution stretching from East Africa to the western Pacific Ocean that persisted for 2 mo. Longer-term records of airport visibility in Sumatra and Kalimantan show that 2015 ranked after 1997 and alongside 1991 and 1994 as among the worst episodes on record. Analysis of yearly dry season rainfall from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and rain gauges shows that, due to the continued use of fire to clear and prepare land on degraded peat, the Indonesian fire environment continues to have nonlinear sensitivity to dry conditions during prolonged periods with less than 4 mm/d of precipitation, and this sensitivity appears to have increased over Kalimantan. Without significant reforms in land use and the adoption of early warning triggers tied to precipitation forecasts, these intense fire episodes will reoccur during future droughts, usually associated with El Niño events. PMID:27482096

  11. Hybrid coordination-network-engineering for bridging cascaded channels to activate long persistent phosphorescence in the second biological window

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xixi; Li, Yang; Zhang, Ruili; Ren, Jinjun; Gecevicius, Mindaugas; Wu, Yiling; Sharafudeen, Kaniyarakkal; Dong, Guoping; Zhou, Shifeng; Ma, Zhijun; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel “Top-down” strategy to design the long phosphorescent phosphors in the second biological transparency window via energy transfer. Inherence in this approach to material design involves an ingenious engineering for hybridizing the coordination networks of hosts, tailoring the topochemical configuration of dopants, and bridging a cascaded tunnel for transferring the persistent energy from traps, to sensitizers and then to acceptors. Another significance of this endeavour is to highlight a rational scheme for functionally important hosts and dopants, Cr/Nd co-doped Zn1−xCaxGa2O4 solid solutions. Such solid-solution is employed as an optimized host to take advantage of its characteristic trap site level to establish an electron reservoir and network parameters for the precipitation of activators Nd3+ and Cr3+. The results reveal that the strategy employed here has the great potential, as well as opens new opportunities for future new-wavelength, NIR phosphorescent phosphors fabrication with many potential multifunctional bio-imaging applications. PMID:26843129

  12. Hybrid coordination-network-engineering for bridging cascaded channels to activate long persistent phosphorescence in the second biological window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xixi; Li, Yang; Zhang, Ruili; Ren, Jinjun; Gecevicius, Mindaugas; Wu, Yiling; Sharafudeen, Kaniyarakkal; Dong, Guoping; Zhou, Shifeng; Ma, Zhijun; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel “Top-down” strategy to design the long phosphorescent phosphors in the second biological transparency window via energy transfer. Inherence in this approach to material design involves an ingenious engineering for hybridizing the coordination networks of hosts, tailoring the topochemical configuration of dopants, and bridging a cascaded tunnel for transferring the persistent energy from traps, to sensitizers and then to acceptors. Another significance of this endeavour is to highlight a rational scheme for functionally important hosts and dopants, Cr/Nd co-doped Zn1-xCaxGa2O4 solid solutions. Such solid-solution is employed as an optimized host to take advantage of its characteristic trap site level to establish an electron reservoir and network parameters for the precipitation of activators Nd3+ and Cr3+. The results reveal that the strategy employed here has the great potential, as well as opens new opportunities for future new-wavelength, NIR phosphorescent phosphors fabrication with many potential multifunctional bio-imaging applications.

  13. Q-Learning and p-persistent CSMA based rendezvous protocol for cognitive radio networks operating with shared spectrum activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Clifton L.; Biswas, Subir

    2014-06-01

    With an increasing demand for spectrum, dynamic spectrum access (DSA) has been proposed as viable means for providing the flexibility and greater access to spectrum necessary to meet this demand. Within the DSA concept, unlicensed secondary users temporarily "borrow" or access licensed spectrum, while respecting the licensed primary user's rights to that spectrum. As key enablers for DSA, cognitive radios (CRs) are based on software-defined radios which allow them to sense, learn, and adapt to the spectrum environment. These radios can operate independently and rapidly switch channels. Thus, the initial setup and maintenance of cognitive radio networks are dependent upon the ability of CR nodes to find each other, in a process known as rendezvous, and create a link on a common channel for the exchange of data and control information. In this paper, we propose a novel rendezvous protocol, known as QLP, which is based on Q-learning and the p-persistent CSMA protocol. With the QLP protocol, CR nodes learn which channels are best for rendezvous and thus adapt their behavior to visit those channels more frequently. We demonstrate through simulation that the QLP protocol provides a rendevous capability for DSA environments with different dynamics of PU activity, while attempting to achieve the following performance goals: (1) minimize the average time-to-rendezvous, (2) maximize system throughput, (3) minimize primary user interference, and (4) minimize collisions among CR nodes.

  14. Hybrid coordination-network-engineering for bridging cascaded channels to activate long persistent phosphorescence in the second biological window.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xixi; Li, Yang; Zhang, Ruili; Ren, Jinjun; Gecevicius, Mindaugas; Wu, Yiling; Sharafudeen, Kaniyarakkal; Dong, Guoping; Zhou, Shifeng; Ma, Zhijun; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel "Top-down" strategy to design the long phosphorescent phosphors in the second biological transparency window via energy transfer. Inherence in this approach to material design involves an ingenious engineering for hybridizing the coordination networks of hosts, tailoring the topochemical configuration of dopants, and bridging a cascaded tunnel for transferring the persistent energy from traps, to sensitizers and then to acceptors. Another significance of this endeavour is to highlight a rational scheme for functionally important hosts and dopants, Cr/Nd co-doped Zn1-xCaxGa2O4 solid solutions. Such solid-solution is employed as an optimized host to take advantage of its characteristic trap site level to establish an electron reservoir and network parameters for the precipitation of activators Nd(3+) and Cr(3+). The results reveal that the strategy employed here has the great potential, as well as opens new opportunities for future new-wavelength, NIR phosphorescent phosphors fabrication with many potential multifunctional bio-imaging applications. PMID:26843129

  15. Propane biostimulation in biologically activated carbon (BAC) selects for bacterial clades adept at degrading persistent water pollutants.

    PubMed

    Mikkelson, Kristin M; Homme, Carissa L; Li, Dong; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2015-08-01

    Biologically activated carbon (BAC) can be used in both municipal water and hazardous waste remediation applications to enhance contaminant attenuation in water; however, questions remain about how selective pressures can be applied to increase the capabilities of microbial communities to attenuate recalcitrant contaminants. Here we utilized flow-through laboratory columns seeded with municipally derived BAC and exposed to water from a local drinking water facility to query how propane biostimulation impacts resident microorganisms. Ecological analyses using high throughput phylogenetic sequencing revealed that while propane did not increase the total number of microbiological species, it did select for bacterial communities that were distinct from those without propane. Temporal extractions demonstrated that microbial succession was rapid and established in approximately 2 months. A higher density of propane monooxygenase genes and bacterial clades including the Pelosinus and Dechloromonas genera suggest an enhanced potential for the degradation of persistent water pollutants in propane-stimulated systems. However, the ecological selective pressure was exhausted in less than 15 cm of transit in this flow-through scenario (25 hour retention) indicating a pronounced zonation that could limit the size of a biostimulated zone and require physical mixing, hydraulic manipulation, or other strategies to increase the spatial impact of biostimulation in flow-through scenarios. PMID:26154499

  16. VANADL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF ENOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF eNOS. Zhuowei Li, Jacqueline D. Carter, Lisa A. Dailey, Joleen Soukup, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    V...

  17. VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF ENOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF eNOS.

    Zhuowei Li, Jacqueline D. Carter, Lisa A. Dailey, Joleen Soukup, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina and NHEERL, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Ca...

  18. Inhibition of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Activity by Levo-1-Methyl Tryptophan Blocks Gamma Interferon-Induced Chlamydia trachomatis Persistence in Human Epithelial Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ibana, Joyce A.; Belland, Robert J.; Zea, Arnold H.; Schust, Danny J.; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; AbdelRahman, Yasser M.; Tate, David J.; Beatty, Wandy L.; Aiyar, Ashok A.; Quayle, Alison J.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induces expression of the tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) in human epithelial cells, the permissive cells for the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. IDO1 depletes tryptophan by catabolizing it to kynurenine with consequences for C. trachomatis, which is a tryptophan auxotroph. In vitro studies reveal that tryptophan depletion can result in the formation of persistent (viable but noncultivable) chlamydial forms. Here, we tested the effects of the IDO1 inhibitor, levo-1-methyl-tryptophan (L-1MT), on IFN-γ-induced C. trachomatis persistence. We found that addition of 0.2 mM L-1MT to IFN-γ-exposed infected HeLa cell cultures restricted IDO1 activity at the mid-stage (20 h postinfection [hpi]) of the chlamydial developmental cycle. This delayed tryptophan depletion until the late stage (38 hpi) of the cycle. Parallel morphological and gene expression studies indicated a consequence of the delay was a block in the induction of C. trachomatis persistence by IFN-γ. Furthermore, L-1MT addition allowed C. trachomatis to undergo secondary differentiation, albeit with limited productive multiplication of the bacterium. IFN-γ-induced persistent infections in epithelial cells have been previously reported to be more resistant to doxycycline than normal productive infections in vitro. Pertinent to this observation, we found that L-1MT significantly improved the efficacy of doxycycline in clearing persistent C. trachomatis forms. It has been postulated that persistent forms of C. trachomatis may contribute to chronic chlamydial disease. Our findings suggest that IDO1 inhibitors such as L-1MT might provide a novel means to investigate, and potentially target, persistent chlamydial forms, particularly in conjunction with conventional therapeutics. PMID:21911470

  19. Ablation of eNOS does not promote adipose tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jurrissen, Thomas J; Sheldon, Ryan D; Gastecki, Michelle L; Woodford, Makenzie L; Zidon, Terese M; Rector, R Scott; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Padilla, Jaume

    2016-04-15

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation is a hallmark characteristic of obesity and an important determinant of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease; therefore, a better understanding of factors regulating AT inflammation is critical. It is well established that reduced vascular endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability promotes arterial inflammation; however, the role of NO in modulating inflammation in AT remains disputed. In the present study, 10-wk-old C57BL6 wild-type and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knockout male mice were randomized to either a control diet (10% kcal from fat) or a Western diet (44.9% kcal from fat, 17% sucrose, and 1% cholesterol) for 18 wk (n= 7 or 8/group). In wild-type mice, Western diet-induced obesity led to increased visceral white AT expression of inflammatory genes (e.g., MCP1, TNF-α, and CCL5 mRNAs) and markers of macrophage infiltration (e.g., CD68, ITGAM, EMR1, CD11C mRNAs, and Mac-2 protein), as well as reduced markers of mitochondrial content (e.g., OXPHOS complex I and IV protein). Unexpectedly, these effects of Western diet on visceral white AT were not accompanied by decreases in eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 or increases in eNOS phosphorylation at Thr-495. Also counter to expectations, eNOS knockout mice, independent of the diet, were leaner and did not exhibit greater white or brown AT inflammation compared with wild-type mice. Collectively, these findings do not support the hypothesis that reduced NO production from eNOS contributes to obesity-related AT inflammation. PMID:26864812

  20. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-01-01

    SWift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18 - 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 1038 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in IE 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  1. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Göǧüş, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, James Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-10-01

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in 2010 May with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least 2011 July. Here we present Swift and Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T 90 durations of the bursts range between 18 and 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) × 1038 erg, which is on the low side of soft gamma repeater bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large-scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  2. BURST AND PERSISTENT EMISSION PROPERTIES DURING THE RECENT ACTIVE EPISODE OF THE ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSAR 1E 1841-045

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Van der Klis, Michiel; Baring, Matthew G.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Mcenery, Julie; Michael Burgess, James; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain; Preece, Robert D.; Granot, Jonathan; Tierney, David

    2011-10-10

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in 2010 May with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least 2011 July. Here we present Swift and Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T {sub 90} durations of the bursts range between 18 and 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 10{sup 38} erg, which is on the low side of soft gamma repeater bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large-scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  3. New Findings in eNOS gene and Thalidomide Embryopathy Suggest pre-transcriptional effect variants as susceptibility factors.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Thayne Woycinck; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; Hutz, Mara Helena; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic properties of thalidomide have created an interest in the use of the drug in treatment of cancer. However, thalidomide is responsible for thalidomide embryopathy (TE). A lack of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of thalidomide teratogenesis acts as a barrier in the aim to synthesize a safer analogue of thalidomide. Recently, our group detected a higher frequency of alleles that impair the pro-angiogenic mechanisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), coded by the NOS3 gene. In this study we evaluated variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) functional polymorphism in intron 4 of NOS3 in individuals with TE (38) and Brazilians without congenital anomalies (136). Haplotypes were estimated for this VNTR with previously analyzed polymorphisms, rs2070744 (-786C > T) and rs1799983 (894T > G), in promoter region and exon 7, respectively. Haplotypic distribution was different between the groups (p = 0.007). Alleles -786C (rs2070744) and 4b (VNTR), associated with decreased NOS3 expression, presented in higher frequency in TE individuals (p = 0.018; OR = 2.57; IC = 1.2-5.8). This association was not identified with polymorphism 894T > G (p = 0.079), which influences eNOS enzymatic activity. These results suggest variants in NOS3, with pre-transcriptional effects as susceptibility factors, influencing the risk TE development. This finding generates insight for a new approach to research that pursues a safer analogue. PMID:27004986

  4. New Findings in eNOS gene and Thalidomide Embryopathy Suggest pre-transcriptional effect variants as susceptibility factors

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Thayne Woycinck; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; Hutz, Mara Helena; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic properties of thalidomide have created an interest in the use of the drug in treatment of cancer. However, thalidomide is responsible for thalidomide embryopathy (TE). A lack of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of thalidomide teratogenesis acts as a barrier in the aim to synthesize a safer analogue of thalidomide. Recently, our group detected a higher frequency of alleles that impair the pro-angiogenic mechanisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), coded by the NOS3 gene. In this study we evaluated variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) functional polymorphism in intron 4 of NOS3 in individuals with TE (38) and Brazilians without congenital anomalies (136). Haplotypes were estimated for this VNTR with previously analyzed polymorphisms, rs2070744 (−786C > T) and rs1799983 (894T > G), in promoter region and exon 7, respectively. Haplotypic distribution was different between the groups (p = 0.007). Alleles −786C (rs2070744) and 4b (VNTR), associated with decreased NOS3 expression, presented in higher frequency in TE individuals (p = 0.018; OR = 2.57; IC = 1.2–5.8). This association was not identified with polymorphism 894T > G (p = 0.079), which influences eNOS enzymatic activity. These results suggest variants in NOS3, with pre-transcriptional effects as susceptibility factors, influencing the risk TE development. This finding generates insight for a new approach to research that pursues a safer analogue. PMID:27004986

  5. The Serra de Tramuntana World Heritage Site (Mallorca, Spain). Landslide activity valuation by means of Persistent Scatterers Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, Rosa Maria; Bianchini, Silvia; Herrera, Gerardo; Garcia, Inmaculada; Sanabria, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    The Serra de Tramuntana, which forms the backbone of the north-west of Mallorca (Spain), was declared in 2011 World Heritage Site by UNESCO under the cultural landscape category. The particular landscape of this range is the fruit of the exchange of knowledge between cultures, with small-scale works performed collectively for a productive aim, conditioned by the limitations imposed by the physical medium. The steep topography of the chain, highly related to its geological complexity, and the Mediterranean climate, influence intense slope dynamics with the consequent multiple types of slope failures: rock slides, earth landslides and rockfalls, which cause significant damage and specifically to the road network (Mateos, 2013a). The human landscape marked by agricultural terraces (dry stone constructions) has significantly contributed to the slope stability in the range for centuries. In the present work, a landslide inventory map with 918 events has been updated and the landslides state of activity was analyzed exploiting 14 ALOS PALSAR satellite SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) images acquired during the period 2007-2010. Landslide activity maps were elaborated through the use of PSI (Persistent Scatterers Interferometry) technique (Bianchini et al., 2013). Besides assessing the PS visibility of the study area according to the relief, land use and satellite acquisition parameters, these maps evaluate, for every monitored landslide, the average velocities along the satellite Line Of Sight (VLOS) and along the maximum local steepest slope (VSLOPE), providing an estimate of their state of activity and their potential to cause damages. Additionally, a ground motion activity map is also generated, based on active PS clusters not included within any mapped landslide phenomenon. A confidence degree evaluation is carried out to attest the reliability of measured displacements to represent landslide dynamics. Results show that 42 landslides were identified as active (VSLOPE

  6. Structure-Activity Relationships of a Diverse Class of Halogenated Phenazines That Targets Persistent, Antibiotic-Tolerant Bacterial Biofilms and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Aaron T; Abouelhassan, Yasmeen; Norwood, Verrill M; Kallifidas, Dimitris; Bai, Fang; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Rolfe, Melanie; Burch, Gena M; Jin, Shouguang; Luesch, Hendrik; Huigens, Robert W

    2016-04-28

    Persistent bacteria, including persister cells within surface-attached biofilms and slow-growing pathogens lead to chronic infections that are tolerant to antibiotics. Here, we describe the structure-activity relationships of a series of halogenated phenazines (HP) inspired by 2-bromo-1-hydroxyphenazine 1. Using multiple synthetic pathways, we probed diverse substitutions of the HP scaffold in the 2-, 4-, 7-, and 8-positions, providing critical information regarding their antibacterial and bacterial eradication profiles. Halogenated phenazine 14 proved to be the most potent biofilm-eradicating agent (≥99.9% persister cell killing) against MRSA (MBEC < 10 μM), MRSE (MBEC = 2.35 μM), and VRE (MBEC = 0.20 μM) biofilms while 11 and 12 demonstrated excellent antibacterial activity against M. tuberculosis (MIC = 3.13 μM). Unlike antimicrobial peptide mimics that eradicate biofilms through the general lysing of membranes, HPs do not lyse red blood cells. HPs are promising agents that effectively target persistent bacteria while demonstrating negligible toxicity against mammalian cells. PMID:27018907

  7. 17-beta-oestradiol-induced vasorelaxation in vitro is mediated by eNOS through hsp90 and akt/pkb dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Mariarosaria; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Cicala, Carla; Pinto, Aldo; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2002-04-01

    1. The L-arginine-NO pathway has been implicated in the vasorelaxant effect of 17-beta-oestradiol. Here we have addressed the involvement of two distinct activation steps of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the 17-beta-oestradiol-induced vasorelaxant effect on rat aortic rings. 2. Rat aortic rings contracted with phenylephrine (PE) 1 microM relaxed in a concentration related fashion to 17-beta-oestradiol water soluble cyclodextrin-encapsulated (E2) only when endothelium was present. The pure anti-oestrogen of E2 receptor ICI 182,780 (20 microM) significantly inhibited E2-induced vasorelaxation. 3. Geldanamycin (10 microM), a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) and N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 microM), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, significantly inhibited E2-induced vasorelaxation. 4. Incubation of rat aortic rings up to 6 h with LY 294002 (25 microM), a specific inhibitor of PI(3)K akt/pkb pathway reduced E2-induced vasorelaxation. 5. Incubation of rat isolated aorta with E2, induced prostacyclin (PGI(2)) release. PGI(2) levels, measured as 6-keto PGF(1alpha), were abolished by ibuprofen (10 microM), both L-NAME and GA did not influence basal or E2-stimulated PGI(2) confirming the specificity of these two compounds on eNOS pathway. 6. In conclusion, we demonstrate that E2 interaction with its receptor is followed by a vasorelaxant effect in rat aortic rings mediated by eNOS activation through both hsp90 and akt/pkb dependent mechanisms. PMID:11934809

  8. Persistent at-level thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia accompany chronic neuronal and astrocyte activation in superficial dorsal horn following mouse cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jaime L; Hala, Tamara J; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Sannie, Daniel; Lepore, Angelo C

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can lead to maladaptive circuitry, aberrant pain processing and, ultimately, chronic neuropathic pain. Here we present a mouse model of SCI-induced neuropathic pain that exhibits a persistent pain phenotype accompanied by chronic neuronal hyperexcitability and glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. We generated a unilateral cervical contusion injury at the C5 or C6 level of the adult mouse spinal cord. Following injury, an increase in the number of neurons expressing ΔFosB (a marker of chronic neuronal activation), persistent astrocyte activation and proliferation (as measured by GFAP and Ki67 expression), and a decrease in the expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter GLT1 are observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn of cervical spinal cord. These changes have previously been associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to altered pain transmission and chronic neuropathic pain. In our model, they are accompanied by robust at-level hyperaglesia in the ipsilateral forepaw and allodynia in both forepaws that are evident within two weeks following injury and persist for at least six weeks. Furthermore, the pain phenotype occurs in the absence of alterations in forelimb grip strength, suggesting that it represents sensory and not motor abnormalities. Given the importance of transgenic mouse technology, this clinically-relevant model provides a resource that can be used to study the molecular mechanisms contributing to neuropathic pain

  9. Intensive Instruction Affects Brain Magnetic Activity Associated with Oral Word Reading in Children with Persistent Reading Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simos, Panagiotis G.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Sarkari, Shirin; Billingsley-Marshall, Rebecca; Denton, Carolyn A.; Papanicolaou, Andrew C.

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen children ages 7 to 9 years who had persistent reading difficulties despite adequate instruction were provided with intensive tutorial interventions. The interventions targeted deficient phonological processing and decoding skills for 8 weeks (2 hours per day) followed by an 8-week, 1-hour-per-day intervention that focused on the…

  10. Diesel exhaust exposure enhances venoconstriction via uncoupling of eNOS

    SciTech Connect

    Knuckles, Travis L.; Lund, Amie K.; Lucas, Selita N.; Campen, Matthew J.

    2008-08-01

    Environmental air pollution is associated with adverse cardiovascular events, including increased hospital admissions due to heart failure and myocardial infarction. The exact mechanism(s) by which air pollution affects the heart and vasculature is currently unknown. Recent studies have found that exposure to air pollution enhances arterial vasoconstriction in humans and animal models. Work in our laboratory has shown that diesel emissions (DE) enhance vasoconstriction of mouse coronary arteries. Thus, we hypothesized that DE could enhance vasoconstriction in arteries and veins through uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). To test this hypothesis, we first bubbled DE through a physiological saline solution and exposed isolated mesenteric veins. Second, we exposed animals, whole body, to DE at 350 {mu}g/m{sup 3} for 4 h, after which mesenteric arteries and veins were isolated. Results from these experiments show that saline bubbled with DE as well as inhaled DE enhances vasoconstriction in veins but not arteries. Exposure to several representative volatile organic compounds found in the DE-exposed saline did not enhance arterial constriction. L-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME), an eNOS inhibitor, normalized the control vessels to the DE-exposed vessels implicating an uncoupling of eNOS as a mechanism for enhanced vasoconstriction. The principal conclusions of this research are 1) veins exhibit endothelial dysfunction following in vivo and ex vivo exposures to DE, 2) veins appear to be more sensitive to DE effects than arteries, and 3) DE components most likely induce endothelial dysfunction through the uncoupling of eNOS.

  11. An artificial compression method for ENO schemes: The slope modification method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Huanan

    1988-01-01

    A simple and effective method of artificial compression is introduced. This method is based on a modification of the slopes of the ENO (essentially nonoscillatory) reconstruction and, with the help of suitable chosen parameters, greatly improves the resolution of the contact discontinuities. Numerical examples are provided to test the performance of the method and to give some suggestions as to the choice of the parameters.

  12. Some Aspects of Essentially Nonoscillatory (ENO) Formulations for the Euler Equations, Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, Sukumar R.

    1990-01-01

    An essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) formulation is described for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. ENO approaches are based on smart interpolation to avoid spurious numerical oscillations. ENO schemes are a superset of Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) schemes. In the recent past, TVD formulations were used to construct shock capturing finite difference methods. At extremum points of the solution, TVD schemes automatically reduce to being first-order accurate discretizations locally, while away from extrema they can be constructed to be of higher order accuracy. The new framework helps construct essentially non-oscillatory finite difference methods without recourse to local reductions of accuracy to first order. Thus arbitrarily high orders of accuracy can be obtained. The basic general ideas of the new approach can be specialized in several ways and one specific implementation is described based on: (1) the integral form of the conservation laws; (2) reconstruction based on the primitive functions; (3) extension to multiple dimensions in a tensor product fashion; and (4) Runge-Kutta time integration. The resulting method is fourth-order accurate in time and space and is applicable to uniform Cartesian grids. The construction of such schemes for scalar equations and systems in one and two space dimensions is described along with several examples which illustrate interesting aspects of the new approach.

  13. Buckling Reduces eNOS Production and Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Arteries in Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yangming; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-09-01

    Artery buckling alters the fluid shear stress and wall stress in the artery but its temporal effect on vascular wall remodeling is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the early effect of artery buckling on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and extracellular matrix remodeling. Bilateral porcine carotid arteries were maintained in an ex vivo organ culture system with and without buckling while under the same physiological pressure and flow rate for 3-7 days. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III and IV, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), and eNOS were determined using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that MMP-2 expression level was significantly higher in buckled arteries than in the controls and higher at the inner curve than at the outer curve of buckled arteries, while collagen IV content showed an opposite trend, suggesting that artery buckling increased MMP-2 expression and collagen IV degradation in a site-specific fashion. However, no differences for MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III, and TIMP-2 were observed among the outer and inner curve sides of buckled arteries and straight controls. Additionally, eNOS expression was significantly decreased in buckled arteries. These results suggest that artery buckling triggers uneven wall remodeling that could lead to development of tortuous arteries. PMID:26913855

  14. Persistent Electrical Activity in Primary Nociceptors after Spinal Cord Injury Is Maintained by Scaffolded Adenylyl Cyclase and Protein Kinase A and Is Associated with Altered Adenylyl Cyclase Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bavencoffe, Alexis; Li, Yong; Wu, Zizhen; Yang, Qing; Herrera, Juan; Kennedy, Eileen J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about intracellular signaling mechanisms that persistently excite neurons in pain pathways. Persistent spontaneous activity (SA) generated in the cell bodies of primary nociceptors within dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has been found to make major contributions to chronic pain in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI) (Bedi et al., 2010; Yang et al., 2014). The occurrence of SCI-induced SA in a large fraction of DRG neurons and the persistence of this SA long after dissociation of the neurons provide an opportunity to define intrinsic cell signaling mechanisms that chronically drive SA in pain pathways. The present study demonstrates that SCI-induced SA requires continuing activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), as well as a scaffolded complex containing AC5/6, A-kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150), and PKA. SCI caused a small but significant increase in the expression of AKAP150 but not other AKAPs. DRG membranes isolated from SCI animals revealed a novel alteration in the regulation of AC. AC activity stimulated by Ca2+-calmodulin increased, while the inhibition of AC activity by Gαi showed an unexpected and dramatic decrease after SCI. Localized enhancement of the activity of AC within scaffolded complexes containing PKA is likely to contribute to chronic pathophysiological consequences of SCI, including pain, that are promoted by persistent hyperactivity in DRG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic neuropathic pain is a major clinical problem with poorly understood mechanisms and inadequate treatments. Recent findings indicate that chronic pain in a rat SCI model depends upon hyperactivity in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Although cAMP signaling is involved in many forms of neural plasticity, including hypersensitivity of nociceptors in the presence of inflammatory mediators, our finding that continuing cAMP-PKA signaling is required for persistent SA months after SCI and long after isolation of

  15. Coinfection with Human Herpesvirus 8 Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation and Immune Activation in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Robledano, Catalina; Ortiz de la Tabla, Victoria; Antequera, Pedro; Lumbreras, Blanca; Hernández, Ildefonso; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Infection with co-pathogens is one of the postulated factors contributing to persistent inflammation and non-AIDS events in virologically-suppressed HIV-infected patients. We aimed to investigate the relationship of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8), a vasculotropic virus implicated in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, with inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-infected patients. Methods Prospective study including virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients. Several blood biomarkers (highly-sensitive C-reactive protein [hsCRP], tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, malondialdehyde, plasminogen activator inhibitor [PAI-1], D-dimer, sCD14, sCD163, CD4/CD38/HLA-DR, and CD8/CD38/HLA-DR), serological tests for HHV-8 and the majority of herpesviruses, carotid intima-media thickness, and endothelial function through flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery were measured. Results A total of 136 patients were included, 34.6% of them infected with HHV-8. HHV-8-infected patients were more frequently co-infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) (P<0.001), and less frequently with hepatitis C virus (HCV) (P = 0.045), and tended to be older (P = 0.086). HHV-8-infected patients had higher levels of hsCRP (median [interquartile range], 3.63 [1.32–7.54] vs 2.08 [0.89–4.11] mg/L, P = 0.009), CD4/CD38/HLA-DR (7.67% [4.10–11.86]% vs 3.86% [2.51–7.42]%, P = 0.035) and CD8/CD38/HLA-DR (8.02% [4.98–14.09]% vs 5.02% [3.66–6.96]%, P = 0.018). After adjustment for the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, HCV and HSV-2 infection, the associations remained significant: adjusted difference between HHV-8 positive and negative patients (95% confidence interval) for hsCRP, 74.19% (16.65–160.13)%; for CD4/CD38/HLA-DR, 89.65% (14.34–214.87)%; and for CD8/CD38/HLA-DR, 58.41% (12.30–123.22)%. Flow

  16. Computational and anti-tumor studies of 7a-Aza-B-homostigmast-5-eno [7a, 7-d] tetrazole-3β-yl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mahboob; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Nami, Shahab A. A.; Lee, Dong-Ung; Azam, Mohammad; Ahmad, Shabbir

    2016-03-01

    The present paper reports the detailed computational study including molecular docking of a biologically active steroidal tetrazole, 7a-Aza-B-homostigmast-5-eno [7a,7-d] tetrazole-3β-yl chloride. The molecular structure, IR and NMR (13C and 1H) spectra of the tetrazole were interpreted by comparing the experimental results with the theoretical, B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) calculations. The vibrational bands appearing in the FTIR are assigned with great accuracy using animated modes. Molecular properties like HOMO-LUMO analysis, chemical reactivity descriptors, MEP mapping, dipole moment and natural atomic charges have been presented at the same level of theory. The theoretical results are found in good correlation with the experimental data. Moreover, the Hirshfeld analysis was carried out to ascertain the secondary interactions and associated 2D fingerprint plots. The in vitro anti-tumor activity of 7a-Aza-B-homostigmast-5-eno [7a,7-d] tetrazole-3β-yl chloride has also been carried out against five human tumor cell lines. Doxorubicin is used as a standard drug for the in vitro anti-tumor screening.

  17. Age-dependent differences in the strength and persistence of psychostimulant-induced conditioned activity in rats: effects of a single environment-cocaine pairing.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Sanders A; Pipkin, Joseph A; Der-Ghazarian, Taleen; Cortez, Anthony M; Gutierrez, Arnold; Lee, Ryan J; Carbajal, Sandra; Mohd-Yusof, Alena

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the strength and persistence of cocaine-induced conditioned activity in young and adult rats. A one-trial protocol has proven useful for studying the ontogeny of psychostimulant-induced behavioral sensitization; therefore, a similar procedure was used to examine conditioned activity. On postnatal day (PD) 19 or PD 80, rats were injected with saline or cocaine in either a novel test chamber or the home cage. After various drug abstinence intervals (1-21 days), rats were injected with saline and returned to the test chamber, where conditioned activity was assessed. In a separate experiment, we examined whether cocaine-induced conditioned activity was a consequence of Pavlovian conditioning or a failure to habituate to the test environment. The results indicated that adult rats showed strong one-trial conditioned activity that persisted for at least 21 days, whereas young rats did not show a conditioned locomotor response. The conditioned activity shown by adult rats did not result from a failure to habituate to the cocaine-paired environment. These results indicate that cocaine-paired contextual stimuli differentially affect behavior depending on the age of the animal. The data obtained from adult rats have potential translational relevance for humans because a single environment-drug pairing caused long-term alterations in behavior. PMID:25171082

  18. A novel multiplex PCR-RFLP method for simultaneous detection of the MTHFR 677 C > T, eNOS +894 G > T and - eNOS -786 T > C variants among Malaysian Malays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperhomocysteinemia as a consequence of the MTHFR 677 C > T variant is associated with cardiovascular disease and stroke. Another factor that can potentially contribute to these disorders is a depleted nitric oxide level, which can be due to the presence of eNOS +894 G > T and eNOS −786 T > C variants that make an individual more susceptible to endothelial dysfunction. A number of genotyping methods have been developed to investigate these variants. However, simultaneous detection methods using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis are still lacking. In this study, a novel multiplex PCR-RFLP method for the simultaneous detection of MTHFR 677 C > T and eNOS +894 G > T and eNOS −786 T > C variants was developed. A total of 114 healthy Malay subjects were recruited. The MTHFR 677 C > T and eNOS +894 G > T and eNOS −786 T > C variants were genotyped using the novel multiplex PCR-RFLP and confirmed by DNA sequencing as well as snpBLAST. Allele frequencies of MTHFR 677 C > T and eNOS +894 G > T and eNOS −786 T > C were calculated using the Hardy Weinberg equation. Methods The 114 healthy volunteers were recruited for this study, and their DNA was extracted. Primer pair was designed using Primer 3 Software version 0.4.0 and validated against the BLAST database. The primer specificity, functionality and annealing temperature were tested using uniplex PCR methods that were later combined into a single multiplex PCR. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) was performed in three separate tubes followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. PCR product residual was purified and sent for DNA sequencing. Results The allele frequencies for MTHFR 677 C > T were 0.89 (C allele) and 0.11 (T allele); for eNOS +894 G > T, the allele frequencies were 0.58 (G allele) and 0.43 (T allele); and for eNOS −786 T > C, the allele frequencies were 0.87 (T allele

  19. eNOS and iNOS trigger apoptosis in the brains of sheep and goats naturally infected with the border disease virus.

    PubMed

    Dincel, Gungor Cagdas; Kul, Oguz

    2015-10-01

    In this study, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic mechanisms and if present, which pathway to trigger the apoptosis in the brains of Border Disease Virus (BDV) infected lambs (n=10) and goat kids (n=5) were investigated. Briefly, apoptotic (caspase 3, caspase 9) and anti-apoptotic markers (Bcl-2), cytokine response (TNF-α, INF-γ), reactive gliosis and myelin loss were examined. eNOS, iNOS, caspase 9, caspase 3 and GFAP expressions were higher in BDV infected tissues compared to control animals (6 kids and 6 lambs) (p<0.05). Double immunoperoxidase test revealed that TUNEL positive apoptotic cells showed significant association with increased eNOS-iNOS and iNOS-BDV expressions. However, no significant differences were found for TNFR1, TNF-α and INF-γ expressions in BD (p>0.05). There was a positive correlation between the intensity of myelin loss, GFAP activity and severity of infection. Inconclusion, as a novel finding, it is established that eNOS and iNOS overexpressions are co-associated with apoptosis in BDV infected neurons and neuroglia. The results also strongly suggested that BDV infected apoptotic cells mainly prefer the intrinsic pathway that might be most likely related to increased nitric oxide levels. PMID:25882134

  20. Evaluation of methylation status of the eNOS promoter at birth in relation to childhood bone mineral content

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Nicholas C.; Lillycrop, Karen A.; Garratt, Emma; Sheppard, Allan; McLean, Cameron; Burdge, Graham; Slater-Jefferies, Jo; Rodford, Joanne; Crozier, Sarah; Inskip, Hazel; Emerald, Bright Starling; Gale, Catharine R; Hanson, Mark; Gluckman, Peter; Godfrey, Keith; Cooper, Cyrus

    2013-01-01

    Aim Our previous work has shown associations between childhood adiposity and perinatal methylation status of several genes in umbilical cord tissue, including endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). There is increasing evidence that eNOS is important in bone metabolism; we therefore related the methylation status of the eNOS gene promoter in stored umbilical cord to childhood bone size and density in a group of 9-year old children. Methods We used Sequenom MassARRAY to assess the methylation status of 2 CpGs in the eNOS promoter, identified from our previous study, in stored umbilical cords of 66 children who formed part of a Southampton birth cohort and who had measurements of bone size and density at age 9 years (Lunar DPXL DXA instrument). Results Percentage methylation varied greatly between subjects. For one of the two CpGs, eNOS chr7:150315553+, after taking account of age and sex there was a strong positive association between methylation status and the child’s whole body bone area (r=0.28,p=0.02), bone mineral content (r=0.34,p=0.005) and areal bone mineral density (r=0.34,p=0.005) at age 9 years. These associations were independent of previously documented maternal determinants of offspring bone mass. Conclusions Our findings suggest an association between methylation status at birth of a specific CpG within the eNOS promoter and bone mineral content in childhood. This supports a role for eNOS in bone growth and metabolism and implies that its contribution may at least in part occur during early skeletal development. PMID:22159788

  1. Hemoglobin α / eNOS Coupling at Myoendothelial Junctions is Required for Nitric Oxide Scavenging During Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Adam C.; Butcher, Joshua T.; Billaud, Marie; Mutchler, Stephanie M.; Artamonov, Mykhaylo V.; Nguyen, Anh T.; Johnson, Tyler; Best, Angela K.; Miller, Megan P.; Palmer, Lisa A.; Columbus, Linda; Somlyo, Avril V.; Le, Thu H.; Isakson, Brant E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hb α and eNOS form a macromolecular complex at myoendothelial junctions; the functional role of this interaction remains undefined. To test if coupling of eNOS and Hb α regulates NO signaling, vascular reactivity and blood pressure using a mimetic peptide of Hb α to disrupt this interaction. Approach and Results In silico modeling of Hb α and eNOS identified a conserved sequence of interaction. By mutating portions of Hb α, we identified a specific sequence that binds eNOS. A mimetic peptide of the Hb α sequence (Hb α X) was generated to disrupt this complex. Utilizing in vitro binding assays with purified Hb α and eNOS and ex vivo proximity ligation assays on resistance arteries, we have demonstrated that Hb α X significantly decreased interaction between eNOS and Hb α. FITC-labeling of Hb α X revealed localization to holes in the internal elastic lamina (i.e., myoendothelial junctions). To test the functional effects of Hb α X, we measured cGMP and vascular reactivity. Our results reveal augmented cGMP production and altered vasoconstriction with Hb α X. To test the in vivo effects of these peptides on blood pressure, normotensive and hypertensive mice were injected with Hb α X which caused a significant decrease in blood pressure; injection of Hb α X into eNOS−/− mice had no effect. Conclusion These results identify a novel sequence on Hb α that is important for Hb α / eNOS complex formation and is critical for nitric oxide signaling at myoendothelial junctions. PMID:25278292

  2. West Nile Virus Activity in a Winter Roost of American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos): Is Bird-To-Bird Transmission Important in Persistence and Amplification?

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, M. G.; Reisen, W. K.; Wheeler, S. S.; Townsend, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Since its emergence in North America, West Nile virus (WNV) has had a large impact on equines, humans, and wild bird communities, yet gaps remain in our understanding of how the virus persists at temperate latitudes when winter temperatures preclude virus replication and host-seeking activity by mosquito vectors. Bird-to-bird transmission at large communal American Crow roosts could provide one mechanism for WNV persistence. Herein, we describe seasonal patterns of crow and Culex mosquito abundance, WNV infection rates, and the prevalence of WNV-positive fecal samples at a winter crow roost to test the hypothesis that bird-to-bird transmission allows WNV to persist at winter crow roosts. Samples were collected from large winter crow roosts in the Sacramento Valley of California from January 2013 until August 2014, encompassing two overwintering roost periods. West Nile virus RNA was detected in local crow carcasses in both summer [13/18 (72% WNV positive)] and winter [18/44 (41% WNV positive)] 2013–2014. Winter infections were unlikely to have arisen by recent bites from infected mosquitoes because Culex host-seeking activity was very low in winter and all Culex mosquitoes collected during winter months tested negative for WNV. Opportunities existed for fecal-oral transfer at the overwintering roost: most carcasses that tested positive for WNV had detectable viral RNA in both kidney and cloacal swabs, suggesting that infected crows were shedding virus in their feces, and >50% of crows at the roost were stained with feces by mid-winter. Moreover, 2.3% of fecal samples collected in late summer, when mosquitoes were active, tested positive for WNV RNA. Nevertheless, none of the 1,119 feces collected from three roosts over two winters contained detectable WNV RNA. This study provided evidence of WNV infection in overwintering American crows without mosquito vector activity, but did not elucidate a mechanism of WNV transmission during winter. PMID:26335475

  3. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Prax, Marcel; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopolog profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds. PMID:25374846

  4. Persistent barrage firing in cortical interneurons can be induced in vivo and may be important for the suppression of epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Norimitsu; Tang, Clara S.-M.; Bekkers, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural circuits are typically maintained in a state of dynamic equilibrium by balanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. However, brain regions that are particularly susceptible to epilepsy may have evolved additional specialized mechanisms for inhibiting over-excitation. Here we identify one such possible mechanism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. Recently it was reported that some types of GABAergic interneurons can slowly integrate excitatory inputs until eventually they fire persistently in the absence of the original stimulus. This property, called persistent firing or retroaxonal barrage firing (BF), is of unknown physiological importance. We show that two common types of interneurons in cortical regions, neurogliaform (NG) cells and fast-spiking (FS) cells, are unique in exhibiting BF in acute slices (~85 and ~23% success rate for induction, respectively). BF can also be induced in vivo, although the success rate for induction is lower (~60% in NG cells). In slices, BF could reliably be triggered by trains of excitatory synaptic input, as well as by exposure to proconvulsant bath solutions (elevated extracellular K+, blockade of GABAA receptors). Using pair recordings in slices, we confirmed that barrage-firing NG cells can produce synaptic inhibition of nearby pyramidal neurons, and that this inhibition outlasts the original excitation. The ubiquity of NG and FS cells, together with their ability to fire persistently following excessive excitation, suggests that these interneurons may function as cortical sentinels, imposing an activity-dependent brake on undesirable neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:24659955

  5. Persistent barrage firing in cortical interneurons can be induced in vivo and may be important for the suppression of epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norimitsu; Tang, Clara S-M; Bekkers, John M

    2014-01-01

    Neural circuits are typically maintained in a state of dynamic equilibrium by balanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. However, brain regions that are particularly susceptible to epilepsy may have evolved additional specialized mechanisms for inhibiting over-excitation. Here we identify one such possible mechanism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. Recently it was reported that some types of GABAergic interneurons can slowly integrate excitatory inputs until eventually they fire persistently in the absence of the original stimulus. This property, called persistent firing or retroaxonal barrage firing (BF), is of unknown physiological importance. We show that two common types of interneurons in cortical regions, neurogliaform (NG) cells and fast-spiking (FS) cells, are unique in exhibiting BF in acute slices (~85 and ~23% success rate for induction, respectively). BF can also be induced in vivo, although the success rate for induction is lower (~60% in NG cells). In slices, BF could reliably be triggered by trains of excitatory synaptic input, as well as by exposure to proconvulsant bath solutions (elevated extracellular K(+), blockade of GABAA receptors). Using pair recordings in slices, we confirmed that barrage-firing NG cells can produce synaptic inhibition of nearby pyramidal neurons, and that this inhibition outlasts the original excitation. The ubiquity of NG and FS cells, together with their ability to fire persistently following excessive excitation, suggests that these interneurons may function as cortical sentinels, imposing an activity-dependent brake on undesirable neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:24659955

  6. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) 4a/b and G894T Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Zohreh; Aghaei, Amir; Rahimi, Ziba; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad

    2013-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia is a pregnancy complication with unknown etiology and its incidence is associated with genetic and environmental factors. There are inconsistent reports related to the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) 4a/b polymorphism on the risk of preeclampsia development. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible influence of eNOS 4a/b and its synergism with eNOS G894T polymorphism on the risk of preeclampsia. Methods The present case-control study consisted of 179 unrelated women with preeclampsia including 118 with mild and 61 with severe preeclampsia and 96 unrelated women with normal pregnancy as controls. All studied women were from Kermanshah Province of Iran. eNOS 4a/b and G894T genotypes were detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods, respectively. The categorical variables between groups were compared using χ2 test and the Odds ratios (OR) were obtained by SPSS logistic regression. Statistical significance was assumed at p<0.05 level. Results The frequency of eNOS a allele was slightly higher in both mild (16.5%) and severe (17.2%) preeclamptic women than controls (15.1%). Also, no significant difference was found between early- and late-onset preeclamptic women regarding the distribution of eNOS 4a/b genotypes. The presence of each allele of eNOS a or T was not associated with the risk of preeclampsia. However, the concomitant presence of both eNOS a and T alleles was associated with a non significant increased risk of severe preeclampsia by 1.77-fold (p=0.35). Conclusion The present study indicates the lack of association between eNOS a and T alleles with the risk of mild preeclampsia and a non significant increased risk of severe preeclampsia in the presence of both alleles which needs to be investigated in a study with larger samples. PMID:24551572

  7. Ratio of 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin to 7,8-dihydrobiopterin in endothelial cells determines glucose-elicited changes in NO vs. superoxide production by eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Mark J.; Smith, Caroline L.; Lam, George; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Gross, Steven S.

    2009-01-01

    5,6,7,8-Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs). Oxidation of BH4, in the setting of diabetes and other chronic vasoinflammatory conditions, can cause cofactor insufficiency and uncoupling of endothelial NOS (eNOS), manifest by a switch from nitric oxide (NO) to superoxide production. Here we tested the hypothesis that eNOS uncoupling is not simply a consequence of BH4 insufficiency, but rather results from a diminished ratio of BH4 vs. its catalytically incompetent oxidation product, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH2). In support of this hypothesis, [3H]BH4 binding studies revealed that BH4 and BH2 bind eNOS with equal affinity (Kd ≈ 80 nM) and BH2 can rapidly and efficiently replace BH4 in preformed eNOS-BH4 complexes. Whereas the total biopterin pool of murine endothelial cells (ECs) was unaffected by 48-h exposure to diabetic glucose levels (30 mM), BH2 levels increased from undetectable to 40% of total biopterin. This BH2 accumulation was associated with diminished calcium ionophore-evoked NO activity and accelerated superoxide production. Since superoxide production was suppressed by NOS inhibitor treatment, eNOS was implicated as a principal superoxide source. Importantly, BH4 supplementation of ECs (in low and high glucose-containing media) revealed that calcium ionophore-evoked NO bioactivity correlates with intracellular BH4: BH2 and not absolute intracellular levels of BH4. Reciprocally, superoxide production was found to negatively correlate with intracellular BH4:BH2. Hyperglycemia-associated BH4 oxidation and NO insufficiency was recapitulated in vivo, in the Zucker diabetic fatty rat model of type 2 diabetes. Together, these findings implicate diminished intracellular BH4:BH2, rather than BH4 depletion per se, as the molecular trigger for NO insufficiency in diabetes. PMID:18192221

  8. WLS-ENO: Weighted-least-squares based essentially non-oscillatory schemes for finite volume methods on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxu; Jiao, Xiangmin

    2016-06-01

    ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) and WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) schemes are widely used high-order schemes for solving partial differential equations (PDEs), especially hyperbolic conservation laws with piecewise smooth solutions. For structured meshes, these techniques can achieve high order accuracy for smooth functions while being non-oscillatory near discontinuities. For unstructured meshes, which are needed for complex geometries, similar schemes are required but they are much more challenging. We propose a new family of non-oscillatory schemes, called WLS-ENO, in the context of solving hyperbolic conservation laws using finite-volume methods over unstructured meshes. WLS-ENO is derived based on Taylor series expansion and solved using a weighted least squares formulation. Unlike other non-oscillatory schemes, the WLS-ENO does not require constructing sub-stencils, and hence it provides a more flexible framework and is less sensitive to mesh quality. We present rigorous analysis of the accuracy and stability of WLS-ENO, and present numerical results in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D for a number of benchmark problems, and also report some comparisons against WENO.

  9. Shear stress stimulates phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(635) by a protein kinase A-dependent mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Hwang, Jinah; Sykes, Michelle; Michell, Belinda J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Lum, Hazel; Jo, Hanjoong

    2002-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) production by phosphorylating endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) at Ser(1179) in a phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent manner. The eNOS has additional potential phosphorylation sites, including Ser(116), Thr(497), and Ser(635). Here, we studied these potential phosphorylation sites in response to shear, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and 8-bromocAMP (8-BRcAMP) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). All three stimuli induced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(635), which was consistently slower than that at Ser(1179). Thr(497) was rapidly dephosphorylated by 8-BRcAMP but not by shear and VEGF. None of the stimuli phosphorylated Ser(116). Whereas shear-stimulated Ser(635) phosphorylation was not affected by phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002, it was blocked by either treating the cells with a PKA inhibitor H89 or infecting them with a recombinant adenovirus-expressing PKA inhibitor. These results suggest that shear stress stimulates eNOS by two different mechanisms: 1) PKA- and PI3K-dependent and 2) PKA-dependent but PI3K-independent pathways. Phosphorylation of Ser(635) may play an important role in chronic regulation of eNOS in response to mechanical and humoral stimuli.

  10. Association of eNOS Gene Polymorphisms G894T and T-786C with Risk of Hepatorenal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Ali; Yesilada, Elif; Gulbay, Gonca; Bılgıc, Yılmaz; Yildirim, Oguzhan; Turkoz, Yusuf; Aksungur, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are no studies investigating the relationship between endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene polymorphisms and hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Aim. The purpose of this study is to elucidate whether eNOS gene polymorphisms (G894T and T-786C) play a role in the development of type-2 HRS. Methods. This study was carried out in a group of 92 patients with cirrhosis (44 patients with type-2 HRS and 48 without HRS) and 50 healthy controls. Polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and melting curve analysis. Results. We did not find any significant difference in allele and genotype distributions of the eNOS -T-786C polymorphism among the groups (p = 0.440). However, the frequency of GT (40.9%) and TT (13.6%) genotypes and mutant allele T (34.1%) for the eNOS G894T polymorphism were significantly higher (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, resp.) in the HRS group than in both the stable cirrhosis (14.6%, 4.2%, and 11.5%, resp.) and the control (22.0%, 2.0%, and 13.0%, resp.) groups. Conclusion. The occurrence of mutant genotypes (GT/TT) and mutant allele T in eNOS -G894T polymorphisms should be considered as a potential risk factor in cirrhotic patients with HRS. PMID:27594880

  11. Hypoxia-induced endothelial NO synthase gene transcriptional activation is mediated through the tax-responsive element in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiho; Jin, Yoon-Mi; Moon, Je-Sung; Sung, Min-Sun; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2006-06-01

    Although hypoxia is known to induce upregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) gene expression, the underlying mechanism is largely unclear. In this study, we show that hypoxia increases eNOS gene expression through the binding of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein (pCREB) to the eNOS gene promoter. Hypoxia (1% O2) increased both eNOS expression and NO production, peaking at 24 hours, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, and these increases were accompanied by increases in pCREB. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 or transfection with dominant-negative inhibitor of CREB reversed the hypoxia-induced increases in eNOS expression and NO production, with concomitant inhibition of the phosphorylation of CREB induced by hypoxia, suggesting an involvement of protein kinase A/pCREB-mediated pathway. To map the regulatory elements of the eNOS gene responsible for pCREB binding under hypoxia, we constructed an eNOS gene promoter (-1600 to +22 nucleotides) fused with a luciferase reporter gene [pGL2-eNOS(-1600)]. Hypoxia (for 24-hour incubation) increased the promoter activity by 2.36+/-0.18-fold in the bovine aortic endothelial cells transfected with pGL2-eNOS(-1600). However, progressive 5'-deletion from -1600 to -873 completely attenuated the hypoxia-induced increase in promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift, anti-pCREB antibody supershift, and site-specific mutation analyses showed that pCREB is bound to the Tax-responsive element (TRE) site, a cAMP-responsive element-like site, located at -924 to -921 of the eNOS promoter. Our data demonstrate that the interaction between pCREB and the Tax-responsive element site within the eNOS promoter may represent a novel mechanism for the mediation of hypoxia-stimulated eNOS gene expression. PMID:16651461

  12. Persistent cystic fibrosis isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RP73 exhibits an under-acylated LPS structure responsible of its low inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Silipo, Alba; Bianconi, Irene; Lore', Nicola Ivan; Scamporrino, Andrea; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the major pathogen involved in lethal infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) population, is able to cause permanent chronic infections that can persist over the years. This ability to chronic colonize CF airways is related to a series of adaptive bacterial changes involving the immunostimulant lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule. The structure of LPSs isolated from several P. aeruginosa strains showed conserved features that can undergo chemical changes during the establishment of the chronic infection. In the present paper, we report the elucidation of the structure and the biological activity of the R-LPS (lipooligosaccharide, LOS) isolated from the persistent CF isolate P. aeruginosa strain RP73, in order to give further insights in the adaptation mechanism of the pathogen in the CF environment. The complete structural analysis of P. aeruginosa RP73 LOS was achieved by chemical analyses, NMR spectroscopy and MALDI MS spectrometry, while the assessment of the biological activity was attained testing the in vivo pro-inflammatory capacity of the isolated LOS molecule. While a typical CF LPS is able to trigger a high immune response and production of pro-inflammatory molecules, this P. aeruginosa RP73 LOS showed to possess a low pro-inflammatory capacity. This was possible due to a singular chemical structure possessing an under-acylated lipid A very similar to the LPS of P. aeruginosa found in chronic lung diseases such as bronchiectstasis. PMID:24856407

  13. The Attenuated Brucella abortus Strain 19 Invades, Persists in, and Activates Human Dendritic Cells, and Induces the Secretion of IL-12p70 but Not IL-23

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Mario; Eisenblätter, Martin; Jasny, Edith; Fehlings, Michael; Finke, Antje; Gayum, Hermine; Rüschendorf, Ursula; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Moos, Verena; Allers, Kristina; Schneider, Thomas; Schaible, Ulrich E.; Schumann, Ralf R.; Mielke, Martin E.; Ignatius, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vectors have been proposed as novel vaccine strategies to induce strong cellular immunity. Attenuated strains of Brucella abortus comprise promising vector candidates since they have the potential to induce strong CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell mediated immune responses in the absence of excessive inflammation as observed with other Gram-negative bacteria. However, some Brucella strains interfere with the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs), which is essential for antigen-specific T-cell priming. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of human monocyte-derived DCs with the smooth attenuated B. abortus strain (S) 19, which has previously been employed successfully to vaccinate cattle. Methodology/Principal findings We first looked into the potential of S19 to hamper the cytokine-induced maturation of DCs; however, infected cells expressed CD25, CD40, CD80, and CD86 to a comparable extent as uninfected, cytokine-matured DCs. Furthermore, S19 activated DCs in the absence of exogeneous stimuli, enhanced the expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR, and was able to persist intracellularly without causing cytotoxicity. Thus, DCs provide a cellular niche for persisting brucellae in vivo as a permanent source of antigen. S19-infected DCs produced IL-12/23p40, IL-12p70, and IL-10, but not IL-23. While heat-killed bacteria also activated DCs, soluble mediators were not involved in S19-induced activation of human DCs. HEK 293 transfectants revealed cellular activation by S19 primarily through engagement of Toll-like receptor (TLR)2. Conclusions/Significance Thus, as an immunological prerequisite for vaccine efficacy, B. abortus S19 potently infects and potently activates (most likely via TLR2) human DCs to produce Th1-promoting cytokines. PMID:23805193

  14. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation in endothelial cells by S1P1 and S1P3.

    PubMed

    Tölle, M; Klöckl, L; Wiedon, A; Zidek, W; van der Giet, M; Schuchardt, M

    2016-08-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Lysophospholipid interaction with sphingosine 1-phosphat (S1P) receptors results in eNOS activation in different cells. In endothelial cells, eNOS activation via S1P1 or S1P3 was shown controversially. The aim of this study is to investigate the meaning of both S1P receptors for eNOS activation in human endothelial cells. Therefore, several S1P1 and S1P3 agonists in combination with antagonists and specific RNAi approach were used. eNOS activation was measured in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) via DAF2-DA-based fluorescence microscopy. For investigation of the signaling pathway, agonists/antagonist studies, RNAi approach, Luminex™ multiplex, and Western Blot were used. In HUVEC, both the S1P1 agonist AUY954 as well as the S1P1,3 agonist FTY720P induced eNOS activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Other S1P1 agonists activated eNOS to a lesser extent. The AUY954-induced eNOS activation was blocked by the S1P1 antagonist W146, the combination of W146 and the S1P3 antagonist CAY10444 and the S1P1,3 antagonist VPC23019, but not by CAY10444 indicating the meaning of S1P1 for the AUY954-induced eNOS activation. The FTY720P-induced eNOS activation was blocked only by the combination of W146 and CAY10444 and the combined S1P1,3 antagonist VPC23019, but not by W146 or CAY10444 indicating the importance of both S1P1 and S1P3 for FTY720-induced eNOS activation. These results were confirmed using specific siRNA against S1P1 and S1P3. The S1P1,3 activation results in Akt phosphorylation and subsequent activation of eNOS via phosphorylation at serine(1177) and dephosphorylation at threonine(495). Beside former investigations with rather unspecific S1P receptor activation these data show potent selective S1P1 activation by using AUY954 and with selective S1P receptor inhibition evidence was provided that both S1P1 and S1P3 lead to downstream activation of eNOS in

  15. A numerical study of ENO and TVD schemes for shock capturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Shih-Hung; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1988-01-01

    The numerical performance of a second-order upwind-based total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and that of a uniform second-order essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme for shock capturing are compared. The TVD scheme used is a modified version of Liou, using the flux-difference splitting (FDS) of Roe and his superbee function as the limiter. The construction of the basic ENO scheme is based on Harten, Engquist, Osher, and Chakravarthy, and the 2-D extensions are obtained by using a Strang-type of fractional-step time-splitting method. Numerical results presented include both steady and unsteady, 1-D and 2-D calculations. All the chosen test problems have exact solutions so that numerical performance can be measured by comparing the computer results to them. For 1-D calculations, the standard shock-tube problems of Sod and Lax are chosen. A very strong shock-tube problem, with the initial density ratio of 400 to 1 and pressure ratio of 500 to 1, is also used to study the behavior of the two schemes. For 2-D calculations, the shock wave reflection problems are adopted for testing. The cases presented in this report include flows with Mach numbers of 2.9, 5.0, and 10.0.

  16. A family of high-order targeted ENO schemes for compressible-fluid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lin; Hu, Xiangyu Y.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-01-01

    Although classical WENO schemes have achieved great success and are widely accepted, they exhibit several shortcomings. They are too dissipative for direct simulations of turbulence and lack robustness when very-high-order versions are applied to complex flows. In this paper, we propose a family of high-order targeted ENO schemes which are applicable for compressible-fluid simulations involving a wide range of flow scales. In order to increase the numerical robustness as compared to very-high-order classical WENO schemes, the reconstruction dynamically assembles a set of low-order candidate stencils with incrementally increasing width. While discontinuities and small-scale fluctuations are efficiently separated, the numerical dissipation is significantly diminished by an ENO-like stencil selection, which either applies a candidate stencil with its original linear weight, or removes its contribution when it is crossed by a discontinuity. The background linear scheme is optimized under the constraint of preserving an approximate dispersion-dissipation relation. By means of quasi-linear analyses and practical numerical experiments, a set of case-independent parameters is determined. The general formulation of arbitrarily high-order schemes is presented in a straightforward way. A variety of benchmark-test problems, including broadband waves, strong shock and contact discontinuities are studied. Compared to well-established classical WENO schemes, the present schemes exhibit significantly improved robustness, low numerical dissipation and sharp discontinuity capturing. They are particularly suitable for DNS and LES of shock-turbulence interactions.

  17. High-order ENO schemes for unstructured meshes based on least-squares reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Ollivier-Gooch, C.F.

    1997-03-01

    High-order accurate schemes for conservation laws for unstructured meshes are not nearly so well advanced as such schemes for structured meshes. Consequently, little or nothing is known about the possible practical advantages of high-order discretization on unstructured meshes. This article is part of an ongoing effort to develop high-order schemes for unstructured meshes to the point where meaningful information can be obtained about the trade-offs involved in using spatial discretizations of higher than second-order accuracy on unstructured meshes. This article describes a high-order accurate ENO reconstruction scheme, called DD-L{sub 2}-ENO, for use with vertex-centered upwind flow solution algorithms on unstructured meshes. The solution of conservation equations in this context can be broken naturally into three phases: (1) solution reconstruction, in which a polynomial approximation of the solution is obtained in each control volume. (2) Flux integration around each control volume, using an appropriate flux function and a quadrature rule with accuracy commensurate with that of the reconstruction. (3) Time evolution, which may be implicit, explicit, multigrid, or some hybrid.

  18. Medication persistence over 2 years of follow-up in a cohort of early rheumatoid arthritis patients: associated factors and relationship with disease activity and with disability

    PubMed Central

    Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Contreras-Yáñez, Irazú; Villa, Antonio R; Cabiedes, Javier; Rull-Gabayet, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) plays a major role in improving early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patient outcomes. Persistence and adherence with medication occurs variably (20% to 70%). The objectives of the study were to determine medication persistence (MP) in early RA patients over 13 consecutive visits each 2 months apart, to investigate the relationship between MP and disease activity, disability and structural damage, and to identify baseline prognosticators. Methods Charts from 75 patients of an early RA cohort were reviewed. At each visit, a rheumatologist interviewed patients regarding therapy, scored disease activity with the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and disability with the health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), and recorded comorbidities and treatment. A complete medical history was obtained at baseline. MP was defined as the duration of time from initiation to discontinuation of at least one DMARD and/or corticosteroids for at least 1 week and was reported as a dichotomous variable at consecutive evaluations. Structural damage was defined by detection of new erosions on radiography. Descriptive statistics, Student's t test, the chi-squared test, and logistic regression analyses were used. Results The proportion of MP patients decreased from 98% at 2 months to 34% at 2 years. MP patients (n = 32) had similar DAS28 to non-MP patients (n = 53) at initial visits, lower DAS28 and greater DAS28 improvements at follow-ups (P ≤ 0.05 at visits 4, 6, 7 and 9) and reached sustained remission (≥ 3 consecutive visits with DAS28 < 2.6) more frequently (82.8% versus 46.5%, P = 0.003) and earlier (7.7 ± 4.6 versus 13.6 ± 5.7 months, P = 0.001) than non-MP patients. MP patients had similar baseline HAQ scores, but lower HAQ scores at follow-up (P ≤ 0.05 at visits 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 13). More non-MP patients developed erosive disease than MP patients (26.8% versus 17.9%, P = 0.56). Older age

  19. Predictors of Student Persistence in the STEM Pipeline: Activities Outside the Classroom, Parent Aspirations, and Student Self-Beliefs using NELS:88 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joelle A.

    Focusing on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) literacy is a national priority for the United States. As competition increases internationally for scientific and technological innovations, the United States is concentrating on building its STEM capacity (Stephens, 2011). Despite the numerous STEM reform efforts there continues to be a decline in STEM graduates and STEM competencies (McNally, 2012; Langdon, Mckittrick, Beede, Doms, & Khan, 2011; Herschback, 2011). With attention focused on increasing STEM college majors and occupations among the student population, the current research investigation centered on the role of parent aspirations, student self-beliefs, and activities outside the classroom to determine the outcome of middle and high school students choosing a STEM college major. Research suggested that students formulate their degree attainment during their middle and high school years, and even earlier (Roach, 2006; Maltese & Tai, 2011); therefore, it was logical to investigate STEM persistence during middle and high school years. The study analyzed NELS:88, a longitudinal national public data set created by the National Center for Educational Statistics that used 12,144 participants. The students' self-reported data spanned over a 12-year period. Students completed five surveys in the NELS:88 data collection (NCES, 2011). Binary and multivariate logistical regressions determined if activities outside the classroom, parent aspirations, and student self-beliefs influenced STEM college majors. Conclusions of the study found significant relationships between the variables and STEM persistence. Individuals who participated in STEM activities after school were more likely to major in STEM (p<.001,Exp(B)=1.106). There was a significant positive relationship between parent aspirations and increased odds of choosing a STEM major (p<.0001, Exp(B)=1.041). There was a significant relationship between student self-beliefs and choosing a STEM

  20. Attracting Non-Traditional Students to Campus Activities and Leadership Programs: Providing Links to Academics, Persistence Are Key.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Marcie S.

    2003-01-01

    Explores some strategies to attract non-traditional students to campus activities, highlights a model program that integrates scholarship support and leadership programs, explores new ways of marketing to these students, and offers some suggestions for continued development. (EV)

  1. L-Arginine ameliorates cardiac left ventricular oxidative stress by upregulating eNOS and Nrf2 target genes in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Hamenth Kumar, Palani; Syed Mohamed Puhari, Shanavas; Senthil Murugan, Ponniah; Vasudevan, Varadaraj; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antioxidant marker proteins were found high in myocardium by L-arginine treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated antioxidant status, mediates the reduced TBA-reactivity in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment enhanced the Nrf2 and eNOS signaling in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved cell survival signaling by arginine, offers a novel tactic for targeting. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia is independently related with excessive morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disorders. L-Arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the involvement of NO in modulating nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling were well established. In the present study we investigated, whether L-arginine supplementation would improve the myocardial antioxidant defense under hyperglycemia through activation of Nrf2 signaling. Diabetes was induced by alloxan monohydrate (90 mg kg{sup -1} body weight) in rats. Both non-diabetic and diabetic group of rats were divided into three subgroups and they were administered either with L-arginine (2.25%) or L-NAME (0.01%) in drinking water for 12 days. Results showed that L-arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic rats. Antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels were found to be increased in heart left ventricles, thereby reduction of lipid peroxidation by L-arginine treatment. Heart histopathological analysis further validates the reversal of typical diabetic characteristics consisting of alterations in myofibers and myofibrillary degeneration. qRT-PCR studies revealed that L-arginine treatment upregulated the transcription of Akt and downregulated NF-{kappa}B. Notably, transcription of eNOS and Nrf2 target genes was also upregulated, which were accompanied by enhanced expression of Nrf2 in left ventricular tissue from diabetic

  2. Systems for persistent surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Keith

    2011-09-01

    The requirements for a persistent wide-area surveillance system are discussed in the context of evolving military operations. Significant emphasis has been placed on the development of new sensing technologies to meet the challenges posed by asymmetric threats. Within the UK, the Electro-Magnetic Remote Sensing Defence Technology Centre (EMRS DTC) has supported the research and development of new capabilities including radio-frequency (RF) and electro-optic (EO) systems, as well as work on sensor exploitation, with a goal of developing solutions for enhancing situational awareness. This activity has been supported by field trials to determine the efficacy of competing technologies in relation to realistic threat scenarios.

  3. Convex ENO High Order Multi-dimensional Schemes without Field by Field Decomposition or Staggered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu-Dong; Osher, Stanley

    1998-05-01

    Second order accurate (first order at extrema) cell averaged based approximations extending the Lax-Friedrichs central scheme, using component-wise rather than field-by-field limiting, have been found to give surprisingly good results for a wide class of problems involving shocks (see H. Nessyahu and E. Tadmor, J. Comput. Phys.87, 408, 1990). The advantages of component-wise limiting compared to its counterpart, field-by-field limiting, are apparent: (1) No complete set of eigenvectors is needed and hence weakly hyperbolic systems can be solved. (2) Component-wise limiting is faster than field-by-field limiting. (3) The programming is much simpler, especially for complicated coupled systems of many equations. However, these methods are based on cell-averages in a staggered grid and are thus a bit complicated to extend to multiple dimensions. Moreover the staggering causes slight difficulties at the boundaries. In this work we modify and extend this component-wise central differencing based procedure in two directions: (1) Point values, rather than cell averages are used, thus removing the need for staggered grids, and also making the extension to multi-dimensions quite simple. We use TVD Runge-Kutta time discretizations to update the solution. (2) A new type of decision process, which follows the general ENO philosophy is introduced and used. This procedure enables us to extend our method to a third order component-wise central ENO scheme, which apparently works well and is quite simple to implement in multi-dimensions. Additionally, our numerical viscosity is governed by the local magnitude of the maximum eigenvalue of the Jacobian, thus reducing the smearing in the numerical results. We found a speed up of a factor of 2 in each space dimension, on a SGI O2workstation, over methods based on field-by-field decomposition limiting. The new decision process leads to new, "convex" ENO schemes which, we believe, are of interest in a more general setting. Our numerical

  4. Development of confocal immunofluorescence FRET microscopy to Investigate eNOS and GSNOR localization and interaction in pulmonary endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Shagufta; Brown-Steinke, Kathleen; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2015-03-01

    Confocal FRET microscopy is a widely used technique for studying protein-protein interactions in live or fixed cells. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) are enzymes involved in regulating the bioavailability of S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) in the pulmonary endothelium and have roles in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Labeling of endogenous proteins to better understand a disease process can be challenging. We have used immunofluorescence to detect endogenous eNOS and GSNOR in primary pulmonary endothelial cells to co-localize these proteins as well as to study their interaction by FRET. The challenge has been in selecting the right immunofluorescence labeling condition, right antibody, the right blocking reagent, the right FRET pair and eliminating cross-reactivity of secondary antibodies. We have used Alexa488 and Alexa568 as a FRET pair. After a series of optimizations, the data from Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) demonstrate co-localization of eNOS and GSNOR in the perinuclear region of the pulmonary endothelial cell primarily within the cis-Golgi with lower levels of co-localization seen within the trans-Golgi. FRET studies demonstrate, for the first time, interaction between eNOS and GSNOR in both murine and bovine pulmonary endothelial cells. Further characterization of eNOSGSNOR interaction and the subcellular location of this interaction will provide mechanistic insight into the importance of S-nitrosothiol signaling in pulmonary biology, physiology and pathology.

  5. Antiprion Activity of DB772 and Related Monothiophene- and Furan-Based Analogs in a Persistently Infected Ovine Microglia Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Dinkel, Kelcey D.; Stanton, James B.; Boykin, David W.; Stephens, Chad E.; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the misfolding of the native cellular prion protein (PrPC) into the accumulating, disease-associated isoform (PrPSc). Despite extensive research into the inhibition of prion accumulation, no effective treatment exists. Previously, we demonstrated the inhibitory activity of DB772, a monocationic phenyl-furan-benzimidazole, against PrPSc accumulation in sheep microglial cells. In an effort to determine the effect of structural substitutions on the antiprion activity of DB772, we employed an in vitro strategy to survey a library of structurally related, monothiophene- and furan-based compounds for improved inhibitory activity. Eighty-nine compounds were screened at 1 μM for effects on cell viability and prion accumulation in a persistently infected ovine microglia culture system. Eleven compounds with activity equivalent to or higher than that of DB772 were identified as preliminary hit compounds. For the preliminary hits, cytotoxicities and antiprion activities were compared to calculate the tissue culture selectivity index. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis was performed to determine molecular components contributing to antiprion activity. To investigate potential mechanisms of inhibition, effects on PrPC and PrPSc were examined. While inhibition of total PrPC was not observed, the results suggest that a potential target for inhibition at biologically relevant concentrations is through PrPC misfolding to PrPSc. Further, SAR analysis suggests that two structural elements were associated with micromolar antiprion activity. Taken together, the described data provide a foundation for deeper investigation into untested DB compounds and in the design of effective therapeutics. PMID:27381401

  6. Antiprion Activity of DB772 and Related Monothiophene- and Furan-Based Analogs in a Persistently Infected Ovine Microglia Culture System.

    PubMed

    Dinkel, Kelcey D; Stanton, James B; Boykin, David W; Stephens, Chad E; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Schneider, David A

    2016-09-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the misfolding of the native cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the accumulating, disease-associated isoform (PrP(Sc)). Despite extensive research into the inhibition of prion accumulation, no effective treatment exists. Previously, we demonstrated the inhibitory activity of DB772, a monocationic phenyl-furan-benzimidazole, against PrP(Sc) accumulation in sheep microglial cells. In an effort to determine the effect of structural substitutions on the antiprion activity of DB772, we employed an in vitro strategy to survey a library of structurally related, monothiophene- and furan-based compounds for improved inhibitory activity. Eighty-nine compounds were screened at 1 μM for effects on cell viability and prion accumulation in a persistently infected ovine microglia culture system. Eleven compounds with activity equivalent to or higher than that of DB772 were identified as preliminary hit compounds. For the preliminary hits, cytotoxicities and antiprion activities were compared to calculate the tissue culture selectivity index. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis was performed to determine molecular components contributing to antiprion activity. To investigate potential mechanisms of inhibition, effects on PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) were examined. While inhibition of total PrP(C) was not observed, the results suggest that a potential target for inhibition at biologically relevant concentrations is through PrP(C) misfolding to PrP(Sc) Further, SAR analysis suggests that two structural elements were associated with micromolar antiprion activity. Taken together, the described data provide a foundation for deeper investigation into untested DB compounds and in the design of effective therapeutics. PMID:27381401

  7. Characterisation of eye-lens DNases: long term persistence of activity in post apoptotic lens fibre cells.

    PubMed

    Arruti, C; Chaudun, E; De Maria, A; Courtois, Y; Counis, M F

    1995-01-01

    Fibre cells in the ocular lens exhibit a constitutive apoptotic process of nuclear degradation that includes chromatin breakage, generating a ladder pattern of DNA fragments. This process is intrinsic to the normal terminal differentiation program. Despite the loss of nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, the terminal differentiated fibre cells remain in the lens during the whole life span of the individual. The lens cells thus provide a unique system in which to determine the presence and fate of endonucleases once the chromatin has been cleaved. We report here on the presence of DNase activity in nucleated and anucleated lens cells. Using a nuclease gel assay and double-stranded DNA as substrate, we found active 30 and 60 kDa DNases. The enzymatic activities were Ca(2+), Mg(2+) dependent, and active at neutral pH. The relative amount of these forms changed during development and aging of the lens fibre cells. Both forms were inhibited by Zn(2+), aurintricarboxylic acid, and G-actin. The proteins were also separated by SDS-PAGE, renatured after removing SDS and incubated in the presence of native DNA adsorbed to a membrane. Therefore it was possible to demonstrate, by means of a nick translation reaction, that the enzymes produced single strand cuts. Based on these findings we propose that these chick lens nucleases are probably related to DNase I. PMID:17180015

  8. IVIg immune reconstitution treatment alleviates the state of persistent immune activation and suppressed CD4 T cell counts in CVID.

    PubMed

    Paquin-Proulx, Dominic; Santos, Bianca A N; Carvalho, Karina I; Toledo-Barros, Myrthes; Barreto de Oliveira, Ana Karolina; Kokron, Cristina M; Kalil, Jorge; Moll, Markus; Kallas, Esper G; Sandberg, Johan K

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by defective B cell function, impaired antibody production, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections may result in substantial perturbations in the T cell compartment. Newly diagnosed CVID patients were sampled before, and 6-12 months after, initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy. Treatment-naïve CVID patients displayed suppressed CD4 T cell counts and myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) levels, as well as high levels of immune activation in CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells, and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Expression of co-stimulatory receptors CD80 and CD83 was elevated in mDCs and correlated with T cell activation. Levels of both FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells and iNKT cells were low, whereas soluble CD14 (sCD14), indicative of monocyte activation, was elevated. Importantly, immune reconstitution treatment with IVIg partially restored the CD4 T cell and mDC compartments. Treatment furthermore reduced the levels of CD8 T cell activation and mDC activation, whereas levels of Treg cells and iNKT cells remained low. Thus, primary deficiency in humoral immunity with impaired control of microbial infections is associated with significant pathological changes in cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, therapeutic enhancement of humoral immunity with IVIg infusions alleviates several of these defects, indicating a relationship between poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections and the occurrence of abnormalities in the T cell and mDC compartments. These findings help our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of primary immunodeficiency, as well as acquired immunodeficiency caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:24130688

  9. High-order ENO methods for the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    The adaptive stencil concepts of ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) methods are applied to the laminar Navier-Stokes equations to yield a high-order, time-accurate algorithm with a shock-capturing capability. The method targets problems in the areas of nonlinear acoustics, compressible transition, and turbulence which, due to the presence of shocks or complex geometries, are not easily solved by spectral methods. The present approach has been implemented and tested for the full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in a transformed curvilinear coordinate system. Validation results are presented for a variety of problems which verify the method's accuracy properties and shock capturing capabilities, as well as demonstrate its use as a direct simulation tool.

  10. A high-order symmetrical weighted hybrid ENO-flux limiter scheme for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedian, Rooholah; Adibi, Hojatollah; Dehghan, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) procedure for solving hyperbolic conservation laws, on uniform meshes. The new scheme combines essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) reconstructions together with monotone upwind schemes for scalar conservation laws' interpolants. In a one-dimensional context, first, we obtain an optimum polynomial on a five-cells stencil. This optimum polynomial is fifth-order accurate in regions of smoothness. Next, we modify a third-order ENO polynomial by choosing an additional point inside the stencil in order to obtain the highest accuracy when combined with the Harten-Osher reconstruction-evolution method limiter. Then, we consider the optimum polynomial as a symmetric and convex combination of four polynomials with ideal weights. After that, following the methodology of the classic WENO procedure, we calculate non-oscillatory weights with the ideal weights. Also, the numerical solution is advanced in time by means of the linear multi-step total variation bounded (TV B) technique. Numerical examples on both scalar and gas dynamics problems confirm that the new scheme is non-oscillatory and yields sharp results when solving profiles with discontinuities. Comparing the new scheme with high-order WENO schemes shows that our method reduces smearing near shocks and corners, and in some cases it is more accurate near discontinuities. Finally, the new method is extended to multi-dimensional problems by a dimension-by-dimension approach. Several multi-dimensional examples are performed to show that our method remains non-oscillatory while giving good resolution of discontinuities.

  11. Epistasis among eNOS, MMP-9 and VEGF maternal genotypes in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Luizon, Marcelo R; Sandrim, Valeria C; Palei, Ana Ct; Lacchini, Riccardo; Cavalli, Ricardo C; Duarte, Geraldo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2012-09-01

    Polymorphisms of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) genes were shown to be associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. However, epistasis is suggested to be an important component of the genetic susceptibility to preeclampsia (PE). The aim of this study was to characterize the interactions among these genes in PE and gestational hypertension (GH). Seven clinically relevant polymorphisms of eNOS (T-786C, rs2070744, a variable number of tandem repeats in intron 4 and Glu298Asp, rs1799983), MMP-9 (C-1562T, rs3918242 and -90(CA)₁₃-₂₅, rs2234681) and VEGF (C-2578A, rs699947 and G-634C, rs2010963) were genotyped by TaqMan allelic discrimination assays or PCR and fragment separation by electrophoresis in 122 patients with PE, 107 patients with GH and a control group of 102 normotensive pregnant (NP) women. A robust multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis was used to characterize gene-gene interactions. Although no significant genotype combinations were observed for the comparison between the GH and NP groups (P>0.05), the combination of MMP-9-1562CC with VEGF-634GG was more frequent in NP women than in women with PE (P<0.05). Moreover, the combination of MMP-9-1562CC with VEGF-634CC or MMP-9-1562CT with VEGF-634CC or-634GG was more frequent in women with PE than in NP women (P<0.05). These results are obscured when single polymorphisms in these genes are considered and suggest that specific genotype combinations of MMP-9 and VEGF contribute to PE susceptibility. PMID:22573202

  12. Caveolin-1 mediates endotoxin inhibition of endothelin-1-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Willson; Lee, Sang Ho; Culberson, Cathy; Korneszczuk, Katarzyna; Clemens, Mark G

    2009-11-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) plays a key role in the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). In the presence of endotoxin, an increase in caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression impairs ET-1/eNOS signaling; however, the molecular mechanism is unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of Cav-1 in the regulation of LPS suppression of ET-1-mediated eNOS activation in LSECs by examining the effect of caveolae disruption using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CD) and filipin. Treatment with 5 mM CD for 30 min increased eNOS activity (+255%, P < 0.05). A dose (0.25 microg/ml) of filipin for 30 min produced a similar effect (+111%, P < 0.05). CD induced the perinuclear localization of Cav-1 and eNOS and stimulated NO production in the same region. Readdition of 0.5 mM cholesterol to saturate CD reversed these effects. Both the combined treatment with CD and ET-1 (CD + ET-1) and with filipin and ET-1 stimulated eNOS activity; however, pretreatment with endotoxin (LPS) abrogated these effects. Following LPS pretreatment, CD + ET-1 failed to stimulate eNOS activity (+51%, P > 0.05), which contributed to the reduced levels of eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and eNOS-Thr495 dephosphorylation, the LPS/CD-induced overexpression and translocation of Cav-1 in the perinuclear region, and the increased perinuclear colocalization of eNOS with Cav-1. These results supported the hypothesis that Cav-1 mediates the action of endotoxin in suppressing ET-1-mediated eNOS activation and demonstrated that the manipulation of caveolae produces significant effects on ET-1-mediated eNOS activity in LSECs. PMID:20501440

  13. Modeling the influence of temperature, water activity and water mobility on the persistence of Salmonella in low-moisture foods.

    PubMed

    Farakos, S M Santillana; Frank, J F; Schaffner, D W

    2013-09-01

    Salmonella can survive in low-moisture foods for long periods of time. Reduced microbial inactivation during heating is believed to be due to the interaction of cells and water, and is thought to be related to water activity (a(w)). Little is known about the role of water mobility in influencing the survival of Salmonella in low-moisture foods. The aim of this study was to determine how the physical state of water in low-moisture foods influences the survival of Salmonella and to use this information to develop mathematical models that predict the behavior of Salmonella in these foods. Whey protein powder of differing water mobilities was produced by pH adjustment and heat denaturation, and then equilibrated to aw levels between 0.19±0.03 and 0.54±0.02. Water mobility was determined by wide-line proton-NMR. Powders were inoculated with a four-strain cocktail of Salmonella, vacuum-sealed and stored at 21, 36, 50, 60, 70 and 80°C. Survival data was fitted to the log-linear, the Geeraerd-tail, the Weibull, the biphasic-linear and the Baranyi models. The model with the best ability to describe the data over all temperatures, water activities and water mobilities (f(test)activity significantly influenced the survival of Salmonella at all temperatures, survival increasing with decreasing a(w). Water mobility did not significantly influence survival independent of a(w). Secondary models were useful in predicting the survival of Salmonella in various low-moisture foods providing a correlation of R=0.94 and an acceptable prediction performance of 81

  14. Persistent inflation at Aira caldera accompanying explosive activity at Sakurajima volcano: Constraining deformation source parameters from Finite Element inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Jo; Iguchi, Masato; Nakamichi, Haruhisa

    2015-04-01

    Aira caldera is located within Kagoshima Bay at the southern end of Kyushu, Japan. Sakurajima is an active post-caldera andesitic stratovolcano that sits on the caldera's southern rim. Despite frequent Vulcanian-type explosive activity, the area is experiencing continued uplift at a maximum rate of approximately 1.5 cm/yr with a footprint of 40 km, indicating that magma is being supplied faster than it is erupted. This is of particular concern as the amplitude of deformation is approaching the level inferred prior to the 1914 VEI 4 eruption. Using GPS data from 1996 - 2007 we explore causes for the uplift. To solve for the optimum deformation source parameters we use an inverse Finite Element method accounting for three-dimensional material heterogeneity (inferred from seismic tomography) and the surrounding topography of the region. The same inversions are also carried out using Finite Element models that incorporate simplified homogeneous or one-dimensional subsurface material properties, with and without topography. Results from the comparison of the six different models show statistically significant differences in the inferred deformation sources. This indicates that both subsurface heterogeneity and surface topography are essential in geodetic modelling to extract the most realistic deformation source parameters. The current best-fit source sits within a seismic low-velocity zone in the north-east of the caldera at a depth of approximately 14 km with a volume increase of 1.2 x 108 m3. The source location underlies a region of active underwater fumaroles within the Wakamiko crater and differs significantly from previous analytical modelling results. Seismic data further highlights areas of high seismic attenuation as well as large aseismic zones, both of which could allude to inelastic behaviour and a significant heat source at depth. To integrate these observations, subsequent forward Finite Element models will quantify the importance of rheology and

  15. [Antibacterial activity of enoxacin in vitro and in urine].

    PubMed

    Soussy, C J; Deforges, L; Duval, J

    1987-05-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of enoxacin (ENO) were evaluated by agar dilution, in comparison with MIC of nalidixic acid (NAL), pipemidic acid (PIP), oxolinic acid (OXO), pefloxacin (PEF), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL) and ciprofloxacin (CIP), for eleven Enterobacteriaceae reference strains chosen as a function of sensitivity and level of resistance to NAL. In the four strains susceptible to NAL, MIC of ENO (0.06 to 0.25 micrograms/ml) were similar to those for PEF and NOR, 2 to 4 times inferior to those for OXO, 16 to those for PIP and 32 to those for NAL; this ratio of activity was also seen in the majority of strains resistant to NAL. Measurement of MIC of ENO for 397 recent clinical isolates confirmed efficacy of this substance against Enterobacteriaceae and showed its activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mode MIC: 0.5-1 micrograms/ml), and Gram positive cocci, essentially Staphylococcus aureus (mode MIC: 0.5-1). Antibacterial activity in the urine was measured by the Heilman test in 5 male adults after two doses of 200 mg of ENO administered at 12 hours intervals, two doses of 400 mg of ENO and, in comparison two of 400 mg of PIP administered under the same conditions. Maximal inhibitory dilutions obtained with ENO reached (mean for 5 subjects): 1/64 to 1/128 after 200 mg and 1/128 to 1/512 after 400 mg for a sensitive Providencia strain (MIC ENO: 0.25); 1/32 to 1/128 and 1/64 to 1/256 for an E. coli strain of low level of resistance to NAL (MIC ENO: 2); activity was very low on a Serratia strain highly resistant to NAL (MIC ENO: 16).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3302849

  16. Lectin binding to surface Ig variable regions provides a universal persistent activating signal for follicular lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Linley, Adam; Krysov, Sergey; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Johnson, Peter W; Packham, Graham; Stevenson, Freda K

    2015-10-15

    The vast majority of cases of follicular lymphoma (FL), but not normal B cells, acquire N-glycosylation sites in the immunoglobulin variable regions during somatic hypermutation. Glycans added to sites are unusual in terminating at high mannoses. We showed previously that the C-type lectins, dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) and mannose receptor, bound to FL surface immunoglobulin (sIg), generating an intracellular Ca(2+) flux. We have now mapped further intracellular pathways activated by DC-SIGN in a range of primary FL cells with detection of phosphorylated ERK1/2, AKT, and PLCγ2. The SYK inhibitor (tamatinib) or the BTK inhibitor (ibrutinib) each blocked phosphorylation. Activation by DC-SIGN occurred in both IgM(+) and IgG(+) cases and led to upregulation of MYC expression, with detection in vivo observed in lymph nodes. Unlike cells of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, FL cells expressed relatively high levels of sIg, unchanged by long-term incubation in vitro, indicating no antigen-mediated downregulation in vivo. In contrast, expression of CXCR4 increased in vitro. Engagement of sIg in FL cells or normal B cells by anti-Ig led to endocytosis in vitro as expected, but DC-SIGN, even when cross-linked, did not lead to significant endocytosis of sIg. These findings indicate that lectin binding generates signals via sIg but does not mediate endocytosis, potentially maintaining a supportive antigen-independent signal in vivo. Location of DC-SIGN in FL tissue revealed high levels in sinusoidlike structures and in some colocalized mononuclear cells, suggesting a role for lectin-expressing cells at this site. PMID:26194765

  17. AB037. Icariside II improves human cavernous endothelial cells function by regulating miR-155/eNOS signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ruili; Lei, Hongen; Yang, Bicheng; Li, Huixi; Wang, Lin; Guo, Yinglu; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the changes of miR-155/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signal pathway under the stimulation of age-BSA and glucose with or without icariside II (ICAII) intervention inhuman cavernous endothelial cells (HCECs). Methods Purified HCECs were first divided into three groups randomly: normal group + BSA (NC group), age-BSA + glucose group (DM group), ICAII treatment group (DM + ICAII group with different concentrations at 0.1, 1, 10 µM). Western Blot to detect the protein expression of eNOS and RAGE; real time PCR to detect the expression of miR-155 and eNOS; DAF-FM DA fluorescent probes assay and NaNO3/NaNO2 assay to detect the NO concentration. Lentivirus mediated miR-155 over-expression was constructed to observe the changes of eNOS and NO. Results The eNOS and RAGE expression in DM group is significantly reduced and increased respectively compared with that of NC group (P<0.05), while ICAII intervention could reverse this change effectively. The 10 µM of ICAII has the most powerful effect. MiR-155 has the highest fold changes among candidate miRNAs in diabetic like HCECs (P<0.05). MiR-155 increased and eNOS decreased remarkably in DM group, while ICAII intervention could inhibit the miR-155 expression, which led to the significantly higher eNOS expression and NO concentration (P<0.05). In lentivirus mediated miR-155 overexpression with or without ICAII intervention model, we found the similar trend with the above diabetic model. Conclusions MiR-155/eNOS signal pathway may be involved in the process of diabetic HCECs dysfunction. ICAII could promote the recovery of the endothelial dysfunction by regulating the miR-155/eNOS signal pathway.

  18. Disseminated Tumor Cells Persist in the Bone Marrow of Breast Cancer Patients through Sustained Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Bartkowiak, Kai; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Buck, Friedrich; Gorges, Tobias M; Nilse, Lars; Assmann, Volker; Andreas, Antje; Müller, Volkmar; Wikman, Harriet; Riethdorf, Sabine; Schlüter, Hartmut; Pantel, Klaus

    2015-12-15

    Disseminated tumor cells (DTC), which share mesenchymal and epithelial properties, are considered to be metastasis-initiating cells in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms supporting DTC survival are poorly understood. DTC extravasation into the bone marrow may be encouraged by low oxygen concentrations that trigger metabolic and molecular alterations contributing to DTC survival. Here, we investigated how the unfolded protein response (UPR), an important cytoprotective program induced by hypoxia, affects the behavior of stressed cancer cells. DTC cell lines established from the bone marrow of patients with breast cancer (BC-M1), lung cancer, (LC-M1), and prostate cancer (PC-E1) were subjected to hypoxic and hypoglycemic conditions. BC-M1 and LC-M1 exhibiting mesenchymal and epithelial properties adapted readily to hypoxia and glucose starvation. Upregulation of UPR proteins, such as the glucose-regulated protein Grp78, induced the formation of filamentous networks, resulting in proliferative advantages and sustained survival under total glucose deprivation. High Grp78 expression correlated with mesenchymal attributes of breast and lung cancer cells and with poor differentiation in clinical samples of primary breast and lung carcinomas. In DTCs isolated from bone marrow specimens from breast cancer patients, Grp78-positive stress granules were observed, consistent with the likelihood these cells were exposed to acute cell stress. Overall, our findings provide the first evidence that the UPR is activated in DTC in the bone marrow from cancer patients, warranting further study of this cell stress pathway as a predictive biomarker for recurrent metastatic disease. PMID:26573792

  19. Persistence and residual activity of an organophosphate, pirimiphos-methyl, and three IGRs, hexaflumuron, teflubenzuron and pyriproxyfen, against the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Abo-Elghar, Gamal E; El-Sheikh, Anwar E; El-Sayed, Ferial M; El-Maghraby, Hamdi M; El-Zun, Hesham M

    2004-01-01

    Three insect growth regulators (IGR), the chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSI) teflubenzuron and hexaflumuron and the juvenile hormone mimic (JHM) pyriproxyfen, as well as the organophosphate (OP) pirimiphos-methyl, were evaluated for their activity against the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F), in cowpea seeds stored for up to 8 months post-treatment. The initial activity data showed that, based on LC50 level, teflubenzuron had strong ovicidal activity (LC50 = 0.056 mg kg(-1)) followed by pirimiphos-methyl (1.82 mg kg(-1)) and pyriproxyfen (91.9 mg kg(-1)). The residual activity data showed that none of the IGRs tested had strong activity when applied at 200 mg kg(-1) in reducing the oviposition rates of C maculatus at various storage intervals up to 8 months post-treatment. However, teflubenzuron reduced adult emergence (F1 progeny), achieving control ranging from 96.2% at 1 month to 94.3% at 8 months. Hexaflumuron showed a similar trend in its residual activity, ranging between 93.8% control at 1 month to 88.2% control at 8 months post-treatment. However, pyriproxyfen was more active than the CSIs tested and caused complete suppression (100% control) of adult emergence at all storage intervals. Unlike the IGRs tested, pirimiphos-methyl applied at 25 mg kg(-1) was more effective in reducing oviposition rates of C maculatus up to 8 months post-treatment. A strong reduction of adult emergence was also observed at various bimonthly intervals (98.6% control at 1 month to 91.6% control at 8 months post-treatment). The persistence of hexaflumuron and pirimiphos-methyl in cowpea seeds was also studied over a period of 8 months. The loss of hexaflumuron residue in treated cowpeas (200 mg kg(-1)) was very slow during the first month post-treatment (4.43%). At the end of 8 months, the residue level had declined significantly to 46.4% of the initial applied rate. The loss of pirimiphos-methyl residue in treated cowpeas (25 mg kg(-1)) was relatively high during the

  20. Developmental Exposure to Concentrated Ambient Ultrafine Particulate Matter Air Pollution in Mice Results in Persistent and Sex-Dependent Behavioral Neurotoxicity and Glial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Joshua L.; Liu, Xiufang; Weston, Douglas; Prince, Lisa; Oberdörster, Günter; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Johnston, Carl J.; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    The brain appears to be a target of air pollution. This study aimed to further ascertain behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms of our previously observed preference for immediate reward (Allen, J. L., Conrad, K., Oberdorster, G., Johnston, C. J., Sleezer, B., and Cory-Slechta, D. A. (2013). Developmental exposure to concentrated ambient particles and preference for immediate reward in mice. Environ. Health Perspect. 121, 32–38), a phenotype consistent with impulsivity, in mice developmentally exposed to inhaled ultrafine particles. It examined the impact of postnatal and/or adult concentrated ambient ultrafine particles (CAPS) or filtered air on another behavior thought to reflect impulsivity, Fixed interval (FI) schedule-controlled performance, and extended the assessment to learning/memory (novel object recognition (NOR)), and locomotor activity to assist in understanding behavioral mechanisms of action. In addition, levels of brain monoamines and amino acids, and markers of glial presence and activation (GFAP, IBA-1) were assessed in mesocorticolimbic brain regions mediating these cognitive functions. This design produced four treatment groups/sex of postnatal/adult exposure: Air/Air, Air/CAPS, CAPS/Air, and CAPS/CAPS. FI performance was adversely influenced by CAPS/Air in males, but by Air/CAPS in females, effects that appeared to reflect corresponding changes in brain mesocorticolimbic dopamine/glutamate systems that mediate FI performance. Both sexes showed impaired short-term memory on the NOR. Mechanistically, cortical and hippocampal changes in amino acids raised the potential for excitotoxicity, and persistent glial activation was seen in frontal cortex and corpus callosum of both sexes. Collectively, neurodevelopment and/or adulthood CAPS can produce enduring and sex-dependent neurotoxicity. Although mechanisms of these effects remain to be fully elucidated, findings suggest that neurodevelopment and/or adulthood air pollution exposure may

  1. Immune reconstitution but persistent activation after 48 weeks of antiretroviral therapy in youth with pre-therapy CD4 >350 in ATN 061

    PubMed Central

    Rudy, Bret J.; Kapogiannis, Bill G.; Worrell, Carol; Squires, Kathleen; Bethel, James; Li, Su; Wilson, Craig M.; Agwu, Allison; Emmanuel, Patricia; Price, Georgine; Hudey, Stephanie; Goodenow, Maureen M.; Sleasman, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Measures of immune outcomes in youth who initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) early in HIV infection are limited. Design Adolescent Trials Network 061 examined changes over 48 weeks of cART in T cell subsets and markers of T cell and macrophage activation in subjects with pre-therapy CD4>350. All subjects had optimal viral suppression from weeks 24 through 48. Methods Subjects (n=48) initiated cART with tenofovir/emtricitabine plus ritonavir-boosted atazanavir. Data were collected at baseline and weeks 12, 24, and 48. Trends were compared to uninfected controls. Results Significant increases over 48 weeks were noted in all CD4 populations including total, naïve, central memory (CM), and effector memory RO (EM RO) and effector memory RA (EM RA) while numbers of CM and EMRO CD8 cells declined significantly. By week 48, CD4 naïve cells were similar to controls while CM CD4 cells remained significantly lower and EM RO and EM RA subsets were significantly higher. CD38 and HLA DR expression, both individually and when co-expressed, decreased over 48 weeks of cART on CD8 cells but remained significantly higher than controls at week 48. In contrast, markers of macrophage activation measured by sCD14 and sCD163 in plasma did not change with cART and were significantly higher than controls. Conclusion In youth initiating early cART, CD4 cell reconstitution is robust with decreases in CD8 cells. However CD8 T cell and macrophage activation persists at higher levels than uninfected controls. PMID:25942459

  2. Developmental exposure to concentrated ambient ultrafine particulate matter air pollution in mice results in persistent and sex-dependent behavioral neurotoxicity and glial activation.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joshua L; Liu, Xiufang; Weston, Douglas; Prince, Lisa; Oberdörster, Günter; Finkelstein, Jacob N; Johnston, Carl J; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A

    2014-07-01

    The brain appears to be a target of air pollution. This study aimed to further ascertain behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms of our previously observed preference for immediate reward (Allen, J. L., Conrad, K., Oberdorster, G., Johnston, C. J., Sleezer, B., and Cory-Slechta, D. A. (2013). Developmental exposure to concentrated ambient particles and preference for immediate reward in mice. Environ. Health Perspect. 121, 32-38), a phenotype consistent with impulsivity, in mice developmentally exposed to inhaled ultrafine particles. It examined the impact of postnatal and/or adult concentrated ambient ultrafine particles (CAPS) or filtered air on another behavior thought to reflect impulsivity, Fixed interval (FI) schedule-controlled performance, and extended the assessment to learning/memory (novel object recognition (NOR)), and locomotor activity to assist in understanding behavioral mechanisms of action. In addition, levels of brain monoamines and amino acids, and markers of glial presence and activation (GFAP, IBA-1) were assessed in mesocorticolimbic brain regions mediating these cognitive functions. This design produced four treatment groups/sex of postnatal/adult exposure: Air/Air, Air/CAPS, CAPS/Air, and CAPS/CAPS. FI performance was adversely influenced by CAPS/Air in males, but by Air/CAPS in females, effects that appeared to reflect corresponding changes in brain mesocorticolimbic dopamine/glutamate systems that mediate FI performance. Both sexes showed impaired short-term memory on the NOR. Mechanistically, cortical and hippocampal changes in amino acids raised the potential for excitotoxicity, and persistent glial activation was seen in frontal cortex and corpus callosum of both sexes. Collectively, neurodevelopment and/or adulthood CAPS can produce enduring and sex-dependent neurotoxicity. Although mechanisms of these effects remain to be fully elucidated, findings suggest that neurodevelopment and/or adulthood air pollution exposure may represent

  3. Reverse transcription quantitative PCR revealed persistency of thermophilic lactic acid bacteria metabolic activity until the end of the ripening of Emmental cheese.

    PubMed

    Falentin, Hélène; Henaff, Nadine; Le Bivic, Pierre; Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Parayre, Sandrine; Richoux, Romain; Sohier, Daniele; Thierry, Anne; Lortal, Sylvie; Postollec, Florence

    2012-02-01

    For Emmental manufacture two kinds of adjunct culture are added: (i) thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (starters) such as Lactobacillus helveticus (LH), and Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) growing the first day of the manufacture and (ii) ripening culture. ST and LH have a key role in curd acidification and proteolysis at the beginning of the manufacture but are considered to be lyzed for a great part of them at the ripening step. The aim of this work was to assess the metabolic activity of these bacteria throughout manufacture and ripening. During Emmental cheesemaking, LH and ST were subjected to i) population quantification by numerations and by quantitative PCR (qPCR) ii) reverse transcription (RT) Temporal Temperature Gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) iii) transcript quantification by RT-qPCR targeting 16S rRNA, tuf and groL mRNAs to evaluate bacterial metabolic activity. During ripening, ST and LH numerations showed a 2.5 log(10) loss of culturability whereas qPCR on pelleted cells revealed only one log(10) of decrease for both of these species. 10(9) ST and 10(8) LH cells/g of cheese still remained. They contained a stable number of 16S transcript and at least 10(6) copies of mRNAs per 10(9) cells until the end of ripening. These results prove the unexpected persistency of thermophilic lactic acid bacteria starters (ST and LH) metabolic activity until the end of ripening and open new perspectives in term of their involvement in the quality of cheeses during ripening. PMID:22029927

  4. Persistent Activation of NF-κB in BRCA1-Deficient Mammary Progenitors Drives Aberrant Proliferation and Accumulation of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Sau, Andrea; Lau, Rosanna; Cabrita, Miguel A; Nolan, Emma; Crooks, Peter A; Visvader, Jane E; Pratt, M A Christine

    2016-07-01

    Human BRCA1 mutation carriers and BRCA1-deficient mouse mammary glands contain an abnormal population of mammary luminal progenitors that can form 3D colonies in a hormone-independent manner. The intrinsic cellular regulatory defect in these presumptive breast cancer precursors is not known. We have discovered that nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) (p52/RelB) is persistently activated in a subset of BRCA1-deficient mammary luminal progenitors. Hormone-independent luminal progenitor colony formation required NF-κB, ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), and the inhibitor of kappaB kinase, IKKα. Progesterone (P4)-stimulated proliferation resulted in a marked enhancement of DNA damage foci in Brca1(-/-) mouse mammary. In vivo, NF-κB inhibition prevented recovery of Brca1(-/-) hormone-independent colony-forming cells. The majority of human BRCA1(mut/+) mammary glands showed marked lobular expression of nuclear NF-κB. We conclude that the aberrant proliferative capacity of Brca1(-/-) luminal progenitor cells is linked to the replication-associated DNA damage response, where proliferation of mammary progenitors is perpetuated by damage-induced, autologous NF-κB signaling. PMID:27292187

  5. CRISPR/gRNA-directed synergistic activation mediator (SAM) induces specific, persistent and robust reactivation of the HIV-1 latent reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonggang; Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Li, Fang; Yang, Wensheng; Kaminski, Rafal; Fagan, Philip Regis; Putatunda, Raj; Young, Won-Bin; Khalili, Kamel; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy does not eliminate the integrated and transcriptionally silent HIV-1 provirus in latently infected cells. Recently, a "shock and kill" strategy has been extensively explored to eradicate the HIV-1 latent reservoirs for a permanent cure of AIDS. The therapeutic efficacy of currently used agents remains disappointing because of low efficiency, non-specificity and cellular toxicity. Here we present a novel catalytically-deficient Cas9-synergistic activation mediator (dCas9-SAM) technology to selectively, potently and persistently reactivate the HIV-1 latent reservoirs. By screening 16 MS2-mediated single guide RNAs, we identified long terminal repeat (LTR)-L and O that surround the enhancer region (-165/-145 for L and -92/-112 for O) and induce robust reactivation of HIV-1 provirus in HIV-1 latent TZM-bI epithelial, Jurkat T lymphocytic and CHME5 microglial cells. This compulsory reactivation induced cellular suicide via toxic buildup of viral proteins within HIV-1 latent Jurkat T and CHME5 microglial cells. These results suggest that this highly effective and target-specific dCas9-SAM system can serve as a novel HIV-latency-reversing therapeutic tool for the permanent elimination of HIV-1 latent reservoirs. PMID:26538064

  6. CRISPR/gRNA-directed synergistic activation mediator (SAM) induces specific, persistent and robust reactivation of the HIV-1 latent reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonggang; Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Li, Fang; Yang, Wensheng; Kaminski, Rafal; Fagan, Philip Regis; Putatunda, Raj; Young, Won-Bin; Khalili, Kamel; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy does not eliminate the integrated and transcriptionally silent HIV-1 provirus in latently infected cells. Recently, a “shock and kill” strategy has been extensively explored to eradicate the HIV-1 latent reservoirs for a permanent cure of AIDS. The therapeutic efficacy of currently used agents remains disappointing because of low efficiency, non-specificity and cellular toxicity. Here we present a novel catalytically-deficient Cas9-synergistic activation mediator (dCas9-SAM) technology to selectively, potently and persistently reactivate the HIV-1 latent reservoirs. By screening 16 MS2-mediated single guide RNAs, we identified long terminal repeat (LTR)-L and O that surround the enhancer region (-165/-145 for L and -92/-112 for O) and induce robust reactivation of HIV-1 provirus in HIV-1 latent TZM-bI epithelial, Jurkat T lymphocytic and CHME5 microglial cells. This compulsory reactivation induced cellular suicide via toxic buildup of viral proteins within HIV-1 latent Jurkat T and CHME5 microglial cells. These results suggest that this highly effective and target-specific dCas9-SAM system can serve as a novel HIV-latency-reversing therapeutic tool for the permanent elimination of HIV-1 latent reservoirs. PMID:26538064

  7. The effect of high protein diet and exercise on irisin, eNOS, and iNOS expressions in kidney.

    PubMed

    Tastekin, Ebru; Palabiyik, Orkide; Ulucam, Enis; Uzgur, Selda; Karaca, Aziz; Vardar, Selma Arzu; Yilmaz, Ali; Aydogdu, Nurettin

    2016-08-01

    Long-term effects of high protein diets (HPDs) on kidneys are still not sufficiently studied. Irisin which increases oxygen consumption and thermogenesis in white fat cells was shown in skeletal muscles and many tissues. Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are a family of enzymes catalyzing the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. We aimed to investigate the effects of HPD, irisin and NO expression in kidney and relation of them with exercise and among themselves. Animals were grouped as control, exercise, HPD and exercise combined with HPD (exercise-HPD). Rats were kept on a HPD for 5 weeks and an exercise program was given them as 5 exercise and 2 rest days per week exercising on a treadmill with increasing speed and angle. In our study, while HPD group had similar total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels with control group, exercise and exercise-HPD groups had lower levels (p < 0.05). Kidneys of exercising rats had no change in irisin or eNOS expression but their iNOS expression had increased (p < 0.001). HPD-E group has not been observed to cause kidney damage and not have a significant effect on rat kidney irisin, eNOS, or iNOS expression. Localization of irisin, eNOS, and iNOS staining in kidney is highly selective and quite clear in this study. Effects of exercise and HPD on kidney should be evaluated with different exercise protocols and contents of the diet. İrisin, eNOS, and iNOS staining localizations should be supported with various research studies. PMID:27277302

  8. Endothelial function does not improve with high-intensity continuous exercise training in SHR: implications of eNOS uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Battault, Sylvain; Singh, François; Gayrard, Sandrine; Zoll, Joffrey; Reboul, Cyril; Meyer, Grégory

    2016-02-01

    Exercise training is a well-recognized way to improve vascular endothelial function by increasing nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. However, in hypertensive subjects, unlike low- and moderate-intensity exercise training, the beneficial effects of continuous high-intensity exercise on endothelial function are not clear, and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of high-intensity exercise on vascular function, especially on the NO pathway, in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR). These effects were studied on WKY, sedentary SHR and SHR that exercised at moderate (SHR-MOD) and high intensity (SHR-HI) on a treadmill (1 h per day; 5 days per week for 6 weeks at 55% and 80% of their maximal aerobic velocity, respectively). Endothelial function and specific NO contributions to acetylcholine-mediated relaxation were evaluated by measuring the aortic ring isometric forces. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and phosphorylation (ser1177) were evaluated by western blotting. The total aortic and eNOS-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was assessed using electron paramagnetic resonance in aortic tissue. Although the aortas of SHR-HI had increased eNOS levels without alteration of eNOS phosphorylation, high-intensity exercise had no beneficial effect on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, unlike moderate exercise. This result was associated with increased eNOS-dependent ROS production in the aortas of SHR-HI. Notably, the use of the recoupling agent BH4 or a thiol-reducing agent blunted eNOS-dependent ROS production in the aortas of SHR-HI. In conclusion, the lack of a positive effect of high-intensity exercise on endothelial function in SHR was mainly explained by redox-dependent eNOS uncoupling, resulting in a switch from NO to O2(-) generation. PMID:26537830

  9. eNOS Glu298Asp Polymorphism and Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients with and without End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    İlhan, Nevin; Ateş, Kadir; İlhan, Necip; Kaman, Dilara; Çeliker, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney diseases are known to influence nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), though the exact mechanism is still poorly understood. Aims: The purpose of the present study was to examine eNOS Glu298Asp gene polymorphism, plasma NOx and ADMA concentration in subjects with and without End-stage Renal Disease. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: In this study, genotype distributions of Glu-298Asp in exon 7 of the eNOS gene polymorphisms in 130 hemodialysis and 64 peritoneal dialysis patients were compared with 92 controls. NOx was measured by using the Griess reaction while arginine, ADMA and SDMA measurements were performed by HPLC. Genotyping for eNOS Glu298Asp polymorphism was detected with the polymerase chain reaction and/or polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Results: When the genotype frequencies of TT and GT genes were compared between both groups, there was no detected statistically important difference, even-though a TT genotype frequency was 27 (20.8%) versus 17 (26.6%), GT heterozygote genotype frequency was 52 (40%) versus 22 (34.4%), and GG homozygote genotype frequency was 51 (39.2%) versus 25 (39.1%), respectively (p>0.05). NOx, SDMA and ADMA concentrations were significantly elevated in subjects with hemodialysis patients as compared to their corresponding controls. Whereas nitrite was found to be significantly decreased in the patient with peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion: Not observed any connection between the Glu298Asp polymorphism in the eNOS gene and end-stage Renal Diseases in our study population under different dialysis treatments. However, higher ADMA and SDMA concentrations in subjects with ESRD support the existing hypothesis that NOx overproduction affects endothelial dysfunction. Thus, the reduction of ADMA and SDMA concentrations might play a protective role in ESRD patients. PMID:27403380

  10. RNase G-dependent degradation of the eno mRNA encoding a glycolysis enzyme enolase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Naoko; Umitsuki, Genryou; Nagai, Kazuo; Wachi, Masaaki

    2002-10-01

    Escherichia coli RNase G, encoded by the rng gene, is involved in the processing of 16S rRNA and degradation of the adhE mRNA encoding a fermentative alcohol dehydrogenase. In a search for the intracellular target RNAs of RNase G other than the 16S rRNA precursor and adhE mRNA, total cellular proteins from rng+ and rng::cat cells were compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The amount of enolase encoded by the eno gene reproducibly increased two- to three-fold in the rng::cat mutant strain compared with the rng+ parent strain. Rifampicin chase experiments showed that the half-life of the eno mRNA was some 3 times longer in the rng::cat mutant than in the wild type. These results indicate that the eno mRNA was a substrate of RNase G in vivo, in addition to 16S rRNA precursor and adhE mRNA. PMID:12450135

  11. Response: persistent perplexities.

    PubMed

    Radin, M J

    2001-09-01

    This response to the preceding five articles highlights the stubborn persistence of the philosophical perplexities surrounding commodification in the realm of medicine and biotechnology. PMID:11700685

  12. Assessment of caprine corpora lutea growth, progesterone concentration, and eNOS expression: effect of a compensatory gain model.

    PubMed

    Thammasiri, J; Navanukraw, C; Uriyapongson, S; Khanthusaeng, V; Lertchunhakiat, K; Boonkong, S

    2016-07-01

    The experiment was conducted to evaluate corpus luteum (CL) growth, progesterone (P4) concentration, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression in nutrient stair-step fed goats. Female goats (n = 32) that exhibited at least 2, normal, consecutive estrous cycles were randomly assigned to either the control or stair-step fed group. In the control group, goats were fed ad libitum (100% of nutrient requirement for goats). The goats in the stair-step group were fed 70% of the control consumption for the first 42 d and 130% for the later 42 d during 4 consecutive estrous cycles (84 d). Blood and luteal samples were collected on days 3, 8, 13, and 18 of the estrous cycle to determine concentration of glucose, insulin, P4, luteal growth, and eNOS expression. Luteal growth was determined using fresh CL weight, DNA content, DNA and protein concentrations, and cell proliferation (labeling index of Ki-67). During realimentation phase at 4 h, glucose and insulin concentrations were greater (P < 0.05) in stair-step fed goat than those in control goats. Fresh CL weight, DNA content, protein concentrations, and labeling index of Ki67 on day 8 of the estrous cycle in the stair-step group were greater (P < 0.05) than that in the control group. Protein for eNOS was located in the capillaries of CL throughout of the estrous cycle in both groups. Greater serum P4 concentrations and eNOS protein (P < 0.05) were observed in the stair-step fed goats on day 3 (1.83 ng/mL and 6.79%) compared with the control goats (0.98 ng/mL and 6.02%) and on day 8 (5.15 ng/mL and 7.88%) compared with the control goats (4.54 ng/mL and 7.07%). These data demonstrate that luteal growth, progesterone concentration, and eNOS protein were partially affected by nutrient compensatory gain in goats. PMID:27088602

  13. Is the biofilm formation and slime producing ability of coagulase-negative staphylococci associated with the persistence and severity of intramammary infection?

    PubMed

    Simojoki, H; Hyvönen, P; Plumed Ferrer, C; Taponen, S; Pyörälä, S

    2012-08-17

    Biofilm and slime formation assists bacteria in avoiding the host immune defence and antimicrobial therapy. It is suspected to affect the severity or persistence of mastitis caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), which are a common cause of bovine mastitis. The phenotypic biofilm formation ability of 244 CNS isolates (199 isolates from bovine mastitis and 52 type and reference strains) was investigated with a tissue culture plate (TCP) assay and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Slime production of the strains was assessed using Congo red agar (CRA) plates. Additionally, genes encoding the adhesion proteins MSCRAMM (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) and biofilm-associated proteins (bap) were detected. The severity of intramammary infection (IMI) in mastitis from which the isolates originated was measured with milk N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) activity. One-third of isolates from mastitis produced biofilm when analysed with TCP or FISH. The kappa test value, measuring the agreement between two tests, differed between CNS species. Slime production was less frequent for isolates of the common mastitis species Staphylococcus chromogenes (0.2% of isolates produced slime) and Staphylococcus simulans (3.5%) compared to Staphylococcus epidermidis (40%). No association was found between the phenotypic ability to form biofilm and the persistence of IMI or severity of mastitis. Slime production was rare in isolates originating from IMI. Only 12.7% of isolates from persistent IMI and 1.8% of isolates from spontaneously eliminated IMI produced slime. The eno gene encoding laminin-binding protein was most frequently detected among the isolates from mastitis, 75% of them having this gene. Only a few other MSCRAMM genes were detected. PMID:22424866

  14. Participation of a persistent sodium current and calcium-activated nonspecific cationic current to burst generation in trigeminal principal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Tsuruyama, Kentaro; Hsiao, Chie-Fang; Chandler, Scott H

    2013-10-01

    The properties of neurons participating in masticatory rhythmogenesis are not clearly understood. Neurons within the dorsal trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (dPrV) are potential candidates as components of the masticatory central pattern generator (CPG). The present study examines in detail the ionic mechanisms controlling burst generation in dPrV neurons in rat (postnatal day 8-12) brain stem slices using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp methods. Nominal extracellular Ca(2+) concentration transformed tonic discharge in response to a maintained step pulse of current into rhythmical bursting in 38% of nonbursting neurons. This change in discharge mode was suppressed by riluzole, a persistent Na(+) current (INaP) antagonist. Veratridine, which suppresses the Na(+) channel inactivation mechanism, induced rhythmical bursting in nonbursting neurons in normal artificial cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting that INaP contributes to burst generation. Nominal extracellular Ca(2+) exposed a prominent afterdepolarizing potential (ADP) following a single spike induced by a 3-ms current pulse, which was suppressed, but not completely blocked, by riluzole. Application of BAPTA, a Ca(2+) chelator, intracellularly, or flufenamic acid, a Ca(2+)-activated nonspecific cationic channel (ICAN) antagonist, extracellularly to the bath, suppressed rhythmical bursting and the postspike ADP. Application of drugs to alter Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum also suppressed bursting. Finally, voltage-clamp methods demonstrated that nominal Ca(2+) facilitated INaP and induced ICAN. These data demonstrate for the first time that the previously observed induction in dPrV neurons of rhythmical bursting in nominal Ca(2+) is mediated by enhancement of INaP and onset of ICAN, which are dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). PMID:23883859

  15. Infection with the Persistent Murine Norovirus Strain MNV-S99 Suppresses IFN-Beta Release and Activation of Stat1 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Sandra; Klemm, Uwe; Mas Marques, Andreas; Bock, C.-Thomas; Höhne, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus infection is the main cause of epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. Although human norovirus (HuNoV) infection is self-limiting, it can persist for extended periods of time in immune deficient patients. Due to the lack of robust cell culture and small animal systems, little is known about HuNoV pathogenicity. However, murine norovirus (MNV) can be propagated in cell culture and is used as a model to study norovirus infection. Several MNV are known to persist in mice. In this study, we show that the MNV strain MNV-S99 persists in wild type inbred (C57BL/6J) mice over a period of at least 5 weeks post infection. Viral RNA was detectable in the jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon, with the highest titers in the colon and cecum. To characterize the effect of MNV-S99 on the innate immune response, Stat1 phosphorylation and IFN-β production were analyzed and compared to the non-persistent strain MNV-1.CW3. While MNV-S99 and MNV-1.CW3 showed comparable growth characteristics in vitro, Stat1 phosphorylation and IFN-β release is strongly decreased after infection with MNV-S99 compared to MNV-1.CW3. In conclusion, our results show that unlike MNV-1.CW3, MNV-S99 establishes a persistent infection in mice, possibly due to interfering with the innate immune response. PMID:27294868

  16. The red wine extract-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase is mediated by a great variety of polyphenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Auger, Cyril; Chaabi, Mehdi; Anselm, Eric; Lobstein, Annelise; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2010-07-01

    Phenolic extracts from red wine (RWPs) have been shown to induce nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasoprotective effects, mainly by causing the PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). RWPs contain several hundreds of phenolic compounds. The aim of the present study was to identify red wine phenolic compounds capable of activating eNOS in endothelial cells using multi-step fractionation. The red wine phenolic extract was fractionated using Sephadex LH-20 and preparative RP-HPLC approaches. The ability of a fraction to activate eNOS was assessed by determining the phosphorylation level of Akt and eNOS by Western blot analysis, and NO formation by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Tentative identification of phenolic compounds in fractions was performed by MALDI-TOF and HPLC-MS techniques. Separation of RWPs by Sephadex LH-20 generated nine fractions (fractions A to I), of which fractions F, G, H and I caused significant eNOS activation. Fraction F was then subjected to semi-preparative RP-HPLC to generate ten subfractions (subfraction SF1 to SF10), all of which caused eNOS activation. The active fractions and subfractions contained mainly procyanidins and anthocyanins. Isolation of phenolic compounds from SF9 by semi-preparative RP-HLPC lead to the identification of petunidin-O-coumaroyl-glucoside as a potent activator of eNOS. PMID:20440695

  17. Up-Regulation of ENO1 by HIF-1α in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells after Hypoxic Challenge Is Not Involved in the Regulation of VEGF Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Feihui; Jang, Wai-Chi; Fung, Frederic K. C.; Lo, Amy C. Y.; Wong, Ian Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Alpha-enolase (ENO1), a major glycolytic enzyme, is reported to be over-expressed in various cancer tissues. It has been demonstrated to be regulated by the Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α), a crucial transcriptional factor implicated in tumor progression and cancer angiogenesis. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV), which is a leading cause of severe vision loss caused by newly formed blood vessels in the choroid, is also engendered by hypoxic stress. In this report, we investigated the expression of ENO1 and the effects of its down-regulation upon cobalt (II) chloride-induced hypoxia in retinal pigment epithelial cells, identified as the primary source of ocular angiogenic factors. Methods HIF-1α-diminished retinal pigment epithelial cells were generated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology in ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line. Both normal and HIF-1α-diminished ARPE-19 cells were then subjected to hypoxic challenge using cobalt (II) chloride (CoCl2) or anaerobic chamber. The relation between ENO1 expression and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by retinal pigment epithelial cells were examined. Protein levels of HIF-1α and ENO1 were analyzed using Western Blot, while VEGF secretion was essayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cytotoxicity after hypoxia was detected by Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) Assay. Results Upon 24 hr of CoCl2-induced hypoxia, the expression levels of ENO1 and VEGF were increased along with HIF-1α in ARPE-19 cells, both of which can in turn be down-regulated by HIF-1α siRNA application. However, knockdown of ENO1 alone or together with HIF-1α did not help suppress VEGF secretion in hypoxic ARPE-19 cells. Conclusion ENO1 was demonstrated to be up-regulated by HIF-1α in retinal pigment epithelial cells in response to hypoxia, without influencing VEGF secretion. PMID:26882120

  18. Isolated persistent hypermethioninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S H; Levy, H L; Tangerman, A; Boujet, C; Buist, N; Davidson-Mundt, A; Hudgins, L; Oyanagi, K; Nagao, M; Wilson, W G

    1995-01-01

    New information has been obtained on 30 patients with isolated persistent hypermethioninemia, most of them previously unreported. Biopsies to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of partially deficient activity of ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT; E.C.2.5.1.6) in liver were not performed on most of these patients. However, none showed the clinical findings or the extreme elevations of serum folate previously described in other patients with isolated hypermethioninemia considered not to have hepatic MAT deficiency. Patients ascertained on biochemical grounds had no neurological abnormalities, and 27/30 had IQs or Bayley development-index scores within normal limits or were judged to have normal mental development. Methionine transamination metabolites accumulated abnormally only when plasma methionine concentrations exceeded 300-350 microM and did so more markedly after 0.9 years of age. Data were obtained on urinary organic acids as well as plasma creatinine concentrations. Patterns of inheritance of isolated hypermethioninemia were variable. Considerations as to the optimal management of this group of patients are discussed. PMID:7573050

  19. Persistent activation of nuclear factor-kappa B and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in bone marrow cells after exposure of mice to protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn; Reungpatthanaphong, Paiboon; Honikel, Louise; Whorton, Elbert

    -points included in the study, regardless of the dose rate of proton-irradiation. However, these increases were more pronounced when the higher dose rate (1.0 cGy/min) was used. The results indicated that NF-kappa B activation in BM cells persisted up to 6 months after exposure of mice to a single dose of 0.5 Gy of 100 MeV/n protons, delivered at the dose rates occurring in space. Further, significantly up-regulated levels of TNF-alpha were detected in BM cells of exposed mice (p values ranging from p¡0.01 and p¡0.05), compared to those in the corresponding sham controls, at all harvest times, in spite of the difference in dose rate of proton-irradiation. However, steady increases in the levels of IL-1 beta and IL-6 in BM cells of exposed mice over the levels in their sham controls across all time-points included in the study were detected only when a dose rate of 1.0 cGy/min was used. In contrast, with a dose rate of 0.5 cGy/min, significantly high expression levels of these two pro-inflammatory cytokines were consistently found in BM cells collected from exposed mice at late time-points only. In summary, our data provide important information for space flight missions because the findings of persistent activation of NF-kappa B and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines suggest the occurrence of chronic inflammation after exposure of mice to 100 MeV/n protons that, in turn, may have an important impact on health outcome during space flights. Knowledge gained on the NF-kappa B pathway from this study could, therefore, be useful for planning countermeasure strategies to protect astronauts or space travelers in the space environment. Research funded by NASA Grant NNX07AP88G.

  20. Soluble alpha-enolase activates monocytes by CD14-dependent TLR4 signalling pathway and exhibits a dual function

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Clément; Fréret, Manuel; Fondard, Emeline; Derambure, Céline; Avenel, Gilles; Golinski, Marie-Laure; Verdet, Mathieu; Boyer, Olivier; Caillot, Frédérique; Musette, Philippe; Lequerré, Thierry; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common form of chronic inflammatory rheumatism. Identifying auto-antigens targeted by RA auto-antibodies is of major interest. Alpha-enolase (ENO1) is considered to be a pivotal auto-antigen in early RA but its pathophysiologic role remains unknown. The main objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of soluble ENO1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors and RA patients in order to determine the potential pathogenic role of ENO1. ELISA, transcriptomic analysis, experiments of receptor inhibition and flow cytometry analysis were performed to determine the effect, the target cell population and the receptor of ENO1. We showed that ENO1 has the ability to induce early production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines with delayed production of IL-10 and to activate the innate immune system. We demonstrated that ENO1 binds mainly to monocytes and activates the CD14-dependent TLR4 pathway both in healthy subjects and in RA patients. Our results establish for the first time that ENO1 is able to activate in vitro the CD14-dependent TLR4 pathway on monocytes involving a dual mechanism firstly pro-inflammatory and secondly anti-inflammatory. These results contribute to elucidating the role of this auto-antigen in the pathophysiologic mechanisms of RA. PMID:27025255

  1. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePlus

    PDD; Chronic depression; Depression - chronic ... The exact cause of persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is unknown. It tends to run in families. PDD occurs more often in women. Most people with PDD will also ...

  2. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePlus

    The exact cause of persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is unknown. It tends to run in families. PDD occurs more often in women. Most people with PDD will also have an episode of major depression at some point in their lives. ...

  3. Persistent heap Management library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-01-17

    PERM is a C library for persistent heap management and is intended for use with a dynamic-memory allocator (e.g. malloc, free). The PERM memory allocator replaces the standard C dynamic memory allocation functions with compatible versions that provide persistent memory to application programs. Memory allocated with the PERM allocatory will persist between program invocations after a call to a checkpoint function. This function essentially saves the state of the heap and registered global variables tomore » a file which may reside in flash memory or other node local storage. A few other functions are also provided by the library to manage checkpoint files. Global variables in an application can be marked persistent and be included in a checkpoint by using a compiler attribute defined as PERM. The PERM checkpoint methof is not dependent on the programming model ans works with distributed memory or shared memory programs.« less

  4. Persistent heap Management library

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-17

    PERM is a C library for persistent heap management and is intended for use with a dynamic-memory allocator (e.g. malloc, free). The PERM memory allocator replaces the standard C dynamic memory allocation functions with compatible versions that provide persistent memory to application programs. Memory allocated with the PERM allocatory will persist between program invocations after a call to a checkpoint function. This function essentially saves the state of the heap and registered global variables to a file which may reside in flash memory or other node local storage. A few other functions are also provided by the library to manage checkpoint files. Global variables in an application can be marked persistent and be included in a checkpoint by using a compiler attribute defined as PERM. The PERM checkpoint methof is not dependent on the programming model ans works with distributed memory or shared memory programs.

  5. Resveratrol Ameliorates High Glucose and High-Fat/Sucrose Diet-Induced Vascular Hyperpermeability Involving Cav-1/eNOS Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao lin; Qu, Wei; Wang, Lin zhi; Huang, Bin qing; Ying, Chen jiang; Sun, Xiu fa; Hao, Li ping

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial hyperpermeability is one of the manifestations of endothelial dysfunction. Resveratrol (Res) is considered to be beneficial in protecting endothelial function. However, currently, the exact protective effect and involved mechanisms of Res on endothelial dysfunction-hyperpermeability have not been completely clarified. The aim of present study is to investigate the effects of Res on amelioration of endothelial hyperpermeability and the role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with a normal or high-fat/sucrose diet (HFS) with or without Res for 13 weeks. HFS and in vitro treatment with high glucose increased hyperpermeability in rat aorta, heart, liver and kidney and cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), respectively, which was attenuated by Res treatment. Application of Res reversed the changes in eNOS and Cav-1 expressions in aorta and heart of rats fed HFS and in BAECs incubated with high glucose. Res stimulated the formation of NO inhibited by high glucose in BAECs. Beta-Cyclodextrin (β-CD), caveolae inhibitor, showed the better beneficial effect than Res alone to up-regulate eNOS phosphorylative levels, while NG-Nitro-77 L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), eNOS inhibitor, had no effect on Cav-1 expression. Our studies suggested that HFS and in vitro treatment with high glucose caused endothelial hyperpermeability, which were ameliorated by Res at least involving Cav-1/eNOS regulation. PMID:25419974

  6. Persistent Structural Priming from Language Comprehension to Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bock, Kathryn; Dell, Gary S.; Chang, Franklin; Onishi, Kristine H.

    2007-01-01

    To examine the relationship between syntactic processes in language comprehension and language production, we compared structural persistence from sentence primes that speakers heard to persistence from primes that speakers produced. [Bock, J. K., & Griffin, Z. M. (2000). The persistence of structural priming: transient activation or implicit…

  7. Giant persistent photoconductivity in rough silicon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Mönch, Ingolf; Harazim, Stefan; Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2009-10-01

    This paper reports the observation of giant persistent photoconductivity from rough Si nanomembranes. When exposed to light, the current in p-type Si nanomembranes is enhanced by roughly 3 orders of magnitude in comparison with that in the dark and can persist for days at a high conductive state after the light is switched off. An applied gate voltage can tune the persistent photocurrent and accelerate the response to light. By analyzing the band structure of the devices and the surfaces through various coatings, we attribute the observed effect to hole-localized regions in Si nanomembranes due to the rough surfaces, where light can activate the confined holes. PMID:19637888

  8. Cell Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Caveolae-Dependent Activation of Lung Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Tarun E; Hu, Hanbo; Patel, Jawaharlal M

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides can be used as therapeutic agents via modulation of selective cell functions. Nitric oxide (NO) generated by vascular endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays a critical role in the NO/ cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated pulmonary vascular function. Here we examined whether internalization of a fifteen amino acid (KRFNSISCSSWRRKR) synthetic peptide (P3) enhances the catalytic activity of eNOS via caveolae/eNOS dissociation leading to NO release and increased cGMP production in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (EC). ECs were treated with varying concentrations of P3 and used to monitor internalization, isolation of caveolae-enriched fraction, the catalytic activity of eNOS, NO/cGMP production, and intracellular Ca(2+) release. Confocal images show timedependent internalization of P3 in EC. Treatment of EC with P3, but not scrambled P3, increased the catalytic activity of eNOS in a dose-dependent manner without change in eNOS expression or phosphorylation. Treatment of EC with P3 stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) release, increased the catalytic activity of phospatidylinsositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and resulted in eNOS/caveolae-1 (Cav-1) dissociation leading to translocation of eNOS to intracellular compartment in EC. P3- mediated activation of eNOS was abolished by intracellular Ca(2+) chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenooxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'- tertraacetic acid-AM (BAPTA-AM), PI3K inhibition, or by siRNA-mediated Cav-1 suppression. These results demonstrate that exogenous peptide consisting of cationic amino acids can internalize and enhance the catalytic activity of eNOS via modulation of caveolar signaling and intracellular Ca(2+) release in EC. PMID:26655728

  9. Finite-volume application of high order ENO schemes to multi-dimensional boundary-value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay; Dorrepaal, J. Mark

    1990-01-01

    The finite volume approach in developing multi-dimensional, high-order accurate essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes is considered. In particular, a two dimensional extension is proposed for the Euler equation of gas dynamics. This requires a spatial reconstruction operator that attains formal high order of accuracy in two dimensions by taking account of cross gradients. Given a set of cell averages in two spatial variables, polynomial interpolation of a two dimensional primitive function is employed in order to extract high-order pointwise values on cell interfaces. These points are appropriately chosen so that correspondingly high-order flux integrals are obtained through each interface by quadrature, at each point having calculated a flux contribution in an upwind fashion. The solution-in-the-small of Riemann's initial value problem (IVP) that is required for this pointwise flux computation is achieved using Roe's approximate Riemann solver. Issues to be considered in this two dimensional extension include the implementation of boundary conditions and application to general curvilinear coordinates. Results of numerical experiments are presented for qualitative and quantitative examination. These results contain the first successful application of ENO schemes to boundary value problems with solid walls.

  10. Association of Common Variants in eNOS Gene with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yang; Dong, Yi; Li, Xuan; Tang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To clarify the association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) polymorphisms and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. After a systematic literature search in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science databases, all relevant studies evaluating the association between the polymorphisms (rs2070744 and rs1799983) of eNOS gene and POAG were screened and included. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in five genetic models were estimated using fixed-effect model if I2 < 50% in the test for heterogeneity; otherwise the random-effects model was used. Results. Thirty-one records were obtained, with five being suitable for meta-analysis. The overall results showed that both TT genotype in rs2070744 and GG genotype in rs1799983 are associated with decreased risk of POAG susceptibility. Stratified analysis based on ethnicity showed that the association of rs2070744 with POAG remained only in Caucasians. Results of subgroup analysis by sex indicated association between both polymorphisms and POAG in female group, but not in male group. Conclusions. TT genotype and/or T-allele in rs2070744, as well as GG genotype and/or G-allele in rs1799983, was associated with decreased risk for POAG overall and in female group. PMID:27242919

  11. Podocyte-Specific VEGF-A Gain of Function Induces Nodular Glomerulosclerosis in eNOS Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Veron, Delma; Aggarwal, Pardeep K.; Velazquez, Heino; Kashgarian, Michael; Moeckel, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    VEGF-A and nitric oxide are essential for glomerular filtration barrier homeostasis and are dysregulated in diabetic nephropathy. Here, we examined the effect of excess podocyte VEGF-A on the renal phenotype of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knockout mice. Podocyte-specific VEGF164 gain of function in eNOS−/− mice resulted in nodular glomerulosclerosis, mesangiolysis, microaneurysms, and arteriolar hyalinosis associated with massive proteinuria and renal failure in the absence of diabetic milieu or hypertension. In contrast, podocyte-specific VEGF164 gain of function in wild-type mice resulted in less pronounced albuminuria and increased creatinine clearance. Transmission electron microscopy revealed glomerular basement membrane thickening and podocyte effacement in eNOS−/− mice with podocyte-specific VEGF164 gain of function. Furthermore, glomerular nodules overexpressed collagen IV and laminin extensively. Biotin-switch and proximity ligation assays demonstrated that podocyte-specific VEGF164 gain of function decreased glomerular S-nitrosylation of laminin in eNOS−/− mice. In addition, treatment with VEGF-A decreased S-nitrosylated laminin in cultured podocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that excess glomerular VEGF-A and eNOS deficiency is necessary and sufficient to induce Kimmelstiel-Wilson–like nodular glomerulosclerosis in mice through a process that involves deposition of laminin and collagen IV and de-nitrosylation of laminin. PMID:24578128

  12. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of GSK2190915, a 5-lipoxygenase activating protein inhibitor, in adults and adolescents with persistent asthma: a randomised dose-ranging study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background GSK2190915 is a high affinity 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein inhibitor being developed for the treatment of asthma. The objective of this study was to evaluate GSK2190915 efficacy, dose–response and safety in subjects with persistent asthma treated with short-acting beta2-agonists (SABAs) only. Methods Eight-week multicentre, randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, stratified (by age and smoking status), parallel-group, placebo-controlled study in subjects aged ≥12 years with a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of 50–85% predicted. Subjects (n = 700) were randomised to receive once-daily (QD) oral GSK2190915 (10–300 mg), twice-daily inhaled fluticasone propionate 100 μg, oral montelukast 10 mg QD or placebo. The primary endpoint was mean change from baseline (randomisation) in trough (morning pre-dose and pre-rescue bronchodilator) FEV1 at the end of the 8-week treatment period. Secondary endpoints included morning and evening peak expiratory flow, symptom-free days and nights, rescue-free days and nights, day and night-time symptom scores, day and night-time rescue medication use, withdrawals due to lack of efficacy, Asthma Control Questionnaire and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire scores. Results For the primary endpoint, there was no statistically significant difference between any dose of GSK2190915 QD and placebo. However, repeated measures sensitivity analysis demonstrated nominal statistical significance for GSK2190915 30 mg QD compared with placebo (mean difference: 0.115 L [95% confidence interval: 0.00, 0.23], p = 0.044); no nominally statistically significant differences were observed with any of the other doses. For the secondary endpoints, decreases were observed in day-time symptom scores and day-time SABA use for GSK2190915 30 mg QD versus placebo (p ≤ 0.05). No dose–response relationship was observed for the primary and secondary endpoints across the GSK2190915 dose range studied; the 10

  13. Persistence and financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.

    2007-09-01

    The persistence phenomenon is studied in a financial context by using a novel mapping of the time evolution of the values of shares in a portfolio onto Ising spins. The method is applied to historical data from the London Financial Times Stock Exchange 100 index (FTSE 100) over an arbitrarily chosen period. By following the time dependence of the spins, we find evidence for a power law decay of the proportion of shares that remain either above or below their ‘starting’ values. As a result, we estimate a persistence exponent for the underlying financial market to be ≈0.5. Preliminary results from computer simulations on persistence in the economic dynamics of a toy model appear to reproduce the behaviour observed in real markets.

  14. Why Do Delusions Persist?

    PubMed Central

    Corlett, Philip R.; Krystal, John H.; Taylor, Jane R.; Fletcher, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    Delusions are bizarre and distressing beliefs that characterize certain mental illnesses. They arise without clear reasons and are remarkably persistent. Recent models of delusions, drawing on a neuroscientific understanding of learning, focus on how delusions might emerge from abnormal experience. We believe that these models can be extended to help us understand why delusions persist. We consider prediction error, the mismatch between expectancy and experience, to be central. Surprising events demand a change in our expectancies. This involves making what we have learned labile, updating and binding the memory anew: a process of memory reconsolidation. We argue that, under the influence of excessive prediction error, delusional beliefs are repeatedly reconsolidated, strengthening them so that they persist, apparently impervious to contradiction. PMID:19636384

  15. Endothelial NOS, estrogen receptor β, and HIFs cooperate in the activation of a prognostic transcriptional pattern in aggressive human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Simona; Benvenuti, Valentina; Grasselli, Annalisa; Priolo, Carmen; Aiello, Aurora; Mattiussi, Stefania; Colussi, Claudia; Lirangi, Vittoria; Illi, Barbara; D’Eletto, Manuela; Cianciulli, Anna Maria; Gallucci, Michele; De Carli, Piero; Sentinelli, Steno; Mottolese, Marcella; Carlini, Paolo; Strigari, Lidia; Finn, Stephen; Mueller, Elke; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Gaetano, Carlo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Donnorso, Raffaele Perrone; Bacchetti, Silvia; Sacchi, Ada; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Loda, Massimo; Farsetti, Antonella

    2009-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers that distinguish between aggressive and indolent forms of prostate cancer (PCa) is crucial for diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we used cultured cells derived from prostate tissue from patients with PCa to define a molecular mechanism underlying the most aggressive form of PCa that involves the functional activation of eNOS and HIFs in association with estrogen receptor β (ERβ). Cells from patients with poor prognosis exhibited a constitutively hypoxic phenotype and increased NO production. Upon estrogen treatment, formation of ERβ/eNOS, ERβ/HIF-1α, or ERβ/HIF-2α combinatorial complexes led to chromatin remodeling and transcriptional induction of prognostic genes. Tissue microarray analysis, using an independent cohort of patients, established a hierarchical predictive power for these proteins, with expression of eNOS plus ERβ and nuclear eNOS plus HIF-2α being the most relevant indicators of adverse clinical outcome. Genetic or pharmacologic modulation of eNOS expression and activity resulted in reciprocal conversion of the transcriptional signature in cells from patients with bad or good outcome, respectively, highlighting the relevance of eNOS in PCa progression. Our work has considerable clinical relevance, since it may enable the earlier diagnosis of aggressive PCa through routine biopsy assessment of eNOS, ERβ, and HIF-2α expression. Furthermore, proposing eNOS as a therapeutic target fosters innovative therapies for PCa with NO inhibitors, which are employed in preclinical trials in non-oncological diseases. PMID:19363294

  16. A Very Persistent Mistake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, J. A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Articulated bodies with an internal energy source require to be coupled to an external mass in order to accelerate themselves but the typical text book assertion that the net force is provided by the external mass is not correct. Arguments are presented demonstrating that the assertion is incorrect and reasons are suggested for the persistence of…

  17. Retention and Persistence Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Timothy R.

    Two studies are combined with an introductory section: one is "Persistence to Graduation for Freshmen Entering the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1967-75," by Timothy Sanford, and the second is "Freshman, Transfer, Professional, Masters, and Doctoral Student Retention at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill," by Paul D.…

  18. The Persistence of PCBs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Robert H.; Highland, Joseph H.

    1979-01-01

    PCB's are one of the most persistent chemicals ever introduced into the environment by man. From very early in their history of manufacture PCB's were suspected of being hazardous to health, but public awareness of the hazard was slow in coming. (RE)

  19. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    Sound cannot travel in a vacuum, physically or socially. The ways in which sound operates are a result of acoustic properties, and the ways by which it is considered to be music are a result of social constructions. Therefore, music is always political, regardless of its content: the way it is performed and composed; the choice of instrumentation, notation, tuning; the medium of its distribution; its inherent hierarchy and power dynamics, and more. My compositional praxis makes me less interested in defining a relationship between music and politics than I am in erasing---or at least blurring---the borders between them. In this paper I discuss the aesthetics of resonance and echo in their metaphorical, physical, social, and musical manifestations. Also discussed is a political aesthetic of resonance, manifested through protest chants. I transcribe and analyze common protest chants from around the world, categorizing and unifying them as universal crowd-mobilizing rhythms. These ideas are explored musically in three pieces. Sumud: Rhetoric of Resistance in Three Movements, for two pianos and two percussion players, is a musical interpretation of the political/social concept of sumud, an Arabic word that literally means "steadfastness" and represents Palestinian non-violent resistance. The piece is based on common protest rhythms and uses the acoustic properties inherent to the instruments. The second piece, Three Piano Studies, extends some of the musical ideas and techniques used in Sumud, and explores the acoustic properties and resonance of the piano. The final set of pieces is part of my Critical Mess Music Project. These are site-specific musical works that attempt to blur the boundaries between audience, performers and composer, in part by including people without traditional musical training in the process of music making. These pieces use the natural structure and resonance of an environment, in this case, locations on the UCSC campus, and offer an active

  20. Persistence of the Lower Stratospheric Polar Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Randel, William J.; Pawson, Steven; Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    The persistence of the Arctic and Antarctic lower stratospheric vortices is examined over the period 1958 to 1998. Three different vortex-following diagnostics (two using potential vorticity and one based solely on the zonal winds) are compared, and shown to give very similar results for the break up date. The variability in the timing of the breakup of each vortex is qualitatively the same: there are large interannual variations together with smaller decadal-scale variations and there is a significant increase in the persistence since the mid-1980s (all variations are larger for the Arctic vortex). Also, in both hemispheres there is a high correlation between the persistence and the strength and coldness of the spring vortex, with all quantities having the same interannual and decadal variability. However, there is no such correlation between the persistence and the characteristics of the mid-winter vortex. In the northern hemisphere there is also a high correlation between the vortex persistence and the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric eddy heat flux averaged over the two months prior to the breakup. This indicates that the variability in the wave activity entering the stratosphere over late-winter to early-spring plays a key role in the variability of the vortex persistence (and spring polar temperatures) on both interannual and decadal time scales. However, the decadal variation in the Arctic vortex coldness and persistence for the 1990's falls outside the range of natural variability, while this is not the case for the eddy heat flux. This suggests that the recent increase in vortex persistence is not due solely to changes in the wave activity entering the stratosphere.

  1. Xuezhikang, Extract of Red Yeast Rice, Improved Abnormal Hemorheology, Suppressed Caveolin-1 and Increased eNOS Expression in Atherosclerotic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ya-Bing; Liu, Mei-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background Xuezhikang is the extract of red yeast rice, which has been widely used for the management of atherosclerotic disease, but the molecular basis of its antiatherosclerotic effects has not yet been fully identified. Here we investigated the changes of eNOS in vascular endothelia and RBCs, eNOS regulatory factor Caveolin-1 in endothelia, and hemorheological parameters in atherosclerotic rats to explore the protective effects of Xuezhikang. Methodology/Principal Findings Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 12/group) group C, controls; group M, high-cholesterol diet (HCD) induced atherosclerotic models; group X, HCD+Xuezhikang; and group L, HCD +Lovastatin. In group X, Xuezhikang inhibited oxidative stress, down-regulated caveolin-1 in aorta wall (P<0.05), up-regulated eNOS expression in vascular endothelia and erythrocytes (P<0.05), increased NOx (nitrite and nitrate) in plasma and cGMP in erythrocyte plasma and aorta wall (P<0.05), increased erythrocyte deformation index (EDI), and decreased whole blood viscosity and plasma viscosity (P<0.05), with the improvement of arterial pathology. Conclusions/Significance Xuezhikang up-regulated eNOS expression in vascular endothelia and RBCs, increased plasma NOx and improved abnormal hemorheology in high cholesterol diet induced atherosclerotic rats. The elevated eNOS/NO and improved hemorheology may be beneficial to atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23675421

  2. Finite-volume application of high-order ENO schemes to two-dimensional boundary-value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay

    1991-01-01

    Finite-volume applications of high-order accurate ENO schemes to two-dimensional boundary-value problems are studied. These schemes achieve high-order spatial accuracy, in smooth regions, by a piecewise polynomial approximation of the solution from cell averages. In addition, this spatial operation involves an adaptive stencil algorithm in order to avoid the oscillatory behavior that is associated with interpolation across steep gradients. High-order TVD Runge-Kutta methods are employed for time integration, thus making these schemes best suited for unsteady problems. Fifth- and sixth-order accurate applications are validated through a grid refinement study involving the solutions of scalar hyperbolic equations. A previously proposed extension for the Euler equations of gas dynamics is tested, including its application to solutions of boundary-value problems involving solid walls and curvilinear coordinates.

  3. Chronic aerobic exercise associated to dietary modification improve endothelial function and eNOS expression in high fat fed hamsters.

    PubMed

    Boa, Beatriz C S; Souza, Maria das Graças C; Leite, Richard D; da Silva, Simone V; Barja-Fidalgo, Thereza Christina; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz Guilherme; Bouskela, Eliete

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is epidemic in the western world and central adipose tissue deposition points to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, independently of any association between obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors. Physical exercise has been used as non-pharmacological treatment to significantly reverse/attenuate obesity comorbidities. In this study we have investigated effects of exercise and/or dietary modification on microcirculatory function, body composition, serum glucose, iNOS and eNOS expression on 120 male hamsters treated for 12 weeks with high fat chow (HF, n = 30) starting on the 21st day of birth. From week 12 to 20, animals were randomly separated in HF (no treatment change), return to standard chow (HFSC, n = 30), high fat chow associated to an aerobic exercise training program (AET) (HFEX, n = 30) and return to standard chow+AET (HFSCEX, n = 30). Microvascular reactivity in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside and macromolecular permeability increase induced by 30 minutes ischemia followed by reperfusion were assessed on the cheek pouch preparation. Total body fat and aorta eNOS and iNOS expression by immunoblotting assay were evaluated on the experimental day. Compared to HFSC and HFSCEX groups, HF and HFEX ones presented increased visceral fat [(mean±SEM) (HF)4.9±1.5 g and (HFEX)4.7±0.9 g vs. (HFSC)*3.0±0.7 g and (HFSCEX)*1.9±0.4 g/100 g BW]; impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation [Ach 10(-8) M (HF)87.9±2.7%; (HFSC)*116.7±5.9%; (HFEX)*109.1±4.6%; (HFSCEX)*105±2.8%; Ach10(-6) M (HF)95.3±3.1%; (HFSC)*126±6.2%; (HFEX)*122.5±2.8%; (HFSCEX)*118.1±4.3% and Ach10(-4) M (HF)109.5±4.8%; (HFSC)*149.6±6.6%; (HFEX)*143.5±5.4% and (HFSCEX)*139.4±5.2%], macromolecular permeability increase after ischemia/reperfusion [(HF)40.5±4.2; (HFSC)*19.0±1.6; (HFEX)*18.6±2.1 and (HFSCEX)* 21.5±3.7 leaks/cm2), decreased eNOS expression, increased leptin and glycaemic levels. Endothelial

  4. The Immunomodulator VacA Promotes Immune Tolerance and Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection through Its Activities on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Djekic, Aleksandra; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    VacA is a pore-forming toxin that has long been known to induce vacuolization in gastric epithelial cells and to be linked to gastric disorders caused by H. pylori infection. Its role as a major colonization and persistence determinant of H. pylori is less well-understood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the various target cell types of VacA and its mechanism of action; specifically, we focus on the evidence showing that VacA targets myeloid cells and T-cells to directly and indirectly prevent H. pylori-specific T-cell responses and immune control of the infection. In particular, the ability of VacA-proficient H. pylori to skew T-cell responses towards regulatory T-cells and the effects of Tregs on H. pylori chronicity are highlighted. The by-stander effects of VacA-driven immunomodulation on extragastric diseases are discussed as well. PMID:27322319

  5. The Immunomodulator VacA Promotes Immune Tolerance and Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection through Its Activities on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    PubMed

    Djekic, Aleksandra; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    VacA is a pore-forming toxin that has long been known to induce vacuolization in gastric epithelial cells and to be linked to gastric disorders caused by H. pylori infection. Its role as a major colonization and persistence determinant of H. pylori is less well-understood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the various target cell types of VacA and its mechanism of action; specifically, we focus on the evidence showing that VacA targets myeloid cells and T-cells to directly and indirectly prevent H. pylori-specific T-cell responses and immune control of the infection. In particular, the ability of VacA-proficient H. pylori to skew T-cell responses towards regulatory T-cells and the effects of Tregs on H. pylori chronicity are highlighted. The by-stander effects of VacA-driven immunomodulation on extragastric diseases are discussed as well. PMID:27322319

  6. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  7. Antenatal Maternally-Administered Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitors Normalize eNOS Expression in the Fetal Lamb Model of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Shue, Eveline H; Schecter, Samuel C.; Gong, Wenhui; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Johengen, Michael; Iqbal, Corey; Derderian, S. Christopher; Oishi, Peter; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Miniati, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pulmonary hypertension (pHTN), a main determinant of survival in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), results from in utero vascular remodeling. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors have never been used antenatally to treat pHTN. The purpose of this study is to determine if antenatal PDE5 inhibitors can prevent pHTN in the fetal lamb model of CDH. Methods CDH were created in pregnant ewes. Postoperatively, pregnant ewes received oral placebo or tadalafil, a PDE5 inhibitor, until delivery. Near term gestation, lambs underwent resuscitations, and lung tissue was snap frozen for protein analysis. Results Mean cGMP levels were 0.53±0.11 in placebo-treated fetal lambs and 1.73±0.21 in tadalafil-treated fetal lambs (p=0.002). Normalized expression of eNOS was 82±12% in Normal-Placebo, 61±5% in CDH-Placebo, 116±6% in Normal-Tadalafil, and 86±8% in CDH-Tadalafil lambs. Normalized expression of β-sGC was 105±15% in Normal-Placebo, 82±3% in CDH-Placebo, 158±16% in Normal-Tadalafil, and 86±8% in CDH-Tadalafil lambs. Endothelial NOS and β-sGC were significantly decreased in CDH (p = 0.0007 and 0.01 for eNOS and β-sGC, respectively), and tadalafil significantly increased eNOS expression (p = 0.0002). Conclusions PDE5 inhibitors can cross the placental barrier. β-sGC and eNOS are downregulated in fetal lambs with CDH. Antenatal PDE5 inhibitors normalize eNOS and may prevent in utero vascular remodeling in CDH. PMID:24439578

  8. Alteration in cardiac uncoupling proteins and eNOS gene expression following high-intensity interval training in favor of increasing mechanical efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Ali Asghar; Shekarfroush, Shahnaz; Rahimi, Mostafa; Jalali, Amirhossain; Khoshbaten, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): High-intensity interval training (HIIT) increases energy expenditure and mechanical energy efficiency. Although both uncoupling proteins (UCPs) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) affect the mechanical efficiency and antioxidant capacity, their effects are inverse. The aim of this study was to determine whether the alterations of cardiac UCP2, UCP3, and eNOS mRNA expression following HIIT are in favor of increased mechanical efficiency or decreased oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: Wistar rats were divided into five groups: control group (n=12), HIIT for an acute bout (AT1), short term HIIT for 3 and 5 sessions (ST3 and ST5), long-term training for 8 weeks (LT) (6 in each group). The rats of the training groups were made to run on a treadmill for 60 min in three stages: 6 min running for warm-up, 7 intervals of 7 min running on treadmill with a slope of 5° to 20° (4 min with an intensity of 80-110% VO2max and 3 min at 50-60% VO2max), and 5-min running for cool-down. The control group did not participate in any exercise program. Rats were sacrificed and the hearts were extracted to analyze the levels of UCP2, UCP3 and eNOS mRNA by RT-PCR. Results: UCP3 expression was increased significantly following an acute training bout. Repeated HIIT for 8 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in UCPs mRNA and a significant increase in eNOS expression in cardiac muscle. Conclusion: This study indicates that Long term HIIT through decreasing UCPs mRNA and increasing eNOS mRNA expression may enhance energy efficiency and physical performance. PMID:27114795

  9. Persistent fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Saucier, P H

    1980-01-01

    A review of persistent fetal circulation, which involves the presence of a right to left extrapulmonary shunt that is sustained into neonatal life, is presented. Clinical signs exhibited by the infant often resemble those of respiratory distress. Treatment is accomplished with hyperventilation and/or pharmacologically with tolazoline which, in addition to the usual attention to the overall condition of the infant, requires intensive monitoring by the nurse. PMID:6898712

  10. Persistent interface fluid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We present an unusual case of persistent interface fluid that would not resolve despite normal intraocular pressure and corneal endothelial replacement with Descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty. Dissection, elevation, and repositioning of the laser in situ keratomileusis flap were required to resolve the interface fluid. Circumferential corneal graft-host margin scar formation acting as a mechanical strut may have been the cause of the intractable interface fluid. PMID:18655997

  11. Persistent fetal circulation

    PubMed Central

    D’cunha, Chrysal; Sankaran, Koravangattu

    2001-01-01

    Persistent fetal circulation (PFC), also known as persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, is defined as postnatal persistence of right-to-left ductal or atrial shunting, or both in the presence of elevated right ventricular pressure. It is a relatively rare condition that is usually seen in newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, overwhelming sepsis, meconium and other aspiration syndromes, intrauterine hypoxia and ischemia, and/or neonatal hypoxia and ischemia. This condition causes severe hypoxemia, and, as a result, has significant morbidity and mortality. Improved antenatal and neonatal care; the use of surfactant; continuous monitoring of oxygenation, blood pressure and other vital functions; and early recognition and intervention have made this condition even more rare. In modern neonatal intensive care units, anticipation and early treatment of PFC and its complications in sick newborns are commonplace. Thus, severe forms of PFC are only seen on isolated occasions. Consequently, it is even more imperative to revisit PFC compared with the time when there were occasional cases of PFC seen in neonatal intensive care units, and to discuss evolving treatment and management issues that pertain to this syndrome. PMID:20084150

  12. Role of T-helper type 2 cytokines in down-modulation of fas mRNA and receptor on the surface of activated CD4(+) T cells: molecular basis for the persistence of the allergic immune response.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Fizzotti, M; Bassotti, G; Russano, A; Droetto, S; Bistoni, O; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1998-12-01

    The mechanisms responsible for persistence of T lymphocytes at the sites of allergic inflammation are not completely understood. Activated T cells, usually expressing Fas on their surface, undergo activation-induced apoptotic death, thus limiting the dangerous consequences of a persistent immune reaction. We have previously shown that pulmonary T lymphocytes from untreated asthmatic subjects do not express surface Fas receptors nor do they contain Fas mRNA, yet they display normal levels of Fas ligand. This is not an inherited defect and is confined to mucosal T cells. To gain insights into the mechanism responsible for these findings, we performed a set of experiments with both purified Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergen and recombinant human cytokines: interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, transforming growth factor beta1, interferon gamma, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In vitro exposure of purified CD4(+) lymphocytes to allergen yielded only transient up-regulation of surface Fas but did not influence susceptibility to Fas-mediated cell death. T-helper type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and GM-CSF) had a dose-dependent and specific inhibitory effect on Fas mRNA, suggesting a new fundamental biological role in the survival of inflammatory cells during allergen exposure. PMID:9837865

  13. Roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET)-induced cardioprotection against infarction in intact rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Gross, Garrett J; Hsu, Anna; Pfeiffer, Adam W; Nithipatikom, Kasem

    2013-06-01

    pore (MPTP) opener, atractyloside (5.0mg/kg) completely abolished the cardioprotection produced by the EETs. 14,15-EET (1.5mg/kg) with an inhibitor of MPTP opening, cyclosporin A (CsA, 1.0mg/kg) produced a greater reduction of infarct size than their individual administration. Conversely, an EET antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (14,15-EEZE, 2.5mg/kg) completely abolished the cardioprotective effects of CsA, suggesting a role of MPTP in mediating the EET actions. Taken together, these results suggest that the cardioprotective effects of the EETs in an acute ischemia-reperfusion model are mediated by distinct mediators depending on the time of EET administration. The cardioprotective effects of EETs administered prior to ischemia were regulated by the activation of eNOS and increased NO production, while sarcKATP channels and MPTP were involved in the beneficial effects of the EETs when administered just prior to reperfusion. PMID:23419451

  14. Learning's "Weak" Link to Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolniak, Gregory C.; Mayhew, Matthew J.; Engberg, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    This study advances the understanding of college persistence by examining five dimensions of student learning in relation to second-year persistence. Two of the five dimensions of learning were found to be significant predictors of persistence, and each was moderated by social integration. (Contains 5 tables and 1 figure.)

  15. Persistence of Salmonid Redds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffington, J. M.; Buxton, T.; Fremier, A. K.; Hassan, M. A.; Yager, E.

    2013-12-01

    The construction of redds by spawning salmonids modifies fluvial processes in ways that are beneficial to egg and embryo survival. Redd topography induces hyporheic flow that oxygenates embryos incubating within the streambed and creates form drag that reduces bed mobility and scour of salmonid eggs. Winnowing of fine material during redd construction also coarsens the streambed, increasing bed porosity and hyporheic flow and reducing bed mobility. In addition to the biological benefits, redds may influence channel morphology by altering channel hydraulics and bed load transport rates depending on the size and extent of redds relative to the size of the channel. A key question is how long do the physical and biological effects of redds last? Field observations indicate that in some basins redds are ephemeral, with redd topography rapidly erased by subsequent floods, while in other basins, redds can persist for years. We hypothesize that redd persistence is a function of basin hydrology, sediment supply, and characteristics of the spawning fish. Hydrology controls the frequency and magnitude of bed mobilizing flows following spawning, while bed load supply (volume and caliber) controls the degree of textural fining and consequent bed mobility after spawning, as well as the potential for burial of redd features. The effectiveness of flows in terms of their magnitude and duration depend on hydroclimate (i.e., snowmelt, rainfall, or transitional hydrographs), while bed load supply depends on basin geology, land use, and natural disturbance regimes (e.g., wildfire). Location within the stream network may also influence redd persistence. In particular, lakes effectively trap sediment and regulate downstream flow, which may promote long-lived redds in stream reaches below lakes. These geomorphic controls are modulated by biological factors: fish species (size of fish controls size of redds and magnitude of streambed coarsening); life history (timing of spawning and

  16. Persistence of airline accidents.

    PubMed

    Barros, Carlos Pestana; Faria, Joao Ricardo; Gil-Alana, Luis Alberiko

    2010-10-01

    This paper expands on air travel accident research by examining the relationship between air travel accidents and airline traffic or volume in the period from 1927-2006. The theoretical model is based on a representative airline company that aims to maximise its profits, and it utilises a fractional integration approach in order to determine whether there is a persistent pattern over time with respect to air accidents and air traffic. Furthermore, the paper analyses how airline accidents are related to traffic using a fractional cointegration approach. It finds that airline accidents are persistent and that a (non-stationary) fractional cointegration relationship exists between total airline accidents and airline passengers, airline miles and airline revenues, with shocks that affect the long-run equilibrium disappearing in the very long term. Moreover, this relation is negative, which might be due to the fact that air travel is becoming safer and there is greater competition in the airline industry. Policy implications are derived for countering accident events, based on competition and regulation. PMID:20618386

  17. Fenofibrate Improves Vascular Endothelial Function by Reducing Oxidative Stress While Increasing eNOS in Healthy Normolipidemic Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Kaplon, Rachelle E; Lucking, Sara Marian S; Russell-Nowlan, Molly J; Eckel, Robert H; Seals, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction develops with aging, as indicated by impaired endothelium-dependent dilation(EDD), and is related to increased cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that short-term treatment with fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent with potential pleiotropic effects, would improve EDD in middle-aged and older normolipidemic adults by reducing oxidative stress. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of EDD, was assessed in 22healthy adults aged 50-77 years before and after 7days of fenofibrate (145 mg/d; n=12/7M) or placebo (n=10/5M). Brachial FMD was unchanged with placebo, but improved after 2 and 7 days of fenofibrate (5.1±0.7 vs. 2d: 6.0±0.7 and 7d: 6.4±0.6 %Δ; both P<0.005). The improvements in FMD after 7 days remained significant (P<0.05) after accounting for modest changes in plasma total and LDL-cholesterol. Endothelium-independent dilation was not affected by fenofibrate or placebo (P>0.05). Infusion (i.v.) of the antioxidant vitamin C improved brachial FMD at baseline in both groups and during placebo treatment (P<0.05), but not after 2 and 7 days of fenofibrate (P>0.05). Fenofibrate treatment also reduced plasma oxidized LDL, a systemic marker of oxidative stress, compared with placebo (P<0.05). In vascular endothelial cells sampled from peripheral veins of the subjects, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression was unchanged with placebo and after 2 days of fenofibrate, but was increased after 7 days of fenofibrate (0.54±0.03 vs. 2d: 0.52±0.04 and 7d: 0.76±0.11 intensity/HUVEC control; P<0.05 7d). Short-term treatment with fenofibrate improves vascular endothelial function in healthy normolipidemic middle-aged/older adults by reducing oxidative stress and induces increases in eNOS. PMID:23108655

  18. Antibody Persistence and Immunologic Memory after Sequential Pneumococcal Conjugate and Polysaccharide Vaccination in HIV-Infected Children on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abzug, Mark J.; Song, Lin Ye; Levin, Myron J.; Nachman, Sharon A.; Borkowsky, William; Pelton, Stephen I.

    2013-01-01

    Background The capacity of pneumococcal vaccination to confer memory in HIV-infected children is critical for durable protection. Methods HIV-infected children 2–<19 years administered two doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and one dose of polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) on HAART were randomized four-five years later to receive a PCV7 or PPV booster. Total and high avidity antibodies to serotypes 1 (PPV) and 6B and 14 (PCV7 and PPV) were determined by ELISA. Memory was defined as persistence of ≥0.5 mcg/mL of serotype-specific antibody on day 0 or change from <0.5 mcg/mL to ≥0.5 mcg/mL between day 0 and week 1, or, ≥4-fold antibody rise between day 0 and week 1. Results Prior to boosting, four to five years after the previous PCV7-PCV7-PPV series, geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were 0.46 mcg/mL (serotype 1), 1.31 mcg/mL (serotype 6B), and 1.47 mcg/mL (serotype 14), with concentrations ≥0.5 mcg/mL in 41% (serotype 1) to 82% (serotypes 6B and 14). Memory based on antibody concentration ≥0.5 mcg/mL before or 1 week after boosting with PCV7 or PPV was demonstrated in 42–61% for serotype 1 and 87–94% for serotypes 6B and 14, with lower rates based on day 0 to week 1 ≥4-fold antibody rise (serotype 1, 3–13%; serotype 6B, 13–31%; serotype 14, 29–53%). Antibody concentrations post-boosting were greater following PCV7 than PPV for serotypes 6B and 14. Ratios of highly avid to total antibody pre- and post-boosting were 0.5–0.8. Predictors of memory included higher CD4% (nadir before HAART and at P1024 and P1061s entry), CD19% (at P1024 and P1061s entry), and antibody response after the PCV7-PCV7-PPV primary series and lower viral load (at P1024 and P1061s entry) and age. Conclusions Protective antibody concentrations, high avidity, and booster responses to PCV7 or PPV indicative of memory were present four-five years after PCV7-PCV7-PPV in HIV-infected children on HAART. PMID:23954381

  19. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Aswath, Manju; Pandit, Lakshmi V.; Kashyap, Karthik; Ramnath, Raguram

    2016-01-01

    Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) is a phenomenon, in which afflicted women experience spontaneous genital arousal, unresolved by orgasms and triggered by sexual or nonsexual stimuli, eliciting stress. The current case is a 40-year-old female who experienced such orgasms for about a month. Physical examination, investigations, and psychological testing were noncontributory. Carbamazepine (600 mg) was discontinued due to a lack of response. She improved significantly with supportive therapy. Various neuropsychological conditions, pelvic pathology, medications, etc., have been associated with this disorder. Pharmacologic strategies have included the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and analgesics. Validation, psycho-education, identifying triggers, distraction techniques, and pelvic massage have been tried. Living with PGAD is very demanding. There is a lack of understanding of the problem, shame, and hesitation to seek help. The syndrome has been recently described, and understanding is still evolving. PMID:27570347

  20. Acute and persistent diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, Keith; Forbes, David A

    2009-12-01

    Socially disadvantaged Indigenous infants and children living in western industrialized countries experience high rates of infectious diarrhea, no more so than Aboriginal children from remote and rural regions of Northern Australia. Diarrheal disease, poor nutrition, and intestinal enteropathy reflect household crowding, inadequate water and poor sanitation and hygiene. Acute episodes of watery diarrhea are often best managed by oral glucose-electrolyte solutions with continuation of breastfeeding and early reintroduction of feeding. Selective use of lactose-free milk formula, short-term zinc supplementation and antibiotics may be necessary for ill children with poor nutrition, persistent symptoms, or dysentery. Education, high standards of environmental hygiene, breastfeeding, and immunization with newly licensed rotavirus vaccines are all needed to reduce the unacceptably high burden of diarrheal disease encountered in young children from Indigenous communities. PMID:19962025

  1. Caliber-Persistent Artery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sabrina Araújo Pinho; Ruiz, Marcelo Martinson; Kaba, Shajadi Pardo; Florezi, Giovanna Piacenza; Lemos Júnior, Celso Augusto; Witzel, Andréa Lusvarghi

    2015-01-01

    Caliber-persistent artery (CPLA) of the lip is a common vascular anomaly in which a main arterial branch extends to the surface of the mucous tissue with no reduction in its diameter. It usually manifests as pulsatile papule, is easily misdiagnosed, and is observed more frequently among older people, suggesting that its development may involve a degenerative process associated with aging; CPLA is also characterized by the loss of tone of the adjacent supporting connective tissue. Although the diagnosis is clinical, high-resolution Doppler ultrasound is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating the lesion. This report describes the case of a 58-year-old male patient who complained of a lesion of the lower lip with bleeding and recurrent ulceration. The patient was successfully treated in our hospital after a diagnosis of CPLA and is currently undergoing a clinical outpatient follow-up with no complaints. PMID:26448884

  2. Reconsidering the Relationship between Student Engagement and Persistence in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Shouping

    2011-01-01

    Using data from two rounds of surveys on students in the Washington State Achievers (WSA) program, this study examined the relationship between student engagement in college activities and student persistence in college. Different approaches using student engagement measures in the persistence models were compared. The results indicated that the…

  3. Trafficking, persistence, and activation state of adoptively transferred allogeneic and autologous SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones during acute and chronic SIV infection of rhesus macaques1

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Diane L.; Minang, Jacob T.; Trivett, Matt; Song, Kaimei; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Li, Yuan; Piatak, Michael; O'Connor, David; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Roederer, Mario; Ohlen, Claes

    2009-01-01

    Despite multiple lines of evidence suggesting their involvement, the precise role of CD8+ T-cells in controlling HIV replication remains unclear. To determine whether CD8+ T cells can limit retroviral replication in the absence of other immune responses, we transferred 1-13 × 109 allogeneic in vitro expanded SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones matched for the relevant restricting MHC-I allele into rhesus macaques near the time of intravenous (i.v.) SIV challenge. Additionally, in vitro expanded autologous SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones were infused 4-9 months post-infection. Infused cells did not appreciably impact acute or chronic viral replication. The partially MHC-matched allogeneic cells were not detected in the blood or most tissues after 3 days but persisted longer in the lungs as assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Autologous cells transferred i.v. or intraperitoneally (i.p.) were found in BAL and blood samples for up to 8 weeks post-infusion. Interestingly, despite having a nominally activated phenotype (CD69+HLA-DR+), many of these cells persisted in the BAL without dividing. This suggests that expression of such markers by T cells at mucosal sites may not reflect recent activation, but may instead identify stable resident memory T cells. The lack of impact following transfer of such a large number of functional antigen-specific CD8+ T cells on SIV replication may reflect the magnitude of the immune response required to contain the virus. PMID:19949089

  4. Development of Persister-FACSeq: a method to massively parallelize quantification of persister physiology and its heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Theresa C.; Brynildsen, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are thought to underlie the relapse of chronic infections. Knowledge of persister physiology would illuminate avenues for therapeutic intervention; however, such knowledge has remained elusive because persisters have yet to be segregated from other cell types to sufficient purity. This technical hurdle has stymied progress toward understanding persistence. Here we developed Persister-FACSeq, which is a method that uses fluorescence-activated cell sorting, antibiotic tolerance assays, and next generation sequencing to interrogate persister physiology and its heterogeneity. As a proof-of-concept, we used Persister-FACSeq on a library of reporters to study gene expression distributions in non-growing Escherichia coli, and found that persistence to ofloxacin is inversely correlated with the capacity of non-growing cells to synthesize protein. Since Persister-FACSeq can be applied to study persistence to any antibiotic in any environment for any bacteria that can harbor a fluorescent reporter, we anticipate that it will yield unprecedented knowledge of this detrimental phenotype. PMID:27142337

  5. Cerebral vasoconstriction reactions and plasma levels of ETBR, ET-1, and eNOS in patients with chronic high altitude disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shizheng; Hao, Guisheng; Zhang, Shukun; Jiang, Dongmei; Wuren, Tana; Luo, Junming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine cerebral vasoconstriction in patients with chronic high altitude disease [cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR)], and to evaluate differences in alterations of brain vascular contractile reactivity of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) patients and healthy controls. Alterations of endothelin (ET) and its receptor, as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) levels in the plasma were examined to determine the cerebral reservation capacities in CMS patients. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and carbon dioxide analysis methods were used to detect the CVR variances. At the same time, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay approaches were utilized to detect the ET and ET B receptor and the eNOS levels in serum of the CMS patients and healthy controls. CVR and CVRI levels in CMS patients were lower than those of the healthy control subjects and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, eNOS and ET-1 levels were not statistically significant for CMS and healthy controls (P>0.05). However, the ET receptor concentration level was higher in CMS than the healthy controls. Thus, ET-1 may not be a direct etiological variation but may play compensatory roles in CMS patients. The results of the study may provide scientific clues for the prevention and treatment of CMS with higher blood coagulation states of cerebral infarction in patients with chronic high altitude disease. PMID:27485004

  6. Cerebral vasoconstriction reactions and plasma levels of ETBR, ET-1, and eNOS in patients with chronic high altitude disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shizheng; Hao, Guisheng; Zhang, Shukun; Jiang, Dongmei; Wuren, Tana; Luo, Junming

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine cerebral vasoconstriction in patients with chronic high altitude disease [cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR)], and to evaluate differences in alterations of brain vascular contractile reactivity of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) patients and healthy controls. Alterations of endothelin (ET) and its receptor, as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) levels in the plasma were examined to determine the cerebral reservation capacities in CMS patients. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and carbon dioxide analysis methods were used to detect the CVR variances. At the same time, enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay approaches were utilized to detect the ET and ET B receptor and the eNOS levels in serum of the CMS patients and healthy controls. CVR and CVRI levels in CMS patients were lower than those of the healthy control subjects and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, eNOS and ET‑1 levels were not statistically significant for CMS and healthy controls (P>0.05). However, the ET receptor concentration level was higher in CMS than the healthy controls. Thus, ET‑1 may not be a direct etiological variation but may play compensatory roles in CMS patients. The results of the study may provide scientific clues for the prevention and treatment of CMS with higher blood coagulation states of cerebral infarction in patients with chronic high altitude disease. PMID:27485004

  7. Exercise Training Could Improve Age-Related Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow and Capillary Vascularity through the Upregulation of VEGF and eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Viboolvorakul, Sheepsumon; Patumraj, Suthiluk

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of exercise training on age-induced microvascular alterations in the brain. Additionally, the association with the protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was also assessed. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary-young (SE-Young, n = 5), sedentary aged (SE-Aged, n = 8), immersed-aged (IM-Aged, n = 5), and exercise trained-aged (ET-Aged, 60 minutes/day and 5 days/week for 8 weeks, n = 8) rats. The MAPs of all aged groups, SE-Aged, IM-Aged, and ET-Aged, were significantly higher than that of the SE-Young group. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the SE-Aged and IM-Aged was significantly decreased as compared to SE-Young groups. However, rCBF of ET-Aged group was significantly higher than that in the IM-Aged group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the percentage of capillary vascularity (%CV) and the levels of VEGF and eNOS in the ET-Aged group were significantly increased compared to the IM-Aged group (P < 0.05). These results imply that exercise training could improve age-induced microvascular changes and hypoperfusion closely associated with the upregulation of VEGF and eNOS. PMID:24822184

  8. Persistent GnRH receptor activation in pituitary αT3-1 cells analyzed with a label-free technology.

    PubMed

    Nederpelt, I; Vergroesen, R D; IJzerman, A P; Heitman, L H

    2016-05-15

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor is a drug target for certain hormone-dependent diseases such as prostate cancer. In this study, we examined the activation profiles of the endogenous ligand, GnRH and a well-known marketed analog, buserelin using a label-free assay in pituitary αT3-1 cells with endogenous GnRH receptor expression. This whole cell impedance-based technology allows for the real-time measurement of morphological cellular changes. Both agonists dose-dependently decreased the impedance as a result of GnRH receptor activation with potencies of 9.3 ± 0.1 (pEC50 value, buserelin) and 7.8 ± 0.06 (pEC50 value, GnRH). Subsequently, GnRH receptor activation was completely abolished with a selective Gαq inhibitor, thereby confirming the Gαq-coupling of the GnRH receptor in pituitary αT3-1 cells. Additionally, we observed continued responses after agonist stimulation of αT3-1 cells indicating long-lasting cellular effects. Wash-out experiments demonstrated that the long-lasting effects induced by GnRH were most likely caused by rebinding since over 70% of the original response was abolished after wash-out. In contrast, a long receptor residence time was responsible for the prolonged effects caused by buserelin, with over 70% of the original response remaining after wash-out. In summary, we validated that impedance-based label-free technology is suited for studying receptor-mediated activation in cell lines endogenously expressing the target of interest. Moreover, this real-time monitoring allows the examination of binding kinetics and its influence on receptor activation at a cellular level. PMID:26774084

  9. Epigenetic regulation of persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guang; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Persistent or chronic pain is tightly associated with various environmental changes and linked to abnormal gene expression within cells processing nociceptive signaling. Epigenetic regulation governs gene expression in response to environmental cues. Recent animal model and clinical studies indicate that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the development/maintenance of persistent pain and, possibly the transition of acute pain to chronic pain, thus shedding light in a direction for development of new therapeutics for persistent pain. PMID:24948399

  10. Impact of Rosuvastatin Treatment on HDL-Induced PKC-βII and eNOS Phosphorylation in Endothelial Cells and Its Relation to Flow-Mediated Dilatation in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Winzer, Ephraim B; Gaida, Pauline; Höllriegel, Robert; Fischer, Tina; Linke, Axel; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker; Erbs, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endothelial function is impaired in chronic heart failure (CHF). Statins upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and improve endothelial function. Recent studies demonstrated that HDL stimulates NO production due to eNOS phosphorylation at Ser(1177), dephosphorylation at Thr(495), and diminished phosphorylation of PKC-βII at Ser(660). The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of rosuvastatin on HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation and its relation to endothelial function. Methods. 18 CHF patients were randomized to 12 weeks of rosuvastatin or placebo. At baseline, 12 weeks, and 4 weeks after treatment cessation we determined lipid levels and isolated HDL. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were incubated with isolated HDL and phosphorylation of eNOS and PKC-βII was evaluated. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was measured at the radial artery. Results. Rosuvastatin improved FMD significantly. This effect was blunted after treatment cessation. LDL plasma levels were reduced after rosuvastatin treatment whereas drug withdrawal resulted in significant increase. HDL levels remained unaffected. Incubation of HAEC with HDL had no impact on phosphorylation of eNOS or PKC-βII. Conclusion. HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation levels in endothelial cells do not change with rosuvastatin in CHF patients and do not mediate the marked improvement in endothelial function. PMID:27563480

  11. Impact of Rosuvastatin Treatment on HDL-Induced PKC-βII and eNOS Phosphorylation in Endothelial Cells and Its Relation to Flow-Mediated Dilatation in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gaida, Pauline; Höllriegel, Robert; Fischer, Tina; Linke, Axel; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker; Erbs, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endothelial function is impaired in chronic heart failure (CHF). Statins upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and improve endothelial function. Recent studies demonstrated that HDL stimulates NO production due to eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177, dephosphorylation at Thr495, and diminished phosphorylation of PKC-βII at Ser660. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of rosuvastatin on HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation and its relation to endothelial function. Methods. 18 CHF patients were randomized to 12 weeks of rosuvastatin or placebo. At baseline, 12 weeks, and 4 weeks after treatment cessation we determined lipid levels and isolated HDL. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were incubated with isolated HDL and phosphorylation of eNOS and PKC-βII was evaluated. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was measured at the radial artery. Results. Rosuvastatin improved FMD significantly. This effect was blunted after treatment cessation. LDL plasma levels were reduced after rosuvastatin treatment whereas drug withdrawal resulted in significant increase. HDL levels remained unaffected. Incubation of HAEC with HDL had no impact on phosphorylation of eNOS or PKC-βII. Conclusion. HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation levels in endothelial cells do not change with rosuvastatin in CHF patients and do not mediate the marked improvement in endothelial function. PMID:27563480

  12. Presence of Rheumatoid Factor during Chronic HCV Infection Is Associated with Expansion of Mature Activated Memory B-Cells that Are Hypo-Responsive to B-Cell Receptor Stimulation and Persist during the Early Stage of IFN Free Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Avilés, Elane; Kostadinova, Lenche; Rusterholtz, Anne; Cruz-Lebrón, Angelica; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Anthony, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of those with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have circulating rheumatoid factor (RF), and a portion of these individuals develop cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. B cell phenotype/function in relation to RF in serum has been unclear. We examined B cell subset distribution, activation state (CD86), cell cycle state (Ki67), and ex-vivo response to BCR, TLR9 and TLR7/8 stimulation, in chronic HCV-infected donors with or without RF, and uninfected donors. Mature-activated B-cells of HCV-infected donors had lower CD86 expression compared to uninfected donors, and in the presence of RF they also showed reduced CD86 expression in response to BCR and TLR9 stimulation. Additionally, mature activated memory B cells of HCV RF+ donors less commonly expressed Ki67+ than HCV RF- donors, and did not proliferate as well in response to BCR stimulation. Proportions of mature-activated B cells were enhanced, while naïve B-cells were lower in the peripheral blood of HCV-RF+ compared to RF- and uninfected donors. None of these parameters normalize by week 8 of IFN free direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapy in HCV RF+ donors, while in RF- donors, mature activated B cell proportions did normalize. These data indicate that while chronic HCV infection alone results in a lower state of activation in mature activated memory B cells, the presence of RF in serum is associated with a more pronounced state of unresponsiveness and an overrepresentation of these B cells in the blood. This phenotype persists at least during the early time window after removal of HCV from the host. PMID:26649443

  13. Endopolyploidy in irradiated p53-deficient tumour cell lines: Persistence of cell division activity in giant cells expressing Aurora B- kinase

    PubMed Central

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Ivanov, Andrei; Wheatley, Sally P; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; Ianzini, Fiorenza; Anisimov, Alim P; Mackey, Michael; Davis, Paul J; Plakhins, Grigorijs; Illidge, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings including computerized live imaging suggest that polyploidy cells transiently emerging after severe genotoxic stress (and named ‘endopolyploid cells’) may have a role in tumour regrowth after anti-cancer treatment. Until now, mostly the factors enabling metaphase were studied in them. Here we investigate the mitotic activities and the role of Aurora B, in view of potential de-polyploidisation of these cells, because Aurora B- kinase is responsible for coordination and completion of mitosis. We observed that endopolyploid giant cells are formed in irradiated p53 tumours in several ways: (1) by division/fusion of daughter cells creating early multi-nucleated cells; (2) by asynchronous division/fusion of sub-nuclei of these multinucleated cells; (3) by a series of polyploidising mitoses reverting replicative interphase from aborted metaphase and forming giant cells with a single nucleus; (4) by micronucleation of arrested metaphases enclosing genome fragments; or (5) by incomplete division in the multipolar mitoses forming late multi-nucleated giant cells. We also observed that these activities are able to release para-diploid cells, although they do so infrequently. Although after a substantial delay, apoptosis typically occurs in these cells, we also found that roughly 2% of endopolyploid cells evade apoptosis and senescence arrest and continue mitotic activities. In this article we describe that catalytically active aurora B-kinase is expressed in the nuclei of many interphase endopolyploid cells, as well as being present at the centromeres, mitotic spindle and cleavage furrow during their mitotic efforts. The totally micronucleated giant cells (containing subgenomic fragments in multiple micronuclei) represented the only minor fraction, which failed to undergo mitosis and Aurora B was absent from it. These observations suggest that most endopolyploid tumour cells are not reproductively inert and that aurora B may contribute to the establishment

  14. Emotional persistence in online chatting communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas, Antonios; Garcia, David; Skowron, Marcin; Schweitzer, Frank

    2012-05-01

    How do users behave in online chatrooms, where they instantaneously read and write posts? We analyzed about 2.5 million posts covering various topics in Internet relay channels, and found that user activity patterns follow known power-law and stretched exponential distributions, indicating that online chat activity is not different from other forms of communication. Analysing the emotional expressions (positive, negative, neutral) of users, we revealed a remarkable persistence both for individual users and channels. I.e. despite their anonymity, users tend to follow social norms in repeated interactions in online chats, which results in a specific emotional ``tone'' of the channels. We provide an agent-based model of emotional interaction, which recovers qualitatively both the activity patterns in chatrooms and the emotional persistence of users and channels. While our assumptions about agent's emotional expressions are rooted in psychology, the model allows to test different hypothesis regarding their emotional impact in online communication.

  15. Closing the cell cycle circle in yeast: G2 cyclin proteolysis initiated at mitosis persists until the activation of G1 cyclins in the next cycle.

    PubMed

    Amon, A; Irniger, S; Nasmyth, K

    1994-07-01

    It is thought that DNA replication and mitosis in yeast are triggered by oscillations in the level of G1-specific (CLN1 and CLN2) and G2-specific (CLB1-CLB4) cyclins, which determine the substrate specificity of the CDC28 protein kinase. It is not understood how the time and order of appearance of different cyclin types are determined. We show here that CLB2 proteolysis, which is important for transition from mitosis to G1, is not confined to a narrow window at the end of mitosis as previously thought but continues until reactivation of CDC28 by CLN cyclins toward the end of the subsequent G1 period. Thus, cell cycle-regulated proteolysis prevents accumulation of G2-specific CLB cyclins during G1 and thereby ensures that the CLN-associated forms of the CDC28 kinase are activated without interference from CLB cyclins. Accumulation of CLN cyclins leads to inactivation of CLB cyclin proteolysis, which is a precondition for subsequent activation of G2-specific B-type cyclins. PMID:8020094

  16. Genipin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced persistent changes of emotional behaviors and neural activation in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and the central amygdala nucleus.

    PubMed

    Araki, Ryota; Hiraki, Yosuke; Yabe, Takeshi

    2014-10-15

    Sickness behavior is a series of behavioral and psychological changes that develop in inflammatory disease, including infections and cancers. Administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces sickness behavior in rodents. Genipin, an aglycon derived from an iridoid glycoside geniposide extracted from the fruit of Gardenia jasminoides, has anti-inflammatory and antidepressant activities. However, the effects of genipin on inflammation-induced changes in emotional behaviors are unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of genipin on LPS-induced inflammation in BV-2 cells and sickness behavior in mice. Pretreatment with genipin inhibited LPS-induced increases in NO production and reduced the mRNA levels of inflammation-related genes (iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β and IL-6) in BV-2 cells. Oral administration of genipin ameliorated LPS-induced depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test and social behavior deficits 24h after LPS administration in mice. LPS-induced expression of mRNAs for inflammation-related genes and the number of c-fos immunopositive cells decreased in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus and the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), suggesting that genipin attenuates LPS-induced changes of emotional behaviors through inhibition of neural activation and inflammatory responses in the PVN and CeA. These novel pharmacological effects of genipin may be useful for treatment of patients with sickness behavior. PMID:25084220

  17. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudo-multidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryo-electron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nano particles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. PMID:26032339

  18. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-07-30

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudomultidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high-dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness, and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryoelectron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nanoparticles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. PMID:26032339

  19. Pterostilbene, an Active Constituent of Blueberries, Stimulates Nitric Oxide Production via Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Hoon; Jeong, Sun-Oh; Chung, Hun-Teag; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, a key process in development of cardiovascular diseases, is largely due to reduced nitric oxide (NO) derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Resveratrol has been reported to stimulate NO production via estrogen receptor α (ERα) activation in endothelial cells. Here, we investigated whether two natural methylated analogs of resveratrol, pterostilbene (Pts) and trans-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene (TMS), similarly to resveratrol, could influence endothelial NO release in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In HUVECs exposed to Pts or TMS, NO production and phosphorylation of eNOS, protein kinase B (Akt), and ERα were measured by using a fluorimetric NO assay kit and Western blot analysis, respectively. Dimethylated Pts, but not trimethylated TMS, stimulated dose-dependent NO production via eNOS phosphorylation. Pts also stimulated dose-dependent phosphorylation of Akt, but not of ERα. NO production and eNOS phosphorylation in response to Pts were significantly abolished by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt inhibitor LY294002, but not by the ERα antagonist ICI182780. Our results suggest that Pts, but not TMS, is capable of inducing eNOS phosphorylation and the subsequent NO release, presumably, by activating PI3K/Akt pathway. The potential efficacy of Pts, an active constituent of blueberries, may aid in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases characterized by endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26008990

  20. Degradation of MSCRAMM target macromolecules in VLU slough by Lucilia sericata chymotrypsin 1 (ISP) persists in the presence of tissue gelatinase activity.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, David I; Brown, Alan P

    2015-08-01

    Venous leg ulcer slough is unpleasant to the patient and difficult to manage clinically. It harbours infection, also preventing wound management materials and dressings from supporting the underlying viable tissues. In other words, slough has significant nuisance value in the tissue viability clinic. In this study, we have sought to increase our knowledge of slough by building upon a previous but limited analysis of this necrotic tissue. In particular, slough has been probed using Western blotting for the presence of proteins with the capacity to engage microbial surface components recognising adhesive matrix macromolecules. Although the samples were difficult to resolve, we detected fibrinogen, fibronectin, IgG, collagen, human serum albumin and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Furthermore, the effect of a maggot-derived debridement enzyme, chymotrypsin 1 on macromolecules in slough was confirmed across seven patient samples. The effect of chymotrypsin 1 on slough confirms our thesis that this potential debridement enzyme could be effective in removing slough along with its associated bacteria, given its observed resistance to intrinsic gelatinase activity. In summary, we believe that the data provide scientists and clinicians with further insights into the potential molecular interactions between bacteria, wound tissue and Lucilia sericata in a clinically problematic yet scientifically interesting wound ecosystem. PMID:23834475

  1. Persistence in eye movement during visual search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Tatiana A.; Reis, Saulo D. S.; Campos, Daniel; Herrmann, Hans J.; Andrade, José S.

    2016-02-01

    As any cognitive task, visual search involves a number of underlying processes that cannot be directly observed and measured. In this way, the movement of the eyes certainly represents the most explicit and closest connection we can get to the inner mechanisms governing this cognitive activity. Here we show that the process of eye movement during visual search, consisting of sequences of fixations intercalated by saccades, exhibits distinctive persistent behaviors. Initially, by focusing on saccadic directions and intersaccadic angles, we disclose that the probability distributions of these measures show a clear preference of participants towards a reading-like mechanism (geometrical persistence), whose features and potential advantages for searching/foraging are discussed. We then perform a Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) over the time series of jump magnitudes in the eye trajectory and find that it exhibits a typical multifractal behavior arising from the sequential combination of saccades and fixations. By inspecting the time series composed of only fixational movements, our results reveal instead a monofractal behavior with a Hurst exponent , which indicates the presence of long-range power-law positive correlations (statistical persistence). We expect that our methodological approach can be adopted as a way to understand persistence and strategy-planning during visual search.

  2. Persistence in eye movement during visual search

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Tatiana A.; Reis, Saulo D. S.; Campos, Daniel; Herrmann, Hans J.; Andrade, José S.

    2016-01-01

    As any cognitive task, visual search involves a number of underlying processes that cannot be directly observed and measured. In this way, the movement of the eyes certainly represents the most explicit and closest connection we can get to the inner mechanisms governing this cognitive activity. Here we show that the process of eye movement during visual search, consisting of sequences of fixations intercalated by saccades, exhibits distinctive persistent behaviors. Initially, by focusing on saccadic directions and intersaccadic angles, we disclose that the probability distributions of these measures show a clear preference of participants towards a reading-like mechanism (geometrical persistence), whose features and potential advantages for searching/foraging are discussed. We then perform a Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) over the time series of jump magnitudes in the eye trajectory and find that it exhibits a typical multifractal behavior arising from the sequential combination of saccades and fixations. By inspecting the time series composed of only fixational movements, our results reveal instead a monofractal behavior with a Hurst exponent , which indicates the presence of long-range power-law positive correlations (statistical persistence). We expect that our methodological approach can be adopted as a way to understand persistence and strategy-planning during visual search. PMID:26864680

  3. Persistence in eye movement during visual search.

    PubMed

    Amor, Tatiana A; Reis, Saulo D S; Campos, Daniel; Herrmann, Hans J; Andrade, José S

    2016-01-01

    As any cognitive task, visual search involves a number of underlying processes that cannot be directly observed and measured. In this way, the movement of the eyes certainly represents the most explicit and closest connection we can get to the inner mechanisms governing this cognitive activity. Here we show that the process of eye movement during visual search, consisting of sequences of fixations intercalated by saccades, exhibits distinctive persistent behaviors. Initially, by focusing on saccadic directions and intersaccadic angles, we disclose that the probability distributions of these measures show a clear preference of participants towards a reading-like mechanism (geometrical persistence), whose features and potential advantages for searching/foraging are discussed. We then perform a Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) over the time series of jump magnitudes in the eye trajectory and find that it exhibits a typical multifractal behavior arising from the sequential combination of saccades and fixations. By inspecting the time series composed of only fixational movements, our results reveal instead a monofractal behavior with a Hurst exponent , which indicates the presence of long-range power-law positive correlations (statistical persistence). We expect that our methodological approach can be adopted as a way to understand persistence and strategy-planning during visual search. PMID:26864680

  4. Persistence of antigen in nonarthritic joints.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A; Glynn, L E

    1975-01-01

    The presence of antigen, IgG and C3 was shown by radioautography and immunofluorescence in the collagenous tissues of the joints of animals injected intra-articularly with antigen after having been previously immunized with that antigen in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Since these joints were shown to be virtually free of inflammatory reactions, we suggest that the persistence of immune complexes activating complement cannot fully explain the chronicity of experimental allergic arthritis. Images PMID:769709

  5. Persistent low thymic activity and non-cardiac mortality in children with chromosome 22q11·2 microdeletion and partial DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, P; Berger, C; Junge, S; Dougoud, S; Büchel, E Valsangiacomo; Riegel, M; Schinzel, A; Seger, R; Güngör, T

    2009-01-01

    A subgroup of patients with 22q11·2 microdeletion and partial DiGeorge syndrome (pDGS) appears to be susceptible to non-cardiac mortality (NCM) despite sufficient overall CD4+ T cells. To detect these patients, 20 newborns with 22q11·2 microdeletion and congenital heart disease were followed prospectively for 6 years. Besides detailed clinical assessment, longitudinal monitoring of naive CD4+ and cytotoxic CD3+CD8+ T cells (CTL) was performed. To monitor thymic activity, we analysed naive platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD31+) expressing CD45RA+RO−CD4+ cells containing high numbers of T cell receptor excision circle (TREC)-bearing lymphocytes and compared them with normal values of healthy children (n = 75). Comparing two age periods, low overall CD4+ and naive CD4+ T cell numbers were observed in 65%/75%, respectively, of patients in period A (< 1 year) declining to 22%/50%, respectively, of patients in period B (> 1/< 7 years). The percentage of patients with low CTLs (< P10) remained robust until school age (period A: 60%; period B: 50%). Low numbers of CTLs were associated with abnormally low naive CD45RA+RO−CD4+ T cells. A high-risk (HR) group (n = 11) and a standard-risk (SR) (n = 9) group were identified. HR patients were characterized by low numbers of both naive CD4+ and CTLs and were prone to lethal infectious and lymphoproliferative complications (NCM: four of 11; cardiac mortality: one of 11) while SR patients were not (NCM: none of nine; cardiac mortality: two of nine). Naive CD31+CD45RA+RO−CD4+, naive CD45RA+RO−CD4+ T cells as well as TRECs/106 mononuclear cells were abnormally low in HR and normal in SR patients. Longitudinal monitoring of naive CD4+ and cytotoxic T cells may help to discriminate pDGS patients at increased risk for NCM. PMID:19040613

  6. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) T-786C, 4a4b, and G894T polymorphisms and male infertility: study for idiopathic asthenozoospermia and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Pingping; Zou, Shasha; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Jianhua; Wang, Yanan; Yang, Juanjuan; Song, Zhijian; Jiang, Huayu; Shi, Huijuan; Huang, Yiran; Li, Zheng; Shi, Yongyong; Hu, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies on the eNOS gene and male infertility show that expression of eNOS regulates normal spermatogenesis in the testis, and the eNOS gene variants (T-786C, 4a4b, and G894T) are potentially involved in impairment of spermatogenesis and sperm function. Thus, we conducted this association and meta-analysis study to further validate whether variants of those three loci affected the risk of idiopathic asthenozoospermia (AZS) and male infertility. Approximately 340 Chinese idiopathic AZS patients and 342 healthy men were included for this case-control study, genotyped by gel electrophoresis analysis or direct sequencing of PCR products. The eNOS mRNA isolated from the semen of patients was further examined by quantitative real-time PCR. Also, a meta-analysis of association between eNOS gene polymorphisms and male infertility was performed. A significant association was identified on allelic level between 4a4b variant and AZS in our study (chi-squared = 7.53, corrected P = 0.018, odds ratio (OR) = 1.808), while there were no significant difference of T-786C and G894T for asthenozoospermia in both genotype and allele distributions. In addition, expression of eNOS was up-regulated in patients compared with controls (about 2.4-fold, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the results of the meta-analysis support the conclusion that the T-786C and 4a4b loci were associated with male infertility in both Asian and Caucasian populations. Our study provides genetic evidence for the eNOS gene being a risk factor for idiopathic AZS and male infertility. Considering genetic differences among populations and complex pathogenesis of male infertility, more validating studies using independent samples are suggested in the future. PMID:25505202

  7. Energy landscapes and persistent minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Joanne M.; Mazauric, Dorian; Cazals, Frédéric; Wales, David J.

    2016-02-01

    We consider a coarse-graining of high-dimensional potential energy landscapes based upon persistences, which correspond to lowest barrier heights to lower-energy minima. Persistences can be calculated efficiently for local minima in kinetic transition networks that are based on stationary points of the prevailing energy landscape. The networks studied here represent peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, an atomic cluster, and a glassy system. Minima with high persistence values are likely to represent some form of alternative structural morphology, which, if appreciably populated at the prevailing temperature, could compete with the global minimum (defined as infinitely persistent). Threshold values on persistences (and in some cases equilibrium occupation probabilities) have therefore been used in this work to select subsets of minima, which were then analysed to see how well they can represent features of the full network. Simplified disconnectivity graphs showing only the selected minima can convey the funnelling (including any multiple-funnel) characteristics of the corresponding full graphs. The effect of the choice of persistence threshold on the reduced disconnectivity graphs was considered for a system with a hierarchical, glassy landscape. Sets of persistent minima were also found to be useful in comparing networks for the same system sampled under different conditions, using minimum oriented spanning forests.

  8. Persistent Neuropathic Pain Influences Persistence Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kniffin, Tracey C.; Danaher, Robert J.; Westlund, Karin N.; Ma, Fei; Miller, Craig S.; Carlson, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To determine whether self-regulation can be studied successfully in a rodent model and whether persistent facial pain influences self-regulatory behavior. Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats, divided into two groups, (1) chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION) and (2) naïve, were used in a two-part behavioral paradigm of self-regulation. This paradigm consisted of both a cued go/no-go task (part one) and a persistence trial (part two). All animals were acclimated and trained for a period of 4 weeks prior to the experimental manipulation and then tested for a total of 5 weeks following experimental manipulation. Results were analyzed with t tests, one-way analysis of variance, and two-way, repeated measures analysis of variance. Results CCI-ION surgery induced significant mechanical hypersensitivity of the ipsilateral whisker pad that began 3 weeks postsurgery and persisted through the duration of the experiment (P < .001). At weeks 4 and 5 post–experimental manipulation, naïve animals demonstrated a significant decrease in lever presses during the persistence task (P < .05) compared to baseline, whereas CCI-ION animals did not (P = .55). Conclusion These results suggest that persistent pain influences behavioral regulation and that animals experiencing persistent pain may have difficulty adapting to environmental demands. PMID:25905537

  9. SOS Response Induces Persistence to Fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dörr, Tobias; Lewis, Kim; Vulić, Marin

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria can survive antibiotic treatment without acquiring heritable antibiotic resistance. We investigated persistence to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli. Our data show that a majority of persisters to ciprofloxacin were formed upon exposure to the antibiotic, in a manner dependent on the SOS gene network. These findings reveal an active and inducible mechanism of persister formation mediated by the SOS response, challenging the prevailing view that persisters are pre-existing and formed purely by stochastic means. SOS-induced persistence is a novel mechanism by which cells can counteract DNA damage and promote survival to fluoroquinolones. This unique survival mechanism may be an important factor influencing the outcome of antibiotic therapy in vivo. PMID:20011100

  10. Methylxanthine-evoked perturbation of spontaneous and evoked activities in isolated newborn rat hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Ruangkittisakul, A; Sharopov, S; Kantor, C; Kuribayashi, J; Mildenberger, E; Luhmann, H J; Kilb, W; Ballanyi, K

    2015-08-20

    Treatment of apnea of prematurity with methylxanthines like caffeine, aminophylline or theophylline can evoke hippocampal seizures. However, it is unknown at which interstitial brain concentrations methylxanthines promote such neonatal seizures or interfere with physiological 'early network oscillations' (ENOs) that are considered as pivotal for maturation of hippocampal neural networks. We studied theophylline and caffeine effects on ENOs in CA3 neurons (CA3-ENOs) and CA3 electrical stimulation-evoked monosynaptic CA1 field potentials (CA1-FPs) in sliced and intact hippocampi, respectively, from 8 to 10-days-old rats. Submillimolar doses of theophylline and caffeine, blocking adenosine receptors and phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), did not affect CA3-ENOs, ENO-associated cytosolic Ca(2+) transients or CA1-FPs nor did they provoke seizure-like discharges. Low millimolar doses of theophylline (⩾1mM) or caffeine (⩾5mM), blocking GABAA and glycine receptors plus sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA)-type Ca(2+) ATPases, evoked seizure-like discharges with no indication of cytosolic Ca(2+) dysregulation. Inhibiting PDE4 with rolipram or glycine receptors with strychnine had no effect on CA3-ENOs and did not occlude seizure-like events as tested with theophylline. GABAA receptor blockade induced seizure-like discharges and occluded theophylline-evoked seizure-like discharges in the slices, but not in the intact hippocampi. In summary, submillimolar methylxanthine concentrations do not acutely affect spontaneous CA3-ENOs or electrically evoked synaptic activities and low millimolar doses are needed to evoke seizure-like discharges in isolated developing hippocampal neural networks. We conclude that mechanisms of methylxanthine-related seizure-like discharges do not involve SERCA inhibition-related neuronal Ca(2+) dysregulation, PDE4 blockade or adenosine and glycine receptor inhibition, whereas GABA(A) receptor blockade may contribute partially. PMID

  11. Persistence of undergraduate women in STEM fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, Maggie Helene

    The underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a complex problem that continues to persist at the postsecondary level, particularly in computer science and engineering fields. This dissertation explored the pre-college and college level factors that influenced undergraduate women's persistence in STEM. This study also examined and compared the characteristics of undergraduate women who entered STEM fields and non-STEM fields in 2003-2004. The nationally representative Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/09) data set was used for analysis. BPS:04/09 study respondents were surveyed three times (NPSAS:04, BPS:04/06, BPS:04/09) over a six-year period, which enabled me to explore factors related to long-term persistence. Astin's Input-Environment-Output (I-E-O) model was used as the framework to examine student inputs and college environmental factors that predict female student persistence (output) in STEM. Chi-square tests revealed significant differences between undergraduate women who entered STEM and non-STEM fields in 2003-2004. Differences in student demographics, prior academic achievement, high school course-taking patterns, and student involvement in college such as participation in study groups and school clubs were found. Notably, inferential statistics showed that a significantly higher proportion of female minority students entered STEM fields than non-STEM fields. These findings challenge the myth that underrepresented female minorities are less inclined to enter STEM fields. Logistic regression analyses revealed thirteen significant predictors of persistence for undergraduate women in STEM. Findings showed that undergraduate women who were younger, more academically prepared, and academically and socially involved in college (e.g., lived on campus, interacted with faculty, participated in study groups, fine arts activities, and school sports) were more likely to persist in STEM

  12. Gene 33/Mig-6, a transcriptionally inducible adapter protein that binds GTP-Cdc42 and activates SAPK/JNK. A potential marker transcript for chronic pathologic conditions, such as diabetic nephropathy. Possible role in the response to persistent stress.

    PubMed

    Makkinje, A; Quinn, D A; Chen, A; Cadilla, C L; Force, T; Bonventre, J V; Kyriakis, J M

    2000-06-01

    Chronic stresses, including the mechanical strain caused by hypertension or excess pulmonary ventilation pressure, lead to important clinical consequences, including hypertrophy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pathologic hypertrophy contributes to decreased organ function and, ultimately, organ failure; and cardiac and diabetic renal hypertrophy are major causes of morbidity and morality in the developed world. Likewise, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious potential side effect of mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Whereas the deleterious effects of chronic stress are well established, the molecular mechanisms by which these stresses affect cell function are still poorly characterized. gene 33 (also called mitogen-inducible gene-6, mig-6) is an immediate early gene that is transcriptionally induced by a divergent array of extracellular stimuli. The physiologic function of Gene 33 is unknown. Here we show that gene 33 mRNA levels increase sharply in response to a set of commonly occurring chronic stress stimuli: mechanical strain, vasoactive peptides, and diabetic nephropathy. Induction of gene 33 requires the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. This expression pattern suggests that gene 33 is a potential marker for diabetic nephropathy and other pathologic responses to persistent sublethal stress. The structure of Gene 33 indicates an adapter protein capable of binding monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily. Consistent with this, Gene 33 interacts in vivo and, in a GTP-dependent manner, in vitro with Cdc42Hs; and transient expression of Gene 33 results in the selective activation of the SAPKs. These results imply a reciprocal, positive feedback relationship between Gene 33 expression and SAPK activation. Expression of Gene 33 at sufficient levels may enable a compensatory reprogramming of cellular function in response to chronic stress, which may have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:10749885

  13. Immunomodulation by Persistent Organic Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widely distnbuted in the environment, are resistant to degradation, and increase in concentration (biomagnify) in the food chain. Concentrations in apical predators may be tens to hundreds of times greater than concentrations in their pref...

  14. Object-oriented persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  15. Asymmetric dimethylarginine inhibits HSP90 activity in Pulmonary Arterial Endothelial Cells: Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wells, Sandra M.; Wiseman, Dean A.; Wilham, Jason; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Increased ADMA levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of conditions affecting the cardiovascular system. However, the mechanism(s) by which ADMA exerts its effect has not been adequately elucidated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increased ADMA on nitric oxide (NO) signaling and to begin to elucidate the mechanism by which ADMA acts. Our initial data demonstrated that that ADMA increased NOS uncoupling both in recombinant human endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC). Further, we found that this eNOS uncoupling increased 3-nitrotyrosine levels preferentially in the mitochondria of PAEC due to a redistribution of eNOS from the plasma membrane to the mitochondria. This increase in nitration in the mitochondria was found to induce mitochondrial dysfunction as determined by increased mitochondrial derived reactive oxygen species and decreased generation of ATP. Finally, we found that the decrease in ATP resulted in a reduction in the chaperone activity of HSP90 resulting in a decrease in its interaction with eNOS. In conclusion increased levels of ADMA causes mitochondrial dysfunction and a loss of HSP90 chaperone activity secondary to an uncoupling of eNOS. Mitochondrial dysfunction may be an understudied component of the endothelial dysfunction associated with various cardiovascular disease states. PMID:18385287

  16. Genistein activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase in broiler pulmonary arterial endothelial cells by an Akt-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Nie, Wei; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhang, Bingkun; Wang, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Deregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the development of multiple cardiovascular diseases. Our recent study demonstrated that genistein supplementation attenuates pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers by restoration of endothelial function. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by using broiler pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs). Our results showed that genistein stimulated a rapid phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179 which was associated with activation of eNOS/NO axis. Further study indicated that the activation of eNOS was not mediated through estrogen receptors or tyrosine kinase inhibition, but via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-dependent signaling pathway, as the eNOS activity and related NO release were largely abolished by pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K or Akt. Thus, our findings revealed a critical function of Akt in mediating genistein-stimulated eNOS activity in PAECs, partially accounting for the beneficial effects of genistein on the development of cardiovascular diseases observed in animal models. PMID:20926919

  17. Boromycin Kills Mycobacterial Persisters without Detectable Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Wilfried; Aziz, Dinah B.; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Boromycin is a boron-containing polyether macrolide antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It was shown to be active against Gram positive bacteria and to act as an ionophore for potassium ions. The antibiotic is ineffective against Gram negative bacteria where the outer membrane appears to block access of the molecule to the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we asked whether boromycin is active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis which, similar to Gram negative bacteria, possesses an outer membrane. The results show that boromycin is a potent inhibitor of mycobacterial growth (MIC50 = 80 nM) with strong bactericidal activity against growing and non-growing drug tolerant persister bacilli. Exposure to boromycin resulted in a rapid loss of membrane potential, reduction of the intracellular ATP level and leakage of cytoplasmic protein. Consistent with boromycin acting as a potassium ionophore, addition of KCl to the medium blocked its antimycobacterial activity. In contrast to the potent antimycobacterial activities of the polyether macrolide, its cytotoxicity and haemolytic activity were low (CC50 = 30 μM, HC50 = 40 μM) with a selectivity index of more than 300. Spontaneous resistant mutants could not be isolated suggesting a mutation frequency of less than 10-9/CFU. Taken together, the results suggests that targeting mycobacterial transmembrane ion gradients may be an attractive chemotherapeutic intervention level to kill otherwise drug tolerant persister bacilli, and to slow down the development of genetic antibiotic resistance. PMID:26941723

  18. Boromycin Kills Mycobacterial Persisters without Detectable Resistance.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Wilfried; Aziz, Dinah B; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Boromycin is a boron-containing polyether macrolide antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It was shown to be active against Gram positive bacteria and to act as an ionophore for potassium ions. The antibiotic is ineffective against Gram negative bacteria where the outer membrane appears to block access of the molecule to the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we asked whether boromycin is active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis which, similar to Gram negative bacteria, possesses an outer membrane. The results show that boromycin is a potent inhibitor of mycobacterial growth (MIC50 = 80 nM) with strong bactericidal activity against growing and non-growing drug tolerant persister bacilli. Exposure to boromycin resulted in a rapid loss of membrane potential, reduction of the intracellular ATP level and leakage of cytoplasmic protein. Consistent with boromycin acting as a potassium ionophore, addition of KCl to the medium blocked its antimycobacterial activity. In contrast to the potent antimycobacterial activities of the polyether macrolide, its cytotoxicity and haemolytic activity were low (CC50 = 30 μM, HC50 = 40 μM) with a selectivity index of more than 300. Spontaneous resistant mutants could not be isolated suggesting a mutation frequency of less than 10(-9)/CFU. Taken together, the results suggests that targeting mycobacterial transmembrane ion gradients may be an attractive chemotherapeutic intervention level to kill otherwise drug tolerant persister bacilli, and to slow down the development of genetic antibiotic resistance. PMID:26941723

  19. Association of G894T eNOS, 4G/5G PAI and T1131C APOA5 polymorphisms with susceptibility to myocardial infarction in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Hassani Idrissi, Hind; Hmimech, Wiam; Diakite, Brehima; Korchi, Farah; Baghdadi, Dalila; Habbal, Rachida; Nadifi, Sellama

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) is a common multifactorial disease. Numerous studies have found that genetic plays an essential role in MI occurrence. The main objective of our case–control study is to explore the association of G894T eNOS (rs1799983), 4G/5G PAI (rs1799889) and T1131C APOA5 (rs662799) polymorphisms with MI susceptibility in the Moroccan population. Methods and results 118 MI patients were recruited vs 184 healthy controls. DNA samples were genotyped by PCR-RFLP method using MboI, BslI and MseI restriction enzymes respectively for the G894T eNOS, 4G/5G PAI and T1131C APOA5 polymorphisms. Our results show that the G894T eNOS was significantly associated with increased risk of MI under the three genetic transmission models (dominant: OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.05–2.58, P = 0.003; recessive: OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 0.74–6.16, P = 0.03; additive: OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.06–2.23, P = 0.001). The T1131C APOA5 polymorphism was associated to MI risk in recessive and additive models (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 0.72–3.2, P = 0.04 and OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.26–2.51, P = 0.03 respectively). For the 4G/5G PAI variant, even the cases and controls groups were not in Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE), the dominant and additive models show a statistically significant association with MI risk (OR = 7.96, 95%CI = 3.83–16.36, P = 0.01 and OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.4–2.72, P = 0.03 respectively). Conclusion Our results suggest that G894T eNOS and T1131C APOA5 polymorphisms may be considered as genetic markers of MI among the Moroccan population. Further studies including larger sample sizes and exploring more genetic associations are needed to confirm our results and to better understand the susceptibility to MI. PMID:27222817

  20. Schistosomes Enhance Plasminogen Activation: The Role of Tegumental Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Barbara C.; Da'dara, Akram A.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Skelly, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease of global public health importance. These relatively large parasites are able to survive prolonged periods in the human vasculature without inducing stable blood clots around them. We show here that the intravascular life stages (schistosomula and adult males and females) can all promote significant plasminogen (PLMG) activation in the presence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). This results in the generation of the potent fibrinolytic agent plasmin which could degrade blood clots forming around the worms in vivo. We demonstrate that S. mansoni enolase (SmEno) is a host-interactive tegumental enzyme that, in recombinant form, can bind PLMG and promote its activation. Like classical members of the enolase protein family, SmEno can catalyze the interconversion of 2-phospho-D-glycerate (2-PGA) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The enzyme has maximal activity at pH 7.5, requires Mg2+ for optimal activity and can be inhibited by NaF but not mefloquin. Suppressing expression of the SmEno gene significantly diminishes enolase mRNA levels, protein levels and surface enzyme activity but, surprisingly, does not affect the ability of the worms to promote PLMG activation. Thus, while SmEno can enhance PLMG activation, our analysis suggests that it is not the only contributor to the parasite’s ability to perform this function. We show that the worms possess several other PLMG-binding proteins in addition to SmEno and these may have a greater importance in schistosome-driven PLMG activation. PMID:26658895

  1. Performance characteristics of methods for quantifying spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage: data from the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Kailash; Mukhtar, Siti F; Lingard, James; Houlton, Aimee; Walker, Elizabeth; Jones, Tanya; Sprigg, Nikola; Cala, Lesley A; Becker, Jennifer L; Dineen, Robert A; Koumellis, Panos; Adami, Alessandro; Casado, Ana M; Bath, Philip M W; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor prognosis after intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is related to haemorrhage characteristics. Along with developing therapeutic interventions, we sought to understand the performance of haemorrhage descriptors in large clinical trials. Methods Clinical and neuroimaging data were obtained for 548 participants with ICH from the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial. Independent observers performed visual categorisation of the largest diameter, measured volume using ABC/2, modified ABC/2, semiautomated segmentation (SAS), fully automatic measurement methods; shape, density and intraventricular haemorrhage were also assessed. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were determined for these measures. Results ICH volume was significantly different among standard ABC/2, modified ABC/2 and SAS: (mean) 12.8 (SD 16.3), 8.9 (9.2), 12.8 (13.1) cm3, respectively (p<0.0001). There was excellent agreement for haemorrhage volume (n=193): ABC/2 intraobserver intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.96–0.97, interobserver ICC 0.88; modified ABC/2 intraobserver ICC 0.95–0.97, interobserver ICC 0.91; SAS intraobserver ICC 0.95–0.99, interobserver ICC 0.93; largest diameter: (visual) interadjudicator ICC 0.82, (visual vs measured) adjudicator vs observer ICC 0.71; shape intraobserver ICC 0.88 interobserver ICC 0.75; density intraobserver ICC 0.86, interobserver ICC 0.73. Graeb score (mean 3.53) and modified Graeb (5.22) scores were highly correlated. Using modified ABC/2, ICH volume was underestimated in regular (by 2.2-2.5 cm3, p<0.0001) and irregular-shaped haemorrhages (by 4.8-4.9 cm3, p<0.0001). Fully automated measurement of haemorrhage volume was possible in only 5% of cases. Conclusions Formal measurement of haemorrhage characteristics and visual estimates are reproducible. The standard ABC/2 method is superior to the modified ABC/2 method for quantifying ICH volume. Clinical trial registration ISRCTN9941422. PMID:25575847

  2. Ceramide-Initiated Protein Phosphatase 2A Activation Contributes to Arterial Dysfunction In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bharath, Leena P; Ruan, Ting; Li, Youyou; Ravindran, Anindita; Wan, Xin; Nhan, Jennifer Kim; Walker, Matthew Lewis; Deeter, Lance; Goodrich, Rebekah; Johnson, Elizabeth; Munday, Derek; Mueller, Robert; Kunz, David; Jones, Deborah; Reese, Van; Summers, Scott A; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Holland, William L; Zhang, Quan-Jiang; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David

    2015-11-01

    Prior studies have implicated accumulation of ceramide in blood vessels as a basis for vascular dysfunction in diet-induced obesity via a mechanism involving type 2 protein phosphatase (PP2A) dephosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The current study sought to elucidate the mechanisms linking ceramide accumulation with PP2A activation and determine whether pharmacological inhibition of PP2A in vivo normalizes obesity-associated vascular dysfunction and limits the severity of hypertension. We show in endothelial cells that ceramide associates with the inhibitor 2 of PP2A (I2PP2A) in the cytosol, which disrupts the association of I2PP2A with PP2A leading to its translocation to the plasma membrane. The increased association between PP2A and eNOS at the plasma membrane promotes dissociation of an Akt-Hsp90-eNOS complex that is required for eNOS phosphorylation and activation. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of PP2A attenuated PP2A activation, prevented disruption of the Akt-Hsp90-eNOS complex in the vasculature, preserved arterial function, and maintained normal blood pressure in obese mice. These findings reveal a novel mechanism whereby ceramide initiates PP2A colocalization with eNOS and demonstrate that PP2A activation precipitates vascular dysfunction in diet-induced obesity. Therapeutic strategies targeted to reducing PP2A activation might be beneficial in attenuating vascular complications that exist in the context of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and conditions associated with insulin resistance. PMID:26253611

  3. DFT, Hirshfeld surfaces, spectral and in vivo cytotoxic studies of 7a-Aza-B-homostigmast-5-eno [7a,7-d] tetrazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mahboob; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Nami, Shahab A. A.; Khan, Mohd Shoeb; Ahmad, Shabbir; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2015-11-01

    The DFT (B3LYP) calculations on a synthetic steroidal molecule 7a-Aza-B-homostigmast-5-eno [7a,7-d] tetrazole, C29H48N4, have been performed. The molecular structure, IR and NMR (13C and 1H) spectra of the present compound were interpreted using experiments (XRD, FTIR, NMR) as well as theoretical, B3LYP/6-311 + G(2d,p), calculations. The vibrational bands appearing in FTIR are assigned with great accuracy using animated modes. Molecular properties like HOMO-LUMO analysis, chemical reactivity descriptors, MEP mapping, dipole moment and Mullikan's atomic charges have been presented at the same level of theory. The theoretical results are found in good correlation with experimental data. Moreover, the Hirshfeld analysis was carried out to ascertain the secondary interactions and associated 2D fingerprint plots. The in vivo cytotoxicity of 7a-Aza-B-homostigmast-5-eno [7a,7-d] has also been carried out against brine shrimp nauplii by lethality bioassay.

  4. Differential effect of beetroot bread on postprandial DBP according to Glu298Asp polymorphism in the eNOS gene: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, D A; George, T W; Lovegrove, J A

    2014-12-01

    Our objective was to investigate whether the presence of Glu298Asp polymorphism in the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) gene differentially affects the postprandial blood pressure response to dietary nitrate-rich beetroot bread. A randomised, single-blind, controlled, crossover acute pilot study was performed in 14 healthy men (mean age: 34±9 years) who were retrospectively genotyped for Glu298Asp polymorphism (7GG; T carriers 7). Volunteers were randomised to receive 200 g beetroot-enriched bread (1.1 mmol nitrate) or control bread (no beetroot; 0.01 mmol nitrate) on two separate occasions 10 days apart. Baseline and incremental area under the curve of blood pressure and NOx (nitrate/nitrite) were measured for a 6-h postprandial period. A treatment × genotype interaction was observed for diastolic blood pressure (P<0.02), which was significantly lower in T carriers (P<0.01) after consumption of beetroot bread compared with control bread. No significant differences were observed in the GG group. The beneficial diastolic blood pressure reduction was observed only in the T carriers of the Glu298Asp polymorphism in the eNOS gene after consumption of nitrate-rich beetroot bread. These data require confirmation in a larger population group. PMID:24670328

  5. Evaluation of retrocommissioning persistence in large commercialbuildings

    SciTech Connect

    Bourassa, Norman J.; Piette, Mary Ann; Motegi, Naoya

    2004-05-01

    Commercial Building Retrocommissioning activity has increased in recent years. This paper discusses LBNL's recently conducted study of 8 participants in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District Retrocommissioning program. We evaluated the persistence of energy savings and measure implementation, in an effort to identify and understand factors that can improve the longevity of retrocommissioning benefits. The LBNL analysis included a whole-building and measure status analysis, incorporating elements of previous work by Texas A&M University and Portland Energy Conservation Inc. Included in the energy analysis were whole building calculated energy savings and consideration of effects from the 2001 energy crisis. The measure persistence analysis examined each recommended measure and it's current operational status. Results showed a 59% implementation rate of recommended measures. Some process findings were: (1) Building engineers will tweak a measure that didn't work, instead of reverting to the pre-retrocommissioning settings; (2) A majority of the implementation costs were absorbed into regular operation and maintenance budgets; (3) The most frequently reported down side was the large time demands on the building engineering staff. However, all respondents thought it was worth the price; (4) All the sites said that retrocommissioning is beneficial to their operations, due to ongoing training and continuous improvement of system specifications; and (5) Approximately 65% of the peak retrocommissioning savings persisted beyond four years.

  6. Cytokines and persistent viral infections.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C and B or Epstein-Barr virus often cause chronic viral infections in humans. Persistence of these viruses in the host is associated with a dramatic loss of T-cell immune response due to functional T-cell exhaustion. Developing efficient immunotherapeutic approaches to prevent viral persistence and/or to restore a highly functional T-cell mediated immunity remains a major challenge. During the last two decades, numerous studies aimed to identify relevant host-derived factors that could be modulated to achieve this goal. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the role of cytokines in preventing or facilitating viral persistence. We concentrate on the impact of multiple relevant cytokines in T-cell dependent immune response to chronic viral infection and the potential for using cytokines as therapeutic agents in mice and humans. PMID:26907634

  7. Persistent Mobility Disability After Neurotoxic Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The impact of cancer and its treatments on balance and functional mobility in older adults remains unknown but is increasingly important, given the evolution of cancer treatments. Subacute and more persistent side effects such as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy are on the rise, and the effects on mobility and balance, as well as the prognosis for resolution of any functional deficits, must be established before interventions can be trialed. The purpose of this case report is to describe the severity and long-term persistence of mobility decline in an older adult who received neurotoxic chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe an older adult with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy using results of standardized balance and mobility tests and to focus on prognosis by repeating these measures more than 2 years after chemotherapy. Case Description An 81-year-old woman received a neurotoxic agent (paclitaxel) after curative mastectomy for breast cancer. Baseline testing prior to taxane therapy revealed a socially active woman with no reported functional deficits or neuropathic symptoms, 1.2-m/s gait speed, and performance at the ceiling on balance and gait portions of a standardized mobility measure. Outcomes After 3 cycles, paclitaxel therapy was stopped by the oncologist because of neurotoxicity. Declines as large as 50% were seen in performance-based measures at 12 weeks and persisted at 2.5 years, and the patient reported recurrent falls, cane use, and mobility-related disability. Discussion This case highlights the extent to which function can decline in an older individual receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy, the potential for these deficits to persist years after treatment is stopped, and the need for physical therapy intervention and further research in this population. PMID:20813818

  8. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  9. Redox-sensitive up-regulation of eNOS by purple grape juice in endothelial cells: role of PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, JNK, FoxO1 and FoxO3a.

    PubMed

    Alhosin, Mahmoud; Anselm, Eric; Rashid, Sherzad; Kim, Jong Hun; Madeira, Socorro Vanesca Frota; Bronner, Christian; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2013-01-01

    The vascular protective effect of grape-derived polyphenols has been attributable, in part, to their direct action on blood vessels by stimulating the endothelial formation of nitric oxide (NO). The aim of the present study was to determine whether Concord grape juice (CGJ), which contains high levels of polyphenols, stimulates the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in porcine coronary artery endothelial cells and, if so, to determine the signaling pathway involved. CGJ dose- and time-dependently increased eNOS mRNA and protein levels and this effect is associated with an increased formation of NO in endothelial cells. The stimulatory effect of CGJ on eNOS mRNA is not associated with an increased eNOS mRNA stability and inhibited by antioxidants such as MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, and catalase, and by wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3-kinase), SB 203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK), and SP 600125 (an inhibitor of JNK). Moreover, CGJ induced the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelial cells and this effect is inhibited by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, and catalase. The CGJ-induced the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK kinases is abolished by MnTMPyP. CGJ induced phosphorylation of transcription factors FoxO1 and FoxO3a, which regulate negatively eNOS expression, and this effect is prevented by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, wortmannin, SB203580 and SP600125. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the FoxO3a protein is associated with the eNOS promoter in control cells and that CGJ induced its dissociation. Thus, the present study indicates that CGJ up-regulates the expression of eNOS mRNA and protein leading to an increased formation of NO in endothelial cells. The stimulatory effect of CGJ is a redox-sensitive event involving PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK and JNK pathways, and the inactivation of the FoxO transcription factors, FoxO1 and FoxO3a, thereby preventing their repression of the eNOS gene. PMID:23533577

  10. Redox-Sensitive Up-Regulation of eNOS by Purple Grape Juice in Endothelial Cells: Role of PI3-Kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, JNK, FoxO1 and FoxO3a

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Sherzad; Kim, Jong Hun; Frota Madeira, Socorro Vanesca; Bronner, Christian; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B.

    2013-01-01

    The vascular protective effect of grape-derived polyphenols has been attributable, in part, to their direct action on blood vessels by stimulating the endothelial formation of nitric oxide (NO). The aim of the present study was to determine whether Concord grape juice (CGJ), which contains high levels of polyphenols, stimulates the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in porcine coronary artery endothelial cells and, if so, to determine the signaling pathway involved. CGJ dose- and time-dependently increased eNOS mRNA and protein levels and this effect is associated with an increased formation of NO in endothelial cells. The stimulatory effect of CGJ on eNOS mRNA is not associated with an increased eNOS mRNA stability and inhibited by antioxidants such as MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, and catalase, and by wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3-kinase), SB 203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK), and SP 600125 (an inhibitor of JNK). Moreover, CGJ induced the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelial cells and this effect is inhibited by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, and catalase. The CGJ-induced the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK kinases is abolished by MnTMPyP. CGJ induced phosphorylation of transcription factors FoxO1 and FoxO3a, which regulate negatively eNOS expression, and this effect is prevented by MnTMPyP, PEG-catalase, wortmannin, SB203580 and SP600125. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the FoxO3a protein is associated with the eNOS promoter in control cells and that CGJ induced its dissociation. Thus, the present study indicates that CGJ up-regulates the expression of eNOS mRNA and protein leading to an increased formation of NO in endothelial cells. The stimulatory effect of CGJ is a redox-sensitive event involving PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK and JNK pathways, and the inactivation of the FoxO transcription factors, FoxO1 and FoxO3a, thereby preventing their repression of the eNOS gene. PMID:23533577

  11. Non-Persisting Student Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the characteristics and opinions of the non-persisting students at Moraine Valley Community College. A random sample of 500 non-persisting students was selected, with equal numbers of full-time and part-time ex-students. Separate questionnaires were used for non-persisting full-time and non-persisting part-time…

  12. Persistence of interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics: An analysis of persisting and non-persisting students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffry L.

    While there has been an increase in enrollment, interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has been declining on college campuses since 1967. Higher enrollment does not transfer to an increase in the number of minorities in the STEM fields. The majority-minority enrollment ratio is nearly 2:1 but the gap widens to 4:1 when it comes to graduation. In fact, underrepresented minorities (URM) earned only 12% of the STEM degrees awarded in 1998. When the higher attrition and lower graduation rates of URM are scrutinized, upwards of 60% changed majors or dropped out of STEM. Further investigation reveals the most frequently cited reasons for departure were loss of initial interest, developed a greater interest in another field, or were turned off by the STEM disciplines. A primarily exploratory study was conducted into the conditions necessary for academic interest in the STEM fields to persist. A model based on student engagement (Astin, 1977) and interest operations (Prenzel, 1988a) theories was used with a random sample of URM at universities participating in the Ohio Science and Engineering Alliance. Survey research was employed to investigate interest development and the effect of student retention programs and activities on such interest. The latter part of the study could not be fully examined when 95% reported not utilizing retention services. For the section on interest, an online survey using a 5-point Likert scale was validated using principal components analysis. A binominal logistic regression was used to predict membership in one of two possible groups: persisters and students at-risk for not persisting. The major conclusions are: (1) While 3 variables (feelings, learning and difficulty) were statistically significant only one, feelings was substantively significant. (2) Persistence increased 80.9% for each 1-unit increase in feelings and 9.9% for learning. (3) Persistence decreased 19.8% for each one-unit increase in difficulty

  13. Caveolin 1 Is Required for the Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in Response to 17β-Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Wiseman, Dean A.; Black, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that estrogen mediates rapid endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation via estrogen receptor-a (ERα) within the plasma membrane of endothelial cells (EC). ERα is known to colocalize with caveolin 1, the major structural protein of caveolae, and caveolin 1 stimulates the translocation of ERα to the plasma membrane. However, the role played by caveolin 1 in regulating 17β-estradiol-mediated NO signaling in EC has not been adequately resolved. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore how 17β-estradiol stimulates eNOS activity and the role of caveolin 1 in this process. Our data demonstrate that modulation of caveolin 1 expression using small interfering RNA or adenoviral gene delivery alters ERα localization to the plasma membrane in EC. Further, before estrogen stimulation ERα associates with caveolin 1, whereas stimulation promotes a pp60Src-mediated phosphorylation of caveolin 1 at tyrosine 14, increasing ERα-PI3 kinase interactions and disrupting caveolin 1-ERα interactions. Adenoviral mediated overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of caveolin (Y14FCav) attenuated the ERα/PI3 kinase interaction and prevented Akt-mediated eNOS activation. Furthermore, Y14FCav overexpression reduced eNOS phosphorylation at serine1177 and decreased NO generation after estrogen exposure. Using a library of overlapping peptides we identified residues 62–73 of caveolin 1 as the ERα-binding site. Delivery of a synthetic peptide based on this sequence decreased ERα plasma membrane translocation and reduced estrogen-mediated activation of eNOS. In conclusion, caveolin 1 stimulates 17β-estradiol-induced NO production by promoting ERα to the plasma membrane, which facilitates the activation of the PI3 kinase pathway, leading to eNOS activation and NO generation. PMID:20610538

  14. DNA Persistence in Sink Drain Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-07-31

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm.

  15. Persistent Bleeding Following a Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Taek; Lee, Jae-Bum; Kim, Mi Jung; Lee, Doo-Seok; Youk, Eui-Gon; Kim, Do-Sun; Lee, Doo-Han

    2016-01-01

    A stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) is widely used for treatment of patients with grades III and IV hemorrhoids. The SH is easy to perform, is associated with less pain and allows early return to normal activities. However, complications, whether severe or not, have been reported. Here, we present the case of a female patient with persistent bleeding after a SH. The bleeding was caused by the formation of granulation tissue at the stapler line, diagnosed with sigmoidoscopy, and successfully treated via transanal excision (TAE) under spinal anesthesia. The biopsy showed inflammatory granulation tissue. After the TAE, her symptom was completely gone. PMID:27437395

  16. Computational Methods to Model Persistence.

    PubMed

    Vandervelde, Alexandra; Loris, Remy; Danckaert, Jan; Gelens, Lendert

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are dormant cells, tolerant to multiple antibiotics, that are involved in several chronic infections. Toxin-antitoxin modules play a significant role in the generation of such persister cells. Toxin-antitoxin modules are small genetic elements, omnipresent in the genomes of bacteria, which code for an intracellular toxin and its neutralizing antitoxin. In the past decade, mathematical modeling has become an important tool to study the regulation of toxin-antitoxin modules and their relation to the emergence of persister cells. Here, we provide an overview of several numerical methods to simulate toxin-antitoxin modules. We cover both deterministic modeling using ordinary differential equations and stochastic modeling using stochastic differential equations and the Gillespie method. Several characteristics of toxin-antitoxin modules such as protein production and degradation, negative autoregulation through DNA binding, toxin-antitoxin complex formation and conditional cooperativity are gradually integrated in these models. Finally, by including growth rate modulation, we link toxin-antitoxin module expression to the generation of persister cells. PMID:26468111

  17. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  18. Visual Persistence and Adult Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Roberta L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Visual persistence was investigated in adults with and without dyslexia in order to determine whether dyslexic adults demonstrate problems similar to those found in childhood dyslexia. Results showed that sensitivity of dyslexic adults was impaired when parts of a test stimulus were presented to adjacent retinal areas, suggesting that under…

  19. Blood Persistent Organic Pollutants Level

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the presence of a subset of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the blood of the U.S. population from 1999 to 2002. Some POPs have been linked to adverse health effects such as cancer and nervous system disorders. Three broad classes of POPs are in...

  20. Hypoionic shock treatment enables aminoglycosides antibiotics to eradicate bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Jiafeng, Liu; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persisters, usually being considered as dormant cells that are tolerant to antibiotics, are an important source for recurrent infection and emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Clinical eradication of pathogenic persisters is highly desired but greatly difficult mainly due to the substantial reduction in antibiotics uptake as well as the non-active state of the drug targets. Here we report that bacterial persisters (normal growing cells as well) can be effectively eradicated by aminoglycoside antibiotics upon hypoionic shock (e.g. pure water treatment) even for less than one minute. Such hypoionic shock potentiation effect on aminoglycosides is proton motive force-independent, and is apparently achieved by promoting the entrance of aminoglycosides, speculatively through the mechanosensitive ion channels. Our revelations may provide a simple and powerful strategy to eradicate pathogen persisters. PMID:26435063

  1. Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus Genome Persistence.

    PubMed

    Juillard, Franceline; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has an etiologic role in Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. These diseases are most common in immunocompromised individuals, especially those with AIDS. Similar to all herpesviruses, KSHV infection is lifelong. KSHV infection in tumor cells is primarily latent, with only a small subset of cells undergoing lytic infection. During latency, the KSHV genome persists as a multiple copy, extrachromosomal episome in the nucleus. In order to persist in proliferating tumor cells, the viral genome replicates once per cell cycle and then segregates to daughter cell nuclei. KSHV only expresses several genes during latent infection. Prominent among these genes, is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). LANA is responsible for KSHV genome persistence and also exerts transcriptional regulatory effects. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and in addition, is responsible for segregation of replicated genomes to daughter nuclei. LANA serves as a molecular tether, bridging the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes to ensure that KSHV DNA reaches progeny nuclei. N-terminal LANA attaches to mitotic chromosomes by binding histones H2A/H2B at the surface of the nucleosome. C-terminal LANA binds specific KSHV DNA sequence and also has a role in chromosome attachment. In addition to the essential roles of N- and C-terminal LANA in genome persistence, internal LANA sequence is also critical for efficient episome maintenance. LANA's role as an essential mediator of virus persistence makes it an attractive target for inhibition in order to prevent or treat KSHV infection and disease. PMID:27570517

  2. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase negatively regulates hydrogen peroxide-stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Benjamin Y; Sartoretto, Juliano L; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Michel, Thomas

    2009-10-13

    Hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species are intimately involved in endothelial cell signaling. In many cell types, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been implicated in the control of metabolic responses, but the role of endothelial cell redox signaling in the modulation of AMPK remains to be completely defined. We used RNA interference and pharmacological methods to establish that H(2)O(2) is a critical activator of AMPK in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). H(2)O(2) treatment of BAECs rapidly and significantly increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. The EC(50) for H(2)O(2)-promoted phosphorylation of AMPK is 65 + or - 15 microM, within the physiological range of cellular H(2)O(2) concentrations. The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKbeta) inhibitor STO-609 abolishes H(2)O(2)-dependent AMPK activation, whereas eNOS inhibitors enhance AMPK activation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKKbeta abrogates AMPK activation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of eNOS leads to a striking increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Cellular imaging studies using the H(2)O(2) biosensor HyPer show that siRNA-mediated eNOS knockdown leads to a marked increase in intracellular H(2)O(2) generation, which is blocked by PEG-catalase. eNOS(-/-) mice show a marked increase in AMPK phosphorylation in liver and lung compared to wild-type mice. Lung endothelial cells from eNOS(-/-) mice also show a significant increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, these results establish that CaMKKbeta is critically involved in mediating the phosphorylation of AMPK promoted by H(2)O(2) in endothelial cells, and document that eNOS is an important negative regulator of AMPK phosphorylation and intracellular H(2)O(2) generation in endothelial cells. PMID:19805165

  3. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells.

  4. New alternative splicing BCR/ABL-OOF shows an oncogenic role by lack of inhibition of BCR GTPase activity and an increased of persistence of Rac activation in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Panuzzo, Cristina; Volpe, Gisella; Cibrario Rocchietti, Elisa; Casnici, Claudia; Crotta, Katia; Crivellaro, Sabrina; Carrà, Giovanna; Lorenzatti, Roberta; Peracino, Barbara; Torti, Davide; Morotti, Alessandro; Camacho-Leal, Maria Pilar; Defilippi, Paola; Marelli, Ornella; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia 80% of patients present alternative splice variants involving BCR exons 1, 13 or 14 and ABL exon 4, with a consequent impairment in the reading frame of the ABL gene. Therefore BCR/ABL fusion proteins (BCR/ABL-OOF) are characterized by an in-frame BCR portion followed by an amino acids sequence arising from the out of frame (OOF) reading of the ABL gene. The product of this new transcript contains the characteristic BCR domains while lacking the COOH-terminal Rho GTPase GAP domain. The present work aims to characterize the protein functionality in terms of cytoskeleton (re-)modelling, adhesion and activation of canonical oncogenic signalling pathways. Here, we show that BCR/ABL-OOF has a peculiar endosomal localization which affects EGF receptor activation and turnover. Moreover, we demonstrate that BCR/ABL-OOF expression leads to aberrant cellular adhesion due to the activation of Rac GTPase, increase in cellular proliferation, migration and survival. When overexpressed in a BCR/ABL positive cell line, BCR/ABL-OOF induces hyperactivation of Rac signaling axis offering a therapeutic window for Rac-targeted therapy. Our data support a critical role of BCR/ABL-OOF in leukemogenesis and identify a subset of patients that may benefit from Rac-targeted therapies. PMID:26682280

  5. Persistent histamine excitation of glutamatergic preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  6. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  7. Global persistence in directed percolation