Science.gov

Sample records for persisting mixed cryoglobulinemia

  1. [Heart failure as clinical onset of essential mixed cryoglobulinemia].

    PubMed

    Bragagni, G; Baldini, A; Bianconcini, M

    1998-01-01

    The case of a 58-year old man affected by heart failure on ischemic basis, as clinical onset of essential mixed cryoglobulinemia (EMC) is reported. Laboratory assays, ECG at rest and exercise electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, myocardial scintigraphy, cardiac catheterization with coronarography, hepatic, bone and kidney biopsies confirmed the diagnosis. Cases of primitive heart involvement are rarely reported and are, usually, due to myocardial infarction. Nevertheless in the published series of cases, heart failure is often coupled with EMC and, not seldom, is the cause of death. In the present case heart failure was the dominant element of clinical symptomatology and wasn't consequent to renal involvement or hypertension, but was sustained by a myocardial contractile deficiency, on ischemic basis, with undamaged coronary circle at angiography. Therefore heart failure was ascribed to an involvement of coronary microcirculation in the course of systemic vasculitis. PMID:9824990

  2. Cutaneous lesions and finger clubbing uncovering hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis and hepatitis C with mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Almeida, Teresa; Caetano, Mónica; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis is a rare clinicopathologic entity characterized by urticarial lesions that persist for more than 24 hours and histologic features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Patients can be divided into normocomplementemic or hypocomplementemic. The authors report the case of a healthy 49-year-old woman with a 1-year history of highly pruritic generalized cutaneous lesions and finger clubbing. Laboratory tests together with histopathologic examination allowed the diagnosis of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, chronic hepatitis C and type II mixed cryoglobulinemia. The patient started symptomatic treatment and was referred to a gastroenterologist for management of the hepatitis C, with progressive improvement of the skin condition. The development of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis in the context of chronic hepatitis C is exceedingly rare and possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24474109

  3. Catastrophic multiple organ ischemia due to an anti-Pr cold agglutinin developing in a patient with mixed cryoglobulinemia after treatment with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Ruch, Joshua; McMahon, Brandon; Ramsey, Glenn; Kwaan, Hau C

    2009-02-01

    Cold agglutinin disease occurring with cryoglobulinemia is a rare occurrence. Here, we report a patient with mixed cryoglobulinemia that was treated with rituximab and, after response, developed an anti-Pr cold agglutinin that manifested with hemolysis and microvascular occlusion causing mesenteric ischemia and cerebral infarction. Unlike previous reports of patients with cryoglobulinemia and cold agglutinin disease, our patient did not have a detectable cryoprecipitate when his cold agglutinin manifested. PMID:19097173

  4. A Rare Cause of Unilateral Central Retinal Vein Occlusion in a Young Patient: Type III Mixed Cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Sekeroglu, Mehmet Ali; Anayol, Mustafa Alpaslan; Yilmazbas, Pelin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a young male with unilateral central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) associated with cryoglobulinemia. Case Presentation. A 33-year-old male without any known systemic or ocular disorder was admitted to our clinic with a complaint of visual loss for three days in his left eye. Based on the clinical, laboratory, and ophthalmological assessments, we diagnosed this case as type III mixed cryoglobulinemia with unilateral CRVO with macular edema. For treatment, two intravitreal ranibizumab injections were administered monthly and oral prednisone (64 mg/day) was begun. Subsequently, cryoglobulins became undetectable, macular edema decreased, and the visual acuity improved to 20/32 over an 8-week period. At 24 weeks, the patient's visual acuity remained 20/32 and no recurrence was observed while the patient was still on prednisone (16 mg/day). Conclusion. Cryoglobulinemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the patients with CRVO. PMID:27418988

  5. Mixed cryoglobulinemia-associated Sjögren’s syndrome leading to spontaneous rupture of the kidney: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Haddiya, Intissar; Hamzaoui, Hakim; Alhamany, Zitouna; Berkchi, Fatime-zohra; Rhou, Hakima; Benamar, Loubna; Ouzeddoun, Naima; Bayahia, Rabea

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous rupture of the kidney is uncommon and is mainly caused by renal tumors. Only a few cases are caused by vasculitis. We report here the first case of spontaneous rupture of kidney resulting from mixed cryoglobulinemia. Case presentation A 44-year-old man presented with sudden onset of fever, acute pulmonary edema, left flank abdominal pain unassociated with trauma, and rapidly progressive renal failure requiring dialysis. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a large perirenal hematoma of the left kidney. During conservative surgery, the patient underwent renal biopsy that showed renal vasculitis and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with intracapillary microthrombi. Tests were positive for mixed cryoglobulinemia caused by Sjögren’s syndrome. The patient was better after immunosuppressive therapy, with the disappearance of clinical symptoms and the recovery of baseline renal function. Conclusion We report on this case and discuss a possible link between spontaneous rupture of kidney and mixed cryoglobulinemia-associated Sjögren’s syndrome. PMID:27042145

  6. Incidence of thyroid disorders in mixed cryoglobulinemia: Results from a longitudinal follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Ruffilli, Ilaria; Elia, Giusy; Giuggioli, Dilia; Colaci, Michele; Ferri, Clodoveo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    No study has evaluated the incidence of new cases of thyroid autoimmunity (AT) and dysfunction (TD) in hepatitis C-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) patients. We aimed to evaluate the incidence of new cases of AT and TD in a wide group of MC patients vs. age- and gender-matched controls from the same geographic area. After exclusion of MC patients with TD at the initial evaluation, the appearance of new cases of TD was evaluated in 112 MC patients and 112 matched controls, with similar iodine intake (median follow-up 67months in MC vs. 78 in controls). A high incidence (P<0.05) of new cases of hypothyroidism, TD, anti-thyroperoxidase antibody (AbTPO) positivity, appearance of a hypoechoic thyroid pattern, and thyroid autoimmunity in MC patients vs. controls was shown. A logistic regression analysis showed that in MC, the appearance of hypothyroidism was related to female gender, a borderline high initial thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), AbTPO positivity, a hypoechoic, and small thyroid. In conclusion, we show a high incidence of new cases of AT and TD in MC patients. MC patients at high risk (female gender, a borderline high initial TSH, AbTPO positivity, a hypoechoic, and small thyroid) should have periodically thyroid function follow-up. PMID:26970485

  7. Vitamin D pathway gene polymorphisms as predictors of hepatitis C virus-related mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Cusato, Jessica; Boglione, Lucio; De Nicolò, Amedeo; Cardellino, Chiara Simona; Carcieri, Chiara; Cariti, Giuseppe; Di Perri, Giovanni; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is the most frequent extrahepatic hepatitis C virus (HCV) complication. Vitamin D is a modulator of several biological processes, including immune and skeletal systems and MC presence and systemic vasculitis were associated independently with low levels of vitamin D. Considering the impact of vitamin D, we aimed to evaluate the role of some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of vitamin D pathway genes in the prediction of MC in HCV patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. We investigated SNPs in IL-28B, CYP27B1, CYP27A1, CYP24A1, VDBP, and VDR genes through real-time PCR. VDR gene SNPs were related to baseline viral load: VDR BsmI AA (P=0.018), TaqI CC (P=0.009), and ApaI AA (P=0.004) showed a lower baseline HCV count. Among vitamin D pathway gene polymorphisms, VDR FokI T>C was a factor associated with the presence of MC in the study population (P=0.011): related to C allele carriers (TT vs. TC/CC), we obtained a P-value of 0.003. In the logistic regression analysis to assess which demographic, clinical, or genetic factors could predict the presence of cryoglobulin, the TT/CC IL-28B rs8099917/rs12979860 haplotype [P<0.001; odds ratio (OR) 3.516 (1.951-6.336)], baseline viral load [P<0.001; OR 1.000 (0.999-1.001)], and VDR FokI TC/CC genotypes [0.044; OR 0.463 (0.218-0.981)] remained in the final regression model. These data could help physicians identify patients with a higher probability of developing MC extrahepatic complications. PMID:27139837

  8. Pulmonary Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma with Macroglobulinemia and Mixed Cryoglobulinemia Developed in a Patient with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Min, Chisun; Higuchi, Takakazu; Koyamada, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Norihiro; Okada, Sadamu

    2015-01-01

    We report a 65-year-old woman with a chronic hepatitis C virus infection who developed pulmonary extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (EMZL) of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues complicated with macroglobulinemia and mixed cryoglobulinemia. She was treated with immunochemotherapy which resulted in the reduction of both the tumors and the serum immunoglobulin (Ig) M level. This case exemplifies an extensive stimulation upon immune system with derangement in the production of immunoglobulines associated with EMZL, and suggests that it is necessary to consider the possibility of B-cell lymphoma when IgM paraprotein is detected. PMID:26278303

  9. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a patient with type 1 cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Paul Y; Prete, Pamela E; Kukes, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of type 1 cryoglobulinemia are usually related to vascular occlusion by noninflammatory thrombosis; rarely is leukocytoclastic vasculitis seen in type 1 cryoglobulinemia. We report the case of a 64-year-old male who presented with isolated cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis that was initially attributed to essential mixed cryoglobulinemia after thorough diagnostic evaluation. A lack of adequate clinical response to therapy prompted further investigation, including cryoprecipitate electrophoresis and immunofixation, which revealed an IgM kappa monoclonal gammopathy consistent with type 1 cryoglobulinemia. A renewed search for an underlying malignancy led to the discovery of early Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. Although leukocytoclastic vasculitis is more characteristic of mixed cryoglobulinemia, it can be a presenting manifestation of type 1 cryoglobulinemia. PMID:22937435

  10. Thromboangiitis obliterans with cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Owlia, Mohammad Bagher; Mehrpoor, Golbarg

    2014-11-01

    Thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), or Buerger's disease, is a vascular occlusive disease associated with cigarette smoking. It typically affects medium sized vessels of extremities. Basic pathology of TAO is described to be endothelial activation with highly inflammatory intraluminal thrombosis preserving internal elastic membrane. Cryoglobulins are immunoglobulins that precipitate in the cold and dissolve on re-warming. Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis is a typical small vessel disease associated with cryoglobulinemia commonly bearing typical purpuric skin lesions. An association of TAO with cryoglobulinemia is not reported yet. We report a 34-year-old male heavy cigarette smoker seen for extremity pain and cyanosis of left little finger along with skin rashes characteristic of small vessel disease. Initial presentation of his symptoms at winter and unusual purpuric skin lesions led to search for cold-agglutinating globulins in his plasma. He had severe cryoglobulinemia while the other laboratory tests were normal. TAO associated with cryoglobulinemia merges as a possibility. PMID:25404449

  11. [Renal involvement during type 1 cryoglobulinemia].

    PubMed

    Zaidan, Mohamad; Plasse, Florent; Rabant, Marion; Javaugue, Vincent; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Joly, Dominique; Nochy, Dominique; Bridoux, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Cryoglobulins are circulating immunoglobulins that precipitate with cold temperature and dissolve with rewarming. Type 1 cryoglobulinemia is composed of a single monoclonal immunoglobulin and is associated with renal involvement in up to 40% of cases. Type 1 cryoglobulinemia is related to an underlying B-cell haematological malignancy in 60% of patients. In the remaining cases, in the absence of criteria for malignancy, the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance should be established. The clinical and biological setting and histological features of type 1 cryoglobulinemia are globally similar to those of mixed cryoglobulinemia. In case of haematological malignancy, the treatment is guided by the nature of the underlying disease, and aims at inducing haematological remission, which is necessary for the renal response. The management of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance has been clarified by an international consensus group and is based on the nature of the underlying clone. In case of monoclonal cryoglobulinemia associated with a plasma-cell clone (IgG or IgA), the treatment is based on the combination of bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone. In case of IgM monoclonal cryoglobulinemia, the treatment is similar to that of Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and is based on rituximab. The clinical course of renal monoclonal cryoglobulinemia is intimately associated with the haematological response, and is usually favourable. PMID:26972092

  12. Hepatic and Mesenteric Vasculitis as Presenting Manifestation of Mixed Cryoglobulinemia Related to Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection in a Female Patient.

    PubMed

    Calle Toro, Juan S; Davalos, Diana M; Charry, Jose D; Arrunategi, Ana M; Tobon, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 80% of patients with hepatitis C virus infection develop chronic liver disease as cirrhosis, and 40% develop autoimmune complications as mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC). Gastrointestinal involvement in MC is rare, and even more so is hepatic involvement. We report a case of an 87-year-old woman with a 10-year history of blood transfusion-acquired hepatitis C virus infection, without treatment. She consulted the emergency department for diffuse abdominal pain, associated with vomiting. After 2 weeks of hospitalization in the intensive care unit, a diagnosis of MC was made; cirrhosis and secondary mesenteric and hepatic vasculitis were confirmed by a diagnostic laparoscopy. Unfortunately the condition of the patient worsened with sepsis and resulted in death in the fourth week from admission. This case highlights the importance of having in mind gastrointestinal tract vasculitis as a medical cause of abdominal pain in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and using data laboratory tests, images, and histopathologic studies to aid with the diagnosis. PMID:27219310

  13. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with essential cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Satish, S.; Rajesh, R.; George, K.; Elango, E. M.; Unni, V. N.

    2008-01-01

    Cryoglobulinemia is an uncommon cause of renal disease and often occurs in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We report a case of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in a patient with cryoglobulinemia, which was not associated with HCV infection or any identifiable etiology. PMID:20142909

  14. Cryoglobulinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... high if hepatitis C is present Rheumatoid factor -- positive in types II and III Skin biopsy -- may show inflammation in blood vessels, vasculitis Protein electrophoresis - blood -- may show an abnormal antibody protein Urinalysis -- may show blood in the urine if the ...

  15. Cryoglobulinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... is also used. In this his procedure, blood plasma is taken out of blood circulation and abnormal cryoglobulin antibody proteins are removed. The plasma is replaced by fluid, protein, or donated plasma. ...

  16. Cryoglobulinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the VF E-News HERE A A A Youtube LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Takayasu’s Arteritis Webinar + Vasculitis Behcet’s ... Book Vasculitis Terms A – Z VF Medical Consultants YouTube Education Videos YouTube Education Videos produced by Alliance ...

  17. Safety and efficacy of rituximab treatment for vasculitis in hepatitis B virus-associated type II cryoglobulinemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Systemic B-cell depletion and clinical remission of the systemic effects of cryoglobulins have already been achieved using rituximab in hepatitis C virus-positive immunocompetent patients. Conversely, to the best of our knowledge there are no reports in the literature regarding the use of rituximab in hepatitis B virus-associated cryoglobulinemia. Case presentation We report here the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man who presented with hepatitis B virus-associated type II cryoglobulinemia with severe multisystem disease, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with acute renal failure. The vasculitis was refractory to conventional and antiviral therapy but rituximab use led to a fall in cryoglobulin levels and disease control. The B-cell depletion was safe and efficient to induce a complete remission of the disease. Conclusion Our case highlights the benefit and the efficacy of rituximab in association with antiviral therapy in small vessel vasculitis related to hepatitis B virus-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia. PMID:22284897

  18. Idiopathic Nonviral Cryoglobulinemia Treated Successfully With Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Mahmoud; Thajudeen, Bijin; Bracamonte, Erika; Madhrira, Machaiah

    2016-01-01

    Cryoglobulinemia is a systemic inflammatory syndrome that generally involves small-to-medium vessel vasculitis due to cryoglobulin-containing immune complexes. The therapeutic management of idiopathic cryoglobulinemic vasculitis has yet to be defined because no study has evaluated the best strategies. However, treatment of severe vasculitis is traditionally based on a combination of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants or plasmapheresis, and more recently rituximab. We report a case of 77-year-old female patient diagnosed with idiopathic cryoglobulinemia, treated successfully with 6 months prednisone tapering and 2 doses of rituximab (1 g each dose). After receiving the above-mentioned treatment, her creatinine went back to normal with resolution of proteinuria and hematuria, normalization of serum complements, and significant improvement in her clinical picture. We conclude that rituximab could be an effective treatment for idiopathic cryoglobulnemia. PMID:24914502

  19. Successful Treatment of Pyoderma Gangrenosum with Cryoglobulinemia and Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Pourmorteza, Mohsen; Tawadros, Fady; Bader, Gilbert; Al-Tarawneh, Mohamed; Cook, Emilie; Shams, Wael; Young, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare, ulcerative cutaneous condition that was first described by Brocq in 1916. This diagnosis is quite challenging as the histopathological findings are nonspecific. Pyoderma gangrenosum is usually associated with inflammatory bowel disease, leukemia, and hepatitis C. We describe a rare clinical case of a patient with hepatitis C (HCV), mixed cryoglubinemia, and pyoderma gangrenosum, which was successfully treated with prednisone in combination with the new antiviral medication ledipasvir/sofosbuvir. CASE REPORT A 68-year-old male with a history of untreated HCV presented to the clinic with a left lower extremity ulcer that had progressively worsened over 4 days after the patient sustained a minor trauma to the left lower extremity. Examination revealed a 2×3 cm purulent ulcer with an erythematous rim on medial aspect of his left lower leg. HCV viral load and genotype analysis revealed genotype 1A with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showing viral counts of 9,506,048 and cryoglobulinemia. With a worsening and enlarging erythematous ulcer and failure of IV antibiotic therapy, the patient underwent skin biopsy, which showed acanthotic epidermis with superficial and deep perivascular lymphoplasmacytic dermatitis admixed with mild neutrophilic infiltrate. The patient was subsequently started on ledipasvir/sofosbuvir and prednisone with a high suspicion of pyoderma gangrenosum. At one-month follow-up at the hepatology clinic, the patient demonstrated a near resolution of the lower extremity ulcer with undetectable viral load. CONCLUSIONS Pyoderma gangrenosum is an inflammatory process of unknown etiology, and establishing the correct diagnosis can be a difficult task. For this reason it is prudent for clinicians to consider Pyoderma gangrenosum in their differential diagnosis, especially in the setting of a nonhealing surgical wound or skin infection. PMID:27345376

  20. Successful Treatment of Pyoderma Gangrenosum with Cryoglobulinemia and Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Pourmorteza, Mohsen; Tawadros, Fady; Bader, Gilbert; Al-Tarawneh, Mohammad; Cook, Emilie; Shams, Wael; Young, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 68 Final Diagnosis: Pyoderma gangrenosum Symptoms: Worsening lower extremity wound Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare, ulcerative cutaneous condition that was first described by Brocq in 1916. This diagnosis is quite challenging as the histopathological findings are nonspecific. Pyoderma gangrenosum is usually associated with inflammatory bowel disease, leukemia, and hepatitis C. We describe a rare clinical case of a patient with hepatitis C (HCV), mixed cryoglubinemia, and pyoderma gangrenosum, which was successfully treated with prednisone in combination with the new antiviral medication ledipasvir/sofosbuvir. Case Report: A 68-year-old male with a history of untreated HCV presented to the clinic with a left lower extremity ulcer that had progressively worsened over 4 days after the patient sustained a minor trauma to the left lower extremity. Examination revealed a 2×3 cm purulent ulcer with an erythematous rim on medial aspect of his left lower leg. HCV viral load and genotype analysis revealed genotype 1A with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showing viral counts of 9,506,048 and cryoglobulinemia. With a worsening and enlarging erythematous ulcer and failure of IV antibiotic therapy, the patient underwent skin biopsy, which showed acanthotic epidermis with superficial and deep perivascular lymphoplasmacytic dermatitis admixed with mild neutrophilic infiltrate. The patient was subsequently started on ledipasvir/sofosbuvir and prednisone with a high suspicion of pyoderma gangrenosum. At one-month follow-up at the hepatology clinic, the patient demonstrated a near resolution of the lower extremity ulcer with undetectable viral load. Conclusions: Pyoderma gangrenosum is an inflammatory process of unknown etiology, and establishing the correct diagnosis can be a difficult task. For this reason it is prudent for clinicians to consider Pyoderma

  1. Secondary Science Teachers' Beliefs and Persistence: A Longitudinal Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Sissy S.; Luft, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    While many studies focus on why teachers leave the classroom, there remains a need to study why teachers persist in teaching. One area to study is the beliefs of teachers, which may impact persistence in the field. This 5-year mixed-methods study explored whether 35 beginning secondary science teachers' beliefs were related to their persistence in…

  2. Persistence of rotationally grazed red clover in mixed stands.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) is an important forage legume in grazing pastures. Historically red clover was limited by its comparatively lower stand persistence in hay and grazed systems. Smith (2000) demonstrated increased persistence under hay management achieved through over 30 years of bree...

  3. Secondary Science Teachers' Beliefs and Persistence: A Longitudinal Mixed-Methods Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sissy S.; Luft, Julie A.

    2015-11-01

    While many studies focus on why teachers leave the classroom, there remains a need to study why teachers persist in teaching. One area to study is the beliefs of teachers, which may impact persistence in the field. This 5-year mixed-methods study explored whether 35 beginning secondary science teachers' beliefs were related to their persistence in teaching. Quantitative analysis of the teachers' responses to annual semi-structured interviews revealed that teachers with more student-centered beliefs were more likely to persist at the end of the third year of teaching. Additionally, the teaching beliefs of teachers were more teacher-centered, while the learning beliefs of teachers were more student-centered. A case study of one persisting teacher and one non-persisting teacher revealed that personal experiences and knowledge impacted beliefs about teaching and learning. Bruce, who had extensive inquiry-based school experiences, believed in teaching via student-centered methods. Oscar, who underwent mostly direct instruction during his school experiences, believed in teacher-centered instruction and focused on classroom management. This longitudinal study contributes to the field of science education by examining beginning secondary science teacher persistence over time. Implications from this study call for challenging teacher beliefs during the induction period, proper placement of new teachers into their first teaching positions, and understanding the impact of prior experiences on teachers' beliefs.

  4. Stories of staying and leaving: A mixed methods analysis of biology undergraduate choice, persistence, and departure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Sarah Adrienne

    Using a sequential, explanatory mixed methods design, this dissertation study compared students who persist in the biology major (persisters) with students who leave the biology major (switchers) in terms of how their pre-college experiences, college biology experiences, and biology performance figured into their choice of biology and their persistence in or departure from the biology major. This study combined (1) quantitative comparisons of biology persisters and switchers via a questionnaire developed for the study and survival analysis of a larger population of biology freshmen with (2) qualitative comparison of biology switchers and persisters via semi-structured life story interviews and homogenous focus groups. 319 students (207 persisters and 112 switchers) participated in the questionnaire and 36 students (20 persisters and 16 switchers) participated in life story and focus group interviews. All participants were undergraduates who entered The University of Texas at Austin as biology freshmen in the fall semesters of 2000 through 2004. Findings of this study suggest: (1) Regardless of eventual major, biology students enter college with generally the same suite of experiences, sources of personal encouragement, and reasons for choosing the biology major; (2) Despite the fact that they have also had poor experiences in the major, biology persisters do not actively decide to stay in the biology major; they simply do not leave; (3) Based upon survival analysis, biology students are most at-risk of leaving the biology major during the first two years of college and if they are African-American or Latino, women, or seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree (rather than a Bachelor of Science); (4) Biology switchers do not leave biology due to preference for other disciplines; they leave due to difficulties or dissatisfaction with aspects of the biology major, including their courses, faculty, and peers; (5) Biology performance has a differential effect on persistence in

  5. Successful use of cryocrit for monitoring response to therapeutic plasma exchange in type 1 cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Olson, Nicholas; Yerrabothala, Swaroopa; Dunbar, Nancy

    2016-08-01

    Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) is a clinical syndrome that is defined as lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma with bone marrow involvement and IgM monoclonal gammopathy of any level. In some instances WM can result in a type I cryoglobulinemia with very high cryocrits, which is unusual in type II and III cryoglobulinemia. We describe a case of an 80 year old male with WM, severe type I cryoglobulinemia, and an extremely elevated cryocrit (69%). Over the course of five weeks we performed nine therapeutic plasma exchanges (TPE), and after seven treatments his cryocrit had decreased to 6% with improvement in his symptoms. By monitoring his cryocrit throughout his TPE sessions, we were able to assess his response to treatment, determine the ideal length of treatment in addition to his symptomatic improvement. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:403-404, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26194475

  6. Cryoglobulinemia as an Initial Manifestation of Underlying Hematological Malignancy: A Rare Occurrence in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narender; Das, Reena; Chandra, Dinesh; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Cryoglobulinemias rarely been reported from India even though associated conditions such as hepatitis C infection, rheumatoid arthritis and plasma cell dyscrasias, etc., are common occurrences. In many regions of the country, temperatures in winter can be conducive to the precipitation of cryoglobulins, yet epidemiology of the disease suggests that it is a common condition in the west. We encountered a 68-year-old-male patient who presented with a history of headache off and on along with hepatosplenomegaly. The rare occurrence of cryoglobulinemia in our setting can delay the diagnosis, as happened in our case, since the index of suspicion of clinicians and laboratory personnel is low. We are reporting this case because of the rarity and protean clinical manifestations of cryoglobulinemia. PMID:25328341

  7. An Unusual Case of HCV Negative Cryoglobulinemia Presenting as Symmetrical Peripheral Gangrene

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Behera, Samir Kumar; Nayak, Sachidananda; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cryoglobulins are monoclonal or polyclonal immunoglobulins that undergo reversible precipitation at low temperatures. Cryoglobulinemia is associated with HCV infection in more than 90% cases, the remaining 10% being called as Essential Cryoglobulinemia which is generally associated with a severe course and suboptimal response to conventional therapies. As the digital vessels are more prone to colder temperatures, hyperviscosity in those vessels can initiate local thrombosis and may manifest as ischemic ulceration and gangrene. We report here a very unusual case of HCV negative cryoglobulinemic vasculitis presenting as symmetrical peripheral gangrene of fingers and toes. PMID:27190872

  8. Coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with active idiopathic cryoglobulinemia: revisiting the issue

    PubMed Central

    Fakih, Hafiz Abdul Moiz; Elueze, Emmanuel; Vij, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Background Cryoglobulinemia is a cold-reactive autoimmune disease. It is of distinctive importance in cardiac surgery because of the use of hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Cryoglobulins, which activate at variable levels of hypothermia, can cause precipitation during surgery leading to possibly severe leukocytoclastic or necrotizing vasculitis, clinically manifested as ischemic events, such as cutaneous ulcerations, glomerulonephritis, arthritis, or peripheral neuropathies among the most reported associated comorbidities. Management of CPB and systemic protection in this rare but unique scenario requires individualized planning. We report the case of a patient with active cryoglobulinemia who was preoperatively managed with plasmapheresis. He underwent hypothermic coronary bypass with no precipitation and flare during and after surgery. Case presentation We describe the case of a 59-year-old Caucasian male with clinically significant idiopathic cryoglobulinemia and history of recurrent skin lesions and toe amputations secondary to cold exposure. He presented with 2-h duration of chest pain and new onset atrial fibrillation. After cardiac catheterization, a diagnosis of three-vessel coronary artery disease was established and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) was scheduled. Because of a high risk of flare-up during surgery, the patient was preemptively treated with two sessions of plasmapheresis before bypass. He then underwent hypothermic CABG. The pre- and perioperative course was unremarkable without any clinical evidence of precipitation. The patient was discharged on day 6 postoperatively without any complications. Conclusion Preoperative plasmapheresis before hypothermic coronary bypass can prevent fatal cryoglobulinemia-related complications in patients with active disease. PMID:26908383

  9. Persistent dopants and phase segregation in organolead mixed-halide perovskites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosales, Bryan A.; Men, Long; Cady, Sarah D.; Hanrahan, Michael P.; Rossini, Aaron J.; Vela, Javier

    2016-07-25

    Organolead mixed-halide perovskites such as CH3NH3PbX3–aX'a (X, X' = I, Br, Cl) are interesting semiconductors because of their low cost, high photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies, enhanced moisture stability, and band gap tunability. Using a combination of optical absorption spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and, for the first time, 207Pb solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), we probe the extent of alloying and phase segregation in these materials. Because 207Pb ssNMR chemical shifts are highly sensitive to local coordination and electronic structure, and vary linearly with halogen electronegativity and band gap, this technique can provide the true chemical speciation and compositionmore » of organolead mixed-halide perovskites. We specifically investigate samples made by three different preparative methods: solution phase synthesis, thermal annealing, and solid phase synthesis. 207Pb ssNMR reveals that nonstoichiometric dopants and semicrystalline phases are prevalent in samples made by solution phase synthesis. We show that these nanodomains are persistent after thermal annealing up to 200 °C. Further, a novel solid phase synthesis that starts from the parent, single-halide perovskites can suppress phase segregation but not the formation of dopants. Our observations are consistent with the presence of miscibility gaps and spontaneous spinodal decomposition of the mixed-halide perovskites at room temperature. This underscores how strongly different synthetic procedures impact the nanostructuring and composition of organolead halide perovskites. In conclusion, better optoelectronic properties and improved device stability and performance may be achieved through careful manipulation of the different phases and nanodomains present in these materials.« less

  10. Students' Persistence in a Distributed Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership in Higher Education: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivankova, Nataliya V.; Stick, Sheldon L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods sequential explanatory study was to identify factors contributing to students' persistence in the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Distributed Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership in Higher Education by obtaining quantitative results from surveying 278 current and former students and then following up with…

  11. The Federal Transformation Intervention Model in Persistently Lowest Achieving High Schools: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Patner, Michelle B.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act federal mandate of the Transformation Intervention Model (TIM) outlined by the School Improvement Grant, which was designed to turn around persistently lowest achieving schools. The study was conducted in four high schools in a large Southern California urban district that selected the…

  12. Variable but persistent coexistence of Prochlorococcus ecotypes along temperature gradients in the ocean's surface mixed layer.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Jeremy W; Lin, Yajuan; Gainer, P Jackson; Post, Anton F; Johnson, Zackary I; Zinser, Erik R

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of the phytoplankton communities in surface mixed layer of the oligotrophic ocean are numerically dominated by one of two ecotypes of Prochlorococcus, eMIT9312 or eMED4. In this study, we surveyed large latitudinal transects in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean to determine if these ecotypes discretely partition the surface mixed layer niche, or if populations exist as a continuum along key environmental gradients, particularly temperature. Transitions of dominance occurred at approximately 19-21°C, with the eMED4 ecotype dominating the colder, and eMIT9312 ecotype dominating the warmer regions. Within these zones of regional dominance, however, the minority ecotype was not competed to extinction. Rather, a robust log-linear relationship between ecotype ratio and temperature characterized this stabilized coexistence: for every 2.5°C increase in temperature, the eMIT9312:eMED4 ratio increased by an order of magnitude. This relationship was observed in both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in pyrosequencing assays. Water column stratification also contributed to the ecotype ratio along the basin-scale transects, but to a lesser extent. Finally, instances where the ratio of the eMED4 and eMIT9312 abundances did not correlate well with temperature were identified. Such occurrences are likely due to changes in water temperatures outpacing changes in community structure. PMID:26743532

  13. The occurrence and persistence of mixed biofilms in automobile air conditioning systems.

    PubMed

    Simmons, R B; Rose, L J; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    1999-09-01

    Twelve automobile air conditioner systems from six manufacturers and three countries, selected mostly because of complaints of unpleasant odors in the passenger compartment, were examined for microbial growth by direct microscopy and enrichment culture. Mixed populations of fungi and bacteria (with occasional protozoa) were observed in biofilms in at least some of the components from all used units. The aluminum heat exchanger fins from ten evaporators demonstrated bacterial biofilms that yielded Methylobacterium mesophilicum. Penicillium viridicatum colonized components from four units. These bacteria and fungi were recoverable repeatedly from these units during 'dry' storage of up to 27 months. This report associates a bacterial-fungal community with disagreeable air quality in some automobiles. PMID:10441727

  14. Brominated, chlorinated and mixed brominated/chlorinated persistent organic pollutants in European eels (Anquilla anquilla) from Latvian lakes.

    PubMed

    Zacs, Dzintars; Rjabova, Jekaterina; Fernandes, Alwyn; Bartkevics, Vadims

    2016-03-01

    Fifty-eight European eel (Anquilla anquilla) specimens collected from five Latvian lakes were investigated for six groups of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated, polybrominated and mixed bromo-chloro dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/DFs, PBDD/DFs and PXDD/DFs), polychlorinated and mixed bromo-chloro biphenyls (PCBs and PXBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). PCDD/DFs and PCBs were found to occur in the range 0.85-15.8 pg Total-WHO2005-TEQ g(-1) f.w., and concentrations in most of the samples were below the maximum levels specified in European Commission Regulation (EU) No. 1259/2011. The summed concentrations of 27 PBDEs (∑PBDE) and 16 non-dioxin-like PCBs (∑NDL-PCB) were in the ranges of 0.28-26.7 and 6.37-320 ng g(-1) f.w., respectively. PBDD/DFs, PXDD/DFs and PXBs show average upper-bound concentrations of 0.05, 0.06 and 0.01 pg TEQ f.w. and collectively contributed 3.4% to the sum TEQ of dioxin-like compounds. The highest contaminant concentrations were measured in samples from lakes near the Baltic Sea and the industrialised area near Riga (Liepajas and Kisezers lakes). A correlation of POP concentration with the length of collected specimens was observed. PMID:26730547

  15. Hepatitis C eradication and improvement of cryoglobulinemia-associated rash and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with interferon and ribavirin after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zeman, Marilyn; Campbell, Patricia; Bain, Vincent G

    2006-01-01

    Postrenal transplant hepatitis C is increasing in frequency due to the high prevalence of hepatitis C among patients with renal failure. Despite this, there is still no standard hepatitis C treatment available for renal transplanted recipients. Combination antiviral hepatitis C therapy, the standard of care in the nontransplant population, is generally avoided because of documented renal graft rejection secondary to interferon treatment. A case of a male patient with postrenal transplant hepatitis C, which was associated with cryoglobulinemia and glomerulonephritis of the graft, is presented. He was treated with standard interferon with ribavirin. Sustained viral clearance was achieved despite ongoing evidence of cryoglobulinemia. Renal function, which had been deteriorating before treatment, improved as evidenced by the stabilization of serum creatinine and marked improvement of proteinuria. In conclusion, in selected patients, combination antiviral therapy may still be a viable option postrenal transplant. PMID:16779461

  16. Large-eddy simulation of three mixed-phase cloud events during ISDAC: Conditions for persistent heterogeneous ice formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savre, J.; Ekman, A. M. L.

    2015-08-01

    A Classical-Nucleation-Theory-based parameterization for heterogenous ice nucleation, including explicit dependencies of the nucleation rates on the number concentration, size, and composition of the ambient aerosol population, is implemented in a cloud-scale, large-eddy simulation model and evaluated against Arctic mixed-phase cloud events observed during Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). An important feature of the parameterization is that the ice nucleation efficiency of each considered aerosol type is described using a contact angle distribution which evolves with time so that the model accounts for the inhibition of ice nucleation as the most efficient ice-forming particles are nucleated and scavenged. The model gives a reasonable representation of first-order (ice water paths) and second-order (ice crystal size distributions) ice microphysical properties. The production of new ice crystals in the upper part of the cloud, essential to guarantee sustained mixed-phase conditions, is found to be controlled mostly by the competition between radiative cooling (resulting in more aerosol particles becoming efficient ice nuclei as the temperature decreases), cloud-top entrainment (entraining fresh particles into the cloud), and nucleation scavenging of the ice+forming aerosol particles. The relative contribution of each process is mostly determined by the cloud-top temperature and the entrainment rates. Accounting for the evolution of the contact angle probability density function with time seems to be essential to capture the persistence of in-cloud ice production without having to, for example, increase the free tropospheric aerosol concentration. Although limited to only three cases and despite important limitations of the parameterization (e.g., the present version only considers dust and black carbon as potential ice nuclei), the results suggest that modeling the time evolution of the ice nuclei population ability to form ice is required to

  17. Complexities in Isolation and Purification of Multiple Viruses from Mixed Viral Infections: Viral Interference, Persistence and Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naveen; Barua, Sanjay; Riyesh, Thachamvally; Chaubey, Kundan K.; Rawat, Krishan Dutt; Khandelwal, Nitin; Mishra, Anil K.; Sharma, Nitika; Chandel, Surender S.; Sharma, Shalini; Singh, Manoj K.; Sharma, Dinesh K.; Singh, Shoor V.; Tripathi, Bhupendra N.

    2016-01-01

    Successful purification of multiple viruses from mixed infections remains a challenge. In this study, we investigated peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) mixed infection in goats. Rather than in a single cell type, cytopathic effect (CPE) of the virus was observed in cocultured Vero/BHK-21 cells at 6th blind passage (BP). PPRV, but not FMDV could be purified from the virus mixture by plaque assay. Viral RNA (mixture) transfection in BHK-21 cells produced FMDV but not PPRV virions, a strategy which we have successfully employed for the first time to eliminate the negative-stranded RNA virus from the virus mixture. FMDV phenotypes, such as replication competent but noncytolytic, cytolytic but defective in plaque formation and, cytolytic but defective in both plaque formation and standard FMDV genome were observed respectively, at passage level BP8, BP15 and BP19 and hence complicated virus isolation in the cell culture system. Mixed infection was not found to induce any significant antigenic and genetic diversity in both PPRV and FMDV. Further, we for the first time demonstrated the viral interference between PPRV and FMDV. Prior transfection of PPRV RNA, but not Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and rotavirus RNA resulted in reduced FMDV replication in BHK-21 cells suggesting that the PPRV RNA-induced interference was specifically directed against FMDV. On long-term coinfection of some acute pathogenic viruses (all possible combinations of PPRV, FMDV, NDV and buffalopox virus) in Vero cells, in most cases, one of the coinfecting viruses was excluded at passage level 5 suggesting that the long-term coinfection may modify viral persistence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented evidence describing a natural mixed infection of FMDV and PPRV. The study not only provides simple and reliable methodologies for isolation and purification of two epidemiologically and economically important groups of viruses, but

  18. Complexities in Isolation and Purification of Multiple Viruses from Mixed Viral Infections: Viral Interference, Persistence and Exclusion.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Barua, Sanjay; Riyesh, Thachamvally; Chaubey, Kundan K; Rawat, Krishan Dutt; Khandelwal, Nitin; Mishra, Anil K; Sharma, Nitika; Chandel, Surender S; Sharma, Shalini; Singh, Manoj K; Sharma, Dinesh K; Singh, Shoor V; Tripathi, Bhupendra N

    2016-01-01

    Successful purification of multiple viruses from mixed infections remains a challenge. In this study, we investigated peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) mixed infection in goats. Rather than in a single cell type, cytopathic effect (CPE) of the virus was observed in cocultured Vero/BHK-21 cells at 6th blind passage (BP). PPRV, but not FMDV could be purified from the virus mixture by plaque assay. Viral RNA (mixture) transfection in BHK-21 cells produced FMDV but not PPRV virions, a strategy which we have successfully employed for the first time to eliminate the negative-stranded RNA virus from the virus mixture. FMDV phenotypes, such as replication competent but noncytolytic, cytolytic but defective in plaque formation and, cytolytic but defective in both plaque formation and standard FMDV genome were observed respectively, at passage level BP8, BP15 and BP19 and hence complicated virus isolation in the cell culture system. Mixed infection was not found to induce any significant antigenic and genetic diversity in both PPRV and FMDV. Further, we for the first time demonstrated the viral interference between PPRV and FMDV. Prior transfection of PPRV RNA, but not Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and rotavirus RNA resulted in reduced FMDV replication in BHK-21 cells suggesting that the PPRV RNA-induced interference was specifically directed against FMDV. On long-term coinfection of some acute pathogenic viruses (all possible combinations of PPRV, FMDV, NDV and buffalopox virus) in Vero cells, in most cases, one of the coinfecting viruses was excluded at passage level 5 suggesting that the long-term coinfection may modify viral persistence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented evidence describing a natural mixed infection of FMDV and PPRV. The study not only provides simple and reliable methodologies for isolation and purification of two epidemiologically and economically important groups of viruses, but

  19. Persistence of insecticides in ready-mix formulations and their efficacy against Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt) in cauliflower.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suman; Sharma, R K; Gajbhiye, V T; Gupta, R K

    2013-03-01

    Persistence of cypermethrin, deltamethrin, profenofos, and triazophos in cauliflower curd was studied, following application of two premix formulations viz: Roket 44EC (profenofos 40 % + cypermethrin 4 %) and Anaconda Plus 36EC (triazophos 35 % + deltamethrin 1 %) at recommended (1.0 L ha(-1)) and double doses (2.0 L ha(-1)). In the case of Roket 44EC, residues of cypermethrin dissipated with the half-life values of 1.5-2.1 days, whereas residues of profenofos dissipated with the half-life of 2.9-3.3 days on cauliflower curd. In the case of Anaconda, residues of triazophos and deltamethrin dissipated from curd with the half-life values of 2.6-3.0 and 2.2-2.6 days, respectively. Both the combination mix significantly reduced the aphid population up to 14 days after spray and increased the yield by 155-160 % over control. Anaconda (2.0 L ha(-1)) treated plots yielded the highest number of marketable curds. Based on risk assessment analysis, safe waiting period of 3 and 5 days has been suggested for Roket 44EC and Anaconda Plus 36EC, respectively, in cauliflower at recommended dose of application. PMID:22648021

  20. Aberrant immunoglobulin and c-myc gene rearrangements in patients with nonmalignant monoclonal cryoglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, A.; Wang, N.; Williams, J.M.; Hunt, M.J.; Rosenfeld, S.I.; Condemi, J.J.; Packman, C.H.; Abraham, G.N.

    1987-11-15

    The status of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes was investigated in patients with idiopathic nonmalignant monoclonal IgG cryoglobulinemia (NCG). In NCG, monoclonal antibodies are synthesized at an accelerated rate by nonmalignant B lymphocytes. In order to determine whether this high production rate is related to a clonal B cell expansion, the rearrangement of the Ig genes was investigated by Southern blot analysis of genomic, /sup 32/P-labelled, DNA extracted from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of four NCG patients. In three of four (VI, BR, and CH) clonal expansion of B cells was detected using probes specific for the genes. BamHI digestion of DNA from VI and BR produced three rearranged fragments which cohybridized with two of the probes. This finding suggested the presence of additional nonsecretory B cell clones and/or disruption of the gene segments spanned by and detected with the probes. In addition, the possibility of aberrant gene rearrangements was supported by noting the alteration of the c-myc gene locus in genomic DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of VI and CH. Northern blot analysis of RNA isolated from peripheral blood B cells of VI and CH demonstrated aberrant transcripts of the c-myc gene, showing an active role of the altered c-myc locus. Detection of c-myc rearrangement in NCG patients clearly shows that this event may not be a final step in malignant B cell transformation.

  1. Delineation of autoantibody repertoire through differential proteogenomics in hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ogishi, Masato; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies cross-reactive to pathogens and autoantigens are considered pivotal in both infection control and accompanying autoimmunity. However, the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies largely remain elusive without a priori knowledge of disease-specific autoantigens. Here, through a novel quantitative proteogenomics approach, we demonstrated a successful identification of immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (VH) sequences highly enriched in pathological immune complex from clinical specimens obtained from a patient with hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia (HCV-CG). Reconstructed single-domain antibodies were reactive to both HCV antigens and potentially liver-derived human proteins. Moreover, over the course of antiviral therapy, a substantial "de-evolution" of a distinct sub-repertoire was discovered, to which proteomically identified cryoprecipitation-prone autoantibodies belonged. This sub-repertoire was characterized by IGHJ6*03-derived, long, hydrophobic complementarity determining region (CDR-H3). This study provides a proof-of-concept of de novo mining of autoantibodies and corresponding autoantigen candidates in a disease-specific context in human, thus facilitating future reverse-translational research for the discovery of novel biomarkers and the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against various autoantibody-related disorders. PMID:27403724

  2. Delineation of autoantibody repertoire through differential proteogenomics in hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ogishi, Masato; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies cross-reactive to pathogens and autoantigens are considered pivotal in both infection control and accompanying autoimmunity. However, the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies largely remain elusive without a priori knowledge of disease-specific autoantigens. Here, through a novel quantitative proteogenomics approach, we demonstrated a successful identification of immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (VH) sequences highly enriched in pathological immune complex from clinical specimens obtained from a patient with hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia (HCV-CG). Reconstructed single-domain antibodies were reactive to both HCV antigens and potentially liver-derived human proteins. Moreover, over the course of antiviral therapy, a substantial “de-evolution” of a distinct sub-repertoire was discovered, to which proteomically identified cryoprecipitation-prone autoantibodies belonged. This sub-repertoire was characterized by IGHJ6*03-derived, long, hydrophobic complementarity determining region (CDR-H3). This study provides a proof-of-concept of de novo mining of autoantibodies and corresponding autoantigen candidates in a disease-specific context in human, thus facilitating future reverse-translational research for the discovery of novel biomarkers and the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against various autoantibody-related disorders. PMID:27403724

  3. Policy and Persistence: An Exploratory Mixed Methods Case Study of "Last Mile" Students at Portland State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wubbold, Joseph Mark

    2012-01-01

    In an extension of educational attainment research, this exploratory mixed- methods case study examines the influence of institutional policies on the behavior of five cohorts (n = 925) of traditional first time, full time (FTFT) freshmen--called "Last Mile" students--at one urban research university located in the Pacific Northwest.…

  4. Persistent photoconductivity and optically stimulated luminescence in Zn0.8Mg0.2Se mixed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firszt, F.; McZyska, H.; Gowski, S.; Zakrzewski, J.; Strzakowski, K.; Wróbel, M.

    2004-03-01

    Photoelectric properties of Zn0.8Mg0.2Se mixed crystals grown by high pressure Bridgman method were investigated. Spectral distributions and temperature characteristics of photoconductivity as well as thermal and optical stimulation and quenching of luminescence and photoconductivity were measured. Relaxation of stored carriers were discussed in terms of random local potential fluctuation (RLPF) due to statistical fluctuations of composition. Based on the observed photoinduced phenomena in ZnxMg1-xSe, the potential applications of II-VI solid solutions for construction of optoelectronic devices were discussed.

  5. Long-term mass transfer and mixing-controlled reactions of a DNAPL plume from persistent residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2014-02-01

    Understanding and being able to predict the long-term behavior of DNAPL (i.e., PCE and TCE) residuals after active remediation has ceased have become increasingly important as attention at many sites turns from aggressive remediation to monitored natural attenuation and long-term stewardship. However, plume behavior due to mass loading and reactions during these later phases is less studied as they involve large spatial and temporal scales. We apply both theoretical analysis and pore-scale simulations to investigate mass transfer from DNAPL residuals and subsequent reactions within the generated plume, and, in particular, to show the differences between early- and late-time behaviors of the plume. In the zone of entry of the DNAPL entrapment zone where the concentration boundary layer in the flowing groundwater has not fully developed, the pore-scale simulations confirm the past findings based on laboratory studies that the mass transfer increases as a power-law function of the Peclét number, and is enhanced due to reactions in the plume. Away from the entry zone and further down gradient, the long-term reactions are limited by the available additive and mixing in the porous medium, thereby behave considerably differently from the entry zone. For the reaction between the contaminant and an additive with intrinsic second-order bimolecular kinetics, the late-time reaction demonstrates a first-order decay macroscopically with respect to the mass of the limiting additive, not with respect to that of the contaminant. The late-time decay rate only depends on the intrinsic reaction rate and the solubility of the entrapped DNAPL. At the intermediate time, the additive decays exponentially with the square of time (t2), instead of time (t). Moreover, the intermediate decay rate also depends on the initial conditions, the spatial distribution of DNAPL residuals, and the effective dispersion coefficient.

  6. Non HCV-related infectious cryoglobulinemia vasculitis: Results from the French nationwide CryoVas survey and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Benjamin; Marie, Isabelle; Lacraz, Adeline; Belenotti, Pauline; Bonnet, Fabrice; Chiche, Laurent; Graffin, Bruno; Hot, Arnaud; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Michel, Catherine; Quemeneur, Thomas; de Saint-Martin, Luc; Hermine, Olivier; Léger, Jean-Marc; Mariette, Xavier; Senet, Patricia; Plaisier, Emmanuelle; Cacoub, Patrice

    2015-12-01

    In patients with infectious cryoglobulinemia vasculitis (CryoVas) in the absence of hepatitis C virus infection, data on presentation, therapeutic management and outcome are lacking. We conducted a nationwide survey that included patients with HCV-negative CryoVas. We describe here the presentation, therapeutic management and outcome of 18 patients with non-HCV infectious CryoVas and 27 additional patients identified form a systematic review of the literature. We included 18 patients, mean age 57.9±13.5 years. Infectious causes were viral infections in 8 patients [hepatitis B virus (HBV) in 4, and cytomegalovirus, Epstein Barr virus, parvovirus B19 and human immunodeficiency virus in one case each], pyogenic bacterial infection in 6 patients, parasitic infection in 2 patients, and leprosy and candidiasis in one case each. Baseline manifestations were purpura (78%), glomerulonephritis (28%), arthralgia (28%), peripheral neuropathy (22%), skin necrosis (22%), cutaneous ulcers (17%), and myalgia (11%). Cryoglobulinemia was type II in 2/3 of cases. Most cases received specific anti-infectious therapy as first-line therapy, sometimes associated with corticosteroids, achieving sustained remission in the majority of cases. Refractory or relapsing patients, frequently related to HBV infection, showed a complete remission after rituximab in addition to antiviral therapy. In contrast, corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive agents used in the absence of anti-infectious agents were frequently associated with refractory CryoVas. Viral and pyogenic bacterial infections represent the main causes of non-HCV infectious CryoVas. Antimicrobial therapy is commonly associated with sustained remission. Immunosuppressive agents should be considered only as a second-line option in patients with refractory vasculitis. PMID:26320984

  7. Portraits of Success: A Mixed-Method Study of the Enrollment, Persistence, and Success Experiences of Female Graduate Engineering Students at a Hispanic Serving Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre-Covarrubias, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The current study addresses the underrepresentation of female graduate engineering students. Specifically, its purpose was to gain insight on how enrollment, persistence, and success factors are experienced by female graduate engineering students at a Hispanic Serving Institution located on the U.S.-Mexico border. The topic of underrepresentation…

  8. Quantitatively different red cell/nucleated cell chimerism in patients with long-term, persistent hematopoietic mixed chimerism after bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia major or sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Andreani, Marco; Testi, Manuela; Gaziev, Javid; Condello, Rossella; Bontadini, Andrea; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Ricci, Francesca; De Felice, Lidia; Agostini, Francesca; Fraboni, Daniela; Ferrari, Giuliana; Battarra, Mariarosa; Troiano, Maria; Sodani, Pietro; Lucarelli, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Background Persistent mixed chimerism represents a state in which recipient and donor cells stably co-exist after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, since in most of the studies reported in literature the engraftment state was observed in the nucleated cells, in this study we determined the donor origin of the mature erythrocytes of patients with persistent mixed chimerism after transplantation for hemoglobinopathies. Results were compared with the engraftment state observed in singly picked out burst-forming unit – erythroid colonies and in the nucleated cells collected from the peripheral blood and from the bone marrow. Design and Methods The donor origin of the erythrocytes was determined analyzing differences on the surface antigens of the erythrocyte suspension after incubation with anti-ABO and/or anti-C, -c, -D, -E and -e monoclonal antibodies by a flow cytometer. Analysis of short tandem repeats was used to determine the donor origin of nucleated cells and burst-forming unit – erythroid colonies singly picked out after 14 days of incubation. Results The proportions of donor-derived nucleated cells in four transplanted patients affected by hemoglobinopathies were 71%, 46%, 15% and 25% at day 1364, 1385, 1314 and 932, respectively. Similar results were obtained for the erythroid precursors, analyzing the donor/recipient origin of the burst-forming unit – erythroid colonies. In contrast, on the same days of observation, the proportions of donor-derived erythrocytes in the four patients with persistent mixed chimerism were 100%, 100%, 73% and 90%. Conclusions Our results showed that most of the erythrocytes present in four long-term transplanted patients affected by hemoglobinopathies and characterized by the presence of few donor engrafted nucleated cells were of donor origin. The indication that small proportions of donor engrafted cells might be sufficient for clinical control of the disease in patients affected by hemoglobinopathies is

  9. [Persistent diarrhea

    PubMed

    Andrade, J A; Moreira, C; Fagundes Neto, U

    2000-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent diarrhea has high impact on infantile morbidity and mortality rates in developing countries. Several studies have shown that 3 to 20% of acute diarrheal episodes in children under 5 years of age become persistent. DEFINITION: Persistent diarrhea is defined as an episode that lasts more than 14 days. ETIOLOGY: The most important agents isolated in persistent diarrhea are: Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Salmonella, Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Klebisiella and Cryptosporidium. CLINICAL ASPECTS: In general, the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent diarrhea do not change with the pathogenic agent. Persistent diarrhea seems to represent the final result of a several insults a infant suffers that predisposes to a more severe episode of diarrhea due to a combination of host factors and high rates of enviromental contamination. Therefore, efforts should be made to promptly treat all episodes of diarrhea with apropriate follow-up. THERAPY: The aim of the treatment is to restore hydroelectrolytic deficits and to replace losses until the diarrheal ceases. It is possible in the majority of the cases, using oral rehydration therapy and erly an appropriate type of diet. PREVENTION: It is imperative that management strategies also focus on preventive aspects. The most effective diarrheal prevention strategy in young infants worldwide is promotion of exclusive breast feeding. PMID:14676915

  10. Persistence in ozone scaling under the Hurst exponent as an indicator of the relative rates of chemistry and fluid mechanical mixing in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, A.F.; Hovde, S.J.; Proffitt, M.H.

    1999-12-09

    The observed self-affine fractal behavior of ozone, wind, and temperature in the stratosphere is used to produce an indication of the rate of occurrence of chemistry relative to that of fluid mixing which, unlike the usual method, is independent of an assumed mechanism sequence of elementary chemical steps followed by application of the law of mass action to obtain differential equations describing the temporal and spatial evolution of the reacting gases. Rather, the occurrence of chemistry is deduced from the scaling of the observed variability; it is applied empirically to deduce the presence of chemical processes that are faster than fluid mechanical mixing above an altitude of 19 km during a balloon flight, and in the Antarctic spring, Arctic summer, and Arctic winter during high altitude aircraft flights. The method should apply to any volume of reacting molecules to which the equations of fluid motion apply and for which measurements can be made over a range of scales.

  11. Semibiotic Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothmann, C.; Zauner, K.-P.

    From observation, we find four different strategies to successfully enable structures to persist over extended periods of time. If functionally relevant features are very large compared to the changes that can be effectuated by entropy, the functional structure itself has a high enough probability to erode only slowly over time. If the functionally relevant features are protected from environmental influence by sacrificial layers that absorb the impinging of the environment, deterioration can be avoided or slowed. Loss of functionality can be delayed, even for complex systems, by keeping alternate options for all required components available. Biological systems also apply information processing to actively counter the impact of entropy by mechanisms such as self-repair. The latter strategy increases the overall persistence of living systems and enables them to maintain a highly complex functional organisation during their lifetime and over generations. In contrast to the other strategies, information processing has only low material overhead. While at present engineered technology is far from achieving the self-repair of evolved systems, the semibiotic combination of biological components with conventionally engineered systems may open a path to long-term persistence of functional devices in harsh environments. We review nature's strategies for persistence, and consider early steps taken in the laboratory to import such capabilities into engineered architectures.

  12. Patient outcomes and experiences of an acupuncture and self-care service for persistent low back pain in the NHS: a mixed methods approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Supported self-management, acupuncture and information can help reduce the symptoms of low back pain. These approaches are currently recommended by NICE guidance as treatment options for patients with persistent low back pain. However, there has been no previous evaluation of a service providing them together for this common problem. The purpose of this service evaluation was to report patient outcomes and experiences of the Beating Back Pain Service (BBPS), a pilot service based in a primary and community care setting, delivering acupuncture, self-management and information to patients with chronic low back pain. Methods Patients completed a questionnaire at three time points: pre-BBPS, immediately post-BBPS and three months post-BBPS. Outcome measures included the Bournemouth Questionnaire (measuring musculoskeletal, MSK, problems), EuroQoL-5D (measuring quality of life), Pain and Self-efficacy Questionnaire, and additional questions on medication use, physical activity, understanding of pain and positive well-being. Additionally, the STarT Back (measuring risk of developing chronic pain) was collected at BBPS information sessions. Non-parametric tests were used to evaluate pre- and post- variables. Questionnaires also collected qualitative data (open-text responses) regarding patient views and experiences of the BBPS, which were analysed using thematic analysis. Results 80 (out of 108) patients who attended the initial BBPS information session agreed to participate in the service evaluation (mean age 47 years, 65% female). 65 patients attended subsequent BBPS acupuncture and/or self-management sessions and were asked to complete post-treatment questionnaires; complete datasets were available for 61 patients. There were statistically significant improvements over time for pain (p <0.0001), quality of life (p = 0.006), understanding of pain (p <0.001), physical activity (p = 0.047) and relaxation (p = 0.012). Post-hoc analysis revealed that

  13. Response: persistent perplexities.

    PubMed

    Radin, M J

    2001-09-01

    This response to the preceding five articles highlights the stubborn persistence of the philosophical perplexities surrounding commodification in the realm of medicine and biotechnology. PMID:11700685

  14. Community College Students' Self-Reports of Persistence: Looking beyond Student Satisfaction Ratings of Persisters and Nonpersisters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Marsha Dee

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of students who persist to the end of their courses at two-year colleges do not do so with a passing grade, yet research on the educational experiences of these unsuccessful community college persisters remains limited. The purpose of this explanatory mixed-methods study was threefold. First, this study attempted to identify…

  15. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePlus

    PDD; Chronic depression; Depression - chronic ... The exact cause of persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is unknown. It tends to run in families. PDD occurs more often in women. Most people with PDD will also ...

  16. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePlus

    The exact cause of persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is unknown. It tends to run in families. PDD occurs more often in women. Most people with PDD will also have an episode of major depression at some point in their lives. ...

  17. Persistent heap Management library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-01-17

    PERM is a C library for persistent heap management and is intended for use with a dynamic-memory allocator (e.g. malloc, free). The PERM memory allocator replaces the standard C dynamic memory allocation functions with compatible versions that provide persistent memory to application programs. Memory allocated with the PERM allocatory will persist between program invocations after a call to a checkpoint function. This function essentially saves the state of the heap and registered global variables tomore » a file which may reside in flash memory or other node local storage. A few other functions are also provided by the library to manage checkpoint files. Global variables in an application can be marked persistent and be included in a checkpoint by using a compiler attribute defined as PERM. The PERM checkpoint methof is not dependent on the programming model ans works with distributed memory or shared memory programs.« less

  18. Persistent heap Management library

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-17

    PERM is a C library for persistent heap management and is intended for use with a dynamic-memory allocator (e.g. malloc, free). The PERM memory allocator replaces the standard C dynamic memory allocation functions with compatible versions that provide persistent memory to application programs. Memory allocated with the PERM allocatory will persist between program invocations after a call to a checkpoint function. This function essentially saves the state of the heap and registered global variables to a file which may reside in flash memory or other node local storage. A few other functions are also provided by the library to manage checkpoint files. Global variables in an application can be marked persistent and be included in a checkpoint by using a compiler attribute defined as PERM. The PERM checkpoint methof is not dependent on the programming model ans works with distributed memory or shared memory programs.

  19. The Sunk Cost Effect with Pigeons: Some Determinants of Decisions about Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaskill, Anne C.; Hackenberg, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The sunk cost effect occurs when an individual persists following an initial investment, even when persisting is costly in the long run. The current study used a laboratory model of the sunk cost effect. Two response alternatives were available: Pigeons could persist by responding on a schedule key with mixed ratio requirements, or escape by…

  20. Persistence and financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.

    2007-09-01

    The persistence phenomenon is studied in a financial context by using a novel mapping of the time evolution of the values of shares in a portfolio onto Ising spins. The method is applied to historical data from the London Financial Times Stock Exchange 100 index (FTSE 100) over an arbitrarily chosen period. By following the time dependence of the spins, we find evidence for a power law decay of the proportion of shares that remain either above or below their ‘starting’ values. As a result, we estimate a persistence exponent for the underlying financial market to be ≈0.5. Preliminary results from computer simulations on persistence in the economic dynamics of a toy model appear to reproduce the behaviour observed in real markets.

  1. Why Do Delusions Persist?

    PubMed Central

    Corlett, Philip R.; Krystal, John H.; Taylor, Jane R.; Fletcher, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    Delusions are bizarre and distressing beliefs that characterize certain mental illnesses. They arise without clear reasons and are remarkably persistent. Recent models of delusions, drawing on a neuroscientific understanding of learning, focus on how delusions might emerge from abnormal experience. We believe that these models can be extended to help us understand why delusions persist. We consider prediction error, the mismatch between expectancy and experience, to be central. Surprising events demand a change in our expectancies. This involves making what we have learned labile, updating and binding the memory anew: a process of memory reconsolidation. We argue that, under the influence of excessive prediction error, delusional beliefs are repeatedly reconsolidated, strengthening them so that they persist, apparently impervious to contradiction. PMID:19636384

  2. A Very Persistent Mistake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, J. A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Articulated bodies with an internal energy source require to be coupled to an external mass in order to accelerate themselves but the typical text book assertion that the net force is provided by the external mass is not correct. Arguments are presented demonstrating that the assertion is incorrect and reasons are suggested for the persistence of…

  3. Retention and Persistence Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Timothy R.

    Two studies are combined with an introductory section: one is "Persistence to Graduation for Freshmen Entering the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1967-75," by Timothy Sanford, and the second is "Freshman, Transfer, Professional, Masters, and Doctoral Student Retention at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill," by Paul D.…

  4. The Persistence of PCBs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Robert H.; Highland, Joseph H.

    1979-01-01

    PCB's are one of the most persistent chemicals ever introduced into the environment by man. From very early in their history of manufacture PCB's were suspected of being hazardous to health, but public awareness of the hazard was slow in coming. (RE)

  5. Persistent fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Saucier, P H

    1980-01-01

    A review of persistent fetal circulation, which involves the presence of a right to left extrapulmonary shunt that is sustained into neonatal life, is presented. Clinical signs exhibited by the infant often resemble those of respiratory distress. Treatment is accomplished with hyperventilation and/or pharmacologically with tolazoline which, in addition to the usual attention to the overall condition of the infant, requires intensive monitoring by the nurse. PMID:6898712

  6. Persistent interface fluid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We present an unusual case of persistent interface fluid that would not resolve despite normal intraocular pressure and corneal endothelial replacement with Descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty. Dissection, elevation, and repositioning of the laser in situ keratomileusis flap were required to resolve the interface fluid. Circumferential corneal graft-host margin scar formation acting as a mechanical strut may have been the cause of the intractable interface fluid. PMID:18655997

  7. Persistent fetal circulation

    PubMed Central

    D’cunha, Chrysal; Sankaran, Koravangattu

    2001-01-01

    Persistent fetal circulation (PFC), also known as persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, is defined as postnatal persistence of right-to-left ductal or atrial shunting, or both in the presence of elevated right ventricular pressure. It is a relatively rare condition that is usually seen in newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, overwhelming sepsis, meconium and other aspiration syndromes, intrauterine hypoxia and ischemia, and/or neonatal hypoxia and ischemia. This condition causes severe hypoxemia, and, as a result, has significant morbidity and mortality. Improved antenatal and neonatal care; the use of surfactant; continuous monitoring of oxygenation, blood pressure and other vital functions; and early recognition and intervention have made this condition even more rare. In modern neonatal intensive care units, anticipation and early treatment of PFC and its complications in sick newborns are commonplace. Thus, severe forms of PFC are only seen on isolated occasions. Consequently, it is even more imperative to revisit PFC compared with the time when there were occasional cases of PFC seen in neonatal intensive care units, and to discuss evolving treatment and management issues that pertain to this syndrome. PMID:20084150

  8. Learning's "Weak" Link to Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolniak, Gregory C.; Mayhew, Matthew J.; Engberg, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    This study advances the understanding of college persistence by examining five dimensions of student learning in relation to second-year persistence. Two of the five dimensions of learning were found to be significant predictors of persistence, and each was moderated by social integration. (Contains 5 tables and 1 figure.)

  9. Persistence of Salmonid Redds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffington, J. M.; Buxton, T.; Fremier, A. K.; Hassan, M. A.; Yager, E.

    2013-12-01

    The construction of redds by spawning salmonids modifies fluvial processes in ways that are beneficial to egg and embryo survival. Redd topography induces hyporheic flow that oxygenates embryos incubating within the streambed and creates form drag that reduces bed mobility and scour of salmonid eggs. Winnowing of fine material during redd construction also coarsens the streambed, increasing bed porosity and hyporheic flow and reducing bed mobility. In addition to the biological benefits, redds may influence channel morphology by altering channel hydraulics and bed load transport rates depending on the size and extent of redds relative to the size of the channel. A key question is how long do the physical and biological effects of redds last? Field observations indicate that in some basins redds are ephemeral, with redd topography rapidly erased by subsequent floods, while in other basins, redds can persist for years. We hypothesize that redd persistence is a function of basin hydrology, sediment supply, and characteristics of the spawning fish. Hydrology controls the frequency and magnitude of bed mobilizing flows following spawning, while bed load supply (volume and caliber) controls the degree of textural fining and consequent bed mobility after spawning, as well as the potential for burial of redd features. The effectiveness of flows in terms of their magnitude and duration depend on hydroclimate (i.e., snowmelt, rainfall, or transitional hydrographs), while bed load supply depends on basin geology, land use, and natural disturbance regimes (e.g., wildfire). Location within the stream network may also influence redd persistence. In particular, lakes effectively trap sediment and regulate downstream flow, which may promote long-lived redds in stream reaches below lakes. These geomorphic controls are modulated by biological factors: fish species (size of fish controls size of redds and magnitude of streambed coarsening); life history (timing of spawning and

  10. Systems for persistent surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Keith

    2011-09-01

    The requirements for a persistent wide-area surveillance system are discussed in the context of evolving military operations. Significant emphasis has been placed on the development of new sensing technologies to meet the challenges posed by asymmetric threats. Within the UK, the Electro-Magnetic Remote Sensing Defence Technology Centre (EMRS DTC) has supported the research and development of new capabilities including radio-frequency (RF) and electro-optic (EO) systems, as well as work on sensor exploitation, with a goal of developing solutions for enhancing situational awareness. This activity has been supported by field trials to determine the efficacy of competing technologies in relation to realistic threat scenarios.

  11. Special Education Teacher Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorp, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this study was special education teachers, who remained in the teaching field 5 or more years. Through the use of qualitative mixed-methods study, variables contributing to their longevity were explored. Research indicates that 50% of special education teachers leave the field within five years of employment (Alliance for Education,…

  12. Persistence of airline accidents.

    PubMed

    Barros, Carlos Pestana; Faria, Joao Ricardo; Gil-Alana, Luis Alberiko

    2010-10-01

    This paper expands on air travel accident research by examining the relationship between air travel accidents and airline traffic or volume in the period from 1927-2006. The theoretical model is based on a representative airline company that aims to maximise its profits, and it utilises a fractional integration approach in order to determine whether there is a persistent pattern over time with respect to air accidents and air traffic. Furthermore, the paper analyses how airline accidents are related to traffic using a fractional cointegration approach. It finds that airline accidents are persistent and that a (non-stationary) fractional cointegration relationship exists between total airline accidents and airline passengers, airline miles and airline revenues, with shocks that affect the long-run equilibrium disappearing in the very long term. Moreover, this relation is negative, which might be due to the fact that air travel is becoming safer and there is greater competition in the airline industry. Policy implications are derived for countering accident events, based on competition and regulation. PMID:20618386

  13. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Aswath, Manju; Pandit, Lakshmi V.; Kashyap, Karthik; Ramnath, Raguram

    2016-01-01

    Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) is a phenomenon, in which afflicted women experience spontaneous genital arousal, unresolved by orgasms and triggered by sexual or nonsexual stimuli, eliciting stress. The current case is a 40-year-old female who experienced such orgasms for about a month. Physical examination, investigations, and psychological testing were noncontributory. Carbamazepine (600 mg) was discontinued due to a lack of response. She improved significantly with supportive therapy. Various neuropsychological conditions, pelvic pathology, medications, etc., have been associated with this disorder. Pharmacologic strategies have included the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and analgesics. Validation, psycho-education, identifying triggers, distraction techniques, and pelvic massage have been tried. Living with PGAD is very demanding. There is a lack of understanding of the problem, shame, and hesitation to seek help. The syndrome has been recently described, and understanding is still evolving. PMID:27570347

  14. Acute and persistent diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, Keith; Forbes, David A

    2009-12-01

    Socially disadvantaged Indigenous infants and children living in western industrialized countries experience high rates of infectious diarrhea, no more so than Aboriginal children from remote and rural regions of Northern Australia. Diarrheal disease, poor nutrition, and intestinal enteropathy reflect household crowding, inadequate water and poor sanitation and hygiene. Acute episodes of watery diarrhea are often best managed by oral glucose-electrolyte solutions with continuation of breastfeeding and early reintroduction of feeding. Selective use of lactose-free milk formula, short-term zinc supplementation and antibiotics may be necessary for ill children with poor nutrition, persistent symptoms, or dysentery. Education, high standards of environmental hygiene, breastfeeding, and immunization with newly licensed rotavirus vaccines are all needed to reduce the unacceptably high burden of diarrheal disease encountered in young children from Indigenous communities. PMID:19962025

  15. Caliber-Persistent Artery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sabrina Araújo Pinho; Ruiz, Marcelo Martinson; Kaba, Shajadi Pardo; Florezi, Giovanna Piacenza; Lemos Júnior, Celso Augusto; Witzel, Andréa Lusvarghi

    2015-01-01

    Caliber-persistent artery (CPLA) of the lip is a common vascular anomaly in which a main arterial branch extends to the surface of the mucous tissue with no reduction in its diameter. It usually manifests as pulsatile papule, is easily misdiagnosed, and is observed more frequently among older people, suggesting that its development may involve a degenerative process associated with aging; CPLA is also characterized by the loss of tone of the adjacent supporting connective tissue. Although the diagnosis is clinical, high-resolution Doppler ultrasound is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating the lesion. This report describes the case of a 58-year-old male patient who complained of a lesion of the lower lip with bleeding and recurrent ulceration. The patient was successfully treated in our hospital after a diagnosis of CPLA and is currently undergoing a clinical outpatient follow-up with no complaints. PMID:26448884

  16. Epigenetic regulation of persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guang; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Persistent or chronic pain is tightly associated with various environmental changes and linked to abnormal gene expression within cells processing nociceptive signaling. Epigenetic regulation governs gene expression in response to environmental cues. Recent animal model and clinical studies indicate that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the development/maintenance of persistent pain and, possibly the transition of acute pain to chronic pain, thus shedding light in a direction for development of new therapeutics for persistent pain. PMID:24948399

  17. Isolated persistent hypermethioninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S H; Levy, H L; Tangerman, A; Boujet, C; Buist, N; Davidson-Mundt, A; Hudgins, L; Oyanagi, K; Nagao, M; Wilson, W G

    1995-01-01

    New information has been obtained on 30 patients with isolated persistent hypermethioninemia, most of them previously unreported. Biopsies to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of partially deficient activity of ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT; E.C.2.5.1.6) in liver were not performed on most of these patients. However, none showed the clinical findings or the extreme elevations of serum folate previously described in other patients with isolated hypermethioninemia considered not to have hepatic MAT deficiency. Patients ascertained on biochemical grounds had no neurological abnormalities, and 27/30 had IQs or Bayley development-index scores within normal limits or were judged to have normal mental development. Methionine transamination metabolites accumulated abnormally only when plasma methionine concentrations exceeded 300-350 microM and did so more markedly after 0.9 years of age. Data were obtained on urinary organic acids as well as plasma creatinine concentrations. Patterns of inheritance of isolated hypermethioninemia were variable. Considerations as to the optimal management of this group of patients are discussed. PMID:7573050

  18. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from the first ... disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive assessments followed by ...

  19. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Prax, Marcel; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopolog profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds. PMID:25374846

  20. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudo-multidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryo-electron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nano particles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. PMID:26032339

  1. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-07-30

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudomultidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high-dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness, and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryoelectron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nanoparticles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. PMID:26032339

  2. Energy landscapes and persistent minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Joanne M.; Mazauric, Dorian; Cazals, Frédéric; Wales, David J.

    2016-02-01

    We consider a coarse-graining of high-dimensional potential energy landscapes based upon persistences, which correspond to lowest barrier heights to lower-energy minima. Persistences can be calculated efficiently for local minima in kinetic transition networks that are based on stationary points of the prevailing energy landscape. The networks studied here represent peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, an atomic cluster, and a glassy system. Minima with high persistence values are likely to represent some form of alternative structural morphology, which, if appreciably populated at the prevailing temperature, could compete with the global minimum (defined as infinitely persistent). Threshold values on persistences (and in some cases equilibrium occupation probabilities) have therefore been used in this work to select subsets of minima, which were then analysed to see how well they can represent features of the full network. Simplified disconnectivity graphs showing only the selected minima can convey the funnelling (including any multiple-funnel) characteristics of the corresponding full graphs. The effect of the choice of persistence threshold on the reduced disconnectivity graphs was considered for a system with a hierarchical, glassy landscape. Sets of persistent minima were also found to be useful in comparing networks for the same system sampled under different conditions, using minimum oriented spanning forests.

  3. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    form of musical consumption and experience. The three pieces draw lines connecting different aspects of persistence, resistance, and resonance.

  4. Persistent Neuropathic Pain Influences Persistence Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kniffin, Tracey C.; Danaher, Robert J.; Westlund, Karin N.; Ma, Fei; Miller, Craig S.; Carlson, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To determine whether self-regulation can be studied successfully in a rodent model and whether persistent facial pain influences self-regulatory behavior. Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats, divided into two groups, (1) chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION) and (2) naïve, were used in a two-part behavioral paradigm of self-regulation. This paradigm consisted of both a cued go/no-go task (part one) and a persistence trial (part two). All animals were acclimated and trained for a period of 4 weeks prior to the experimental manipulation and then tested for a total of 5 weeks following experimental manipulation. Results were analyzed with t tests, one-way analysis of variance, and two-way, repeated measures analysis of variance. Results CCI-ION surgery induced significant mechanical hypersensitivity of the ipsilateral whisker pad that began 3 weeks postsurgery and persisted through the duration of the experiment (P < .001). At weeks 4 and 5 post–experimental manipulation, naïve animals demonstrated a significant decrease in lever presses during the persistence task (P < .05) compared to baseline, whereas CCI-ION animals did not (P = .55). Conclusion These results suggest that persistent pain influences behavioral regulation and that animals experiencing persistent pain may have difficulty adapting to environmental demands. PMID:25905537

  5. Immunomodulation by Persistent Organic Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widely distnbuted in the environment, are resistant to degradation, and increase in concentration (biomagnify) in the food chain. Concentrations in apical predators may be tens to hundreds of times greater than concentrations in their pref...

  6. Object-oriented persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  7. [Mixed marriages].

    PubMed

    Harmsen, C N

    1998-08-01

    The author examines the extent and characteristics of mixed marriages in the Netherlands. "Nine out of ten married persons born in Turkey or Morocco have a partner who was born in the same country. The majority of married Surinamese also have a partner originating from the same country. Those who spend (a part of) their youth in Indonesia (the former Dutch East Indies), on the other hand, are mostly married to someone born in the Netherlands." (EXCERPT) PMID:12294179

  8. Transmission and persistence of Ceratonova shasta genotypes in Chinook salmon.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Charlene N; Wong, Peter; Hallett, Sascha L; Ray, R Adam; Bartholomew, Jerri L

    2014-12-01

    Ceratonova shasta is a myxozoan parasite of salmon and trout transmitted by waterborne actinospores. Based on DNA sequence data and host specificity, 4 distinct parasite genotypes are recognized. Genotypes I and II are common in the lower reaches of the Klamath River, Oregon-California, but only infection by genotype I causes mortality in Chinook salmon. We conducted sentinel fish exposures and determined genotype composition in river water during exposure, and in fish gills, intestine, and tank water post-exposure to determine whether: (1) transmission of parasites having different genotypes is host-specific and (2) all transmitted genotypes persist in the host through to release as waterborne stages. Initial parasite transmission to the fish host appears indiscriminant, since we detected both genotypes I and II in 83.6% of the fish gills sampled. However, only genotype I was detected in fish that succumbed to infection, while both genotypes persisted in fish that survived. Persistence was likely dependent on exposure dose, initial infection type (mixed or single) and infection outcome (mortality or survival). The transmission of both genotypes to a majority of Chinook salmon and the persistence of multiple genotypes raises questions about how infection with mixed genotypes could result in within-host interactions that affect disease severity. PMID:24945751

  9. Mixed results with mixed disulfides.

    PubMed

    Brigelius-Flohé, Regina

    2016-04-01

    A period of research with Helmut Sies in the 1980s is recalled. Our experiments aimed at an in-depth understanding of metabolic changes due to oxidative challenges under near-physiological conditions, i.e. perfused organs. A major focus were alterations of the glutathione and the NADPH/NADP(+) system by different kinds of oxidants, in particular formation of glutathione mixed disulfides with proteins. To analyze mixed disulfides, a test was adapted which is widely used until today. The observations in perfused rat livers let us believe that glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), i.a. might be activated by glutathionylation. Although we did not succeed to verify this hypothesis for the special case of G6PDH, the regulation of enzyme/protein activities by glutathionylation today is an accepted posttranslational mechanism in redox biology in general. Our early experimental approaches are discussed in the context of present knowledge. PMID:27095221

  10. Measles virus persistence in an immortalized murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M B; Buckthal, D J; Picciotto, S; O'Bryan, T A; Goldman, J N

    1995-02-20

    Persistent infection with the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) has been established in IC-21 cells, an immortalized murine macrophage cell line. Persistence was established immediately without syncytia formation or cytopathic effects. MV was expressed in the majority of the cells as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, infectious centers assays, and limiting dilution analysis. Hemagglutinin (H) and phosphoprotein expressed in persistently infected IC-21 cells had retarded migration in SDS-PAGE gels when compared to these proteins expressed in Vero cells. H protein differences were also found between freshly infected IC-21 cells and persistently infected IC-21 cells passaged for over 2 years. Six sublines of IC-21 cells, infected at different times, have maintained these characteristics for 2 years of passage. During this time period the intensity of immunofluorescence and the number of infectious virus particles recoverable fluctuated in five of the six cell lines. In one cell line virus expression remained at a consistent high level. The ability to establish a persistent MV infection in murine macrophages allows studies using a cell important in disseminating the infection. It facilitates experiments on immunological aspects of viral immunity by enabling cell mixing experiments with histocompatible cell populations and by making available the wide array of cellular and humoral reagents in the mouse. PMID:7871720

  11. Cytokines and persistent viral infections.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C and B or Epstein-Barr virus often cause chronic viral infections in humans. Persistence of these viruses in the host is associated with a dramatic loss of T-cell immune response due to functional T-cell exhaustion. Developing efficient immunotherapeutic approaches to prevent viral persistence and/or to restore a highly functional T-cell mediated immunity remains a major challenge. During the last two decades, numerous studies aimed to identify relevant host-derived factors that could be modulated to achieve this goal. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the role of cytokines in preventing or facilitating viral persistence. We concentrate on the impact of multiple relevant cytokines in T-cell dependent immune response to chronic viral infection and the potential for using cytokines as therapeutic agents in mice and humans. PMID:26907634

  12. Non-Persisting Student Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the characteristics and opinions of the non-persisting students at Moraine Valley Community College. A random sample of 500 non-persisting students was selected, with equal numbers of full-time and part-time ex-students. Separate questionnaires were used for non-persisting full-time and non-persisting part-time…

  13. Computational Methods to Model Persistence.

    PubMed

    Vandervelde, Alexandra; Loris, Remy; Danckaert, Jan; Gelens, Lendert

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are dormant cells, tolerant to multiple antibiotics, that are involved in several chronic infections. Toxin-antitoxin modules play a significant role in the generation of such persister cells. Toxin-antitoxin modules are small genetic elements, omnipresent in the genomes of bacteria, which code for an intracellular toxin and its neutralizing antitoxin. In the past decade, mathematical modeling has become an important tool to study the regulation of toxin-antitoxin modules and their relation to the emergence of persister cells. Here, we provide an overview of several numerical methods to simulate toxin-antitoxin modules. We cover both deterministic modeling using ordinary differential equations and stochastic modeling using stochastic differential equations and the Gillespie method. Several characteristics of toxin-antitoxin modules such as protein production and degradation, negative autoregulation through DNA binding, toxin-antitoxin complex formation and conditional cooperativity are gradually integrated in these models. Finally, by including growth rate modulation, we link toxin-antitoxin module expression to the generation of persister cells. PMID:26468111

  14. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  15. Visual Persistence and Adult Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Roberta L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Visual persistence was investigated in adults with and without dyslexia in order to determine whether dyslexic adults demonstrate problems similar to those found in childhood dyslexia. Results showed that sensitivity of dyslexic adults was impaired when parts of a test stimulus were presented to adjacent retinal areas, suggesting that under…

  16. Blood Persistent Organic Pollutants Level

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the presence of a subset of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the blood of the U.S. population from 1999 to 2002. Some POPs have been linked to adverse health effects such as cancer and nervous system disorders. Three broad classes of POPs are in...

  17. Evolutionary dynamics for persistent cooperation in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Xinsheng; Claussen, Jens Christian; Guo, Wanlin

    2015-06-01

    The emergence and maintenance of cooperative behavior is a fascinating topic in evolutionary biology and social science. The public goods game (PGG) is a paradigm for exploring cooperative behavior. In PGG, the total resulting payoff is divided equally among all participants. This feature still leads to the dominance of defection without substantially magnifying the public good by a multiplying factor. Much effort has been made to explain the evolution of cooperative strategies, including a recent model in which only a portion of the total benefit is shared by all the players through introducing a new strategy named persistent cooperation. A persistent cooperator is a contributor who is willing to pay a second cost to retrieve the remaining portion of the payoff contributed by themselves. In a previous study, this model was analyzed in the framework of well-mixed populations. This paper focuses on discussing the persistent cooperation in lattice-structured populations. The evolutionary dynamics of the structured populations consisting of three types of competing players (pure cooperators, defectors, and persistent cooperators) are revealed by theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. In particular, the approximate expressions of fixation probabilities for strategies are derived on one-dimensional lattices. The phase diagrams of stationary states, and the evolution of frequencies and spatial patterns for strategies are illustrated on both one-dimensional and square lattices by simulations. Our results are consistent with the general observation that, at least in most situations, a structured population facilitates the evolution of cooperation. Specifically, here we find that the existence of persistent cooperators greatly suppresses the spreading of defectors under more relaxed conditions in structured populations compared to that obtained in well-mixed populations.

  18. Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus Genome Persistence.

    PubMed

    Juillard, Franceline; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has an etiologic role in Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. These diseases are most common in immunocompromised individuals, especially those with AIDS. Similar to all herpesviruses, KSHV infection is lifelong. KSHV infection in tumor cells is primarily latent, with only a small subset of cells undergoing lytic infection. During latency, the KSHV genome persists as a multiple copy, extrachromosomal episome in the nucleus. In order to persist in proliferating tumor cells, the viral genome replicates once per cell cycle and then segregates to daughter cell nuclei. KSHV only expresses several genes during latent infection. Prominent among these genes, is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). LANA is responsible for KSHV genome persistence and also exerts transcriptional regulatory effects. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and in addition, is responsible for segregation of replicated genomes to daughter nuclei. LANA serves as a molecular tether, bridging the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes to ensure that KSHV DNA reaches progeny nuclei. N-terminal LANA attaches to mitotic chromosomes by binding histones H2A/H2B at the surface of the nucleosome. C-terminal LANA binds specific KSHV DNA sequence and also has a role in chromosome attachment. In addition to the essential roles of N- and C-terminal LANA in genome persistence, internal LANA sequence is also critical for efficient episome maintenance. LANA's role as an essential mediator of virus persistence makes it an attractive target for inhibition in order to prevent or treat KSHV infection and disease. PMID:27570517

  19. The patch microstructure in concrete: effect of mixing time

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Sidney . E-Mail: diamond@ecn.purdue.edu

    2005-05-01

    It has been previously shown by backscatter-mode scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that various laboratory- and field-mixed concretes exhibit dense areas or patches of hardened cement paste (hcp) alternating with highly porous areas or patches. The present work represents an effort to establish whether this distinctive microstructure was a result of inadequate mixing. A conventional laboratory concrete was prepared and subjected to prolonged mixing in an efficient pan mixer, with small samples being removed periodically, compacted, and cured for 28 days. Examination indicated that evidences of the patchy microstructure persisted despite prolonged mixing for up to 30 min, far beyond normal concrete mixing times.

  20. Global persistence in directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerding, K.; van Wijland, F.

    1998-08-01

    We consider a directed percolation process at its critical point. The probability that the deviation of the global order parameter with respect to its average has not changed its sign between 0 and t decays with t as a power law. In space dimensions 0305-4470/31/34/004/img5 the global persistence exponent 0305-4470/31/34/004/img6 that characterizes this decay is 0305-4470/31/34/004/img7 while for d<4 its value is increased to first order in 0305-4470/31/34/004/img8. Combining a method developed by Majumdar and Sire with renormalization group techniques we compute the correction to 0305-4470/31/34/004/img6 to first order in 0305-4470/31/34/004/img10. The global persistence exponent is found to be a new and independent exponent. Finally we compare our results with existing simulations.

  1. Persistence and the Nikkei Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.; Yamano, T.

    2007-12-01

    The persistence phenomenon is studied in the Japanese financial market by using a novel mapping of the time evolution of the values of shares in a portfolio onto Ising spins. The method is applied to historical end of day data from the Japanese stock market over an arbitrarily chosen period. By studying the time dependence of the spins, we find clear evidence for a power law decay of the proportion of shares that remain either above or below their "starting" values. The results are compared with those resulting from data from the London market, where there is evidence of a distinctive double power law. Preliminary results from the Japanese market indicate similar behavior. We estimate a long time persistence exponent for the underlying financial markets to be 0.5.

  2. Persistent Monitoring Platforms Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C L

    2007-02-22

    This project was inspired and motivated by the need to provide better platforms for persistent surveillance. In the years since the inception of this work, the need for persistence of surveillance platforms has become even more widely appreciated, both within the defense community and the intelligence community. One of the most demanding technical requirements for such a platform involves the power plant and energy storage system, and this project concentrated almost exclusively on the technology associated with this system for a solar powered, high altitude, unmanned aircraft. An important realization for the feasibility of such solar powered aircraft, made at the outset of this project, was that thermal energy may be stored with higher specific energy density than for any other known practical form of rechargeable energy storage. This approach has proved to be extraordinarily fruitful, and a large number of spin-off applications of this technology were developed in the course of this project.

  3. Persistent Patterns in Accretion Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Frolov, Andrei V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-03

    We present a set of new characteristic frequencies associated with accretion disks around compact objects. These frequencies arise from persistent rotating patterns in the disk that are finite in radial extent and driven purely by the gravity of the central body. Their existence depends on general relativistic corrections to orbital motion and, if observed, could be used to probe the strong gravity region around a black hole. We also discuss a possible connection to the puzzle of quasi-periodic oscillations.

  4. Dealing with Persistent Pain in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pain Management Related Documents PDF Dealing with Persistent Pain in Later Life Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Dealing with Persistent Pain in Older Adults Tools and Tips Printer-friendly ...

  5. Bilateral persistent pupillary membranes associated with cataract

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Syed Shoeb; Binson, Caroline; Lung, Chong Ka; Ghani, Shuaibah Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Summary Exuberant persistent pupillary membranes (PPM) are rare in adult eyes. We report the case of a 53-year-old man diagnosed with bilateral, profuse, persistent pupillary membranes and unilateral cataract. PMID:23362401

  6. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of animals in sinks can compromise persistence. Conversely, sinks can bolster population sizes, improving viability. To assess the contribution of sinks to regional persistence, we simulated the removal of sink hab...

  7. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Torrey, Heather L; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  8. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  9. MOOCs and Persistence: Definitions and Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Brent J.; Baker, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter argues for redefining the term "persistence" as it relates to MOOCs and considers how different measures produce different results in the research; it closes with a review of research on persistence in MOOCs.

  10. Dynamically Induced Displacements of a Persistent Cold-Air Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lareau, Neil P.; Horel, John D.

    2015-02-01

    We examine the influence of a passing weather system on a persistent cold-air pool (CAP) during the Persistent Cold-Air Pool Study in the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, USA. The CAP experiences a sequence of along-valley displacements that temporarily and partially remove the cold air in response to increasing along-valley winds aloft. The displacements are due to the formation of a mountain wave over the upstream topography as well as adjustments to the regional horizontal pressure gradient and wind-stress divergence acting on the CAP. These processes appear to help establish a balance wherein the depth of the CAP increases to the north. When that balance is disrupted, the CAP tilt collapses, which sends a gravity current of cold air travelling upstream and thereby restores CAP conditions throughout the valley. Intra-valley mixing of momentum, heat, and pollution within the CAP by Kelvin-Helmholtz waves and seiching is also examined.

  11. Persistence and Attrition at San Juan College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Nelle

    A project was undertaken at San Juan College, in New Mexico, to examine findings from several studies of student persistence and retention to shed light on factors influencing persistence at the college. The project took into account several definitions of persistence, including re-enrollment in the subsequent semester (semester to semester),…

  12. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This snapshot report provides information on student persistence and retention rates for Spring 2014. Data is presented in tabular format on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Starting Enrollment Intensity (all institutional sectors); (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Age at College Entry (all…

  13. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This Snapshot Report offers information on student persistence and retention rates for 2009-2013. It offers data on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year Private Nonprofit Institutions; (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year…

  14. Intent to Persist at Religiously Affiliated Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansom, J. Mel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the secondary data analysis was to examine the attributes of students who intend to persist at the same religiously affiliated institution. The review of literature indicated that persistence has been studied extensively, but there has been only limited investigation of persistence focused on religiously affiliated institutions. The…

  15. Does Motivation Affect Performance via Persistence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmeyer, Regina; Rheinberg, Falko

    2000-01-01

    Studied the relationships among motivation, persistence, and performance in a sample of 51 German college students. Path analysis showed that initial motivation influenced persistence but that the relationship between persistence and performance was disrupted because learners with more knowledge stopped sooner. (SLD)

  16. The Extraction of Information From Visual Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Donald E.

    1976-01-01

    This research sought to distinguish among three concepts of visual persistence by substituting the physical presence of the target stimulus while simultaneously inhibiting the formation of a persisting representation. Reportability of information about the stimuli was compared to a condition in which visual persistence was allowed to fully develop…

  17. A Grounded Theory of Adult Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Rosemary

    2010-01-01

    This grounded theory study investigates adult student persistence at a community college. Student persistence in college is a prerequisite for degree achievement, which correlates with higher earnings and overall better quality of life. Persistence rates remain low for adult students, who combine their college endeavors with responsibilities to…

  18. On Persistence in Multiobjective Oligopoly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, E.; Hegazi, A. S.; El-Hafez, A. T. Abd

    Multiobjective oligopoly models are constructed. The objective of th e first two models are to maximize profits and to maximize sales. In the third model, the objectives are to maximize profits and to minimize risk. Giving more weight to risk minimization decreased the profits. In all the three models, we found that the weight of the profit maximization has to be higher than a given threshold. Sufficient conditions for persistence of some multiobjective oligopolies are derived. Again, they require that the weight of profit maximization to be higher than certain value.

  19. Housing Mix, School Mix: Barriers to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camina, M. M.; Iannone, P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent UK policy has emphasised both the development of socially mixed communities and the creation of balanced school intakes. In this paper, we use a case study of an area of mixed tenure in eastern England to explore policy in practice and the extent to which mechanisms of segregation impact on both the creation of socially mixed neighbourhoods…

  20. Behavior and persistence of spilled oil on shoreline

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Recent oil spills have re-demonstrated the range of shoreline impacts that are possible from medium to large spills in the United States, i.e., the Exxon Valdez spill which significantly contaminated over 1000 km of shoreline in Alaska and the Mega Borg, which resulted in widely scattered tar balls over a small area. Immediate and total removal of stranded oil should not always be the primary objective. Instead, shoreline cleanup strategies developed for oil spills need to consider the persistence and short- to long-term persistence of stranded oil. There are several general guidelines on the persistence of stranded oil. High-energy shorelines are rapidly and effectively cleaned by natural processes, although there are micro-environments where oil tends to persist (wave shadows, supratidal zone, rock crevices, etc.). On sand and mixed sand and gravel beaches, oil tends to be buried below clean layers of sediment, but erosional/depositional cycles will result in oil removal, usually within one year. In sheltered environments (wetlands, tidal flats) oil will persist for long periods; therefore, oil removal is frequently required, though it is usually poorly implemented. Cobble/boulder beaches, while usually very complex, present a special problem. They can be found in a range of energy settings, with years between periods of storm activity. These beaches can hold large volumes of oil; they can be a source of long-term ({gt} one year) leaching and sheening; subsurface oil is very difficult to remove by surface treatment methods; and they have poorly understood sedimentation patterns, so it is difficult to predict rates of sediment reworking. Studies of recent oil spills have shown a need for shoreline-specific technologies for these types of beaches.

  1. Mixing and Transport.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; Chapman, Tom; Siverts-Wong, Elena; Wei, Li; Mei, Ying

    2016-10-01

    This section covers research published during the calendar year 2015 on mixing and transport processes. The review covers mixing of anaerobic digesters, mixing of heat transfer, and environmental fate and transport. PMID:27620101

  2. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made. PMID:26122810

  3. Long-persistence blue phosphors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, William M. (Inventor); Jia, Weiyi (Inventor); Lu, Lizhu (Inventor); Yuan, Huabiao (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to phosphors including long-persistence blue phosphors. Phosphors of the invention are represented by the general formula: MO . mAl.sub.2 O.sub.3 :Eu.sup.2+,R.sup.3+ wherein m is a number ranging from about 1.6 to about 2.2, M is Sr or a combination of Sr with Ca and Ba or both, R.sup.3+ is a trivalent metal ion or trivalent Bi or a mixture of these trivalent ions, Eu.sup.2+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M, and R.sup.3+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M. Phosphors of this invention include powders, ceramics, single crystals and single crystal fibers. A method of manufacturing improved phosphors and a method of manufacturing single crystal phosphors are also provided.

  4. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  5. Persistent homology and string vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirafici, Michele

    2016-03-01

    We use methods from topological data analysis to study the topological features of certain distributions of string vacua. Topological data analysis is a multi-scale approach used to analyze the topological features of a dataset by identifying which homological characteristics persist over a long range of scales. We apply these techniques in several contexts. We analyze {N}=2 vacua by focusing on certain distributions of Calabi-Yau varieties and Landau-Ginzburg models. We then turn to flux compactifications and discuss how we can use topological data analysis to extract physical information. Finally we apply these techniques to certain phenomenologically realistic heterotic models. We discuss the possibility of characterizing string vacua using the topological properties of their distributions.

  6. Mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ragnar; Hetlevik, Siri Opsahl; Lilleby, Vibke; Molberg, Øyvind

    2016-02-01

    The concept of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) as a separate connective tissue disease (CTD) has persisted for more than four decades. High titers of antibodies targeting the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U1 snRNP) in peripheral blood are a sine qua non for the diagnosis of MCTD, in addition to distinct clinical features including Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), "puffy hands," arthritis, myositis, pleuritis, pericarditis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Recently, population-based epidemiology data from Norway estimated the point prevalence of adult-onset MCTD to be 3.8 per 100,000 and the mean annual incidence to be 2.1 per million per year, supporting the notion that MCTD is the least common CTD. Little is known about the etiology of MCTD, but recent genetic studies have confirmed that MCTD is a strongly HLA (​human leukocyte antigen)-linked disease, as the HLA profiles of MCTD differ distinctly from the corresponding profiles of ethnically matched healthy controls and other CTDs. In the first section of this review, we provide an update on the clinical, immunological, and genetic features of MCTD and discuss the relationship between MCTD and the other CTDs. Then we proceed to discuss the recent advances in therapy and our current understanding of prognosis and prognostic factors, especially those that are associated with the more serious pulmonary and cardiovascular complications of the disease. In the final section, we discuss some of the key, unresolved questions related to anti-RNP-associated diseases and indicate how these questions may be approached in future studies. PMID:27421219

  7. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery: a review.

    PubMed

    Azab, Waleed; Delashaw, Johnny; Mohammed, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    The trigeminal artery is the largest of the fetal carotid-basilar anastomotic arteries, and it persists for the longest embryonic period. The artery usually involutes after the development of the posterior communicating artery. The exact causes of persistence of this primitive vessel into adulthood are not completely clear. Angiographic and anatomical descriptions of the various persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) configurations and their relation to the remainder of the cerebrovascular tree and the other surrounding structures have been reported. Persistent trigeminal artery can be associated with many other vascular anomalies and disorders including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations and carotid-cavernous fistulae. A thorough understanding of the anatomical and angiographic features of this persistent embryonic arterial channel is of utmost importance when making therapeutic decisions and embarking on surgical or endovascular intervention for any pertinent pathological condition. We review the embryology, angiographic features, microsurgical anatomy and associated vascular anomalies and disorders of the persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:22843453

  8. A Historical Perspective on Bacterial Persistence.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Natalie; Knapen, Wouter; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal antibiotics quickly kill the majority of a bacterial population. However, a small fraction of cells typically survive through entering the so-called persister state. Persister cells are increasingly being viewed as a major cause of the recurrence of chronic infectious disease and could be an important factor in the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The phenomenon of persistence was first described in the 1940s, but remained poorly understood for decades afterwards. Only recently, a series of breakthrough discoveries has started to shed light on persister physiology and the molecular and genetic underpinnings of persister formation. We here provide an overview of the key studies that have paved the way for the current boom in persistence research, with a special focus on the technological and methodological advances that have enabled this progress. PMID:26468095

  9. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    SciTech Connect

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  10. Science Identity's Influence on Community College Students' Engagement, Persistence, and Performance in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccitelli, Melinda

    In the United States (U.S.), student engagement, persistence, and academic performance levels in college science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs have been unsatisfactory over the last decade. Low student engagement, persistence, and academic performance in STEM disciplines have been identified as major obstacles to U.S. economic goals and U.S. science education objectives. The central and salient science identity a college student claims can influence his engagement, persistence, and academic achievement in college science. While science identity studies have been conducted on four-year college populations there is a gap in the literature concerning community college students' science identity and science performance. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to examine the relationship between community college students claimed science identities and engagement, persistence, and academic performance. A census sample of 264 community college students enrolled in biology during the summer of 2015 was used to study this relationship. Science identity and engagement levels were calculated using the Science Identity Centrality Scale and the Biology Motivation Questionnaire II, respectively. Persistence and final grade data were collected from institutional and instructor records. Engagement significantly correlated to, r =.534, p = .01, and varied by science identity, p < .001. Percent final grade also varied by science identity (p < .005), but this relationship was weaker (r = .208, p = .01). Results for science identity and engagement and final grade were consistent with the identity literature. Persistence did not vary by science identity in this student sample (chi2 =2.815, p = .421). This result was inconsistent with the literature on science identity and persistence. Quantitative results from this study present a mixed picture of science identity status at the community college level. It is suggested, based on the findings

  11. High turnover drives prolonged persistence of influenza in managed pig herds.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Virginia E; Aguas, Ricardo; Riley, Steven; Loeffen, Willie L A; Wood, James L N; Grenfell, Bryan T

    2016-06-01

    Pigs have long been hypothesized to play a central role in the emergence of novel human influenza A virus (IAV) strains, by serving as mixing vessels for mammalian and avian variants. However, the key issue of viral persistence in swine populations at different scales is ill understood. We address this gap using epidemiological models calibrated against seroprevalence data from Dutch finishing pigs to estimate the 'critical herd size' (CHS) for IAV persistence. We then examine the viral phylogenetic evidence for persistence by comparing human and swine IAV. Models suggest a CHS of approximately 3000 pigs above which influenza was likely to persist, i.e. orders of magnitude lower than persistence thresholds for IAV and other acute viruses in humans. At national and regional scales, we found much stronger empirical signatures of prolonged persistence of IAV in swine compared with human populations. These striking levels of persistence in small populations are driven by the high recruitment rate of susceptible piglets, and have significant implications for management of swine and for overall patterns of genetic diversity of IAV. PMID:27358277

  12. High turnover drives prolonged persistence of influenza in managed pig herds

    PubMed Central

    Aguas, Ricardo; Riley, Steven; Loeffen, Willie L. A.; Wood, James L. N.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Pigs have long been hypothesized to play a central role in the emergence of novel human influenza A virus (IAV) strains, by serving as mixing vessels for mammalian and avian variants. However, the key issue of viral persistence in swine populations at different scales is ill understood. We address this gap using epidemiological models calibrated against seroprevalence data from Dutch finishing pigs to estimate the ‘critical herd size’ (CHS) for IAV persistence. We then examine the viral phylogenetic evidence for persistence by comparing human and swine IAV. Models suggest a CHS of approximately 3000 pigs above which influenza was likely to persist, i.e. orders of magnitude lower than persistence thresholds for IAV and other acute viruses in humans. At national and regional scales, we found much stronger empirical signatures of prolonged persistence of IAV in swine compared with human populations. These striking levels of persistence in small populations are driven by the high recruitment rate of susceptible piglets, and have significant implications for management of swine and for overall patterns of genetic diversity of IAV. PMID:27358277

  13. Unrelated toxin-antitoxin systems cooperate to induce persistence.

    PubMed

    Fasani, Rick A; Savageau, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    non-growing cells, typical of persisters, that exist under normal conditions, rather than only as an induced response. The frequency of persisters in the population can be tuned for a particular environmental niche by mixing and matching unrelated systems via mutation, horizontal gene transfer and selection. PMID:26063817

  14. A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pilot Study of Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) investigated the aggregate exposures of 257 preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to pollutants commonly detected in their everyday environments. ...

  15. Genetic Mapping of Persistence in Tetraploid Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Persistence is a critical trait for alfalfa, yet the genetics of this trait is poorly understood. Herein, we characterize an F1 alfalfa population derived from the cross between the two cultivated alfalfa subpecies for persistence in three production seasons at Ames and Nashua, Iowa locations and o...

  16. Persistence of Grazed Red Clover Varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically, red clover (Trifolium pratense) has been limited by its lack of stand persistence in hay and grazed systems compared to other small-seeded forage legumes. Breeding over the past 50 years has extended red clover persistence in a hay management system to four years. This study examined g...

  17. Long Persistent Light Emitting Diode Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Dongdong; Ma, Yiwei; Hunter, D. N.

    2007-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory was designed for undergraduate students to make long persistent light emitting diode (LED) indicators using phosphors. Blue LEDs, which emit at 465 nm, were characterized and used as an excitation source. Long persistent phosphors, SrAl[subscript 2]O[subscript 4]:Eu[superscript 2+],Dy[superscript 3+] (green) and…

  18. Supplemental Instruction: Supporting Persistence in Barrier Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Susan B.

    2008-01-01

    Courses that interfere with undergraduate students' persistence are barriers that appear all along the undergraduate continuum. Supplemental Instruction (SI) may contribute to students' achievement in a barrier course and, therefore, to their persistence in their academic program. The purpose of this single-case descriptive study was to explore…

  19. Personality Characteristics in Relation to College Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Duane E.

    1970-01-01

    Scales of the Minnesota Counseling Inventory (MCI) were used to compare persisters with nonpersisters. All four comparisons involving the Conformity scale and two of four comparisons involving the Family Relationships scale demonstrated significant differences. Persisters scored lower than nonpersisters on all comparisons involving the Conformity…

  20. Counseling on Campus: Client Persistence and Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Margaretha S.

    2012-01-01

    Two related studies addressed college students' persistence and progress in psychotherapy. In Study 1, using emotional health variables assessed at intake, students who persisted in counseling and demonstrated clinical improvement were compared with those who either did not return for their first session or who did return but stopped before…

  1. Reprogramming of Yersinia from Virulent to Persistent Mode Revealed by Complex In Vivo RNA-seq Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Avican, Kemal; Fahlgren, Anna; Huss, Mikael; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Beckstette, Michael; Dersch, Petra; Fällman, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We recently found that Yersinia pseudotuberculosis can be used as a model of persistent bacterial infections. We performed in vivo RNA-seq of bacteria in small cecal tissue biopsies at early and persistent stages of infection to determine strategies associated with persistence. Comprehensive analysis of mixed RNA populations from infected tissues revealed that Y. pseudotuberculosis undergoes transcriptional reprogramming with drastic down-regulation of T3SS virulence genes during persistence when the pathogen resides within the cecum. At the persistent stage, the expression pattern in many respects resembles the pattern seen in vitro at 26oC, with for example, up-regulation of flagellar genes and invA. These findings are expected to have impact on future rationales to identify suitable bacterial targets for new antibiotics. Other genes that are up-regulated during persistence are genes involved in anaerobiosis, chemotaxis, and protection against oxidative and acidic stress, which indicates the influence of different environmental cues. We found that the Crp/CsrA/RovA regulatory cascades influence the pattern of bacterial gene expression during persistence. Furthermore, arcA, fnr, frdA, and wrbA play critical roles in persistence. Our findings suggest a model for the life cycle of this enteropathogen with reprogramming from a virulent to an adapted phenotype capable of persisting and spreading by fecal shedding. PMID:25590628

  2. Type I Interferon Receptor Deficiency in Dendritic Cells Facilitates Systemic Murine Norovirus Persistence Despite Enhanced Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nice, Timothy J.; Osborne, Lisa C.; Tomov, Vesselin T.; Artis, David; Wherry, E. John; Virgin, Herbert W.

    2016-01-01

    In order for a virus to persist, there must be a balance between viral replication and immune clearance. It is commonly believed that adaptive immunity drives clearance of viral infections and, thus, dysfunction or viral evasion of adaptive immunity is required for a virus to persist. Type I interferons (IFNs) play pleiotropic roles in the antiviral response, including through innate control of viral replication. Murine norovirus (MNoV) replicates in dendritic cells (DCs) and type I IFN signaling in DCs is important for early control of MNoV replication. We show here that the non-persistent MNoV strain CW3 persists systemically when CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. Persistence in this setting is associated with increased early viral titers, maintenance of DC numbers, increased expression of DC activation markers and an increase in CD8 T cell and antibody responses. Furthermore, CD8 T cell function is maintained during the persistent phase of infection and adaptive immune cells from persistently infected mice are functional when transferred to Rag1-/- recipients. Finally, increased early replication and persistence are also observed in mixed bone marrow chimeras where only half of the CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. These findings demonstrate that increased early viral replication due to a cell-intrinsic innate immune deficiency is sufficient for persistence and a functional adaptive immune response is not sufficient for viral clearance. PMID:27327515

  3. Type I Interferon Receptor Deficiency in Dendritic Cells Facilitates Systemic Murine Norovirus Persistence Despite Enhanced Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Nice, Timothy J; Osborne, Lisa C; Tomov, Vesselin T; Artis, David; Wherry, E John; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-06-01

    In order for a virus to persist, there must be a balance between viral replication and immune clearance. It is commonly believed that adaptive immunity drives clearance of viral infections and, thus, dysfunction or viral evasion of adaptive immunity is required for a virus to persist. Type I interferons (IFNs) play pleiotropic roles in the antiviral response, including through innate control of viral replication. Murine norovirus (MNoV) replicates in dendritic cells (DCs) and type I IFN signaling in DCs is important for early control of MNoV replication. We show here that the non-persistent MNoV strain CW3 persists systemically when CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. Persistence in this setting is associated with increased early viral titers, maintenance of DC numbers, increased expression of DC activation markers and an increase in CD8 T cell and antibody responses. Furthermore, CD8 T cell function is maintained during the persistent phase of infection and adaptive immune cells from persistently infected mice are functional when transferred to Rag1-/- recipients. Finally, increased early replication and persistence are also observed in mixed bone marrow chimeras where only half of the CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. These findings demonstrate that increased early viral replication due to a cell-intrinsic innate immune deficiency is sufficient for persistence and a functional adaptive immune response is not sufficient for viral clearance. PMID:27327515

  4. Mixing in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  5. Mixing in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee

    2011-01-07

    Turbulent mixing plays a vital role in many fields in astronomy. Here I review a few of these sites, discuss the importance of this turbulent mixing and the techniques used by astrophysicists to solve these problems.

  6. Laboratory diagnosis of persistent human chlamydial infection

    PubMed Central

    Puolakkainen, Mirja

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic assays for persistent chlamydial infection are much needed to conduct high-quality, large-scale studies investigating the persistent state in vivo, its disease associations and the response to therapy. Yet in most studies the distinction between acute and persistent infection is based on the interpretation of the data obtained by the assays developed to diagnose acute infections or on complex assays available for research only and/or difficult to establish for clinical use. Novel biomarkers for detection of persistent chlamydial infection are urgently needed. Chlamydial whole genome proteome arrays are now available and they can identify chlamydial antigens that are differentially expressed between acute infection and persistent infection. Utilizing these data will lead to the development of novel diagnostic assays. Carefully selected specimens from well-studied patient populations are clearly needed in the process of translating the proteomic data into assays useful for clinical practice. Before such antigens are identified and validated assays become available, we face a challenge of deciding whether the persistent infection truly induced appearance of the proposed marker or do we just base our diagnosis of persistent infection on the presence of the suggested markers. Consequently, we must bear this in mind when interpreting the available data. PMID:24381934

  7. Giant persistent photoconductivity in rough silicon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Mönch, Ingolf; Harazim, Stefan; Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2009-10-01

    This paper reports the observation of giant persistent photoconductivity from rough Si nanomembranes. When exposed to light, the current in p-type Si nanomembranes is enhanced by roughly 3 orders of magnitude in comparison with that in the dark and can persist for days at a high conductive state after the light is switched off. An applied gate voltage can tune the persistent photocurrent and accelerate the response to light. By analyzing the band structure of the devices and the surfaces through various coatings, we attribute the observed effect to hole-localized regions in Si nanomembranes due to the rough surfaces, where light can activate the confined holes. PMID:19637888

  8. Foundations of chaotic mixing.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Stephen; Ottino, Julio M

    2004-05-15

    The simplest mixing problem corresponds to the mixing of a fluid with itself; this case provides a foundation on which the subject rests. The objective here is to study mixing independently of the mechanisms used to create the motion and review elements of theory focusing mostly on mathematical foundations and minimal models. The flows under consideration will be of two types: two-dimensional (2D) 'blinking flows', or three-dimensional (3D) duct flows. Given that mixing in continuous 3D duct flows depends critically on cross-sectional mixing, and that many microfluidic applications involve continuous flows, we focus on the essential aspects of mixing in 2D flows, as they provide a foundation from which to base our understanding of more complex cases. The baker's transformation is taken as the centrepiece for describing the dynamical systems framework. In particular, a hierarchy of characterizations of mixing exist, Bernoulli --> mixing --> ergodic, ordered according to the quality of mixing (the strongest first). Most importantly for the design process, we show how the so-called linked twist maps function as a minimal picture of mixing, provide a mathematical structure for understanding the type of 2D flows that arise in many micromixers already built, and give conditions guaranteeing the best quality mixing. Extensions of these concepts lead to first-principle-based designs without resorting to lengthy computations. PMID:15306478

  9. Exploring the beliefs of persisting secondary science teachers in general induction programs: A longitudinal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sissy Sze-Mun

    Experienced, prepared, and fully certified teachers have been related with higher student achievement, but teacher retention has been a challenge for many decades, especially retention of secondary science teachers. In order to support teachers and student learning, it is critical to understand what impacts secondary science teachers' decisions to persist in the field. This mixed methods study explored whether teacher beliefs were related to persistence over a three-year period. Participants were beginning secondary science teachers that participated in general induction programs provided by their school or district. These participants were selected due to their representative nature of the average beginning secondary science teacher in the United States. Participants' responses to annual semi-structured interviews were the source of data. Findings from quantitative and qualitative analyses revealed that the persisting teachers' beliefs remained stable over the three-year period. Quantitative analyses also revealed that there were no prevalent beliefs among the persisting teachers, even when the variables of gender and socioeconomic status of their schools were considered. When persisting teachers' beliefs about teaching and beliefs about learning were quantitatively analyzed, no relationship was found. Case study of one persisting teacher and one non-persisting teacher revealed that personal experiences and knowledge impacted their beliefs about teaching and learning. The persisting teacher that participated in inquiry-based experiences held student-centered beliefs, while the non-persisting teacher that participated in verification-type experiences held teacher-centered beliefs. This study contributes to the field of science education by examining science teacher persistence instead of attrition. It focused specifically on secondary science teachers while exploring their beliefs longitudinally. Implications from this study calls for teacher beliefs to be

  10. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  11. The persistent stereotype: children's images of scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emens McAdam, Janice

    1990-03-01

    Through their reading children learn to regard scientists as eccentrics. It is shown that this stereotype has persisted for over thirty years and affects many adult attitudes. Some methods of breaking the author-reader cycle are suggested.

  12. Helicobacter and Salmonella Persistent Infection Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Monack, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    Some host-adapted bacterial pathogens are capable of causing persistent infections in humans. For example, Helicobacter pylori inhabits the human gastric mucosa and persistence can be lifelong. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi causes systemic infections that involve colonization of the reticuloendothelial system and some individuals become lifelong carriers. In this review, I compare and contrast the different lifestyles of Helicobacter and Salmonella within the host and the strategies they have evolved to persist in mammalian hosts. Persistently infected carriers serve as the reservoirs for these pathogens, and the carrier state is an essential feature that is required for survival of the bacteria within a restricted host population. Therefore, investigating the chronic carrier state should provide insight into bacterial survival strategies, as well as new therapeutic approaches for treatments. PMID:24296347

  13. Persisters-as elusive as ever.

    PubMed

    Kaldalu, Niilo; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Tenson, Tanel

    2016-08-01

    Persisters-a drug-tolerant sub-population in an isogenic bacterial culture-have been featured throughout the last decade due to their important role in recurrent bacterial infections. Numerous investigations detail the mechanisms responsible for the formation of persisters and suggest exciting strategies for their eradication. In this review, we argue that the very term "persistence" is currently used to describe a large and heterogeneous set of physiological phenomena that are functions of bacterial species, strains, growth conditions, and antibiotics used in the experiments. We caution against the oversimplification of the mechanisms of persistence and urge for a more rigorous validation of the applicability of these mechanisms in each case. PMID:27262568

  14. Teen Birth Rates Drop, But Disparities Persist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Teen Birth Rates Drop, But Disparities Persist Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The feature you selected is no longer available. In 10 seconds you will be automatically redirected to the CDC. ...

  15. Stimuli, Reinforcers, and the Persistence of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, John A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews evidence from basic and translational research with pigeons and humans suggesting that the persistence of operant behavior depends on the contingency between stimuli and reinforcers, and considers some implications for clinical interventions. (Contains 4 figures.)

  16. Demystifying the persistent pneumothorax: role of imaging.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Apeksha; Lee, Steven; Klionsky, Nina; Chaturvedi, Abhishek

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation for pneumothorax is an important indication for obtaining chest radiographs in patients who have had trauma, recent cardiothoracic surgery or are on ventilator support. By definition, a persistent pneumothorax constitutes ongoing bubbling of air from an in situ chest drain, 48 h after its insertion. Persistent pneumothorax remains a diagnostic dilemma and identification of potentially treatable aetiologies is important. These may be chest tube related (kinks or malposition), lung parenchymal disease, bronchopleural fistula, or rarely, oesophageal-pleural fistula. Although radiographs remain the mainstay for diagnosis and follow up of pneumothorax, computed tomography (CT) is increasingly being used for problem solving. Aetiology of persistent air leak determines the optimal treatment. For some, a simple repositioning of the chest tube/drain may suffice; others may require surgery. In this pictorial review, we will briefly describe the physiology of pneumothorax, discuss imaging features of identifiable causes for persistent pneumothorax and provide a brief overview of treatment options. Specific aetiology of a persistent air leak may often not be immediately discernible, and will need to be carefully sought. Accurate interpretation of imaging studies can expedite diagnosis and facilitate prompt treatment. Key points • Persistent pneumothorax is defined as a leak persisting for more than 2 days.• Radiographs can identify chest-tube-related causes of pneumothorax.• CT is the most useful test to identify other causes.• Penetrating thoracic injury can cause fistulous communication resulting in a persistent pneumothorax.• Discontinuity of visceral pleura identified by CT may indicate a bronchopleural fistula. PMID:27100907

  17. Persistence of the Lower Stratospheric Polar Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Randel, William J.; Pawson, Steven; Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    The persistence of the Arctic and Antarctic lower stratospheric vortices is examined over the period 1958 to 1998. Three different vortex-following diagnostics (two using potential vorticity and one based solely on the zonal winds) are compared, and shown to give very similar results for the break up date. The variability in the timing of the breakup of each vortex is qualitatively the same: there are large interannual variations together with smaller decadal-scale variations and there is a significant increase in the persistence since the mid-1980s (all variations are larger for the Arctic vortex). Also, in both hemispheres there is a high correlation between the persistence and the strength and coldness of the spring vortex, with all quantities having the same interannual and decadal variability. However, there is no such correlation between the persistence and the characteristics of the mid-winter vortex. In the northern hemisphere there is also a high correlation between the vortex persistence and the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric eddy heat flux averaged over the two months prior to the breakup. This indicates that the variability in the wave activity entering the stratosphere over late-winter to early-spring plays a key role in the variability of the vortex persistence (and spring polar temperatures) on both interannual and decadal time scales. However, the decadal variation in the Arctic vortex coldness and persistence for the 1990's falls outside the range of natural variability, while this is not the case for the eddy heat flux. This suggests that the recent increase in vortex persistence is not due solely to changes in the wave activity entering the stratosphere.

  18. Persistent homology analysis of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Irene; Gori, Matteo; Pettini, Marco; Petri, Giovanni; De Nigris, Sarah; Franzosi, Roberto; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Persistent homology analysis, a recently developed computational method in algebraic topology, is applied to the study of the phase transitions undergone by the so-called mean-field XY model and by the ϕ4 lattice model, respectively. For both models the relationship between phase transitions and the topological properties of certain submanifolds of configuration space are exactly known. It turns out that these a priori known facts are clearly retrieved by persistent homology analysis of dynamically sampled submanifolds of configuration space.

  19. Persistent and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Shola A.; Stahl, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It has become a significant dilemma in the treatment of patients, and causes increasing morbidity that, in extreme cases, may result in death. Persistent and recurrent disease hamper attempts at eradication of this infection. Escalating levels of treatment and novel therapeutics are being utilized and developed to treat CDI. Further trials are warranted to definitively determine what protocols can be used to treat persistent and recurrent disease. PMID:26034401

  20. Longitudinal persistence with secondary prevention therapies relative to patient risk after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Supriya; Jones, Philip G.; Maddox, Thomas M.; Bradley, Steven M.; Stolker, Joshua M.; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Parashar, Susmita; Peterson, Pamela; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Spertus, John; Ho, P. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies have demonstrated that high-risk AMI patients are less likely to receive guideline-directed medications during hospitalization. It is unknown if this paradox persists following discharge. We aimed to assess if persistence with guideline-directed medications post-discharge varies by patients’ risk following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods Data were analyzed from two prospective, multicenter U.S. AMI registries. The primary outcome was persistence with all prescribed guideline-directed medications (aspirin, beta-blockers, statins, angiotensin-antagonists) at 1, 6, and 12-months post-discharge. The association between risk and medication persistence post-discharge was assessed using multivariable mixed-effect models. Results Among 6434 AMI patients discharged home, 2824 were considered low-risk, 2014 intermediate-risk and 1596 high-risk for death based upon their GRACE 6-month risk score. High-risk was associated with a lower likelihood of receiving all appropriate therapies at discharge compared with low-risk patients (RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.87–0.94). At 12-months, the rate of persistence with all prescribed therapies was 61.5%, 57.9% and 45.9% among low-, intermediate- and high-risk patients respectively. After multivariable adjustment, high-risk was associated with lower persistence with all prescribed medications (RR 0.87; 95% CI 0.82–0.92) over follow-up. Similar associations were seen for individual medications. Over the 5 years of the study, persistence with prescribed therapies post-discharge improved modestly among high-risk patients (RR 1.05; 95% CI 1.03–1.08 per year). Conclusion High-risk AMI patients have a lower likelihood of persistently taking prescribed medications post-discharge as compared with low-risk patients. Continued efforts are needed to improve the use of guideline-directed medications in high-risk patients. PMID:25801001

  1. Persistent multitiered magma plumbing beneath Katla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, David A.; Troll, Valentin R.; Dahren, Börje; Burchardt, Steffi

    2016-03-01

    Recent seismic unrest and a persistent Holocene eruption record at Katla volcano, Iceland indicate that a near-future eruption is possible. Previous petrological investigations suggest that Katla is supplied by a simple plumbing system that delivers magma directly from depth, while seismic and geodetic data also point toward the existence of upper-crustal magma storage. To characterize Katla's recent plumbing system, we established mineral-melt equilibrium crystallization pressures from four age-constrained Katla tephras spanning from 8 kyr BP to 1918. The results point to persistent shallow- (≤8 km depth) as well as deep-crustal (ca. 10 - 25 km depth) magma storage beneath Katla throughout the last 8 kyr. The presence of multiple magma storage regions implies that mafic magma from the deeper reservoir system may become gas-rich during ascent and storage in the shallow crust and erupt explosively. Alternatively, it might intersect evolved magma pockets in the shallow-level storage region, and so increase the potential for explosive mixed-magma ash eruptions.

  2. Persistence of Pigment Production by Yeast Isolates Grown on CHROMagar Candida Medium

    PubMed Central

    Hospenthal, Duane R.; Murray, Clinton K.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Green, Judith A.; Dooley, David P.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the persistence of pigmentation in yeast isolates grown on the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida over 7 days. Candida, Cryptococcus, and Trichosporon isolates were inoculated alone or mixed onto duplicate sets of plates and incubated at 30 and 35°C. Candida albicans and Candida krusei were readily identified throughout the reading period, but Candida glabrata was difficult to differentiate from other species until the 3- or 4-day time point. Candida tropicalis produced colonies similar to those of rare Cryptococcus and Trichosporon species, and mixed cultures were often difficult to identify as such. PMID:12454192

  3. PERSISTENT BREAST PAIN FOLLOWING BREAST CANCER SURGERY IS ASSOCIATED WITH PERSISTENT SENSORY CHANGES, PAIN INTERFERENCE, AND FUNCTIONAL IMPAIRMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Langford, Dale J.; Paul, Steven M.; West, Claudia; Levine, Jon D.; Hamolsky, Deborah; Elboim, Charles; Schmidt, Brian L.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Abrams, Gary; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Inter-individual variability exists in persistent breast pain following breast cancer surgery. Recently, we used growth mixture modeling to identify three subgroups of women (n=398) with distinct persistent breast pain trajectories over six months following surgery (i.e., Mild, Moderate, Severe). Purposes of this study were to identify demographic and clinical characteristics that differed among the breast pain classes and, using linear mixed effects modeling, determine how changes over time, in sensitivity in the breast scar area, pain qualities, pain interference, and hand and arm function differed among these classes. Several demographic and clinical characteristics differentiated the breast pain classes. Of note, 60% to 80% of breast scar sites tested were much less sensitive than the unaffected breast. Significant group effects were observed for pain qualities and interference scores, such that, on average, women in the Severe Pain class reported higher scores than women in the Moderate Pain class. In addition, women in the Moderate Pain class reported higher scores than women in the Mild Pain class. Compared to the Mild Pain class, women in the Severe Pain class had significantly impaired grip strength and women in the Moderate and Severe Pain classes had impaired flexion and abduction. PMID:25439318

  4. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  5. Characterization of Bacillus anthracis Persistence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Sarah A.; Xu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to Bacillus anthracis spores initiates inhalational anthrax, a life-threatening infection. It is known that dormant spores can be recovered from the lungs of infected animals months after the initial spore exposure. Consequently, a 60-day course antibiotic treatment is recommended for exposed individuals. However, there has been little information regarding details or mechanisms of spore persistence in vivo. In this study, we investigated spore persistence in a mouse model. The results indicated that weeks after intranasal inoculation with B. anthracis spores, substantial amounts of spores could be recovered from the mouse lung. Moreover, spores of B. anthracis were significantly better at persisting in the lung than spores of a non-pathogenic Bacillus subtilis strain. The majority of B. anthracis spores in the lung were tightly associated with the lung tissue, as they could not be readily removed by lavage. Immunofluorescence staining of lung sections showed that spores associated with the alveolar and airway epithelium. Confocal analysis indicated that some of the spores were inside epithelial cells. This was further confirmed by differential immunofluorescence staining of lung cells harvested from the infected lungs, suggesting that association with lung epithelial cells may provide an advantage to spore persistence in the lung. There was no or very mild inflammation in the infected lungs. Furthermore, spores were present in the lung tissue as single spores rather than in clusters. We also showed that the anthrax toxins did not play a role in persistence. Together, the results suggest that B. anthracis spores have special properties that promote their persistence in the lung, and that there may be multiple mechanisms contributing to spore persistence. PMID:23750280

  6. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F.; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  7. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  8. "A pesar de todo" (Despite Everything): The Persistence of Latina Graduate Engineering Students at a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre-Covarrubias, Sandra; Arellano, Eduardo; Espinoza, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses a mixed-methods study of personal and programmatic factors that affected persistence of Latina graduate engineering students at a Hispanic-serving institution (HSI). The study's findings enabled us to share recommendations that may be useful to HSIs and other colleges and universities.

  9. An Exploration of Academically Underprepared Students' Decisions to Persist at a Large Urban Community College in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingori, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors that influence underprepared students' persistence at a California community college. A mixed method, sequential explanatory design comprised of a quantitative phase followed by a qualitative phase was utilized. The quantitative part entailed statistical analysis of data available through the…

  10. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry Using SENTINEL-1 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosetto, M.; Monserrat, O.; Devanthéry, N.; Cuevas-González, M.; Barra, A.; Crippa, B.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on deformation monitoring using a Persistent Scatterer Interferometry technique and the interferometric SAR data acquired by the Sentinel-1 satellite of the European Space Agency. The first part of the paper describes the procedure used to process and analyze Sentinel-1 interferometric SAR data. Two main approaches are described. The first one is a simplified Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach that exploits two key properties of the Sentinel-1 data: the high coherence of the 12-day interferograms and the reduced orbital tube. The second approach is a full Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach, where a more sophisticate data treatment is employed. The second part of the paper illustrates the results obtained with the two processing approaches. Two case studies are described. The first one concerns landslide detection and monitoring. In this case, the simplified Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach was used. The second one regards the deformation monitoring of an urban area. In this case, a full Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach was used.

  11. Dry season streamflow persistence in seasonal climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dralle, David N.; Karst, Nathaniel J.; Thompson, Sally E.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonally dry ecosystems exhibit periods of high water availability followed by extended intervals during which rainfall is negligible and streamflows decline. Eventually, such declining flows will fall below the minimum values required to support ecosystem functions or services. The time at which dry season flows drop below these minimum values (Q*), relative to the start of the dry season, is termed the "persistence time" (). The persistence time determines how long seasonal streams can support various human or ecological functions during the dry season. In this study, we extended recent work in the stochastic hydrology of seasonally dry climates to develop an analytical model for the probability distribution function (PDF) of the persistence time. The proposed model accurately captures the mean of the persistence time distribution, but underestimates its variance. We demonstrate that this underestimation arises in part due to correlation between the parameters used to describe the dry season recession, but that this correlation can be removed by rescaling the flow variables. The mean persistence time predictions form one example of the broader class of streamflow statistics known as crossing properties, which could feasibly be combined with simple ecological models to form a basis for rapid risk assessment under different climate or management scenarios.

  12. Persistent Pain and Sensory Abnormalities after Abdominoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Finnerup, Kenneth; Andresen, Sven R.; Nikolajsen, Lone; Finnerup, Nanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Persistent postsurgical pain is a well-recognized problem after a number of common surgical procedures, such as amputation, thoracotomy, and inguinal hernia repair. Less is known about persistent pain after cosmetic surgical procedures. We, therefore, decided to study the incidence and characteristics of persistent pain after abdominoplasty, which is one of the most frequent cosmetic surgical procedures. Methods: In September 2014, a link to a web-based questionnaire was mailed to 217 patients who had undergone abdominoplasty between 2006 and 2014 at the Department of Plastic Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire included questions about pain and sensory abnormalities located to the abdominal skin, and physical and psychological function; patient satisfaction with surgery was rated on a 4-point scale. Results: One hundred seventy patients answered the questionnaire. Fourteen patients (8.2%) reported pain within the past 7 days related to the abdominoplasty. Abnormal abdominal skin sensation was common and reported by 138 patients (81%). Sensory hypersensitivity was associated with the presence of persistent pain. Satisfaction with the procedure was reported by 149 (88%) patients. The majority of patients reported improvement on all physical and psychological factors. Patients with pain were more often disappointed with the surgery and unwilling to recommend the surgery. Conclusions: Overall, patients were satisfied with the procedure, although abnormal abdominal skin sensation was common. However, there is a risk of developing persistent neuropathic pain after abdominoplasty, and patients should be informed about this before surgery. PMID:26893986

  13. On persistence interfaces for scientific data stores

    SciTech Connect

    Malon, D.M.; May, E.N.

    1996-02-09

    A common dilemma among builders of large scientific data stores is whether to use a lightweight object persistence manager or a genuine object-oriented database. There are often good reasons to consider each of these strategies; a few are described in this paper. Too often, however, electing to use a lightweight approach has meant programming to an interface that is entirely different than that expected by commercial object-oriented databases. With the emergence of object database standards, it is possible to provide an interface to persistence managers that does not needlessly inhibit coexistence with (and, perhaps, eventual migration to) object-oriented databases. This paper describes an implementation of a substantial subset of the ODMG-93[1]C++ specification that allows clients to use many of today`s lightweight object persistence managers through an interface that conforms to the ODMG standard. We also describe a minimal interface that persistence software should support in order to provide persistence services for ODMG implementations.

  14. Persistent agents in Axelrod's social dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reia, Sandro M.; Neves, Ubiraci P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Axelrod's model of social dynamics has been studied under the effect of external media. Here we study the formation of cultural domains in the model by introducing persistent agents. These are agents whose cultural traits are not allowed to change but may be spread through local neighborhood. In the absence of persistent agents, the system is known to present a transition from a monocultural to a multicultural regime at some critical Q (number of traits). Our results reveal a dependence of critical Q on the occupation probability p of persistent agents and we obtain the phase diagram of the model in the (p,Q) -plane. The critical locus is explained by the competition of two opposite forces named here barrier and bonding effects. Such forces are verified to be caused by non-persistent agents which adhere (adherent agents) to the set of traits of persistent ones. The adherence (concentration of adherent agents) as a function of p is found to decay for constant Q. Furthermore, adherence as a function of Q is found to decay as a power law with constant p.

  15. Hepatitis C virus as a systemic disease: reaching beyond the liver.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kirat; Ghazinian, Hasmik; Manch, Richard; Gish, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is associated with multiple extrahepatic manifestations that may impact infected patients. The mechanisms through which these develop include those which are immunological, in which the chronic persistence of virus leads to the circulation of immune complexes (mixed cryoglobulinemia) and other autoimmune phenomena, and those which are virological and related to the extrahepatic tropism of the virus to other tissues. It is estimated that 40-74 % of patients with CHC may develop at least one extrahepatic manifestation during the course of the disease. Extrahepatic syndromes may represent the first signal of hepatitis C infection in some patients. CHC is associated with a four-fold increased risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus; with cardiovascular disease in 17-37 % of patients; and with increased risk for cerebrovascular deaths, with a biological gradient of cerebrovascular mortality correlating with an increasing serum viral load. CHC is also associated with lymphoproliferative disorders, particularly non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma. The kidney is involved in 35-60 % of patients with CHC-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia. The prevalent type of glomerulonephritis associated with mixed cryoglobulinemia is membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. In 30 % of cases, renal involvement begins with a nephritis syndrome and acute renal failure, while in 55 % there is only mild hematuria, microalbuminuria, proteinuria and renal insufficiency. CHC is also associated with cognitive impairment, especially in memory and concentration. Thus, extrahepatic CHC manifestations involve multiple organ systems outside the liver linked to a variety of comorbidities which may lead to significantly increased mortality from non-liver-related events. PMID:26660706

  16. Mixing and scaling of accelerated interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzon, A.; Rozanov, V.; Redondo, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs when a layer of dense fluid is placed on top of a less dense layer in a gravitational field or are accelerated. The instability forms a turbulent front between the two layers, but some patterns seem to have a persistent memory of the initial conditions as turbulence develops. The advance of this front is described in Linden & Redondo (1991), and may be shown to follow a quadratic law in time. The width of the growing region of instability is proportional to the Atwood number but the distribution of fractal interfaces between the miscible fluids allow to distinguish the dominant mixing regions located at the sides of the RT blobs, where accelerated shear is greatest. A Large Eddy Simulation numerical model is used to predict some of the features of the experiments, different models on the interaction of the bubble generated buoyancy flux and on the boundary conditions are compared with the experiments. The aspect ratios of the bubble induced convective cells and some mixing descriptors are also seen to depend on the boundary conditions applied to the enclosure. The influence of the initial conditions on the structure of the flow and its mixing ability are investigated by means of image analysis, PIV and scaling analysis to determine the regions of the front which contribute most to molecular mixing.

  17. The Childrens Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate exposure studies of young children in the United States. The CTEPP study examined the exposures of about 260 preschool children and their primary a...

  18. The Childrens Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) Study -- Ohio

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate exposure studies of young children in the United States. The CTEPP study examined the exposures of about 260 preschool children and their primary a...

  19. THE CHILDRENS TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP) STUDY -- NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate exposure studies of young children in the United States. The CTEPP study examined the exposures of about 260 preschool children and their primary a...

  20. Persistence of community college engineering science students: The impact of selected cognitive and noncognitive characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatman, Lawrence M., Jr.

    If the United States is to remain technologically competitive, persistence in engineering programs must improve. This study on student persistence employed a mixed-method design to identify the cognitive and noncognitive factors which contribute to students remaining in an engineering science curriculum or switching from an engineering curriculum at a community college in the northeast United States. Records from 372 students were evaluated to determine the characteristics of two groups: those students that persisted with the engineering curriculum and those that switched from engineering; also, the dropout phenomenon was evaluated. The quantitative portion of the study used a logistic regression analyses on 22 independent variables, while the qualitative portion of the study used group interviews to investigate the noncognitive factors that influenced persisting or switching. The qualitative portion of the study added depth and credibility to the results from the quantitative portion. The study revealed that (1) high grades in first year calculus, physics and chemistry courses, (2) fewer number of semesters enrolled, (3) attendance with full time status, and (4) not participating in an English as a Second Language (ESL) program were significant variables used to predict student persistence. The group interviews confirmed several of these contributing factors. Students that dropped out of college began with (1) the lowest levels of remediation, (2) the lowest grade point averages, and (3) the fewest credits earned.

  1. Contrasting persistence strategies in Salmonella and Mycobacterium

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Long-term survival of persistent bacterial pathogens in mammalian hosts critically depends on their ability to avoid elimination by innate and adaptive immune responses. The persistent human pathogens that cause typhoid fever and tuberculosis exemplify alternative strategies for survival in the host: immune evasion and immune adaptation, respectively. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi evades host innate immune responses and inflammation by expressing factors that interfere with its detection as a Gram-negative bacterium, enabling persistent colonization of an immunologically privileged niche, the gallbladder. In contrast, Mycobacterium tuberculosis has adapted to survive within phagocytic cells, which typically eliminate invading microbes, by deploying stress resistance mechanisms that counteract the harsh environment of the phagolysosome. PMID:20056478

  2. Persistent Structures in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Chabalko, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Persistent structures in the turbulent boundary layer are located and analyzed. The data are taken from flight experiments on large commercial aircraft. An interval correlation technique is introduced which is able to locate the structures. The Morlet continuous wavelet is shown to not only locates persistent structures but has the added benefit that the pressure data are decomposed in time and frequency. To better understand how power is apportioned among these structures, a discrete Coiflet wavelet is used to decompose the pressure data into orthogonal frequency bands. Results indicate that some structures persist a great deal longer in the TBL than would be expected. These structure contain significant power and may be a primary source of vibration energy in the airframe.

  3. Persistent hydrogen bonding in polymorphic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Galek, Peter T A; Fábián, László; Allen, Frank H

    2009-02-01

    The significance of hydrogen bonding and its variability in polymorphic crystal structures is explored using new automated structural analysis methods. The concept of a chemically equivalent hydrogen bond is defined, which may be identified in pairs of structures, revealing those types of bonds that may persist, or not, in moving from one polymorphic form to another. Their frequency and nature are investigated in 882 polymorphic structures from the Cambridge Structural Database. A new method to compare conformations of equivalent molecules is introduced and applied to derive distinct subsets of conformational and packing polymorphs. The roles of chemical functionality and hydrogen-bond geometry in persistent interactions are systematically explored. Detailed structural comparisons reveal a large majority of persistent hydrogen bonds that are energetically crucial to structural stability. PMID:19155561

  4. Persistence and predictability in a perfect model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried D.; Suarez, Max J.; Schemm, Jae-Kyung

    1992-01-01

    A realistic two-level GCM is used to examine the relationship between predictability and persistence. Predictability is measured by the average divergence of ensembles of solutions starting from perturbed initial conditions, and persistence is defined in terms of the autocorrelation function based on a single long-term model integration. The average skill of the dynamical forecasts is compared with the skill of simple persistence-based statistical forecasts. For initial errors comparable in magnitude to present-day analysis errors, the statistical forecast loses all skill after about one week, reflecting the lifetime of the lowest frequency fluctuations in the model. Large ensemble mean dynamical forecasts would be expected to remain skillful for about 3 wk. The disparity between the skill of the statistical and dynamical forecasts is greater for the higher frequency modes, which have little memory beyond 1 d, yet remain predictable for about 2 wk. The results are analyzed in terms of two characteristic time scales.

  5. Vegetation persistence and carbon storage: Implications for environmental water management for Phragmites australis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Kai; Rogers, Kerrylee; Saintilan, Neil; Mazumder, Debashish; Wen, Li; Morrison, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    Environmental water allocations are used to improve the ecological health of wetlands. There is now increasing demand for allocations to improve ecosystem productivity and respiration, and enhance carbon sequestration. Despite global recognition of wetlands as carbon sinks, information regarding carbon dynamics is lacking. This is the first study estimating carbon sequestration for semiarid Phragmites australis reedbeds. The study combined aboveground biomass assessments with stable isotope analyses of soils and modeling of biomass using Normalized Digital Vegetation Index (NDVI) to investigate the capacity of environmental water allocations to improve carbon storage. The study considered relationships between soil organic carbon (SOC), carbon sources, and reedbed persistence in the Macquarie Marshes, a regulated semiarid floodplain of the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. SOC storage levels to 1 m soil depth were higher in persistent reedbeds (167 Mg ha-1) than ephemeral reedbeds (116-138 Mg ha-1). In situ P. australis was the predominant source of surface SOC at persistent reedbeds; mixed sources of surface SOC were proposed for ephemeral reedbeds. 13C enrichment with increasing soil depth occurred in persistent and ephemeral reedbeds and may not relate to flow characteristics. Despite high SOC at persistent reedbeds, differences in the rate of accretion contributed to significantly higher rates of carbon sequestration at ephemeral reedbeds (approximately 554 and 465 g m-2 yr-1) compared to persistent reedbeds (5.17 g m-2 yr-1). However, under current water regimes, rapid accretion at ephemeral reedbeds cannot be maintained. Effective management of persistent P. australis reedbeds may enhance carbon sequestration in the Macquarie Marshes and floodplain wetlands more generally.

  6. Theory for Neutrino Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations, for which Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald were awarded the 2015 Nobel prize in physics, tremendous progresses have been made in measuring the mixing angles which determine the oscillation pattern. A lot of theoretical efforts have been made to understand how neutrinos mix with each other. Present data show that in the standard parameterization of the mixing matrix, θ23 is close to π/4 and the CP violating phase is close to ‑ π/2. In this talk I report results obtained in arXiv:1505.01932 (Phys. Lett. B750(2015)620) and arXive:1404.01560 (Chin. J. Phys.53(2015)100101) and discuss some implications for theoretical model buildings for such mixing pattern. Specific examples for neutrino mixing based on A4 family symmetry are given.

  7. High-mix insulins

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Farooqi, Mohammad Hamed; El-Houni, Ali E.

    2015-01-01

    Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use. PMID:26425485

  8. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  9. Chronic Bacterial Pathogens: Mechanisms of Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Byndloss, Mariana X.; Tsolis, Renee M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many bacterial pathogens can cause acute infections that are cleared with onset of adaptive immunity, however a subset of these pathogens can establish persistent, and sometimes lifelong infections. While bacteria causing chronic infections are phylogenetically diverse, they share common features in their interactions with the host that enable a protracted period of colonization. This chapter will compare the persistence strategies of two chronic pathogens from the Proteobacteria, Brucella abortus, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) to consider how these two pathogens, which are very different at the genomic level, can utilize common strategies to evade immune clearance to cause chronic intracellular infections of the mononuclear phagocyte system. PMID:27227304

  10. Trigeminal neuralgia and persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Renata; Parlato, Raffaele Stefano; De Paulis, Danilo; Cirillo, Mario; Marrone, Valeria; Cirillo, Sossio; Moraci, Aldo; Parlato, Ciro

    2012-12-01

    We report a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) associated with asymptomatic left temporal cavernoma. Our patient presented unstable blood hypertension and the pain of typical trigeminal neuralgia over the second and third divisions of the nerve in the right side of the face. The attacks were often precipitated during physical exertion. MRI and Angio-MRI revealed the persistent carotid basilar anastomosis and occasionally left parietal cavernoma. After drug treatment of blood hypertension, spontaneous recovery of neuralgia was observed and we planned surgical treatment of left temporal cavernoma. PMID:22246457

  11. Amnestically Induced Persistence in Random Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressoni, J. C.; da Silva, Marco Antonio Alves; Viswanathan, G. M.

    2007-02-01

    We study how the Hurst exponent α depends on the fraction f of the total time t remembered by non-Markovian random walkers that recall only the distant past. We find that otherwise nonpersistent random walkers switch to persistent behavior when inflicted with significant memory loss. Such memory losses induce the probability density function of the walker’s position to undergo a transition from Gaussian to non-Gaussian. We interpret these findings of persistence in terms of a breakdown of self-regulation mechanisms and discuss their possible relevance to some of the burdensome behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

  12. Infection persistence time of Aedes breeding habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicout, D. J.; Chalvet-Monfray, K.; Sabatier, P.

    2002-03-01

    The Aedes mosquito species are capable of maintaining the circulation of viruses only by the strategy of transovarial transmission and diapause of eggs. It is found that when the transovarial transmission is inhibited, the survival time of the presence of viruses in a given mosquito habitat is limited from above by the eggs lifetime. In contrast, when the transovarial transmission is turned on, the infection persistence time may largely exceed both the eggs lifetime and flooding period depending upon the production rate of infected eggs. We present a simple model allowing the derivation of analytical expressions of the infection persistence time.

  13. Nicotine replacement therapies: patient safety and persistence

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Stuart G; Shiffman, Saul; Gitchell, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) has become a central part of the treatment of nicotine dependence. However, NRT’s potential efficacy is limited to some extent by patient adherence and persistence. Here we review the relationship between NRT compliance and adherence, and overall treatment outcome. We then examine the factors that likely impact on treatment compliance and persistence, with a special focus on users’ perceptions of treatment safety and efficacy as possible mediators. Potential clinical strategies for improving suboptimal medication use are also discussed. PMID:22915971

  14. Persistent migraine aura in an adolescent girl.

    PubMed

    Bruen, Robin; Peng, Si Liang; Perreault, Sebastien; Major, Philippe; Ospina, Luis H

    2013-08-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a prolonged migraine visual aura of several weeks' duration. Symptoms gradually resolved over a 6-week period, with no recurrence of visual aura over a 20-month follow-up period. Although there is significant overlap between the features of stereotypical and persistent migraine auras, or "visual snow," the latter tend to be unformed and can occupy the entire visual field of both eyes. To our knowledge, this phenomenon has been reported only twice before in children. Recognition of its features will allow the pediatric ophthalmologist to differentiate persistent visual aura from visual hallucinations. PMID:23871134

  15. The dynamics of Persistent Cold-Air Pool breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lareau, Neil P.

    The wind-induced disruption and breakup of multiday cold-air pools are investigated using observational analyses and idealized numerical simulations. The observations are from the Persistent Cold-Air Pool (CAP) Study, which provides modern measurement of the meteorological processes affecting the duration of cold-air pools in the Salt Lake Valley of Utah. In general, the observations indicate that synoptic-scale processes control cold-air pool duration while local processes affect near-surface stratification and mixing. The most common form of CAP breakup is due to cold-air advection aloft. However, analyses reveal that some cold-air pools are destroyed or disrupted by strong winds penetrating into the valley. The resulting wind-CAP interactions are complex, involving sequential CAP displacements, internal oscillations, dynamic instabilities, and terrain-flow interactions. Large Eddy Simulations of multiday cold-air pools in idealized valley topography further demonstrate that cold-air pool removal is affected by the interplay of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and warm air advection. This dynamic instability generates breaking waves in the stratified shear flow that mix cold-air into the warmer flow aloft. Variations in the initial cold pool stratification and valley terrain affect the timescale for cold-air pool removal. Despite these variations, a basic relationship between the magnitude of the flow aloft and the strength of the underlying cold-air pool can be expressed in terms of the "CAP Froude number." This dimensionless quantity is useful for diagnosing the onset and amplification of turbulent mixing, as well as the complete removal of cold-air pools.

  16. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Dimenna, R; Tamburello, D

    2011-02-14

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in

  17. Persistent ion beam induced conductivity in zinc oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Johannes, Andreas; Niepelt, Raphael; Gnauck, Martin; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-12-19

    We report persistently increased conduction in ZnO nanowires irradiated by ion beam with various ion energies and species. This effect is shown to be related to the already known persistent photo conduction in ZnO and dubbed persistent ion beam induced conduction. Both effects show similar excitation efficiency, decay rates, and chemical sensitivity. Persistent ion beam induced conduction will potentially allow countable (i.e., single dopant) implantation in ZnO nanostructures and other materials showing persistent photo conduction.

  18. Sub-Planck structure in a mixed state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Asmita; Pan, Alok Kumar; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2015-11-01

    The persistence of sub-Planck structure in phase space with loss of coherence is demonstrated in a mixed state, which comprises two terms in the density matrix. Its utility in carrying out Heisenberg-limited measurement and quantum parameter estimation have been shown. It is also shown that the mixed state performs equally well as the compass state for carrying out precision measurements. The advantage of using mixed state relies on the fact that such a state can be easier to prepare and may appear from pure states after partial loss of coherence. We explicate the effect of environment on these sub-Planck structures in the mixed state and estimates the time scale of complete decoherence.

  19. Study Circle Guide: Adult Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This study circle was created by the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL). The study circle is part of NCSALL's efforts to help connect research and practice in the field of adult basic education and adult literacy. The Adult Student Persistence Study Circle is one of a series of study circles that NCSALL has…

  20. Inchworm, Inchworm: Persistent Problems in Reading Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Constance M., Ed.

    The papers in this volume represent thoughts about the state of the art of teaching reading (with an emphasis on persistent problems) of many recognized authorities in the field of reading education. Eight of the articles were originally presented at a joint Reading Hall of Fame and International Reading Association (IRA) symposium at the IRA…

  1. TOXICITY PERSISTENCE IN PRICKLY PEAR CREEK, MONTANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Instream toxicity tests using the larval fathead minnow Pimephales promelas and the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia reticulata were conducted on Prickly Pear Creek, Montana waters to study toxicity persistence in a stream. The toxicity source was Spring Creek, a tributary of Prickly Pear...

  2. The Enigmatic Persistence of Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, B. Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this review, based on recent advances in cognitive neuroscience, the author presents a formulation in which the marked persistence of anorexia nervosa can be usefully understood as a well-ingrained maladaptive habit. Method The author reviewed the relevant literature on the development and course of anorexia nervosa and interpreted critical features in light of developments in cognitive neuroscience. Results Anorexia nervosa is a well characterized disorder with remarkable persistence both across history and among affected individuals. Food restriction, the salient behavioral feature of the disorder, often begins innocently but gradually takes on a life of its own. Over time, it becomes highly entrenched and resistant to change through either psychological or pharmacological treatment. Cognitive neuroscience has described two related but distinct processes that underlie the acquisition of new patterns of behavior, namely, action-outcome and stimulus-response learning. It is likely that both processes are engaged in the development of anorexia nervosa and that stimulus-response learning (that is, habit formation) is critical to the persistence of the dieting behavior. Conclusions The formulation of the dieting behavior characteristic of anorexia nervosa as a well-entrenched habit provides a basis for understanding the striking persistence of this disorder. This model helps explain the resistance of anorexia nervosa to interventions that have established efficacy in related disorders and implies that addressing the dieting behavior is critical, especially early in the course of the illness, before it has become ingrained. PMID:23429750

  3. Persistence of Ebola Virus in Sterilized Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the wake of the ongoing 2014/2015 Ebola virus outbreak, significant questions regarding the appropriate handling of Ebola virus-contaminated liquid waste remain, including the persistence of Ebola virus in wastewater. To address these uncertainties, we evaluated the persistence of Ebola virus spiked in sterilized domestic sewage. The viral titer decreased approximately 99% within the first test day from an initial viral titer of 106 TCID50 mL–1; however, it could not be determined if this initial rapid decrease was due to aggregation or inactivation of the viral particles. The subsequent viral titer decrease was less rapid, and infectious Ebola virus particles persisted for all 8 days of the test. The inactivation constant (k) was determined to be −1.08 (2.1 days for a 90% viral titer decrease). Due to experimental conditions, we believe these results to be an upper bound for Ebola virus persistence in wastewater. Wastewater composition is inherently heterogeneous; subsequently, we caution that interpretation of these results should be made within a holistic assessment, including the effects of wastewater composition, dilution, and potential exposure routes within wastewater infrastructure. While it remains unknown if Ebola virus may be transmitted via wastewater, these data demonstrate a potential exposure route to infectious Ebola virus via wastewater and emphasize the value of a precautionary approach to wastewater handling in an epidemic response. PMID:26523283

  4. Persistence in eye movement during visual search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Tatiana A.; Reis, Saulo D. S.; Campos, Daniel; Herrmann, Hans J.; Andrade, José S.

    2016-02-01

    As any cognitive task, visual search involves a number of underlying processes that cannot be directly observed and measured. In this way, the movement of the eyes certainly represents the most explicit and closest connection we can get to the inner mechanisms governing this cognitive activity. Here we show that the process of eye movement during visual search, consisting of sequences of fixations intercalated by saccades, exhibits distinctive persistent behaviors. Initially, by focusing on saccadic directions and intersaccadic angles, we disclose that the probability distributions of these measures show a clear preference of participants towards a reading-like mechanism (geometrical persistence), whose features and potential advantages for searching/foraging are discussed. We then perform a Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) over the time series of jump magnitudes in the eye trajectory and find that it exhibits a typical multifractal behavior arising from the sequential combination of saccades and fixations. By inspecting the time series composed of only fixational movements, our results reveal instead a monofractal behavior with a Hurst exponent , which indicates the presence of long-range power-law positive correlations (statistical persistence). We expect that our methodological approach can be adopted as a way to understand persistence and strategy-planning during visual search.

  5. Persistence in eye movement during visual search

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Tatiana A.; Reis, Saulo D. S.; Campos, Daniel; Herrmann, Hans J.; Andrade, José S.

    2016-01-01

    As any cognitive task, visual search involves a number of underlying processes that cannot be directly observed and measured. In this way, the movement of the eyes certainly represents the most explicit and closest connection we can get to the inner mechanisms governing this cognitive activity. Here we show that the process of eye movement during visual search, consisting of sequences of fixations intercalated by saccades, exhibits distinctive persistent behaviors. Initially, by focusing on saccadic directions and intersaccadic angles, we disclose that the probability distributions of these measures show a clear preference of participants towards a reading-like mechanism (geometrical persistence), whose features and potential advantages for searching/foraging are discussed. We then perform a Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) over the time series of jump magnitudes in the eye trajectory and find that it exhibits a typical multifractal behavior arising from the sequential combination of saccades and fixations. By inspecting the time series composed of only fixational movements, our results reveal instead a monofractal behavior with a Hurst exponent , which indicates the presence of long-range power-law positive correlations (statistical persistence). We expect that our methodological approach can be adopted as a way to understand persistence and strategy-planning during visual search. PMID:26864680

  6. The Persistent Madness of Greek Hazing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Origins and persistent reasons for college sorority and fraternity hazing, particularly in black organizations, are examined, including desire for domination, links to childhood abuse, and homoeroticism. The influences of tradition, peer pressure, the need to belong, and desire for solidarity are also considered. Reviews recent research on the…

  7. The role of persistence in chemical evaluations.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donald; Hughes, Dianne M; Romano, M Luisa; Bonnell, Mark

    2014-10-01

    The initial stage in the assessment and priority setting of chemicals for their potential to cause harm to humans and the environment is usually a hazard assessment employing metrics for persistence, bioaccumulation, and inherent toxicity. This hazard assessment is followed, when necessary, by the more demanding task of risk assessment. Hazard assessment of data and processes influencing persistence are discussed, leading to a number of suggestions for more effective evaluation. These include 1) an initial focus on accurate data for intensive chemical partitioning and reaction half-life properties that are universally applicable as distinct from extensive properties that can be included later on a location-specific basis; 2) separate treatments of near-field and far-field exposures; 3) a focus on persistence and its effect on levels of exposure, especially for substances for which "time to exposure" is less than "time to degradation" and have been termed "pseudo-persistent." We show that "continuously present" is a better descriptor of this concern. Case studies illustrate and support these suggestions. Data on the intensive properties and on exposure pathways are best combined in evaluative multimedia mass balance models that can provide a clear depiction of the likely chemical fate, exposure routes, and levels. The information generated by the mass balance models can serve to justify and direct a full risk assessment that includes region-specific information on chemical quantities, estimates of exposure, and potential for adverse effects. PMID:24753402

  8. PERSISTENT, BIOACCUMULATIVE, AND TOXIC POLLUTANTS (PBTS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Article describes the class of compounds known as persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic pollutants (known as PBTs), including the mechanisms responsible for ability to build up the food chain and for causing adverse health effects and ecosystem damage. Exposure to numerous PBTs ...

  9. Paradoxical Understandings Regarding Adult Undergraduate Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasworm, Carol E.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, characteristics of student persistence and graduation completion were most often linked to strategies which honored the full-time residential younger undergraduate. Adult students have been viewed as high-risk and typically problematic students for continuous enrollment and degree completion. This article explores the key paradoxical…

  10. Anger Expression and Persistence in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jie; Xu, Qinmei; Degnan, Kathryn Amey

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated anger expression during toy removal (TR) in 92 young Chinese children, two to five years of age, and its relations to their persistence in responding to obstacles during two challenging tasks with highly desirable goals [TR and locked box (LB)] and one challenging task with a less desirable goal [impossible perfect circles…

  11. Persistence of Problematic Sexual Behaviors in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levesque, Mireille; Bigras, Marc; Pauze, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify personal and family predictors and correlates of persistence of problematic sexual behaviors (PSB) in children. Participants were the families of 49 children (ages 4-11 years) referred by Child Protective Services in 4 administrative districts of Quebec. Caregivers completed interviews and questionnaires…

  12. Persistence of Value-Driven Attentional Capture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Brian A.; Yantis, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Stimuli that have previously been associated with the delivery of reward involuntarily capture attention when presented as unrewarded and task-irrelevant distractors in a subsequent visual search task. It is unknown how long such effects of reward learning on attention persist. One possibility is that value-driven attentional biases are plastic…

  13. RISK CHARACTERIZATION OF PERSISTENT NEUROTOXIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxicity is an adverse change in structure or function of the central and/or peripheral nervous system following exposure to a chemical, physical, or biological agent. Thousands of chemicals have been estimated to have neurotoxic potential. Many persistent and bioaccumulat...

  14. High School Economic Composition and College Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niu, Sunny X.; Tienda, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Using a longitudinal sample of Texas high school seniors of 2002 who enrolled in college within the calendar year of high school graduation, we examine variation in college persistence according to the economic composition of their high schools, which serves as a proxy for unmeasured high school attributes that are conductive to postsecondary…

  15. Prerequisites for Persistence in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrand, Britten

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, distance education has grown worldwide and is now established as a reliable educational method. Accompanying this development, questions about low rates of student persistence have come to interest governments, institutions, and university management. This article is based on an original local study at a university in…

  16. Persistent Marriage Regimes in Changing Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fussell, Elizabeth; Palloni, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Marriage among women in Latin America occurs early in life and is nearly universal in spite of the social and economic changes and instability in the region. We use demographic measures to illustrate the precociousness, persistence, and universality of marriage during the past 50 years. We argue that marriage is central to social life because…

  17. The persistence length of adsorbed dendronized polymers.

    PubMed

    Grebikova, Lucie; Kozhuharov, Svilen; Maroni, Plinio; Mikhaylov, Andrey; Dietler, Giovanni; Schlüter, A Dieter; Ullner, Magnus; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-07-21

    The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth generation polymer adsorbed on mica, which is a hydrophilic and highly charged substrate. However, the observed dependence on the ionic strength is much weaker than the one predicted by the Odijk, Skolnik, and Fixman (OSF) theory for semi-flexible chains. Low-generation polymers show a variation with the ionic strength that resembles the one observed for simple and flexible polyelectrolytes in solution. For high-generation polymers, this dependence is weaker. Similar dependencies are found for silica and gold substrates. The observed behavior is probably caused by different extents of screening of the charged groups, which is modified by the polymer generation, and to a lesser extent, the nature of the substrate. For highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is a hydrophobic and weakly charged substrate, the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is much smaller. In the latter case, we suspect that specific interactions between the polymer and the substrate also play an important role. PMID:27353115

  18. Persistence of Salmonella typhimurium on Fabrics

    PubMed Central

    Wilkoff, Lee J.; Westbrook, Louise; Dixon, Glen J.

    1969-01-01

    The persistence of Salmonella typhimurium (V-31) on wool blanket, wool gabardine, cotton sheeting, cotton knit jersey, cotton terry cloth, and cotton wash-and-wear fabrics was studied. Three methods of exposure were employed to contaminate the fabrics: direct contact, aerosol, and a lyophilized mixture of bacteria and dust having a high content of textile fibers. After contamination, the fabrics were held in 35 or 78% relative humidity at 25 C. The persistence time of S. typhimurium on fabrics held in 35% relative humidity was substantially longer when the fabrics were contaminated by direct contact or by exposure to dust containing bacteria than when contaminated by exposure to aerosolized cultures. Viable bacterial populations persisted for 24 weeks at relatively high population densities on swatches of wool gabardine, cotton sheeting, cotton knit jersey, and cotton terry cloth exposed by direct contact and held in a humidity of 35%. In 78% humidity, bacterial populations persisted on the fabrics for relatively shorter periods of time regardless of the mode of contamination or fabric type. This organism retained its virulence for Swiss mice after being recovered from wool gabardine swatches held 8 weeks in humidities of 35 or 78% and from cotton terry cloth swatches held 6 weeks in the same humidities. Images PMID:4896883

  19. Persistence in eye movement during visual search.

    PubMed

    Amor, Tatiana A; Reis, Saulo D S; Campos, Daniel; Herrmann, Hans J; Andrade, José S

    2016-01-01

    As any cognitive task, visual search involves a number of underlying processes that cannot be directly observed and measured. In this way, the movement of the eyes certainly represents the most explicit and closest connection we can get to the inner mechanisms governing this cognitive activity. Here we show that the process of eye movement during visual search, consisting of sequences of fixations intercalated by saccades, exhibits distinctive persistent behaviors. Initially, by focusing on saccadic directions and intersaccadic angles, we disclose that the probability distributions of these measures show a clear preference of participants towards a reading-like mechanism (geometrical persistence), whose features and potential advantages for searching/foraging are discussed. We then perform a Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) over the time series of jump magnitudes in the eye trajectory and find that it exhibits a typical multifractal behavior arising from the sequential combination of saccades and fixations. By inspecting the time series composed of only fixational movements, our results reveal instead a monofractal behavior with a Hurst exponent , which indicates the presence of long-range power-law positive correlations (statistical persistence). We expect that our methodological approach can be adopted as a way to understand persistence and strategy-planning during visual search. PMID:26864680

  20. The Myth of Persistence of Vision Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Joseph; Anderson, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    Argues that "persistence of vision" myth (the succession of still images perceived as continuous motion) has a place in the history of film scholarship but can no longer be given currency in film theory. Suggests replacement of the concept of the passive viewer implied by the myth by an enlightened understanding of how viewers actually interface…

  1. Registered Nurse Persistence in Baccalaureate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krov, Kathleen Nadler

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to increase the number of baccalaureate prepared registered nurses to safely meet the complex healthcare needs of citizens of the United States. Since there is no research on the characteristics of registered nurse students persisting in baccalaureate education, this quantitative descriptive case study was designed to identify the…

  2. Characteristics of Learning Disabilities Persisting into Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Lillian A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes characteristics of learning disabled teenagers. Describes results of a study of 331 secondary students who completed a self-report inventory showing that childhood learning disability characteristics persist into adolescence, most seriously in the areas of visual perception, fine motor skills, and the ability to write and make spatial…

  3. The Persistence of African American College Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Tyson J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the family dynamics of persistent African American college men. These students were typical Black males, not those pre-categorized as high-achieving or unprepared for college. The stories of participants revealed their strength, ambition, and intentions to successfully gain a baccalaureate degree. In general Black males are…

  4. Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch with Coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sue Hyun; Choi, Eun-Suk; Cho, Sungkyu; Kim, Woong-Han

    2016-01-01

    Persistent fifth aortic arch (PFAA) is a rare congenital anomaly of the aortic arch frequently associated with other cardiovascular anomalies, such as tetralogy of Fallot and aortic arch coarctation or interruption. We report the case of a neonate with PFAA with coarctation who successfully underwent surgical repair. PMID:26889445

  5. Persistence of Change: Fume Hood Campaign Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feder, Elah; Robinson, Jennifer; Wakefield, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability initiatives typically operate for a limited time period, but it is often unclear whether they have lasting effects. The purpose of this paper is to examine a laboratory fume hood campaign, in order to identify factors that might contribute or detract from long-term change persistence. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  6. The Academic Library Impact on Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmons, Mark; Wilkinson, Frances C.

    2011-01-01

    What impact does the academic library have on student persistence? This study explores the relationship between traditional library input and output measures of staff, collections, use, and services with fall-to-fall retention and six-year graduation rates at Association of Research Libraries member libraries. When controlling for race/ethnicity…

  7. The Contribution of Student Satisfaction to Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiner, Laurie A.; Nelson, Denise D.

    2013-01-01

    This study of nearly 30,000 undergraduates at 61 four-year public and private institutions examines the influence of satisfaction on students' persistence in college. Data were collected using the Student Satisfaction Inventory (Schreiner & Juillerat, 1994) and were analyzed by class level. The hierarchical multiple regression analyses…

  8. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to a remotely controllable mixing system in which a plurality of mixing assemblies are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly employs a central chamber and two outer, upper and lower chambers. Valves are positioned between chambers, and these valves for a given mixing assembly are operated by upper and lower control rotors, which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors. Additionally, a hoop is compressed around upper control rotors and a hoop is compressed around lower control rotors to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors and drive rotors. The drive rollers are driven by a motor.

  9. Persistence of undergraduate women in STEM fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, Maggie Helene

    The underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a complex problem that continues to persist at the postsecondary level, particularly in computer science and engineering fields. This dissertation explored the pre-college and college level factors that influenced undergraduate women's persistence in STEM. This study also examined and compared the characteristics of undergraduate women who entered STEM fields and non-STEM fields in 2003-2004. The nationally representative Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/09) data set was used for analysis. BPS:04/09 study respondents were surveyed three times (NPSAS:04, BPS:04/06, BPS:04/09) over a six-year period, which enabled me to explore factors related to long-term persistence. Astin's Input-Environment-Output (I-E-O) model was used as the framework to examine student inputs and college environmental factors that predict female student persistence (output) in STEM. Chi-square tests revealed significant differences between undergraduate women who entered STEM and non-STEM fields in 2003-2004. Differences in student demographics, prior academic achievement, high school course-taking patterns, and student involvement in college such as participation in study groups and school clubs were found. Notably, inferential statistics showed that a significantly higher proportion of female minority students entered STEM fields than non-STEM fields. These findings challenge the myth that underrepresented female minorities are less inclined to enter STEM fields. Logistic regression analyses revealed thirteen significant predictors of persistence for undergraduate women in STEM. Findings showed that undergraduate women who were younger, more academically prepared, and academically and socially involved in college (e.g., lived on campus, interacted with faculty, participated in study groups, fine arts activities, and school sports) were more likely to persist in STEM

  10. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  11. Fish population persistence in hydrologically variable landscapes.

    PubMed

    Bond, Nick R; Balcombe, Stephen R; Crook, David A; Marshall, Jonathan C; Menke, Norbert; Lobegeiger, Jaye S

    2015-06-01

    Forecasting population persistence in environments subjected to periodic disturbances represents a general challenge for ecologists. In arid and semiarid regions, climate change and human water use pose significant threats to the future persistence of aquatic biota whose populations typically depend on permanent refuge waterholes for their viability. As such, habitats are increasingly being lost as a result of decreasing runoff and increasing water extraction. We constructed a spatially explicit population model for golden perch Macquaria ambigua (Richardson), a native freshwater fish in the Murray-Darling Basin in eastern Australia. We then used the model to examine the effects of increased aridity, increased drought frequency, and localized human water extraction on population viability. Consistent with current observations, the model predicted golden perch population persistence under the current climate and levels of water use. Modeled increases in local water extraction greatly increased the risk of population decline, while scenarios of increasing aridity and drought frequency were associated with only minor increases in this risk. We conclude that natural variability in abundances and high turnover rates (extinction/recolonization) of local populations dictate the importance of spatial connectivity and periodic cycles of population growth. Our study also demonstrates an effective way to examine population persistence in intermittent and ephemeral river systems by integrating spatial and temporal dynamics of waterhole persistence with demographic processes (survival, recruitment, and dispersal) within a stochastic modeling framework. The approach can be used to help understand the impacts of natural and anthropogenic drivers, including water resource development, on the viability of biota inhabiting highly dynamic environments. PMID:26465032

  12. Rotenone persistence model for montane streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Peter J.; Zale, Alexander V.

    2012-01-01

    The efficient and effective use of rotenone is hindered by its unknown persistence in streams. Environmental conditions degrade rotenone, but current label instructions suggest fortifying the chemical along a stream based on linear distance or travel time rather than environmental conditions. Our objective was to develop models that use measurements of environmental conditions to predict rotenone persistence in streams. Detailed measurements of ultraviolet radiation, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solids (TDS), conductivity, pH, oxidation–reduction potential (ORP), substrate composition, amount of organic matter, channel slope, and travel time were made along stream segments located between rotenone treatment stations and cages containing bioassay fish in six streams. The amount of fine organic matter, biofilm, sand, gravel, cobble, rubble, small boulders, slope, pH, TDS, ORP, light reaching the stream, energy dissipated, discharge, and cumulative travel time were each significantly correlated with fish death. By using logistic regression, measurements of environmental conditions were paired with the responses of bioassay fish to develop a model that predicted the persistence of rotenone toxicity in streams. This model was validated with data from two additional stream treatment reaches. Rotenone persistence was predicted by a model that used travel time, rubble, and ORP. When this model predicts a probability of less than 0.95, those who apply rotenone can expect incomplete eradication and should plan on fortifying rotenone concentrations. The significance of travel time has been previously identified and is currently used to predict rotenone persistence. However, rubble substrate, which may be associated with the degradation of rotenone by adsorption and volatilization in turbulent environments, was not previously considered.

  13. Kaposi’s Sarcoma Herpesvirus Genome Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Juillard, Franceline; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Kaye, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has an etiologic role in Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman’s disease. These diseases are most common in immunocompromised individuals, especially those with AIDS. Similar to all herpesviruses, KSHV infection is lifelong. KSHV infection in tumor cells is primarily latent, with only a small subset of cells undergoing lytic infection. During latency, the KSHV genome persists as a multiple copy, extrachromosomal episome in the nucleus. In order to persist in proliferating tumor cells, the viral genome replicates once per cell cycle and then segregates to daughter cell nuclei. KSHV only expresses several genes during latent infection. Prominent among these genes, is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). LANA is responsible for KSHV genome persistence and also exerts transcriptional regulatory effects. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and in addition, is responsible for segregation of replicated genomes to daughter nuclei. LANA serves as a molecular tether, bridging the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes to ensure that KSHV DNA reaches progeny nuclei. N-terminal LANA attaches to mitotic chromosomes by binding histones H2A/H2B at the surface of the nucleosome. C-terminal LANA binds specific KSHV DNA sequence and also has a role in chromosome attachment. In addition to the essential roles of N- and C-terminal LANA in genome persistence, internal LANA sequence is also critical for efficient episome maintenance. LANA’s role as an essential mediator of virus persistence makes it an attractive target for inhibition in order to prevent or treat KSHV infection and disease. PMID:27570517

  14. Persistence of brucellosis in pastoral systems.

    PubMed

    Racloz, V; Schelling, E; Chitnis, N; Roth, F; Zinsstag, J

    2013-04-01

    Regarded as a highly contagious, zoonotic disease with worldwide distribution, brucellosis is endemic in many countries and settings and is responsible for a considerable economic and health-related burden. Limited information is available on the persistence and prevalence of brucellosis in pastoral communities, due to the difficulty in gathering information and to their mobility. However, since these communities are economically and culturally dependent on livestock, it is important to further determine the cause of persistent disease and develop possible methods for its management. The two main objectives of this paper are to review the literature, identifying various epidemiological and social factors that affect the persistence of brucellosis in pastoral ecosystems, and determine prevalence estimates within these communities. The general trend of the summarised studies indicates low-level, relatively stable transmission of brucellosis in pastoral areas, when compared to transmission in intensive and semi-intensive peri-urban production systems. A formal mathematical analysis can be undertaken using matrix models or coupled differential equations. This allows an examination of the various conditions under which the number of diseased, infected or exposed animals remains stable. The authors examined an existing mathematical differential equation model for brucellosis in Mongolia for its equilibrium conditions and found it reasonably robust, though clearly more data are needed to estimate threshold densities for brucellosis transmission in other regions of the world. However, the results indicate the importance of livestock demographic determinants for brucellosis persistence. The paper concludes that brucellosis remains largely persistent in pastoral areas of the world, despite (varying) control efforts. Plans to control brucellosis in pastoral settings should include ecological considerations, such as sustaining ecosystem services in pastoral areas. This

  15. Persistence drives gene clustering in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Gang; Rocha, Eduardo PC; Danchin, Antoine

    2008-01-01

    Background Gene clustering plays an important role in the organization of the bacterial chromosome and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain its extent. However, the controversies raised about the validity of each of these mechanisms remind us that the cause of this gene organization remains an open question. Models proposed to explain clustering did not take into account the function of the gene products nor the likely presence or absence of a given gene in a genome. However, genomes harbor two very different categories of genes: those genes present in a majority of organisms – persistent genes – and those present in very few organisms – rare genes. Results We show that two classes of genes are significantly clustered in bacterial genomes: the highly persistent and the rare genes. The clustering of rare genes is readily explained by the selfish operon theory. Yet, genes persistently present in bacterial genomes are also clustered and we try to understand why. We propose a model accounting specifically for such clustering, and show that indispensability in a genome with frequent gene deletion and insertion leads to the transient clustering of these genes. The model describes how clusters are created via the gene flux that continuously introduces new genes while deleting others. We then test if known selective processes, such as co-transcription, physical interaction or functional neighborhood, account for the stabilization of these clusters. Conclusion We show that the strong selective pressure acting on the function of persistent genes, in a permanent state of flux of genes in bacterial genomes, maintaining their size fairly constant, that drives persistent genes clustering. A further selective stabilization process might contribute to maintaining the clustering. PMID:18179692

  16. Characterization of Mono- and Mixed-Culture Campylobacter jejuni Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Ica, Tuba; Caner, Vildan; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Ahmed, Bulbul; Call, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, one of the most common causes of human gastroenteritis, is a thermophilic and microaerophilic bacterium. These characteristics make it a fastidious organism, which limits its ability to survive outside animal hosts. Nevertheless, C. jejuni can be transmitted to both humans and animals via environmental pathways, especially through contaminated water. Biofilms may play a crucial role in the survival of the bacterium under unfavorable environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to investigate survival strategies of C. jejuni in mono- and mixed-culture biofilms. We grew monoculture biofilms of C. jejuni and mixed-culture biofilms of C. jejuni with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that mono- and mixed-culture biofilms had significantly different structures and activities. Monoculture C. jejuni biofilms did not consume a measurable quantity of oxygen. Using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), we found that cells from monoculture biofilms were alive according to live/dead staining but that these cells were not culturable. In contrast, in mixed-culture biofilms, C. jejuni remained in a culturable physiological state. Monoculture C. jejuni biofilms could persist under lower flow rates (0.75 ml/min) but were unable to persist at higher flow rates (1 to 2.5 ml/min). In sharp contrast, mixed-culture biofilms were more robust and were unaffected by higher flow rates (2.5 ml/min). Our results indicate that biofilms provide an environmental refuge that is conducive to the survival of C. jejuni. PMID:22179238

  17. Long persistent luminescence in the ultraviolet in Pb(2+)-doped Sr2MgGe2O7 persistent phosphor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanjie; Liu, Feng; Chen, Yafei; Sun, Kangning; Pan, Zhengwei

    2016-01-28

    We extend the persistent luminescence into the ultraviolet spectral region by developing a new ultraviolet persistent phosphor Sr2MgGe2O7:Pb(2+). The Sr2MgGe2O7:Pb(2+) phosphor exhibits strong persistent luminescence peaking at 370 nm and a long persistence time of >12 h after excitation. The phosphor also exhibits a photo-stimulated persistent luminescence capability. PMID:26691008

  18. Asymmetric antiproton debuncher: No bad mixing, more good mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Visnjic, V.

    1994-07-01

    An asymmetric lattice for the Fermilab Antiproton Debuncher is designed. The lattice has zero mixing between the pickups and the kickers (bad mixing) while the mixing in the rest of the machine (good mixing) can be varied (even during the operation of the machine) in order to optimize the stochastic cooling. As an example, a lattice with zero bad mixing and twice the good mixing is presented. The betatron cooling rate in this lattice is twice its present value.

  19. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  20. Persistence of mixed staphylococci assemblages following disinfection of hospital room surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sigler, V; Hensley, S

    2013-03-01

    The distribution of staphylococcal assemblages on surfaces in hospital rooms was assessed before and after daily disinfection with quaternary ammonia products. DNA was extracted from enrichment cultures of bacteria, which were swabbed from each of nine surface types, and subjected to analysis by staphylococci-specific, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. A genetic marker for Staphylococcus epidermidis/kloosii was detected on all surface types before and after cleaning, whereas markers for Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were detected on five surface types. Overall, genetic makers for several staphylococci known to colonize and infect humans remained ubiquitous in each room following daily disinfection practices. PMID:23374288

  1. Statistic versus stochastic characterization of persistent droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Perez, J.; Valdes, J. B.

    2005-12-01

    Droughts are one of more devastating natural disasters. A drought event is always related with deficiency in precipitation over a time period. As longer are the drought periods, larger are the damages associated with, following a potential relationship. Additionally, the extension covered by an event also increases its impact, because it makes difficult to compensate the deficit from neighbourhood water resources. Therefore, the characterization of a drought by its persistent deficit, and the area over which it extends are main points to be carried on. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) provides a statistical characterization of the deficits. Its computation, for different aggregation time scales, allows a persistence evaluation. Another more recent statistic that may be applied in drought characterization is the extreme persistent probability function (e.p.f.), which characterizes the persistence of extreme realizations in a random sequence. This work presents an analysis of the differences in performance of the SPI and the e.p.f. in the statistical characterization of a drought event. The inclusion of the persistency directly in the statistic gives to the e.p.f. an advantage over the SPI. Furthermore, the relationship between the e.p.f. and its mean frequency of recurrence is known. Thus, the e.p.f. may be applied to provide either statistic or stochastic characterization of a drought event. Both criteria were compared, showing that the stochastic characterization produces a better drought indicator. The stochastic characterization using the e.p.f. as a criterion yields the new Drought Frequency Index (DFI). The index is applicable to any random water related variable to identify drought events. Its main advantages over the SPI are the direct inclusion of persistence, and its larger robustness to the time scale. To incorporate the spatial extension in the characterization of a drought event, the new DFI may also be evaluated to characterize the drought

  2. Persistence of interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics: An analysis of persisting and non-persisting students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffry L.

    While there has been an increase in enrollment, interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has been declining on college campuses since 1967. Higher enrollment does not transfer to an increase in the number of minorities in the STEM fields. The majority-minority enrollment ratio is nearly 2:1 but the gap widens to 4:1 when it comes to graduation. In fact, underrepresented minorities (URM) earned only 12% of the STEM degrees awarded in 1998. When the higher attrition and lower graduation rates of URM are scrutinized, upwards of 60% changed majors or dropped out of STEM. Further investigation reveals the most frequently cited reasons for departure were loss of initial interest, developed a greater interest in another field, or were turned off by the STEM disciplines. A primarily exploratory study was conducted into the conditions necessary for academic interest in the STEM fields to persist. A model based on student engagement (Astin, 1977) and interest operations (Prenzel, 1988a) theories was used with a random sample of URM at universities participating in the Ohio Science and Engineering Alliance. Survey research was employed to investigate interest development and the effect of student retention programs and activities on such interest. The latter part of the study could not be fully examined when 95% reported not utilizing retention services. For the section on interest, an online survey using a 5-point Likert scale was validated using principal components analysis. A binominal logistic regression was used to predict membership in one of two possible groups: persisters and students at-risk for not persisting. The major conclusions are: (1) While 3 variables (feelings, learning and difficulty) were statistically significant only one, feelings was substantively significant. (2) Persistence increased 80.9% for each 1-unit increase in feelings and 9.9% for learning. (3) Persistence decreased 19.8% for each one-unit increase in difficulty

  3. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 10 rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  4. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 19 equivalent rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  5. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and

  6. SCORPION II persistent surveillance system update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coster, Michael; Hunt, Cassandra

    2011-06-01

    This paper highlights the most recently added features and benefits available in the latest generation of Northrop Grumman SCORPION II persistent surveillance and target recognition systems. By leveraging smaller, lighter, and more power efficient SCORPION II sensor and universal gateway components, with foliage penetrating ad-hoc network communications, persistent field programmable systems that are easier to conceal can be optimized for both image capture and data exfiltration. In addition to the SCORPION II suite of sensor components, a growing list of over sixty different sensor and camera types from a variety of manufacturers have been integrated with the SCORPION Gateway family. In addition to updating several different COP systems, SCORPION and SCORPION II data can be directly processed using a common sensor status graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for viewing and analysis of images and sensor data from hundreds of SCORPION system gateways on single or multiple displays.

  7. Emotional persistence in online chatting communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas, Antonios; Garcia, David; Skowron, Marcin; Schweitzer, Frank

    2012-05-01

    How do users behave in online chatrooms, where they instantaneously read and write posts? We analyzed about 2.5 million posts covering various topics in Internet relay channels, and found that user activity patterns follow known power-law and stretched exponential distributions, indicating that online chat activity is not different from other forms of communication. Analysing the emotional expressions (positive, negative, neutral) of users, we revealed a remarkable persistence both for individual users and channels. I.e. despite their anonymity, users tend to follow social norms in repeated interactions in online chats, which results in a specific emotional ``tone'' of the channels. We provide an agent-based model of emotional interaction, which recovers qualitatively both the activity patterns in chatrooms and the emotional persistence of users and channels. While our assumptions about agent's emotional expressions are rooted in psychology, the model allows to test different hypothesis regarding their emotional impact in online communication.

  8. UAV Cooperation Architectures for Persistent Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R S; Kent, C A; Jones, E D

    2003-03-20

    With the number of small, inexpensive Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) increasing, it is feasible to build multi-UAV sensing networks. In particular, by using UAVs in conjunction with unattended ground sensors, a degree of persistent sensing can be achieved. With proper UAV cooperation algorithms, sensing is maintained even though exceptional events, e.g., the loss of a UAV, have occurred. In this paper a cooperation technique that allows multiple UAVs to perform coordinated, persistent sensing with unattended ground sensors over a wide area is described. The technique automatically adapts the UAV paths so that on the average, the amount of time that any sensor has to wait for a UAV revisit is minimized. We also describe the Simulation, Tactical Operations and Mission Planning (STOMP) software architecture. This architecture is designed to help simulate and operate distributed sensor networks where multiple UAVs are used to collect data.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA replacement versus nuclear DNA persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serva, Maurizio

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we consider two populations whose generations are not overlapping and whose size is large. The number of males and females in both populations is constant. Any generation is replaced by a new one and any individual has two parents concerning nuclear DNA and a single one (the mother) concerning mtDNA. Moreover, at any generation some individuals migrate from the first population to the second. In a finite random time T, the mtDNA of the second population is completely replaced by the mtDNA of the first. In the same time, the nuclear DNA is not completely replaced and a fraction F of the ancient nuclear DNA persists. We compute both T and F. Since this study shows that complete replacement of mtDNA in a population is compatible with the persistence of a large fraction of nuclear DNA, it may have some relevance for the 'out of Africa'/multiregional debate in palaeoanthropology.

  10. The persistence of American Indian health disparities.

    PubMed

    Jones, David S

    2006-12-01

    Disparities in health status between American Indians and other groups in the United States have persisted throughout the 500 years since Europeans arrived in the Americas. Colonists, traders, missionaries, soldiers, physicians, and government officials have struggled to explain these disparities, invoking a wide range of possible causes. American Indians joined these debates, often suggesting different explanations. Europeans and Americans also struggled to respond to the disparities, sometimes working to relieve them, sometimes taking advantage of the ill health of American Indians. Economic and political interests have always affected both explanations of health disparities and responses to them, influencing which explanations were emphasized and which interventions were pursued. Tensions also appear in ongoing debates about the contributions of genetic and socioeconomic forces to the pervasive health disparities. Understanding how these economic and political forces have operated historically can explain both the persistence of the health disparities and the controversies that surround them. PMID:17077399

  11. Persistent Hypoglycemia in Patient with Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Harold Cinco; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Sharon, David

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a rare complication of Hodgkin's disease. Several explanations have been postulated but the exact pathophysiology is not well understood. We are presenting a case of newly diagnosed Stage IV Hodgkin's disease that developed persistent and recurrent hypoglycemia despite giving glucagon, repeated 50% dextrose, and D5 and D10 continuous infusion. Hypoglycemia workup showed the C-peptide level to be low. Patient was suspected of having hypoglycemia related to lymphoma and was given a trial of prednisone which resolved the hypoglycemic episodes and made the patient euglycemic for the rest of his hospital stay. The presence of a substance that mimicked the effects of insulin was highly suspected. Several case reports strengthen the hypothesis of an insulin-like growth factor or antibodies secreted by the cancer cells causing hypoglycemia in Hodgkin's disease but none of them have been confirmed. Further investigation is warranted to more clearly define the pathophysiology of persistent hypoglycemia in patients with Hodgkin's disease. PMID:26839722

  12. The Persistence of American Indian Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David S.

    2006-01-01

    Disparities in health status between American Indians and other groups in the United States have persisted throughout the 500 years since Europeans arrived in the Americas. Colonists, traders, missionaries, soldiers, physicians, and government officials have struggled to explain these disparities, invoking a wide range of possible causes. American Indians joined these debates, often suggesting different explanations. Europeans and Americans also struggled to respond to the disparities, sometimes working to relieve them, sometimes taking advantage of the ill health of American Indians. Economic and political interests have always affected both explanations of health disparities and responses to them, influencing which explanations were emphasized and which interventions were pursued. Tensions also appear in ongoing debates about the contributions of genetic and socioeconomic forces to the pervasive health disparities. Understanding how these economic and political forces have operated historically can explain both the persistence of the health disparities and the controversies that surround them. PMID:17077399

  13. The persistence length of adsorbed dendronized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebikova, Lucie; Kozhuharov, Svilen; Maroni, Plinio; Mikhaylov, Andrey; Dietler, Giovanni; Schlüter, A. Dieter; Ullner, Magnus; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-07-01

    The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth generation polymer adsorbed on mica, which is a hydrophilic and highly charged substrate. However, the observed dependence on the ionic strength is much weaker than the one predicted by the Odijk, Skolnik, and Fixman (OSF) theory for semi-flexible chains. Low-generation polymers show a variation with the ionic strength that resembles the one observed for simple and flexible polyelectrolytes in solution. For high-generation polymers, this dependence is weaker. Similar dependencies are found for silica and gold substrates. The observed behavior is probably caused by different extents of screening of the charged groups, which is modified by the polymer generation, and to a lesser extent, the nature of the substrate. For highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is a hydrophobic and weakly charged substrate, the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is much smaller. In the latter case, we suspect that specific interactions between the polymer and the substrate also play an important role.The persistence length of cationic dendronized polymers adsorbed onto oppositely charged substrates was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quantitative image analysis. One can find that a decrease in the ionic strength leads to an increase of the persistence length, but the nature of the substrate and of the generation of the side dendrons influence the persistence length substantially. The strongest effects as the ionic strength is being changed are observed for the fourth

  14. Persistence diagrams of cortical surface data.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Bubenik, Peter; Kim, Peter T

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel framework for characterizing signals in images using techniques from computational algebraic topology. This technique is general enough for dealing with noisy multivariate data including geometric noise. The main tool is persistent homology which can be encoded in persistence diagrams. These diagrams visually show how the number of connected components of the sublevel sets of the signal changes. The use of local critical values of a function differs from the usual statistical parametric mapping framework, which mainly uses the mean signal in quantifying imaging data. Our proposed method uses all the local critical values in characterizing the signal and by doing so offers a completely new data reduction and analysis framework for quantifying the signal. As an illustration, we apply this method to a 1D simulated signal and 2D cortical thickness data. In case of the latter, extra homological structures are evident in an control group over the autistic group. PMID:19694279

  15. Persisting weakness after withdrawal of a statin.

    PubMed

    Mygland, Åse; Ljøstad, Unn; Krossnes, Bård Kronen

    2014-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman treated with simvastatin for several years followed by atorvastatin for about 1 year presented with fatigue, weakness and unsteady gait. The finding of elevated creatine kinase (CK) and symmetric muscle weakness around shoulders and hips led to suspicion of a toxic statin-associated myopathy. Atorvastatin was withdrawn, but her weakness persisted. Owing to persisting weakness, an autoimmune myopathy (myositis) was suspected, but initially disregarded since a muscle biopsy showed necrotic muscle fibres without inflammatory cell infiltrates and myositis-specific autoantibodies were absent. After 18 months with slowly progressive weakness and increasing CK values, awareness of new knowledge about autoimmunity as a cause of necrotic myopathy, led to a successful treatment trial with intravenous immunoglobulines, followed by steroids and metothrexate. Antibodies to the target enzyme of statins (HMGCR (3-hydroksy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase)) were detected in her serum, and she was diagnosed with autoimmune necrotic myositis probably triggered by atorvastatin. PMID:24713712

  16. Persistent Identifiers for Dutch cultural heritage institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ras, Marcel; Kruithof, Gijsbert

    2016-04-01

    Over the past years, more and more collections belonging to archives, libraries, media, museums, and knowledge institutes are being digitised and made available online. These are exciting times for ALM institutions. They are realising that, in the information society, their collections are goldmines. Unfortunately most heritage institutions in the Netherlands do not yet meet the basic preconditions for long-term availability of their collections. The digital objects often have no long lasting fixed reference yet. URL's and web addresses change. Some digital objects that were referenced in Europeana and other portals can no longer be found. References in scientific articles have a very short life span, which is damaging for scholarly research. In 2015, the Dutch Digital Heritage Network (NDE) has started a two-year work program to co-ordinate existing initiatives in order to improve the (long-term) accessibility of the Dutch digital heritage for a wide range of users, anytime, anyplace. The Digital Heritage Network is a partnership established on the initiative of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. The members of the NDE are large, national institutions that strive to professionally preserve and manage digital data, e.g. the National Library, The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, the Netherlands Cultural Heritage Agency, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Archive of the Netherlands and the DEN Foundation, and a growing number of associations and individuals both within and outside the heritage sector. By means of three work programmes the goals of the Network should be accomplished and improve the visibility, the usability and the sustainability of digital heritage. Each programme contains of a set of projects. Within the sustainability program a project on creating a model for persistent identifiers is taking place. The main goals of the project are (1) raise awareness among cultural heritage institutions on the

  17. Persistent Disparities in Adult Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crockett, David G; Loberiza, Fausto R

    2015-09-01

    The use of large databases has provided advancements in the understanding of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in the field of adult hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT). Disparities exist on individual, institutional, and systemic levels for both allogeneic and autologous HCT. We reviewed the most recent publications that utilized large databases to elucidate disparities in HCT and placed them into historical context of the other major studies in the field. Two emerging themes were identified. These themes are persistent inequalities in both allogeneic HCT and autologous HCT for myeloma and the importance of improving homogeneity of care in HCT. Minimization of inequalities can be achieved only with an understanding of the persistent barriers that exist in the field. PMID:26104908

  18. Persistent docetaxel-induced supravenous erythematous eruption*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Karina de Almeida Pinto; Felix, Paulo Antônio Oldani

    2015-01-01

    Taxanes are drugs used to treat many types of cancer, including breast and lung cancer. The most common side effects of these drugs are neutropenia and mucositis. Signs of skin toxicity are observed in about 65% of cases and include alopecia, hypersensitivity reactions, persistent supravenous erythematous eruption, nail changes, scleroderma reactions and others. We report two cases of skin reaction to docetaxel and warn that it is not necessary to interrupt the treatment in these cases. PMID:26560218

  19. Management of persistent inflammatory large joint monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Byng-Maddick, Rachel; Jeyalingam, Lukshmy; Keat, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    Persistent inflammatory monoarthritis is inflammation of one joint, with symptoms lasting beyond 3 months. Approximately 50 % of cases are self-limiting; others will transform into oligo- or polyarticular disease, but a significant minority remain as a persistent inflammatory monoarthritis, which are often resistant to standard therapies used for oligo- or polyarticular disease and constitute a difficult therapeutic problem. However, there are no clear guidelines for treatment of this category of patients or an evidence-based consensus view on best treatment. A literature search was done through PubMed using 'monoarthritis', 'chronic synovitis' and 'persistent inflammatory monoarthritis' as search terms. Reports were located using references to related articles; reports in humans and animals, published in English, were included. Persistent inflammatory monoarthritis has a variable disease course, generally with a better prognosis than polyarthritis. There is no clear evidence for the use of traditional DMARDS in monoarthritis, and treatment algorithms are extrapolated from oligo- or polyarticular disease. Intra-articular anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has been used with similar efficacy to intra-articular corticosteroids, and as yet, there are no reported cases of systemic anti-TNF use in monoarthritis. Synovectomy may be of use, with lower risk of recurrent disease, in open synovectomy. There is paucity of evidence for best practice in the management of chronic monoarthritis. Questions remain concerning the indications for invasive procedures and the balance between toxicity of systemic therapies versus the intended benefits to prevent disability. There is a pressing need for further studies and randomised controlled trials to be performed in this subset of patients. PMID:23108886

  20. [Persistent idiopathic facial pain and atypical odontalgia].

    PubMed

    Gaul, Charly; Ettlin, Dominik; Pfau, Doreen B

    2013-01-01

    The terms 'persistent idiopathic facial pain' (PIFP) and 'atypical odontalgia' (AO) are currently used as exclusion diagnoses for chronic toothache and chronic facial pain. Knowledge about these pain conditions in medical and dental practices is of crucial importance for the prevention of iatrogenic tissue damage by not-indicated invasive interventions, such as endodontic treatment and tooth extraction. In the present paper, etiology and pathogenesis, differential diagnostic criteria, and diagnostic approaches will be explained and relevant therapeutic principles will be outlined. PMID:23916270

  1. Persistence of antigen in nonarthritic joints.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A; Glynn, L E

    1975-01-01

    The presence of antigen, IgG and C3 was shown by radioautography and immunofluorescence in the collagenous tissues of the joints of animals injected intra-articularly with antigen after having been previously immunized with that antigen in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Since these joints were shown to be virtually free of inflammatory reactions, we suggest that the persistence of immune complexes activating complement cannot fully explain the chronicity of experimental allergic arthritis. Images PMID:769709

  2. Persistent Mobility Disability After Neurotoxic Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The impact of cancer and its treatments on balance and functional mobility in older adults remains unknown but is increasingly important, given the evolution of cancer treatments. Subacute and more persistent side effects such as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy are on the rise, and the effects on mobility and balance, as well as the prognosis for resolution of any functional deficits, must be established before interventions can be trialed. The purpose of this case report is to describe the severity and long-term persistence of mobility decline in an older adult who received neurotoxic chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe an older adult with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy using results of standardized balance and mobility tests and to focus on prognosis by repeating these measures more than 2 years after chemotherapy. Case Description An 81-year-old woman received a neurotoxic agent (paclitaxel) after curative mastectomy for breast cancer. Baseline testing prior to taxane therapy revealed a socially active woman with no reported functional deficits or neuropathic symptoms, 1.2-m/s gait speed, and performance at the ceiling on balance and gait portions of a standardized mobility measure. Outcomes After 3 cycles, paclitaxel therapy was stopped by the oncologist because of neurotoxicity. Declines as large as 50% were seen in performance-based measures at 12 weeks and persisted at 2.5 years, and the patient reported recurrent falls, cane use, and mobility-related disability. Discussion This case highlights the extent to which function can decline in an older individual receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy, the potential for these deficits to persist years after treatment is stopped, and the need for physical therapy intervention and further research in this population. PMID:20813818

  3. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  4. Information persistence using XML database technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Thomas A.; Lipa, Brian E. G.; Macera, Anthony R.; Staskevich, Gennady R.

    2005-05-01

    The Joint Battlespace Infosphere (JBI) Information Management (IM) services provide information exchange and persistence capabilities that support tailored, dynamic, and timely access to required information, enabling near real-time planning, control, and execution for DoD decision making. JBI IM services will be built on a substrate of network centric core enterprise services and when transitioned, will establish an interoperable information space that aggregates, integrates, fuses, and intelligently disseminates relevant information to support effective warfighter business processes. This virtual information space provides individual users with information tailored to their specific functional responsibilities and provides a highly tailored repository of, or access to, information that is designed to support a specific Community of Interest (COI), geographic area or mission. Critical to effective operation of JBI IM services is the implementation of repositories, where data, represented as information, is represented and persisted for quick and easy retrieval. This paper will address information representation, persistence and retrieval using existing database technologies to manage structured data in Extensible Markup Language (XML) format as well as unstructured data in an IM services-oriented environment. Three basic categories of database technologies will be compared and contrasted: Relational, XML-Enabled, and Native XML. These technologies have diverse properties such as maturity, performance, query language specifications, indexing, and retrieval methods. We will describe our application of these evolving technologies within the context of a JBI Reference Implementation (RI) by providing some hopefully insightful anecdotes and lessons learned along the way. This paper will also outline future directions, promising technologies and emerging COTS products that can offer more powerful information management representations, better persistence mechanisms and

  5. PERSISTENT PLACOID MACULOPATHY: A NEW CLINICAL ENTITY

    PubMed Central

    Golchet, Pamela R.; Jampol, Lee M.; Wilson, David; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.; Ober, Michael; Stroh, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To describe a previously unreported clinical entity superficially resembling macular serpiginous choroiditis but with a distinct presentation and clinical course. Methods A retrospective review of the medical records of five patients, aged 50 to 68 years, exhibiting this entity seen at five different centers from 1999 to 2006. Results The lesions in the patients in this study are in some respects similar to those of acute macular serpiginous choroiditis. The patients had well-delineated whitish plaque-like lesions involving the macula and sparing the peripapillary areas of both eyes. In contrast to serpiginous choroiditis, visual acuity remained good despite early involvement of the fovea until complications related to choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or pigmentary mottling developed. The angiographic characteristics and the clinical course were also atypical. Fluorescein angiography revealed well-defined early hypofluorescent areas, which partially filled-in in the late phase. Indocyanine green angiography showed the hypofluorescence to be persistent. Unlike serpiginous choroiditis, the white macular lesions faded over a period of months to years, but the characteristic angiographic findings often persisted longer. CNV developed in nine of 10 eyes with subsequent conversion to disciform macular scars in seven of 10 eyes. Unlike serpiginous choroiditis, none of the eyes showed chorioretinal scar formation unless related to CNV. Conclusion Persistent placoid maculopathy has features resembling macular serpiginous choroiditis but differs in its clinical course and effect on visual acuity. It appears to be a new entity. The majority of eyes develop CNV, which results in loss of central vision. PMID:17471331

  6. Improving Underrepresented Minority Student Persistence in STEM

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Mica; Burnett, Myra; Campbell, Andrew G.; Campbell, Patricia B.; Denetclaw, Wilfred F.; Gutiérrez, Carlos G.; Hurtado, Sylvia; John, Gilbert H.; Matsui, John; McGee, Richard; Okpodu, Camellia Moses; Robinson, T. Joan; Summers, Michael F.; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Zavala, MariaElena

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Joint Working Group on Improving Underrepresented Minorities (URMs) Persistence in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)—convened by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute—review current data and propose deliberation about why the academic “pathways” leak more for URM than white or Asian STEM students. They suggest expanding to include a stronger focus on the institutional barriers that need to be removed and the types of interventions that “lift” students’ interests, commitment, and ability to persist in STEM fields. Using Kurt Lewin’s planned approach to change, the committee describes five recommendations to increase URM persistence in STEM at the undergraduate level. These recommendations capitalize on known successes, recognize the need for accountability, and are framed to facilitate greater progress in the future. The impact of these recommendations rests upon enacting the first recommendation: to track successes and failures at the institutional level and collect data that help explain the existing trends. PMID:27543633

  7. Evaluation of retrocommissioning persistence in large commercialbuildings

    SciTech Connect

    Bourassa, Norman J.; Piette, Mary Ann; Motegi, Naoya

    2004-05-01

    Commercial Building Retrocommissioning activity has increased in recent years. This paper discusses LBNL's recently conducted study of 8 participants in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District Retrocommissioning program. We evaluated the persistence of energy savings and measure implementation, in an effort to identify and understand factors that can improve the longevity of retrocommissioning benefits. The LBNL analysis included a whole-building and measure status analysis, incorporating elements of previous work by Texas A&M University and Portland Energy Conservation Inc. Included in the energy analysis were whole building calculated energy savings and consideration of effects from the 2001 energy crisis. The measure persistence analysis examined each recommended measure and it's current operational status. Results showed a 59% implementation rate of recommended measures. Some process findings were: (1) Building engineers will tweak a measure that didn't work, instead of reverting to the pre-retrocommissioning settings; (2) A majority of the implementation costs were absorbed into regular operation and maintenance budgets; (3) The most frequently reported down side was the large time demands on the building engineering staff. However, all respondents thought it was worth the price; (4) All the sites said that retrocommissioning is beneficial to their operations, due to ongoing training and continuous improvement of system specifications; and (5) Approximately 65% of the peak retrocommissioning savings persisted beyond four years.

  8. Improving Underrepresented Minority Student Persistence in STEM.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Mica; Burnett, Myra; Campbell, Andrew G; Campbell, Patricia B; Denetclaw, Wilfred F; Gutiérrez, Carlos G; Hurtado, Sylvia; John, Gilbert H; Matsui, John; McGee, Richard; Okpodu, Camellia Moses; Robinson, T Joan; Summers, Michael F; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Zavala, MariaElena

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Joint Working Group on Improving Underrepresented Minorities (URMs) Persistence in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)-convened by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute-review current data and propose deliberation about why the academic "pathways" leak more for URM than white or Asian STEM students. They suggest expanding to include a stronger focus on the institutional barriers that need to be removed and the types of interventions that "lift" students' interests, commitment, and ability to persist in STEM fields. Using Kurt Lewin's planned approach to change, the committee describes five recommendations to increase URM persistence in STEM at the undergraduate level. These recommendations capitalize on known successes, recognize the need for accountability, and are framed to facilitate greater progress in the future. The impact of these recommendations rests upon enacting the first recommendation: to track successes and failures at the institutional level and collect data that help explain the existing trends. PMID:27543633

  9. Mixed waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.B.; Kirner, N.P.

    1991-12-31

    Disposal fees for mixed waste at proposed commercial disposal sites have been estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubit foot. If such high disposal fees are imposed, generators may be willing to apply extraordinary treatment or regulatory approaches to properly dispose of their mixed waste. This paper explores the feasibility of several waste management scenarios and attempts to answer the question: Can mixed waste be managed out of existence? Existing data on commercially generated mixed waste streams are used to identify the realm of mixed waste known to be generated. Each waste stream is evaluated from both a regulatory and technical perspective in order to convert the waste into a strictly low-level radioactive or a hazardous waste. Alternative regulatory approaches evaluated in this paper include a delisting petition, no migration petition, and a treatability variance. For each waste stream, potentially available treatment options are identified that could lead to these variances. Waste minimization methodology and storage for decay are also considered. Economic feasibility of each option is discussed broadly.

  10. [Mixed states and schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fakra, E; Belzeaux, R; Pringuey, D; Cermolacce, M; Corréard, N; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Azorin, J-M

    2013-12-01

    Because of their compilation of contrasted symptoms and their variable clinical presentation, mixed episodes have been withdrawn from the DSM. However, mixed states question not only the bonds between depression and mania, but also the distinction between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Indeed, doubts about the dichotomy introduced by Kraepelin between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia is as old as the nosolgy itself, as attest the later works of this author revealing his hesitations on his own classification. But findings here reviewed issued from recent technical advances, particularly in the imaging and genetic fields, offer a better understanding of the boundaries between these two disorders. Yet, when confronted to an acute episode, clinicians may find it challenging to distinguish a mixed state from a schizophrenic relapse. Indeed, there is no pathognomonic manifestation allowing to retain a diagnosis with confidence. The physician will therefore have to identify a pattern of signs, which will orient his assessment with no certainty. Thus, negative rather than affective or psychotic symptomatology appears to be useful in discriminating schizophrenia (or schizoaffective) disorders from mixed mania. However, a conclusion during this acute stage appears in definitive a formal exercise, first because the final diagnosis will only be ascertained once the symptoms are amended, and second because, according to our classifications, a mood episode, including mania and mixed mania, can be observed without ruling out the diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:24359851

  11. On the shock enhancement of confined supersonic mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P. J.; Wu, K. C.

    1991-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations using high-resolution total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme are performed for studying the shock enhancement of two-dimensional confined (spatially growing) supersonic mixing flows. Several specially designed mixing enhancement schemes are examined with emphasis placed on the study of the fundamental aspects involved in the shock-induced mixing enhancement process. The merits associated with these mixing enhancement schemes are evaluated based on a cost/effectiveness criterion, in which the cost paid for the total pressure loss encountered and the improvement in mixing gained are considered together. The results suggest that mixing enhancement using shock waves can only be effective if the stimulation is spatially persistent, and begins from the very upstream. Being motivated by this observation, an idea of using wavy-wall configuration to generate the desirable periodic shock stimulation is proposed and investigated. The computed results show that, by an appropriate manipulation of the parameters including wall wavelength, relative phase shift between the top and bottom walls, as well as the amplitude of the waviness, considerable improvement in mixing efficiency can be achieved.

  12. Extinction dynamics and the regional persistence of a tree frog metapopulation.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, A; Edenhamn, P

    2000-01-01

    The concept of a metapopulation acknowledges local extinctions as a natural part of the dynamics of a patchily distributed population. However, if extinctions are not balanced by recolonizations or if there is a high degree of spatial synchrony of local extinctions, this poses a threat to and will reduce the metapopulation persistence time. Here we show that, in a metapopulation network of 378 pond patches used by the tree frog (Hyla arborea), even though extinctions are frequent (mean extinction probability p(e) = 0.24) they pose no threat to the metapopulation as they are balanced by recolonizations (p(c) = 0.33). In any one year there was a pattern of large populations tending to persist while small populations became extinct. The total number of individuals belonging to populations that went extinct was small (< 5%) compared with those populations that persisted. A spatial autocorrelation analysis indicated no clustering of local extinctions. The tree frog metapopulation studied consisted of a set of larger, persistent populations mixed with smaller populations characterized by high turnover dynamics. PMID:10972125

  13. Numerical Simulation of the Life Cycle of a Persistent Wintertime Inversion over Salt Lake City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Linbo; Pu, Zhaoxia; Wang, Shigong

    2013-08-01

    An episode of persistent wintertime inversion over Salt Lake City, Utah and its vicinity from 1200 UTC 30 November to 0000 UTC 7 December 2010 is simulated using an advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The numerical simulations agree well with observed soundings in temperature, wind speed, and wind direction in the atmospheric boundary layer and above, although there are some differences near the surface due to the influence of complex terrain in the area. The characteristics of large-scale environmental conditions and their interactions with local-scale processes are analyzed to understand the factors that influence the onset and evolution of persistent inversions. It is found that the inversion formed mainly because of the interaction between the heating effect from a high-pressure ridge in the mid-troposphere and a near-surface cold pool due to the effects of radiation. During the following six to seven days, the high-pressure ridge was maintained and vertical motion very weak, allowing a persistent inversion to become established. Finally, the cold effect from a low-pressure trough in the mid-troposphere, combined with mixing due to vertical motion, led to extreme weakening of the persistent inversion.

  14. Temperature and population density determine reservoir regions of seasonal persistence in highland malaria.

    PubMed

    Siraj, Amir S; Bouma, Menno J; Santos-Vega, Mauricio; Yeshiwondim, Asnakew K; Rothman, Dale S; Yadeta, Damtew; Sutton, Paul C; Pascual, Mercedes

    2015-12-01

    A better understanding of malaria persistence in highly seasonal environments such as highlands and desert fringes requires identifying the factors behind the spatial reservoir of the pathogen in the low season. In these 'unstable' malaria regions, such reservoirs play a critical role by allowing persistence during the low transmission season and therefore, between seasonal outbreaks. In the highlands of East Africa, the most populated epidemic regions in Africa, temperature is expected to be intimately connected to where in space the disease is able to persist because of pronounced altitudinal gradients. Here, we explore other environmental and demographic factors that may contribute to malaria's highland reservoir. We use an extensive spatio-temporal dataset of confirmed monthly Plasmodium falciparum cases from 1995 to 2005 that finely resolves space in an Ethiopian highland. With a Bayesian approach for parameter estimation and a generalized linear mixed model that includes a spatially structured random effect, we demonstrate that population density is important to disease persistence during the low transmission season. This population effect is not accounted for in typical models for the transmission dynamics of the disease, but is consistent in part with a more complex functional form of the force of infection proposed by theory for vector-borne infections, only during the low season as we discuss. As malaria risk usually decreases in more urban environments with increased human densities, the opposite counterintuitive finding identifies novel control targets during the low transmission season in African highlands. PMID:26631558

  15. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  16. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  17. Rapid mixing kinetic techniques.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephen R; Schilstra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Almost all of the elementary steps in a biochemical reaction scheme are either unimolecular or bimolecular processes that frequently occur on sub-second, often sub-millisecond, time scales. The traditional approach in kinetic studies is to mix two or more reagents and monitor the changes in concentrations with time. Conventional spectrophotometers cannot generally be used to study reactions that are complete within less than about 20 s, as it takes that amount of time to manually mix the reagents and activate the instrument. Rapid mixing techniques, which generally achieve mixing in less than 2 ms, overcome this limitation. This chapter is concerned with the use of these techniques in the study of reactions which reach equilibrium; the application of these methods to the study of enzyme kinetics is described in several excellent texts (Cornish-Bowden, Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics. Portland Press, 1995; Gutfreund, Kinetics for the life sciences. Receptors, transmitters and catalysis. Cambridge University Press, 1995).There are various ways to monitor changes in concentration of reactants, intermediates and products after mixing, but the most common way is to use changes in optical signals (absorbance or fluorescence) which often accompany reactions. Although absorbance can sometimes be used, fluorescence is often preferred because of its greater sensitivity, particularly in monitoring conformational changes. Such methods are continuous with good time resolution but they seldom permit the direct determination of the concentrations of individual species. Alternatively, samples may be taken from the reaction volume, mixed with a chemical quenching agent to stop the reaction, and their contents assessed by techniques such as HPLC. These methods can directly determine the concentrations of different species, but are discontinuous and have a limited time resolution. PMID:23729251

  18. Quantifying the degree of persistence in random amoeboid motion based on the Hurst exponent of fractional Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarava, Natallia; Menz, Stephan; Theves, Matthias; Huisinga, Wilhelm; Beta, Carsten; Holschneider, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    Amoebae explore their environment in a random way, unless external cues like, e.g., nutrients, bias their motion. Even in the absence of cues, however, experimental cell tracks show some degree of persistence. In this paper, we analyzed individual cell tracks in the framework of a linear mixed effects model, where each track is modeled by a fractional Brownian motion, i.e., a Gaussian process exhibiting a long-term correlation structure superposed on a linear trend. The degree of persistence was quantified by the Hurst exponent of fractional Brownian motion. Our analysis of experimental cell tracks of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum showed a persistent movement for the majority of tracks. Employing a sliding window approach, we estimated the variations of the Hurst exponent over time, which allowed us to identify points in time, where the correlation structure was distorted ("outliers"). Coarse graining of track data via down-sampling allowed us to identify the dependence of persistence on the spatial scale. While one would expect the (mode of the) Hurst exponent to be constant on different temporal scales due to the self-similarity property of fractional Brownian motion, we observed a trend towards stronger persistence for the down-sampled cell tracks indicating stronger persistence on larger time scales.

  19. Quantifying the degree of persistence in random amoeboid motion based on the Hurst exponent of fractional Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Makarava, Natallia; Menz, Stephan; Theves, Matthias; Huisinga, Wilhelm; Beta, Carsten; Holschneider, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    Amoebae explore their environment in a random way, unless external cues like, e.g., nutrients, bias their motion. Even in the absence of cues, however, experimental cell tracks show some degree of persistence. In this paper, we analyzed individual cell tracks in the framework of a linear mixed effects model, where each track is modeled by a fractional Brownian motion, i.e., a Gaussian process exhibiting a long-term correlation structure superposed on a linear trend. The degree of persistence was quantified by the Hurst exponent of fractional Brownian motion. Our analysis of experimental cell tracks of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum showed a persistent movement for the majority of tracks. Employing a sliding window approach, we estimated the variations of the Hurst exponent over time, which allowed us to identify points in time, where the correlation structure was distorted ("outliers"). Coarse graining of track data via down-sampling allowed us to identify the dependence of persistence on the spatial scale. While one would expect the (mode of the) Hurst exponent to be constant on different temporal scales due to the self-similarity property of fractional Brownian motion, we observed a trend towards stronger persistence for the down-sampled cell tracks indicating stronger persistence on larger time scales. PMID:25375519

  20. Trustworthy persistent identifier systems of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golodoniuc, Pavel; Klump, Jens; Car, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Over the last two decades, persistent identifier (PID) systems have seen some significant changes in their governance policies, system capabilities, and technology. The development of most systems was driven by two main application areas, namely archives and libraries. Guidelines and criteria for trustworthy PID systems have been clearly devised (Bütikofer, 2009) and many PID system implementations for the identification of static digital objects have been built (e.g., PURL). However systems delivering persistent identifiers for dynamic datasets are not yet mature. There has been a rapid proliferation of different PID systems caused by the specific technical or organisational requirements of various communities that could not be met by existing systems such as DOI, ISBN, and EAN. Many of these different systems were limited by their inability to provide native means of persistent identifier resolution. This has prompted a decoupling of PID-associated data from the resolution service and this is where the Handle system has played a significant role. The Handle allowed to build a distributed system of independently managed resolver services. A trustworthy PID system must be designed to outlive the objects it provides persistent identifiers for, which may cease to exist or otherwise be deprecated, and the technology used to implement it, which will certainly need to change with time. We propose that such a system should rest on four pillars of agreements - (i) definitions, (ii) policies, (iii) services, and (iv) data services, to ensure longevity. While we believe all four pillars are equally important, we intentionally leave regulating aspects of issuing of identifiers and their registration out of the scope of this paper and focus on the agreements that have to be established between PID resolver services and the data sources indicated by the persistent identifiers. We propose an approach to development of PID systems that combines the use of (a) the Handle system

  1. Atomization and mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Jaqua, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art in atomization and mixing for triplet, pentad, and coaxial injectors is described. Injectors that are applicable for LOX/hydrocarbon propellants and main chamber and fuel rich preburner/gas generator mixture ratios are of special interest. Various applicable correlating equations and parameters as well as test data found in the literature are presented. The validity, utility, and important aspects of these data and correlations are discussed and the measurement techniques used are evaluated. Propellant mixing tests performed are described and summarized, results are reported, and tentative conclusions are included.

  2. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  3. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  4. Mixed waste characterization strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.E.; Stakebake, J.; Peters, M.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive mixed wastes containing a radioactive component subject to the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and hazardous waste subject to resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are generated, treated, and stored at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and are subject to federal and state statutory and regulatory requirements. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) are the two primary regulatory agencies which enforce these requirements. This paper describes the mechanism by which RFP will characterize mixed wastes within the LDR provisions of RCRA and the LDR FFCA as well as for meeting the waste acceptance criteria for disposal.

  5. Mixed waste characterization strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.E.; Stakebake, J.; Peters, M.

    1992-08-01

    Radioactive mixed wastes containing a radioactive component subject to the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and hazardous waste subject to resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are generated, treated, and stored at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and are subject to federal and state statutory and regulatory requirements. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) are the two primary regulatory agencies which enforce these requirements. This paper describes the mechanism by which RFP will characterize mixed wastes within the LDR provisions of RCRA and the LDR FFCA as well as for meeting the waste acceptance criteria for disposal.

  6. MixDown

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-01-01

    MixDown is a meta-build tool that orchestrates and manages the building of multiple 3rd party libraries. It can manage the downloading, uncompressing, unpacking, patching, configuration, build, and installation of 3rd party libraries using a variety of configuration and build tools. As a meta-build tool, it relies on 3rd party tools such as GNU Autotools, make, Cmake, scons, etc. to actually confugure and build libraries. MixDown includes an extensive database of settings to be used formore » general machines and specific leadership class computing resources.« less

  7. Turbulence and Interfacial Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, James; Li, Xiaolin

    2005-03-15

    The authors study mix from analytical and numerical points of view. These investigations are linked. The analytical studies (in addition to laboratory experiments) provide bench marks for the direct simulation of mix. However, direct simulation is too detailed to be useful and to expensive to be practical. They also consider averaged equations. Here the major issue is the validation of the closure assumptions. They appeal to the direct simulation methods for this step. They have collaborated with several NNSA teams; moreover, Stony Brook alumni (former students, faculty and research collaborators) presently hold staff positions in NNSA laboratories.

  8. Oceanic biogeochemical controls on global dynamics of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Dachs, Jordi; Lohmann, Rainer; Ockenden, Wendy A; Méjanelle, Laurence; Eisenreich, Steven J; Jones, Kevin C

    2002-10-15

    Understanding and quantifying the global dynamics and sinks of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is important to assess their environmental impact and fate. Air-surface exchange processes, where temperature plays a central role in controlling volatilization and deposition, are of key importance in controlling global POP dynamics. The present study is an assessment of the role of oceanic biogeochemical processes, notably phytoplankton uptake and vertical fluxes of particles, on the global dynamics of POPs. Field measurements of atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), and furans (PCDFs) are combined with remote sensing estimations of oceanic temperature, wind speed, and chlorophyll, to model the interactions between air-water exchange, phytoplankton uptake, and export of organic matter and POPs out of the mixed surface ocean layer. Deposition is enhanced in the mid-high latitudes and is driven by sinking marine particulate matter, rather than by a cold condensation effect. However, the relative contribution of the biological pump is a function of the physical-chemical properties of POPs. It is concluded that oceanic biogeochemical processes play a critical role in controlling the global dynamics and the ultimate sink of POPs. PMID:12387392

  9. Sylgard® Mixing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Mollie; Welch, Cynthia F.; Goodwin, Lynne Alese; Keller, Jennie

    2014-08-22

    Sylgard® 184 and Sylgard® 186 silicone elastomers form Dow Corning® are used as potting agents across the Nuclear Weapons Complex. A standardized mixing procedure is required for filled versions of these products. The present study is a follow-up to a mixing study performed by MST-7 which established the best mixing procedure to use when adding filler to either 184 or 186 base resins. The most effective and consistent method of mixing resin and curing agent for three modified silicone elastomer recipes is outlined in this report. For each recipe, sample size, mixing type, and mixing time was varied over 10 separate runs. The results show that the THINKY™ Mixer gives reliable mixing over varying batch sizes and mixing times. Hand Mixing can give improved mixing, as indicated by reduced initial viscosity; however, this method is not consistent.

  10. Persistent Structural Priming from Language Comprehension to Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bock, Kathryn; Dell, Gary S.; Chang, Franklin; Onishi, Kristine H.

    2007-01-01

    To examine the relationship between syntactic processes in language comprehension and language production, we compared structural persistence from sentence primes that speakers heard to persistence from primes that speakers produced. [Bock, J. K., & Griffin, Z. M. (2000). The persistence of structural priming: transient activation or implicit…

  11. Persistent anomalies of the extratropical Northern Hemisphere wintertime circulation - Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dole, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    A study identifying horizontal and vertical structures of low patterns occurring with persistent 500 mb height anomalies in the central North Pacific, eastern North Atlantic, and northern Soviet Union regions is presented. The flow patterns of positive and negative anomalies are compared. The relationship between persistent anomalies and small recurrent anomaly patterns is examined. The temporal fluctuations of the persistent patterns are analyzed.

  12. True Anonymity Without Mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Jimenez, C.; Marshall, L.

    2002-04-01

    Anonymizers based on mix computers interposed between the sender and the receiver of an e-mail message have been used in the Internet for several years by senders of e-mail messages who do not wish to disclose their identity. Unfortunately, the degree of anonymity provided by this paradigm is limited and fragile. First, the messages sent are not truly anonymous but pseudo-anonymous since one of the mixes, at least, always knows the sender's identity. Secondly, the strength of the system to protect the sender's identity depends on the ability and the willingness of the mixes to keep the secret. If the mixes fail, the sender/'s anonymity is reduced to pieces. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for sending truly anonymous messages over the Internet where the anonymous message is sent from a PDA which uses dynamically assigned temporary, non-personal, random IP and MAC addresses. Anonymous E-cash is used to pay for the service.

  13. Josephson junction mixing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, E. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theory is presented which, though too simple to explain quantitative details in the Josephson junction mixing response, is sufficient for explaining qualitatively the results observed. Crucial to the theory presented, and that which differentiates it from earlier ones, is the inclusion of harmonic voltages across the ideal Josephson element.

  14. Mixed valent metals.

    PubMed

    Riseborough, P S; Lawrence, J M

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger's theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach's diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc. PMID:27376888

  15. Stabilizer for mixed fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, M.; Igarashi, T.; Ukigai, T.

    1984-03-13

    A stabilizer for mixed fuels containing a reaction product obtained by reacting (1) a polyol having at least 3 hydroxyl groups in the molecule and a molecular weight of 400-10,000 with (2) an epihalohydrin, as the principal component.

  16. Progress in mix modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.K.

    1997-03-14

    We have identified the Cranfill multifluid turbulence model (Cranfill, 1992) as a starting point for development of subgrid models of instability, turbulent and mixing processes. We have differenced the closed system of equations in conservation form, and coded them in the object-oriented hydrodynamics code FLAG, which is to be used as a testbed for such models.

  17. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  18. Mixed valent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riseborough, P. S.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger’s theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer–Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach’s diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc.

  19. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, Clark W.; Landrum, D. Brian; Turner, Matthew; Wagner, David K.; Lambert, James

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane. Initial cold flow testing of the model is underway to determine both, the behavior of the ingested air in the duct and to validate the mixing diagnostics. During the tests, each of the two rocket nozzles ejected up to two pounds mass per second into the 13.6 square inch duct. The tests showed that the mass flow of the rockets was great enough to cause the entrained air to go sonic at the strut, which is the location of the rocket nozzles. More tests are necessary to determine whether the entrained air chokes due to the reduction in the area of the duct at the strut (a physical choke), or because of the addition of mass inside the duct at the nozzle exit (a Fabri choke). The initial tests of the mixing diagnostics are showing promise.

  20. Mixed Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    Markov random fields can encode complex probabilistic relationships involving multiple variables and admit efficient procedures for probabilistic inference. However, from a knowledge engineering point of view, these models suffer from a serious limitation. The graph of a Markov field must connect all pairs of variables that are conditionally dependent even for a single choice of values of the other variables. This makes it hard to encode interactions that occur only in a certain context and are absent in all others. Furthermore, the requirement that two variables be connected unless always conditionally independent may lead to excessively dense graphs, obscuring the independencies present among the variables and leading to computationally prohibitive inference algorithms. Mumford [Mumford, D. (1996) in ICIAM 95, eds. Kirchgassner, K., Marenholtz, O. & Mennicken, R. (Akademie Verlag, Berlin), pp. 233–256] proposed an alternative modeling framework where the graph need not be rigid and completely determined a priori. Mixed Markov models contain node-valued random variables that, when instantiated, augment the graph by a set of transient edges. A single joint probability distribution relates the values of regular and node-valued variables. In this article, we study the analytical and computational properties of mixed Markov models. In particular, we show that positive mixed models have a local Markov property that is equivalent to their global factorization. We also describe a computationally efficient procedure for answering probabilistic queries in mixed Markov models. PMID:12829802

  1. Color mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Steven J.

    1992-05-01

    In black-and-white printing the page image can be represented within a computer as an array of binary values indicating whether or not pixels should be inked. The Boolean operators of AND, OR, and EXCLUSIVE-OR are often used when adding new objects to the image array. For color printing the page may be represented as an array of continuous tone color values, and the generalization of these logic functions to gray-scale or full-color images is, in general, not defined or understood. When incrementally composing a page image new colors can replace old in an image buffer, or new colors and old can be combined according to some mixing function to form a composite color which is stored. This paper examines the properties of the Boolean operations and suggests full-color mixing functions which preserve the desired properties. These functions can be used to combine colored images, giving various transparency effects. The relationships between the mixing functions and physical models of color mixing are also discussed.

  2. Mixing and Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditmars, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of longitudinal dispersion, mixing and transport in streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, and oceans. This review covers also: (1) fluid-solid mixtures and (2) oil spill behavior. A list of 189 references published in 1976 and 1977 is presented. (HM)

  3. CTEPP OVERVIEW: A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research study, "Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants," (CTEPP) is a pilot-scale project involving about 260 children in their everyday surroundings. The objectives of CTEPP are twofold: (1) To measure the agg...

  4. A possible explanation for the discrepancy in electron persistent current amplitudes: A superfluid persistent current analog

    SciTech Connect

    Maynard, J.D. )

    1992-10-01

    Recently there has been considerable interest in normal electron persistent currents' that result from the wave nature of electrons in a normal metal ring for which inelastic electron-phonon scattering has been reduced so that the electron maintains phase coherence around the ring. The application of the current theory of electron transport, which includes the effects of elastic scattering in a disordered potential field, produces an expression that disagrees with the experimental measurements by Webb, et al. The author presents here an acoustic analog of wave mechanical electrons in a disordered circular waveguide and derives an expression that agrees with the results of the electron persistent current measurements. The acoustic analog shows that the expression derived from electron transport is also correct, but only under conditions that do not correspond to the actual method used in measuring the electron persistent currents. A proposed experiment to test the model using superfluid helium in a disordered scattering field is presented.

  5. Bacterial persistence and expression of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, G J; Woody, H B

    1997-01-01

    A considerable body of experimental and clinical evidence supports the concept that difficult-to-culture and dormant bacteria are involved in latency of infection and that these persistent bacteria may be pathogenic. This review includes details on the diverse forms and functions of individual bacteria and attempts to make this information relevant to the care of patients. A series of experimental studies involving host-bacterium interactions illustrates the probability that most bacteria exposed to a deleterious host environment can assume a form quite different from that of a free-living bacterium. A hypothesis is offered for a kind of reproductive cycle of morphologically aberrant bacteria as a means to relate their diverse tissue forms to each other. Data on the basic biology of persistent bacteria are correlated with expression of disease and particularly the mechanisms of both latency and chronicity that typify certain infections. For example, in certain streptococcal and nocardial infections, it has been clearly established that wall-defective forms can be induced in a suitable host. These organisms can survive and persist in a latent state within the host, and they can cause pathologic responses compatible with disease. A series of cases illustrating idiopathic conditions in which cryptic bacteria have been implicated in the expression of disease is presented. These conditions include nephritis, rheumatic fever, aphthous stomatitis, idiopathic hematuria, Crohn's disease, and mycobacterial infections. By utilizing PCR, previously nonculturable bacilli have been identified in patients with Whipple's disease and bacillary angiomatosis. Koch's postulates may have to be redefined in terms of molecular data when dormant and nonculturable bacteria are implicated as causative agents of mysterious diseases. PMID:9105757

  6. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Julie A; Lawler, Joshua J; Schumaker, Nathan H; Wilsey, Chad B; Bender, Darren J

    2015-12-01

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of individuals in sinks can compromise persistence; but conversely, sinks can improve viability by improving connectivity and facilitating the recolonization of vacant sources. To assess the contribution of sinks to regional population persistence of declining populations, we simulated source-sink dynamics for 3 very different endangered species: Black-capped Vireos (Vireo atricapilla) at Fort Hood, Texas, Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) in Alberta, and Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in the northwestern United States. We used empirical data from these case studies to parameterize spatially explicit individual-based models. We then used the models to quantify population abundance and persistence with and without long-term sinks. The contributions of sink habitats varied widely. Sinks were detrimental, particularly when they functioned as strong sinks with few emigrants in declining populations (e.g., Alberta's Ord's kangaroo rat) and benign in robust populations (e.g., Black-capped Vireos) when Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism was controlled. Sinks, including ecological traps, were also crucial in delaying declines when there were few sources (e.g., in Black-capped Vireo populations with no Cowbird control). Sink contributions were also nuanced. For example, sinks that supported large, variable populations were subject to greater extinction risk (e.g., Northern Spotted Owls). In each of our case studies, new context-dependent sinks emerged, underscoring the dynamic nature of sources and sinks and the need for frequent re-assessment. Our results imply that management actions based on assumptions that sink habitats are generally harmful or helpful risk undermining conservation efforts for declining populations. PMID:26032147

  7. Volatility, persistence, and survival in financial markets.

    PubMed

    Constantin, M; Sarma, S Das

    2005-11-01

    We study the temporal fluctuations in time-dependent stock prices (both individual and composite) as a stochastic phenomenon using general techniques and methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. In particular, we analyze stock price fluctuations as a non-Markovian stochastic process using the first-passage statistical concepts of persistence and survival. We report the results of empirical measurements of the normalized qth-order correlation functions fq(t), survival probability S(t), and persistence probability P(t) for several stock market dynamical sets. We analyze both minute-to-minute and higher-frequency stock market recordings (i.e., with the sampling time deltat of the order of days). We find that the fluctuating stock price is multifractal and the choice of deltat has no effect on the qualitative multifractal behavior displayed by the 1/q dependence of the generalized Hurst exponent Hq associated with the power-law evolution of the correlation function fq(t) approximately tHq. The probability S(t) of the stock price remaining above the average up to time t is very sensitive to the total measurement time tm and the sampling time. The probability P(t) of the stock not returning to the initial value within an interval t has a universal power-law behavior P(t) approximately t(-theta), with a persistence exponent theta close to 0.5 that agrees with the prediction theta=1-H2. The empirical financial stocks also present an interesting feature found in turbulent fluids, the extended self-similarity. PMID:16383592

  8. Mechanisms of viral clearance and persistence.

    PubMed

    Borrow, P

    1997-01-01

    Using examples predominantly drawn from study of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system, this review describes the mechanisms involved in control of virus infections by the cell-mediated immune response, and some of the different strategies viruses have evolved to evade such immune clearance so that they can persist in their hosts. The important role played by the CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) response in clearance of many systemic virus infections is discussed; and it is emphasized that although CD8+ CTL are classically thought of as lymphocytes which mediate lysis of virus-infected target cells, the principal mechanism by which CD8+ T cells effect clearance of persistent and many acute virus infections via production of antiviral cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, not via destruction of virus-producing cells. To avoid immune-mediated clearance, viruses frequently use a combination of several different strategies. These can be grouped into mechanisms for avoiding recognition by the immune response (such as establishing latent infections, replicating in immune-privileged sites, down-regulating the expression of immune recognition signals on the surface of infected cells, or undergoing antigenic variation); and mechanisms for suppressing the immune response. The latter include generalized immune suppression mechanisms, and strategies for more precisely disabling the specific immune response such as inducing tolerance or exhaustion of virus-specific CTL. The value of understanding both immune clearance mechanisms and viral evasion strategies in the rational design of immune-based therapies to combat persistent virus infections is discussed. PMID:9429206

  9. Sequential Hybrid Procedure for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bulava, Alan; Mokracek, Ales; Hanis, Jiri; Kurfirst, Vojtech; Eisenberger, Martin; Pesl, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation yields an unsatisfactorily high number of failures. The hybrid approach has recently emerged as a technique that overcomes the limitations of both surgical and catheter procedures alone. Methods and Results We investigated the sequential (staged) hybrid method, which consists of a surgical thoracoscopic radiofrequency ablation procedure followed by radiofrequency catheter ablation 6 to 8 weeks later using the CARTO 3 mapping system. Fifty consecutive patients (mean age 62±7 years, 32 males) with long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation (41±34 months) and a dilated left atrium (>45 mm) were included and prospectively followed in an unblinded registry. During the electrophysiological part of the study, all 4 pulmonary veins were found to be isolated in 36 (72%) patients and a complete box‐lesion was confirmed in 14 (28%) patients. All gaps were successfully re‐ablated. Twelve months after the completed hybrid ablation, 47 patients (94%) were in normal sinus rhythm (4 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation required propafenone and 1 patient underwent a redo catheter procedure). The majority of arrhythmias recurred during the first 3 months. Beyond 12 months, there were no arrhythmia recurrences detected. The surgical part of the procedure was complicated by 7 (13.7%) major complications, while no serious adverse events were recorded during the radiofrequency catheter part of the procedure. Conclusions The staged hybrid epicardial–endocardial treatment of long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation seems to be extremely effective in maintenance of normal sinus rhythm compared to radiofrequency catheter or surgical ablation alone. Epicardial ablation alone cannot guarantee durable transmural lesions. Clinical Trial Registration URL: www.ablace.cz Unique identifier: cz‐060520121617 PMID:25809548

  10. Serous Ovarian Carcinoma Recurring as Malignant Mixed Mullerian Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Demir; Senem, Demiroz Ahu; Ovgu, Aydin; Hakan, Erenel; Sennur, Ilvan; Zerrin, Calay; Fuat, Demirkiran

    2015-01-01

    Only five cases of recurrence of malignant mixed Mullerian tumor (carcinosarcoma) from the ovarian carcinoma have been published in the literature to our knowledge. A 64-year-old woman first underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy because of pelvic mass. Histological diagnosis was serous papillary carcinoma of the left ovary. After six courses of chemotherapy, CA125 level returned to normal range. However, she had persistent multiple mediastinal and para-aortic lymphadenopathies in spite of additional six courses of chemotherapy. Then she underwent the second operation about 2 years after primary surgery. Multiple excisional biopsies were taken from subcutaneous tissue, over the bowels and the left external iliac artery. The histopathological diagnosis which was confirmed by immunohistochemical study was malignant mixed Mullerian tumor for all metastatic foci. A rare case of ovarian serous papillary carcinoma recurring as malignant mixed Mullerian tumor is reported. PMID:26713165

  11. Holographic measurements of inhomogeneous cloud mixing at the centimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beals, Matthew J.; Fugal, Jacob P.; Shaw, Raymond A.; Lu, Jiang; Spuler, Scott M.; Stith, Jeffrey L.

    2015-10-01

    Optical properties and precipitation efficiency of atmospheric clouds are largely determined by turbulent mixing with their environment. When cloud liquid water is reduced upon mixing, droplets may evaporate uniformly across the population or, in the other extreme, a subset of droplets may evaporate completely, leaving the remaining drops unaffected. Here, we use airborne holographic imaging to visualize the spatial structure and droplet size distribution at the smallest turbulent scales, thereby observing their response to entrainment and mixing with clear air. The measurements reveal that turbulent clouds are inhomogeneous, with sharp transitions between cloud and clear air properties persisting to dissipative scales (<1 centimeter). The local droplet size distribution fluctuates strongly in number density but with a nearly unchanging mean droplet diameter.

  12. DNA Persistence in Sink Drain Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-07-31

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm.

  13. The persistent challenge of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2011-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus has long been considered the prototypic autoimmune disease. Although the etiology remains enigmatic, there has been vigorous definition of the clinical features and the natural history. In this issue, we review the persistent challenge of lupus nephritis and, in particular, features of diagnosis as well as treatment options. It is clear that major therapeutic advances have occurred but there is still a considerable unmet need in the population. This issue does not review all the clinical problems of lupus nephritis, but rather attempts to place the most recent data in perspective for the clinician. PMID:20811786

  14. Explaining evolution via constrained persistent perfect phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The perfect phylogeny is an often used model in phylogenetics since it provides an efficient basic procedure for representing the evolution of genomic binary characters in several frameworks, such as for example in haplotype inference. The model, which is conceptually the simplest, is based on the infinite sites assumption, that is no character can mutate more than once in the whole tree. A main open problem regarding the model is finding generalizations that retain the computational tractability of the original model but are more flexible in modeling biological data when the infinite site assumption is violated because of e.g. back mutations. A special case of back mutations that has been considered in the study of the evolution of protein domains (where a domain is acquired and then lost) is persistency, that is the fact that a character is allowed to return back to the ancestral state. In this model characters can be gained and lost at most once. In this paper we consider the computational problem of explaining binary data by the Persistent Perfect Phylogeny model (referred as PPP) and for this purpose we investigate the problem of reconstructing an evolution where some constraints are imposed on the paths of the tree. Results We define a natural generalization of the PPP problem obtained by requiring that for some pairs (character, species), neither the species nor any of its ancestors can have the character. In other words, some characters cannot be persistent for some species. This new problem is called Constrained PPP (CPPP). Based on a graph formulation of the CPPP problem, we are able to provide a polynomial time solution for the CPPP problem for matrices whose conflict graph has no edges. Using this result, we develop a parameterized algorithm for solving the CPPP problem where the parameter is the number of characters. Conclusions A preliminary experimental analysis shows that the constrained persistent perfect phylogeny model allows to

  15. Persistent Bleeding Following a Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Taek; Lee, Jae-Bum; Kim, Mi Jung; Lee, Doo-Seok; Youk, Eui-Gon; Kim, Do-Sun; Lee, Doo-Han

    2016-01-01

    A stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) is widely used for treatment of patients with grades III and IV hemorrhoids. The SH is easy to perform, is associated with less pain and allows early return to normal activities. However, complications, whether severe or not, have been reported. Here, we present the case of a female patient with persistent bleeding after a SH. The bleeding was caused by the formation of granulation tissue at the stapler line, diagnosed with sigmoidoscopy, and successfully treated via transanal excision (TAE) under spinal anesthesia. The biopsy showed inflammatory granulation tissue. After the TAE, her symptom was completely gone. PMID:27437395

  16. Persistent paper: the myth of "going paperless".

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Richard H; Ash, Joan S; Campbell, Emily; Sittig, Dean F; Guappone, Ken; Carpenter, James; Richardson, Joshua; Wright, Adam; McMullen, Carmit

    2009-01-01

    How does paper usage change following the introduction of Computerized Physician Order Entry and the Electronic Medical Record (EMR/CPOE)? To answer that question we analyzed data collected from fourteen sites across the U.S. We found paper in widespread use in all institutions we studied. Analysis revealed psychological, ergonomic, technological, and regulatory reasons for the persistence of paper in an electronic environment. Paper has unique attributes allowing it to fill gaps in information timeliness, availability, and reliability in pursuit of improved patient care. Creative uses have led to "better paper." PMID:20351841

  17. Monitoring Coastal Marshes for Persistent Saltwater Intrusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalcic, Maria; Hall, Callie; Fletcher, Rose; Russell, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Primary goal: Provide resource managers with remote sensing products that support ecosystem forecasting models requiring salinity and inundation data. Work supports the habitat-switching modules in the Coastal Louisiana Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration (CLEAR) model, which provides scientific evaluation for restoration management (Visser et al., 2008). Ongoing work to validate flooding with radar (NWRC/USGS) and enhance persistence estimates through "fusion" of MODIS and Landsat time series (ROSES A.28 Gulf of Mexico). Additional work will also investigate relationship between saltwater dielectric constant and radar returns (Radarsat) (ROSES A.28 Gulf of Mexico).

  18. Persistent trigeminal artery causing "double" neurovascular conflict.

    PubMed

    Clerici, Angelo Maurizio; Merlo, Paola; Rognone, Felice; Noce, Monica; Rognone, Elisa; Bono, Giorgio

    2009-03-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who presented with right VI nerve palsy and homolateral atypical trigeminal neuralgia; standard neuroradiological investigation of orbital/retroorbital regions and intracranial arteries excluded the most commonly demonstrable underlying causes while brain magnetic resonance (T1-weighted fat suppression; T2-weighted thin-section) and magnetic resonance angiography disclosed the evidence of "double" neurovascular conflict because of persistent trigeminal artery with aneurysmal dilation. A role of this almost rare vascular condition in causing painful ophthalmoplegia is discussed. PMID:19267790

  19. Virulence, persistence and dissemination of Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Bürki, Sibylle; Frey, Joachim; Pilo, Paola

    2015-08-31

    Bovine mycoplasmosis due to Mycoplasma bovis causes several important bovine diseases such as pneumonia, mastitis, arthritis, otitis, genital disorders or keratoconjunctivitis. Variable surface lipoproteins, adhesion, invasion of host cells, modulation of the host immune system, biofilm formation and the release of secondary metabolites like hydrogen peroxide, as well as synergistic infections with other bacterial or viral pathogens are among the more significantly studied characteristics of the bacterium. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding the virulence of M. bovis and additionally, factors contributing to the dissemination and persistence of this pathogen in the bovine host will be discussed. PMID:25824130

  20. Synaptic mechanisms underlying persistent cocaine craving.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marina E

    2016-06-01

    Although it is challenging for individuals with cocaine addiction to achieve abstinence, the greatest difficulty is avoiding relapse to drug taking, which is often triggered by cues associated with prior cocaine use. This vulnerability to relapse persists for long periods (months to years) after abstinence is achieved. Here, I discuss rodent studies of cue-induced cocaine craving during abstinence, with a focus on neuronal plasticity in the reward circuitry that maintains high levels of craving. Such work has the potential to identify new therapeutic targets and to further our understanding of experience-dependent plasticity in the adult brain under normal circumstances and in the context of addiction. PMID:27150400

  1. Cricket: A Mapped, Persistent Object Store

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shekita, Eugene; Zwilling, Michael

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes Cricket, a new database storage system that is intended to be used as a platform for design environments and persistent programming languages. Cricket uses the memory management primitives of the Mach operating system to provide the abstraction of a shared, transactional single-level store that can be directly accessed by user applications. In this paper, we present the design and motivation for Cricket. We also present some initial performance results which show that, for its intended applications, Cricket can provide better performance than a general-purpose database storage system.

  2. Geomorphic factors related to the persistence of subsurface oil from the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nixon, Zachary; Michel, Jacqueline; Hayes, Miles O.; Irvine, Gail V.; Short, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Oil from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill has persisted along shorelines of Prince William Sound, Alaska, for more than two decades as both surface and subsurface oil residues. To better understand the distribution of persistent subsurface oil and assess the potential need for further restoration, a thorough and quantitative understanding of the geomorphic factors controlling the presence or absence of subsurface oil is required. Data on oiling and geomorphic features were collected at 198 sites in Prince William Sound to identify and quantify the relationships among these geomorphic factors and the presence and absence of persistent subsurface oil. Geomorphic factors associated with the presence of subsurface oil were initial oil exposure, substrate permeability, topographic slope, low exposure to waves, armoring on gravel beaches, tombolos, natural breakwaters, and rubble accumulations. Geomorphic factors associated with the absence of subsurface oil were impermeable bedrock; platforms with thin sediment veneer; fine-grained, well-sorted gravel beaches with no armor; and low-permeability, raised bay-bottom beaches. Relationships were found between the geomorphic and physical site characteristics and the likelihood of encountering persistent subsurface oiling at those sites. There is quantitative evidence of more complex interactions between the overall wave energy incident at a site and the presence of fine-scale geomorphic features that may have provided smaller, local wave energy sheltering of oil. Similarly, these data provide evidence for interactions between the shoreline slope and the presence of angular rubble, with decreased likelihood for encountering subsurface oil at steeply sloped sites except at high-angle sheltered rubble shoreline locations. These results reinforce the idea that the interactions of beach permeability, stability, and site-specific wave exposure are key drivers for subsurface oil persistence in exposed and intermittently exposed mixed

  3. Unitarity constraints on trimaximal mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2010-07-01

    When the neutrino mass eigenstate {nu}{sub 2} is trimaximally mixed, the mixing matrix is called trimaximal. The middle column of the trimaximal mixing matrix is identical to tribimaximal mixing and the other two columns are subject to unitarity constraints. This corresponds to a mixing matrix with four independent parameters in the most general case. Apart from the two Majorana phases, the mixing matrix has only one free parameter in the CP conserving limit. Trimaximality results in interesting interplay between mixing angles and CP violation. A notion of maximal CP violation naturally emerges here: CP violation is maximal for maximal 2-3 mixing. Similarly, there is a natural constraint on the deviation from maximal 2-3 mixing which takes its maximal value in the CP conserving limit.

  4. Dissolution patterns and mixing dynamics in unstable reactive flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco; Cabeza, Yoar; Carrera, Jesus

    2015-08-01

    We study the fundamental problem of mixing and chemical reactions under a Rayleigh-Taylor-type hydrodynamic instability in a miscible two-fluid system. The dense fluid mixture, which is generated at the fluid-fluid interface, leads to the onset of a convective fingering instability and triggers a fast chemical dissolution reaction. Contrary to intuition, the dissolution pattern does not map out the finger geometry. Instead, it displays a dome-like, hierarchical structure that follows the path of the ascending fluid interface and the regions of maximum mixing. These mixing and reaction hot spots coincide with the flow stagnation points, at which the interfacial mixing layer is compressed and deformed. We show that the deformation of the boundary layer around the stagnation points controls the evolution of the global scalar dissipation and reaction rates and shapes the structure of the reacted zones. The persistent compression of the mixing layer explains the independence of the mixing rate from the Rayleigh number when convection dominates.

  5. Langmuir mixing effects on global climate: WAVEWATCH III in CESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Webb, Adrean; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Craig, Anthony; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Large, William G.; Vertenstein, Mariana

    2016-07-01

    Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) have shown the effects of ocean surface gravity waves in enhancing the ocean boundary layer mixing through Langmuir turbulence. Neglecting this Langmuir mixing process may contribute to the common shallow bias in mixed layer depth in regions of the Southern Ocean and the Northern Atlantic in most state-of-the-art climate models. In this study, a third generation wave model, WAVEWATCH III, has been incorporated as a component of the Community Earth System Model, version 1.2 (CESM1.2). In particular, the wave model is now coupled with the ocean model through a modified version of the K-Profile Parameterization (KPP) to approximate the influence of Langmuir mixing. Unlike past studies, the wind-wave misalignment and the effects of Stokes drift penetration depth are considered through empirical scalings based on the rate of mixing in LES. Wave-Ocean only experiments show substantial improvements in the shallow biases of mixed layer depth in the Southern Ocean. Ventilation is enhanced and low concentration biases of pCFC-11 are reduced in the Southern Hemisphere. A majority of the improvements persist in the presence of other climate feedbacks in the fully coupled experiments. In addition, warming of the subsurface water over the majority of global ocean is observed in the fully coupled experiments with waves, and the cold subsurface ocean temperature biases are reduced.

  6. Measuring persistence: A literature review focusing on methodological issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.K.; Brown, M.A.; Trumble, D.

    1995-03-01

    This literature review was conducted as part of a larger project to produce a handbook on the measurement of persistence. The past decade has marked the development of the concept of persistence and a growing recognition that the long-term impacts of demand-side management (DSM) programs warrant careful assessment. Although Increasing attention has been paid to the topic of persistence, no clear consensus has emerged either about its definition or about the methods most appropriate for its measurement and analysis. This project strives to fill that gap by reviewing the goals, terminology, and methods of past persistence studies. It was conducted from the perspective of a utility that seeks to acquire demand-side resources and is interested in their long-term durability; it was not conducted from the perspective of the individual consumer. Over 30 persistence studies, articles, and protocols were examined for this report. The review begins by discussing the underpinnings of persistence studies: namely, the definitions of persistence and the purposes of persistence studies. Then. it describes issues relevant to both the collection and analysis of data on the persistence of energy and demand savings. Findings from persistence studies also are summarized. Throughout the review, four studies are used repeatedly to illustrate different methodological and analytical approaches to persistence so that readers can track the data collection. data analysis, and findings of a set of comprehensive studies that represent alternative approaches.

  7. Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Apkarian, A. Vania; Mutso, Amelia A.; Centeno, Maria V.; Kan, Lixin; Wu, Melody; Levinstein, Marjorie; Banisadr, Ghazal; Gobeske, Kevin T.; Miller, Richard J.; Radulovic, Jelena; Hen, René; Kessler, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The full role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) remains to be determined, yet it is implicated in learning and emotional functions, and is disrupted in negative mood disorders. Recent evidence indicates that AHN is decreased in persistent pain consistent with the idea that chronic pain is a major stressor, associated with negative moods and abnormal memories. Yet, the role of AHN in development of persistent pain has remained unexplored. In this study, we test the influence of AHN in postinjury inflammatory and neuropathic persistent pain-like behaviors by manipulating neurogenesis: pharmacologically through intracerebroventricular infusion of the antimitotic AraC; ablation of AHN by x-irradiation; and using transgenic mice with increased or decreased AHN. Downregulating neurogenesis reversibly diminished or blocked persistent pain; oppositely, upregulating neurogenesis led to prolonged persistent pain. Moreover, we could dissociate negative mood from persistent pain. These results suggest that AHN-mediated hippocampal learning mechanisms are involved in the emergence of persistent pain. PMID:26313405

  8. Boromycin Kills Mycobacterial Persisters without Detectable Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Wilfried; Aziz, Dinah B.; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Boromycin is a boron-containing polyether macrolide antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It was shown to be active against Gram positive bacteria and to act as an ionophore for potassium ions. The antibiotic is ineffective against Gram negative bacteria where the outer membrane appears to block access of the molecule to the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we asked whether boromycin is active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis which, similar to Gram negative bacteria, possesses an outer membrane. The results show that boromycin is a potent inhibitor of mycobacterial growth (MIC50 = 80 nM) with strong bactericidal activity against growing and non-growing drug tolerant persister bacilli. Exposure to boromycin resulted in a rapid loss of membrane potential, reduction of the intracellular ATP level and leakage of cytoplasmic protein. Consistent with boromycin acting as a potassium ionophore, addition of KCl to the medium blocked its antimycobacterial activity. In contrast to the potent antimycobacterial activities of the polyether macrolide, its cytotoxicity and haemolytic activity were low (CC50 = 30 μM, HC50 = 40 μM) with a selectivity index of more than 300. Spontaneous resistant mutants could not be isolated suggesting a mutation frequency of less than 10-9/CFU. Taken together, the results suggests that targeting mycobacterial transmembrane ion gradients may be an attractive chemotherapeutic intervention level to kill otherwise drug tolerant persister bacilli, and to slow down the development of genetic antibiotic resistance. PMID:26941723

  9. Persistent histamine excitation of glutamatergic preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  10. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  11. Resonant activation: a strategy against bacterial persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yan; Zhu, Meng; Xing, Jianhua

    2010-03-01

    A bacterial colony may develop a small number of cells genetically identical to, but phenotypically different from, other normally growing bacteria. These so-called persister cells keep themselves in a dormant state and thus are insensitive to antibiotic treatment, resulting in serious problems of drug resistance. In this paper, we proposed a novel strategy to 'kill' persister cells by triggering them to switch, in a fast and synchronized way, into normally growing cells that are susceptible to antibiotics. The strategy is based on resonant activation (RA), a well-studied phenomenon in physics where the internal noise of a system can constructively facilitate fast and synchronized barrier crossings. Through stochastic Gilliespie simulation with a generic toggle switch model, we demonstrated that RA exists in the phenotypic switching of a single bacterium. Further, by coupling single cell level and population level simulations, we showed that with RA, one can greatly reduce the time and total amount of antibiotics needed to sterilize a bacterial population. We suggest that resonant activation is a general phenomenon in phenotypic transition, and can find other applications such as cancer therapy.

  12. Asthma: mechanisms of disease persistence and progression.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Lauren; Elias, Jack A; Chupp, Geoffrey L

    2004-01-01

    When asthma is diagnosed, eosinophilic inflammation and airway remodeling are established in the bronchial airways and can no longer be separated as cause and effect because both processes contribute to persistence and progression of disease, despite anti-inflammatory therapy. Th2 cells are continually active in the airways, even when disease is quiescent. IL-13 is the key effector cytokine in asthma and stimulates airway fibrosis through the action of matrix metalloproteinases on TGF-beta and promotes epithelial damage, mucus production, and eosinophilia. The production of IL-13 and other Th2 cytokines by non-T cells augments the inflammatory response. Inflammation is amplified by local responses of the epithelium, smooth muscle, and fibroblasts through the production of chemokines, cytokines, and proteases. Injured cells produce adenosine that enhances IL-13 production. We review human and animal data detailing the cellular and molecular interactions in established allergic asthma that promote persistent disease, amplify inflammation, and, in turn, cause disease progression. PMID:15032597

  13. Microbial Biofilms: Persisters, Tolerance and Dosing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogan, N. G.

    2005-03-01

    Almost all moist surfaces are colonized by microbial biofilms. Biofilms are implicated in cross-contamination of food products, biofouling, medical implants and various human infections such as dental cavities, ulcerative colitis and chronic respiratory infections. Much of current research is focused on the recalcitrance of biofilms to typical antibiotic and antimicrobial treatments. Although the polymer component of biofilms impedes the penetration of antimicrobials through reaction-diffusion limitation, this does not explain the observed tolerance, it merely delays the action of the agent. Heterogeneities in growth-rate also slow the eradication of the bacteria since most antimicrobials are far less effective for non-growing, or slowly growing bacteria. This also does not fully describe biofilm tolerance, since heterogeneities arr primairly a result of nutrient consumption. In this investigation, we describe the formation of `persister' cells which neither grow nor die in the presence of antibiotics. We propose that the cells are of a different phenotype than typical bacterial cells and the expression of the phenotype is regulated by the growth rate and the antibiotic concentration. We describe several experiments which describe the dynamics of persister cells and which motivate a dosing protocol that calls for periodic dosing of the population. We then introduce a mathematical model, which describes the effect of such a dosing regiment and indicates that the relative dose/withdrawal times are important in determining the effectiveness of such a treatment. A reduced model is introduced and the similar behavior is demonstrated analytically.

  14. Trigeminal neuralgia and persistent idiopathic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Obermann, Mark; Holle, Dagny; Katsarava, Zaza

    2011-11-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP) are two of the most puzzling orofacial pain conditions and affected patients are often very difficult to treat. TN is characterized by paroxysms of brief but severe pain followed by asymptomatic periods without pain. In some patients a constant dull background pain may persist. This constant dull pain sometimes makes the distinction from PIFP difficult. PIFP is defined as continuous facial pain, typically localized in a circumscribed area of the face, which is not accompanied by any neurological or other lesion identified by clinical examination or clinical investigations. The pain usually does not stay within the usual anatomic boundaries of the trigeminal nerve distribution and is a diagnosis of exclusion. Epidemiologic evidence on TN, and even more so on PIFP, is quite scarce, but generally both conditions are considered to be rare diseases. The etiology and underlying pathophysiology of TN, and more so PIFP, remain unknown. Treatment is based on only few randomized controlled clinical trials and insufficiently evaluated surgical procedures. PMID:22014140

  15. KSHV: Pathways to Tumorigenesis and Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Louise; Damania, Blossom

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8) is the etiological agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman’s disease. These cancers often occur in the context of immunosuppression, which has made KSHV-associated malignancies an increasing global health concern with the persistence of the AIDS epidemic. KSHV has also been linked to several acute inflammatory diseases. KSHV exists between a lytic and latent lifecycle which allow the virus to transition between active replication and quiescent infection. KSHV encodes a number of proteins and small RNAs that are thought to inadvertently transform host cells while performing their functions of helping the virus persist in the infected host. KSHV also has an arsenal of components that aid the virus in evading the host immune response, which help the virus establish a successful lifelong infection. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss the diseases associated with KSHV infection, the biology of latent and lytic infection, and individual proteins and microRNAs that are known to contribute to host cell transformation and immune evasion. PMID:24373311

  16. Persistence Mapping Using EUV Solar Imager Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Young, C. A.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a simple image processing technique that is useful for the visualization and depiction of gradually evolving or intermittent structures in solar physics extreme-ultraviolet imagery. The technique is an application of image segmentation, which we call “Persistence Mapping,” to isolate extreme values in a data set, and is particularly useful for the problem of capturing phenomena that are evolving in both space and time. While integration or “time-lapse” imaging uses the full sample (of size N ), Persistence Mapping rejects (N ‑ 1)/N of the data set and identifies the most relevant 1/N values using the following rule: if a pixel reaches an extreme value, it retains that value until that value is exceeded. The simplest examples isolate minima and maxima, but any quantile or statistic can be used. This paper demonstrates how the technique has been used to extract the dynamics in long-term evolution of comet tails, erupting material, and EUV dimming regions.

  17. Persistent optical gating of a topological insulator

    PubMed Central

    Yeats, Andrew L.; Pan, Yu; Richardella, Anthony; Mintun, Peter J.; Samarth, Nitin; Awschalom, David D.

    2015-01-01

    The spin-polarized surface states of topological insulators (TIs) are attractive for applications in spintronics and quantum computing. A central challenge with these materials is to reliably tune the chemical potential of their electrons with respect to the Dirac point and the bulk bands. We demonstrate persistent, bidirectional optical control of the chemical potential of (Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films grown on SrTiO3. By optically modulating a space-charge layer in the SrTiO3 substrates, we induce a persistent field effect in the TI films comparable to electrostatic gating techniques but without additional materials or processing. This enables us to optically pattern arbitrarily shaped p- and n-type regions in a TI, which we subsequently image with scanning photocurrent microscopy. The ability to optically write and erase mesoscopic electronic structures in a TI may aid in the investigation of the unique properties of the topological insulating phase. The gating effect also generalizes to other thin-film materials, suggesting that these phenomena could provide optical control of chemical potential in a wide range of ultrathin electronic systems. PMID:26601300

  18. Boromycin Kills Mycobacterial Persisters without Detectable Resistance.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Wilfried; Aziz, Dinah B; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Boromycin is a boron-containing polyether macrolide antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It was shown to be active against Gram positive bacteria and to act as an ionophore for potassium ions. The antibiotic is ineffective against Gram negative bacteria where the outer membrane appears to block access of the molecule to the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we asked whether boromycin is active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis which, similar to Gram negative bacteria, possesses an outer membrane. The results show that boromycin is a potent inhibitor of mycobacterial growth (MIC50 = 80 nM) with strong bactericidal activity against growing and non-growing drug tolerant persister bacilli. Exposure to boromycin resulted in a rapid loss of membrane potential, reduction of the intracellular ATP level and leakage of cytoplasmic protein. Consistent with boromycin acting as a potassium ionophore, addition of KCl to the medium blocked its antimycobacterial activity. In contrast to the potent antimycobacterial activities of the polyether macrolide, its cytotoxicity and haemolytic activity were low (CC50 = 30 μM, HC50 = 40 μM) with a selectivity index of more than 300. Spontaneous resistant mutants could not be isolated suggesting a mutation frequency of less than 10(-9)/CFU. Taken together, the results suggests that targeting mycobacterial transmembrane ion gradients may be an attractive chemotherapeutic intervention level to kill otherwise drug tolerant persister bacilli, and to slow down the development of genetic antibiotic resistance. PMID:26941723

  19. DNA Persistence in a Sink Drain Environment

    PubMed Central

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm. The sink drain apparatus was sampled before and for several days after the addition of the sterilized B. anthracis culture to detect the presence of B. anthracis DNA. Multiple PCR primer pairs were used to screen for chromosomal and plasmid DNA with primers targeting shorter sequences showing greater amplification efficiency and success. PCR amplification and detection of target sequences indicate persistence of chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA in the biofilm for 5 or more and 14 or more days, respectively. PMID:26230525

  20. Metapopulation Persistence in Random Fragmented Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Grilli, Jacopo; Barabás, György; Allesina, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Habitat destruction and land use change are making the world in which natural populations live increasingly fragmented, often leading to local extinctions. Although local populations might undergo extinction, a metapopulation may still be viable as long as patches of suitable habitat are connected by dispersal, so that empty patches can be recolonized. Thus far, metapopulations models have either taken a mean-field approach, or have modeled empirically-based, realistic landscapes. Here we show that an intermediate level of complexity between these two extremes is to consider random landscapes, in which the patches of suitable habitat are randomly arranged in an area (or volume). Using methods borrowed from the mathematics of Random Geometric Graphs and Euclidean Random Matrices, we derive a simple, analytic criterion for the persistence of the metapopulation in random fragmented landscapes. Our results show how the density of patches, the variability in their value, the shape of the dispersal kernel, and the dimensionality of the landscape all contribute to determining the fate of the metapopulation. Using this framework, we derive sufficient conditions for the population to be spatially localized, such that spatially confined clusters of patches act as a source of dispersal for the whole landscape. Finally, we show that a regular arrangement of the patches is always detrimental for persistence, compared to the random arrangement of the patches. Given the strong parallel between metapopulation models and contact processes, our results are also applicable to models of disease spread on spatial networks. PMID:25993004

  1. DNA Persistence in a Sink Drain Environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-07-31

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm. The sink drain apparatus was sampled before and for several days after the addition of themore » sterilized B. anthracis culture to detect the presence of B. anthracis DNA. Multiple PCR primer pairs were used to screen for chromosomal and plasmid DNA with primers targeting shorter sequences showing greater amplification efficiency and success. PCR amplification and detection of target sequences indicate persistence of chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA in the biofilm for 5 or more and 14 or more days, respectively.« less

  2. Persisting weakness after withdrawal of a statin

    PubMed Central

    Mygland, Åse; Ljøstad, Unn; Krossnes, Bård Kronen

    2014-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman treated with simvastatin for several years followed by atorvastatin for about 1 year presented with fatigue, weakness and unsteady gait. The finding of elevated creatine kinase (CK) and symmetric muscle weakness around shoulders and hips led to suspicion of a toxic statin-associated myopathy. Atorvastatin was withdrawn, but her weakness persisted. Owing to persisting weakness, an autoimmune myopathy (myositis) was suspected, but initially disregarded since a muscle biopsy showed necrotic muscle fibres without inflammatory cell infiltrates and myositis-specific autoantibodies were absent. After 18 months with slowly progressive weakness and increasing CK values, awareness of new knowledge about autoimmunity as a cause of necrotic myopathy, led to a successful treatment trial with intravenous immunoglobulines, followed by steroids and metothrexate. Antibodies to the target enzyme of statins (HMGCR (3-hydroksy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase)) were detected in her serum, and she was diagnosed with autoimmune necrotic myositis probably triggered by atorvastatin. PMID:24713712

  3. Persistent active longitudes in sunspot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S.; Usoskin, I.

    It has been recently shown that spot activity of cool stars including solar analogues, is grouped in two clearly distinguished active longitudes which are persistent within at least one starspot cycle. Solar data including positional information of individual sunspots / groups extends back for about 130 years covering 12 solar cycles. Here we present the results of our research of longitudinal distribution of sunspot activity using an analysis similar to that applied to the stars. First, we synthesized, from the actual sunspot data, the sun's light curve as if it was defined only by spots. Then solar images were calculated from this light curve, giving a natural smoothing of the spot pattern. For each Carrington rotation, longitudinal position of these smoothed spot regions was calculated. The analysis reveals the following main features: - Sunspot activity is grouped in two active longitudes (with the differential rotation taken into account) 180o apart from each other which are persistent through the entire studied period of 12 cycles, similarly to stars. - The longitude migration is determined by changing the mean latitude of sunspot activity (the Maunder butterfly) and differential rotation. - The two longitudes periodically alternate the dominant activity with about 3.7 year period implying for the existence of the Sflip-flopT phenomenon known in - starspot activity.

  4. DNA Persistence in a Sink Drain Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-07-31

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm. The sink drain apparatus was sampled before and for several days after the addition of the sterilized B. anthracis culture to detect the presence of B. anthracis DNA. Multiple PCR primer pairs were used to screen for chromosomal and plasmid DNA with primers targeting shorter sequences showing greater amplification efficiency and success. PCR amplification and detection of target sequences indicate persistence of chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA in the biofilm for 5 or more and 14 or more days, respectively.

  5. A Methodology for Conducting Integrative Mixed Methods Research and Data Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Felipe González; Kellison, Joshua G.; Boyd, Stephen J.; Kopak, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Mixed methods research has gained visibility within the last few years, although limitations persist regarding the scientific caliber of certain mixed methods research designs and methods. The need exists for rigorous mixed methods designs that integrate various data analytic procedures for a seamless transfer of evidence across qualitative and quantitative modalities. Such designs can offer the strength of confirmatory results drawn from quantitative multivariate analyses, along with “deep structure” explanatory descriptions as drawn from qualitative analyses. This article presents evidence generated from over a decade of pilot research in developing an integrative mixed methods methodology. It presents a conceptual framework and methodological and data analytic procedures for conducting mixed methods research studies, and it also presents illustrative examples from the authors' ongoing integrative mixed methods research studies. PMID:22167325

  6. [Mixed leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Torsten

    2011-03-01

    Coexisting peripheral arterial disease is not uncommon (15 - 21 %) in patients with ulcera cruris primarily based on a venous etiology. Patient's history, clinical examination and detection of ABI as well as duplex scan will establish diagnosis of mixed arterial-venous ulcera. Clinical significance of coexisting arterial disease is often difficult to define and should be evaluated by a vascular specialist. The concept of treatment of mixed ulcers should always include the arterial component. Frequently peripheral arterial perfusion and healing can be improved by minimal invasive, endovascular revascularization. Compression therapy is the corner stone in treatment of venous disease and should be complemented by contemporary two piece graduated compression systems if ulcera are present. According to circumstances ablation of varicose veins must be considered. PMID:21360460

  7. Nozzle mixing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mensink, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a nozzle device for causing two fluids to mix together. In particular, a spray nozzle comprise two hollow, concentric housings, an inner housing and an outer housing. The inner housing has a channel formed therethrough for a first fluid. Its outer surface cooperates with the interior surface of the outer housing to define the second channel for a second fluid. The outer surface of the inner housing and the inner surface of the outer housing each carry a plurality of vanes that interleave but do not touch, each vane of one housing being between two vanes of the other housing. The vanes are curved and the inner surface of the outer housing and the outer surface of the inner housing converge to narrow the second channel. The shape of second channel results in a swirling, accelerating second fluid that will impact the first fluid just past the end of the nozzle where mixing will take place.

  8. Experiments in mixed reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krum, David M.; Sadek, Ramy; Kohli, Luv; Olson, Logan; Bolas, Mark

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Institute for Creative Technologies and the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California, the Mixed Reality lab develops technologies and techniques for presenting realistic immersive training experiences. Such experiences typically place users within a complex ecology of social actors, physical objects, and collections of intents, motivations, relationships, and other psychological constructs. Currently, it remains infeasible to completely synthesize the interactivity and sensory signatures of such ecologies. For this reason, the lab advocates mixed reality methods for training and conducts experiments exploring such methods. Currently, the lab focuses on understanding and exploiting the elasticity of human perception with respect to representational differences between real and virtual environments. This paper presents an overview of three projects: techniques for redirected walking, displays for the representation of virtual humans, and audio processing to increase stress.

  9. Mixing by individual swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkin, Dmitri; Shum, Henry; Yeomans, Julia

    2012-11-01

    Despite their evolutionary and technological importance, different biomixing mechanisms, their effectiveness and universality remain poorly understood. In this talk we focus on the Lagrangian transport of the surrounding fluid by swimmers. Low Re passive tracers advected by swimmers move in loops that are, in general, almost closed. We analyze the reasons for this behavior and, as non-closedness of the loops is a natural requirement for an efficient mixing, propose a classification of possible mechanisms for biogenic mixing. Next, we discuss the universal (common to all swimmers) and the swimmer-dependent features of the resulting tracer displacements and analyze the Darwin drift, the total fluid volume displaced by a swimmer passing from and to infinity. We show that the Darwin drift is finite for force-free swimmers and can be decomposed into a universal and a swimmer-dependent part. We illustrate our consideration with examples for model swimmers and biological data.

  10. Turbulent mixing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Abarzhi, S I; Sreenivasan, K R

    2010-04-13

    Turbulence is a supermixer. Turbulent mixing has immense consequences for physical phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales under both high- and low-energy-density conditions. It influences thermonuclear fusion in inertial and magnetic confinement systems; governs dynamics of supernovae, accretion disks and explosions; dominates stellar convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics; affects premixed and non-premixed combustion; controls standard turbulent flows (wall-bounded and free-subsonic, supersonic as well as hypersonic); as well as atmospheric and oceanic phenomena (which themselves have important effects on climate). In most of these circumstances, the mixing phenomena are driven by non-equilibrium dynamics. While each article in this collection dwells on a specific problem, the purpose here is to seek a few unified themes amongst diverse phenomena. PMID:20211872

  11. Predictors of caregiver feeding practices differentiating persistently obese from persistently non-overweight adolescents ✩

    PubMed Central

    Towner, Elizabeth K.; Reiter-Purtill, Jennifer; Boles, Richard E.; Zeller, Meg H.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the contribution of caregiver feeding practices to adolescent diet and weight is important to refining caregiver roles within the context of adolescent obesity prevention and treatment. This secondary data analysis examined whether feeding practices of female caregivers differentiated persistently non-overweight (n = 29) from persistently obese (n = 47) adolescents. Families who previously participated in a cross-sectional study on correlates of obesity were recruited for this follow-up study. At the time of the follow-up study, anthropometric measures were taken for all female caregivers and adolescents, and caregivers completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire-Adolescent version. Socioeconomic, demographic, female caregiver anthropometric, and psychological (caregiver perceived self-weight and concern for adolescent overweight) variables were examined as predictors of feeding practices found to differentiate the two groups. Female caregivers of persistently obese adolescents reported significantly greater use of restriction and monitoring compared to female caregivers of persistently non-overweight adolescents. Restriction was predicted by female caregiver age and concern for adolescent overweight whereas monitoring was predicted by concern for adolescent overweight only. Caregiver feeding strategies may be an important target for adolescent obesity prevention and intervention efforts particularly among those with heightened concern about their teen’s weight status. PMID:25246031

  12. Perceptions of Persistence: Why Underprepared Community College Students Are Not Persisting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maue, Lea C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illuminate the barriers to persistence underprepared students at the community college experience after the initial successful completion of one semester. A qualitative interview study, grounded in phenomenology, was implemented. Participants were identified through a process of purposeful selection, which included…

  13. Characteristics of Student Persisters and Non-Persisters at Old Dominion University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Lloyd R.; And Others

    Demographic, academic, and other college-related characteristics of the persisting and nonpersisting students at Old Dominion University were investigated during a one-year period from fall 1976 to fall 1977. Information was collected from the student master registration file for a study population of 11,637 undergraduates. The students ranged in…

  14. Numerical simulation of topographically forced mesoscale variability in a well-mixed marine layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddington, Lee W.; O'Brien, J. J.; Stuart, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    A simple nonlinear numerical model of a well-mixed marine layer is employed to examine topographically forced mesoscale variability off coastal California. This model is utilized to simulate a persistent wind maximum observed near Point Conception during northwesterly winds. The model solves for the two horizontal components of the marine-layer height and the marine-layer wind.

  15. Development of Academic Self-Efficacy in Women during College: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Savala

    2013-01-01

    Although women account for more than 50% of the college degrees awarded nationally, The College of Idaho has had a challenge retaining female students. There are any number of reasons for women's struggle to persist at the college, but one of the most basic may be a matter of self-efficacy. This mixed methods study used a combination of…

  16. Perceived Stress and an Elaborated Structural Model of Adult Student Persistence: An Examination of Financial Aid, Financial Satisfaction, Intent To Persist and Persistence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Martin E.

    Researchers used cross-sectional survey research to reexamine the problem of adult persistence within undergraduate degree programs. They identified a variable--perceived stress--that permitted a richer explanation of the process of student persistence. A model was presented that examined the attitudinal and behavioral impacts of unmet need,…

  17. Persistent damage induces mitochondrial DNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shokolenko, Inna N.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently toward understanding the processes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and repair. However, a paucity of information still exists regarding the physiological effects of persistent mtDNA damage. This is due, in part, to experimental difficulties associated with targeting mtDNA for damage, while sparing nuclear DNA. Here, we characterize two systems designed for targeted mtDNA damage based on the inducible (Tet-ON) mitochondrial expression of the bacterial enzyme, exonuclease III, and the human enzyme, uracil-N-glyosylase containing the Y147A mutation. In both systems, damage was accompanied by degradation of mtDNA, which was detectable by six hours after induction of mutant uracil-N-glycosylase and by twelve hours after induction of exoIII. Unexpectedly, increases in the steady-state levels of single-strand lesions, which led to degradation, were small in absolute terms indicating that both abasic sites and single-strand gaps may be poorly tolerated in mtDNA. mtDNA degradation was accompanied by the loss of expression of mtDNA-encoded COX2. After withdrawal of the inducer, recovery from mtDNA depletion occurred faster in the system expressing exonuclease III, but in both systems reduced mtDNA levels persisted longer than 144h after doxycycline withdrawal. mtDNA degradation was followed by reduction and loss of respiration, decreased membrane potential, reduced cell viability, reduced intrinsic reactive oxygen species production, slowed proliferation, and changes in mitochondrial morphology (fragmentation of the mitochondrial network, rounding and “foaming” of the mitochondria). The mutagenic effects of abasic sites in mtDNA were low, which indicates that damaged mtDNA molecules may be degraded if not rapidly repaired. This study establishes, for the first time, that mtDNA degradation can be a direct and immediate consequence of persistent mtDNA damage and that increased ROS production is not an invariant consequence

  18. Persistent Identifiers, Discoverability and Open Science (Communication)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Fiona; Lehnert, Kerstin; Hanson, Brooks

    2016-04-01

    Early in 2016, the American Geophysical Union announced it was incorporating ORCIDs into its submission workflows. This was accompanied by a strong statement supporting the use of other persistent identifiers - such as IGSNs, and the CrossRef open registry 'funding data'. This was partly in response to funders' desire to track and manage their outputs. However the more compelling argument, and the reason why the AGU has also signed up to the Center for Open Science's Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines (http://cos.io/top), is that ultimately science and scientists will be the richer for these initiatives due to increased opportunities for interoperability, reproduceability and accreditation. The AGU has appealed to the wider community to engage with these initiatives, recognising that - unlike the introduction of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for articles by CrossRef - full, enriched use of persistent identifiers throughout the scientific process requires buy-in from a range of scholarly communications stakeholders. At the same time, across the general research landscape, initiatives such as Project CRediT (contributor roles taxonomy), Publons (reviewer acknowledgements) and the forthcoming CrossRef DOI Event Tracker are contributing to our understanding and accreditation of contributions and impact. More specifically for earth science and scientists, the cross-functional Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences (COPDESS) was formed in October 2014 and is working to 'provide an organizational framework for Earth and space science publishers and data facilities to jointly implement and promote common policies and procedures for the publication and citation of data across Earth Science journals'. Clearly, the judicious integration of standards, registries and persistent identifiers such as ORCIDs and International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs) to the research and research output processes is key to the success of this venture

  19. Targeting Disease Persistence in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zörnig, Martin; Hayashi, Yujiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent 20%–40% of human sarcomas. Although approximately half of GISTs are cured by surgery, prognosis of advanced disease used to be poor due to the high resistance of these tumors to conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The introduction of molecularly targeted therapy (e.g., with imatinib mesylate) following the discovery of the role of oncogenic mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinases KIT and platelet-derived growth factor α (PDGFRA) significantly increased patient survival. However, GIST cells persist in 95%–97% of imatinib-treated patients who eventually progress and die of the disease because of the emergence of clones with drug-resistant mutations. Because these secondary mutations are highly heterogeneous, even second- and third-line drugs that are effective against certain genotypes have only moderately increased progression-free survival. Consequently, alternative strategies such as targeting molecular mechanisms underlying disease persistence should be considered. We reviewed recently discovered cell-autonomous and microenvironmental mechanisms that could promote the survival of GIST cells in the presence of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. We particularly focused on the potential role of adult precursors for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), the normal counterpart of GISTs. ICC precursors share phenotypic characteristics with cells that emerge in a subset of patients treated with imatinib and in young patients with GIST characterized by loss of succinate dehydrogenase complex proteins and lack of KIT or PDGFRA mutations. Eradication of residual GIST cells and cure of GIST will likely require individualized combinations of several approaches tailored to tumor genotype and phenotype. Significance Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are one of the most common connective tissue cancers. Most GISTs that cannot be cured by surgery respond to molecularly targeted therapy (e.g., with imatinib

  20. Swimming and persons with mild persistant asthma.

    PubMed

    Arandelović, Mirjana; Stanković, Ivana; Nikolić, Maja

    2007-01-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of recreational swimming on lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) in patients with mild persistent asthma. This study included 65 patients with mild persistent asthma, who were divided into two groups: experimental group A (n = 45) and control group B (n = 20). Patients from both groups were treated with low doses of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and short-acting beta2 agonists salbutamol as needed. Our program for patients in group A was combined asthma education with swimming (twice a week on a 1-h basis for the following 6 months). At the end of the study, in Group A, we found a statistically significant increase of lung function parameters FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) (3.55 vs. 3.65) (p < 0.01), FVC (forced vital capacity) (4.27 vs. 4.37) (p < 0.05), PEF (peak expiratory flow) (7.08 vs. 7.46) (p < 0.01), and statistically significant decrease of BHR (PD20 0.58 vs. 2.01) (p < 0.001). In Group B, there was a statistically significant improvement of FEV1 3.29 vs. 3.33 (p < 0.05) and although FVC, FEV1/FVC, and PEF were improved, it was not significant. When Groups A and B were compared at the end of the study, there was a statistically significant difference of FVC (4.01 vs. 4.37), FEV1 (3.33 vs. 3.55), PEF (6.79 vs.7.46), and variability (p < 0.001), and statistically significantly decreased BHR in Group A (2.01 vs. 1.75) (p < 0.001). Engagement of patients with mild persistent asthma in recreational swimming in nonchlorinated pools, combined with regular medical treatment and education, leads to better improvement of their parameters of lung function and also to more significant decrease of their airway hyperresponsiveness compared to patients treated with traditional medicine. PMID:17704850

  1. College Persistence of First-Year African American and African Immigrant Males: Differences of Non-Academic and Other Factors on Community College Black Male Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams-Mahaley, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    Literature has postulated that noncognitive or psychosocial variables are a strong predictor of African American and international students persisting in college. Using a modified version of the Noncognitive-Revised (NCQ-R) questionnaire developed by Tracey and Sedlacek (1984), this mixed methods descriptive study investigated the relationships…

  2. Persistence with osteoporosis medication among newly-treated osteoporotic patients.

    PubMed

    van Boven, Job F M; de Boer, Pieter T; Postma, Maarten J; Vegter, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Low persistence with osteoporosis medication is associated with higher fracture risk. Previous studies estimated that 1-year persistence with osteoporosis medication is low. Our aim was to study persistence with osteoporosis medication among patients with long-term follow-up (to 5 years). The InterAction Database (IADB) was used to analyze persistence of 8610 Dutch patients initiating osteoporosis drugs between 2003 and 2011. Drugs under study were alendronate, risedronate, ibandronate, etidronate, raloxifene and strontium ranelate. Cumulative persistence rates were calculated after different time frames (3 months-5 years) using survival analysis. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to identify determinants of non-persistence. Furthermore, switching rates of persistent patients who initiated bisphosphonate therapy were analyzed. Persistence with osteoporosis therapy was 70.7 % (95 % CI, 69.7-71.7), 58.5 % (95 % CI, 57.4-59.6 %), 25.3 % (95 % CI, 24.1-26.5) after 6 months, 1 and 5 years, respectively. Determinants associated with higher risk to non-persistence within the first year were daily dosing regimen [HR, 1.76 (95 % CI, 1.46-2.14)], age <60 years [HR, 1.26 (95 % CI, 1.19-1.34)] and use of glucocorticoids [HR, 1.16 (95 % CI, 1.07-1.26)]. Monthly dosing schedule and use of generic brands of alendronate did not show a significant association with non-persistence. Approximately 4.0 % of patients initiating therapy with weekly alendronate or weekly risedronate switched therapy. Persistence with osteoporosis medication is low. Because low persistence is strongly associated with higher fracture risk, interventions to improve persistence are recommended. This study identified several patient groups in whom such interventions may be most relevant. PMID:23575910

  3. [Persistent atrial paralysis: reported of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Reyes, H; Cruz Cruz, F; Iturralde Torres, P; de Micheli, A; González Hermosillo, J A

    1997-01-01

    Persistent atrial standstill is an uncommon clinical finding, this condition has no atrial electrical activity and do not respond to electrical stimulation. Electrophysiologic mapping of the heart, demonstrates two types of standstill: total and partial. There are three types of patients with this condition: patients with chronic cardiopathy, patients with muscular dystrophy and the third idiopathic group. In this article, we present two clinical cases, the fist one with dilated cardiomiopathy, in which we demonstrated total atrial standstill. The second patient with rheumatic heart disease, in which we demonstrated partial standstill that included the apical portion of the rigth atrium. We discuss the clinical and electrophysiological finding of both cases and we review the literature. PMID:9585833

  4. Synaptic reverberation underlying mnemonic persistent activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, X J

    2001-08-01

    Stimulus-specific persistent neural activity is the neural process underlying active (working) memory. Since its discovery 30 years ago, mnemonic activity has been hypothesized to be sustained by synaptic reverberation in a recurrent circuit. Recently, experimental and modeling work has begun to test the reverberation hypothesis at the cellular level. Moreover, theory has been developed to describe memory storage of an analog stimulus (such as spatial location or eye position), in terms of continuous 'bump attractors' and 'line attractors'. This review summarizes new studies, and discusses insights and predictions from biophysically based models. The stability of a working memory network is recognized as a serious problem; stability can be achieved if reverberation is largely mediated by NMDA receptors at recurrent synapses. PMID:11476885

  5. Melting of persistent double-stranded polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Hertzberg, Mark Peter; Kardar, Mehran

    2008-11-01

    Motivated by recent DNA-pulling experiments, we revisit the Poland-Scheraga model of melting a double-stranded polymer. We include distinct bending rigidities for both the double-stranded segments and the single-stranded segments forming a bubble. There is also bending stiffness at the branch points between the two segment types. The transfer matrix technique for single persistent chains is generalized to describe the branching bubbles. Properties of spherical harmonics are then exploited in truncating and numerically solving the resulting transfer matrix. This allows efficient computation of phase diagrams and force-extension curves (isotherms). While the main focus is on exposition of the transfer matrix technique, we provide general arguments for a reentrant melting transition in stiff double strands. Our theoretical approach can also be extended to study polymers with bubbles of any number of strands, with potential applications to molecules such as collagen.

  6. Slow light with persistent hole burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhmuratov, R. N.; Rebane, A.; Mégret, P.; Odeurs, J.

    2005-05-01

    We consider the propagation of a Gaussian probe pulse in an absorptive, optically dense, two-level medium if a deep, persistent hole is created in advance by another pump field in the inhomogeneously broadened absorption spectrum of this medium. Both fields are well separated in time and the lifetime of the hole is assumed to be long with respect to the delay time between the pump and probe pulses. We show that the group velocity of the Gaussian probe pulse reduces several orders in magnitude, similarly to the reduction of the group velocity for the probe field in electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomena. In contrast to EIT, the width of the transparency window can be made very wide because of the saturation broadening of the hole.

  7. PERSISTENT WRIST PAIN IN A MATURE GOLFER

    PubMed Central

    Hazle, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Clients presenting with ulnar-sided wrist pain can provide diagnostic and management challenges for physical therapists. Symptoms in this region may originate from multiple structures. Integration of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging results is often required for optimal decision-making and patient management. To obtain the most informative imaging results, practitioners need an understanding of injury patterns and their detection by various imaging modalities. This case describes a mature golfer who presented with persistent ulnar-sided wrist pain and was eventually determined to have a fracture of the hook of the hamate accompanied by neighboring soft tissue involvement also contributing to his symptom complex. His history and the diagnostic process are detailed along with a brief discussion of his subsequent management post-operatively. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case Report) PMID:22893862

  8. Phosphors with long-persistent green phosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Yen, William M; Jia, Weiyi; Lu, Lizhu; Yuan, Huabiao

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to phosphors including long-persistence green phosphors. Phosphors of the invention are represented by the general formula: M.sub.k Al.sub.2 O.sub.4 :2xEu.sup.2+,2yR.sup.3+ wherein k-1-2x-2y, x is a number ranging from about 0.0001 to about 0.05, y is a number ranging from about x to about 3x, M is an alkaline earth metal, and R.sup.3+ is one or more trivalent metal ions. Phosphors of this invention include powders, ceramics, single crystals and single crystal fibers. A method of manufacturing improved phosphors and a method of manufacturing single crystal phosphors are also provided.

  9. Flexibility, persistence, and success in sex therapy.

    PubMed

    Sewell, H H; Abramowitz, S I

    1979-11-01

    The predictive utility of patient flexibility as a moderator of persistence and benefit from sex therapy was examined. In addition to a direct self-report flexibility scale, 21 couples completed psychometric measures of sexual and marital compatibility before undergoing a modified Masters and Johnson sexual retraining regimen. Following treatment the 15 continuing pairs filled out the same satisfaction inventories and, along with their male and female cotherapists, made posttherapy ratings of change on sex-specific personal and marital criteria. Flexibility proved to be a strikingly effective discriminator of remainers from early terminators and demonstrated promise as a predictor of favorable sex therapy outcome. Results are discussed in terms of the need to identify and prepare rigid individuals who cannot easily accommodate the relatively directive and value-laden features of sexual retraining. PMID:518289

  10. Hemodialysis through persistent left superior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Kute, V. B.; Vanikar, A. V.; Gumber, M. R.; Shah, P. R.; Goplani, K. R.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of end stage renal disease patient who displayed a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) after placement of hemodialysis (HD) catheter through left internal jugular vein, as revealed by routine post-procedure X-ray chest. The diagnosis of PLSVC was confirmed by arterial blood gas, two-dimensional echocardiography, computed tomography thorax and angiographic examination. This anomaly is rather rare; few studies on safety of PLSVC for HD have been reported. The catheter was uneventfully used for HD for 2 months with careful continuous monitoring and removed after arteriovenous fistula was successfully cannulated. Physicians who place HD catheters in the left jugular/subclavian vein should be aware of the existence of PLSVC. PMID:21633545

  11. Nasal leech infestation causing persistent epistaxis

    PubMed Central

    Sarathi, Kalra

    2011-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the nasal cavity are commonly encountered as a cause of epistaxis; however, nasal leech infestation as a cause of unilateral persistent epistaxis is very rare. Examination of nasal cavity revealed fleshy material in the left nostril, which was identified as leech. The leech was removed with the help of an artery forceps following irrigation of the left nostril with normal saline and adopting wait-and-watch policy. In developing countries, leech infestation as a cause of epistaxis should be suspected in patients with lower socioeconomic status or in those living in rural areas who give history of drinking polluted water from, or bathing in, stagnant ponds and puddles. PMID:21887037

  12. Committee Opinion No 673: Persistent Vulvar Pain.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Persistent vulvar pain is a complex disorder that frequently is frustrating to the patient and the clinician. It can be difficult to treat and rapid resolution is unusual, even with appropriate therapy. Vulvar pain can be caused by a specific disorder or it can be idiopathic. Idiopathic vulvar pain is classified as vulvodynia. Although optimal treatment remains unclear, consider an individualized, multidisciplinary approach to address all physical and emotional aspects possibly attributable to vulvodynia. Specialists who may need to be involved include sexual counselors, clinical psychologists, physical therapists, and pain specialists. Patients may perceive this approach to mean the practitioner does not believe their pain is "real"; thus, it is important to begin any treatment approach with a detailed discussion, including an explanation of the diagnosis and determination of realistic treatment goals. Future research should aim at evaluating a multimodal approach in the treatment of vulvodynia, along with more research on the etiologies of vulvodynia. PMID:27548558

  13. Low latency and persistent data storage

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Blake G; Franceschini, Michele M; Jagmohan, Ashish; Takken, Todd

    2014-11-04

    Persistent data storage is provided by a computer program product that includes computer program code configured for receiving a low latency store command that includes write data. The write data is written to a first memory device that is implemented by a nonvolatile solid-state memory technology characterized by a first access speed. It is acknowledged that the write data has been successfully written to the first memory device. The write data is written to a second memory device that is implemented by a volatile memory technology. At least a portion of the data in the first memory device is written to a third memory device when a predetermined amount of data has been accumulated in the first memory device. The third memory device is implemented by a nonvolatile solid-state memory technology characterized by a second access speed that is slower than the first access speed.

  14. Low latency and persistent data storage

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Blake G; Franceschini, Michele M; Jagmohan, Ashish; Takken, Todd E

    2014-02-18

    Persistent data storage is provided by a method that includes receiving a low latency store command that includes write data. The write data is written to a first memory device that is implemented by a nonvolatile solid-state memory technology characterized by a first access speed. It is acknowledged that the write data has been successfully written to the first memory device. The write data is written to a second memory device that is implemented by a volatile memory technology. At least a portion of the data in the first memory device is written to a third memory device when a predetermined amount of data has been accumulated in the first memory device. The third memory device is implemented by a nonvolatile solid-state memory technology characterized by a second access speed that is slower than the first access speed.

  15. Persistent superconductor currents in holographic lattices.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Norihiro; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Maeda, Kengo

    2014-07-01

    We consider a persistent superconductor current along the direction with no translational symmetry in a holographic gravity model. Incorporating a lattice structure into the model, we numerically construct novel solutions of hairy charged stationary black branes with momentum or rotation along the latticed direction. The lattice structure prevents the horizon from rotating, and the total momentum is only carried by matter fields outside the black brane horizon. This is consistent with the black hole rigidity theorem, and it suggests that in dual field theory with lattices, superconductor currents are made up of "composite" fields, rather than "fractionalized" degrees of freedom. We also show that our solutions are consistent with the superfluid hydrodynamics. PMID:25032917

  16. Chatter detection in turning using persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasawneh, Firas A.; Munch, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new approach for ascertaining the stability of stochastic dynamical systems in their parameter space by examining their time series using topological data analysis (TDA). We illustrate the approach using a nonlinear delayed model that describes the tool oscillations due to self-excited vibrations in turning. Each time series is generated using the Euler-Maruyama method and a corresponding point cloud is obtained using the Takens embedding. The point cloud can then be analyzed using a tool from TDA known as persistent homology. The results of this study show that the described approach can be used for analyzing datasets of delay dynamical systems generated both from numerical simulation and experimental data. The contributions of this paper include presenting for the first time a topological approach for investigating the stability of a class of nonlinear stochastic delay equations, and introducing a new application of TDA to machining processes.

  17. The Persistence of Gaining and Losing Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, J. P.; Frye, A.

    2012-12-01

    Streams are commonly classified as "gaining" or "losing", according to their relationships with groundwater. However, the gaining and losing nature of a stream can vary in space and time. Understanding the spatial and temporal persistence of gaining and losing reaches is essential for understanding controls on stream health. This is particularly important during low flow conditions. Hydrologic models are typically designed to simulate high flows, and are challenged by low flow. This problem will become more important as hydrologists are asked to forecast the increasing occurrence of low flows as a consequence of climate change. Low flow discharges have been a focus of research as they are occurring earlier in the summer and have longer durations throughout the fall. A concern is how low flow will affect water resources and its users in the region when demand is at its highest. As low flow discharges continue to persist, debate over these rights will continue as well. This study we used chloride as a chemical tracer to monitor gains and losses of stream discharge of small watershed in Southwestern, Idaho. Six conductivity probes were spaced evenly 200m apart along a control reach 1200m in total length. Tracers were performed at least once a month at this site throughout the winter and spring and even more often during the summer dry down to understand the temporal changes occurring. Spatial variations were observed by performing basin wide tracers over a stream length of ~9km during the spring and late summer. Results show that stream baseflow is dependent on the winter snowpack and spring rains in order to recharge the deep groundwater systems and to create a hydrologic connection between the stream and local hillslopes. As a result, when winter snowpack's and spring rains are mild, this connectivity is cut off much sooner producing low flow conditions much earlier in the summer.

  18. Persistent organochlorine pesticide residues in animal feed.

    PubMed

    Nag, Subir Kumar; Raikwar, Mukesh K

    2011-03-01

    Animal products like milk and meat are often found to be contaminated with residues of persistent pesticides and other toxic substances. The major source of entry of these compounds to animal body is the contaminated feed and fodder. So, unless the residues are managed at this stage, it is very difficult to prevent contamination in milk and meat. Therefore, the status of residue level of most persistent organochlorinated pesticides (OCP) in feed and fodder should be monitored regularly. The frequency of occurrence and contamination levels of OCP residues in different kinds of animal concentrate feed and straw samples collected from Bundelkhand region of India were determined. Out of 533 total samples, 301 i.e. 56.47% samples were positive containing residues of different OCPs like hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) complex, endosulfan and dicofol. Among different HCH isomers, the mean concentration of β-HCH was highest, and total HCH varied from 0.01 to 0.306 mg kg(-1). In case of DDT complex, i.e. DDD, DDE and DDT, the concentration ranged between 0.016 and 0.118 mg kg(-1) and the pp(|) isomers were more frequently encountered than their op(|) counterparts. Endosulfan was also found in some samples in concentration ranging from 0.009 to 0.237 mg/kg, but dicofol could be recorded in very few samples. Although feed samples were found to contain OC residues, after comparing their levels in positive samples with the limiting values of respective pesticides, only very few were found to exceed the threshold level. Otherwise, they were mostly within safe limits. PMID:20443138

  19. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  20. Mix/Cast Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallentine, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presented is a training handbook for Mix/Cast Contamination Control; a part of a series of training courses to qualify access to Mix/Cast facilities. Contents: List Contamination Control Requirements; Identify foreign objects debris (FOD), Control Areas and their guidelines; Describe environmental monitoring; List Contamination Control Initiatives; Describe concern for Controlled Materials; Identify FOD Controlled Areas in Mix/Cast.

  1. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2015-09-22

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  2. Development of Persister-FACSeq: a method to massively parallelize quantification of persister physiology and its heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Theresa C.; Brynildsen, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are thought to underlie the relapse of chronic infections. Knowledge of persister physiology would illuminate avenues for therapeutic intervention; however, such knowledge has remained elusive because persisters have yet to be segregated from other cell types to sufficient purity. This technical hurdle has stymied progress toward understanding persistence. Here we developed Persister-FACSeq, which is a method that uses fluorescence-activated cell sorting, antibiotic tolerance assays, and next generation sequencing to interrogate persister physiology and its heterogeneity. As a proof-of-concept, we used Persister-FACSeq on a library of reporters to study gene expression distributions in non-growing Escherichia coli, and found that persistence to ofloxacin is inversely correlated with the capacity of non-growing cells to synthesize protein. Since Persister-FACSeq can be applied to study persistence to any antibiotic in any environment for any bacteria that can harbor a fluorescent reporter, we anticipate that it will yield unprecedented knowledge of this detrimental phenotype. PMID:27142337

  3. Persistent bacterial infections, antibiotic tolerance, and the oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Sarah Schmidt; Hung, Deborah T.

    2013-01-01

    Certain bacterial pathogens are able to evade the host immune system and persist within the human host. The consequences of persistent bacterial infections potentially include increased morbidity and mortality from the infection itself as well as an increased risk of dissemination of disease. Eradication of persistent infections is difficult, often requiring prolonged or repeated courses of antibiotics. During persistent infections, a population or subpopulation of bacteria exists that is refractory to traditional antibiotics, possibly in a non-replicating or metabolically altered state. This review highlights the clinical significance of persistent infections and discusses different in vitro models used to investigate the altered physiology of bacteria during persistent infections. We specifically focus on recent work establishing increased protection against oxidative stress as a key element of the altered physiologic state across different in vitro models and pathogens. PMID:23563389

  4. People underestimate the value of persistence for creative performance.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Brian J; Nordgren, Loran F

    2015-08-01

    Across 7 studies, we investigated the prediction that people underestimate the value of persistence for creative performance. Across a range of creative tasks, people consistently underestimated how productive they would be while persisting (Studies 1-3). Study 3 found that the subjectively experienced difficulty, or disfluency, of creative thought accounted for persistence undervaluation. Alternative explanations based on idea quality (Studies 1-2B) and goal setting (Study 4) were considered and ruled out and domain knowledge was explored as a boundary condition (Study 5). In Study 6, the disfluency of creative thought reduced people's willingness to invest in an opportunity to persist, resulting in lower financial performance. This research demonstrates that persistence is a critical determinant of creative performance and that people may undervalue and underutilize persistence in everyday creative problem solving. PMID:26191961

  5. A comparative study on the persistence of imidacloprid and beta-cyfluthrin in vegetables.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tirthankar; Banerjee, Devottam; Roy, Sankhajit; Banerjee, Hemanta; Pal, Srikumar

    2012-07-01

    In an effort to compare the persistence of imidacloprid and beta-cyfluthrin, when applied through a ready mix formulation, Solomon 300 OD @ 200 and 400 mL ha(-1) in the fruits of brinjal, tomato and okra, the present study has been made. The study indicated that the dissipation of these insecticides irrespective of fruits followed concentration dependent first order kinetics. The degradation constant and half live value of beta-cyfluthrin varies between -0.287 and -0.642 day(-1) and 1.07 and 2.41 days while that of imidacloprid between -0.21 and -0.34 day(-1) and 1.98 and 3.30 days respectively suggesting that the persistence of beta-cyfluthrin is lower than that of imidacloprid in fruits of these vegetables. Moreover, the persistence of these insecticides when compared between different fruits, it is highest in brinjal followed by tomato and least in okra, a probable clue of which has been proposed based on the non-enzymatic antioxidant content of the fruits. PMID:22526997

  6. Collaborative air/ground command and control for responsive persistent ISR operations using unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordower, Rick; Dixon, Lee; Lynch, Nick

    2010-04-01

    "The foundation for integrating ISR planning and direction is the information network, including the appropriate ISR services and applications oriented toward the [commanders] needs. By combining global visibility of available information and intelligence needs with the tools to maximize platform/sensor/target management, the network will improve efficiency and maximize persistence. Inherent within this concept is the idea of integrating and synchronizing a mix of sensing systems and platforms rather than relying on a single system. The second concept embedded within this concept is the ability to capture the activity/information as it occurs rather than forensically reconstructing after the fact. This requires the ability for the [commander] to adjust collection priorities of the entire collection suite to a level appropriate to the activity of interest. Individual sensors, platforms and exploitation nodes will become more efficient as part of an integrated system. Implementing this fully integrated ISR Enterprise will result in improved persistence, and ultimately better ISR for the warfighter."[3] Over the last 6 years, SAIC has been working with CERDEC and AMRDEC to introduce Battle Command aids supporting (semi) autonomous execution and collaboration of unmanned assets. This paper presents an operational context and a distributed command and control architecture aiming to reduce workload and increase Persistent ISR effectiveness. This architecture has been implemented and demonstrated in field tests and as part of FY'09 C4ISR OTM testbed.

  7. Cryotherapy-Induced Persistent Vasoconstriction After Cutaneous Cooling: Hysteresis Between Skin Temperature and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K; Matthew Brothers, R; Diller, Kenneth R

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the persistence of cold-induced vasoconstriction following cessation of active skin-surface cooling. This study demonstrates a hysteresis effect that develops between skin temperature and blood perfusion during the cooling and subsequent rewarming period. An Arctic Ice cryotherapy unit (CTU) was applied to the knee region of six healthy subjects for 60 min of active cooling followed by 120 min of passive rewarming. Multiple laser Doppler flowmetry perfusion probes were used to measure skin blood flow (expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)). Skin surface cooling produced a significant reduction in CVC (P < 0.001) that persisted throughout the duration of the rewarming period. In addition, there was a hysteresis effect between CVC and skin temperature during the cooling and subsequent rewarming cycle (P < 0.01). Mixed model regression (MMR) showed a significant difference in the slopes of the CVC-skin temperature curves during cooling and rewarming (P < 0.001). Piecewise regression was used to investigate the temperature thresholds for acceleration of CVC during the cooling and rewarming periods. The two thresholds were shown to be significantly different (P = 0.003). The results show that localized cooling causes significant vasoconstriction that continues beyond the active cooling period despite skin temperatures returning toward baseline values. The significant and persistent reduction in skin perfusion may contribute to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI) associated with cryotherapy. PMID:26632263

  8. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr/sup +3/:LaF/sub 3/ verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the /sup 3/H/sub 4/, /sup 3/H/sub 6/, and /sup 3/P/sub 0/ levels of the praseodymium ions.

  9. Transition mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, C.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model capable of analyzing the flow field in the transition liner of small gas turbine engines is developed. A FORTRAN code has been assembled from existing codes and physical submodels and used to predict the flow in several test geometries which contain characteristics similar to transition liners, and for which experimental data was available. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements indicate that the code produces qualitative results but that the turbulence models, both K-E and algebraic Reynolds Stress, underestimate the cross-stream diffusion. The code has also been used to perform a numerical experiment to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the mixing process in transition liners. Comparisons illustrate that geometries with significant curvature show a drift of the jet trajectory toward the convex wall and weaker wake region vortices and decreased penetration for jets located on the convex wall of the liner, when compared to jets located on concave walls. Also shown were the approximate equivalency of angled slots and round holes and a technique by which jet mixing correlations developed for rectangular channels can be used for can geometries.

  10. Low Velocity Difference Thermal Shear Layer Mixing Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Robert H.; Culver, Harry C. M.; Weissbein, Dave; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Current CFD modeling techniques are known to do a poor job of predicting the mixing rate and persistence of slot film flow in co-annular flowing ducts with relatively small velocity differences but large thermal gradients. A co-annular test was devised to empirically determine the mixing rate of slot film flow in a constant area circular duct (D approx. 1ft, L approx. 10ft). The axial rate of wall heat-up is a sensitive measure of the mixing rate of the two flows. The inflow conditions were varied to simulate a variety of conditions characteristic of moderate by-pass ratio engines. A series of air temperature measurements near the duct wall provided a straightforward means to measure the axial temperature distribution and thus infer the mixing rate. This data provides a characterization of the slot film mixing rates encountered in typical jet engine environments. The experimental geometry and entrance conditions, along with the sensitivity of the results as the entrance conditions vary, make this a good test for turbulence models in a regime important to modern air-breathing propulsion research and development.

  11. Diagnosing Intermittent and Persistent Faults using Static Bayesian Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megshoel, Ole Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Both intermittent and persistent faults may occur in a wide range of systems. We present in this paper the introduction of intermittent fault handling techniques into ProDiagnose, an algorithm that previously only handled persistent faults. We discuss novel algorithmic techniques as well as how our static Bayesian networks help diagnose, in an integrated manner, a range of intermittent and persistent faults. Through experiments with data from the ADAPT electrical power system test bed, generated as part of the Second International Diagnostic Competition (DXC-10), we show that this novel variant of ProDiagnose diagnoses intermittent faults accurately and quickly, while maintaining strong performance on persistent faults.

  12. [Symptomatology and treatment of persistent genital arousal disorder. Case report].

    PubMed

    Erős, Erika; Brockhauser, Ildikó; Pólyán, Edina

    2015-04-01

    Persistent genital arousal disorder is a rare condition among women characterized by unwanted and intrusive sexual arousal that can persist for an extended period of time and unrelated to sexual desire or sexual stimuli. Since its first documentation in 2001, numerous studies have been dedicated to investigate its specifics. The persistent genital arousal occurs in the absence of sexual interest and fantasies and it causes excessive psychological suffering. Masturbation, spontaneous orgasm or sexual intercourse can offer only a temporary relief. Researches provide a limited insight into the characteristics of persistent genital arousal disorder. This paper presents a case and summarizes the scientific findings on prevalence, etiology and treatment perspectives. PMID:25845321

  13. Persistence and resistance as complementary bacterial adaptations to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vogwill, T; Comfort, A C; Furió, V; MacLean, R C

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial persistence represents a simple of phenotypic heterogeneity, whereby a proportion of cells in an isogenic bacterial population can survive exposure to lethal stresses such as antibiotics. In contrast, genetically based antibiotic resistance allows for continued growth in the presence of antibiotics. It is unclear, however, whether resistance and persistence are complementary or alternative evolutionary adaptations to antibiotics. Here, we investigate the co-evolution of resistance and persistence across the genus Pseudomonas using comparative methods that correct for phylogenetic nonindependence. We find that strains of Pseudomonas vary extensively in both their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and rifampicin) and persistence following exposure to these antibiotics. Crucially, we find that persistence correlates positively to antibiotic resistance across strains. However, we find that different genes control resistance and persistence implying that they are independent traits. Specifically, we find that the number of type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) in the genome of a strain is correlated to persistence, but not resistance. Our study shows that persistence and antibiotic resistance are complementary, but independent, evolutionary adaptations to stress and it highlights the key role played by TAs in the evolution of persistence. PMID:26999656

  14. Persistence without pathology in phosphoglycan-deficient Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Späth, Gerald F; Lye, Lon-Fey; Segawa, Hiroaki; Sacks, David L; Turco, Salvatore J; Beverley, Stephen M

    2003-08-29

    Leishmania infections involve an acute phase of replication within macrophages, typically associated with pathology. After recovery parasites persist for long periods, which can lead to severe disease upon reactivation. Unlike the role of host factors, parasite factors affecting persistence are poorly understood. Leishmania major lacking phosphoglycans (lpg2-) were unable to survive in sand flies and macrophages, but retained the ability to persist indefinitely in the mammalian host without inducing disease. The L. major lpg2- thus provides a platform for probing parasite factors implicated in persistence and its role in disease and immunity. PMID:12947201

  15. Inference of Mix from Experimental Data and Theoretical Mix Models

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Haynes, D. A.; Cooley, J. H.; Mancini, R. C.; Haan, S. W.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2007-08-02

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosion cores is a topic of great interest. Mixing due to hydrodynamic instabilities can affect implosion dynamics and could also go so far as to prevent ignition. We have demonstrated that it is possible to extract information on mixing directly from experimental data using spectroscopic arguments. In order to compare this data-driven analysis to a theoretical framework, two independent mix models, Youngs' phenomenological model and the Haan saturation model, have been implemented in conjunction with a series of clean hydrodynamic simulations that model the experiments. The first tests of these methods were carried out based on a set of indirect drive implosions at the OMEGA laser. We now focus on direct drive experiments, and endeavor to approach the problem from another perspective. In the current work, we use Youngs' and Haan's mix models in conjunction with hydrodynamic simulations in order to design experimental platforms that exhibit measurably different levels of mix. Once the experiments are completed based on these designs, the results of a data-driven mix analysis will be compared to the levels of mix predicted by the simulations. In this way, we aim to increase our confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from the experimental data, as well as to study sensitivities and the range of validity of the mix models.

  16. An Observational Case Study of Persistent Fog and Comparison with an Ensemble Forecast Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Jeremy; Porson, Aurore; Lock, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    We present a study of a persistent case of fog and use the observations to evaluate the UK Met Office ensemble model. The fog appeared to form initially in association with small patches of low-level stratus and spread rapidly across southern England during 11 December 2012, persisting for 24 h. The low visibility and occurrence of fog associated with the event was poorly forecast. Observations show that the surprisingly rapid spreading of the layer was due to a circulation at the fog edge, whereby cold cloudy air subsided into and mixed with warmer adjacent clear air. The resulting air was saturated, and hence the fog layer grew rapidly outwards from its edge. Measurements of fog-droplet deposition made overnight show that an average of 12 g m h was deposited but that the liquid water content remained almost constant, indicating that further liquid was condensing at a similar rate to the deposition, most likely due to the slow cooling. The circulation at the fog edge was also present during its dissipation, by which time the fog top had lowered by 150 m. During this period the continuing circulation at the fog edge, and increasing wind shear at fog top, acted to dissipate the fog by creating mixing with, by then, the drier adjacent and overlying air. Comparisons with a new, high resolution Met Office ensemble model show that this type of case remains challenging to simulate. Most ensemble members successfully simulated the formation and persistence of low stratus cloud in the region, but produced too much cloud initially overnight, which created a warm bias. During the daytime, ensemble predictions that had produced fog lifted it into low stratus, whilst in reality the fog remained present all day. Various aspects of the model performance are discussed further.

  17. Degassing Processes at Persistently Active Explosive Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, Jean-Francois

    Among volcanic gases, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is by far the most commonly measured. More than a monitoring proxy for volcanic degassing, SO 2 has the potential to alter climate patterns. Persistently active explosive volcanoes are characterized by short explosive bursts, which often occur at periodic intervals numerous times per day, spanning years to decades. SO 2 emissions at those volcanoes are poorly constrained, in large part because the current satellite monitoring techniques are unable to detect or quantify plumes of low concentration in the troposphere. Eruption plumes also often show high concentrations of ash and/or aerosols, which further inhibit the detection methods. In this work I focus on quantifying volcanic gas emissions at persistently active explosive volcanoes and their variations over short timescales (minutes to hours), in order to document their contribution to natural SO2 flux as well as investigate the physical processes that control their behavior. In order to make these measurements, I first develop and assemble a UV ground-based instrument, and validate it against an independently measured source of SO2 at a coal-burning power plant in Arizona. I establish a measurement protocol and demonstrate that the instrument measures SO 2 fluxes with < 20 % error. Using the same protocol, I establish a record of the degassing patterns at Semeru volcano (Indonesia), a volcano that has been producing cycles of repeated explosions with periods of minutes to hours for the past several decades. Semeru produces an average of 21-71 tons of SO2 per day, amounting to a yearly output of 8-26 Mt. Using the Semeru data, along with a 1-D transient numerical model of magma ascent, I test the validity of a model in which a viscous plug at the top of the conduit produces cycles of eruption and gas release. I find that it can be a valid hypothesis to explain the observed patterns of degassing at Semeru. Periodic behavior in such a system occurs for a very narrow range

  18. Correlating lepton mixing angles and mixing maxtrix with Wolfenstein parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyi; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2012-11-01

    Inspired by a new relation θ13PMNS=θC/2 observed from the relatively large θ13PMNS, we find that the combination of this relation with the quark-lepton complementarity and the self-complementarity results in correlations of the lepton mixing angles with the quark mixing angles. We find that the three mixing angles in the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrix are all related to the Wolfenstein parameter λ in the quark mixing, so they are also correlated. Consequently, the PMNS matrix can be parameterized by λ, A, and a Dirac CP-violating phase δ. Such parametrizations for the PMNS matrix have the same explicitly hierarchical structure as the Wolfenstein parametrization for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix in the quark mixing, and the bimaximal mixing pattern is deduced at the leading order. We also discuss implications of these phenomenological relations in parametrizations.

  19. SCORPION II persistent surveillance system update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coster, Michael; Chambers, Jon

    2010-04-01

    This paper updates the improvements and benefits demonstrated in the next generation Northrop Grumman SCORPION II family of persistent surveillance and target recognition systems produced by the Xetron Campus in Cincinnati, Ohio. SCORPION II reduces the size, weight, and cost of all SCORPION components in a flexible, field programmable system that is easier to conceal and enables integration of over fifty different Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) and camera types from a variety of manufacturers, with a modular approach to supporting multiple Line of Sight (LOS) and Beyond Line of Sight (BLOS) communications interfaces. Since 1998 Northrop Grumman has been integrating best in class sensors with its proven universal modular Gateway to provide encrypted data exfiltration to Common Operational Picture (COP) systems and remote sensor command and control. In addition to feeding COP systems, SCORPION and SCORPION II data can be directly processed using a common sensor status graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for viewing and analysis of images and sensor data from up to seven hundred SCORPION system gateways on single or multiple displays. This GUI enables a large amount of sensor data and imagery to be used for actionable intelligence as well as remote sensor command and control by a minimum number of analysts.

  20. The onset of lactase persistence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Gerbault, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The genomic region containing the lactase (LCT) gene shows one of the strongest signals of positive selection in Europeans, detectable using a range of approaches including haplotype length, linked microsatellite variation and population-differentiation-based tests. Lactase is the enzyme that carries out the digestion of the milk sugar lactose. Its expression decreases at some point after the weaning period is over in most mammals and in around 68% of all living adult humans. However, in some humans, particularly those from populations with a history of dairying, lactase is expressed throughout adulthood. This trait is called lactase persistence (LP), and in people of European ancestry, it is associated with a single mutation (-13910*T). Evidence from the detection of dairy fat residues in potsherds, and allele frequencies in ancient DNA samples suggest that LP arose after dairying practices had developed. However, the reasons why LP may have been advantageous are still debated, and the respective contribution of demography and natural selection remains to be disentangled. This paper discusses various studies, from archaeology to population genetics, that have shed some light on the subject by investigating the evolution of LP in Europe. PMID:24861860

  1. Endangered plants persist under phosphorus limitation.

    PubMed

    Wassen, Martin J; Venterink, Harry Olde; Lapshina, Elena D; Tanneberger, Franziska

    2005-09-22

    Nitrogen enrichment is widely thought to be responsible for the loss of plant species from temperate terrestrial ecosystems. This view is based on field surveys and controlled experiments showing that species richness correlates negatively with high productivity and nitrogen enrichment. However, as the type of nutrient limitation has never been examined on a large geographical scale the causality of these relationships is uncertain. We investigated species richness in herbaceous terrestrial ecosystems, sampled along a transect through temperate Eurasia that represented a gradient of declining levels of atmospheric nitrogen deposition--from approximately 50 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) in western Europe to natural background values of less than 5 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) in Siberia. Here we show that many more endangered plant species persist under phosphorus-limited than under nitrogen-limited conditions, and we conclude that enhanced phosphorus is more likely to be the cause of species loss than nitrogen enrichment. Our results highlight the need for a better understanding of the mechanisms of phosphorus enrichment, and for a stronger focus on conservation management to reduce phosphorus availability. PMID:16177790

  2. SCORPION persistent surveillance system with universal gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coster, Michael; Chambers, Jon; Winters, Michael; Belesi, Joe

    2008-04-01

    This paper addresses benefits derived from the universal gateway utilized in Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation's (NGSC) SCORPION, a persistent surveillance and target recognition system produced by the Xetron campus in Cincinnati, Ohio. SCORPION is currently deployed in Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF). The SCORPION universal gateway is a flexible, field programmable system that provides integration of over forty Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) types from a variety of manufacturers, multiple visible and thermal electro-optical (EO) imagers, and numerous long haul satellite and terrestrial communications links, including the Army Research Lab (ARL) Blue Radio. Xetron has been integrating best in class sensors with this universal gateway to provide encrypted data exfiltration and remote sensor command and control since 1998. SCORPION data can be distributed point to point, or to multiple Common Operational Picture (COP) systems, including Command and Control Personal Computer (C2PC), Common Data Interchange Format for the Situational Awareness Display (CDIF/SAD), Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below (FBCB2), Defense Common Ground Systems (DCGS), and Remote Automated Position Identification System (RAPIDS).

  3. Persistent Ion Pairing in Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Fulton, John L.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2014-07-03

    For strong acids, like hydrochloric acid, the complete dissociation into an excess proton and conjugated base as well as the formation of independent solvated charged fragments is assumed. The existence of a chloride-Hyronium (Cl-H3O+) contact ion pairs even in moderate concentration hydrochloric acid (2.5 m) demonstrates that the counter ions do not behave merely as spectators. Through the use of modern extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements in conjunction with state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we are able to obtain an unprecedented view into the molecular structure of medium to high concentrated electrolytes. Here we report that the Cl-H3O+ contact ion pair structure persists throughout the entire concentration range studied and that these structures differ significantly from moieties studied in micro-solvated hydrochloric acid clusters. Characterizing distinct populations of these ion pairs gives rise to a novel molecular level description of how to think about the activity of the proton that impacts our picture of the pH scale. Funding for CJM, GKS, and JLF was provided by DOE Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Funding for MDB was provided throught the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. MB was funded through Argonne National Laboratory.

  4. Altered functional connectivity in persistent developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jia, Fanlu; Siok, Wai Ting; Tan, Li Hai

    2016-01-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering (PDS) is a speech disorder that impairs communication skills. Despite extensive research, the core causes of PDS are elusive. Converging evidence from task-induced neuroimaging methods has demonstrated the contributions of the basal ganglia and the cerebellum to PDS, but such task-state neuroimaging findings are often confounded by behavioral performance differences between subjects who stutter and normal controls. Here, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated functional connectivity within cerebellar-cortical and basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks in 16 adults who stutter and 18 age-matched fluent speakers. Seed-to-voxel analysis demonstrated that, compared to controls, adults who stutter showed alternations in functional connectivity of cerebellum to motor cortex as well as connectivity among different locals within cerebellum. Additionally, we found that functional connectivity within cerebellar circuits was significantly correlated with severity of stuttering. The alternations of functional connectivity within basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks were identified as the reduced connectivity of the putamen to the superior temporal gyrus and inferior parietal lobules in adults who stutter. The abnormalities of resting state functional connectivity are assumed to affect language planning and motor execution critical for speaking fluently. Our findings may yield neurobiological cues to the biomarkers of PDS. PMID:26743821

  5. Abnormalities in Hippocampal Functioning with Persistent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mutso, Amelia A.; Radzicki, Daniel; Baliki, Marwan N.; Huang, Lejian; Banisadr, Ghazal; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Radulovic, Jelena; Martina, Marco; Miller, Richard J.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain patients exhibit increased anxiety, depression, and deficits in learning and memory. Yet how persistent pain affects the key brain area regulating these behaviors, the hippocampus, has remained minimally explored. In this study we investigated the impact of spared nerve injury (SNI) neuropathic pain in mice on hippocampal-dependent behavior and underlying cellular and molecular changes. In parallel, we measured the hippocampal volume of three groups of chronic pain patients. We found that SNI animals were unable to extinguish to contextual fear and showed increased anxiety-like behavior. Additionally, SNI mice in comparison to sham animals exhibited hippocampal 1) reduced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) expression and phosphorylation, 2) decreased neurogenesis and 3) altered short-term synaptic plasticity. In order to relate the observed hippocampal abnormalities with human chronic pain, we measured the volume of human hippocampus in chronic back pain (CBP), complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), and osteoarthritis patients (OA). Compared to controls, CBP and CRPS, but not OA, had significantly less bilateral hippocampal volume. These results indicate that hippocampus-mediated behavior, synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis are abnormal in neuropathic rodents. The changes may be related to the reduction in hippocampal volume we see in chronic pain patients, and these abnormalities may underlie learning and emotional deficits commonly observed in such patients. PMID:22539837

  6. Persistent pattern speeds in Saturn's D ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancia, Robert; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-05-01

    Saturn's D ring is the innermost part of Saturn's ring system. Due to its close proximity to the planet, it is sensitive to perturbing forces caused by asymmetries in Saturn's interior and magnetic field. Using high-phase-angle images obtained by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) over the course of the entire Cassini mission we investigate the region between 71000-73000 km from Saturn's center. Previous studies have shown that this region contains azimuthal brightness variations generated by periodic perturbing forces with frequencies close to Saturn's rotation rate (nearly twice the local orbital period). These structures are not due to a single resonance, but instead involve a complex network of patterns drifting past one another over time. Some of these could be caused by asymmetries in Saturn's magnetosphere, which have rotation rates that have been observed to change over the course of the Cassini mission. However, some patterns may be generated by perturbations from long-lived gravitational anomalies inside the planet that move at speeds comparable to Saturn's winds. By comparing observations taken over several years we can distinguish the patterns caused by each phenomenon. We identify multiple structures with nearly constant pattern speeds that would appear to be due to persistent structures inside the planet. Strangely, the rotation rates required to produce these D ring structures are different from those responsible for generating waves in the C ring (where the local orbital rate is roughly 3/2 Saturn's rotation rate).

  7. Altered functional connectivity in persistent developmental stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Jia, Fanlu; Siok, Wai Ting; Tan, Li Hai

    2016-01-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering (PDS) is a speech disorder that impairs communication skills. Despite extensive research, the core causes of PDS are elusive. Converging evidence from task-induced neuroimaging methods has demonstrated the contributions of the basal ganglia and the cerebellum to PDS, but such task-state neuroimaging findings are often confounded by behavioral performance differences between subjects who stutter and normal controls. Here, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated functional connectivity within cerebellar-cortical and basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks in 16 adults who stutter and 18 age-matched fluent speakers. Seed-to-voxel analysis demonstrated that, compared to controls, adults who stutter showed alternations in functional connectivity of cerebellum to motor cortex as well as connectivity among different locals within cerebellum. Additionally, we found that functional connectivity within cerebellar circuits was significantly correlated with severity of stuttering. The alternations of functional connectivity within basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks were identified as the reduced connectivity of the putamen to the superior temporal gyrus and inferior parietal lobules in adults who stutter. The abnormalities of resting state functional connectivity are assumed to affect language planning and motor execution critical for speaking fluently. Our findings may yield neurobiological cues to the biomarkers of PDS. PMID:26743821

  8. Earliest archaeological evidence of persistent hominin carnivory.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Joseph V; Plummer, Thomas W; Pobiner, Briana L; Oliver, James S; Bishop, Laura C; Braun, David R; Ditchfield, Peter W; Seaman, John W; Binetti, Katie M; Seaman, John W; Hertel, Fritz; Potts, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of lithic technology by ≈ 2.6 million years ago (Ma) is often interpreted as a correlate of increasingly recurrent hominin acquisition and consumption of animal remains. Associated faunal evidence, however, is poorly preserved prior to ≈ 1.8 Ma, limiting our understanding of early archaeological (Oldowan) hominin carnivory. Here, we detail three large well-preserved zooarchaeological assemblages from Kanjera South, Kenya. The assemblages date to 2.0 Ma, pre-dating all previously published archaeofaunas of appreciable size. At Kanjera, there is clear evidence that Oldowan hominins acquired and processed numerous, relatively complete, small ungulate carcasses. Moreover, they had at least occasional access to the fleshed remains of larger, wildebeest-sized animals. The overall record of hominin activities is consistent through the stratified sequence - spanning hundreds to thousands of years - and provides the earliest archaeological evidence of sustained hominin involvement with fleshed animal remains (i.e., persistent carnivory), a foraging adaptation central to many models of hominin evolution. PMID:23637995

  9. Earliest Archaeological Evidence of Persistent Hominin Carnivory

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Joseph V.; Plummer, Thomas W.; Pobiner, Briana L.; Oliver, James S.; Bishop, Laura C.; Braun, David R.; Ditchfield, Peter W.; Seaman, John W.; Binetti, Katie M.; Seaman, John W.; Hertel, Fritz; Potts, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of lithic technology by ∼2.6 million years ago (Ma) is often interpreted as a correlate of increasingly recurrent hominin acquisition and consumption of animal remains. Associated faunal evidence, however, is poorly preserved prior to ∼1.8 Ma, limiting our understanding of early archaeological (Oldowan) hominin carnivory. Here, we detail three large well-preserved zooarchaeological assemblages from Kanjera South, Kenya. The assemblages date to ∼2.0 Ma, pre-dating all previously published archaeofaunas of appreciable size. At Kanjera, there is clear evidence that Oldowan hominins acquired and processed numerous, relatively complete, small ungulate carcasses. Moreover, they had at least occasional access to the fleshed remains of larger, wildebeest-sized animals. The overall record of hominin activities is consistent through the stratified sequence – spanning hundreds to thousands of years – and provides the earliest archaeological evidence of sustained hominin involvement with fleshed animal remains (i.e., persistent carnivory), a foraging adaptation central to many models of hominin evolution. PMID:23637995

  10. Youngsters who persistently do not attend school.

    PubMed

    Place, M; Kolvin, I

    1986-01-01

    5% of the children attending psychiatric clinics in the UK have difficulties with school attendance and these stem from difficulties which are predominantly social (truancy) or predominantly psychological or dynamic (school refusal). Adolescents who display school refusal are three times more likely to develop neurotic difficulties in adult life, especially if marked family difficulties are persistent. Up to 20% of the senior school pupils may truant in a 2-week period and teachers report these youngsters to be more aggressive and to show more neurotic symptoms then the regular school attenders. Their peers choose them significantly less often as friends, and the marked differences in the rate of absence between schools seems related to school philosophy and the degree of school involvement in the community. Truancy can be influenced by greater vigilance in the school and by legal intervention. Although absence from school in itself does not seem to adversely influence the youngsters' adult functioning, if it is associated with conduct problems and educational retardation, long-term difficulties are common. PMID:3822952

  11. Persistence of explosives under real world conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papantonakis, Michael R.; Furstenberg, Robert; Nguyen, Viet; Fischer, Thomas; Howard, Andrew; Adams, Katy; Kendziora, Christopher A.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Those that handle explosives materials invariably become contaminated with particulates of materials, which become entrapped in the grooves of the fingers and are then transferred by contact to other surfaces. These particles provide an evidentiary trail which is useful for security applications, a fact which is enhanced by the fact that many explosives materials of interest have low vapor pressures, augmenting their longevity. The persistence or stability of explosives particles on a substrate is a function of several environmental parameters or particle properties, including vapor pressure, particle size and geometry, airflow, particle field size, substrate topography, humidity, reactivity, adlayers, admixtures, particle areal density, and temperature. In this work we deposited particles of 2,4-dinitrotoluene on standard microscope glass slides by particle sieving and studied their sublimation as a function of temperature and relative humidity. A custom airflow cell allowed us to monitor the particles with in situ photomicroscopy while keeping the airflow over the particles, substrate type, and areal field size constant for each experiment. We define the size-independent radial sublimation velocity for the equivalent sphere of a particle as the parameter to characterize the sublimation rate. The dependence of the sublimation rate for an ensemble of particles on temperature was quantified according the radial sublimation velocity, while the sublimation of 2,4-dinintrotoluene was found to independent of relative humidity between 25-90%.

  12. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  13. PERSISTENT PUPILLARY MEMBRANE OR ACCESSORY IRIS MEMBRANE?.

    PubMed

    Gavriş, Monica; Horge, Ioan; Avram, Elena; Belicioiu, Roxana; Olteanu, Ioana Alexandra; Kedves, Hanga

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, in literature and curent practice, accessory iris membrane (AIM) and persistant pupillary membrane (PPM) are confused. Both AIM and PPM are congenital iris anomalies in which fine or thick iris strands arrise form the collarette and obscure the pupil. AIM, which is also called iris duplication, closely resembles the normal iris tissue in color and thickness and presents a virtual second pseudopupil aperture in the centre while PPM even in its extreme forms presents as a translucent or opaque membranous structure that extends across the pupil and has no pseudopupil. Mydriatiscs, laser treatment or surgery is used to clear the visual axis and optimize visual development. Surgical intervention is reserved for large, dense AIMs and PPMs. Our patient, a 29 year old male, has come with bilateral dense AIM, bilateral compound hyperopic astigmatism, BCVA OD = 0.6, BCVA OS = 0.4, IOP OU = 17 mmHg. To improve the visual acuity of the patient we decided to do a bilateral membranectomy, restoring in this way transparency of the visual axis. After surgery, the visual acuity improved to BCVA OD= 0.8, BCVA OS=0.8. PMID:26978889

  14. Making web annotations persistent over time

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, Robert; Van De Sompel, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    As Digital Libraries (DL) become more aligned with the web architecture, their functional components need to be fundamentally rethought in terms of URIs and HTTP. Annotation, a core scholarly activity enabled by many DL solutions, exhibits a clearly unacceptable characteristic when existing models are applied to the web: due to the representations of web resources changing over time, an annotation made about a web resource today may no longer be relevant to the representation that is served from that same resource tomorrow. We assume the existence of archived versions of resources, and combine the temporal features of the emerging Open Annotation data model with the capability offered by the Memento framework that allows seamless navigation from the URI of a resource to archived versions of that resource, and arrive at a solution that provides guarantees regarding the persistence of web annotations over time. More specifically, we provide theoretical solutions and proof-of-concept experimental evaluations for two problems: reconstructing an existing annotation so that the correct archived version is displayed for all resources involved in the annotation, and retrieving all annotations that involve a given archived version of a web resource.

  15. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT): ubiquity, persistence, and risks.

    PubMed Central

    Turusov, Vladimir; Rakitsky, Valery; Tomatis, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Due to uncontrolled use for several decades, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), probably the best known and most useful insecticide in the world, has damaged wildlife and might have negative effects on human health. This review gives a brief history of the use of DDT in various countries and presents the results of epidemiologic and experimental studies of carcinogenesis. Even though its use has been prohibited in most countries for ecologic considerations, mainly because of its negative impact on wildlife, it is still used in some developing countries for essential public health purposes, and it is still produced for export in at least three countries. Due to its stability and its capacity to accumulate in adipose tissue, it is found in human tissues, and there is now not a single living organism on the planet that does not contain DDT. The possible contribution of DDT to increasing the risks for cancers at various sites and its possible role as an endocrine disruptor deserve further investigation. Although there is convincing experimental evidence for the carcinogenicity of DDT and of its main metabolites DDE and DDD, epidemiologic studies have provided contrasting or inconclusive, although prevailingly negative, results. The presence and persistence of DDT and its metabolites worldwide are still problems of great relevance to public health. Efficient pesticides that do not have the negative properties of DDT, together with the development of alternative methods to fight malaria, should be sought with the goal of completely banning DDT. PMID:11836138

  16. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vinay; Berkelhamer, Sara; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2015-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in right-to-left shunting of blood and hypoxemia. PPHN is often secondary to parenchymal lung disease (such as meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia or respiratory distress syndrome) or lung hypoplasia (with congenital diaphragmatic hernia or oligohydramnios) but can also be idiopathic. The diagnosis of PPHN is based on clinical evidence of labile hypoxemia often associated with differential cyanosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by the echocardiographic demonstration of - (a) right-to-left or bidirectional shunt at the ductus or foramen ovale and/or, (b) flattening or leftward deviation of the interventricular septum and/or, (c) tricuspid regurgitation, and finally (d) absence of structural heart disease. Management strategies include optimal oxygenation, avoiding respiratory and metabolic acidosis, blood pressure stabilization, sedation and pulmonary vasodilator therapy. Failure of these measures would lead to consideration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO); however decreased need for this rescue therapy has been documented with advances in medical management. While trends also note improved survival, long-term neurodevelopmental disabilities such as deafness and learning disabilities remain a concern in many infants with severe PPHN. Funded by: 1R01HD072929-0 (SL). PMID:27057331

  17. Persistency and Uncertainty Across the Academic Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Alexander; Riccaboni, Massimo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2012-02-01

    Recent shifts in the business structure of universities and a bottleneck in the supply of tenure track positions are two issues that threaten to change the longstanding patronage system in academia and affect the overall potential of science. We analyze the longitudinal publication rate ni(t) on the 1-year scale for 300 physicists i=1...300. For most careers analyzed, we observe cumulative production acceleration Ni(t) Ait^αi with αi>1, reflecting the benefits of learning and collaboration spillovers which constitute a cumulative advantage. We find that the variance in production scales with collaboration radius size Si as 2̂i˜Si^ψ with 0.4 < ψ< 0.8. We develop a preferential growth model to gain insight into the relation between career persistency and career uncertainty. This model shows that emphasis on nonstop production, a consequence of short-term contract systems, results in a significant number of ``sudden death'' careers that terminate due to unavoidable negative production shocks. Hence, short-term contracts may increase the strength of ``rich-get-richer'' mechanisms in competitive professions and hinder the upward mobility of young scientists.

  18. Persistency in monthly mean temperatures in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Dubravka; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2016-04-01

    Time series from a number of weather stations in Europe have been studied in order to assess the persistency of montly mean temperatures. In most regions, the correlation between the mean temperatures of two months next to each other in time has maxima in the summer and in the winter, while there are minima in the sping and the autumn. An exception from this is in the oceanic warm climate in the southwest, where the spring minimum is missing. A plausible explanation for the positive correlation in the winter may be related to snow on the ground. The snow is associated with cold spells and increases the albedo, contributing to extension of the low temperatures. The summertime correlation may be related to the water content of the soil. A cold and rainy period results in wet soil and subsequently, relatively large part of the energy of the incoming solar radiation is consumed by evaporation, rather than sensible heating. In the spring, there is generally no snow on the ground and in the autumn, the air temperature is not as sensitive to the water content of the soil as in the summer. This may explain the low correlation in spring and autumn.

  19. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  20. Epigenetic regulation of EBV persistence and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Italo; Lieberman, Paul M

    2014-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play a fundamental role in generating diverse and heritable patterns of viral and cellular gene expression. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can adopt a variety of gene expression programs that are necessary for long-term viral persistence and latency in multiple host-cell types and conditions. The latent viral genomes assemble into chromatin structures with different histone and DNA modifications patterns that control viral gene expression. Variations in nucleosome organization and chromatin conformations can also influence gene expression by coordinating physical interactions between different regulatory elements. The viral-encoded and host-cell factors that control these epigenetic features are beginning to be understood at the genome-wide level. These epigenetic regulators can also influence viral pathogenesis by expanding tissue tropism, evading immune detection, and driving host-cell carcinogenesis. Here, we review some of the recent findings and perspectives on how the EBV epigenome plays a central role in viral latency and viral-associated carcinogenesis. PMID:24468737

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of EBV Persistence and Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tempera, Italo; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play a fundamental role in generating diverse and heritable patterns of viral and cellular gene expression. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) can adopt a variety of gene expression programs that are necessary for long-term viral persistence and latency in multiple host-cell types and conditions. The latent viral genomes assemble into chromatin structures with different histone and DNA modifications patterns that control viral gene expression. Variations in nucleosome organization and chromatin conformations can also influence gene expression by coordinating physical interactions between different regulatory elements. The viral-encoded and host-cell factors that control these epigenetic features are beginning to be understood at the genome-wide level. These epigenetic regulators can also influence viral pathogenesis by expanding tissue tropism, evading immune detection, and driving host-cell carcinogenesis. Here, we review some of the recent findings and perspectives on how the EBV epigenome plays a central role in viral latency and viral-associated carcinogenesis. PMID:24468737

  2. China's water pollution by persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lian-Jun; Maruya, Keith A; Snyder, Shane A; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2012-04-01

    Available data were reviewed to assess the status of contamination by persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), in drinking water sources and coastal waters of China. The levels of POPs in China's waters were generally at the high end of the global range. A comparison of China's regulatory limits indicated that PCBs in rivers and coastal water may pose potential human health risk. Occurrence of DDTs in some rivers of China may also pose health risk to humans using the regulatory limits of DDTs recommended by the European Union. Future monitoring of POPs in China's waters should be directed towards analytes of concern (e.g. PCBs and PCDD/Fs) and to fill data gaps for analytes (e.g. PBDEs, PCDD/Fs, and chlordane) and in watersheds/regions (e.g. West China) where data are scarce. PMID:22325437

  3. Persistence of social signatures in human communication.

    PubMed

    Saramäki, Jari; Leicht, E A; López, Eduardo; Roberts, Sam G B; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2014-01-21

    The social network maintained by a focal individual, or ego, is intrinsically dynamic and typically exhibits some turnover in membership over time as personal circumstances change. However, the consequences of such changes on the distribution of an ego's network ties are not well understood. Here we use a unique 18-mo dataset that combines mobile phone calls and survey data to track changes in the ego networks and communication patterns of students making the transition from school to university or work. Our analysis reveals that individuals display a distinctive and robust social signature, captured by how interactions are distributed across different alters. Notably, for a given ego, these social signatures tend to persist over time, despite considerable turnover in the identity of alters in the ego network. Thus, as new network members are added, some old network members either are replaced or receive fewer calls, preserving the overall distribution of calls across network members. This is likely to reflect the consequences of finite resources such as the time available for communication, the cognitive and emotional effort required to sustain close relationships, and the ability to make emotional investments. PMID:24395777

  4. Persistent topological features of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletić, Slobodan; Zhao, Yi; Rajković, Milan

    2016-05-01

    Inspired by an early work of Muldoon et al., Physica D 65, 1-16 (1993), we present a general method for constructing simplicial complex from observed time series of dynamical systems based on the delay coordinate reconstruction procedure. The obtained simplicial complex preserves all pertinent topological features of the reconstructed phase space, and it may be analyzed from topological, combinatorial, and algebraic aspects. In focus of this study is the computation of homology of the invariant set of some well known dynamical systems that display chaotic behavior. Persistent homology of simplicial complex and its relationship with the embedding dimensions are examined by studying the lifetime of topological features and topological noise. The consistency of topological properties for different dynamic regimes and embedding dimensions is examined. The obtained results shed new light on the topological properties of the reconstructed phase space and open up new possibilities for application of advanced topological methods. The method presented here may be used as a generic method for constructing simplicial complex from a scalar time series that has a number of advantages compared to the mapping of the same time series to a complex network.

  5. Long-term persistence of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Feynman, Joan; Robinson, Paul

    1994-01-01

    We examine the question of whether or not the non-periodic variations in solar activity are caused by a white-noise, random process. The Hurst exponent, which characterizes the persistence of a time series, is evaluated for the series of C-14 data for the time interval from about 6000 BC to 1950 AD. We find a constant Hurst exponent, suggesting that solar activity in the frequency range from 100 to 3000 years includes an important continuum component in addition to the well-known periodic variations. The value we calculate, H approximately 0.8, is significantly larger than the value of 0.5 that would correspond to variations produced by a white-noise process. This value is in good agreement with the results for the monthly sunspot data reported elsewhere, indicating that the physics that produces the continuum is a correlated random process and that it is the same type of process over a wide range of time interval lengths.

  6. Persistent topological features of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Maletić, Slobodan; Zhao, Yi; Rajković, Milan

    2016-05-01

    Inspired by an early work of Muldoon et al., Physica D 65, 1-16 (1993), we present a general method for constructing simplicial complex from observed time series of dynamical systems based on the delay coordinate reconstruction procedure. The obtained simplicial complex preserves all pertinent topological features of the reconstructed phase space, and it may be analyzed from topological, combinatorial, and algebraic aspects. In focus of this study is the computation of homology of the invariant set of some well known dynamical systems that display chaotic behavior. Persistent homology of simplicial complex and its relationship with the embedding dimensions are examined by studying the lifetime of topological features and topological noise. The consistency of topological properties for different dynamic regimes and embedding dimensions is examined. The obtained results shed new light on the topological properties of the reconstructed phase space and open up new possibilities for application of advanced topological methods. The method presented here may be used as a generic method for constructing simplicial complex from a scalar time series that has a number of advantages compared to the mapping of the same time series to a complex network. PMID:27249945

  7. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-02-28

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  8. Persistence and uncertainty in the academic career

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Riccaboni, Massimo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how institutional changes within academia may affect the overall potential of science requires a better quantitative representation of how careers evolve over time. Because knowledge spillovers, cumulative advantage, competition, and collaboration are distinctive features of the academic profession, both the employment relationship and the procedures for assigning recognition and allocating funding should be designed to account for these factors. We study the annual production ni(t) of a given scientist i by analyzing longitudinal career data for 200 leading scientists and 100 assistant professors from the physics community. Our empirical analysis of individual productivity dynamics shows that (i) there are increasing returns for the top individuals within the competitive cohort, and that (ii) the distribution of production growth is a leptokurtic “tent-shaped” distribution that is remarkably symmetric. Our methodology is general, and we speculate that similar features appear in other disciplines where academic publication is essential and collaboration is a key feature. We introduce a model of proportional growth which reproduces these two observations, and additionally accounts for the significantly right-skewed distributions of career longevity and achievement in science. Using this theoretical model, we show that short-term contracts can amplify the effects of competition and uncertainty making careers more vulnerable to early termination, not necessarily due to lack of individual talent and persistence, but because of random negative production shocks. We show that fluctuations in scientific production are quantitatively related to a scientist’s collaboration radius and team efficiency. PMID:22431620

  9. Persistent HyperCKemia in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Paola; Maffulli, Nicola; Politano, Luisa; Lippi, Giuseppe; Limongelli, Francesco Mario

    2011-01-01

    Summary We compared the effects of exercise on serum levels of creatin kinase (CK) in athletes with persistent hyperCKemia at rest (CK group) and in healthy athletes (control group). Prospective controlled study. Eighteen male Caucasian athletes with high serum CK levels at rest (CK between 80 and 150 U/L) and 25 male Caucasian athletes with normal serum CK levels at rest (CK between 10 and 80 U/L) Main Outcome Measures Blood samples were collected at rest, 30 minutes, 6 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours after a progressive cycloergometer test to exhaustion. The levels of serum CK and its isoenzymes were measured. In the control group, serum CK values at rest were normal (48.18 ± 14.14 U/L). After exercise, they increased slightly, though they always remained <80 U/L, decreasing to the rest level after 48 hours. The CK group had serum CK levels at rest higher than normal (116.56 ± 33.30 U/L). Serum CK levels were still outwith the normal range after 48 hours (130.11 ± 46.95 U/L) and 72 hours (116.55 ± 24.84 U/L). Serum CK levels were significantly different in both groups both before and after progressive cycloergometer test to exhaustion. In athletes with high serum CK levels at rest, serum CK levels remained elevated and had a different kinetics after exercise when compared with healthy athletes. PMID:23738242

  10. Nation's water picture mixed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The nation's water picture for April showed mixed trends: More than half of the index gaging stations reported normal streamflow conditions during the month, while the spring snowmelt boosted streamflow in the Northeast and Northwest to well above normal levels. Parts of the Southeast, however, from West Virginia south to the Carolinas, reported well-below normal streamflow conditions, according to a month-end check on water resources conditions by the U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior.After nearly 2 years of drought conditions the three major reservoirs supplying New York City reached full storage capacity and were spilling during April. Combined contents of the three reservoirs on May 1, 1982, was 272 billion gallons, 101% of their full usable capacity. The full reservoirs and the generally good surface and groundwater conditions throughout the Delaware River basin allowed the Delaware River Basin Commission to lift its drought emergency warning on April 27.

  11. Holographic mixing quantified

    SciTech Connect

    Batell, Brian; Gherghetta, Tony

    2007-08-15

    We compute the precise elementary/composite field content of mass eigenstates in holographic duals of warped models in a slice of AdS{sub 5}. This is accomplished by decomposing the bulk fields not in the usual Kaluza-Klein basis, but rather into a holographic basis of 4D fields, corresponding to purely elementary source or conformal field theory (CFT) composite fields. Generically, this decomposition yields kinetic and mass mixing between the elementary and composite sectors of the holographic theory. Depending on where the bulk zero mode is localized, the elementary/composite content may differ radically, which we show explicitly for several examples including the bulk Randall-Sundrum graviton, bulk gauge boson, and Higgs boson.

  12. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  13. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  14. The Relationship between Resourcefulness and Persistence in Adult Autonomous Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponton, Michael K; Derrick, M. Gail; Carr, Paul B.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the tenability of a proposed path-analytic model relating resourcefulness and persistence in the context of adult autonomous learning. Data collected from a nonprobability sample of 492 American adults using valid and reliable measures for resourcefulness and persistence were analyzed. Results suggest…

  15. A Longitudinal Analysis of Latina/o Students' Academic Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordes-Edgar, Veronica; Arredondo, Patricia; Kurpius, Sharon Robinson; Rund, James

    2011-01-01

    This was a 4.5-year follow-up study of university persistence involving 71 Latina/o students, who were initially surveyed as 1st-semester freshmen. Academic (high school grade point average [GPA], entrance exam scores, and college GPA) and nonacademic (self-beliefs, social support, and academic persistence decisions) factors were examined to…

  16. Pre-College Factors Impacting Persistence at a Diverse University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaquera, Gloria; Maestas, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate student persistence has been widely studied over the past several decades; however, the majority of this research focuses on predominantly White institutions and fails to consider retention in a diverse context. To address this need, this exploratory study examined 3rd and 5th semester persistence of White and Hispanic students at a…

  17. Toward a New Model of Student Persistence in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcone, Tara M.

    2011-01-01

    As a group, low-income, low-socioeconomic status, first-generation and working class students have lower persistence rates and educational attainment than their peers from higher- socioeconomic backgrounds. These gaps in college persistence and degree attainment have endured over the years with no evidence that they are diminishing in time. This…

  18. Aortic arch vessel anomalies associated with persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mehrzad; Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Foroughi, Amin Abolhasani

    2012-01-01

    Developmental anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and persistent trigeminal artery that is the most common of the four anomalous carotid-basilar anastomoses are repeatedly reported in the literature as separate entities. Herein we report a previously undescribed variant including the coexistence of persistent trigeminal artery, truncus bicaroticus and direct origin of left vertebral artery from aortic arch. PMID:22542381

  19. International Student Persistence at a Faith-Based Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2008-01-01

    As college and university campuses continue to increase access and diversify their enrollments, more research must examine the experiences of specific student populations and at specific institutions, particularly as these relate to student success in terms of persistence. Dominant persistence theories are often inadequate to explain the behaviors…

  20. Persistence of poultry associated Salmonella spp. on spinach plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Pre-harvest spinach contamination can occur via irrigation water and can influence the persistence of Salmonella on spinach leaves. Salmonella persistence on spinach plants should be evaluated as nearby poultry farms can be a critical source of contaminated water run-off. Purpose: The...

  1. Auditory abilities of speakers who persisted, or recovered, from stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Peter; Davis, Stephen; Williams, Sheila M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to see whether participants who persist in their stutter have poorer sensitivity in a backward masking task compared to those participants who recover from their stutter. Design The auditory sensitivity of 30 children who stutter was tested on absolute threshold, simultaneous masking, backward masking with a broadband and with a notched noise masker. The participants had been seen and diagnosed as stuttering at least 1 year before their 12th birthday. The participants were assessed again at age 12 plus to establish whether their stutter had persisted or recovered. Persistence or recovery was based on participant's, parent's and researcher's assessment and Riley's [Riley, G. D. (1994). Stuttering severity instrument for children and adults (3rd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.] Stuttering Severity Instrument-3. Based on this assessment, 12 speakers had persisted and 18 had recovered from stuttering. Results Thresholds differed significantly between persistent and recovered groups for the broadband backward-masked stimulus (thresholds being higher for the persistent group). Conclusions Backward masking performance at teenage is one factor that distinguishes speakers who persist in their stutter from those who recover.

 Education objectives: Readers of this article should: (1) explain why auditory factors have been implicated in stuttering; (2) summarise the work that has examined whether peripheral, and/or central, hearing are problems in stuttering; (3) explain how the hearing ability of persistent and recovered stutterers may differ; (4) discuss how hearing disorders have been implicated in other language disorders. PMID:16920188

  2. Interrupting Infants' Persisting Object Representations: An Object-Based Limit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheries, Erik W.; Wynn, Karen; Scholl, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    Making sense of the visual world requires keeping track of objects as the same persisting individuals over time and occlusion. Here we implement a new paradigm using 10-month-old infants to explore the processes and representations that support this ability in two ways. First, we demonstrate that persisting object representations can be maintained…

  3. Cohesion as a Constraint on Object Persistence in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheries, Erik W.; Mitroff, Stephen R.; Wynn, Karen; Scholl, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    A critical challenge for visual perception is to represent objects as the same persisting individuals over time and motion. Across several areas of cognitive science, researchers have identified cohesion as among the most important theoretical principles of object persistence: An object must maintain a single bounded contour over time. Drawing…

  4. Outreach and Identity Development: New Perspectives on College Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergerson, Amy Aldous; Hotchkins, Bryan K.; Furse, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    College student persistence continues to pose challenges for higher education institutions, despite over 40 years of research. Although persistence is studied from many different angles, the majority of studies examining the causes of and cures for students' departure from college reflect the importance of engagement in the higher education…

  5. Reconsidering the Relationship between Student Engagement and Persistence in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Shouping

    2011-01-01

    Using data from two rounds of surveys on students in the Washington State Achievers (WSA) program, this study examined the relationship between student engagement in college activities and student persistence in college. Different approaches using student engagement measures in the persistence models were compared. The results indicated that the…

  6. Investigation of the persistence of new building commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Amanda; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Claridge, David

    2002-03-17

    Commissioning is gaining increasing recognition as a cost-effective strategy for reducing commercial building energy use. Although the success and cost-effectiveness of commissioning projects depends on how well the benefits of commissioning persist over time, this aspect of commissioning is not well understood. The persistence of commissioning benefits was recently studied in a PIER project evaluating ten buildings that were commissioned at building start-up at least two years ago. The researchers examined the commissioning reports, control algorithms, EMCS point measurements, and energy use data, and conducted operator and commissioning provider interviews to investigate the persistence of commissioning benefits. In addition, they conducted site visits in a sample of the buildings. A set of commissioning measures was selected for each building to compare the persistence of benefits. Persistence was measured both qualitatively through a discussion of occupant comfort and decreased maintenance and quantitatively through estimations of energy savings. This paper reports the results of the study. The discussion includes how well the benefits of commissioning persisted over time, reasons for declining performance, and methods for improving persistence. The results provide valuable insight into how to estimate the persistence of commissioning information central to the cost benefit analyses routinely performed for commissioning measures.

  7. Retention, Persistence, and Enrollment Management: An Exploration of Organizational Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Stacy A.

    2013-01-01

    Low student retention and persistence continues to be a major problem within American higher education (Elkins, Braxton, & James, 2000; Kalsbeek & Hossler, 2010; Kezar, 2004; Tinto, 2006-2007). Less is known about the institutional organizational behavior influence on student persistence (Berger, 2001-2002); and while enrollment management…

  8. Gifted Students' Characteristics, Persistence, and Difficulties in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conejeros-Solar, M. Leonor; Gómez-Arízaga, María P.

    2015-01-01

    This study is about persistence and perceived difficulties of gifted students in college explored through sociodemographic and academic characteristics. Two hundred and nine nongifted and 45 gifted participated in the study. A persistence scale along with sociodemographic variables were used to compare both groups. The groups shared many…

  9. Academic Persistence and Black University Students' Perceived Personal Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Robbie J.; Jackson, James

    This study of the correlation between the self-concept of black university students and their academic persistence supports previous research identifying the importance of self-efficacy in academic persistence. Forty of the 115 18-year-old, American-born black freshmen, who lived on campus at a large predominantly white university, volunteered to…

  10. What about Master's Students? The Master's Student Persistence Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Kristin E.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the factors that affect master's student persistence in the United States. More specifically, this study explored whether the following factors: students' background, institution's, academic, environmental and psychological influences, had a significant effect on whether a master's student persisted and/or…

  11. Motor Task Persistence of Children with and without Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Francis M.; Porretta, David L.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2000-01-01

    Task persistence by 31 children (ages 9-13) with and without mental retardation during two challenging motor tasks was investigated. A main effect was found for group affiliation: children without mental retardation attempted more trials over three sessions. Results indicated children with mental retardation were less persistent than typical…

  12. Why They Stay: Women Persisting in US Engineering Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buse, Kathleen; Bilimoria, Diana; Perelli, Sheri

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Women remain dramatically underrepresented in the engineering profession and far fewer women than men persist in the field. This study aims to identify individual and contextual factors that distinguish women who persist in engineering careers in the US. Design/methodology/approach: Qualitative research was conducted based on…

  13. Persistent Infection Caused by Hobi-Like Pestivirus

    PubMed Central

    Losurdo, Michele; Lucente, Maria Stella; Sciarretta, Rossana; Mari, Viviana; Larocca, Vittorio; Elia, Gabriella; Cavaliere, Nicola; Martella, Vito; Fasanella, Antonio; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2013-01-01

    A calf persistently infected by Hobi-like pestivirus was monitored for about 6 months, displaying clinical signs typical of bovine viral diarrhea virus persistent infection and shedding the virus through all body secretions, with maximal titers detected in urine. This report provides new insights into the pathogenesis of the emerging pestivirus. PMID:23325822

  14. The Persistence of School-Level Value-Added

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Weeks, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal data for an entire state from 2004 to 2008, this article describes the results from an empirical investigation of the persistence of value-added school effects on student achievement in reading and math. It shows that when schools are the principal units of analysis rather than teachers, the persistence of estimated school…

  15. What Can Alumni Tell Us about Persistence at Commuter Institutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    With growing concerns over higher education accountability and diminishing resources, student persistence rates and the reasons why students remain at a post-secondary institution continue to persist. Using the Backward Design Model, the purpose of this observational study was to determine the difference between the pre-college characteristics of…

  16. No Exit: Predicting Student Persistence. AIR 1990 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beil, Cheryl; Shope, Janet H.

    A longitudinal study was conducted to determine the factors influencing college student persistence in remaining in school. Persistence was examined at two points: after the first year and 4 years after enrollment. The study was conducted at an urban university using the American College Testing's Entering Student Survey and Student Opinion…

  17. The Impact of Persistent Pain on Working Memory and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alexander; Ayres, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The study reviewed the evidence that persistent pain has the capacity to interrupt and consume working memory resources. It was argued that individuals with persistent pain essentially operate within a compromised neurocognitive paradigm of limited working memory resources that impairs task performance. Using cognitive load theory as a theoretical…

  18. A Longitudinal Behavioral Genetic Analysis of Task Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Petrill, Stephen A.; Thompson, Lee A.; DeThorne, Laura S.

    2006-01-01

    Change in task persistence was assessed in two annual assessments using teachers', testers', and observers' ratings. Participants included 79 monozygotic and 116 same-sex dizygotic twin pairs who were in Kindergarten or 1st grade (4.3 to 7.9 years old) at the initial assessment. Task persistence was widely distributed and higher among older…

  19. The role of viral persistence in flavivirus biology

    PubMed Central

    Mlera, Luwanika; Melik, Wessam; Bloom, Marshall E.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, vector-borne flaviviruses are persistently cycled between either the tick or mosquito vector and small mammals such as rodents, skunks, and swine. These viruses account for considerable human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Increasing and substantial evidence of viral persistence in humans, which includes the isolation of RNA by RT-PCR and infectious virus by culture, continues to be reported. Viral persistence can also be established in vitro in various human, animal, arachnid and insect cell lines in culture. Although some research has focused on the potential roles of defective virus particles, evasion of the immune response through the manipulation of autophagy and/or apoptosis, the precise mechanism of flavivirus persistence is still not well understood. We propose additional research for further understanding of how viral persistence is established in different systems. Avenues for additional studies include determining if the multifunctional flavivirus protein NS5 has a role in viral persistence, the development of relevant animal models of viral persistence as well as investigating the host responses that allow vector borne flavivirus replication without detrimental effects on infected cells. Such studies might shed more light on the viral-host relationships, and could be used to unravel the mechanisms for establishment of persistence. PMID:24737600

  20. Student Persistence Predictors and Community College Institutional Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, Jeffrey Lee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand the literature on student persistence in community colleges through three research innovations. First, the literature on student persistence in community colleges was expanded by applying theory to the identification and testing of predictors. Second, it was expanded by validating retention prediction…

  1. Supporting Academic Persistence in Low-Skilled Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Susan; Thomson, Margareta Maria

    2013-01-01

    The current literature review explores the factors that contribute to academic persistence for adult learners. The aim of the study is to identify current research-based strategies aimed at supporting learner persistence, particularly for low-skilled adults. Elements of three theoretical frameworks, namely, expectancy-value theory (EVT), goal…

  2. College Student Persistence to Degree: The Burden of Debt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Cliff A.; Moody, Beth; Abdel-Ghany, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Data collected from two major universities (one in the Midwest and one in the Southeast) in the United States were used to analyze student persistence behavior and perceptions of debt. Results from four separate logistic regression analyses suggested that financial factors play a significant role in student persistence behavior as well as in…

  3. Persistent Poverty in Rural America. Rural Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rural Sociological Society, Bozeman, MT.

    In this volume, the Rural Sociological Society Task Force on Persistent Rural Poverty analyzes the leading explanations of persistent rural poverty and points out new directions in theory that should provide a firmer foundation for antipoverty policies and programs. Written by over 50 leading social scientists, the Task Force report explains that…

  4. Persistence Diagrams of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Méndez, F.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study applies Topological Data Analysis (TDA), by generating persistence diagrams to uncover patterns in the data of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). Persistence diagrams are a way to identify essential cycles in state-space representations of the data.

  5. Desmoplastic melanoma: recent advances and persisting challenges.

    PubMed

    Wood, Benjamin A

    2013-08-01

    Desmoplastic melanoma is an uncommon variant of melanoma which presents significant challenges to the clinician and histopathologist. In particular, many cases show a bland 'fibroblastic' appearance, mimicking scar and a range of other benign proliferations. This diagnosis can be particularly problematic in small biopsy specimens, a difficulty exacerbated by an immunoprofile which is typically negative for a number of conventional melanocytic markers. The clinical and histological features of desmoplastic melanoma are reviewed, as are the differential diagnoses and some newer techniques which may contribute to assessment of these lesions. In recent years it has become clear that subclassification of desmoplastic melanoma into pure and mixed variants has clinical significance and it is suggested that this classification be employed in routine practice. PMID:23811805

  6. Mixing entropy in Dean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Petru; Vyhnalek, Brian; Kaufman, Miron

    2013-03-01

    We investigate mixing in Dean flows by solving numerically the Navier-Stokes equation for a circular channel. Tracers of two chemical species are carried by the fluid. The centrifugal forces, experienced as the fluid travels along a curved trajectory, coupled with the fluid incompressibility induce cross-sectional rotating flows (Dean vortices). These transversal flows promote the mixing of the chemical species. We generate images for different cross sections along the trajectory. The mixing efficiency is evaluated using the Shannon entropy. Previously we have found, P. S. Fodor and M. Kaufman, Modern Physics Letters B 25, 1111 (2011), this measure to be useful in understanding mixing in the staggered herringbone mixer. The mixing entropy is determined as function of the Reynolds number, the angle of the cross section and the observation scale (number of bins). Quantitative comparison of the mixing in the Dean micromixer and in the staggered herringbone mixer is attempted.

  7. SOS Response Induces Persistence to Fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dörr, Tobias; Lewis, Kim; Vulić, Marin

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria can survive antibiotic treatment without acquiring heritable antibiotic resistance. We investigated persistence to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli. Our data show that a majority of persisters to ciprofloxacin were formed upon exposure to the antibiotic, in a manner dependent on the SOS gene network. These findings reveal an active and inducible mechanism of persister formation mediated by the SOS response, challenging the prevailing view that persisters are pre-existing and formed purely by stochastic means. SOS-induced persistence is a novel mechanism by which cells can counteract DNA damage and promote survival to fluoroquinolones. This unique survival mechanism may be an important factor influencing the outcome of antibiotic therapy in vivo. PMID:20011100

  8. Using Persistent Homology to Describe Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tithof, Jeffrey; Suri, Balachandra; Xu, Mu; Kramar, Miroslav; Levanger, Rachel; Mischaikow, Konstantin; Paul, Mark; Schatz, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Complex spatial patterns that exhibit aperiodic dynamics commonly arise in a wide variety of systems in nature and technology. Describing, understanding, and predicting the behavior of such patterns is an open problem. We explore the use of persistent homology (a branch of algebraic topology) to characterize spatiotemporal dynamics in a canonical fluid mechanics problem, Rayleigh Bénard convection. Persistent homology provides a powerful mathematical formalism in which the topological characteristics of a pattern (e.g. the midplane temperature field) are encoded in a so-called persistence diagram. By applying a metric to measure the pairwise distances across multiple persistence diagrams, we can quantify the similarities between different states in a time series. Our results show that persistent homology yields new physical insights into the complex dynamics of large spatially extended systems that are driven far-from-equilibrium. This work is supported under NSF grant DMS-1125302.

  9. Strong self-limitation promotes the persistence of rare species.

    PubMed

    Yenni, Glenda; Adler, Peter B; Ernest, S K Morgan

    2012-03-01

    Theory has recognized a combination of niche and neutral processes each contributing, with varying importance, to species coexistence. However, long-term persistence of rare species has been difficult to produce in trait-based models of coexistence that incorporate stochastic dynamics, raising questions about how rare species persist despite such variability. Following recent evidence that rare species may experience significantly different population dynamics than dominant species, we use a plant community model to simulate the effect of disproportionately strong negative frequency dependence on the long-term persistence of the rare species in a simulated community. This strong self-limitation produces long persistence times for the rare competitors, which otherwise succumb quickly to stochastic extinction. The results suggest that the mechanism causing species to be rare in this case is the same mechanism allowing those species to persist. PMID:22624200

  10. Results from Persistence Mapping of Solar EUV Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.; Young, C. Alex

    2014-06-01

    Persistence Mapping is a simple image processing technique that is useful for the visualization and depiction of gradually evolving or intermittent structures. Persistence Mapping allows the user to isolate extreme values in a data set, and is particularly useful for the problem of capturing phenomena that are evolving in both space and time. While integration or "time lapse" imaging uses the full sample (of size N), Persistence Mapping rejects (N-1)/N of the data set and identifies the most relevant 1/N values using the following rule: if a pixel reaches an extreme value, it retains that value until that value is exceeded. The simplest examples isolate minima and maxima, and the technique has been used to extract the dynamics in long-term evolution of comet tails, erupting material, spicules, and EUV dimming regions. The presentation will review the technique and discuss scientific results obtained through Persistence Mapping. For more information, please see http://sipwork.org/persistence-mapping

  11. Estimating beta-mixing coefficients

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Daniel J.; Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla; Schervish, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The literature on statistical learning for time series assumes the asymptotic independence or “mixing” of the data-generating process. These mixing assumptions are never tested, and there are no methods for estimating mixing rates from data. We give an estimator for the beta-mixing rate based on a single stationary sample path and show it is L1-risk consistent. PMID:26279742

  12. Environmental controls on spatial patterns in the long-term persistence of giant kelp in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Mary Alida; Cavanaugh, Kyle C.; Bell, Tom W.; Raimondi, Peter T.; Edwards, Christopher A.; Drake, Patrick T.; Erikson, Li H.; Storlazzi, Curt

    2016-01-01

    As marine management is moving towards the practice of protecting static areas, it is 44 important to make sure protected areas capture and protect persistent populations. Rocky reefs in 45 many temperate areas worldwide serve as habitat for canopy forming macroalgae and these 46 structure forming species of kelps (order Laminariales) often serve as important habitat for a great 47 diversity of species. Macrocystis pyrifera is the most common canopy forming kelp species found 48 along the coast of California but the distribution and abundance of M. pyrifera varies in space and 49 time. The purpose of this study is to determine what environmental parameters are correlated with 50 the spatial and temporal persistence of M. pyrifera along the central coast of California and how 51 well those environmental parameters can be used to predict areas where M. pyrifera is more likely 52 to persist. Nine environmental variables considered in this study included depth of the seafloor, 53 structure of the rocky reef, proportion of rocky reef, size of kelp patch, biomass of kelp within a 54 patch, distance from the edge of a kelp patch, sea surface temperature, wave orbital velocities, and 55 population connectivity of individual kelp patches. Using a generalized linear mixed effects model 56 (GLMM), the persistence of M. pyrifera was significantly associated with seven of the nine 57 variables considered: depth, complexity of the rocky reef, proportion of rock, patch biomass, 58 distance from the edge of a patch, population connectivity, and wave-orbital velocities. These 59 seven environmental variables were then used to predict the persistence of kelp across the central 60 coast and these predictions were compared to a reserved dataset of M. pyrifera persistence, which 61 was not used in the creation of the GLMM. The environmental variables were shown to accurately 62 predict the persistence of M. pyrifera within the central coast of California (r = 0.71, P<0.001). 63 Because

  13. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Ru-Jeng; Wu, Tzong-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a severe pulmonary disorder which occurs one in every 500 live births. About 10–50% of the victims will die of the problem and 7–20% of the survivors develop long term impairments such as hearing deficit, chronic lung disease, and intracranial bleed. Most of the adult survivors show evidence of augmented pulmonary vasoreactivity suggesting a phenotypical change. Several animal models have been used to study the pathophysiology and help to develop new therapeutic modality for PPHN. The etiology of PPHN can be classified into three groups: [A] abnormally constricted pulmonary vasculature due to parenchymal diseases; [B] hypoplastic pulmonary vasculature; [C] normal parenchyma with remodeled pulmonary vasculature. Impaired vasorelaxation of pulmonary artery and reduced blood vessel density in lungs are two characteristic findings in PPHN. Medical treatment includes sedation, oxygen, mechanical ventilation, vasorelaxants (inhaled nitric oxide, inhaled or intravenous prostacyclin, intravenous prostaglandin E1, magnesium sulfate), and inotropic agents. Phosphodiesterase inhibitor has recently been studied as another therapeutic agent for PPHN. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) inhibitor has been studied in animal and a case of premature infant with PPHN successfully treated with ET-I inhibitor has been reported in the literature. Surfactant has been reported as an adjunct treatment for PPHN as a complication of meconium aspiration syndrome. Even with the introduction of several new therapeutic modalities there has no significant change in survival rate. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenator is used when medical treatment fails and patient is considered to have a recoverable cause of PPHN. PMID:23537863

  14. Persistent Bleeding After Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cholkeri-Singh, Aarathi; Sulo, Suela; Miller, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In our clinical experience, there seemed to be a correlation between cervical stump bleeding and adenomyosis. Therefore, we wanted to conduct a study to determine whether there was an actual correlation and to identify other risk factors for persistent bleeding after a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. Methods: The study included women who underwent laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2012. Data were collected on age, postmenopausal status, body mass index (BMI), uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, concomitant bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), presence of endometriosis, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, presence of endocervix in the specimen, and postoperative bleeding. Results: The study included 256 patients, of whom 187 had no postoperative bleeding after the operation, 40 had bleeding within 12 weeks, and 29 had bleeding after 12 weeks. The 3 groups were comparable in BMI, postmenopausal status, uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, BSO, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, and the presence of endocervix. However, patients who had postoperative bleeding at more than 12 weeks were significantly younger (P = .002) and had a higher rate of endometriosis (P < .001). Conclusions: Risks factors for postoperative bleeding from the cervical stump include a younger age at the time of hysterectomy and the presence of endometriosis. Therefore, younger patients and those with endometriosis who desire to have no further vaginal bleeding may benefit from total hysterectomy over supracervical hysterectomy. All patients who are undergoing supracervical hysterectomy should be counseled about the possible alternatives, benefits, and risks, including continued vaginal bleeding from the cervical stump and the possibility of requiring future treatment and procedures. PMID:25516706

  15. Persistent toxic substances in Mediterranean aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Miniero, Roberto; Abate, Vittorio; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Davoli, Enrico; De Felip, Elena; De Filippis, Stefania P; Dellatte, Elena; De Luca, Silvia; Fanelli, Roberto; Fattore, Elena; Ferri, Fabiola; Fochi, Igor; Rita Fulgenzi, Anna; Iacovella, Nicola; Iamiceli, Anna Laura; Lucchetti, Dario; Melotti, Paolo; Moret, Ivo; Piazza, Rossano; Roncarati, Alessandra; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Zambon, Stefano; di Domenico, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Fish and fishery products may represent one of the main sources of dietary exposure to persistent toxic substances (PTSs) such as polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls; polybromodiphenyl ethers; organochlorine pesticides; perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate; and inorganic mercury and methyl mercury. In this study, PTS contamination of Mediterranean fish and crustaceans caught in Italian coastal waters was investigated in order to increase the representativeness of the occurrence database for wild species. The objectives were to verify the suitability of regulatory limits for PTSs, identify background concentrations values, if any, and examine the possible sources of variability when assessing the chemical body burdens of aquatic species. Twelve wild species of commercial interest and two farmed fish species were chosen. Excluding methyl mercury, chemical concentrations found in wild species fell generally towards the low ends of the concentration ranges found in Europe according to EFSA database and were quite lower than the tolerable maximum levels established in the European Union; farmed fish always showed contamination levels quite lower than those detected in wild species. The data obtained for wild species seemed to confirm the absence of local sources of contamination in the chosen sampling areas; however, species contamination could exceed regulatory levels even in the absence of specific local sources of contamination as a result of the position in the food web and natural variability in species' lifestyle. A species-specific approach to the management of contamination in aquatic organisms is therefore suggested as an alternative to a general approach based only on contaminant body burden. A chemical-specific analysis performed according to organism position in the food chain strengthened the need to develop this approach. PMID:25020099

  16. Persistent Gravitational Radiation from Glitching Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, A.; Douglass, J. A.; Simula, T. P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum mechanical simulations of neutron star rotational glitches, triggered by vortex avalanches in the superfluid stellar interior, reveal that vortices pin nonaxisymmetrically to the crust during the intervals between glitches. Hence a glitching neutron star emits a persistent current quadrupole gravitational wave signal at the star’s rotation frequency, whose interglitch amplitude is constant and determined by the avalanche history since birth. The signal can be detected in principle by coherent searches planned for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), whether or not a glitch occurs during the observation, if the power-law distribution of glitch sizes extends up to {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max}/{{Ω }}≳ {10}-6{η }-1{({{Δ }}φ )}-1{({{Ω }}/{10}3 {rad} {{{s}}}-1)}-3(D/1 {kpc}) in the targeted object, where {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max} and {{Δ }}φ are the largest angular velocity jump and avalanche opening angle, respectively, to have occurred in a glitch since birth, Ω is the angular velocity at present, η is the crustal fraction of the moment of inertia, and D is the distance from the Earth. A major caveat concerning detectability is whether the nonaxisymmetries observed in existing simulations with ≲ {10}3 vortices extrapolate to realistic neutron stars with ≳ {10}15 vortices. The arguments for and against extrapolation are discussed critically in the context of avalanche dynamics in self-organized critical systems, but the issue cannot be resolved without larger simulations and tighter observational limits on η {{Δ }}φ {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max} from future LIGO (non)detections and radio timing campaigns.

  17. Using the systematic review methodology to evaluate factors that influence the persistence of influenza virus in environmental matrices.

    PubMed

    Irwin, C K; Yoon, K J; Wang, C; Hoff, S J; Zimmerman, J J; Denagamage, T; O'Connor, A M

    2011-02-01

    Understanding factors that influence persistence of influenza virus in an environment without host animals is critical to appropriate decision-making for issues such as quarantine downtimes, setback distances, and eradication programs in livestock production systems. This systematic review identifies literature describing persistence of influenza virus in environmental samples, i.e., air, water, soil, feces, and fomites. An electronic search of PubMed, CAB, AGRICOLA, Biosis, and Compendex was performed, and citation relevance was determined according to the aim of the review. Quality assessment of relevant studies was performed using criteria from experts in virology, disease ecology, and environmental science. A total of 9,760 abstracts were evaluated, and 40 appeared to report the persistence of influenza virus in environmental samples. Evaluation of full texts revealed that 19 of the 40 studies were suitable for review, as they described virus concentration measured at multiple sampling times, with viruses detectable at least twice. Seven studies reported persistence in air (six published before 1970), seven in water (five published after 1990), two in feces, and three on surfaces. All three fomite and five air studies addressed human influenza virus, and all water and feces studies pertained to avian influenza virus. Outcome measurements were transformed to half-lives, and resultant multivariate mixed linear regression models identified influenza virus surviving longer in water than in air. Temperature was a significant predictor of persistence over all matrices. Salinity and pH were significant predictors of persistence in water conditions. An assessment of the methodological quality review of the included studies revealed significant gaps in reporting critical aspects of study design. PMID:21148699

  18. Overview of Neutrino Mixing Models and Their Mixing Angle Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Carl H.

    2009-11-01

    An overview of neutrino-mixing models is presented with emphasis on the types of horizontal flavor and vertical family symmetries that have been invoked. Distributions for the mixing angles of many models are displayed. Ways to differentiate among the models and to narrow the list of viable models are discussed.

  19. Interaction of Staphylococcus aureus persister cells with the host when in a persister state and following awakening

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Elin G.; Marques, Cláudia N. H.

    2016-01-01

    Persister cells, a tolerant cell sub-population, are commonly associated with chronic and recurrent infections. However, little is known about their ability to actually initiate or establish an infection, become virulent and cause pathogenicity within a host. Here we investigated whether Staphylococcus aureus persister cells initiate an infection and are recognized by macrophages, while in a persister cell status, and upon awakening due to exposure to cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA). Our results show that S. aureus persister cells are not able to initiate infections in A. thaliana and present significantly reduced virulence towards C. elegans compared to total populations. In contrast, awakened S. aureus persister cells are able to initiate infections in A. thaliana and in C. elegans albeit, with lower mortality than total population. Furthermore, exposure of S. aureus persister cells to cis-DA led to a loss of tolerance to ciprofloxacin, and an increase of the bacterial fluorescence to levels found in total population. In addition, macrophage engulfment of persister cells was significantly lower than engulfment of total population, both before and following awakening. Overall our findings indicate that upon awakening of a persister population the cells regain their ability to infect hosts despite the absence of an increased immune response. PMID:27506163

  20. STUDY DESIGN FOR A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC PESTICIDES "CTEPP"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study is one of the largest aggregate exposure studies of young children in the United States. The CTEPP study examines the exposures of about 260 preschool children and their primary ad...

  1. Mixed Valence Niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Steven James

    1992-01-01

    The structural, crystal-chemical, and electrical properties of perovskites are reviewed, with respect to metallic phases similar to tungsten bronze. Phase diagrams are presented for the SrO-NbO-NbO_{2.5 } and SrNbO_3-KNbO _3-rm Sr_{0.5}NbO _3 ternaries, and for the SrNbO_3 -rm Sr_{0.5}NbO_3 binary. The influence of oxygen partial pressure, temperature, melting, and solid solutions affecting the perovskite phase rm Sr_{x}NbO _3 (0.75 <= x < 1.0) are detailed. The phase rm Sr_5Nb_4O_{15-y} (0.0 <= y <= 1.04) is discussed and XRD data are presented. The effects of A-cation substitutions in the rm A_{x}NbO_3 (A = K^+, Ba^{2+ }, Sr^{2+}, La^{3+}, Gd^ {3+}, Y^{3+} ) perovskite have been investigated. Large ions such as K^+ and Ba^ {2+} cause x to approach unity, whereas smaller ions such as Sr^{2+} and La^{3+} increase the ability of the A-site to accommodate vacancies (i.e. x < 1). Ba^{2+} results in an increase in the lattice parameter of the perovskite, whereas K^+ (which requires oxidation of Nb^{4+} to Nb^{5+}) results in a lattice parameter decrease, even though it has an ionic radius similar to Ba^{2+} . A unique relationship between unit cell volume and valence is established, suggesting that the oxidation state of the NbO_6 network dictates the lattice parameters and stability of the perovskite. The resistivity variation for rm Sr_{x}NbO_3, (Ba,Sr)NbO _3, (K,Sr)NbO_3, and (rm K_{0.5}Sr_ {0.5})NbO_3 indicates metallic behavior between 298K and 77K. Resistivity increased as the Nb was oxidized from Nb^{4+} to Nb^{5+}, but metallic properties persisted to at least Nb^ {5+}/(Nb^{5+} + Nb^{4+}) = 0.5. The influence of the exchanges Sr^{2+} = Ba^{2+} and V_{rm A} + Sr ^{2+} = 2K^+ on the electrical resistivity of the perovskite suggests ordering or band structure effects which are orders of magnitude stronger than those observed in metal alloys. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate Pauli-paramagnetism. At low temperature (<15K), the paramagnetic

  2. Mixed additive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Francisco; Covas, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We consider mixed models y =∑i =0 w Xiβi with V (y )=∑i =1 w θiMi Where Mi=XiXi⊤ , i = 1, . . ., w, and µ = X0β0. For these we will estimate the variance components θ1, . . ., θw, aswell estimable vectors through the decomposition of the initial model into sub-models y(h), h ∈ Γ, with V (y (h ))=γ (h )Ig (h )h ∈Γ . Moreover we will consider L extensions of these models, i.e., y˚=Ly+ɛ, where L=D (1n1, . . ., 1nw) and ɛ, independent of y, has null mean vector and variance covariance matrix θw+1Iw, where w =∑i =1 n wi .

  3. Mixed waste analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.J.; Turner, C.A.

    1993-12-31

    Improved superpower relations followed by the Soviet Union`s collapse acted as catalysts for changing the mission at Rocky Flats. Now, environmental concerns command as much attention as production capability. As a result, laboratory instruments once dedicated to plutonium production have a new purpose - the analysis of mixed wastes. Waste drums destined for WIPP require headspace analysis by GS/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC and SVOC). Flame AA analysis provides information on inorganic constituents. EPA guidelines for waste analysis (SW-846) overlook the obstacles of glove box manipulations. Sometimes, SW-846 guidelines conflict with the Rocky Flats waste minimization effort. However, the EPA encourages SW-846 adaptations if experimental data confirms the results. For water and soil samples, AA analysis of laboratory control samples show method capability inside a glove box. Non-radioactive drum headspace samples use a revised version of USEPA compendium method TO-14. Radioactive drum headspace samples require new instrumentation and change to SW-846 methods.

  4. Mixed voltage VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Rennels, David; Alkalaj, Leon

    1993-01-01

    A technique for minimizing the power dissipated in a Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) chip by lowering the operating voltage without any significant penalty in the chip throughput even though low voltage operation results in slower circuits. Since the overall throughput of a VLSI chip depends on the speed of the critical path(s) in the chip, it may be possible to sustain the throughput rates attained at higher voltages by operating the circuits in the critical path(s) with a high voltage while operating the other circuits with a lower voltage to minimize the power dissipation. The interface between the gates which operate at different voltages is crucial for low power dissipation since the interface may possibly have high static current dissipation thus negating the gains of the low voltage operation. The design of a voltage level translator which does the interface between the low voltage and high voltage circuits without any significant static dissipation is presented. Then, the results of the mixed voltage design using a greedy algorithm on three chips for various operating voltages are presented.

  5. Maximum mixing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorth, Jens

    The unique feature of MEM is that C(-1)(z) = exp(z) amplifies all scales equally. Narayan & Nityananda (1986) have shown that this leads to Gaussian deconvolved peaks. In MMM different scales are treated differently, depending on the choice of C. This gives different peak shapes, but also allows one to experiment with the degree of peak sharpening as a function of peak height. In fact, despite its strong information-theoretic background, MEM is known to redistribute flux incorrectly during deconvolution, thus making the method problematic if the goal is to get correct intensities out. MMM could remedy this problem by using an alternative to the entropy. In conclusion, some ideas connecting the physics of blurring with a proposed reconstruction scheme, dubbed Maximum Mixing Method, have been presented. It has been shown that this physically motivated, non-information theoretic, non-probabilistic, non-Bayesian approach can be turned into a powerful deconvolution technique, competitive with, and having as a special case, the Maximum Entropy Method. Further work within the proposed framework is required to fully explore the consequences of the theory. A paper including proofs and examples is in preparation.

  6. Measures on mixing angles

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Gielen, Steffen; Pope, C. N.; Turok, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We address the problem of the apparently very small magnitude of CP violation in the standard model, measured by the Jarlskog invariant J. In order to make statements about probabilities for certain values of J, we seek to find a natural measure on the space of Kobayashi-Maskawa matrices, the double quotient U(1){sup 2}/SU(3)/U(1){sup 2}. We review several possible, geometrically motivated choices of the measure, and compute expectation values for powers of J for these measures. We find that different choices of the measure generically make the observed magnitude of CP violation appear finely tuned. Since the quark masses and the mixing angles are determined by the same set of Yukawa couplings, we then do a second calculation in which we take the known quark mass hierarchy into account. We construct the simplest measure on the space of 3x3 Hermitian matrices which reproduces this known hierarchy. Calculating expectation values for powers of J in this second approach, we find that values of J close to the observed value are now rather likely, and there does not seem to be any fine-tuning. Our results suggest that the choice of Kobayashi-Maskawa angles is closely linked to the observed mass hierarchy. We close by discussing the corresponding case of neutrinos.

  7. Mixing in polymeric microfluidic devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Davis, Robert H.; Brotherton, Christopher M. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO)

    2006-04-01

    This SAND report describes progress made during a Sandia National Laboratories sponsored graduate fellowship. The fellowship was funded through an LDRD proposal. The goal of this project is development and characterization of mixing strategies for polymeric microfluidic devices. The mixing strategies under investigation include electroosmotic flow focusing, hydrodynamic focusing, physical constrictions and porous polymer monoliths. For electroosmotic flow focusing, simulations were performed to determine the effect of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with heterogeneous surface potential. The heterogeneous surface potential caused recirculations to form within the microchannel. These recirculations could then be used to restrict two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the mixing region surface potential to the average channel surface potential was made large in magnitude and negative in sign, and when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the characteristic diffusion time was minimized. Based on these results, experiments were performed to evaluate the manipulation of surface potential using living-radical photopolymerization. The material chosen to manipulate typically exhibits a negative surface potential. Using living-radical surface grafting, a positive surface potential was produced using 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and a neutral surface was produced using a poly(ethylene glycol) surface graft. Simulations investigating hydrodynamic focusing were also performed. For this technique, mixing is enhanced by using a tertiary fluid stream to constrict the two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the tertiary flow stream flow-rate to the mixing streams flow-rate was maximized. Also, like the electroosmotic focusing mixer, mixing was also maximized when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the

  8. Incomplete Mixing and Reactions - A Lagrangian Approach in a Pure Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, Amir; Bolster, Diogo; Aquino, Tomas

    2015-04-01

    Incomplete mixing of reactive solutes is well known to slow down reaction rates relative to what would be expected from assuming perfect mixing. As reactions progress in a system and deplete reactant concentrations, initial fluctuations in the concentrations of reactions can be amplified relative to mean background concentrations and lead to spatial segregation of reactants. As the system evolves, in the absence of sufficient mixing, this segregation will increase, leading to a persistence of incomplete mixing that fundamentally changes the effective rate at which overall reactions will progress. On the other hand, nonuniform fluid flows are known to affect mixing between interacting solutes. Thus a natural question arises: Can non-uniform flows sufficiently enhance mixing to suppress incomplete mixing effects, and if so, under what conditions? In this work we address this question by considering one of the simplest possible flows, a laminar pure shear flow, which is known to significantly enhance mixing relative to diffusion alone. To study this system we adapt a novel Lagrangian particle-based random walk method, originally designed to simulate reactions in purely diffusive systems, to the case of advection and diffusion in a shear flow. To interpret the results we develop a semi-analytical solution, by proposing a closure approximation that aims to capture the effect of incomplete mixing. The results obtained via the Lagrangian model and the semi-analytical solutions consistently highlight that if shear effects in the system are not sufficiently strong, incomplete mixing effects initially similar to purely diffusive systems will occur, slowing down the overall reaction rate. Then, at some later time, dependent on the strength of the shear, the system will return to behaving as if it were well-mixed, but represented by a reduced effective reaction rate. If shear effects are sufficiently strong, the incomplete mixing regime never emerges and the system can behave

  9. Persistent or not persistent? Polychlorinated biphenyls are readily depurated by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jennie R; Letcher, Robert J; Ross, Peter S

    2009-10-01

    Major pharmacokinetic processes influencing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) accumulation in mammals include uptake, biotransformation, respiration, and excretion. We characterized some of the factors underlying PCB accumulation/loss by evaluating PCB concentrations and patterns in pre- and posthibernation grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and their prey. The PCB congeners with vicinal meta- and para-chlorine unsubstituted hydrogen positions consistently showed loss both before and during hibernation, supporting the idea of a dominant role for biotransformation. Retention of all other studied congeners relative to that of PCB 194 varied widely (from <1 to 100%) and was highly correlated with log octanol-water partition coefficient (p < 0.0001). A lack of loss for most of these other congeners during hibernation supports the notion that excretion (e.g., fecal or urinary) or lack of uptake during the feeding season underlies their lack of accumulation, because hibernating bears do not eat or excrete. We estimate that grizzly bears retain less than 10% of total PCBs taken up from their diet. Our results suggest that for grizzly bears, depuration of PCBs via biotransformation is important (explaining approximately 40% of loss), but that nonbiotransformation processes, such as excretion, may be more important (explaining approximately 60% of loss). These findings, together with the approximately 91% loss of the persistent PCB 153 congener relative to PCB 194 in grizzly bears, raise important questions about how one defines persistence of PCBs in wildlife and may have bearing on the interpretation of food-web biomagnification studies. PMID:19480534

  10. Effects of mixing in threshold models of social behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetzhanov, Andrei R.; Worden, Lee; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    We consider the dynamics of an extension of the influential Granovetter model of social behavior, where individuals are affected by their personal preferences and observation of the neighbors’ behavior. Individuals are arranged in a network (usually the square lattice), and each has a state and a fixed threshold for behavior changes. We simulate the system asynchronously by picking a random individual and we either update its state or exchange it with another randomly chosen individual (mixing). We describe the dynamics analytically in the fast-mixing limit by using the mean-field approximation and investigate it mainly numerically in the case of finite mixing. We show that the dynamics converge to a manifold in state space, which determines the possible equilibria, and show how to estimate the projection of this manifold by using simulated trajectories, emitted from different initial points. We show that the effects of considering the network can be decomposed into finite-neighborhood effects, and finite-mixing-rate effects, which have qualitatively similar effects. Both of these effects increase the tendency of the system to move from a less-desired equilibrium to the “ground state.” Our findings can be used to probe shifts in behavioral norms and have implications for the role of information flow in determining when social norms that have become unpopular in particular communities (such as foot binding or female genital cutting) persist or vanish.

  11. Serial image analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis colony growth reveals a persistent subpopulation in sputum during treatment of pulmonary TB.

    PubMed

    Barr, David A; Kamdolozi, Mercy; Nishihara, Yo; Ndhlovu, Victor; Khonga, Margaret; Davies, Geraint R; Sloan, Derek J

    2016-05-01

    Faster elimination of drug tolerant 'persister' bacteria may shorten treatment of tuberculosis (TB) but no method exists to quantify persisters in clinical samples. We used automated image analysis to assess whether studying growth characteristics of individual Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonies from sputum on solid media during early TB treatment facilitates 'persister' phenotyping. As Time to Detection (TTD) in liquid culture inversely correlates with total bacterial load we also evaluated the relationship between individual colony growth parameters and TTD. Sputum from TB patients in Malawi was prepared for solid and liquid culture after 0, 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Serial photography of agar plates was used to measure time to appearance (lag time) and radial growth rate for each colony. Mixed-effects modelling was used to analyse changing growth characteristics from serial samples. 20 patients had colony measurements recorded at ≥1 time-point. Overall lag time increased by 6.5 days between baseline and two weeks (p = 0.0001). Total colony count/ml showed typical biphasic elimination, but long lag time colonies (>20days) had slower, monophasic decline. TTD was associated with minimum lag time (time to appearance of first colony1). Slower elimination of long lag time colonies suggests that these may represent a persister subpopulation of bacilli. PMID:27156626

  12. Biannual birth pulses allow filoviruses to persist in bat populations

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, David T. S.

    2015-01-01

    Filoviruses Ebolavirus (EBOV) and Marburgvirus (MARV) cause haemorrhagic fevers with high mortality rates, posing significant threats to public health. To understand transmission into human populations, filovirus dynamics within reservoir host populations must be understood. Studies have directly linked filoviruses to bats, but the mechanisms allowing viral persistence within bat populations are poorly understood. Theory suggests seasonal birthing may decrease the probability of pathogen persistence within populations, but data suggest MARV may persist within colonies of seasonally breeding Egyptian fruit bats, Rousettus aegyptiacus. I synthesize available filovirus and bat data in a stochastic compartmental model to explore fundamental questions relating to filovirus ecology: can filoviruses persist within isolated bat colonies; do critical community sizes exist; and how do host–pathogen relationships affect spillover transmission potential? Synchronous annual breeding and shorter incubation periods did not allow filovirus persistence, whereas bi-annual breeding and longer incubation periods, such as reported for Egyptian fruit bats and EBOV in experimental studies, allowed persistence in colony sizes often found in nature. Serological data support the findings, with bats from species with two annual birth pulses more likely to be seropositive (odds ratio (OR) 4.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5–8.7) than those with one, suggesting that biannual birthing is necessary for filovirus persistence. PMID:25673678

  13. Persistence of Rift Valley fever virus in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gachohi, J.; Hansen, F.; Bett, B.; Kitala, P.

    2012-04-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFv) is a mosquito-borne pathogen of livestock, wildlife and humans that causes severe outbreaks in intervals of several years. One of the open questions is how the virus persists between outbreaks. We developed a spatially-explicit, individual-based simulation model of the RVFv transmission dynamics to investigate this question. The model, is based on livestock and mosquito population dynamics. Spatial aspects are explicitly represented by a set of grid cells that represent mosquito breeding sites. A grid cell measures 500 by 500m and the model considers a grid of 100 by 100 grid cells; the model thus operates on the regional scale of 2500km2. Livestock herds move between grid cells, and provide connectivity between the cells. The model is used to explore the spatio-temporal dynamics of RVFv persistence in absence of a wildlife reservoir in an east African semi-arid context. Specifically, the model assesses the importance of local virus persistence in mosquito breeding sites relative to global virus persistence mitigated by movement of hosts. Local persistence is determined by the length of time the virus remains in a mosquito breeding site once introduced. In the model, this is a function of the number of mosquitoes that emerge infected and their lifespan. Global persistence is determined by the level of connectivity between isolated grid cells. Our work gives insights into the ecological and epidemiological conditions under which RVFv persists. The implication for disease surveillance and management are discussed.

  14. Biannual birth pulses allow filoviruses to persist in bat populations.

    PubMed

    Hayman, David T S

    2015-03-22

    Filoviruses Ebolavirus (EBOV) and Marburgvirus (MARV) cause haemorrhagic fevers with high mortality rates, posing significant threats to public health. To understand transmission into human populations, filovirus dynamics within reservoir host populations must be understood. Studies have directly linked filoviruses to bats, but the mechanisms allowing viral persistence within bat populations are poorly understood. Theory suggests seasonal birthing may decrease the probability of pathogen persistence within populations, but data suggest MARV may persist within colonies of seasonally breeding Egyptian fruit bats, Rousettus aegyptiacus. I synthesize available filovirus and bat data in a stochastic compartmental model to explore fundamental questions relating to filovirus ecology: can filoviruses persist within isolated bat colonies; do critical community sizes exist; and how do host-pathogen relationships affect spillover transmission potential? Synchronous annual breeding and shorter incubation periods did not allow filovirus persistence, whereas bi-annual breeding and longer incubation periods, such as reported for Egyptian fruit bats and EBOV in experimental studies, allowed persistence in colony sizes often found in nature. Serological data support the findings, with bats from species with two annual birth pulses more likely to be seropositive (odds ratio (OR) 4.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5-8.7) than those with one, suggesting that biannual birthing is necessary for filovirus persistence. PMID:25673678

  15. Virulence as a positive trait in viral persistence.

    PubMed Central

    Sáiz, J C; Domingo, E

    1996-01-01

    A population replacement experiment has been devised to test the ability of a challenge virus to replace the resident virus in a persistently infected cell culture. BHK-21 cells persistently infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus of serotype C (clone C-S8c1) were challenged with a large excess of either the parental foot-and-mouth disease virus C-S8c1, genetically marked variants differing in their degree of virulence, or a mutant rescued after prolonged persistence in BHK-21 cells. After challenge, the composition of the resident virus population in the carrier culture was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR amplification and nucleotide sequencing. The dominance of the initial persisting virus was seen in all cases, except when virulent viruses were used in the challenge. The experiments document that, paradoxically, virulence can be a positive factor in the reestablishment of a virus population in a persistently infected cell culture. A model based on the selection of virus-resistant cell variants during persistence is proposed to interpret these observations. Implications about the persistence of viruses in their host cells and organisms are discussed. PMID:8709272

  16. Persistence and transport potential of chemicals in a multimedia environment

    SciTech Connect

    van de Meent, D.; McKone, T.E.; Parkerton, T.; Matthies, M.; Scheringer, M.; Wania, F.; Purdy, R.; Bennett, D.H.

    2000-02-01

    Persistence in the environment and potential for long-range transport are related since time in the environment is required for transport. A persistent chemical will travel longer distances than a reactive chemical that shares similar chemical properties. Scheringer (1997) has demonstrated the correlation between persistence and transport distance for different organic chemicals. However, this correlation is not sufficiently robust to predict one property from the other. Specific chemicals that are persistent mayor may not exhibit long-range transport potential. Persistence and long-range transport also present different societal concerns. Persistence concerns relate to the undesired possibility that chemicals produced and used now may somehow negatively affect future generations. Long-range transport concerns relate to the undesired presence of chemicals in areas where these compounds have not been used. Environmental policy decisions can be based on either or both considerations depending on the aim of the regulatory program. In this chapter, definitions and methods for quantifying persistence and transport potential of organic chemicals are proposed which will assist in the development of sound regulatory frameworks.

  17. Persistence and reactivation of human adenoviruses in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kosulin, K; Geiger, E; Vécsei, A; Huber, W-D; Rauch, M; Brenner, E; Wrba, F; Hammer, K; Innerhofer, A; Pötschger, U; Lawitschka, A; Matthes-Leodolter, S; Fritsch, G; Lion, T

    2016-04-01

    Reactivation of persistent human adenoviruses (HAdVs) is associated with high morbidity and mortality in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Although invasive HAdV infections mainly arise from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the specific sites of HAdV persistence are not well characterised. We prospectively screened biopsies from 143 non-HSCT paediatric patients undergoing GI endoscopy and monitored serial stool specimens from 148 paediatric HSCT recipients for the presence of HAdV by real-time PCR. Persistence of HAdV in the GI tract was identified in 31% of children, with the highest prevalence in the terminal ileum. In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry identified HAdV persistence in lymphoid cells of the lamina propria, whereas biopsies from five transplant recipients revealed high numbers of replicating HAdV in intestinal epithelial cells. The prevalence of HAdV species, the frequencies of persistence in the GI tract and reactivations post transplant indicated a correlation of intestinal HAdV shedding pre-transplant with high risk of invasive infection. HAdV persistence in the GI tract is a likely origin of infectious complications in immunocompromised children. Intestinal lymphocytes represent a reservoir for HAdV persistence and reactivation, whereas the intestinal epithelium is the main site of viral proliferation preceding dissemination. The findings have important implications for assessing the risk of life-threatening invasive HAdV infections. PMID:26711435

  18. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-09

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

  19. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: ASPHALT HOT MIX

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the asphalt hot mix industry. A representative asphalt hot mix plant was defined, based on the results of an industrial survey, to assess the severity of emissions from this industry. Source severity was defined as the ratio of th...

  20. Mixed-Methods Research Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-Method studies have emerged from the paradigm wars between qualitative and quantitative research approaches to become a widely used mode of inquiry. Depending on choices made across four dimensions, mixed-methods can provide an investigator with many design choices which involve a range of sequential and concurrent strategies. Defining…