Science.gov

Sample records for personal care substances

  1. Presence of selected priority and personal care substances in an onsite bathroom greywater treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, E; Donner, E; Ledin, A

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, concerns about climate change and the inefficient use and ongoing pollution of water resources have increased the political motivation to encourage water recycling. This has led to the widespread introduction of water saving measures and to advances in the decentralised treatment and reuse of wastewater. In particular, the treatment and reuse of greywater has received attention, although important information such as greywater substance loadings is still only rarely available. With the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive the focus on controlling and phasing-out Priority/Priority Hazardous Substances (PS/PHS) is growing, and it is vital to know their sources and flows in order to generate sustainable emission control strategies. The main objective of this study was to quantify the concentrations and loads of PS/PHS and personal care substances in bathroom greywater, and to thereby assess the contribution of household activities to municipal wastewater loads for these substances. Nickel and mercury may be sourced substantially from household activities as it shown in the paper that bathroom greywater contributed a significant proportion of the overall load of these substances at the municipal wastewater treatment plant. Organic matter in the influent greywater was found to be principally associated with large particles (>8 µm), however it was the dissolved and small sized particles that were predominantly removed in the treatment. PMID:21123919

  2. Unhealthy substance-use behaviors as symptom-related self-care in persons with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Brion, John M; Rose, Carol Dawson; Nicholas, Patrice K; Sloane, Rick; Corless, Inge B; Lindgren, Teri G; Wantland, Dean J; Kemppainen, Jeanne K; Sefcik, Elizabeth F; Nokes, Kathleen M; Kirksey, Kenn M; Eller, Lucille; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L; Portillo, Carmen J; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Robinson, Linda M; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Ros, Ana Viamonte; Nicholas, Thomas P; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Bain, Catherine; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Zang, Sheryl M; Shannon, Maureen; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen; Willard, Suzanne

    2011-03-01

    Unhealthy substance-use behaviors, including a heavy alcohol intake, illicit drug use, and cigarette smoking, are engaged in by many HIV-positive individuals, often as a way to manage their disease-related symptoms. This study, based on data from a larger randomized controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual, examines the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy behaviors in relation to HIV/AIDS symptoms. The mean age of the sample (n = 775) was 42.8 years and 38.5% of the sample was female. The mean number of years living with HIV was 9.1 years. The specific self-reported unhealthy substance-use behaviors were the use of marijuana, cigarettes, a large amount of alcohol, and illicit drugs. A subset of individuals who identified high levels of specific symptoms also reported significantly higher substance-use behaviors, including amphetamine and injection drug use, heavy alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. The implications for clinical practice include the assessment of self-care behaviors, screening for substance abuse, and education of persons regarding the self-management of HIV. PMID:21352430

  3. Quantification of pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and perfluoroalkyl substances in the marine sediments of Puget Sound, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Long, Edward R; Dutch, Margaret; Weakland, Sandra; Chandramouli, Bharat; Benskin, Jonathan P

    2013-08-01

    Concentrations of 119 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and 13 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in marine sediments measured throughout Puget Sound (n = 10) and Bellingham Bay (n = 30), Washington, USA, are reported. These data are among the first measurements of PPCPs and PFASs in marine sediments from the Pacific Northwest and provide a comparison to previous measurements of these chemicals in influent, effluent, and biosolids from municipal wastewater treatment plants throughout the region. The concentrations of both PPCPs and PFASs in sediments from Puget Sound and Bellingham Bay ranged from very low to non-detectable for most compounds. Only 14 of the 119 PPCPs and 3 of 13 PFASs were quantifiable in sediments. Diphenhydramine (an antihistamine) was most frequently detected (87.5% of samples), with a maximum concentration of 4.81 ng/g dry weight and an estimated mean detected concentration of 1.68 ng/g. Triclocarban (an antibacterial) was detected in 35.0% of the samples, with a maximum concentration of 16.6 ng/g dry weight. Perfluoroalkyl substances were detected in 2.5% of analyses. Perfluorobutanoate, perfluorooctane sulfonate, and perfluorooctane sulfonamide were detected in 7, 5, and 1 sample(s) each, respectively, with the highest concentrations observed for perfluorooctane sulfonate (1.5 ng/g). Detected concentrations were often highest within the industrial harbor in Bellingham Bay and near the cities of Seattle and Bremerton. Environ Toxicol Chem 2013;32:1701-1710. © 2013 SETAC. PMID:23843318

  4. Validation of an aggregate exposure model for substances in consumer products: a case study of diethyl phthalate in personal care products

    PubMed Central

    Delmaar, Christiaan; Bokkers, Bas; ter Burg, Wouter; Schuur, Gerlienke

    2015-01-01

    As personal care products (PCPs) are used in close contact with a person, they are a major source of consumer exposure to chemical substances contained in these products. The estimation of realistic consumer exposure to substances in PCPs is currently hampered by the lack of appropriate data and methods. To estimate aggregate exposure of consumers to substances contained in PCPs, a person-oriented consumer exposure model has been developed (the Probabilistic Aggregate Consumer Exposure Model, PACEM). The model simulates daily exposure in a population based on product use data collected from a survey among the Dutch population. The model is validated by comparing diethyl phthalate (DEP) dose estimates to dose estimates based on biomonitoring data. It was found that the model's estimates compared well with the estimates based on biomonitoring data. This suggests that the person-oriented PACEM model is a practical tool for assessing realistic aggregate exposures to substances in PCPs. In the future, PACEM will be extended with use pattern data on other product groups. This will allow for assessing aggregate exposure to substances in consumer products across different product groups. PMID:25352161

  5. Personality and substance dependence symptoms: modeling substance-specific traits.

    PubMed

    Grekin, Emily R; Sher, Kenneth J; Wood, Phillip K

    2006-12-01

    Personality traits related to neuroticism and disinhibition have been consistently associated with substance use disorders (SUDs). It is unclear, however, whether different personality traits predict distinct forms of substance dependence. Additionally, it is unclear whether personality traits continue to predict alcohol, drug, and tobacco dependence after controlling for comorbid antisociality and other SUDs. The current study addresses these questions by characterizing relations between personality traits and substance dependence symptoms in a longitudinal sample of 3,720 college students. Results revealed that antisociality and certain core personality traits predicted multiple types of substance pathology. In addition, several personality traits were differentially associated with alcohol, drug, and tobacco symptomatology. PMID:17176176

  6. [Substance use risk personality trait for adolescents].

    PubMed

    Omiya, Souichiro; Kobori, Osamu; Tomoto, Aika; Igarashi, Yoshito; Iyo, Masaomi

    2012-12-01

    The prevention and treatment of substance use for youth are important issues in Japan. Substance use have significant risks of adverse psychological, social and physical health consequences. Personality factors in order to understand individual differences for substance use and misuse particularly were the much promise, and several personality factors have been demonstrated to be associated with risk for substance use. Conrod and Woicik (2002) developed Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) that measures four substance use risk personalities: anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, sensation-seeking, impulsivity being closely relevant to substance use/misuse and abuse. There are only a few studies focusing the relationship between personality factors and substance use among Japanese adolescents. Thus, this paper aimed to review the previous studies on these issues, and introduce studies regarding SURPS including our studies. PMID:23461217

  7. Implementing personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Implementing personalized cancer care requires a sound understanding of cancer genomics, familiarity with the analytical methods used to study cancer, knowledge of the mechanisms of action of targeted drugs, and ways to assimilate and understand complex data sets. Perhaps the greatest challenge is obtaining the drugs predicted to be beneficial based on the genomic profile of a patient's tumour. A potential solution is creation of a national facilitated access programme and registry for off-label use of targeted anti-cancer drugs. Within such a programme, patients could receive the targeted agent matched to the genomic profile of their tumour. Physicians would receive guidance in interpretation of complex genomic tests and access to drugs. Pharmaceutical companies, payers and regulators would receive data on off-label drug and test use and clinical outcomes to inform their research and development plans and coverage decisions and to track real-world safety. Although recently launched prospective clinical trials will determine the true benefit of matching drugs to genomic alterations, the approach proposed here will facilitate delivery of personalized medicine services to participating patients while at the same time making observations that allow us to learn from each patient to inform clinical care and future research initiatives. PMID:24687035

  8. Balancing personalized medicine and personalized care.

    PubMed

    Cornetta, Kenneth; Brown, Candy Gunther

    2013-03-01

    The current description of personalized medicine by the National Institutes of Health is "the science of individualized prevention and therapy." Although physicians are beginning to see the promise of genetic medicine coming to fruition, the rapid pace of sequencing technology, informatics, and computer science predict a revolution in the ability to care for patients in the near future. The enthusiasm expressed by researchers is well founded, but the expectations voiced by the public do not center on advancing technology. Rather, patients are asking for personalized care: a holistic approach that considers physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. This perspective considers psychological, religious, and ethical challenges that may arise as the precision of preventive medicine improves. Psychological studies already highlight the barriers to single gene testing and suggest significant barriers to the predictive testing envisioned by personalized medicine. Certain religious groups will likely mount opposition if they believe personalized medicine encourages embryo selection. If the technology prompts cost-containment discussions, those concerned about the sanctity of life may raise ethical objections. Consequently, the availability of new scientific developments does not guarantee advances in treatment because patients may prove unwilling to receive and act on personalized genetic information. This perspective highlights current efforts to incorporate personalized medicine and personalized care into the medical curriculum, genetic counseling, and other aspects of clinical practice. Because these efforts are generally independent, the authors offer recommendations for physicians and educators so that personalized medicine can be implemented in a manner that meets patient expectations for personalized care. PMID:23348082

  9. Integrated Care for Pediatric Substance Abuse.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Rebecca P; Hilt, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    Integrated care is a way to improve the prevention, identification, and treatment of mental health difficulties, including substance abuse, in pediatric care. The pediatrician's access, expertise in typical development, focus on prevention, and alignment with patients and families can allow successful screening, early intervention, and referral to treatment. Successful integrated substance abuse care for youth is challenged by current reimbursement systems, information exchange, and provider role adjustment issues, but these are being addressed as comfort with this care form and resources to support its development grow. PMID:27613351

  10. Personalized cancer care conference.

    PubMed

    Zänker, Kurt S; Mihich, Enrico; Huber, Hans-Peter; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The Oslo University Hospital (Norway), the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research (Norway), The Radiumhospital Foundation (Norway) and the Fritz-Bender-Foundation (Germany) designed under the conference chairmen (E. Mihich, K.S. Zänker, A.L. Borresen-Dale) and advisory committee (A. Borg, Z. Szallasi, O. Kallioniemi, H.P. Huber) a program at the cutting edge of "PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE: Risk prediction, early diagnosis, progression and therapy resistance." The conference was held in Oslo from September 7 to 9, 2012 and the science-based presentations concerned six scientific areas: (1) Genetic profiling of patients, prediction of risk, late side effects; (2) Molecular profiling of tumors and metastases; (3) Tumor-host microenvironment interaction and metabolism; (4) Targeted therapy; (5) Translation and (6) Informed consent, ethical challenges and communication. Two satellite workshops on (i) Ion Ampliseq-a novel tool for large scale mutation detection; and (ii) Multiplex RNA ISH and tissue homogenate assays for cancer biomarker validation were additionally organized. The report concludes that individual risk prediction in carcinogenesis and/or metastatogenesis based on polygenic profiling may be useful for intervention strategies for health care and therapy planning in the future. To detect distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations in tumor samples and adjacent normal tissues, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individualized patients. However, large individualized datasets need a new approach in bio-information technology to reduce this enormous data dimensionally to simply working hypotheses about health and disease for each individual. PMID:25562519

  11. Perspective: Balancing Personalized Medicine and Personalized Care

    PubMed Central

    Cornetta, Kenneth; Brown, Candy Gunther

    2013-01-01

    The current description of personalized medicine by the National Institutes of Health is “the science of individualized prevention and therapy.” Although physicians are just beginning to see the promise of genetic medicine coming to fruition, the rapid pace of sequencing technology, informatics, and computer science predict a true revolution in the ability to care for patients in the near future. The enthusiasm expressed by researchers is well founded, but the expectations voiced by the public do not center on advancing technology. Rather, patients are asking for personalized care: a holistic approach that considers an individual’s physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. This perspective considers psychological, religious, and ethical challenges that may arise as the precision of preventive medicine improves. Psychological studies already highlight the barriers to single gene testing and suggest significant barriers to the predictive testing envisioned by personalized medicine. Certain religious groups will likely mount opposition if they believe personalized medicine encourages embryo selection. If the technology prompts cost-containment discussions, those concerned about the sanctity of life may raise ethical objections. Consequently, the availability of new scientific developments does not guarantee advances in treatment because patients may prove unwilling to receive and act upon personalized genetic information. This perspective highlights current efforts to incorporate personalized medicine and personalized care into the medical curriculum, genetic counseling, and other aspects of clinical practice. As these efforts are generally independent, the authors offer recommendations for physicians and educators so that personalized medicine can be implemented in a manner that meets patient expectations for personalized care. PMID:23348082

  12. Formalehyde in personal care products.

    PubMed

    Jackson, E M

    2012-01-01

    Personal care products reported to cause allergic contact dermatitis from the presence of formaldehyde need to be re-examined in light of recent chemical developments in our understanding of the film former, toluene sulfonamide formaldehyde resin, the preservatives diazolidinyl urea and imidazolidinyl urea, and formalin. This paper will elucidate these chemistries as well as review how formaldehyde is used in personal care products in raw materials and formaldehyde donor preservatives. PMID:22699123

  13. Substance Use by Persons with Recent Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen W.; And Others

    Substance use histories were obtained from 103 persons (16 to 63 years of age) with recent spinal cord injuries (SCI). Lifetime exposure to and current use of substances with abuse potential were substantially greater in this sample compared to a like-age national sample. Exposure to and recent use of substances with abuse potential was…

  14. Personality Subtypes, Coping Styles, Symptom Correlates, and Substances of Choice among a Cohort of Substance Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quirk, Stuart W.; McCormick, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of the Five-Factor personality domains of the NEO Personality Inventory (P. Costa and R. McCrae, 1992) in identifying subtypes was studied with 3,256 substance abusers. Three groups, differing in coping style, psychopathological symptoms, and pattern of substance choice, were reliably identified. Implications for use of the measure…

  15. Dental care of patients with substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Bullock, K

    1999-07-01

    Patients who abuse alcohol, crack, heroin or prescription drugs, are likely to interact with the dental professional. The dentist should therefore be able to identify problems of abuse and provide informed care and referral. Substance abuse should be a consideration in all patients who present with dental trauma and those who present with frequent vague complaints, multiple pain medication allergies, and regimens with multiple narcotic medications. Polydrug use, either prescription or illicit, is also a possibility, and effective treatment requires prompt recognition. Dentists should be alert to drug-seeking behavior within the context of pain management, and because pain severity is an objective experience, each patient must be treated carefully and sensitively. Unrelieved or unremitting pain can be a relapse trigger and therefore adequate pain control is a necessity in the recovering chemically dependent patient. New modalities, such as coanalgesia with low-dose ketamine in the opioid addicted have been shown to work effectively. In the post-dental surgical patient with chemical dependency, agents with less psychoactive activity than their drugs of abuse, such as extended-release morphine (MS Contin) have been tried with variable success. An informed treatment plan includes recognition of substance abuse, appropriate intervention, and referral. This plan may include universal screening, followed by brief interventional therapy for positive patients and in some cases, pharmacological pain control. On discharge from the office, instructions concerning referral to a substance abuse program or, in the case of the patient who may require more immediate treatment, to the emergency department are important. PMID:10516924

  16. Association between personality traits and substance use in Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gonzálvez, María T; Espada, José P; Guillon-Riquelme, Alejandro; Secades, Roberto; Orgilés, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    Substance use is considered one of the most frequent risk behaviors during adolescence. Personality factors are linked to consumption during adolescence. Although there are studies on personality and consumption among Spanish adolescents, some outcomes are contradictory, and more studies including larger samples and using validated measures are needed. The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between different personality factors and substance use among Spanish adolescents. Participants were 1,455 students aged between 13-18 years. The adaptation of the 16PF-IPIP Personality Inventory was applied to assess Warmth, Stability, Gregariousness, Friendliness, Sensitivity, Trust, Openness to experience, Sociability, Perfectionism, and Calmness. Participants were asked about their different consumption substances during their lifetime. Results provide evidence for a relationship between personality factors and psychoactive substance use. There are different distributions of alcohol use regarding personality traits. Furthermore, personality factors have some influence on consumption of alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine.Trust and Calmness influence average alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine consumption, whereas Sociability had no statistically significant influence on any of the three substances. The results from this study are highly useful in the design of preventive programs, as they provide more evidence of the role of personality traits as a risk factor. PMID:26990262

  17. Continuing Care for Adolescents in Treatment for Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Passetti, Lora L; Godley, Mark D; Kaminer, Yifrah

    2016-10-01

    Adolescents who enter treatment for substance use often do not complete the program and do not connect with continuing care services. Most return to some level of substance use. Our review found 10 outcome studies of continuing care treatment. More assertive approaches can increase continuing care initiation rates and rapid initiation of continuing care makes a difference in reducing substance use. Continuing care is appropriate for those who complete treatment and for those who do not. Adaptive treatment designs hold promise for establishing decision rules as to which adolescents need low-intensity continuing care services and which need more intensive care. PMID:27613345

  18. New systems of care for substance use disorders: treatment, finance, and technology under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Pating, David R; Miller, Michael M; Goplerud, Eric; Martin, Judith; Ziedonis, Douglas M

    2012-06-01

    This article outlined ways in which persons with addiction are currently underserved by our current health care system. However, with the coming broad scale reforms to our health care system, the access to and availability of high-quality care for substance use disorders will increase. Addiction treatments will continue to be offered through traditional substance abuse care systems, but these will be more integrated with primary care, and less separated as treatment facilities leverage opportunities to blend services, financing mechanisms, and health information systems under federally driven incentive programs. To further these reforms, vigilance will be needed by consumers, clinicians, and policy makers to assure that the unmet treatment needs of individuals with addiction are addressed. Embedded in this article are essential recommendations to facilitate the improvement of care for substance use disorders under health care reform. Ultimately, as addiction care acquires more of the “look and feel” of mainstream medicine, it is important to be mindful of preexisting trends in health care delivery overall that are reflected in recent health reform legislation. Within the world of addiction care, clinicians must move beyond their self-imposed “stigmatization” and sequestration of specialty addiction treatment. The problem for addiction care, as it becomes more “mainstream,” is to not comfortably feel that general slogans like “Treatment Works,” as promoted by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment during its annual Recovery Month celebrations, will meet the expectations of stakeholders outside the specialty addiction treatment community. Rather, the problem is to show exactly how addiction treatment works, and to what extent it works-there have to be metrics showing changes in symptom level or functional outcome, changes in health care utilization, improvements in workplace attendance and

  19. Pharmaceuticals, hormones, personal-care products, and other organic wastewater contaminants in water resources: Recent research activities of the U.S. Geological Survey's toxic substances hydrology program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Focazio, Michael J.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Buxton, Herbert T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent decades have brought increasing concerns for potential contamination of water resources that could inadvertently result during production, use, and disposal of the numerous chemicals offering improvements in industry, agriculture, medical treatment, and even common household products. Increasing knowledge of the environmental occurrence or toxicological behavior of these contaminants from various studies in Europe, United States, and elsewhere has resulted in increased concern for potential adverse environmental and human health effects (Daughton and Ternes, 1999). Ecologists and public health experts often have incomplete understandings of the toxicological significance of many of these contaminants, particularly long-term, low-level exposure and when they occur in mixtures with other contaminants (Daughton and Ternes, 1999; Kümmerer, 2001). In addition, these ‘emerging contaminants’ are not typically monitored or assessed in ambient water resources. The need to understand the processes controlling the transport and fate of these contaminants in the environment, and the lack of knowledge of the significance of long-term exposures have increased the need to study environmental occurrence down to trace (nanogram per liter) levels. Furthermore, the possibility that mixtures of environmental contaminants may interact synergistically or antagonistically has increased the need to characterize the types of mixtures that are found in our waters. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Toxic Substances Hydrology Program (Toxics Program) is developing information and tools on emerging water-quality issues that will be used to design and improve water-quality monitoring and assessment programs of the USGS and others, and for proactive decision-making by industry, regulators, the research community, and the public (http://toxics.usgs.gov/regional/emc.html). This research on emerging water-quality issues includes a combination of laboratory work to develop new analytical

  20. Attending to the whole person in the patient-centered medical home: the case for incorporating mental healthcare, substance abuse care, and health behavior change.

    PubMed

    DeGruy, Frank Verloin; Etz, Rebecca S

    2010-12-01

    The foundation of the U.S. healthcare system is faulty, and the consequences have become inescapable (Committee of Quality of Health Care in America, 2001). We are first among nations in spending on healthcare, whether measured in absolute dollars, per capita expenditures, or proportion of our national budget. Yet our citizens are the least healthy in the developed world. (Anderson & Hussey, 2001) Our nation's healthcare system is simply not a high-quality system. This shortfall is serious enough to cause tens of thousands of unnecessary deaths each year and to compromise our capacity for further economic growth (Anderson & Hussey, 2001; Anderson, Frogner, Johns, & Reinhardt, 2006; Macinko, Starfield, & Shi, 2003), yet it ramifies into so many of our political, financial, and social institutions that change is difficult and fraught with serious unintended consequences. PMID:21299277

  1. Superabsorbents in Personal Care Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong

    1997-10-01

    Water swellable hydrogels, often called Superabsorbent Polymers, are used as a major component in many absorbent products such as baby diapers. The superabsorbents used in personal care industry are typically lightly crosslinked sodium polyacrylate polymers. The current annual worldwide production of the material is close to one million metric tons. These hydrogels can absorb water more than 100 times of their own weight. The absorbed liquid is tightly held inside the superabsorbent materials even against pressure. The balance of many different properties will be discussed.

  2. Substance Use among Young People Living in Residential State Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrystal, Patrick; Percy, Andrew; Higgins, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Existing empirical evidence on substance use among young people living in residential state care during adolescence is comparatively limited. This paper reports on substance use trends of young people living in residential state care during three annual data-sweeps when aged 14, 15 and 16 years. A repeated cross-sectional research design was…

  3. Is managed care closing substance abuse treatment units?

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca; Harris Lemak, Christy; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Roddy, Brian L; Nahra, Tammie A

    2007-03-01

    Despite high levels of unmet need for outpatient substance abuse treatment, a significant percentage of outpatient units have closed over the past several years. This study drew on 1999-2000 and 2005 national surveys to determine if managed care was associated with outpatient substance abuse treatment units' likelihood of surviving. Each substance abuse unit director was asked about the presence of any managed care contracts, percentage revenues from managed care, percentage of clients for whom prior authorization was required, and percentage of clients for whom concurrent review was required. A multiple logistic regression revealed that none of these factors was associated with substance abuse treatment unit survival. At this point, neither the presence nor the structure of managed care appears to affect the survival of outpatient substance abuse treatment units. Given the need for these facilities, however, and their vulnerability to closure, continued attention to managed care's potential influence is warranted. PMID:17458479

  4. Substance abusers' personality disorders and staff members' emotional reactions

    PubMed Central

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous research has indicated that aggressive behaviour and DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders (PD) may be associated with professionals' emotional reactions to clients, and that cluster C PD may be associated with positive emotional reactions. Methods Staff members recruited from workshops completed a self-report inventory of emotional reactions to patients, the Feeling Word Checklist-58, and substance abusers completed a self-report of DSM-IV personality disorder, the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Disorder Questionnaire. Correlational analysis and multiple regression analysis was used to assess the associations between personality disorders and emotional reations. Results Cluster B disorder features were associated with feeling distance to patients, and cluster C disorder features were associated with feeling helpful towards patients. Cluster A disorders had no significant impact on emotional reactions. Conclusion The findings confirm clinical experiences that personality disorder features in patients with substance abuse have an impact on staff members reactions to them. These reactions should be considered in supervision of staff, and in treatment models for patients with co-morbid personality disorders and substance abuse. PMID:18402658

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 250 ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  6. Social workers' ratings of comorbid personality disorders in substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Morten

    2005-07-01

    Clinical diagnoses of personality disorders have been discredited in the literature. However, the artificial dichotomization of dimensions, along with the constraint of having to select only one or a few diagnoses, may have limited the ability of clinical judgment to converge with other clinician's judgments, or with relevant external criteria. Assessment with a dimensional approach to personality disorders may provide improved agreement. In this study, substance abusers were rated by two different staff members involved in their treatment. Inter-rater agreement was moderately high for paranoid, schizotypal, antisocial, and borderline personality disorder, and high-moderate discriminant validity was found for all personality disorders except schizoid and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. PMID:15925133

  7. Partial Knee with Personalized Patient Care

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Oxford® Partial Knee with Signature™ Personalized Patient Care You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and ...

  8. Official conceptualizations of person-centered care: which person counts?

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that a "psycho-social" person-centered care approach, involving the delivery of a compassionate, respectful model of care, leads to a high quality of life, particularly for older people living in residential care. This has prompted policy-makers to endorse this approach. Yet, some commentators have argued that the model of person-centered care in official government policies equates to a "consumer-based" rather than a psycho-social approach, as it focuses solely on offering service-users more choice and on promoting independence. However, as such arguments are made in the absence of any empirical analysis, it is unclear both whether such a distinction exists in practice, and, if so, how this alternative model developed. This study explores the development of minimum standards for residential care settings for older people in Ireland in order to address this gap in our understanding of person-centered care. Findings confirm that a consumer-driven model of person-centered care underpins the Irish Standards; residential care is portrayed as a hotel-like service and residents as discerning consumers, which may be unsuitable for older people in residential care with limited capacity to make key choices. Analysis indicates that this model can be seen both as an extension of consumer-driven policies endorsed by many neo-liberal governments, and also of policy-makers' fears of losing their autonomy when they reach the "Fourth Age". This study is particularly illuminating, given the similarities between the Irish care system with England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and Australia. PMID:23849421

  9. Household Products Database: Personal Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... blemish control aftershave antibacterial antiperspirant baby bath baby lotion/ointment baby powder bar soap bar soap, antibacterial ... moisturizer, anti-aging facial moisturizer, w/sunscreen fade lotion/cream foot care for kids for men for ...

  10. Substance abuse intervention for health care workers: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Lapham, S C; Chang, I; Gregory, C

    2000-05-01

    The Workplace Managed Care Cooperative Agreement project targets 3,300 health care professionals in hospital, specialty clinic, and primary care settings located in metropolitan New Mexico communities. This project will evaluate whether enhancements to existing substance abuse prevention/early intervention programs can prevent the onset of risky drinking, reduce prevalence of risky drinking, better identify employees who abuse alcohol and drugs, and improve employee wellness. This article describes one such enhancement (Project WISE [Workplace Initiative in Substance Education]), implemented at Lovelace Health Systems. Project WISE includes relatively low-cost elements such as substance abuse awareness training, information on how to reduce drinking, and brief motivational counseling. Evaluation will consist of baseline comparisons of the intervention and comparison sites, a process evaluation, a qualitative analysis using focus groups, and an outcome evaluation using health and work records. Methodological challenges, solutions, and implications for researchers undertaking similar projects are presented. PMID:10795124

  11. Treating substance abuse in primary care: a demonstration project

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Denise; Miller, William R.; Rollnick, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this project was to implement the delivery of a full range of substance abuse services in a primary care setting. Implementation and logistical issues including confidentiality and communication are discussed. The delivery of services, types of patients, and contextual and policy factors that influenced project implementation are described. Context Substance use disorders are associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Patients with alcohol/drug problems frequently present in primary care. Effective and brief treatments are available and recommended for primary care but infrequently implemented. Institutional and provider barriers to implementation have been identified. Data source Project documentation, data from the patient tracking system, and clinical case notes were used for description and analyses. Conclusion Addressing substance abuse problems in primary care is important. Behavioral health professionals with training in substance abuse can provide a range of services that are likely to enhance the quality and quantity of care available to patients. Although contextual factors needed to be addressed, integration of services was manageable and seemed acceptable to both providers and patients in this project. PMID:18043722

  12. Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment: Organizational Change and Quality of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieckmann, Traci; Fussell, Holly; Doyle, Kevin; Ford, Jay; Riley, Katherine J.; Henderson, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse treatment agencies serving youth face unique barriers to providing quality care. Interviews with 17 adolescent programs found that family engagement, community involvement, and gender and diversity issues affected treatment delivery. Programs report organizational change efforts with implications for future process improvement…

  13. A Care Coordination Program for Substance-Exposed Newborns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twomey, Jean E.; Caldwell, Donna; Soave, Rosemary; Fontaine, Lynne Andreozzi; Lester, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    The Vulnerable Infants Program of Rhode Island (VIP-RI) was established as a care coordination program to promote permanency for substance-exposed newborns in the child welfare system. Goals of VIP-RI were to optimize parents' opportunities for reunification and increase the efficacy of social service systems involved with families affected by…

  14. Respect for persons, autonomy and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Woods, Simon

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores some of the values that underpin health care and how these relate more specifically to the values and ethics of palliative care. The paper focuses on the concept of autonomy because autonomy has emerged as a foundational concept in contemporary health care ethics and because this is an opportunity to scratch the surface of this concept in order to reveal something of its complexity, a necessary precaution when applying the concept to the context of palliative care. The paper begins with a theoretical discussion of autonomy exploring an aspect of its contemporary meaning and relevance to health care. The second part of the paper focuses more closely on how the principle of respect for autonomy can be applied in the context of palliative care. In this section an ethical framework is employed to explore a practical application of this principle within a broader context of respect for persons. PMID:16215803

  15. Training Doctors for Person-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    English, Jeannine

    2016-03-01

    Person-centered care, in which an individual patient's goals and preferences are treated as paramount, should be the standard throughout the nation. Achieving this ideal will require a change in the culture of health care, and medical schools can play a vital role in helping achieve it. Lack of communication, uncoordinated services, and dealings with sometimes-aloof clinicians and staff all can increase stress and undermine a person's sense of well-being. In a person-centered system, such experiences would be much less common. The cultural shift starts with the idea of "engaging the consumer" rather than "treating the patient." Such engagement requires honoring individuality. The doctor may have a certain way of doing things. But people vary enormously in their values and priorities. They have different goals, different thresholds of pain, different anxieties, different needs for support, different backgrounds, and different resources to draw on. Individuals should feel empowered, aware of their choices, and connected to their health care providers through meaningful communication and understanding. They deserve to feel that their personal dignity and their wishes are a top priority. They should be made to feel that they, along with their caregivers, are members of the care team. This change will benefit not only patients and families but doctors as well. Doctors will benefit from more insight into the individuals they serve, their interactions with consumers and caregivers will be more positive, and the quality of care will improve. PMID:26717502

  16. Personalized Care in Uterine Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, David A.; Bodurka, Diane C.

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer typically presents at an early stage when surgery alone, with or without radiotherapy, is often curative. However, in women who present with advanced disease or who develop disease recurrence, long-term prognosis is poor. While surgical cytoreduction remains the mainstay of initial therapy, over the last several decades, the roles of cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy have been evaluated in both the adjuvant and recurrent setting in an attempt to improve long-term survival while also minimizing associated toxicities. Unfortunately, response rates remain poor and survival is limited in these settings. More recently, with the introduction of personalized cancer treatment, several biologic agents have been developed that target specific pathways critical to tumor initiation and growth. Molecular studies have found that many endometrial cancers are driven by some of these tumorigenic pathways, which has led to early clinical studies evaluating the role of these targeted agents in patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. This review describes existing treatment options for patients with early and advanced endometrioid endometrial cancer, as well as for patients with uterine serous cancers. Furthermore, this review examines the growing body of literature involving targeted biologic agents as treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. PMID:23271352

  17. The Administrative Control System of Substance Abuse Managed Care

    PubMed Central

    Sosin, Michael R

    2005-01-01

    Objective This article searches for the dimensions of the administrative structures in outpatient substance abuse managed care that control the behavior of agency providers. It also ascertains how these dimensions, and several financial mechanisms, affect key aspects of the providers services: the average number of sessions of care that are delivered, the rate of completion of care, and the (estimated) rate at which clients control their substance use. Data Sources The data were collected in 1999 for this investigation. Study Design These data come from a nationally representative, cross-sectional sample of individual contracts between outpatient drug treatment providers and the Behavioral Health Managed Care Organizations (BHMCOs) that are empowered to regulate the delivery of services. Provider responses are analyzed here. Data Collection Methods Factor analyses at a contract level examine the structural dimensions of the control system. Multivariate analyses at the same level rely on generalized linear models to predict the dependent variables by the structural dimensions and financial mechanisms. Findings The factor analyses suggest that there are six multiple variable structural dimensions. The multivariate analyses suggest that the dimension that mandates follow-up of discharged clients tends to relate to more sessions of care and perhaps a higher rate of service completion. Most other dimensions are found to relate to fewer sessions of care, lower rates of service completion, or lower rates of control of substance abuse. No structural dimension relates to all dependent variables. Financial mechanisms evince varying relations to the sessions of care. They rarely relate to the other dependent variables. Conclusion The results generally suggest that providers, payers, or policymakers might affect service provision by selecting BHMCOs that stress particular structural dimensions and financial mechanisms. However, managed care contracts most heavily rely on

  18. Caring work, personal obligation and collective responsibility.

    PubMed

    Provis, Chris; Stack, Sue

    2004-01-01

    Studies of workers in health care and the care of older people disclose tensions that emerge partly from their conflicting obligations. They incur some obligations from the personal relationships they have with clients, but these can be at odds with organizational demands and resource constraints. One implication is the need for policies to recognize the importance of allowing workers some discretion in decison making. Another implication may be that sometimes care workers can meet their obligations to clients only by taking collective action. PMID:14763646

  19. Genetic variation in personality traits explains genetic overlap between borderline personality features and substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Few, Lauren R.; Grant, Julia D; Trull, Timothy J.; Statham, Dixie J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Lynskey, Michael T.; Agrawal, Arpana

    2014-01-01

    Aims To examine the genetic overlap between borderline personality features (BPF) and substance use disorders (SUDs) and the extent to which variation in personality traits contributes to this covariance. Design Genetic structural equation modelling was used to partition the variance in and covariance between personality traits, BPF, and SUDs into additive genetic, shared, and individual-specific environmental factors. Setting All participants were registered with the Australian Twin Registry. Participants A total of 3,127 Australian adult twins participated in the study. Measurements Diagnoses of DSM-IV alcohol and cannabis abuse/dependence (AAD; CAD), and nicotine dependence (ND) were derived via computer-assisted telephone interview. BPF and five-factor model personality traits were derived via self-report questionnaires. Findings Genetic factors were responsible for 49% (95%CI: 42%–55%) of the variance in BPF, 38–42% (95%CI range: 32%–49%) for personality traits and 47% (95%CI: 17%–77%), 54% (95%CI: 43%–64%), and 78% (67%–86%) for ND, AAD and CAD, respectively. Genetic and individual-specific environmental correlations between BPF and SUDs ranged from .33–.56 (95%CI range: .19–.74) and .19–.32 (95%CI range: .06–.43), respectively. Overall, there was substantial support for genetic influences that were specific to AAD, ND and CAD (31%–69%). Finally, genetic variation in personality traits was responsible for 11% (Extraversion for CAD) to 59% (Neuroticism for AAD) of the correlation between BPF and SUDs. Conclusions Both genetic and individual-specific environmental factors contribute to comorbidity between borderline personality features and substance use disorders. A substantial proportion of this comorbidity can be attributed to variation in normal personality traits, particularly Neuroticism. PMID:25041562

  20. Cleanser, Detergent, Personal Care Product Pretreatment Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Niklas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the Cleanser, Detergent, Personal Care Product, and Pretreatment Evaluation & Selection task is to identify the optimal combination of personal hygiene products, crew activities, and pretreatment strategies to provide the crew with sustainable life support practices and a comfortable habitat. Minimal energy, mass, and crew time inputs are desired to recycle wastewater during long duration missions. This document will provide a brief background on the work this past year supporting the ELS Distillation Comparison Test, issues regarding use of the hygiene products originally chosen for the test, methods and results used to select alternative products, and lessons learned from testing.

  1. Should personality traits be considered when refining substance misuse treatment programs?

    PubMed

    Staiger, Petra K; Kambouropoulos, Nicolas; Dawe, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    The interplay between stable personality characteristics and environmental factors is emphasised in most contemporary approaches to individual differences. This interaction appears to be important in understanding the development of substance use and misuse. Impulsivity related personality traits such as sensation-seeking, novelty seeking, reward-sensitivity and behavioural disinhibition, are strongly linked to adolescent and adult substance use and misuse. The role of anxiety-related traits, in the development of substance misuse is less clear. Nonetheless, anxiety disorders are very common amongst adult substance misusers and almost certainly play a critical role in the maintenance of a substance use disorder and influence treatment effectiveness. The data suggest that personality influences treatment outcomes and yet these individual differences are generally not addressed in treatment. We argue in this review that interventions which are matched to these relevant personality traits may improve treatment outcomes for substance misusers. PMID:17364832

  2. Do Substance Use Risk Personality Dimensions Predict the Onset of Substance Use in Early Adolescence? A Variable- and Person-Centered Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmberg, Monique; Kleinjan, Marloes; Vermulst, Ad A.; Overbeek, Geertjan; Monshouwer, Karin; Lammers, Jeroen; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Various studies found personality to be related to substance use, but little attention is paid to the role of personality risk dimensions with regard to an early onset of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use. Therefore, the current study used a variable-centered approach to examine whether anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, sensation seeking, and…

  3. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Substance Abusers Adapted for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS with Substance Use Diagnoses and Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Elizabeth E.; Miller, Alec L.; Greene, Lori I.; Winiarski, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    The primary aim of this article is to describe modifications made to Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for a predominantly ethnic minority population of persons living with HIV/AIDS with substance-use diagnoses and borderline personality disorder (BPD) or three features of BPD plus suicidality (i.e., the triply diagnosed). Despite the myriad…

  4. Emotion Regulation and Substance Use Frequency in Women with Substance Dependence and Borderline Personality Disorder Receiving Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Seth R.; Perepletchikova, Francheska; Holtzman, Kevin; Sinha, Rajita

    2011-01-01

    Background Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) identifies emotion dysregulation as central to the dangerous impulsivity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) including substance use disorders, and DBT targets improved emotion regulation as a primary mechanism of change. However, improved emotion regulation with DBT and associations between such improvement and behavioral outcomes such as substance use has not been previously reported. Objective Thus, the goal of this study was to assess for improvement in emotion regulation and to examine the relationship between improvements in the emotion regulation and substance use problems following DBT treatment. Method Emotion regulation as assessed by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, depressed mood as assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory, and their associations with substance use frequency were investigated in 27 women with substance dependence and BPD receiving 20 weeks of DBT in an academic community outpatient substance abuse treatment program. Results indicated improved emotion regulation, improved mood, and decreased substance use frequency. Further, emotion regulation improvement, but not improved mood, explained the variance of decreased substance use frequency. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate improved emotion regulation in BPD patients treated with DBT and to show that improved emotion regulation can account for increased behavioral control in BPD patients. Significance and Future Research Emotion regulation assessment is recommended for future studies to further clarify the etiology and maintenance of disorders associated with emotional dyregulation such as BPD and substance dependence, and to further explore emotion regulation as a potential mechanism of change for clinical interventions. PMID:21091162

  5. Unhealthy Substance Use Behaviors as Symptom-Related Self-Care in HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Brion, John M.; Rose, Carol Dawson; Nicholas, Patrice K.; Sloane, Rick; Voss, Joachim G.; Corless, Inge B.; Lindgren, Teri G.; Wantland, Dean J.; Kemppainen, Jeanne K.; Sefcik, Elizabeth F.; Nokes, Kathleen M.; Kirksey, Kenn M.; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Robinson, Linda M.; Moezzi, Shanaz; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Ros, Ana Viamonte; Nicholas, Thomas P.; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Bain, Catherine; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Zang, Sheryl M.; Shannon, Maureen; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of symptoms in HIV disease can be associated with HIV disease itself, comorbid illness, and/or antiretroviral therapy. Unhealthy substance use behaviors, particularly substance-use behaviors including heavy alcohol intake, marijuana use, other illicit drug use, and cigarette smoking, are engaged in by many HIV-positive individuals, often as a way to manage disease-related symptoms. This study is a secondary data analysis of baseline data from a larger randomized-controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS Symptom Management Manual. In the present study, the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy substance use behaviors in relation to HIV/AIDS symptoms are examined. Subjects were recruited from a variety of settings which provide HIV/AIDS care and treatment. The mean age of the sample (n=775) was 42.8 years (SD=9.6) and nearly thirty-nine percent (38.5%) of the sample was female. The racial demographics of the sample were: 28% African American, 28% Hispanic, 21% White/Caucasian, 16% African from Kenya or South Africa, 1% Asian, and 5% self-described as “Other.” The mean number of years living with HIV was reported to be 9.1 years (SD=6.6).Specific self-reported unhealthy substance-use behaviors were use of marijuana (n= 111; 14.3%), cigarette smoking (n=355; 45.8%), heavy alcohol use (n= 66; 8.5%), and illicit drugs (n= 98; 12.6%). A subset of individuals who identified high levels of specific symptoms also reported significantly higher substance use behaviors including amphetamine and injection drug use in addition to heavy alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. Implications for clinical practice include assessment of self-care behaviors, screening for substance abuse, and education of persons related to self-management across the trajectory of HIV disease. PMID:21352430

  6. Personalizing health care: feasibility and future implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Considerable variety in how patients respond to treatments, driven by differences in their geno- and/ or phenotypes, calls for a more tailored approach. This is already happening, and will accelerate with developments in personalized medicine. However, its promise has not always translated into improvements in patient care due to the complexities involved. There are also concerns that advice for tests has been reversed, current tests can be costly, there is fragmentation of funding of care, and companies may seek high prices for new targeted drugs. There is a need to integrate current knowledge from a payer’s perspective to provide future guidance. Multiple findings including general considerations; influence of pharmacogenomics on response and toxicity of drug therapies; value of biomarker tests; limitations and costs of tests; and potentially high acquisition costs of new targeted therapies help to give guidance on potential ways forward for all stakeholder groups. Overall, personalized medicine has the potential to revolutionize care. However, current challenges and concerns need to be addressed to enhance its uptake and funding to benefit patients. PMID:23941275

  7. How did the introduction of managed care for the uninsured in Iowa affect the use of substance abuse services?

    PubMed

    Ettner, Susan L; Argeriou, Milton; McCarty, Dennis; Dilonardo, Joan; Liu, Hui

    2003-01-01

    Concerns about access under managed care have been raised for vulnerable populations such as publicly funded patients with substance abuse problems. To estimate the effects of the Iowa Managed Substance Abuse Care Plan (IMSACP) on substance abuse service use by publicly funded patients, service use before and after IMSACP was compared; adjustments were made for changes in population sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Between fiscal years 1994 and 1997, patient case mix was marked by a higher burden of illness and the use of inpatient, residential nondetox, outpatient counseling, and assessment services declined, while use of intensive outpatient and residential detox services increased. Findings were similar among women, children, and homeless persons. Thus, care moved away from high-cost inpatient settings to less costly venues. Without knowing the impact on treatment outcomes, these changes cannot be interpreted as improved provider efficiency versus simply cost containment and profit maximization. PMID:12645495

  8. Culturally competent substance abuse treatment with transgender persons.

    PubMed

    Nuttbrock, Larry A

    2012-01-01

    Transgender individuals are misunderstood and inadequately treated in many conventional substance abuse treatment programs. This article reviews current concepts regarding the definition and diversity of transgenderism and summarizes the existing literature on the prevalence and correlates of substance use in transgendered populations. Examples of culturally competent and gender-sensitive treatment in specialized settings are cited, with a call to extend these initiatives throughout the gamut of service venues that engage transgender individuals. Cultural competence combined with gender sensitivity should improve the effectiveness of substance abuse treatment for transgender individuals and will contribute to the goal of providing effective services in an increasingly diverse society. PMID:22873185

  9. Development of a personalized bidirectional text messaging tool for HIV adherence assessment and intervention among substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Karen; Dillingham, Rebecca; Reynolds, George; Hettema, Jennifer; Freeman, Jason; Hosseinbor, Sharzad; Winstead-Derlega, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We describe the development of a two-way text messaging intervention tool for substance users who are non-adherent with HIV medications, and examine message flow data for feasibility and acceptability. The assessment and intervention tool, TxText, is fully automated, sending participants mood, substance use, and medication adherence queries by text message. Participants respond, the tool recognizes the category of response, and sends the personalized intervention message that participants designed in return. In 10months, the tool sent 16,547 messages (half initial, half follow-up) to 31 participants assigned to the TxText condition, who sent 6711 messages in response to the initial messages. Response rates to substance use (n=2370), medication (n=2918) and mood (n=4639) queries were 67, 69, and 64%, respectively. Responses indicating medication adherence, abstinence from substances, and good moods were more common than negative responses. The TxText tool can send messages daily over a 3month period, receive responses, and decode them to deliver personalized affirming or intervention messages. While we await the outcomes of a pilot randomized trial, the process analysis shows that TxText is acceptable and feasible for substance abusers with HIV, and may serve as a complement to HIV medical care. PMID:24029625

  10. Personality Disorders, Narcotics, and Stimulants; Relationship in Iranian Male Substance Dependents Population

    PubMed Central

    Noorbakhsh, Simasadat; Zeinodini, Zahra; Khanjani, Zeynab; Poorsharifi, Hamid; Rajezi Esfahani, Sepideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individuals with certain personality disorders, especially the antisocial and borderline personality disorders, are more prone to substance use disorders. Objectives: Regarding the importance of substance use disorders, this study aimed to explore the association between personality disorders and types of used drugs (narcotics and stimulants) in Iranian male substance users. Patients and Methods: The current study was a correlation study. We evaluated 285 male substance users and excluded 25 according to exclusion criteria. A total of 130 narcotic users and 130 stimulant users were recruited randomly in several phases from January 2013 to October 2013. All participants were referred to Substance Dependency Treatment Clinics in Tehran, Iran. Data collection process was accomplished by means of clinical interview based on DSM-V criteria for substance use disorders, Iranian version of addiction severity index (ASI), and Millon clinical multi-axial inventory-III (MCMI-III). Data were analyzed by SPSS 21 using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression, the. Results: There was a significant correlation between stimulant use and histrionic personality disorder (P < 0.001) and antisocial and narcissistic personality disorders (P < 0.05). In addition, correlation between avoidant, histrionic, and narcissistic personality disorders (P < 0.05) and depressed, antisocial, and borderline personality disorders (P < 0.001) with narcotics consumption were significant. In clusters, there was a significant correlation between cluster B personality disorders, and narcotic and stimulants consumption (P < 0.001). In addition, this association was explored between cluster C personality disorder and narcotics (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results of this study in terms of personality disorders and types of used drugs were in accordance with the previous studies results. It is necessary to design appropriate treatment plans for medical treatment of those with personality

  11. Offenders with mental health problems and problematic substance use: affective psychopathic personality traits as potential barriers to participation in substance abuse interventions.

    PubMed

    Durbeej, Natalie; Palmstierna, Tom; Berman, Anne H; Kristiansson, Marianne; Gumpert, Clara Hellner

    2014-01-01

    Substance abuse is related to re-offending, and treatment of substance abuse may reduce criminal recidivism. Offender characteristics including problem severity, violence risk and psychopathic personality traits may be positively or negatively associated with participation in substance abuse treatment. We explored the relationships between such characteristics and participation in substance abuse interventions among Swedish offenders with mental health problems and problematic substance use. Our analyses revealed that problem severity regarding drugs, employment, and family/social situations predicted intervention participation, and that affective psychopathic personality traits were negatively associated with such participation. Thus, affective psychopathic personality traits could be considered as potential barriers to participation in substance abuse interventions. Among offenders with mental health problems and problematic substance use, such personality traits should be taken into account in order to optimize treatment participation and treatment outcome. Approaches used in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) could be applicable for these patients. PMID:24512943

  12. Personal health care of internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Palabindala, Venkataraman; Foster, Paul; Kanduri, Swetha; Doppalapudi, Avanthi; Pamarthy, Amaleswari; Kovvuru, Karthik

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medical residents, as part of their job to balance the demands of their work with caring for themselves so as to be mentally, emotionally, and physically sound to stay clinically competent. While regulatory and legislative attempts at limiting medical resident work hours have materialized but have yet to attain passage, there are fairly little data looking into how residents cope up with their demands and yet attend to their own personal health. Design Anonymous mailed survey. Subjects Three hundred and thirty-seven residents from all internal medicine residency programs within United States. Methods We conducted a survey in the form of a questionnaire that was sent by e-mail to the program directors of various internal medicine residency programs within the United States, and responses were collected between May 19 and June 21, 2009. Response was well appreciated with total number of participants of 337 with even demographical distribution in gender, residency year, AMG/IMG, age group. Seventy-one percent of the residents felt that they would prefer getting admitted to their own hospital for any acute medical or surgical condition. Of the 216 residents who have had received health care in the past, almost half of them chose their own hospital because of the proximity, while 45% did not choose their own hospital despite proximity. Two out of three residents missed their doctors appointments or cancelled them due to demands of medical training. Only half of the residents have a primary care physician and almost 80% of them did not have their yearly health checkup. Close to 30% held back information regarding their social and sexual history from their provider because of privacy and confidentiality concerns. Eighty percent of residents never received information about barriers that physicians may face in obtaining care for their socially embarrassing conditions. Seventy percent felt that their performance then was suboptimal because of that health

  13. Innovation in the personal care industry.

    PubMed

    Knaggs, Helen

    2010-09-01

    When considering opportunities to develop novel, eye-catching and consumer-relevant personal care (PC) products, it is important to understand and reflect on how science has changed over the last two decades and how this has generated a new body of data from which to draw ideas and technologies. This article outlines some advances in scientific technologies and new ways of thinking in science, which lead to new insights into skin biology. How these innovations may impact and be leveraged into the development of new products in PC is also discussed. For example, fundamental discoveries in skin biology and the advancement of scientific methodologies are enabling step changes in technology in PC. Two examples of areas where we have seen much advancement are discussed. This article is based on and summarizes a presentation given at the HBA in Sep 2009 as part of a session entitled "Emerging Technologies and New Opportunities in Antiaging in PC." PMID:20883304

  14. Personality psychopathology, drug use and psychological symptoms in adolescents with substance use disorders and community controls

    PubMed Central

    Forns, Maria; Goti, Javier; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2015-01-01

    Substance use is a risk behavior that tends to increase during adolescence, a time when part of the personality is still in development. Traditionally, personality psychopathology has been measured in terms of categories, although dimensional models have demonstrated better consistency. This study aimed to analyze differences in personality profiles between adolescents with substance use disorders (SUD n = 74) and matched community controls (MCC n = 74) using the Personality Psychopathology Five (PSY-5) dimensional model. Additionally, we compared age at first drug use, level of drug use and internalizing and externalizing symptoms between the groups. In this study, the PSY-5 model has proved to be useful for differentiating specific personality disturbances in adolescents with SUD and community adolescents. The Disconstraint scale was particularly useful for discriminating adolescents with substance use problems and the Delinquent Attitudes facet offered the best differentiation. PMID:26082873

  15. Dementia and the person-centred care approach.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Approaches to care that focus solely on biomedical needs are still rife in dementia; however, a person-centred approach is emerging that focuses on 'seeing the person'. This article explores the literature on person-centred dementia care to determine if it is an ideal rather than a reality. The background to the development of person-centred care is presented with reference to policies in place in the UK. Using the setting of long-term care, the journey of people with dementia is explored at diagnosis, living well and end of life. PMID:26402212

  16. Perceived reasons for substance misuse among persons with a psychiatric disorder.

    PubMed

    Laudet, Alexandra B; Magura, Stephen; Vogel, Howard S; Knight, Edward L

    2004-07-01

    The etiology of substance use among persons with severe mental illness remains unclear. This study investigates stated reasons for substance use among persons in recovery from co-occurring disorders of serious mental illness and substance abuse and dependence. The desire to fit in with peers played a key role in the initiation of substance use; boredom, loneliness, temptations to use, and stress were cited most as relapse triggers. The authors discuss the need for dually diagnosed persons to develop sobriety-supporting peer networks to help them learn adaptive strategies to deal with the stress of recovery; further, treatment programs should instill hope for recovery and provide opportunities for meaningful activities and relationships. PMID:15291712

  17. In-Home Continuing Care Services for Substance-Affected Families: The Bridges Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Kenneth J.; Fleetwood, Thomas W.; Herring, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a preliminary view of a continuing care substance abuse recovery services program designed to assist the substance-affected family. The program focuses on helping substance abusers and their families achieve relapse prevention by addressing functioning in four domains: individual actions and cognitions; individual recovery actions; family…

  18. Care Perceptions among Residents of LTC Facilities Purporting to Offer Person-Centred Care.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Leeann; MacEntee, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    This study explored qualitatively how residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities feel about and adapt to the care they receive. We interviewed and observed a purposeful selection of elderly residents in seven facilities purporting to provide person-centred care. Interpretative descriptions from 43 personal interviews with 23 participants answered the question: How do residents perceive the care rendered in LTC facilities purporting to offer person-centred care? Three themes emerged: (1) the caring environment; (2) preservation of dignity; and (3) maintenance of personal autonomy. Participants were sympathetic to the nursing staff's workload, but felt distant from the staff. Participants gave examples of poor care and lack of empathy, human indignities, and violations of personal autonomy caused by institutional policies they felt inhibited their ability to receive care based on their preferences. Overall, they challenged the claims of person-centred care, but adapted to cope with an environment that threatened their dignity and autonomy. PMID:27063137

  19. Does Comorbid Substance Use Disorder Exacerbate Borderline Personality Features?: A Comparison of Borderline Personality Disorder Individuals with vs. without Current Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Joo; Bagge, Courtney L.; Schumacher, Julie A.; Coffey, Scott F.

    2010-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) negatively impact the clinical courses and outcomes of substance use disorders (SUD). Conversely, there is little evidence that concurrent SUD exacerbates the clinical characteristics of BPD. Thus, this study sought to examine whether the presence of current substance dependence among BPD patients would be associated with stronger BPD-relevant personality traits and behavioral characteristics. Female BPD patients without (BOR; n = 37) or with current substance dependence (BSUD; n = 19), and female non-BPD/SUD controls (CON; n = 48) were compared with respect to impulsivity, affective lability, affective intensity, externalizing behaviors, and self-harming/suicidal tendencies, taking into consideration their comorbid mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and antisocial personality disorder. Results indicated that both BOR and BSUD groups scored higher than CON in most of the measures, but BOR and BSUD failed to reveal significant group differences especially when the influence of comorbid psychopathology was removed. The overall pattern of findings remained identical even when comparing BPD patients with vs. without the diagnosis of lifetime substance dependence. Our results do not support the notion that BPD individuals with SUD display more severe BPD features than individuals with BPD alone. PMID:21116439

  20. Personality and Substance Abuse Disorders: A Review of the Recent Literature on Their Comorbidity and Implications for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Gregory A.

    The major questions when considering substance abuse/dependence and personality are how these two constructs are related and how they interact. A review of the prevalence literature since 1986 documenting the co-occurrence of substance abuse disorders and personality disorders is presented in this study. Sampled are substance abuse and personality…

  1. Person-centred care for people with dementia: Kitwood reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary; Agnelli, Joanne

    2015-10-14

    There is a plethora of literature on person-centred care and its importance in health care. The principles of person-centred care are especially important for people living with dementia because of the clinical manifestations of the disease. This article intends to provide nurses with an overview of the work of Tom Kitwood and how it pertains to providing best practice in dementia care. Various person-centred theories have been developed. However, Kitwood's work is by far the most widely referred to in dementia care. An understanding of Kitwood's ideas, in particular those of malignant social psychology and positive person work, enables nurses to develop competence in delivering optimum person-centred care to people with dementia in clinical practice. PMID:26463810

  2. Changes in personal networks of women in residential and outpatient substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Min, Meeyoung O; Tracy, Elizabeth M; Kim, Hyunsoo; Park, Hyunyong; Jun, Minkyoung; Brown, Suzanne; McCarty, Christopher; Laudet, Alexandre

    2013-10-01

    Changes in personal network composition, support and structure over 12 months were examined in 377 women from residential (n=119) and intensive outpatient substance abuse treatment (n=258) through face-to-face interviews utilizing computer based data collection. Personal networks of women who entered residential treatment had more substance users, more people with whom they had used alcohol and/or drugs, and fewer people from treatment programs or self- help groups than personal networks of women who entered intensive outpatient treatment. By 12 months post treatment intake, network composition improved for women in residential treatment; however, concrete support was still lower and substance users are still more prevalent in their networks. Network composition of women in outpatient treatment remained largely the same over time. Both groups increased cohesiveness within the network over 12 months. Targeting interventions that support positive changes in personal networks may heighten positive long term outcomes for women entering treatment. PMID:23755971

  3. Changes in Personal Networks of Women in Residential and Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Min, Meeyoung O.; Tracy, Elizabeth M.; Kim, Hyunsoo; Park, Hyunyong; Jun, MinKyong; Brown, Suzanne; McCarty, Christopher; Laudet, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Changes in personal network composition, support and structure over 12 months were examined in 377 women from residential (n=119) and intensive outpatient substance abuse treatment (n=258) through face-to-face interviews utilizing computer based data collection. Personal networks of women who entered residential treatment had more substance users, more people with whom they had used alcohol and/or drugs, and fewer people from treatment programs or self- help groups than personal networks of women who entered intensive outpatient treatment. By 12 months post treatment intake, network composition improved for women in residential treatment; however, concrete support was still lower and substance users still more prevalent in their networks. Network composition of women in outpatient treatment remained largely the same over time. Both groups increased cohesiveness within the network over 12 months. Targeting interventions that support positive changes in personal networks may heighten positive long term outcomes for women entering treatment. PMID:23755971

  4. Substance Abuse among Health-Care Professionals in Rutherford and Surrounding Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Sherri Reid; Heritage, Jeannette G.

    Drug abuse is a serious problem in today's work force. It is found in every occupation, from the entry-level employee to the chief executive officer. Among health care professionals alcohol is the number-one substance abused, prescription drugs are second, and cocaine is third. Substance abuse among health-care professionals in Rutherford,…

  5. [Conceptualizations on care for persons with dementia in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, Beatriz; Martínez-Andrés, María; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of family perceptions when analyzing care for the elderly in nursing homes, little is said about this aspect. This study aims to identify preferences and areas for improvement in care for persons with dementia, as perceived by families. A qualitative study was performed, based on Grounded Theory, combining two data collection techniques (participant observation and in-depth interviews) in a theoretical sample of institutionalized persons with dementia. The ideal model of care for persons with dementia, as perceived by participants, was based on specialized and individualized care and family participation in the care provided. Areas for improvement included aspects pertaining to specialized training in geriatrics, human relations, and the culture of institutional work. Faced with the current trend towards technification of care, families are now demanding personalized, small-scale care in which they form an active part of the team. PMID:27074217

  6. POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL ACTIONS, ACTIVITIES, AND BEHAVIORS: PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perhaps more so than with any other class of pollutants, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the personal activities of individual citizens and their environ...

  7. POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL ACTIONS, ACTIVITIES, AND BEHAVIORS: PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perhaps more so than with any other class of pollutants, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the personal activities of individual citizens and their environ...

  8. 42 CFR 440.167 - Personal care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... an inpatient or resident of a hospital, nursing facility, intermediate care facility for the mentally... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personal care services. 440.167 Section 440.167... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.167 Personal...

  9. Are inmates’ subjective sleep problems associated with borderline personality, psychopathy, and antisocial personality independent of depression and substance dependence?

    PubMed Central

    Harty, Laura; Duckworth, Rebecca; Thompson, Aaron; Stuewig, Jeffrey; Tangney, June P.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research investigating the relationship between Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and sleep problems, independent of depression, has been conducted on small atypical samples with mixed results. This study extends the literature by utilizing a much larger sample and by statistically controlling for depression and substance dependence. Subjective reports of sleep problems were obtained from 513 jail inmates (70% male) incarcerated on felony charges. Symptoms of BPD were significantly associated with sleep problems even when controlling for depression. Thus, sleep problems associated with BPD cannot be attributed simply to co-morbid symptoms of depression and substance dependence was ruled out as proximal causes for this relationship. Symptoms of depression, but not Antisocial Personality features, were related to sleep problems independent of substance dependence. Treatment of individuals with BPD may be more effective if sleep problems are explicitly addressed in the treatment plan. PMID:20198127

  10. Characteristics Predicting Community Care for Mentally Impaired Older Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Maryann

    1980-01-01

    Availability of nursing home beds was a strong predictor of institutional care. Higher rates of community care occurred where there were greater expenditures for protective, legal, chore, day care and social/recreation services and, in which there were more older persons in poverty and fewer women working. (Author)

  11. Personalized prostate cancer care: from screening to treatment.

    PubMed

    Conran, Carly A; Brendler, Charles B; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Unprecedented progress has been made in genomic personalized medicine in the last several years, allowing for more individualized healthcare assessments and recommendations than ever before. However, most of this progress in prostate cancer (PCa) care has focused on developing and selecting therapies for late-stage disease. To address this issue of limited focus, we propose a model for incorporating genomic-based personalized medicine into all levels of PCa care, from prevention and screening to diagnosis, and ultimately to the treatment of both early-stage and late-stage cancers. We have termed this strategy the "Pyramid Model" of personalized cancer care. In this perspective paper, our objective is to demonstrate the potential application of the Pyramid Model to PCa care. This proactive and comprehensive personalized cancer care approach has the potential to achieve three important medical goals: reducing mortality, improving quality of life and decreasing both individual and societal healthcare costs. PMID:27184548

  12. Personalized prostate cancer care: from screening to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Conran, Carly A; Brendler, Charles B; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Unprecedented progress has been made in genomic personalized medicine in the last several years, allowing for more individualized healthcare assessments and recommendations than ever before. However, most of this progress in prostate cancer (PCa) care has focused on developing and selecting therapies for late-stage disease. To address this issue of limited focus, we propose a model for incorporating genomic-based personalized medicine into all levels of PCa care, from prevention and screening to diagnosis, and ultimately to the treatment of both early-stage and late-stage cancers. We have termed this strategy the “Pyramid Model” of personalized cancer care. In this perspective paper, our objective is to demonstrate the potential application of the Pyramid Model to PCa care. This proactive and comprehensive personalized cancer care approach has the potential to achieve three important medical goals: reducing mortality, improving quality of life and decreasing both individual and societal healthcare costs. PMID:27184548

  13. Substance use disorder patient privacy and comprehensive care in integrated health care settings.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Elizabeth; Padwa, Howard; Urada, Darren; Shoptaw, Steven

    2016-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) expands health insurance coverage for substance use disorder (SUD) treatment, underscoring the value of improving SUD service integration in primarily physical health care settings. It is not yet known to what degree specialized privacy regulations-Code of Federal Regulations Title 42, Part 2 (42 CFR Part 2), in particular-will affect access to or the utilization and delivery of SUD treatment in primary care. In addition to exploring the emerging benefits and barriers that specialized confidentiality regulations pose to treatment in early adopting integrated health care settings, this article introduces and explicates 42 CFR Part 2 to support provider and administrator implementation of SUD privacy regulations in integrated settings. The authors also argue that, although intended to protect patients with SUD, special SUD information protection may inadvertently reinforce stigma against patients by purporting the belief that SUD is different from other health problems and must be kept private. In turn, this stigma may inhibit the delivery of comprehensive integrated care. PMID:26845493

  14. Prevention of adolescent substance abuse through the development of personal and social competence.

    PubMed

    Botvin, G J

    1983-01-01

    The initiation of substance use typically begins during adolescence and appears to be the result of the complex interplay of social, personality, cognitive, attitudinal, behavioral, and developmental factors. Traditional smoking, alcohol, and drug education programs have attempted to increase students' knowledge of the risks associated with using these substances in the hope that this would deter use. Other programs have attempted to enrich the personal and social development of students through what has been referred to as "affective" education. Unfortunately, the inescapable conclusion to be drawn from the substance abuse prevention literature is that few of these programs have demonstrated any degree of success in terms of the actual prevention of substance use/abuse. Traditional educational approaches to substance abuse prevention appear to be inadequate because they are based on faulty assumptions and are too narrow in their focus. The "affective" education approaches, on the other hand, appear to have placed too little emphasis on the acquisition of the kind of skills that are likely to increase general personal competence and enable students to cope with the various interpersonal and intrapersonal pressures to begin using tobacco, alcohol, or drugs. From the perspective of social learning theory (Bandura 1977) and problem behavior theory (Jessor and Jessor 1977), substance use is conceptualized as a socially learned, purposive, and functional behavior which is the result of the interplay of social (environmental) and personal factors. One potentially effective approach to substance abuse prevention might involve enhancing general personal competence and teaching adolescents the kind of problem-specific skills and knowledge which will increase their ability to resist the various forms of pro-substance-use social pressure. Brief reviews of the social skills training literature and the literature related to techniques for coping with anxiety not only provide

  15. Engagement with Care, Substance Use, and Adherence to Therapy in HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Patrice K.; Willard, Suzanne; Thompson, Clinton; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Corless, Inge B.; Wantland, Dean J.; Sefcik, Elizabeth F.; Nokes, Kathleen M.; Kirksey, Kenn M.; Holzemer, William L.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Rivero Mendez, Marta; Robinson, Linda M.; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie P.; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Stanton, Mark A.; Voss, Joachim G.; Moezzi, Shahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Engagement with care for those living with HIV is aimed at establishing a strong relationship between patients and their health care provider and is often associated with greater adherence to therapy and treatment (Flickinger, Saha, Moore, and Beach, 2013). Substance use behaviors are linked with lower rates of engagement with care and medication adherence (Horvath, Carrico, Simoni, Boyer, Amico, and Petroli, 2013). This study is a secondary data analysis using a cross-sectional design from a larger randomized controlled trial (n = 775) that investigated the efficacy of a self-care symptom management manual for participants living with HIV. Participants were recruited from countries of Africa and the US. This study provides evidence that substance use is linked with lower self-reported engagement with care and adherence to therapy. Data on substance use and engagement are presented. Clinical implications of the study address the importance of utilizing health care system and policy factors to improve engagement with care. PMID:24800065

  16. Engagement with Care, Substance Use, and Adherence to Therapy in HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Willard, Suzanne; Thompson, Clinton; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Corless, Inge B; Wantland, Dean J; Sefcik, Elizabeth F; Nokes, Kathleen M; Kirksey, Kenn M; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L; Portillo, Carmen J; Rivero Mendez, Marta; Robinson, Linda M; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie P; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Stanton, Mark A; Driscoll, Marykate; Voss, Joachim G; Moezzi, Shahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Engagement with care for those living with HIV is aimed at establishing a strong relationship between patients and their health care provider and is often associated with greater adherence to therapy and treatment (Flickinger, Saha, Moore, and Beach, 2013). Substance use behaviors are linked with lower rates of engagement with care and medication adherence (Horvath, Carrico, Simoni, Boyer, Amico, and Petroli, 2013). This study is a secondary data analysis using a cross-sectional design from a larger randomized controlled trial (n = 775) that investigated the efficacy of a self-care symptom management manual for participants living with HIV. Participants were recruited from countries of Africa and the US. This study provides evidence that substance use is linked with lower self-reported engagement with care and adherence to therapy. Data on substance use and engagement are presented. Clinical implications of the study address the importance of utilizing health care system and policy factors to improve engagement with care. PMID:24800065

  17. Exploring How Substance Use Impedes Engagement along the HIV Care Continuum: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Gwadz, Marya; de Guzman, Rebecca; Freeman, Robert; Kutnick, Alexandra; Silverman, Elizabeth; Leonard, Noelle R; Ritchie, Amanda Spring; Muñoz-Plaza, Corinne; Salomon, Nadim; Wolfe, Hannah; Hilliard, Christopher; Cleland, Charles M; Honig, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Drug use is associated with low uptake of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART), an under-studied step in the HIV care continuum, and insufficient engagement in HIV primary care. However, the specific underlying mechanisms by which drug use impedes these HIV health outcomes are poorly understood. The present qualitative study addresses this gap in the literature, focusing on African-American/Black and Hispanic persons living with HIV (PLWH) who had delayed, declined, or discontinued ART and who also were generally poorly engaged in health care. Participants (N = 37) were purposively sampled from a larger study for maximum variation on HIV indices. They engaged in 1-2 h audio-recorded in-depth semi-structured interviews on HIV histories guided by a multilevel social-cognitive theory. Transcripts were analyzed using a systematic content analysis approach. Consistent with the existing literature, heavy substance use, but not casual or social use, impeded ART uptake, mainly by undermining confidence in medication management abilities and triggering depression. The confluence of African-American/Black or Hispanic race/ethnicity, poverty, and drug use was associated with high levels of perceived stigma and inferior treatment in health-care settings compared to their peers. Furthermore, providers were described as frequently assuming participants were selling their medications to buy drugs, which strained provider-patient relationships. High levels of medical distrust, common in this population, created fears of ART and of negative interactions between street drugs and ART, but participants could not easily discuss this concern with health-care providers. Barriers to ART initiation and HIV care were embedded in other structural- and social-level challenges, which disproportionately affect low-income African-American/Black and Hispanic PLWH (e.g., homelessness, violence). Yet, HIV management was cyclical. In collaboration with trusted providers and ancillary staff

  18. Exploring How Substance Use Impedes Engagement along the HIV Care Continuum: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Gwadz, Marya; de Guzman, Rebecca; Freeman, Robert; Kutnick, Alexandra; Silverman, Elizabeth; Leonard, Noelle R.; Ritchie, Amanda Spring; Muñoz-Plaza, Corinne; Salomon, Nadim; Wolfe, Hannah; Hilliard, Christopher; Cleland, Charles M.; Honig, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Drug use is associated with low uptake of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART), an under-studied step in the HIV care continuum, and insufficient engagement in HIV primary care. However, the specific underlying mechanisms by which drug use impedes these HIV health outcomes are poorly understood. The present qualitative study addresses this gap in the literature, focusing on African-American/Black and Hispanic persons living with HIV (PLWH) who had delayed, declined, or discontinued ART and who also were generally poorly engaged in health care. Participants (N = 37) were purposively sampled from a larger study for maximum variation on HIV indices. They engaged in 1–2 h audio-recorded in-depth semi-structured interviews on HIV histories guided by a multilevel social-cognitive theory. Transcripts were analyzed using a systematic content analysis approach. Consistent with the existing literature, heavy substance use, but not casual or social use, impeded ART uptake, mainly by undermining confidence in medication management abilities and triggering depression. The confluence of African-American/Black or Hispanic race/ethnicity, poverty, and drug use was associated with high levels of perceived stigma and inferior treatment in health-care settings compared to their peers. Furthermore, providers were described as frequently assuming participants were selling their medications to buy drugs, which strained provider–patient relationships. High levels of medical distrust, common in this population, created fears of ART and of negative interactions between street drugs and ART, but participants could not easily discuss this concern with health-care providers. Barriers to ART initiation and HIV care were embedded in other structural- and social-level challenges, which disproportionately affect low-income African-American/Black and Hispanic PLWH (e.g., homelessness, violence). Yet, HIV management was cyclical. In collaboration with trusted providers and ancillary staff

  19. Economic Evaluation of Continuing Care Interventions in the Treatment of Substance Abuse: Recommendations for Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popovici, Ioana; French, Michael T.; McKay, James R.

    2008-01-01

    The chronic and relapsing nature of substance abuse points to the need for continuing care after a primary phase of treatment. This article reviews the economic studies of continuing care, discusses research gaps, highlights some of the challenges of conducting rigorous economic evaluations of continuing care, and offers research guidelines and…

  20. Personal networks of women in residential and outpatient substance abuse treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, HyunSoo; Tracy, Elizabeth; Brown, Suzanne; Jun, MinKyoung; Park, Hyunyong; Min, Meeyoung; McCarty, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This study compared compositional, social support, and structural characteristics of personal networks among women in residential (RT) and intensive outpatient (IOP) substance abuse treatment. The study sample included 377 women from inner-city substance use disorder treatment facilities. Respondents were asked about 25 personal network members known within the past 6 months, characteristics of each (relationship, substance use, types of support), and relationships between each network member. Differences between RT women and IOP women in personal network characteristics were identified using Chi-square and t-tests. Compared to IOP women, RT women had more substance users in their networks, more network members with whom they had used substances and fewer network members who provided social support. These findings suggest that women in residential treatment have specific network characteristics, not experienced by women in IOP, which may make them more vulnerable to relapse; they may therefore require interventions that target these specific network characteristics in order to reduce their vulnerability to relapse. PMID:27011762

  1. Using risk management to promote person-centred dementia care.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Charlotte; Mantle, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Risk management for people with dementia has traditionally focused on preventing physical harm. However, research has demonstrated that focusing on the physical safety of people with dementia may result in their social and psychological wellbeing being overlooked - the very aspects that are necessary to achieve person-centred care. This article discusses the main challenges for practitioners caring for people with dementia in various settings, and encourages a care approach which enables appropriate risk taking as a way of promoting person-centred care. PMID:26959471

  2. Access to Generic Substance Abuse Services for Persons with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lottman, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    Investigated access to generic substance abuse services for persons with mental retardation. Telephone survey of chemical dependency treatment agencies revealed that agencies accepting mentally retarded clients differed significantly from nonaccepting agencies in their perceived difficulty in integrating these clients and in their acceptance of…

  3. Aggression, Impulsivity, and Psychopathic Traits in Combined Antisocial Personality Disorder and Substance Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alcorn, Joseph L.; Gowin, Joshua L.; Green, Charles E.; Swann, Alan C.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Lane, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Aggression, impulsivity, and psychopathic traits are prominent in both antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and substance use disorders (SUD), but have rarely been examined collectively. The authors' results show that all three variables were elevated in adults with comorbid ASPD/SUD, relative to SUD-only and control subjects. PMID:24026715

  4. Examining the Role of Personality, Peers, and the Transition to College on Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Ursula Louise

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that there is an increase in substance use among college students. In the literature, this increase in use has been attributed to different personality factors, such as sensation seeking. However, what has not received sufficient attention is the possibility that the new peer groups, afforded by the transition to college,…

  5. Empirically-Derived MCMI-III Personality Profiles of Incarcerated Female Substance Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabarek, Joanna K.; Bourke, Michael L.; Van Hasselt, Vincent B.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory- III (MCMI-III) was administered to 210 female inmates in a jail-based substance abuse prevention program. Analyses resulted in the following three cluster profiles: "normal" (no significant elevations), narcissistic, and antisocial. Hypotheses regarding the personality structure of…

  6. Comprehensive Substance Abuse Services for Homeless Persons with Alcohol and Other Drug Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Michael W., Jr.; Braucht, G. Nicholas

    Homeless people with alcohol and other drug problems present the traditional substance abuse services delivery provider with special challenges. This paper discusses the optimal designs of comprehensive treatment services for homeless persons with alcohol and other drug problems. Most importantly, the homeless must have immediate access to a safe…

  7. Linking "Big" Personality Traits to Anxiety, Depressive, and Substance Use Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotov, Roman; Gamez, Wakiza; Schmidt, Frank; Watson, David

    2010-01-01

    We performed a quantitative review of associations between the higher order personality traits in the Big Three and Big Five models (i.e., neuroticism, extraversion, disinhibition, conscientiousness, agreeableness, and openness) and specific depressive, anxiety, and substance use disorders (SUD) in adults. This approach resulted in 66…

  8. Enhancing Readiness-to-Change Substance Abuse in Persons with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Kate B.; Purnine, Daniel M.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Carey, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a four-session intervention designed for persons with co-occurring substance abuse and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, to be administered as an add-on module to supplement ongoing mental health treatment in an outpatient setting. The intervention targets those dually diagnosed individuals with low readiness-to-change as indicated by current use, and/or low level of engagement in treatment for substance abuse. The intervention is designed to increase problem recognition, to enhance motivation to change maladaptive patterns of substance use, and to facilitate engagement in substance abuse. To achieve these goals, we have adopted constructs from the Transtheoretical Model of Change and utilize principles of motivational and harm reduction interventions, and tailored them to the target population. PMID:11428245

  9. Initiation of Substance Use by Adolescents after One Year in Residential Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monshouwer, Karin; Kepper, Annelies; van den Eijnden, Regina; Koning, Ina; Vollebergh, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that substance use levels among adolescents living in residential youth care are high. However, it is not clear to what extent adolescents initiate (heavy) substance during their stay and to what extent these rates are higher than would be expected based on their risk profile. Objective: The aim of the…

  10. Missed Opportunity: National Survey of Primary Care Physicians and Patients on Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    A national representative survey of primary care physicians (N=648) was conducted to determine how they deal with patients who have substance abuse problems. The survey revealed how physicians identify substance abuse in their patients, what efforts they make to help these patients, and what barriers they find to effective diagnosis and treatment.…

  11. Caring for a Person with a Frontotemporal Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for Patients, Families, and Caregivers Caring for a Person with a Frontotemporal Disorder In addition to managing the medical ... help with information about caregiver services and support. A stressful disorder Robert, 60, started humming and whistling ...

  12. PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS (PPCPS) AS ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) as trace environmental pollutants is a multifaceted issue whose scope of concerns continues to expand. PPCPs comprise thousands of distinct chemicals from numerous therapeutic and consumer classes. They typical...

  13. PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS: DIVERSE GALAXY OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) as trace environmental pollutants is a multifaceted issue whose scope of concerns continues to expand. PPCPs comprise thousands of distinct chemicals from numerous therapeutic and consumer classes. They typical...

  14. Promoting Patient- and Family-Centered Care Through Personal Stories.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Beverley H

    2016-03-01

    Patient- and family-centered care is an approach to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care that is grounded in mutually beneficial partnerships among patients, their families, and health care professionals. It redefines the relationships in health care by placing an emphasis on collaborating with patients of all ages, and their families, at all levels of care, in all health care settings, and in organizational change and improvement. This collaboration ensures that health care is responsive to an individual's priorities, preferences, and values. In patient- and family-centered care, patients define their "family" and determine how they and their family will participate in care and decision making. While patient- and family-centered care can improve the experience of care, safety, and quality, it also can improve the learning environment for students and trainees. The author shares personal stories to illustrate the core concepts of patient- and family-centered care, when they are present in health care interactions, and when they are not. Drawing from these stories and the author's experience in working with academic medical centers and other health care organizations over many decades, recommendations for changes in medical education are suggested that can contribute to the development of a health care workforce with the skills and commitment to partner respectfully, effectively, and authentically with patients and families. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act gives new impetus for building a health care delivery system and related educational programs to support patient- and family-centered practice. PMID:26796094

  15. Personality Disorders in Substance Abusers: A Comparison of Patients Treated in a Prison Unit and Patients Treated in Inpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefansson, Ragnar; Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A large body of literature has shown a high prevalence of personality disorders in substance abusers. We compared a sample of substance abusers treated in a prison setting with substance abusers treated in a non-prison inpatient setting rated with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III. Base-rate scores indicated a prevalence of 95% of…

  16. Attitude to Substance Abuse: Do Personality and Socio-Demographic Factors Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Rahimian Boogar, Isaac; Tabatabaee, Sayed Mosa; Tosi, Jalileh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Substance abuse is a serious global problem that is affected by multiple psychosocial and socio-demographic factors. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the leading factors in positive attitude and tendency toward substance abuse in terms of personality, socio-economic, and socio-demographic factors. Patients and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 200 college students (105 females and 95 males) residing in Damghan University dormitory in northeast of Iran were recruited by random sampling from March to July 2013. The participants were instructed and asked to complete the NEO FIVE-factor Inventory, the attitude to substance abuse scale, and the demographic questionnaire. Then data were analyzed by stepwise multiple regression employing PASW 18. Results: Being male sex and neuroticism had a significant positive role in predicting positive attitude toward substance abuse in university students. In addition, agreeableness, conscientiousness, openness, and socio-economic status had a significant negative role in predicting tendency toward substance abuse (P < 0.001). Extraversion had no significant role in prediction of positive attitude to substance abuse (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Lower agreeableness, decreased conscientiousness, higher neuroticism, diminished openness, low socio-economic status, and male sex might make university students more inclined to substance abuse. Thus, it is reasonable to show the importance of these factors in tailored prevention programs. PMID:25593892

  17. Person-Centered Care: A Definition and Essential Elements.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Improving healthcare safety, quality, and coordination, as well as quality of life, are important aims of caring for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and/or functional limitations. Person-centered care is an approach to meeting these aims, but there are no standardized, agreed-upon parameters for delivering such care. The SCAN Foundation charged a team from the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) in collaboration with a research and clinical team from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California to provide the evidence base to support a definition of person-centered care and its essential elements. An interprofessional panel of experts in person-centered care principles and practices that the AGS convened developed this statement. PMID:26626262

  18. The Relationship between Personality and Self-Reported Substance Use: Exploring the Implications for High School and College Educational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Megan; Brosh, Joanne; Dous, Julie; Iannella, Gina; Outten, Rebecca; Rowles, Peggy; Chambliss, Catherine

    This study explored the personality correlates of substance use by administering a questionnaire consisting of the Mini Markers Scale and items assessing substance abuse to 108 high school students and 155 college students. The Mini Markers Scale is a 40 item self-report inventory that measures basic dimensions of personality, including…

  19. A Guide for the Personal Care Attendant: Independent Living with Attendant Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board, Mary Ann; And Others

    The first of three booklets on attendant care of severely disabled persons is addressed to the personal care attendants (PCAs). An introductory section reviews the basic concepts of independent living, noting the role of PCAs in promoting independence. Discussions of congenital and acquired disability are followed by information on equipment and…

  20. Underlying personality differences between alcohol/substance-use disorder patients with and without an affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, D S; Hong, L; Morter, S; Howe, L

    1999-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a popular personality test, was used to profile the personalities of in-patient alcoholics/substance-use disorder patients who had, and those who did not have, a concurrent affective disorder diagnosis. The MBTI divides individuals into eight categories: Extroverts and Introverts, Sensors and Intuitives, Thinkers and Feelers, and Judgers and Perceivers. Alcohol/substance-use disorder patients with no affective disorder differed from a normative population only in being significantly more often Sensing and significantly less often Intuitive single-factor types. The Extroverted/Sensing/ Feeling/Judging four-factor type was also significantly over-represented in this group, compared to a normative population. In contrast, mood-disordered alcohol/substance-use disorder patients were significantly more often Introverted, Sensing, Feeling, and Perceiving and significantly less often Extroverted, Intuitive, Thinking, and Judging single-factor types. They were also significantly more often Introverted/Sensing/ Feeling/Perceiving and Introverted/Intuitive/Feeling/Perceiving four-factor types. 'Pure' alcohol/ substance-use disorder patients differed from alcohol/substance-use disorder patients with a mood disorder in that they were significantly more often Extroverted and Thinking and significantly less often Introverted and Feeling single-factor types; and significantly less often were an Introverted/Sensing/ Feeling/Perceiving four-factor type. The above results may have psychogenetic, diagnostic, and psychotherapeutic implications. PMID:10414613

  1. Mexican American Males Providing Personal Care for Their Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Bronwynne C.; Belyea, Michael J.; Ume, Ebere

    2011-01-01

    We know little about Mexican American (MA) family adaptation to critical events in the informal caregiving experience but, in these days of economic and social turmoil, sons must sometimes step up to provide personal care for their aging mothers. This article compares two empirically real cases of MA males who provided such care, in lieu of a…

  2. Do Personality Traits Moderate the Impact of Care Receipt on End-of-Life Care Planning?

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Hwa; Pai, Manacy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study examines (a) the association between being a care recipient and end-of-life care planning (EOLCP) and (b) the extent to which personality traits moderate the relationship between care receipt and EOLCP. Design and Methods: Data are drawn from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a survey of Wisconsin high school graduates from 1957 to 2004. We used data on EOLCP among older adults in the most recent (2003–2004) wave of this survey. Hierarchical logistic regression models are used to estimate the effects of care receipt and the moderating effects of personality. Results: Compared with their peers who are not receiving care, care recipients are more likely to engage in informal discussion on EOLCP. This association between care receipt and informal EOLCP is strengthened when the individual scores high on openness. Implications: Health practitioners should take into account older adults’ care needs and differing personality traits while helping older adults make successful EOLCP. PMID:22459693

  3. Personal health care expenditures, by State: 1966-82

    PubMed Central

    Levit, Katharine R.

    1985-01-01

    Spending per capita for health care in the United States varies dramatically by State and region. In 1982, personal health care costs per capita ranged from a low of $857 in South Carolina to a high of $1,508 in Massachusetts. The focus of this article is State and regional variation in spending levels and the mix of health care services purchased. Possible causes for these differences are presented. PMID:10311335

  4. PHARMACEUTICAL AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS AS UBIQUITOUS POLLUTANTS FROM PERSONAL USE AND ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perhaps more so than with any other class of pollutants, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the individual activities of consumers and their environment. In...

  5. PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS (PPCPS) AS ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS: POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL ACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) as trace environmental pollutants is a multifaceted issue whose scope of concerns continues to expand. PPCPs comprise thousands of distinct chemicals from numerous therapeutic and consumer classes. They typicall...

  6. PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS (PPCP'S) AS ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS: POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL ACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) as trace environmental pollutants is a multifaceted issue whose scope of concerns continues to expand. PPCPs comprise thousands of distinct chemicals from numerous therapeutic and consumer classes. They typical...

  7. POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL ACTIONS AND ACTIVITIES - PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS (PPCPS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) as trace environmental pollutants is a multifaceted issue whose scope of concerns continues to expand. PPCPs comprise thousands of distinct chemicals from numerous therapeutic and consumer classes. They typical...

  8. PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS AS UBIQUITOUS POLLUTANTS FROM PERSONAL USE AND ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perhaps more so than with any other class of pollutants, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the individual activities of consumers and their environment. In...

  9. Residential Treatment of Substance Abusing Adolescents: Trends in the Post-Managed Care Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMaster, Samuel A.; Ellis, Rodney A.; Cooper, Lyle

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores historical and recent trends in the delivery of residential adolescent substance abuse treatment, looking specifically at the impact of managed care on the service delivery system. Three historical eras are conceptualized by the authors: (1) an era prior to managed care in which services were provided on a fee for service basis…

  10. Do Personality Traits Moderate the Impact of Care Receipt on End-of-Life Care Planning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Jung-Hwa; Pai, Manacy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study examines (a) the association between being a care recipient and end-of-life care planning (EOLCP) and (b) the extent to which personality traits moderate the relationship between care receipt and EOLCP. Design and Methods: Data are drawn from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a survey of Wisconsin high school…

  11. Fostering Humane Care of Dying Persons in Long-Term Care. Guidebook for Staff Development Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sarah A.; Daley, Barbara

    This guide is intended for staff development instructors responsible for inservice education on the topic of fostering humane care for dying persons in long-term care. The introduction discusses the guide's development based on input from administrators, staff, and families of residents in long-term care facilities and focus group interviews in…

  12. Preliminary Support for Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care in Reducing Substance Use in Delinquent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dana K.; Chamberlain, Patricia; Eddy, J. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Although effective outpatient treatments have been identified for the well-documented negative outcomes associated with delinquency and substance use, effective treatments for youths in out-of-home care are rare. In this study, 12- and 18-month substance use outcomes were examined for a sample of 79 boys who were randomly assigned to Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (experimental condition) or to group care (comparison condition). The boys in the experimental condition had lower levels of self-reported drug use at 12 months and lower levels of tobacco, marijuana, and other drug use at 18 months. Limitations and future directions are discussed. PMID:20953309

  13. Systems of care for treatment of adolescent substance use disorders: background, principles and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Laura Burney; Hunt, Sharon R; Bullman, Stephanie; Marmo, Joseph; Smith, David

    2004-12-01

    Adolescent substance abuse is a serious social problem facing the United States. Despite numerous recent advances in the clinical effectiveness of treatment approaches for this population, not enough attention has been paid to the adolescent treatment and service delivery infrastructures. The right services must be delivered through carefully organized and systematic community partnerships among agencies that serve the youth and families most in need. This article provides a working definition for the systems of care approach, reviews the movement's history within children's mental health services, addresses the feasibility of using the systems of care model for adolescent substance use disorders, and discusses principles and elements essential for successfully implementing a system of care for treatment of adolescent substance use disorders. PMID:15751481

  14. Personal Network Recovery Enablers and Relapse Risks for Women With Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Suzanne; Tracy, Elizabeth M.; Jun, MinKyoung; Park, Hyunyong; Min, Meeyoung O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the experiences of women in treatment for substance dependence and their treatment providers about personal networks and recovery. We conducted six focus groups at three women’s intensive substance abuse treatment programs. Four coders used thematic analysis to guide the data coding and an iterative process to identify major themes. Coders identified social network characteristics that enabled and impeded recovery and a reciprocal relationship between internal states, relationship management, and recovery. Although women described adding individuals to their networks, they also described managing existing relationships through distancing from or isolating some members to diminish their negative impact on recovery. Treatment providers identified similar themes but focused more on contextual barriers than the women. The focus of interventions with this population should be on both internal barriers to personal network change such as mistrust and fear, and helping women develop skills for managing enduring network relationships. PMID:25231945

  15. Personality, sexuality, and substance use as predictors of sexual risk taking in college students.

    PubMed

    Turchik, Jessica A; Garske, John P; Probst, Danielle R; Irvin, Clinton R

    2010-09-01

    Sexual risk taking among college students is common and can lead to serious consequences, such as unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. This study utilized responses from 310 undergraduate psychology students aged 18 to 23 to examine personality, sexuality, and substance use predictors of sexual risk behaviors over a six-month period. Data were collected from 2005 to 2006 at a medium-sized Midwestern U.S. university. Results indicated that greater alcohol and recreational drug use, higher extraversion, and lower agreeableness were related to sexual risk taking in men. For women, greater alcohol and drug use, higher sexual excitation, and lower sexual inhibition were predictive of sexual risk taking. Among women, but not men, sensation seeking was found to mediate the relationship between the four significant substance use, personality, and sexuality variables and sexual risk taking. Implications for sexual risk behavior prevention and intervention programming are discussed. PMID:19711220

  16. Is Personality Associated with Health Care Use by Older Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Bruce; Veazie, Peter J; Chapman, Benjamin P; Manning, Willard G; Duberstein, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Context The patterns of health care utilization in the United States pose well-established challenges for public policy. Although economic and sociological research has resulted in considerable knowledge about what influences the use of health services, the psychological literature in this area is underdeveloped. Importantly, it is not known whether personality traits are associated with older adults’ use of acute and long-term care services. Methods Data were collected from 1,074 community-dwelling seniors participating in a Medicare demonstration. First they completed a self-report questionnaire measuring the “Big Five” personality traits: Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. During the next two years, the participants maintained daily journals of their use of health care services. We used regression models based on the Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization to test for associations. Findings Our hypothesis that higher Neuroticism would be associated with greater health care use was confirmed for three services—probability of any emergency department (ED) use, likelihood of any custodial nursing home use, and more skilled nursing facility (SNF) days for SNF users—but was disconfirmed for hospital days for those hospitalized. Higher Openness to Experience was associated with a greater likelihood of custodial home care use, and higher Agreeableness and lower Conscientiousness with a higher probability of custodial nursing home use. For users, lower Openness was associated with more ED visits and SNF days, and lower Conscientiousness with more ED visits. For many traits with significant associations, the predicted use was 16 to 30 percent greater for people high (low) versus low (high) in specific traits. Conclusions Personality traits are associated with Medicare beneficiaries’ use of many expensive health care services, findings that have implications for health services research and

  17. Patient Perspectives of an Integrated Program of Medical Care and Substance Use Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Caitlin; Sorensen-Alawad, Amy; Palmisano, Joseph N.; Chaisson, Christine; Walley, Alexander Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The benefits of integrating primary care and substance use disorder treatment are well known, yet true integration is difficult. We developed and evaluated a team-based model of integrated care within the primary care setting for HIV-infected substance users and substance users at risk for contracting HIV. Qualitative data were gathered via focus groups and satisfaction surveys to assess patients' views of the program, evaluate key elements for success, and provide recommendations for other programs. Key themes related to preferences for the convenience and efficiency of integrated care; support for a team-based model of care; a feeling that the program requirements offered needed structure; the importance of counseling and education; and how provision of concrete services improved overall well-being and quality of life. For patients who received buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid dependence, this was viewed as a major benefit. Our results support other studies that theorize integrated care could be of significant value for hard-to-reach populations and indicate that having a clinical team dedicated to providing substance use disorder treatment, HIV risk reduction, and case management services integrated into primary care clinics has the potential to greatly enhance the ability to serve a challenging population with unmet treatment needs. PMID:24428768

  18. Patient perspectives of an integrated program of medical care and substance use treatment.

    PubMed

    Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Farrell, Caitlin; Sorensen-Alawad, Amy; Palmisano, Joseph N; Chaisson, Christine; Walley, Alexander Y

    2014-02-01

    The benefits of integrating primary care and substance use disorder treatment are well known, yet true integration is difficult. We developed and evaluated a team-based model of integrated care within the primary care setting for HIV-infected substance users and substance users at risk for contracting HIV. Qualitative data were gathered via focus groups and satisfaction surveys to assess patients' views of the program, evaluate key elements for success, and provide recommendations for other programs. Key themes related to preferences for the convenience and efficiency of integrated care; support for a team-based model of care; a feeling that the program requirements offered needed structure; the importance of counseling and education; and how provision of concrete services improved overall well-being and quality of life. For patients who received buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid dependence, this was viewed as a major benefit. Our results support other studies that theorize integrated care could be of significant value for hard-to-reach populations and indicate that having a clinical team dedicated to providing substance use disorder treatment, HIV risk reduction, and case management services integrated into primary care clinics has the potential to greatly enhance the ability to serve a challenging population with unmet treatment needs. PMID:24428768

  19. Application of environmental sensitivity theories in personalized prevention for youth substance abuse: a transdisciplinary translational perspective.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Eric L; August, Gerald J; Cicchetti, Dante; Symons, Frank J

    2016-03-01

    Preventive interventions that target high-risk youth, via one-size-fits-all approaches, have demonstrated modest effects in reducing rates of substance use. Recently, substance use researchers have recommended personalized intervention strategies. Central to these approaches is matching preventatives to characteristics of an individual that have been shown to predict outcomes. One compelling body of literature on person × environment interactions is that of environmental sensitivity theories, including differential susceptibility theory and vantage sensitivity. Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated that environmental sensitivity (ES) factors moderate substance abuse outcomes. We propose that ES factors may augment current personalization strategies such as matching based on risk factors/severity of problem behaviors (risk severity (RS)). Specifically, individuals most sensitive to environmental influence may be those most responsive to intervention in general and thus need only a brief-type or lower-intensity program to show gains, while those least sensitive may require more comprehensive or intensive programming for optimal responsiveness. We provide an example from ongoing research to illustrate how ES factors can be incorporated into prevention trials aimed at high-risk adolescents. PMID:27012256

  20. Substance use among eighth-grade students who take care of themselves after school.

    PubMed

    Richardson, J L; Dwyer, K; McGuigan, K; Hansen, W B; Dent, C; Johnson, C A; Sussman, S Y; Brannon, B; Flay, B

    1989-09-01

    This investigation focused on substance use among children who regularly care for themselves after school (latchkey children). The data, collected from 4932 eighth-grade students, indicated that self-care is an important risk factor for alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use. Data collected from 2185 parents validated these findings. Eighth-grade students, who took care of themselves for 11 or more hours a week, were at twice the risk of substance use as those who did not take care of themselves at all. This relationship held at all levels of sociodemographic status, extracurricular activities, sources of social influence, and stress. Of the 186 stratified tests of the relationship, 90% were significant; even those not found to be significant were in the direction expected. Path analyses suggest that risk-taking, having friends who smoke, and being offered cigarettes may partially explain the relationship between self-care and substance use. Those eighth-grade students who select friends who smoke and place themselves in situations in which they are offered cigarettes may be manifesting a desire to display their sense of maturity and independence. The fact that the increase in substance use occurred among almost all strata tested and the fact that mediation was not complete suggest that more than one mechanism may account for the associated increase in substance use. It is also possible that more time in self-care results in more unnoticed solitary trials of substances, as well as trials motivated by peer offers or peer pressure to use substances. PMID:2788869

  1. Decision support system based semantic web for personalized patient care.

    PubMed

    Douali, Nassim; De Roo, Jos; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine may be considered an extension of traditional approaches to understanding and treating diseases, but with greater precision. A profile of a patient's genetic variation can guide the selection of drugs or treatment protocols that minimize harmful side effects or ensure a more successful outcome. In this paper we describe a decision support system designed to assist physicians for personalized care, and methodology for integration in the clinical workflow. A reasoning method for interacting heterogeneous knowledge and data is a necessity in the context of personalized medicine. Development of clinical decision support based semantic web for personalized patient care is to achieve its potential and improve the quality, safety and efficiency of healthcare. PMID:22874401

  2. Evidence-Based Care of the Patient with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Antai-Otong, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a complex, serious, and high-cost psychiatric disorder. The high prevalence of patients with BPD and co-occurring depression, eating disorders, and substance-use disorders in primary care and mental health settings contribute to their high use of resources in these practice settings. Regardless of treatment challenges associated with BPD, researchers suggest a more positive outlook in the treatment of this complex psychiatric condition. This article focuses on areas in which nurses can strengthen their understanding of underpinnings and multimodal approaches, assess the patient's immediate needs, and manage distressful emotional states and impulsivity. PMID:27229283

  3. Mexican-American Males Providing Personal Care for their Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Bronwynne C.; Belyea, Michael J.; Ume, Ebere

    2011-01-01

    We know little about Mexican-American (MA) family adaptation to critical events in the informal caregiving experience but, in these days of economic and social turmoil, sons must sometimes step up to provide personal care for their aging mothers. This article compares two empirically real cases of MA males who provided such care, in lieu of a female relative. The cases are selected from a federally-funded, descriptive, longitudinal, mixed methods study of 110 MA caregivers and their care recipients. In case-oriented research, investigators can generate propositions (connected sets of statements) that reflect their findings and conclusions, and can be tested against subsequent cases: Caregiving strain and burden in MA males may have more to do with physical and emotional costs than financial ones; MA males providing personal care for their mothers adopt a matter-of-fact approach as they act “against taboo”; and this approach is a new way to fulfill family obligations. PMID:21643486

  4. The financial hazard of personalized medicine and supportive care.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Pricivel M; Olver, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing the delivery of oncological care, promising benefits both at the patient and health system levels. The cost of targeted therapies, unfortunately, is becoming more expensive and unaffordable. Where supportive care in cancer concerns the prevention and management of the adverse effects of cancer and its treatment and is the thrust of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, financing of and value in personalized medicine is an important area of research and engagement for the association. Discussing patients' concerns with and identifying those at most risk for the financial hazard of cancer treatment and offering financial counseling and assistance and/or referral to support networks are potential key areas for (exploring and providing) better supportive care. The time is now to turn the concern of patients and their carers, providers, and other advocates regarding the affordability of cancer treatment into a collective cause towards coordinated action. PMID:26306523

  5. A Two Year Longitudinal Outcome Study of Addicted Health Care Professionals: An Investigation of the Role of Personality Variables

    PubMed Central

    Angres, Daniel; Bologeorges, Stephanie; Chou, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The co-morbidity of personality disorders (PDs) and other dysregulatory personality patterns with addiction have been well-established, although few studies have examined this interplay on long-term sobriety outcome. In addition, health care professionals suffering from addiction have both a significant public health impact and a unique set of treatment and recovery challenges. The aim of this study was to investigate if personality variables differentiated sobriety outcome in this population over a two year interval. A clinical sample of health care professionals participated in a substance abuse hospital treatment program individually tailored with respect to personality. Participants took the Temperament and Character Inventory and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory at intake, and were tracked two years post-discharge to determine sobriety status. Univariate analyses showed antisocial personality, female gender, and alcohol dependence were independent predictors of relapse, however a significant relationship between personality and substance use did not exist in multivariate analysis when controlling for demographic variables The lack of multivariate relationships demonstrates the heterogeneity in self-report measures of personality, which suggests the interplay of personality and addiction is complex and individualized. PMID:23531922

  6. Testing a Dynamic Automated Substance Use Intervention Model for Youths Exiting Foster Care

    PubMed Central

    Braciszewski, Jordan M.; Stout, Robert L.; Tzilos, Golfo K.; Moore, Roland S.; Bock, Beth C.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    With an ever increasing gap between need and availability for substance use services, more scalable and efficient interventions are needed. For youth in the foster care system, this gap is dramatic and expands as they leave care. Effective prevention services are strongly needed for this group of vulnerable young people. We propose a novel technology-driven intervention for preventing problematic substance use among youth receiving foster care services. This intervention approach would extend the work in brief computerized interventions by adding a text message-based booster, dynamically tailored to each individual’s readiness to change. It also combats many barriers to service receipt. Dynamically tailored interventions delivered through technologies commonly used by adolescents and young adults have the strong potential to reduce the burden of problematic substance use. PMID:27081290

  7. Relations of Personality to Substance Use Problems and Mental Health Disorder Symptoms in Two Clinical Samples of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battista, Susan R.; Pencer, Alissa; McGonnell, Melissa; Durdle, Heather; Stewart, Sherry H.

    2013-01-01

    There is a high overlap between substance misuse and mental health disorders in adolescents. Certain personality traits (i.e., sensation seeking, impulsivity, hopelessness, and anxiety sensitivity) may be related to increased risk for mental health symptoms and/or substance misuse. The current study examined the relationships between personality…

  8. Michigan Health Care Costs Review. Personal Health Care Expenditures, 1966-1981. Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Office of Health and Medical Affairs, Lansing.

    Data are presented describing expenditures for personal health services in Michigan from 1977 to 1981. The rapid growth in expenditures is illustrated, as well as the rates of growth in expenditures, for major categories of health services. Personal health expenditures are defined as payments for care directly provided to patients: specifically,…

  9. Personal Care Services Utilization by Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Charlene; Kang, Taewoon

    2010-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with the use of personal care services (PCS) and the amount of authorized hours in California in 2004-2005. Of those Medicaid-eligible individuals with developmental disabilities living at home, 31% received PCS. When we controlled for client need, gender, and age, individuals who were Asian/Pacific…

  10. Up Close and Personal: Theorising Care Work in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Vaughn M.

    2016-01-01

    How do we account for the close personal bonds and deeply caring relationships forged by educators with learners in many adult educational encounters? The literature is relatively silent on the emotional and relational basis to adult educator work. This is a serious silence, given the stressful nature of adult education in developing contexts such…

  11. Interpersonal Complexity: A Cognitive Component of Person-Centered Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medvene, Louis; Grosch, Kerry; Swink, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study concerns one component of the ability to provide person-centered care: the cognitive skill of perceiving others in relatively complex terms. This study tested the effectiveness of a social motivation for increasing the number of psychological constructs used to describe an unfamiliar senior citizen. Design and Methods:…

  12. Continuing Care and Trauma in Women Offenders’ Substance Use, Psychiatric Status, and Self-Efficacy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Preeta; Grella, Christine E.; Messina, Nena P.

    2015-01-01

    Using secondary data analysis of 3 separate trauma-informed treatment programs for women offenders, we examine outcomes between those who received both prison and community-based substance abuse treatment (i.e., continuing care; n = 85) and those who received either prison or community aftercare treatment (n = 108). We further account for differences in trauma exposure to examine whether continuing care moderates this effect on substance use, psychiatric severity, and self-efficacy outcomes at follow-up. The main effect models of continuing care showed a significant association with high psychiatric status and did not yield significant associations with substance use or self-efficacy. However, the interaction between trauma history and continuing care showed significant effects on all 3 outcomes. Findings support the importance of a continuing care treatment model for women offenders exposed to multiple forms of traumatic events, and provide evidence of the effectiveness of integrating trauma-informed treatment into women’s substance abuse treatment. PMID:26924891

  13. Few ACOs pursue innovative models that integrate care for mental illness and substance abuse with primary care.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Valerie A; Colla, Carrie H; Tierney, Katherine; Van Citters, Arica D; Fisher, Elliott S; Meara, Ellen

    2014-10-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) may be well positioned to increase the focus on managing behavioral health conditions (mental health and substance abuse) through the integration of behavioral health treatment and primary care. We used a mixed-methods research design to examine the extent to which ACOs are clinically, organizationally, and financially integrating behavioral health care and primary care. We used data from 257 respondents to the National Survey of Accountable Care Organizations, a nationally representative survey of ACOs. The data were supplemented with semistructured, in-depth interviews with clinical leaders at sixteen ACOs purposively sampled to represent the spectrum of behavioral health integration. We found that most ACOs hold responsibility for some behavioral health care costs, and 42 percent include behavioral health specialists among their providers. However, integration of behavioral health care and primary care remains low, with most ACOs pursuing traditional fragmented approaches to physical and behavioral health care and only a minority implementing innovative models. Contract design and contextual factors appear to influence the extent to which ACOs integrate behavioral health care. Nevertheless, the ACO model has the potential to create opportunities for improving behavioral health care and integrating it with primary care. PMID:25288427

  14. The Impact of Caregiver-Care Recipient Relationship Quality on Family Caregivers of Women with Substance-Use Disorders or Co-Occurring Substance and Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz-Saltzman, Shiri; Biegel, David E.; Townsend, Aloen

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study utilized a stress-process model to examine the impact of caregivers' (N = 82) perceptions of their relationship quality with a female family member (i.e., care-recipient) with substance-use or co-occurring substance and mental disorders on caregivers' perceived burden. Regression findings indicate that relationship…

  15. End-of-Life Care Policies in Flemish Residential Care Facilities Accommodating Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Haene, I.; Pasman, H. R. W.; Deliens, L.; Bilsen, J.; Mortier, F.; Stichele, R. Vander

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article aims to describe the presence, content and implementation strategies of written policies on end-of-life decisions in Flemish residential care facilities (RCFs) accommodating persons with intellectual disabilities (ID), and to describe training, education and quality assessments of end-of-life care. Methods: A…

  16. Transitional care for seriously mentally ill persons: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rose, Linda E; Gerson, Linda; Carbo, Cynthia

    2007-12-01

    This article reports the results of a pilot study of a nurse-based in-home transitional care intervention for seriously mentally ill persons. The goals of the intervention were to address the lack of continuity of care in existing programs and to meet the immediate postdischarge needs of severely mentally ill persons. This article focuses primarily on the applicability and feasibility of the intervention for this population, given the challenges of engaging seriously mentally ill patients in a community-based protocol and the complexity of their illnesses. Factors that are important to community adjustment postdischarge were identified: caregiver concerns and health status impeding illness management, lack of structure/involvement in daily activities, structural and functional factors affecting adherence, and presence of symptoms after discharge. Use of an advanced practice nurse to provide transitional care can offer an alternative to patients who might otherwise be left poorly treated or untreated in the community setting. PMID:18037440

  17. Pillars for the care of older persons in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Powell, Dorothy L; Price, Addie J; Burns, Faith A; McConnell, Eleanor S; Hendrix, Cristina C; McWhinney-Dehaney, Leila; Lombardi, Marilyn M

    2012-01-01

    Pillars for the Care of Older Persons in the Caribbean: A Comprehensive Community-Based Framework (Pillars) is a hybrid of multiple public health frameworks developed through community-based participatory research processes. Health and social service professionals, governmental organizations, elderly persons, and others from across the English-speaking Caribbean countries developed the Pillars framework to address the growing elderly population and with an aim to increase the number of healthy and active years of life. The Pillars framework consists of four interrelated pillars organized across multiple sectors of society: primary care with care management; integrated services coordination; population-based health promotion and disease prevention; and planning and accountability. Pillars is enabled by an envisioned integrated system of information technology that will increase community-based services delivery, interprofessional communication and coordination, and will aggregate data with all identifiers removed for surveillance, planning, forecasting, policy making, evaluation, and research. PMID:22211755

  18. Perspectives and strategies of alternative methods used in the risk assessment of personal care products.

    PubMed

    Quantin, P; Thélu, A; Catoire, S; Ficheux, H

    2015-11-01

    Risk assessment for personal care products requires the use of alternative methods since animal testing is now totally banned. Some of these methods are effective and have been validated by the "European Union Reference Laboratory for alternatives to animal testing"; but there is still a need for development and implementation of methods for specific endpoints. In this review, we have focused on dermal risk assessment because it is the prime route of absorption and main target organ for personal care products. Within this field, various areas must be assessed: irritation, sensitisation and toxicokinetic. Personal care product behaviour after use by the consumer and potential effects on the environment are also discussed. The purpose of this review is to show evolution and the prospects of alternative methods for safety dermal assessment. Assessment strategies must be adapted to the different chemical classes of substances studied but also to the way in which they are used. Finally, experimental and theoretical technical parameters that may impact on measured effects have been identified and discussed. PMID:26184446

  19. [Nursing care needs of the caregiver of persons under palliative care].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Vicente César; Rebelo, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose was to identify needs for nursing care of caregiver of the person in the terminal stage and nursing interventions, using a systematic review of the literature. A research in EBSCO and ProQuest and sought Full Text scientific articles, published between 1998 and 2008, using the following keywords: "Palliative care", "Family", "Nursing" and "Needs" was made. The method PI[C]OD was used to select 14 items of total 77. The care needs the person in the terminal stage are: communication, relationship of trust and security, recognition and operationalization of desires; preparation for mourning; needs for information, training, involvement in care, emotional needs, spiritual needs and resting needs. It was concluded that the family has different needs that require personal intervention of the nurse, through the establishment of a trust relationship. PMID:21468507

  20. Readiness to Change in Adolescents Screening Positive for Substance Use in Urban Primary Care Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Jack; McGeehan, Jennifer; Kelleher, Kelly J.

    2010-01-01

    Primary care physicians often perceive patients as unlikely to decrease their substance use and suggest this reluctance to change diminishes their willingness to screen and intervene. The literature on readiness to change has primarily focused on adults, and the available studies on adolescents have largely included hospitalized and/or…

  1. Effect of Primary Medical Care on Addiction and Medical Severity in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Peter D; Zhang, Zhiwei; Hendrickson, James; Stein, Michael D; Gerstein, Dean R

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether the availability of primary medical care on-site at addiction treatment programs or off-site by referral improves patients' addiction severity and medical outcomes, compared to programs that offer no primary care. DESIGN Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study of patients admitted to a purposive national sample of substance abuse treatment programs. SETTING Substance abuse treatment programs in major U.S. metropolitan areas eligible for demonstration grant funding from the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. RESPONDENTS Administrators at 52 substance abuse treatment programs, and 2,878 of their patients who completed treatment intake, discharge, and follow-up interviews. MEASUREMENTS Program administrators reported whether the program had primary medical care available on-site, only off-site, or not at all. Patients responded to multiple questions regarding their addiction and medical status in intake and 12-month follow-up interviews. These items were combined into multi-item composite scores of addiction and medical severity. The addiction severity score includes items measuring alcohol and drug use, employment, illegal activities, legal supervision, family and other social support, housing, physical conditions, and psychiatric status. The medical severity score includes measures of perceived health, functional limitations, and comorbid physical conditions. MAIN RESULTS After controlling for treatment modality, geographic region, and multiple patient-level characteristics, patients who attended programs with on-site primary medical care experienced significantly less addiction severity at 12-month follow-up (regression coefficient, −25.9; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], −43.2 to −8.5), compared with patients who attended programs with no primary medical care. However, on-site care did not significantly influence medical severity at follow-up (coefficient, −0.28; 95% CI, −0.69 to 0

  2. Infrastructure for Personalized Medicine at Partners HealthCare

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Scott T.; Shin, Meini Sumbada

    2016-01-01

    Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine (PPM) is a center within the Partners HealthCare system (founded by Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital) whose mission is to utilize genetics and genomics to improve the care of patients in a cost effective manner. PPM consists of five interconnected components: (1) Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM), a CLIA laboratory performing genetic testing for patients world-wide; (2) Translational Genomics Core (TGC), a core laboratory providing genomic platforms for Partners investigators; (3) Partners Biobank, a biobank of samples (DNA, plasma and serum) for 50,000 Consented Partners patients; (4) Biobank Portal, an IT infrastructure and viewer to bring together genotypes, samples, phenotypes (validated diagnoses, radiology, and clinical chemistry) from the electronic medical record to Partners investigators. These components are united by (5) a common IT system that brings researchers, clinicians, and patients together for optimal research and patient care. PMID:26927187

  3. Linking Antisocial Behavior, Substance Use, and Personality: An Integrative Quantitative Model of the Adult Externalizing Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Robert F.; Markon, Kristian E.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Benning, Stephen D.; Kramer, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Antisocial behavior, substance use, and impulsive and aggressive personality traits often co-occur, forming a coherent spectrum of personality and psychopathology. In the current research, the authors developed a novel quantitative model of this spectrum. Over 3 waves of iterative data collection, 1,787 adult participants selected to represent a range across the externalizing spectrum provided extensive data about specific externalizing behaviors. Statistical methods such as item response theory and semiparametric factor analysis were used to model these data. The model and assessment instrument that emerged from the research shows how externalizing phenomena are organized hierarchically and cover a wide range of individual differences. The authors discuss the utility of this model for framing research on the correlates and the etiology of externalizing phenomena. PMID:18020714

  4. A Practical Clinical Trial of Coordinated Care Management to Treat Substance Use Disorders among Public Assistance Beneficiaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgenstern, Jon; Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Dasaro, Christopher; McKay, James R.

    2009-01-01

    This study tested whether coordinated care management (CCM), a continuity of care intervention for substance use disorders (SUD), improved rates of abstinence when compared with usual welfare management for substance-using single adults and adults with dependent children applying for public assistance. The study was designed as a practical…

  5. Demographic Characteristics and Rates of Progress of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons Receiving Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dennis; McAweeney, Mary

    2007-01-01

    A lack of demographic information and data related to the achievement of short-term goals during substance abuse treatment among persons who are deaf or hard of hearing dictated the need for the study. New York State maintains a database on all individuals who participate in treatment. Within this database, 1.8% of persons in treatment for…

  6. Clinical Characteristics and Staff Training Needs of Two Substance Use Disorder Treatment Programs Specialized for Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dennis; Lorber, Cathy

    2004-01-01

    The clinical aspects and staff training needs for two substance use disorder (SUD) treatment programs that serve persons with co-existing disabilities are described. The article addresses SUD prevalence among persons with disabilities and the corresponding specialized treatment needs and accommodations that may be necessary. The philosophical…

  7. Cleanser, Detergent, Personal Care Product, and Pretreatment Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Niklas; Carrier, Chris; Vega, Leticia; Casteel, Michael; Verostko, chuck; Pickering, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the Cleanser, Detergent, Personal Care Product, and Pretreatment Evaluation & Selection task is to identify the optimal combination of personal hygiene products, crew activities, and pretreatment strategies to provide the crew with sustainable life support practices and a comfortable habitat. Minimal energy, mass, and crew time inputs are desired to recycle wastewater during long duration missions. This document will provide a brief background on the work this past year supporting the ELS Distillation Comparison Test, issues regarding use of the hygiene products originally chosen for the test, methods and results used to select alternative products, and lessons learned from testing.

  8. PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL ACTIONS, ACTIVITIES, AND BEHAVIORS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Perhaps more so than with any other class of pollutants, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the individual activities of consumers and their environ...

  9. Risk factors for early readmission to acute care for persons with schizophrenia taking antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Boaz, Timothy L; Becker, Marion Ann; Andel, Ross; Van Dorn, Richard A; Choi, Jiyoon; Sikirica, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The study examined risk factors for readmission to acute care among Florida Medicaid enrollees with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics. METHODS Medicaid and service use data for 2004 to 2008 were used to identify adults with schizophrenia discharged from hospitals and crisis units who were taking antipsychotics. Data were extracted on demographic characteristics, service use before admission, psychopharmacologic treatment after discharge, and readmission to acute behavioral health care. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated readmission risk in the 30 days after discharge and in the period after 30 days for participants not readmitted in the first 30 days. RESULTS The mean±SD age of the 3,563 participants was 43.4±11.1; 61% were male, and 38% were white. Participants had 6,633 inpatient episodes; duration of hospitalization was 10.6±7.0 days. Readmission occurred for 84% of episodes, 23% within 30 days. Variables associated with an increased readmission risk in the first 30 days were shorter hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR]=1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.10-1.27, p<.001), shorter time on medication before discharge (HR=1.19, CI=1.06-1.35, p=.003), greater prehospitalization use of acute care (HR=2.64, CI=2.29-3.05, p<.001), serious general medical comorbidity (HR=1.21, CI=1.06-1.38, p=.005), and prior substance abuse treatment (HR=1.58, CI=1.37-1.83, p<.001). After 30 days, hospitalization duration and time on medication were not significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS Short hospital stays for persons with schizophrenia may be associated with risk of early readmission, possibly because the person is insufficiently stabilized. More chronic risk factors include prior acute care, general medical comorbidity, and substance abuse. PMID:23945797

  10. Making Personalized Health Care Even More Personalized: Insights From Activities of the IOM Genomics Roundtable

    PubMed Central

    David, Sean P.; Johnson, Samuel G.; Berger, Adam C.; Feero, W. Gregory; Terry, Sharon F.; Green, Larry A.; Phillips, Robert L.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic research has generated much new knowledge into mechanisms of human disease, with the potential to catalyze novel drug discovery and development, prenatal and neonatal screening, clinical pharmacogenomics, more sensitive risk prediction, and enhanced diagnostics. Genomic medicine, however, has been limited by critical evidence gaps, especially those related to clinical utility and applicability to diverse populations. Genomic medicine may have the greatest impact on health care if it is integrated into primary care, where most health care is received and where evidence supports the value of personalized medicine grounded in continuous healing relationships. Redesigned primary care is the most relevant setting for clinically useful genomic medicine research. Taking insights gained from the activities of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health, we apply lessons learned from the patient-centered medical home national experience to implement genomic medicine in a patient-centered, learning health care system. PMID:26195686

  11. The Affordable Care Act, Substance Use Disorders, and Low-Income Clients: Implications for Social Work.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Heather A; Wahler, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    Social workers are leaders in the substance abuse services field and may often work in substance use disorder (SUD) education, prevention, assessment, treatment, or resource coordination and case management roles. As the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (2010) drives changes in the fields of health and behavioral health, social workers have an opportunity to lead structural changes at the micro and macro levels that will have a positive impact on low-income clients with SUDs. In this article, authors examine the current state of SUDs and health care access, the impact of the ACA on the field, and implications for social work practice and education. Social workers should seek specialized education and credentialing in SUD services, know how to help clients apply for health care coverage, and advocate for integrated substance abuse treatment and health care programs and an expansion of Medicaid in their local communities. Social workers are well positioned to be a voice for clients to ensure that the current structural changes result in a better, integrated system of care that is able to respond to the needs of low-income clients with SUDs. PMID:27501640

  12. The National Exposure Registry: procedures for establishing a registry of persons environmentally exposed to hazardous substances.

    PubMed

    Burg, J R; Gist, G L

    1995-01-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry has, as mandated in Superfund legislation, established the National Exposure Registry (NER). The purpose of the NER is to assess and evaluate the potential relationship between adverse health effects and environmental exposure for an exposed population, particularly the relationship between chronic health effects and long-term, low-level chemical exposures. The NER's primary goal is to facilitate epidemiology research by establishing multiple data bases (subregistries) that contain demographic, environmental, and health information on large populations exposed to selected chemicals. The Registry data mainly serve the purpose of being hypothesis-generating rather than hypothesis-testing. The NER is currently composed of subregistries of: (1) persons exposed to volatile organic compounds (VOCs)--a subset of registrants in whom trichloroethylene (TCE) is the primary VOC exposure, but others are present (N = 4,832), a subset in whom benzene is the primary VOC exposure (N = 1,142), and a subset in whom trichloroethane (TCA) and TCE are the highest VOC exposures (N = 3,666); and (2) persons with dioxin exposure (N = 250). Chromium and radioactive substances subregistries are planned. PMID:7491637

  13. PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: AN OVERVIEW - POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL ACTIONS, ACTIVITES, AND BEHAVIORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perhaps more so than with any other class of pollutants, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the personal activities of individual citizens and their environ...

  14. Usage pattern of personal care products in California households.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangmei May; Bennett, Deborah H; Ritz, Beate; Cassady, Diana L; Lee, Kiyoung; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2010-11-01

    Given the concern over the potential for health risks associated with certain ingredients (e.g., phthalates) in personal care products, usage patterns of ∼30 types of personal care products (e.g., shampoo, sunscreen, fragrance, etc.) were collected in 604 California households through a telephone interview. Preferences in selecting products, e.g., scented or unscented, aerosol, and brand loyalty, were also investigated. Participants were recruited in three age groups, children (mostly preschoolers), their parents, and adults age 55 or older. Use frequencies of various product types varied by sex, age group, race, education, and climatic region. Product use by parent and child from the same household were correlated. Use frequencies of products in the same class (e.g., skincare) were moderately correlated, which may impact aggregate exposures. Use frequencies observed in this study were generally in the same range as those reported in the EPA Exposure Factor Handbook, but we found differences for some individual products. Our study provides additional data on population-based usage patterns of a large collection of commonly used personal care products pertaining to several age groups and socio-demographic strata. This information will be valuable for exposure and risk assessments. PMID:20696198

  15. Delineating Selection and Mediation Effects among Childhood Personality and Environmental Risk Factors in the Development of Adolescent Substance Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Brian M.; Johnson, Wendy; Durbin, C. Emily; Blonigen, Daniel M.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing the large, longitudinal Minnesota Twin Family Study (N = 2510; 96% European American ancestry), we examined the influence of several person-environment transactions on adolescent substance abuse. We focused on the two childhood personality traits found to be most predictive of substance abuse in this sample—socialization (willingness to follow rules and endorse conventional values) and boldness (social engagement and assurance, stress resilience, thrill seeking)—and the environmental variables of antisocial and prosocial peers, academic engagement, parent-child relationship quality, and stressful life events. Path analysis revealed that low socialization had a selection effect for each environmental risk factor, that is, socialization at age 11 predicted environmental risk at age 14, after controlling for the stability of the environmental variables from ages 11 to 14. Antisocial peers and academic engagement at age 14 then mediated some of the risk of low socialization on substance abuse at age 17, but the majority of risk for substance abuse was accounted for by the stability of socialization from age 11 to 14. Boldness at age 11 also increased risk for substance abuse, but did so primarily via a direct effect. The findings help to parse the nature of person-environment transactions across multiple personality traits and contextual risk factors that contribute to adolescent substance abuse. PMID:24337735

  16. Towards personalized care for persons with spinal cord injury: a study on patients' perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Garrino, Lorenza; Curto, Natascia; Decorte, Rita; Felisi, Nadia; Matta, Ebe; Gregorino, Silvano; Actis, M. Vittoria; Marchisio, Cecilia; Carone, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Objective/background A newly designed Spinal Cord Unit (SCU) was set up at the Orthopedic Traumatology Center (OTC), Turin, Italy, in July 2007. With the relocation of the SCU came the need to reorganize and improve the delivery of its services. The study reported here is a preliminary part of a project entitled ‘Experimentation and evaluation of personalized healthcare for patients with spinal cord injury’, which is a component of an overarching program of targeted research into healthcare funded by the Piedmont Region in 2006. The aim of this study was to assess the perception of care by patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) by collecting important data in order to determine whether an integrated and personalized care pathway could be effective both in hospital and in a rehabilitation setting. Design Qualitative research study. The interview format was based on a narrative approach. Methods Qualitative in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 patients with SCI. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify categories and themes arising from the data. Results Six main categories emerged from the perspectives of patients: expectations of rehabilitation care, impact and welcome, relationship with nurses and their involvement in treatment, relationship with physical therapists and participation in rehabilitation programs, relationship with physicians and their availability and attendance, and imparting of information on injury and rehabilitation outcomes. Care was the aspect new patients admitted to the SCU found most important. When closer relationships with staff formed, the healthcare professionals became an essential support. Patients with SCI commonly stated that receiving explicit information was necessary for accepting their condition. Conclusions Analysis of the patients' perceptions revealed a wealth of details on their experience in the SCU and the need for flexible planning of care time in particular. Incorporating the patients

  17. Experiences of person-centred care - patients’ perceptions: qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient care models have been implemented and documented worldwide. Many studies have focused on features that hinder and facilitate the shift to such models, including the implementation process, staff involvement, resistance to new models and cultural dimensions. However, few studies have identified the potential effects of such new care models from a patient perspective. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether patients did in fact perceive the intentions of partnership in the new care model 1 year after its implementation. Methods Sixteen participants were interviewed, selected from two wards in a medical department where a new care model had been implemented 1 year earlier. A directed deductive content analysis was selected. The aim of the directed approach to content analysis was to investigate to what extent the new care model had been implemented, using patients’ perspectives to describe the level of implementation. A coding framework was developed based on a theoretical paper that described the key features of the new care model. Results The implementation of person-centred care had clearly occurred to a large degree, even if some patients appeared not to have been exposed to the model at all. Aspects of the newly implemented care model were obvious; however, it was also clear that implementation was not complete. The analysis showed that patients felt listened to and that their own perception of the situation had been noted. Patients spontaneously expressed that they felt that the staff saw them as persons and did not solely focus on their disease. It was also stated that not every ailment or aspect of a patient’s illness needed to be addressed or resolved for open listening to be perceived as a positive experience. Conclusions The findings indicate that even though some patients were not interested in participating and playing an active role in their own care, this might relate to a lack of understanding on how to invite

  18. Usage patterns of personal care products: important factors for exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Biesterbos, Jacqueline W H; Dudzina, Tatsiana; Delmaar, Christiaan J E; Bakker, Martine I; Russel, Frans G M; von Goetz, Natalie; Scheepers, Paul T J; Roeleveld, Nel

    2013-05-01

    Complete information regarding the use of personal care products (PCPs) by consumers is limited, but such information is crucial for realistic consumer exposure assessment. To fill this gap, a database was created with person-oriented information regarding usage patterns and circumstances of use for 32 different PCPs. Out of 2700 potential participants from the Netherlands, 516 men and women completed a digital questionnaire. The prevalence of use varied by gender, age, level of education and skin type. A high frequency of use was observed for some products (e.g. lip care products), while toothpaste, deodorant and day cream were generally used once or twice a day. The frequency of use for other PCPs varied over a wide range. The amounts of use varied largely between and within different product groups. Body lotion, sunscreen and after sun lotion were often applied on adjacent body parts. The majority of PCPs were applied in the morning, but some products, such as night cream and after sun, were predominantly applied in the evening or night. As expected, the participants used several PCPs simultaneously. The database yields important personalized exposure factors which can be used in aggregate consumer exposure assessment for substances that are components of PCPs. PMID:23174517

  19. Integrated transitional care: patient, informal caregiver and health care provider perspectives on care transitions for older persons with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Toscan, Justine; Mairs, Katie; Hinton, Stephanie; Stolee, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Complex older adults, such as those with hip fracture, frequently require care from multiple professionals across a variety of settings. Integrated care both between providers and across settings is important to ensure care quality and patient safety. The purpose of this study was to determine the core factors related to poorly integrated care when hip fracture patients transition between care settings. Methods A qualitative, focused ethnographic approach was used to guide data collection and analysis. Patients, their informal caregivers and health care providers were interviewed and observed at each care transition. A total of 45 individual interviews were conducted. Interview transcripts and field notes were coded and analysed to uncover emerging themes in the data. Results Four factors related to poorly integrated transitional care were identified: confusion with communication about care, unclear roles and responsibilities, diluted personal ownership over care, and role strain due to system constraints. Conclusions Our research supports a broader notion of collaborative practice that extends beyond specific care settings and includes an appropriate, informed role for patients and informal caregivers. This research can help guide system-level and setting-specific interventions designed to promote high-quality, patient-centred care during care transitions. PMID:22977426

  20. Outcomes for Medicaid Clients With Substance Abuse Problems Before and After Managed Care

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Bentson H.; Deck, Dennis D.; McCamant, Lynn E.; Gabriel, Roy M.; Bigelow, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Medicaid conversion from fee for service to managed care raised numerous questions about outcomes for substance abuse treatment clients. For example, managed care criticisms include concerns that clients will be undertreated (with too short and/or insufficiently intense services). Also of interest are potential variations in outcome for clients served by organizations with assorted financial arrangements such as for-profit status versus not-for-profit status. In addition, little information is available about the impact of state Medicaid managed care policies (including client eligibility) on treatment outcomes. Subjects of this project were Medicaid clients aged 18–64 years enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan during 1994 (before substance abuse treatment managed care, N = 1751) or 1996–1997 (after managed care, N = 14,813), who were admitted to outpatient non-methadone chemical dependency treatment services. Outcome measures were retention in treatment for 90 days or more, completion of a treatment program, abstinence at discharge, and readmission to treatment. With the exception of readmission, there were no notable differences in outcomes between the fee for service era clients versus those in capitated chemical dependency treatment. There were at most minor differences among various managed care systems (such as for-profit vs not-for-profit). However, duration of Medicaid eligibility was a powerful predictor of positive outcomes. Medicaid managed care does not appear to have had an adverse impact on outcomes for clients with substance abuse problems. On the other hand, state policies influencing Medicaid enrollment may have substantial impact on chemical dependency treatment outcomes. PMID:16215446

  1. ADH1A variation predisposes to personality traits and substance dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lingjun; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R.; Stein, Murray B.; Zhang, Huiping; Wei, Feng; Sen, Srijan; Poling, James; Luo, Xingguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Human personality traits are strong predictors or characteristics of many psychiatric disorders including substance dependence (SD). Recently, significant associations between ADH1A and SD have been reported, which led us to investigate the impact of ADH1A variation on personality traits and risk of SD. Methods Five hundred fifty-eight subjects with SD [398 European-Americans (EAs) and 160 African-Americans (AAs)], 517 college students (384 EAs and 133 European-origin Hispanics) and 448 healthy subjects (385 EAs, 48 AAs and 15 European-origin Hispanics) participated. Personality traits were assessed in 247 subjects with SD (179 EAs and 68 AAs), all 517 college students, and 332 healthy subjects (285 EAs, 40 AAs and 7 European-origin Hispanics). The relationships between ADH1A and personality traits were comprehensively examined using stepwise multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), and then decomposed by stepwise analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The relationship between ADH1A and SD was examined using stepwise logistic regression analysis. Admixture effects on analyses were considered. Results Overall, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness were associated with the diplotypes, haplotypes, genotypes and/or alleles of ADH1A in three of four phenotype groups including European-American SD subjects, healthy subjects, and African-American SD subjects (1.7×10-4≤p≤0.055), but not college students. Neuroticism was associated with diplotype, haplotypes and genotypes in African-American SD subjects (0.001≤p≤0.031). In addition, SD was associated with diplotypes, haplotypes, genotypes and/or alleles of ADH1A (0.008≤p≤0.060). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the ADH1A variation may contribute to the genetic component of variation in personality traits and SD. PMID:19526455

  2. Further evidence of self-medication: personality factors influencing drug choice in substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    McKernan, Lindsey Colman; Nash, Michael R; Gottdiener, William H; Anderson, Scott E; Lambert, Warren E; Carr, Erika R

    2015-06-01

    According to Khantzian's (2003) self-medication hypothesis (SMH), substance dependence is a compensatory means to modulate affects and self-soothe in response to distressing psychological states. Khantzian asserts: (1) Drugs become addicting because they have the power to alleviate, remove, or change human psychological suffering, and (2) There is a considerable degree of specificity in a person's choice of drugs because of unique psychological and physiological effects. The SMH has received criticism for its variable empirical support, particularly in terms of the drug-specificity aspect of Khantzian's hypothesis. We posit that previous empirical examinations of the SMH have been compromised by methodological limitations. Also, more recent findings supporting the SMH have yet to be replicated. Addressing previous limitations to the research, this project tested this theory in a treatment sample of treatment-seeking individuals with substance dependence (N = 304), using more heterogeneous, personality-driven measures that are theory-congruent. Using an algorithm based on medical records, individuals were reliably classified as being addicted to a depressant, stimulant, or opiate by two independent raters. Theory-based a priori predictions were that the three groups would exhibit differences in personality characteristics and emotional-regulation strategies. Specifically, our hypotheses entailed that when compared against each other: (1) Individuals with a central nervous system (CNS) depressant as drug of choice (DOC) will exhibit defenses of repression, over-controlling anger, and emotional inhibition to avoid acknowledging their depression; (2) Individuals with an opiate as DOC will exhibit higher levels of aggression, hostility, depression, and trauma, greater deficits in ego functioning, and externalizing/antisocial behavior connected to their use; and (3) Individuals with a stimulant as DOC will experience anhedonia, paranoia, have a propensity to mania, and

  3. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43.2 Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the Department or Agency concerned, any person... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Obligations of persons receiving care...

  4. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43.2 Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the Department or Agency concerned, any person... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Obligations of persons receiving care...

  5. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43.2 Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the Department or Agency concerned, any person... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Obligations of persons receiving care...

  6. Assay Reproducibility and Within-Person Variation of Mullerian Inhibiting Substance

    PubMed Central

    Dorgan, Joanne F.; Spittle, Cynthia S.; Egleston, Brian L.; Shaw, Christiana M.; Kahle, L. L.; Brinton, Louise A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To assess reproducibility of a commercial mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) assay and evaluate within-person variation in serum MIS levels. Design Assay reproducibility was evaluated by measuring MIS in multiple serum aliquots from the same blood collection. Within-person variation was assessed by measuring MIS in serum collected twice from the same individuals. Setting Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA Patient(s) Assay reproducibility was evaluated using serum from 5 volunteers with regular menstrual cycles. Within-person variation was evaluated in serum from 20 premenopausal women who donated blood twice at least 1 year apart. Intervention(s) For both studies, samples were randomly ordered in batches and laboratory personnel were blinded to which aliquots were from the same subject. Main Outcome Measure(s) MIS was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Within- and between-batch coefficients of variation (CVs) of the assay were 7.9% and 12.3%, respectively. After deleting one subject with extreme values, these CVs decreased to 7.6% and 7.7%, respectively. Within- and between-subject variance in MIS measurements were 2.19 and 0.31, respectively, and the intraclass correlation coefficient was .88 (95% confidence interval = .77 – .98). Conclusion(s) MIS serum concentration is relatively stable over one year in premenopausal women and can be measured with good reproducibility using a commercial kit. PMID:19409547

  7. A person-centred segmentation study in elderly care: towards efficient demand-driven care.

    PubMed

    Eissens van der Laan, M R; van Offenbeek, M A G; Broekhuis, H; Slaets, J P J

    2014-07-01

    Providing patients with more person-centred care without increasing costs is a key challenge in healthcare. A relevant but often ignored hindrance to delivering person-centred care is that the current segmentation of the population and the associated organization of healthcare supply are based on diseases. A person-centred segmentation, i.e., based on persons' own experienced difficulties in fulfilling needs, is an elementary but often overlooked first step in developing efficient demand-driven care. This paper describes a person-centred segmentation study of elderly, a large and increasing target group confronted with heterogeneous and often interrelated difficulties in their functioning. In twenty-five diverse healthcare and welfare organizations as well as elderly associations in the Netherlands, data were collected on the difficulties in biopsychosocial functioning experienced by 2019 older adults. Data were collected between March 2010 and January 2011 and sampling took place based on their (temporarily) living conditions. Factor Mixture Model was conducted to categorize the respondents into segments with relatively similar experienced difficulties concerning their functioning. First, the analyses show that older adults can be empirically categorized into five meaningful segments: feeling vital; difficulties with psychosocial coping; physical and mobility complaints; difficulties experienced in multiple domains; and feeling extremely frail. The categorization seems robust as it was replicated in two population-based samples in the Netherlands. The segmentation's usefulness is discussed and illustrated through an evaluation of the alignment between a segment's unfulfilled biopsychosocial needs and current healthcare utilization. The set of person-centred segmentation variables provides healthcare providers the option to perform a more comprehensive first triage step than only a disease-based one. The outcomes of this first step could guide a focused and

  8. Substance use among women receiving post-rape medical care, associated post-assault concerns and current substance abuse: Results from a national telephone household probability sample

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Jenna L.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Walsh, Kate; Resnick, Heidi S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine post-rape substance use, associated post rape medical and social concern variables, and past year substance abuse among women reporting having received medical care following a most recent or only lifetime incident of rape. Method Using a subsample of women who received post-rape medical care following a most recent or only rape incident (n=104) drawn from a national household probability sample of U.S. women, the current study described the extent of peritraumatic substance use, past year substance misuse behaviors, post-rape HIV and pregnancy concerns, and lifetime mental health service utilization as a function of substance use at time of incident. Results One-third (33%) of women seeking post-rape medical attention reported consuming alcohol or drugs at the time of their rape incident. Nearly one in four (24.7%) and one in seven (15%) women seeking medical attention following their most recent rape incident endorsed drug (marijuana, illicit, non-medical use of prescription drugs, or club drug) use or met substance abuse criteria, respectively, in the past year. One in twelve (8.4%) women reported at least monthly binge drinking in the past year. Approximately two-thirds of women reported seeking services for mental health needs in their lifetime. Post-rape concerns among women reporting peritraumatic substance use were not significantly different from those of women not reporting such use. Conclusions Substance use was reported by approximately one-third of women and past year substance abuse was common among those seeking post-rape medical care. Implications for service delivery, intervention implementation, and future research are discussed. PMID:23380490

  9. Bipolar Spectrum – Substance Use Co-occurrence: Behavioral Approach System (BAS) Sensitivity and Impulsiveness as Shared Personality Vulnerabilities

    PubMed Central

    Alloy, Lauren B.; Bender, Rachel E.; Wagner, Clara A.; Whitehouse, Wayne G.; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Hogan, Michael E.; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2009-01-01

    Bipolar disorders and substance use disorders (SUDs) show high co-occurrence. One explanation for this co-occurrence may be common personality vulnerabilities involved in both. We tested whether high Behavioral Approach System (BAS) sensitivity and impulsiveness are shared personality vulnerabilities in bipolar spectrum disorders and substance use problems and their co-occurrence in a longitudinal study of 132 bipolar spectrum and 153 normal individuals. At Time 1, participants completed the BIS/BAS Scales and the Impulsive Nonconformity Scale. Substance use problems were assessed via the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test and the Drug Abuse Screening Test at 4 month intervals for one year. Bipolar participants had higher rates of lifetime SUDs and substance use problems during the follow-up, relative to normal controls. In line with hypotheses, higher BAS sensitivity and impulsiveness predicted bipolar status and increased substance use problems prospectively. BAS Total, BAS Fun-seeking, and impulsiveness mediated the association between bipolar spectrum status and prospective substance use problems, with impulsiveness as the most important mediator. High BAS sensitivity and impulsiveness may represent shared personality vulnerabilities for both disorders, and may partially account for their co-occurrence. PMID:19686007

  10. Employment outcomes for hard-to-reach persons with chronic and severe substance use disorders receiving assertive community treatment.

    PubMed

    Gold, Paul B; Meisler, Neil; Duross, Deborah; Bailey, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Many persons with chronic and severe substance use disorders (SUDs) enter and exit public substance dependence treatment systems with limited benefit, but continue overuse of high-cost health and human services. Less than a third holds jobs, earning income below U.S. federal poverty levels. Long-term integrated substance dependency treatment, rehabilitation, and support services will be essential to resolve substance dependence and employment problems. This single-group program evaluation reports adaptation of Assertive Community Treatment (ACT), a multi-component, team-based service model originally designed for persons with severe mental illnesses and multiple disabilities, for effectiveness with persons with severe SUDs. The ACT model delivers an integrated package of treatment, rehabilitation, and support to reduce substance misuse and increase employment. Of the 35 clients admitted 12 months prior to conclusion of this 2-year service demonstration, only one left treatment prematurely. Generally, clients modestly reduced substance misuse and increased employment. However, the evaluation design and small sample limit inferences of causation and generalizability of these promising outcomes. Persuading states to adopt expensive team-based approaches for this population will require firm evidence of favorable cost-benefit ratios. PMID:15603010

  11. Identifying Affordable Sources of Medical Care among Uninsured Persons

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Peter J; Hadley, Jack; Kenney, Genevieve; Davidoff, Amy J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of policy, health system, and sociodemographic characteristics on the likelihood that uninsured persons pay a lower price at their regular source of care, or that they are aware of lower priced providers in their community. Data Sources The 2003 Community Tracking Study household survey, a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population and 60 randomly selected communities. Study Design The survey asked uninsured persons if they paid full or reduced cost at their usual source of medical care, or if they were aware of providers in their community that charge less for uninsured people. We use binomial and multinomial logistic regression analysis to examine the effects of various policy, health system, and sociodemographic characteristics on use and awareness of lower priced providers. We focus especially on the effects of safety-net capacity, measured by safety-net hospitals, community health centers, physicians' charity care, and Community Access Program (CAP) grants. Principal findings Less than half of the uninsured (47.5 percent) reported that they used or were aware of a lower priced provider in their community. Multivariate regression analysis shows that greater safety-net capacity is associated with a higher likelihood of having a lower priced provider as the regular source of care and greater awareness of lower priced providers. Lower incomes and racial/ethnic minorities also had a higher likelihood of having a lower priced provider, although health status did not have statistically significant effects. Conclusion Although increased safety-net capacity may lead to more uninsured having a lower priced provider, many uninsured who live near safety-net providers are not aware of their presence. Greater outreach designed to increase awareness may be needed in order to increase the effectiveness of safety-net providers in improving access to care for the uninsured. PMID:17355592

  12. The relationship between parenting types and older adolescents' personality, academic achievement, adjustment, and substance use.

    PubMed

    Weiss, L H; Schwarz, J C

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine Baumrind's T3 conceptual framework using a multiple informant design and an older adolescent population. With 178 college students and their families as participants, the present study found many of the predicted relations between parents' child-rearing style (Authoritative, Democratic, Nondirective, Nonauthoritarian-Directive, Authoritarian-Directive, and Unengaged) and their adolescent children's behavior in the 4 domains assessed: personality, adjustment, academic achievement, and substance use. The differences between parenting types on the criterion measures were not as large as reported in Baumrind's study, and significant effects were predominantly due to the poor scores from children with Unengaged and Authoritarian-Directive parents. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the Authoritative parenting type, the utility of using a typology, and areas for future research. PMID:9022232

  13. Access To Mental Health Care Increased But Not For Substance Use, While Disparities Remain.

    PubMed

    Creedon, Timothy B; Cook, Benjamin Lê

    2016-06-01

    We assessed whether early implementation of Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion and state health insurance exchanges increased access to mental health and substance use treatment among those in need and whether these changes differed by racial/ethnic group. We found that mental health treatment rates increased significantly but found no evidence of a reduction in the wide racial/ethnic disparities in mental health treatment that preceded ACA expansion from 2005 to 2013. PMID:27269017

  14. Comorbidity of Borderline Personality Disorder and Lifetime Substance Use Disorders in a Nationally Representative Sample.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Ryan W; Wood, Phillip K; Trull, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is comorbid with substance use disorders (SUDs). However, most epidemiological work on BPD and SUDs has collapsed nonalcohol substances into a drug use disorder indicator, potentially obscuring patterns of association between BPD and individal SUDs. Using a nationally representative sample (National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions; N = 34,481), the authors examined the association between lifetime BPD and nine lifetime SUDs. First, the authors examined the bivariate association of BPD and each SUD. BPD was associated with all nine SUDs. Second, they added relevant covariates (demographic variables, additional psychopathology) to each model. Seven SUDs remained significant. Finally, to account for shared variance across SUDs, the authors conducted a multivariate logistic regression with the nine SUDs and covariates as predictors. Alcohol, cocaine, and opiate use disorder were the only significant SUD predictors, indicating a unique association between BPD and these three SUDs. Future research should explore factors involved in the association of BPD with these specific SUDs. PMID:25893556

  15. HIV Laboratory Monitoring Reliably Identifies Persons Engaged in Care

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Bonnie B.; Hart, Rachel L.D.; Buchacz, Kate; Bozzette, Samuel A.; Wood, Kathy; Brooks, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Attendance at biannual medical encounters has been proposed as a minimum national standard for adequate engagement in HIV care. Using data from the HIV Outpatient Study, we analyzed how well dates of HIV-related laboratory testing correlated with attendance at biannual medical encounters. Methods HIV Outpatient Study is an open prospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients receiving outpatient care in the United States. The data set included dates for laboratory measurements and medical encounters. We included patients with at least 1 HIV laboratory test (CD4 cell count or plasma HIV RNA viral load) during 2010–2011. An HIV laboratory test was defined as associated with a medical encounter if it occurred within 3 weeks of the encounter. We assessed the predictive value of HIV laboratory tests as a proxy for adequate engagement in clinical care, defined as having had ≥2 HIV laboratory tests within 1 year and performed >90 days apart. Results A total of 10,321 HIV laboratory tests were recorded from 2909 patients. Adequate engagement in clinical care based on medical encounters was 88.2% and 77.3% when based on laboratory tests. Using HIV laboratory tests to assess engagement had a sensitivity of 85.7%, specificity of 86.0%, and positive and negative predictive values of 97.9% and 44.5%, respectively. Of the 22.7% classified as not engaged in care by the proxy measure, over half (55.5%) were actually engaged. Conclusions Using laboratory monitoring reliably classified persons as engaged in care. Of the 22.7% of patients classified as not engaged in care, most were actually engaged. PMID:25383710

  16. Students requiring personal nursing care in school: nursing care models and a checklist for school nurses.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Minchella, Lindsey

    2015-03-01

    Unprecedented numbers of children in the United States are now surviving extreme conditions and complications of prematurity, severe congenital anomalies, and significant birth trauma. Advances in medical science and technology have given rise to a marked increase in the population of children with special health care needs who require continuous nursing care, including at school. Students who are considered medically complex and/or are health technology-dependent present many rewards and challenges for families, educational staff, district administrators, and school nurses who may not feel prepared to integrate involved health care for students into the school setting. The purpose of this article is to describe care delivery models for success in providing for the health and safety needs of students who require continuous or personal nursing care at school. PMID:25816436

  17. [Difficulties medical care of persons placed under hand of justice].

    PubMed

    Brahmy, Betty

    2013-01-01

    The "contrôleur général des lieux de privation de liberté", french, national mechanism of prevention is an independant authorithy in charge of making sure since 2008 that rights of deprivation of freedom people--particularly access to health--are respected, in any place they are in captivity. The reports of the controllers present that the care of these persons is still a subject of concern as well for them--as the number of letters received by the Contrôleur général shows--as for professionals working in these places. The exercising of these health professionals in these institutions is a care mission to be done in a real partnership with the other actors. PMID:23457838

  18. Randomized Trial of Dual-Focused versus Single-Focused Individual Therapy for Personality Disorders and Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Samuel A.; Maccarelli, Lisa M.; LaPaglia, Donna M.; Ostrowski, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a randomized comparison of Dual Focus Schema Therapy with Individual Drug Counseling as enhancements to residential treatment for 105 substance dependent patients with versus without specific personality disorders. Both therapies were manual-guided and delivered for 6 months by experienced psychotherapists intensively trained and supervised with independent fidelity assessment. Using Cox Proportional Hazards, we found no psychotherapy differences in retention (days in treatment). Hierarchical Linear Modeling indicated that personality disordered participants started with higher psychiatric, interpersonal, and dysphoria symptoms, and both therapies reduced symptoms over 6 months. Contrary to predictions, Individual Drug Counseling resulted in more sustained reductions than Dual Focus Schema Therapy in several symptoms for several personality disorders. Our findings raised important questions about the added value of integrative or dual-focus therapies for co-occurring personality disorders and substance dependence relative to empirically supported therapies focused more specifically on addiction symptoms. PMID:21543951

  19. Integration of Substance Abuse Treatment Organizations into Accountable Care Organizations: Results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    D’Aunno, Thomas; Friedmann, Peter D.; Chen, Qixuan; Wilson, Donna M.

    2016-01-01

    To meet their aims of managing population health to improve the quality and cost of health care in the United States, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will need to focus on coordinating care for individuals with substance abuse disorders. The prevalence of these disorders is high, and these individuals often suffer from comorbid chronic medical and social conditions. This article examines the extent to which the nation’s fourteen thousand specialty substance abuse treatment (SAT) organizations, which have a daily census of more than 1 million patients, are contracting with ACOs across the country; we also examine factors associated with SAT organization involvement with ACOs. We draw on data from a recent (2014) nationally representative survey of executive directors and clinical supervisors from 635 SAT organizations. Results show that only 15 percent of these organizations had signed contracts with ACOs. Results from multivariate analyses show that directors’ perceptions of market competition, organizational ownership, and geographic location are significantly related to SATinvolvement with ACOs. We discuss implications for integrating the SAT specialty system with the mainstream health care system. PMID:26124307

  20. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were…

  1. The Association between Foster Care and Substance Abuse Risk Factors and Treatment Outcomes: An Exploratory Secondary Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blome, Wendy Whiting; Shields, Joseph; Verdieck, Mary Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    The child welfare and substance abuse systems are integrally linked through the children and families they both serve. There is a dearth of knowledge, however, on how children who have experienced foster care fare when they are treated for substance abuse issues as adults. This article presents an exploratory study using the Alcohol and Drug…

  2. Personality disorders in substance abusers: Validation of the DIP-Q through principal components factor analysis and canonical correlation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Background Personality disorders are common in substance abusers. Self-report questionnaires that can aid in the assessment of personality disorders are commonly used in assessment, but are rarely validated. Methods The Danish DIP-Q as a measure of co-morbid personality disorders in substance abusers was validated through principal components factor analysis and canonical correlation analysis. A 4 components structure was constructed based on 238 protocols, representing antagonism, neuroticism, introversion and conscientiousness. The structure was compared with (a) a 4-factor solution from the DIP-Q in a sample of Swedish drug and alcohol abusers (N = 133), and (b) a consensus 4-components solution based on a meta-analysis of published correlation matrices of dimensional personality disorder scales. Results It was found that the 4-factor model of personality was congruent across the Danish and Swedish samples, and showed good congruence with the consensus model. A canonical correlation analysis was conducted on a subset of the Danish sample with staff ratings of pathology. Three factors that correlated highly between the two variable sets were found. These variables were highly similar to the three first factors from the principal components analysis, antagonism, neuroticism and introversion. Conclusion The findings support the validity of the DIP-Q as a measure of DSM-IV personality disorders in substance abusers. PMID:15910688

  3. Loneliness: a concept relevant to the care of dying persons.

    PubMed

    Zack, M V

    1985-06-01

    Loneliness, whether conceptualized as a basic "fact" of human existence or as a painful, subjective experience in response to changes or deficiencies in the quality or quantity of a person's social relationships, has been recognized as an experience feared or felt by human beings since antiquity. As health care professionals, nurses have observed and responded to loneliness as an actual or potential problem amenable to nursing intervention. Being a subjective experience and one which may or may not be connected to the more objective condition of social isolation or aloneness, loneliness has puzzled scholars and researchers across disciplines. Although the nature of loneliness as a relational deficit is beginning to be explicated, particularly through the efforts of social psychologists, there are still major questions to be answered with regard to antecedents, manifestations, and interventions. Dying persons may represent a particularly vulnerable group, especially those dying in an acute care/cure-oriented setting. Since the limited knowledge about the nature of loneliness has been acquired primarily through studying college students or young adults, the question of whether or not their experience is comparable to that of other groups remains to be answered. Nurses continue to make clinical judgments about the loneliness of their patients. They basically are guided by a knowledge of affiliative functioning, and their interventions reflect a goal of optimal, social functioning for individuals experiencing or at-risk for loneliness. PMID:3846982

  4. Professionalism in global, personalized cancer care: restoring authenticity and integrity.

    PubMed

    Surbone, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing cancer care and creating new expectations among oncologists and patients. At present the benefit is still marginal, however, and must be understood as incremental. In addition, cultural and resource disparities limit the sustainability of new cancer therapies on a global scale. Adequate instruments are needed to enable our exercise of sound and honest judgment in distinguishing breakthrough treatments from those that yield only marginal or doubtful improvements, and to develop strategies for formulation and correct application of balanced guidelines for sustainable cancer care. Professionalism requires that the acquisition of knowledge and skills go hand in hand with moral education in the intellectual virtues of humility, perseverance, adaptability, communicativeness, and commitment to resist self-deception or conflicts of interest. Hidden curricula undermine the moral values of medicine: these must be understood and uncovered. We should possess a special body of knowledge, skills, and values that allow us to change our practices when appropriate and to be stewards of society's limited resources through proper communication with our patients and families. In the era of personalized oncology and global issues of sustainability, professional authenticity and integrity in cancer clinical practice are key to bridging the gaps between true and false expectations of patients and the public. PMID:23714485

  5. Personal recovery in individuals diagnosed with substance use disorder (SUD) and co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Linda M; Verkerk-Tamminga, Roeliene; Goossens, Peter J J; van den Brink, Wim; van Achterberg, Theo

    2015-08-01

    The process of personal recovery in people diagnosed with substance use disorder and comorbid attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was mapped. Four general themes representing four consecutive stages in the recovery process were identified in both client groups: (1) crisis and diagnosis; (2) dealing with agitation, symptoms, and burden; (3) reorganization of life; and (4) meaningful life. However, the personal recovery outcomes and the need for support were different for the two clients groups. Based on these findings, mental health nurses can offer recovery supporting care tailored to the challenging needs of these clients. For the SUD+ADHD group, overall, a coaching attitude is preferred. For the SUD+ASD group, overall, instructional, supportive and directive attitude is needed. PMID:26165980

  6. Personality Correlates of the Common and Unique Variance across Conduct Disorder and Substance Misuse Symptoms in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Conrod, Patricia J.

    2011-01-01

    Externalising behaviours such as substance misuse (SM) and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms highly co-ocurr in adolescence. While disinhibited personality traits have been consistently linked to externalising behaviours there is evidence that these traits may relate differentially to SM and CD. The current study aimed to assess whether this was the…

  7. The future of oncology care with personal health records.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Henry; Rodriguez, Elizabeth S

    2012-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) and patients' access to their own clinical information through a patient portal are changing the patient-physician relationship. Historically, health care providers have been gatekeepers of patients' medical records. Now, these portals provide patients access to clinical information, electronic messaging with the clinical team, and appointment and billing information. This type of access supports patient empowerment by engaging patients in their own care. Patients desire online access to information. The health care industry, like any other, must respond to the needs of its consumers. Oncology practices face unique challenges to meeting this need because of the complex nature of medical records of patients with cancer. Health care providers worry about the consequences of patients receiving "bad news" online, thereby increasing patient anxiety. This anxiety may, in turn, increase providers' workload by creating additional calls or visits to the office. These valid concerns require careful consideration when implementing a PHR or patient portal into a practice. Providers will benefit from a clear understanding of actual compared with potential risks and benefits. Much of the concerns about the negative effect on providers' workload and the potential increase in patients' anxiety have not been borne out. On the other hand, the implementation strategy, governance structure, and end-user education are crucial components to ensuring success. Successful implementation of a PHR or patient portal affords the opportunity to improve patient satisfaction and increase efficiency in provider workflow. The possibility exists to improve patient outcomes by engaging the patient in decision making and follow through. PMID:24451834

  8. Juvenile sex offenders: Personality profile, coping styles and parental care.

    PubMed

    Margari, Francesco; Lecce, Paola Alessandra; Craig, Francesco; Lafortezza, Elena; Lisi, Andrea; Pinto, Floriana; Stallone, Valentina; Pierri, Grazia; Pisani, Rossella; Zagaria, Giuseppina; Margari, Lucia; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2015-09-30

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in juvenile sex offenders showing that this population is highly heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to identify possible different profiles that could help understand the motivation behind offending, comparing 31 Juvenile Sexual Offenders (JSOs), 31 Juvenile Sexual Non Offenders (JSNOs) and 31 Juvenile Non Offenders (Control Group). A data collection form, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) or Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) and the Parental Bonding Inventory (PBI) were administered to all participants. The results show that JSOs differs from JNSOs in some domains, such as living in single-parent homes, while maintain some common aspects such as academic failure and previous sexual intercourse. Moreover, JNSOs showed more abnormal personality traits, such as Authority Problems, MacAndrew Alcoholism, Acknowledgement and Alcohol-Drug Problem Proneness compared to JSOs and the Control Group, while JSOs and JNSOs use a coping strategy more oriented to Avoidance and Distraction compared to the Control group. Finally, JSOs described the relationships with fathers characterized by higher care and protection than JNSOs. These findings provide additional evidence with respect the prevention and treatment of criminal sexual behavior in adolescent. PMID:26233829

  9. Ability of Substance Abusers to Escape Detection on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in a Juvenile Correctional Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, L. A. R.; Graham, John R.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of respondents to underreport successfully on substance abuse and validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A; Butcher et al., 1992) was evaluated. Incarcerated teens (67 substance abusing, 59 non-substance abusing) completed the MMPI-A twice: once under standard instructions (SI) and once…

  10. Human dermal exposure to galaxolide from personal care products.

    PubMed

    Correia, P; Cruz, A; Santos, L; Alves, A

    2013-06-01

    Musks are synthetic fragrances applied on personal care and household products as fixatives, by retarding the release of other fragrances with higher volatility. Galaxolide is the most used polycyclic musk since the 90th decade, and it has been detected in several environmental and biological matrices, particularly in human tissues and fluids. For exposure assessment purposes, large-monitoring data need to be obtained and rapid but reliable analytical techniques are requested. The main objective of this study is to develop and validate a new and fast analytical methodology to quantify galaxolide in personal care products and to apply this method to real matrices like skin care products (creams and lotions), shower products (soap bar), hair care products (shampoo and hair conditioner) and oral care products (toothpaste), to evaluate the human dermal exposure risk. A dispersive solid-phase extraction is proposed, using QuEChERS methodology, followed by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Some extraction parameters were studied, like the ratio of sample/solvent amounts, the homogenization time, the salt addition effect and the used sorbents. The validation parameters of the developed method were the following: a linearity range of 0.005-1.002 mg kg⁻¹ sample, a limit of detection of 0.001 mg kg⁻¹ sample, repeatability between 0.7% and 11.3% (variation coefficient of six standard injections), an intermediate precision of 2.5% (variation coefficient of six independent analysis of the same sample), mean recoveries ranging from 65% (soap bar) to 95% (body cream) and 3% of global uncertainty in most of the working range. The time of analysis, including the extraction steps, is 60 min, allowing a throughput of 4 samples h⁻¹ . Galaxolide was detected in all of the seven analysed products in concentrations ranging from 0.04 ± 0.01 mg kg⁻¹ sample (toothpaste) to 280.78 ± 8.19 mg kg⁻¹ sample (perfumed body cream), which may correspond to a significant estimated

  11. Substance abuse In Middle Eastern adolescents living in two different countries: spiritual, cultural, family and personal factors.

    PubMed

    Badr, Lina Kurdahi; Taha, Asma; Dee, Vivien

    2014-08-01

    It is estimated that the percentage of students using illicit substances by sixth grade has tripled over the last decade not only in developed countries but in developing countries as well probably due to the transition to a more Western society. Although much has been done to understand the mechanisms underlying substance abuse, few studies have been conducted with minority ethnic and religious groups such as Middle Eastern Youth. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether there are differences in factors contributing to substance abuse in adolescents from Lebanon versus the U.S.A. and to decipher the role of spirituality, religion, and culture among other factors that may influence substance abuse. A correlational cross-sectional design was used with adolescents living in two different countries: Los Angeles, California and Beirut, Lebanon. Muslim adolescents had significantly less rates of alcohol and substance use than Christians in both Lebanon and Los Angeles. More years lived in the U.S.A. increases the likelihood of abuse for both Muslims and Christians. Attachment to God and family was negatively associated with substance abuse. These results among others facilitate a better understanding of the influence of culture, religion, family and personal factors on substance abuse. Culturally sensitive interventions could benefit from the findings of this pilot study. PMID:23526183

  12. A personalized framework for medication treatment management in chronic care.

    PubMed

    Koutkias, Vassilis G; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Malousi, Andigoni; Giaglis, Georgios D; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2010-03-01

    The ongoing efforts toward continuity of care and the recent advances in information and communication technologies have led to a number of successful personal health systems for the management of chronic care. These systems are mostly focused on monitoring efficiently the patient's medical status at home. This paper aims at extending home care services delivery by introducing a novel framework for monitoring the patient's condition and safety with respect to the medication treatment administered. For this purpose, considering a body area network (BAN) with advanced sensors and a mobile base unit as the central communication hub from the one side, and the clinical environment from the other side, an architecture was developed, offering monitoring patterns definition for the detection of possible adverse drug events and the assessment of medication response, supported by mechanisms enabling bidirectional communication between the BAN and the clinical site. Particular emphasis was given on communication and information flow aspects that have been addressed by defining/adopting appropriate formal information structures as well as the service-oriented architecture paradigm. The proposed framework is illustrated via an application scenario concerning hypertension management. PMID:20007042

  13. Development and Initial Testing of a Measure of Person-Directed Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Diana L.; Newton-Curtis, Linda; Lyons, Karen S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to empirically test items of a new measure designed to assess person-directed care (PDC) practices in long-term care. Design and Methods: After reviewing the literature, we identified five areas related to PDC: personhood, comfort care, autonomy, knowing the person, and support for relationships. We also…

  14. 75 FR 34140 - Establishment of the Personal Care Attendants Workforce Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Establishment of the Personal Care Attendants Workforce Advisory Panel AGENCY: Community...: Notice. Authority: The Personal Care Attendants Workforce Advisory Panel is authorized under section 8002 of the Affordable Care Act, Pub. L. 111-148. The Committee is governed by provisions of Pub. L....

  15. Clinical Utility of the Cross-Cultural (Chinese) Personality Assessment Inventory (CPAI-2) in the Assessment of Substance Use Disorders among Chinese Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Fanny M.; Cheung, Shu Fai; Leung, Freedom

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the clinical utility of the Cross-Cultural (Chinese) Personality Inventory (CPAI-2) in differentiating the personality characteristics of Chinese men with substance use disorders from other psychiatric patients and normal control participants. The CPAI-2 profile of 121 Chinese men with substance use disorders was contrasted…

  16. Latent Class Analysis of Substance Use among Adolescents Presenting to Urban Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Bohnert, Kipling M.; Walton, Maureen A.; Resko, Stella; Barry, Kristen T.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Zucker, Robert A.; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Booth, Brenda M.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Polysubstance use during adolescence is a significant public health concern; however, few studies have investigated patterns of use during this developmental window within the primary care setting. Objectives This study uses an empirical method to classify adolescents into polysubstance use groups, and examines correlates of the empirically-defined groups. Methods Data come from patients, ages 12-18 years, presenting to urban, primary care community health clinics (Federally Qualified Health Centers) in two cities in the Midwestern United States (n=1664). Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify classes of substance users. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine variables associated with class membership. Results LCA identified three classes: Class 1 (64.5%) exhibited low probabilities of all types of substance use; Class 2 (24.6%) was characterized by high probabilities of cannabis use and consequences; Class 3 (10.9%) had the highest probabilities of polysubstance use, including heavy episodic drinking and misuse of prescription drugs. Those in Class 2 and Class 3 were more likely to be older, and have poorer grades, poorer health, higher levels of psychological distress, and more sexual partners than those in Class 1. Individuals in Class 3 were also less likely to be African-American than those in Class 1. Conclusion Findings provide novel insight into the patterns of polysubstance use among adolescents presenting to low-income urban primary care clinics. Future research should examine the efficacy of interventions that address the complex patterns of substance use and concomitant health concerns among adolescents. PMID:24219231

  17. Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons with Co-Occurring Disorders. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 42

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs), developed by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), part of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders. CSAT draws on the experience…

  18. Occurrence and fate of pharmaceutical and personal care products in a sewage treatment works.

    PubMed

    Reif, Rubén; Santos, Ana; Judd, Simon J; Lema, Juan M; Omil, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence and fate of eight pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) during sewage treatment has been studied in a pilot-scale treatment plant, comprising a primary settler (2.85 m(3)), an aeration tank (1.845 m(3)) and a secondary clarifier (0.5 m(3)), placed on site at a wastewater treatment works in the north west of the UK. It was fed both with raw sewage and the return liquor produced after sludge centrifugation, thus representing the most common configuration for a municipal sewage treatment plant based on the activated sludge process. Samples were taken at six different locations, including the return liquor stream, and analysed for musk fragrances and pharmaceutically active compounds belonging to various therapeutic groups such as anti-inflammatory drugs, tranquillisers and antiepileptics. Mass balances were conducted for those PPCPs that were quantifiable. The fate of the PPCPs was found to differ according to their physical-chemical characteristics. Anti-inflammatories underwent a degradation process and were almost completely removed from sewage during the biological treatment step. Musk fragrances were only partially removed, through adsorption onto the primary suspended solids and the biomass in the aerobic process, due to their strong lipophilic characteristics. The results of this study provide increasing evidence that the partial removal of these substances through the sewage treatment process contribute to the environmental occurrence of PPCPs. Consequently, existing STPs should be upgraded in order to attenuate the release of these substances into the aquatic environment. PMID:21057683

  19. Integrating Mental Health In Care For Noncommunicable Diseases: An Imperative For Person-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vikram; Chatterji, Somnath

    2015-09-01

    Mental disorders such as depression and alcohol use disorders often co-occur with other common noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. Furthermore, noncommunicable diseases are frequently encountered in patients with severe mental disorders such as schizophrenia. The pathways underlying the comorbidity of mental disorders and noncommunicable diseases are complex. For example, mental and physical noncommunicable diseases may have common environmental risk factors such as unhealthy lifestyles, and treatments for one condition may have side effects that increase the risk of another condition. Building on the robust evidence base for effective treatments for a range of mental disorders, there is now a growing evidence base for how such treatments can be integrated into the care of people with noncommunicable diseases. The best-established delivery model is a team approach that features a nonspecialist case manager who coordinates care with primary care physicians and specialists. This approach maximizes efficiencies in person-centered care, which are essential for achieving universal health coverage for both noncommunicable diseases and mental disorders. A number of research gaps remain, but there is sufficient evidence for policy makers to immediately implement measures to integrate mental health and noncommunicable disease care in primary care platforms. PMID:26355051

  20. Can Substance Use Disorders be Managed Using the Chronic Care Model? Review and Recommendations from a NIDA Consensus Group

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, A. Thomas; Starrels, Joanna L.; Tai, Betty; Gordon, Adam J.; Brown, Richard; Ghitza, Udi; Gourevitch, Marc; Stein, Jack; Oros, Marla; Horton, Terry; Lindblad, Robert; McNeely, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Brain imaging and genetic studies over the past two decades suggest that substance use disorders are best considered chronic illnesses. The passing of the Affordable Care Act in the United States has set the occasion for integrating treatment of substance use disorders into mainstream healthcare; and for using the proactive, team-oriented Chronic Care Model (CCM). This paper systematically examines and compares whether and how well the CCM could be applied to the treatment of substance use disorders, using type 2 diabetes as a comparator. The chronic illness management approach is still new in the field of addiction and research is limited. However comparative findings suggest that most proactive, team treatment-oriented clinical management practices now used in diabetes management are applicable to the substance use disorders; capable of being implemented by primary care teams; and should offer comparable potential benefits in the treatment of substance use disorders. Such care should also improve the quality of care for many illnesses now negatively affected by unaddressed substance abuse. PMID:26568649

  1. Antisocial personality disorder is associated with receipt of physical disability benefits in substance abuse treatment patients

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Shannon A.; Cherniack, Martin G.; Petry, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Opioid dependence is growing at an alarming rate in the United States, and opioid dependent patients have substantial medical, as well as psychiatric, conditions that impact their ability to work. This study evaluated the association between antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and receipt of physical disability payments in methadone maintenance patients. Methods Using data from 115 drug and alcohol abusing methadone maintained patients participating in two clinical trials, baseline characteristics of individuals receiving (n = 22) and those not receiving (n = 93) physical disability benefits were compared, and a logistic regression evaluated unique predictors of disability status. Results Both an ASPD diagnosis and severity of medical problems were significant predictors of disability receipt, ps < .05. After controlling for other variables that differed between groups, patients with ASPD were more than five times likelier to receive physical disability benefits than patients without ASPD (odds ratio = 5.66; 95% confidence interval = 1.58 – 20.28). Conclusions These results demonstrate a role of ASPD in the receipt of disability benefits in substance abusers and suggest the need for greater understanding of the reasons for high rates of physical disability benefits in this population. PMID:23394688

  2. Comorbid bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder and substance use disorder.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Walsh, Emily; Rosenstein, Lia; Zimmerman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD) are disabling and life-threatening conditions. Both disorders share relevant comorbidities, particularly the risk of having a lifetime substance use disorder (SUD). We tested the hypothesis that patients with both BD type I (BDI) or II (BDII) and BPD would have a higher rate of SUD than would patients with either disorder alone. A total of 3651 psychiatric patients were evaluated with semistructured diagnostic interviews for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, axis I and II disorders. A total of 63 patients were diagnosed with both BD and BPD, and these patients were significantly more likely to have a SUD compared with BDII patients without BPD (76% vs. 50%, χ = 9.69, p < 0.01). There were no differences when comparing the comorbid group with BPD patients without BD (76% vs. 71%, χ = 0.519, p = 0.4). The present study shows the importance of taking both BPD and BD into consideration insofar as the co-occurrence of the disorders increased the risk of having a SUD especially when compared with BDII alone. PMID:25494335

  3. Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in urban receiving waters.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J B

    2006-11-01

    The transport pathways of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCP) discharges within the urban water cycle include both combined and separate sewer systems with only the former receiving treatment. The dry-weather flow dilution patterns for selected PPCPs following discharge from a sewage treatment works (STW) to a North London stream indicate a persistent downstream increase in concentration. The dilution ratio analysis also indicates that the STW's final effluent only contributes a dilution of the endogenous concentrations already present in the river flow which reflects a progressive PPCP load with increasing urbanization; "worst-case" scenarios being probably related to wet-weather conditions. Maximum PPCP concentrations fall above the reported PEC levels and the analysis highlights the deficiencies of conventional acute toxicity for the evaluation of long-term effects of episodic urban discharges. Groundwater analysis points to sewer exfiltration which is limited in terms of PPCP impact to 25-50 cm depths. PMID:16500738

  4. Evidence of microbeads from personal care product contaminating the sea.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Pui Kwan; Fok, Lincoln

    2016-08-15

    Plastic microbeads in personal care products have been identified as a source of marine pollution. Yet, their existence in the environment is rarely reported. During two surface manta trawls in the coastal waters of Hong Kong, eleven blue, spherical microbeads were captured. Their sizes (in diameters) ranged from 0.332 to 1.015mm. These microbeads possessed similar characteristics in terms of colour, shape and size with those identified and extracted from a facial scrub available in the local market. The FT-IR spectrum of the captured microbeads also matched those from the facial scrub. It was likely that the floating microbeads at the sea surface originated from a facial scrub and they have bypassed or escaped the sewage treatment system in Hong Kong. Timely voluntary or legislative actions are required to prevent more microbeads from entering the aquatic environment. PMID:27237038

  5. Validating Female Psychopathy Subtypes: Differences in Personality, Antisocial and Violent Behavior, Substance Abuse, Trauma, and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Brian M.; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Patrick, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent empirical investigations utilizing male prisoners have begun to validate clinical conceptualizations of primary and secondary psychopathy subtypes. We extended this literature by identifying similar psychopathic subtypes in female prisoners on the basis of personality structure using model-based cluster analysis. Secondary psychopaths (n = 39) were characterized by personality traits of negative emotionality and low behavioral constraint, an early onset of antisocial and criminal behavior, greater substance use and abuse, more violent behavior and institutional misconduct, and more mental health problems including symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and suicide attempts. Primary psychopaths (n = 31) exhibited few distinguishing personality features but were prolific criminals especially in regards to non-violent crime, and exhibited relatively few mental health problems despite substantial exposure to traumatic events. The results support alternative etiological pathways to antisocial and criminal behavior that are evident in personality structure as well as gender similarities and differences in the manifestation of psychopathic personalities. PMID:20582155

  6. ORIGINS AND RAMIFICATIONS OF PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perhaps more so than with any other class of pollutants, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the personal activities of individual citizens and their environ...

  7. Ten Things Transgender Persons Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conference Newsroom Support GLMA Site Search Ten Things Transgender Persons Should discuss with Their Healthcare Care Provider ( ... have identified as most commonly of concern for transgender persons. While not all of these items apply ...

  8. Substance Use and Mental Health Problems as Predictors of HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors among Adolescents in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ronald G., Jr.; Auslander, Wendy F.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between substance use, mental health problems, and HIV sexual risk behaviors among a sample of foster care adolescents. Data were collected through structured baseline interviews with 320 adolescents (ages 15 to 18 years) who resided in foster care placements and participated in a larger evaluation study of an…

  9. PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: AN OVERVIEW - POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL ACTIONS, ACTIVITIES, AND BEHAVIORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perhaps more so than with any other class of pollutants, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the individual activities of consumers and their environment. I...

  10. Improving the care of individuals with schizophrenia and substance use disorders: consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ziedonis, Douglas M; Smelson, David; Rosenthal, Richard N; Batki, Steven L; Green, Alan I; Henry, Renata J; Montoya, Ivan; Parks, Joseph; Weiss, Roger D

    2005-09-01

    National attention continues to focus on the need to improve care for individuals with co-occurring mental illnesses and substance use disorders, as emphasized in the 2003 President's New Freedom Commission Report on Mental Health and recent publications from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). These reports document the need for best practice recommendations that can be translated into routine clinical care. Although efforts are underway to synthesize literature in this area, few focused recommendations are available that include expert opinion and evidence-based findings on the management of specific co-occurring disorders, such as schizophrenia and addiction. In response to the need for user-friendly recommendations on the treatment of schizophrenia and addiction, a consensus conference of experts from academic institutions and state mental health systems was organized to 1) frame the problem from clinical and systems-level perspectives; 2) identify effective and problematic psychosocial, pharmacological, and systems practices; and 3) develop a summary publication with recommendations for improving current practice. The results of the consensus meeting served as the foundation for this publication, which presents a broad set of recommendations for clinicians who treat individuals with schizophrenia. "Integrated treatment" is the new standard for evidence-based treatment for this population and recommendations are given to help clinicians implement such integrated treatment. Specific recommendations are provided concerning screening for substance use disorders in patients with schizophrenia, assessing motivation for change, managing medical conditions that commonly occur in patients with dual diagnoses (e.g., cardiovascular disease, liver complications, lung cancer, HIV, and hepatitis B or C infections) and selecting the most appropriate medications for such patients to maximize safety and minimize drug interactions, use of

  11. Integration of substance use disorder services with primary care: health center surveys and qualitative interviews

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Each year, nearly 20 million Americans with alcohol or illicit drug dependence do not receive treatment. The Affordable Care Act and parity laws are expected to result in increased access to treatment through integration of substance use disorder (SUD) services with primary care. However, relatively little research exists on the integration of SUD services into primary care settings. Our goal was to assess SUD service integration in California primary care settings and to identify the practice and policy facilitators and barriers encountered by providers who have attempted to integrate these services. Methods Primary survey and qualitative interview data were collected from the population of federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) in five California counties known to be engaged in SUD integration efforts was surveyed. From among the organizations that responded to the survey (78% response rate), four were purposively sampled based on their level of integration. Interviews were conducted with management, staff, and patients (n = 18) from these organizations to collect further qualitative information on the barriers and facilitators of integration. Results Compared to mental health services, there was a trend for SUD services to be less integrated with primary care, and SUD services were rated significantly less effective. The perceived difference in effectiveness appeared to be due to provider training. Policy suggestions included expanding the SUD workforce that can bill Medicaid, allowing same-day billing of two services, facilitating easier reimbursement for medications, developing the workforce, and increasing community SUD specialty care capacity. Conclusions Efforts to integrate SUD services with primary care face significant barriers, many of which arise at the policy level and are addressable. PMID:24679108

  12. Screening instruments for substance use and brief interventions targeting adolescents in primary care: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pilowsky, Daniel J; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2013-01-01

    Background A review of the literature was conducted to examine substance use screening instruments commonly used with adolescents in medical settings, their comparative usefulness, and SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment). Methods We screened two databases (Ovid MEDLINE and PsycINFO) targeting journal articles dealing with screening for alcohol and drug use in adolescence as well as adolescent SBIRT. Results Adolescents preferred paper forms and computerized questionnaires over interviews with physicians or nurses. The CRAFFT was the best studied instrument for screening for alcohol/drug use and related problems, and is the only tool with data to support its use in medical settings. Other screening instruments require more testing/evaluation in more representative samples of adolescents in primary care settings. Long term follow-up data to establish the efficacy of SBIRT in adolescence are not available. Innovative computerized approaches to screening for substance use in this population have recently been proposed. Although promising, they require further evaluation. Conclusions The CRAFFT has the most consistent data to support its use in primary care settings. The effects of SBIRT in adolescence have not been adequately evaluated. Adolescents’ opinions and preferences for SBIRT should be studied to improve their acceptance. PMID:23454877

  13. Substance Use and Partner Violence among Urban Women Seeking Emergency Care

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Louisa; El-Bassel, Nabila; Chang, Mingway; Wu, Elwin; Roy, Lolita

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests intimate partner violence (IPV) and substance misuse are co-occurring problems that disproportionately affect low income urban women seeking care in emergency departments (EDs) and represent leading causes of injuries that result in ED visits. This paper examines temporal bi-directional associations between different types of drug and alcohol use and different types of IPV in a longitudinal study of a representative sample of 241 low income, urban women receiving emergency care from an ED in the Bronx, New York. After adjusting and matching for socio-demographics and potentially confounding multi-level risk and protective covariates, women who reported using heroin in the prior six months at Wave 1 were twice as likely as non-heroin using women to indicate any physical, injurious or sexual IPV at subsequent waves and were 2.7 times more likely to indicate experiencing an injury from IPV at subsequent waves. Crack or cocaine use in the past 6 months at Wave 1 was associated with an increased likelihood of injurious IPV and severe verbal abuse at subsequent waves. Findings also suggested that sexual IPV was significantly associated with subsequent use of crack or cocaine. The multiple bidirectional associations found linking these problems underscore the need for conducting routine screening for IPV and substance misuse among women in low income, urban EDs, and for improving linkages to services that will ultimately reduce the risk of morbidity, disability, and mortality related to these co-occurring problems. PMID:22023020

  14. Ethical Issues in mHealth Research Involving Persons Living with HIV/AIDS and Substance Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Labrique, Alain B.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Westergaard, Ryan P.; Merritt, Maria W.

    2013-01-01

    We aim to raise awareness and stimulate dialogue among investigators and research ethics committees regarding ethical issues that arise specifically in the design and conduct of mHealth research involving persons living with HIV/AIDS and substance abuse. Following a brief background discussion of mHealth research in general, we offer a case example to illustrate the characteristics of mHealth research involving people living with HIV/AIDS and substance abuse. With reference to a well-established systematic general ethical framework for biomedical research with human participants, we identify a range of ethical issues that have particular salience for the protection of participants in mHealth research on HIV/AIDS and substance abuse. PMID:24171110

  15. PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: AN OVERVIEW - POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL ACTIONS, ACTIVITIES, AND BEHAVIORS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Perhaps more so than with any other class of pollutants, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the personal activities of individual citizens and their...

  16. Perceptions of health care among persons living with HIV/AIDS who are not receiving antiretroviral medications.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Graham, Jeffrey; Luke, Webster; Austin, James

    2002-05-01

    Antiretroviral medications are effective at improving the health and increasing the survival of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, studies have shown that a substantial number of HIV-infected people do not receive antiretroviral treatments. The current study examined the physical and mental health, substance use, and perceptions of medical care of 163 men and 78 women living with HIV/AIDS. Results of a confidential survey showed that 79 (33%) were not currently treated for HIV. These persons did not differ from those who were treated in chart-abstracted CD4 cell counts, years living with HIV infection, HIV-related symptoms, and HIV-related hospitalizations. Unlike past studies, gender was not found to be a factor in treatment status. However, untreated persons had higher chart-abstracted viral loads and were more likely to be ethnic minorities, have a lower level of education, greater level of depression, and greater pessimistic attitude. They were significantly more likely to have used alcohol, powder cocaine, and crack cocaine in the previous 3 months, were likely to know their own viral load and CD4 count, and held significantly more negative views of their health care and their health care providers. There were no differences between untreated and treated persons in their meeting the year 1999 antiretroviral treatment guidelines that were in effect at the time of data collection. These results suggest that persons who are not receiving antiretroviral medications may be in need of mental health and substance use interventions and may benefit from interventions designed to engage and retain them in medical treatment. PMID:12055031

  17. Personality Disorders and the Persistence of Substance Use Disorders: A Reanalysis of Published NESARC Findings

    PubMed Central

    Vergés, Alvaro; Jackson, Kristina M.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Trull, Timothy J.; Lane, Sean P.; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether published findings regarding the association of personality disorders (PDs) with the persistence of substance use disorders (SUDs) are attributable to an artifact due to time of assessment of the PD. Two previous studies analyzed data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and found that Antisocial PD, Schizotypal PD, and Borderline PD are unique predictors of SUDs. However, a design limitation in NESARC (assessment of PDs at different waves) can potentially compromise these findings. To assess the influence of time of assessment of PDs and to identify associations that might be robust to time of assessment, we compared the association of PDs with two estimates of SUD persistence that were based on different populations at risk: 1) among those who were diagnosed with SUD at baseline, the proportion who continued to meet full criteria at follow-up (“prediction”), and 2) among those who were diagnosed with SUD at follow-up, the proportion who met full criteria at baseline (“postdiction”). Differences between prediction and postdiction revealed a robust pattern of higher odds ratios for postdiction among PDs assessed at baseline, and lower odds ratios for postdiction among PDs assessed at follow-up. All published significant associations between PDs and persistence of SUDs became non-significant in the postdiction analyses, with the exception of Obsessive-Compulsive PD predicting Nicotine Dependence persistence. The present results raise serious doubts about the validity of published findings on PDs and SUD persistence from the NESARC. Design limitations in NESARC preclude a direct comparison among PDs measured at different waves. PMID:25314264

  18. Factors affecting exits from homelessness among persons with serious mental illness and substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Bromley, Elizabeth; Hellemann, Gerhard S.; Kern, Robert S.; Goldenson, Nicholas I.; Danley, Megan E.; Young, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to understand the housing trajectories of homeless consumers with serious mental illness (SMI) and co-occurring substance use disorders (SUD) and to identify factors that best-predicted achievement of independent housing. Methods Using administrative data, we identified homeless persons with SMI and SUD admitted to a residential rehabilitation program from 12/2008-11/2011. On a random sample (n=36), we assessed a range of potential predictors of housing outcomes, including symptoms, cognition, and social/community supports. We used the Residential Time-Line Follow-Back (TLFB) Inventory to gather housing histories since exiting rehabilitation and identify housing outcomes. We used recursive partitioning to identify variables that best-differentiated participants by these outcomes. Results We identified three housing trajectories: stable housing (n=14); unstable housing (n=15); and continuously engaged in housing services (n=7). Using recursive partitioning, two variables (symbol digit modalities test (SDMT), a neurocognitive speed of processing measure and Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS)-relationships subscale, which quantifies symptoms affecting relationships) were sufficient to capture information provided by 26 predictors to classify participants by housing outcome. Participants predicted to continuously engage in services had impaired processing speeds (SDMT score<32.5). Among consumers with SDMT score≥32.5, those predicted to achieve stable housing had fewer interpersonal symptoms (BASIS-relationships score<0.81) than those predicted to have unstable housing. This model explains 57% of this sample's variability and 14% of this population's variability in housing outcomes. Conclusion As cognition and symptoms influencing relationships predicted housing outcomes for homeless adults with SMI and SUD, cognitive and social skills trainings may be useful for this population. PMID:25919839

  19. Ontological Security in Nursing Homes for Older PersonsPerson-Centred Care is the Power of Balance

    PubMed Central

    James, Inger; Ardeman-Merten, Rebecka; Kihlgren, Annica

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Swedish national guidelines for elderly care describe how older persons should be able to trust that their care is permeated with security. Different theoretical perspectives can be found that describe what creates security. Many studies have been done about security. However, few studies have explicitly asked older persons what security in nursing homes means to them. Aim: The aim of the study was to describe how older persons in nursing homes talked and reflected about security in their daily lives. Method: Nine older persons were interviewed in, in-depth interviews one to three times and the resulting data was analysed using content analysis. Results: The older persons adapted to having their own needs and those of the other older persons met and to the staff routines which created a sense of security. At the same time, they longed for security in which they could trust themselves and create their own daily life. Further to have a sense of belonging and of being liked for created an internal, interpersonal and external security. This can be linked to an ontological security which means having a sense of confidence in the continuity of self-identity and order in events, a being in the world. Conclusion: Person-centred instead of institution- centred care can provide the balance of power that allows the older person to obtain ontological security in which the staff's ability to create a relationship with the older persons becomes crucial. PMID:25852785

  20. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Food and Personal Care Products

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Alex; Westerhoff, Paul; Fabricius, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide is a common additive in many food, personal care, and other consumer products used by people, which after use can enter the sewage system, and subsequently enter the environment as treated effluent discharged to surface waters or biosolids applied to agricultural land, incinerated wastes, or landfill solids. This study quantifies the amount of titanium in common food products, derives estimates of human exposure to dietary (nano-) TiO2, and discusses the impact of the nanoscale fraction of TiO2 entering the environment. The foods with the highest content of TiO2 included candies, sweets and chewing gums. Among personal care products, toothpastes and select sunscreens contained 1% to >10% titanium by weight. While some other crèmes contained titanium, despite being colored white, most shampoos, deodorants, and shaving creams contained the lowest levels of titanium (<0.01 μg/mg). For several high-consumption pharmaceuticals, the titanium content ranged from below the instrument detection limit (0.0001 μg Ti/mg) to a high of 0.014 μg Ti/mg. Electron microscopy and stability testing of food-grade TiO2 (E171) suggests that approximately 36% of the particles are less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and that it readily disperses in water as fairly stable colloids. However, filtration of water solubilized consumer products and personal care products indicated that less than 5% of the titanium was able to pass through 0.45 or 0.7 μm pores. Two white paints contained 110 μg Ti/mg while three sealants (i.e., prime coat paint) contained less titanium (25 to 40 μg Ti/mg). This research showed that while many white-colored products contained titanium, it was not a prerequisite. Although several of these product classes contained low amounts of titanium, their widespread use and disposal down the drain and eventually to WWTPs deserves attention. A Monte Carlo human exposure analysis to TiO2 through foods identified children as having the highest

  1. Neuroendocrine responses to a glucose challenge in substance users with high and low levels of aggression, impulsivity, and antisocial personality.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, D H; Dax, E; Lozovsky, D B; Jaffe, J H

    1992-01-01

    Plasma glucose concentrations, and plasma prolactin and cortisol responses to a 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 37 substance abusers, were examined to assess the relationship between varying degrees of antisocial personality, impulsivity, and aggressiveness and measures of endocrine function. Childhood and presenting aggression, impulsivity and antisocial personality features were evaluated by several self-report questionnaires. Those with high scores for psychopathic deviance (MMPI) differed in glucose levels following OGTT from those with low scores. Lower cortisol nadir levels were associated with higher scores on measures of antisocial personality and aggressiveness. Also, prolactin response to glucose was attenuated relative to baseline levels in the more antisocial and aggressive subjects. The results indicate that substance abusers with high levels of self-reported antisocial personality and aggressive behavior have altered neuroendocrine responses to glucose challenge, although there was no evidence of hypoglycemia. No one personality or behavioral trait, as measured by our test battery, more strongly predicted neuroendocrine responses to glucose administration. Thus, our data partially support other reports of altered neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges in aggressive/antisocial individuals. PMID:1625777

  2. Bacillus cereus in personal care products: risk to consumers.

    PubMed

    Pitt, T L; McClure, J; Parker, M D; Amézquita, A; McClure, P J

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is ubiquitous in nature and thus occurs naturally in a wide range of raw materials and foodstuffs. B. cereus spores are resistant to desiccation and heat and able to survive dry storage and cooking. Vegetative cells produce several toxins which on ingestion in sufficient numbers can cause vomiting and/or diarrhoea depending on the toxins produced. Gastrointestinal disease is commonly associated with reheated or inadequately cooked foods. In addition to being a rare cause of several acute infections (e.g. pneumonia and septicaemia), B. cereus can also cause localized infection of post-surgical or trauma wounds and is a rare but significant pathogen of the eye where it may result in severe endophthalmitis often leading to loss of vision. Key risk factors in such cases are trauma to the eye and retained contaminated intraocular foreign bodies. In addition, rare cases of B. cereus-associated keratitis (inflammation of the cornea) have been linked to contact lens use. Bacillus cereus is therefore a microbial contaminant that could adversely affect product safety of cosmetic and facial toiletries and pose a threat to the user if other key risk factors are also present. The infective dose in the human eye is unknown, but as few as 100 cfu has been reported to initiate infection in a susceptible animal model. However, we are not aware of any reports in the literature of B. cereus infections in any body site linked with use of personal care products. Low levels of B. cereus spores may on occasion be present in near-eye cosmetics, and these products have been used by consumers for many years. In addition, exposure to B. cereus is more likely to occur through other routes (e.g. dustborne contamination) due to its ubiquity and resistance properties of spores. The organism has been recovered from the eyes of healthy individuals. Therefore, although there may be a perceived hazard, the risk of severe eye infections as a consequence of exposure through

  3. Using Personal Narratives for Curriculum Development about Substance Abuse and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bial, Martha C.; Gutheil, Irene A.; Hanson, Meredith; White-Ryan, Linda

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a project to sensitize graduate social work students taking courses in substance abuse to the needs of older adults. Graduate social work students at a major urban school of social work in the Northeast were recruited and trained to interview older adults with a history of substance abuse problems regarding their life…

  4. A model of integrated primary care for HIV-positive patients with underlying substance use and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Zaller, N; Gillani, F S; Rich, J D

    2007-10-01

    There is a high burden of underlying substance use and mental illness in HIV-infected populations. HIV-care settings provide an important opportunity to assess substance and mental health needs among HIV-positive patients and to provide or make referrals for appropriate treatment services. In 2003, with funding from the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), we developed a model of integrated substance-use counselling and referral for treatment within a primary care HIV-care setting at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. The project uses a multidisciplinary approach to provide linkage to treatment services for substance use and mental illness as well as to help participants with social service needs, such as housing and medical coverage, to ensure continuity of care and optimal HIV treatment adherence. Twelve percent of the 965 HIV-infected patients in care at our center have been enrolled in the project. Of these, all have a current substance-use disorder and 79.3% have been diagnosed with a mental illness. In addition, most participants are hepatitis C-positive (HCV) (65.5%). The majority of participants are on antiretroviral therapy (76.7%). Participants have been referred for the following treatment modalities: intensive outpatient services, methadone, buprenorphine, outpatient services and residential as well as individual and group counselling. Our model has been successful in assessing the substance-use and mental health needs of HIV-infected individuals with numerous co-morbidities and referring them for ancillary medical and social services. PMID:18058396

  5. Rethinking Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Care: The Importance of Integrated Interventions for Suicidal Youth With Substance Use Problems

    PubMed Central

    McManama O'Brien, Kimberly H.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents psychiatrically hospitalized following a suicide attempt are at high risk for a repeat attempt or suicide completion, and substance use is consistently implicated as a risk factor for continued suicidal behavior in adolescents. Despite this knowledge, there have been few studies that have investigated the effectiveness of combined suicidality and substance use interventions within acute psychiatric care settings for suicidal youth with substance use problems. While social workers are well-positioned to deliver such interventions, greater emphasis on teaching integrated therapeutic techniques in social work curriculum and professional training is needed to ensure their implementation. PMID:26674510

  6. Psychiatric Rehospitalization: Development of a Person-Level Indicator for Care Planning and Quality Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Hirdes, John P.; Vigod, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Rehospitalization affects quality of life and health system efficiency. Although this outcome is a common quality indicator, there are few applications for linking evaluation to risk mitigation at the person level. This study examined risk factors for rehospitalization to develop an application for supporting care planning based on the interRAI Mental Health (MH), a commonly available assessment system. Method: A retrospective analysis was performed of 53,538 psychiatric inpatients assessed with the interRAI MH in Ontario, Canada, between January 2010 and May 2014. The interRAI MH is a clinical system for assessing demographic variables, service utilization, functional status, and clinical needs. Logistic regression models and survival analysis were used to develop the Rehospitalization Clinical Assessment Protocol by predicting 90-day rehospitalization to any inpatient mental health bed. Results: Variables found to significantly predict rehospitalization included 6 or more lifetime hospitalizations (odds ratio [OR] = 1.40), positive symptoms of psychosis (OR = 1.23), a secondary substance use disorder (OR = 1.13), and being at risk of harm to self (OR = 1.11). Using these variables, the Rehospitalization Clinical Assessment Protocol was derived whereby those at level 2 (highest) were 74% more likely to be rehospitalized within 90 days than those at level 0. By 1-year postdischarge, 30% at level 2 and 18% at level 0 were rehospitalized. Conclusions: The Rehospitalization Clinical Assessment Protocol is an application supporting care planning for targeting risk of rehospitalization whenever a person is assessed with the interRAI MH. Further exploration is needed to understand how the use of this Clinical Assessment Protocol, service processes, and health system structures further mediate or moderate psychiatric rehospitalization risk. PMID:26693047

  7. Impact of hair-care products on FAEE hair concentrations in substance abuse monitoring.

    PubMed

    Gareri, Joey; Appenzeller, Brice; Walasek, Paula; Koren, Gideon

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the use of high-ethanol-content (>65%) hair-care products may elevate fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) concentrations in hair. In this case series, nine individuals were identified by FAEE analysis to be chronic alcohol abusers in the context of child-welfare substance abuse monitoring. Based on patient claims of moderate or no alcohol consumption, the presence of ethanol in the patients' hair-care regimens was investigated. Samples were additionally tested for the presence of ethyl glucuronide (EtG). From a total of nine patients, 12 hair samples were submitted for analysis. Patient histories were obtained as well as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) listing hair-care product ethanol content. Hair samples were pre-washed to remove external contamination and analyzed for FAEE and EtG by GC-MS. According to the Society of Hair Testing consensus guidelines, FAEE levels exceeding 0.50 ng/mg and/or EtG levels exceeding 30 pg/mg indicate chronic excessive alcohol consumption. Upon initial analysis, the nine samples exhibited positive FAEE findings ranging from 0.496 to 4.984 ng/mg. MSDS review revealed the presence of ethanol from 10% to 95% by volume in at least one hair-care product used by each individual. Results of the EtG analysis ranged from 1.9 to 23.5 pg/mg. These findings indicate that regular use of products with ethanol content as low as 10% can impact FAEE results. EtG analysis should be used to confirm FAEE findings and appears to be unaffected by hair-care products, likely due to alternative mechanisms of incorporation. PMID:21301822

  8. Evaluation of the Person-Centered Care Essentials Program: Importance of Trainers in Achieving Targeted Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Scott P.; O'Brien, Catherine J.; Edelman, Perry; Fazio, Sam

    2011-01-01

    A person-centered care (PCC) training program was developed and disseminated to 84 institutes for retired religious persons across the United States. The program was delivered via a train-the-trainer model wherein institute trainers attended a 2-day training conference, then taught the material to direct care workers (DCWs) at their respective…

  9. Adaptive leadership and person-centered care: a new approach to solving problems.

    PubMed

    Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    Successfully transitioning to person-centered care in nursing homes requires a new approach to solving care issues. The adaptive leadership framework suggests that expert providers must support frontline caregivers in their efforts to develop high-quality, person-centered solutions. PMID:25237881

  10. The Role and Timing of Palliative Care in Supporting Persons with Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Mary; McCallion, Philip; Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; Connaire, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To better describe the role and timing of palliative care in supporting persons with intellectual disabilities and advanced dementia (AD). Background: Specialist palliative care providers have focused mostly on people with cancers. Working with persons with intellectual disabilities and AD offers opportunities to expand such palliative care…

  11. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Pamela Y.; Musisi, Seggane; Frehywot, Seble; Patel, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers who have access to evidence-based interventions, whose roles, and the associated tasks, are articulated and clearly delineated, and who are equipped to master and maintain the competencies associated with providing MNS disorder care. In 2012, the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a meeting of key stakeholders in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss a set of candidate core competencies for the delivery of mental health and neurological care, focusing specifically on depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders. This article discusses the candidate core competencies for non-specialist health workers and the complexities of implementing core competencies in low- and middle-income country settings. Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has the potential to implement novel training initiatives through university networks and through structured processes that engage ministries of health. Finally, we outline challenges associated with implementing competencies in order to sustain a workforce capable of delivering quality services for people with MNS disorders. PMID:25783229

  12. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Collins, Pamela Y; Musisi, Seggane; Frehywot, Seble; Patel, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers who have access to evidence-based interventions, whose roles, and the associated tasks, are articulated and clearly delineated, and who are equipped to master and maintain the competencies associated with providing MNS disorder care. In 2012, the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a meeting of key stakeholders in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss a set of candidate core competencies for the delivery of mental health and neurological care, focusing specifically on depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders. This article discusses the candidate core competencies for non-specialist health workers and the complexities of implementing core competencies in low- and middle-income country settings. Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has the potential to implement novel training initiatives through university networks and through structured processes that engage ministries of health. Finally, we outline challenges associated with implementing competencies in order to sustain a workforce capable of delivering quality services for people with MNS disorders. PMID:25783229

  13. Root Uptake of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Product Ingredients.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth L; Nason, Sara L; Karthikeyan, K G; Pedersen, Joel A

    2016-01-19

    Crops irrigated with reclaimed wastewater or grown in biosolids-amended soils may take up pharmaceuticals and personal care product ingredients (PPCPs) through their roots. The uptake pathways followed by PPCPs and the propensity for these compounds to bioaccumulate in food crops are still not well understood. In this critical review, we discuss processes expected to influence root uptake of PPCPs, evaluate current literature on uptake of PPCPs, assess models for predicting plant uptake of these compounds, and provide recommendations for future research, highlighting processes warranting study that hold promise for improving mechanistic understanding of plant uptake of PPCPs. We find that many processes that are expected to influence PPCP uptake and accumulation have received little study, particularly rhizosphere interactions, in planta transformations, and physicochemical properties beyond lipophilicity (as measured by Kow). Data gaps and discrepancies in methodology and reporting have so far hindered development of models that accurately predict plant uptake of PPCPs. Topics warranting investigation in future research include the influence of rhizosphere processes on uptake, determining mechanisms of uptake and accumulation, in planta transformations, the effects of PPCPs on plants, and the development of predictive models. PMID:26619126

  14. Effect of Alzheimer's training on multicultural personal care aides.

    PubMed

    Fenley, Robin C; Bober, Sarah J; Powell, Mebane E; Berman, Jacquelin; Altman, Barbara N

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the first 2 years of an ongoing project that examined the efficacy of a 10-hour dementia training provided to entry-level personal care aide (PCA) trainees from the Hispanic, White, African American, and Asian communities in New York City. Participants were enrolled in a 90-hour PCA training program offered by the New York City Department for the Aging and were either recipients of public assistance, displaced employees from September 11, or recent immigrants to the United States from China. Classes were conducted in Spanish, English, and Mandarin/ Cantonese. An 11-item Knowledge of Alzheimer's Disease instrument was developed for the purposes of this project and administered before and after the dementia training and at 3 months following graduation. All groups, regardless of language, showed a significant increase in knowledge of Alzheimer's disease at the conclusion of the training and retention of this knowledge at 3 months follow-up. Age was strongly correlated with an increase in knowledge, while gender and education were not. PMID:18402152

  15. Sorption of pharmaceuticals and personal care products to polyethylene debris.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenxi; Zhang, Kai; Huang, Xiaolong; Liu, Jiantong

    2016-05-01

    Presence of plastic debris in marine and freshwater ecosystems is increasingly reported. Previous research suggested plastic debris had a strong affiliation for many pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and heavy metals. In this study, the sorption behavior of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), including carbamazepine (CBZ), 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC), triclosan (TCS), and 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2), to polyethylene (PE) debris (250 to 280 μm) was investigated. The estimated linear sorption coefficients (K d) are 191.4, 311.5, 5140, and 53,225 L/kg for CBZ, EE2, TCS, and 4MBC, and are related to their hydrophobicities. Increase of salinity from 0.05 to 3.5 % did not affect the sorption of 4MBC, CBZ, and EE2 but enhanced the sorption of TCS, likely due to the salting-out effect. Increase of dissolved organic matter (DOM) content using Aldrich humic acid (HA) as a proxy reduced the sorption of 4MBC, EE2, and TCS, all of which show a relatively strong affiliation to HA. Results from this work suggest that microplastics may play an important role in the fate and transport of PPCPs, especially for those hydrophobic ones. PMID:26810664

  16. Emergency access authorization for personally controlled online health care data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingting; Zhong, Sheng

    2012-02-01

    Personally controlled health records (PCHR) systems have emerged to allow patients to control their own medical data. In a PCHR system, all the access privileges to a patient's data are granted by the patient. However, in many emergency cases, it is impossible for the patient to participate in access authorization on site when immediate medical treatment is needed. To solve the emergency access authorization problem in the absence of patients, we consider two cases: a) the requester is already in the PCHR system but has not obtained the access privilege of the patient's health records, and b) the requester does not even have an account in the PCHR system to submit its request. For each of the two cases, we present a method for emergency access authorization, utilizing the weighted voting and source authentication cryptographic techniques. Our methods provide an effective, secure and private solution for emergency access authorization, that makes the existing PCHR system frameworks more practical and thus improves the patients' experiences of health care when using PCHR systems. We have implemented a prototype system as a proof of concept. PMID:20703719

  17. Person-Centredness and Fundamentals of Care - Dancing with Beauty Rather than Fighting Ugliness.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    The fundamentals of care have re-emerged as an important consideration in nursing following a period when these role elements were predominantly "delegated tasks" delivered by other (usually unregistered/unregulated) members of the health and social care team. Contemporary critiques of nursing highlight the technical focus of nursing at the expense of its caring function. Person-centred nursing theory offers a way of reinstating the value of fundamental care as a core part of providing holistic nursing to persons as well as highlighting the importance of the nursing role in coordinating healthcare services in ways that are consistent with a person's beliefs and values. This paper argues that a focus on person-centredness enables the core function of nurses as providers and coordinators of holistic person-centred fundamental care to be revalued. It highlights the importance of nurses being clear about "what matters" in caring practices and suggests that nurses adopting a person-centred approach can achieve effective care coordination through the lens of the fundamentals of care. In reading this paper, a greater understanding of person-centredness in the context of the fundamentals of care can be achieved. PMID:27309638

  18. Co-occurrence of Substance Use and Eating Disorders: An Approach to the Adolescent Patient in the Context of Family Centered Care. A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kanbur, Nuray; Harrison, Abigail

    2016-06-01

    In this review article, the co-occurrence of substance use and eating disorders will be discussed with a specific emphasis on the approach to the adolescent patient in the context of family centered care. The evidence to date suggests that the associations between eating and substance use disorders are multifactorial. Balancing between confidential health care for substance use and family centered health care for eating disorders is a real challenge in the management of adolescent patients with co-occurring eating and substance use disorders. Reconciling confidential health care with parental involvement should be considered with individually determined limits of confidentiality. PMID:27096462

  19. Improving quality of care in substance abuse treatment using five key process improvement principles

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kim A.; Green, Carla A.; Ford, James H.; Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Gustafson, David H.; McCarty, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Process and quality improvement techniques have been successfully applied in health care arenas, but efforts to institute these strategies in alcohol and drug treatment are underdeveloped. The Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) teaches participating substance abuse treatment agencies to use process improvement strategies to increase client access to, and retention in, treatment. NIATx recommends five principles to promote organizational change: 1) Understand and involve the customer; 2) Fix key problems; 3) Pick a powerful change leader; 4) Get ideas from outside the organization; and 5) Use rapid-cycle testing. Using case studies, supplemented with cross-agency analyses of interview data, this paper profiles participating NIATx treatment agencies that illustrate application of each principle. Results suggest that the most successful organizations integrate and apply most, if not all, of the five principles as they develop and test change strategies. PMID:22282129

  20. Management of persons with co-occurring severe mental illness and substance use disorder: program implications

    PubMed Central

    DRAKE, ROBERT E; MUESER, KIM T; BRUNETTE, MARY F

    2007-01-01

    Adults with severe mental illness have extraordinarily high rates of co-occurring substance use disorders, typically around 50% or more, which adversely affect their current adjustment, course, and outcome. Separate and parallel mental health and substance abuse treatment systems do not offer interventions that are accessible, integrated, and tailored for the presence of co-occurrence. Recent integrated interventions for this population have the specific goal of ameliorating substance use disorder and the general goal of improving adjustment and quality of life. The authors overview the current research and offer guidelines related to mission and philosophy, leadership, comprehensive reorganization, training, specific programs, and quality improvement. PMID:18188429

  1. Ecological Caring: A Developmental Perspective on the Person/Environment Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Abigail S.

    Ecology is the relationship between persons and their environment. A caring ecological relationship is dynamic, able to be affected by the internal environment of the person and by the people/animal/plant/object external environmental surround in which a person lives. This paper attempts to examine the nature of ecology and how to facilitate the…

  2. A randomized trial of Assertive Continuing Care and Contingency Management for adolescents with substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Godley, Mark D.; Godley, Susan H.; Dennis, Michael L.; Funk, Rodney R.; Passetti, Lora L.; Petry, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Most adolescents relapse within 90 days of discharge from residential substance use treatment. We hypothesized that Contingency Management (CM), Assertive Continuing Care (ACC), and their combination (CM+ACC) would each be more effective than Usual Continuing Care (UCC). Method 337 adolescents were randomized to 4 continuing care conditions following residential treatment: UCC alone, CM, ACC, or CM+ACC. UCC was available across all conditions. Outcome measures over 12 months included percentage of days abstinent from alcohol, heavy alcohol, marijuana, and any alcohol or other drugs (AOD) using self-reports and toxicology testing and remission status at 12 months. Results CM had significantly higher rates of abstinence than UCC for heavy alcohol use (t(297)= 2.50, p<.01, d = 0.34), any alcohol use (t(297)= 2.58, p<.01, d = 0.36), any AOD use (t(297)= 2.12, p=.01, d = 0.41), and had a higher rate in remission (Odds Ratio [OR]=2.45 [90% CI: 1.18 to 5.08], p=.02). ACC had significantly higher rates of abstinence than UCC from heavy alcohol use (t(297)= 2.66, p<.01, d = 0.31), any alcohol use (t(297)= 2.63, p<.01, d = 0.30), any marijuana use (t(297)= 1.95, p=.02, d = 0.28), any AOD use (t(297)= 1.88, p=.02, d = 0.30), and had higher rates in remission (OR=2.31 [90% CI: 1.10 to 4.85], p=.03). The ACC+CM condition was not significantly different from UCC on any outcomes. Conclusions CM and ACC are promising continuing care approaches after residential treatment. Future research should seek to further improve their effectiveness. PMID:24294838

  3. Deliberate self-harm in substance-dependent patients and relationship with alexithymia and personality disorders: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Verrocchio, M C; Conti, C; Fulcheri, M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study Is to evaluate differences in the prevalence of deliberate self-harm (DSH), alexithymia, and clinical personality patterns and syndromes between treatment-seeking substance-dependents and a comparison group, and to investigate the relationship of DSH with alexithymia, and personality disorders. One hundred and fifty-four subjects participated in the study (77 substance-dependent inpatients and 77 comparison group). DSM-IV diagnoses of substance dependence were made by the clinicians of the Addiction Services following assessment that included clinical observation. Participants were evaluated by the Deliberate Self Harm Inventory, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, and Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory. An Identifying Information Form was used to collect demographic information (e.g. age, educational history, marital status, and employment status). Only to the clinical sample information was added on: types of substance used, age at first substance use, age at regular substance use, and previous treatment attempts. Significant group differences were found for all measures (DSH, TAS-20, MCMI-III). Among substance-dependent patients there was a significant difference between groups with and without DSH in terms of previous treatment attempts, Hypomania and Borderline personality disorder. DSH were significantly correlated with difficulty in identifying feelings in all cases in both the comparison group and in the personality disorders group, and with difficulty describing feelings in the personality disorders group. Personality disorder and drug dependency were predictors for DSH. This study suggests that treatment of substance-dependents should involve screening for deliberate self-harm behavior, difficulty identifying and describing feelings, and personality disorders. Probably, when these problems are detected, specific psychological intervention should be integrated to usual treatment for substance-dependent patients. PMID:21122286

  4. Effects of person-centered care on residents and staff in aged-care facilities: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Brownie, Sonya; Nancarrow, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Background Several residential aged-care facilities have replaced the institutional model of care to one that accepts person-centered care as the guiding standard of practice. This culture change is impacting the provision of aged-care services around the world. This systematic review evaluates the evidence for an impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and nursing staff. Methods We searched Medline, Cinahl, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Proquest, and Expanded Academic ASAP databases for studies published between January 1995 and October 2012, using subject headings and free-text search terms (in UK and US English spelling) including person-centered care, patient-centered care, resident-oriented care, Eden Alternative, Green House model, Wellspring model, long-term care, and nursing homes. Results The search identified 323 potentially relevant articles. Once duplicates were removed, 146 were screened for inclusion in this review; 21 were assessed for methodological quality, resulting in nine articles (seven studies) that met our inclusion criteria. There was only one randomized, controlled trial. The majority of studies were quasi-experimental pre-post test designs, with a control group (n = 4). The studies in this review incorporated a range of different outcome measures (ie, dependent variables) to evaluate the impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and staff. One person-centered intervention, ie, the Eden Alternative, was associated with significant improvements in residents’ levels of boredom and helplessness. In contrast, facility-specific person-centered interventions were found to impact nurses’ sense of job satisfaction and their capacity to meet the individual needs of residents in a positive way. Two studies found that person-centered care was actually associated with an increased risk of falls. The findings from this review need to be interpreted cautiously due to limitations in study designs and the

  5. Aggregate dermal exposure to cyclic siloxanes in personal care products: implications for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Biesterbos, Jacqueline W H; Beckmann, Gwendolyn; van Wel, Luuk; Anzion, Rob B M; von Goetz, Natalie; Dudzina, Tatsiana; Roeleveld, Nel; Ragas, Ad M J; Russel, Frans G M; Scheepers, Paul T J

    2015-01-01

    Consumers who use personal care products (PCPs) are internally exposed to some of the organic components present of which some may be detected in exhaled air when eliminated. The aim of this study was the quantitative determination of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) in end-exhaled air to study dermal absorption of substances in PCPs. We exposed the forearm of fifteen healthy volunteers for 60min to pure D4 or D5 and to commercial products containing D4 and D5. Inhalation uptake was kept to a minimum by keeping the forearm in a flow cabinet during dermal exposure and supplying filtered air to the breathing zone of the volunteer during the post-exposure period. End-exhaled air was collected using a breath sampler (Bio-VOC), transferred to carbograph multi-bed adsorbent tubes and analyzed by thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). In the end-exhaled air of non-exposed volunteers background concentrations of D4 (0.8-3.5ng/L) and D5 (0.8-4.0ng/L) were observed. After exposing the volunteers, the level of D4 and D5 in end-exhaled air did not or barely exceed background concentrations. At t=90min, a sharp increase of the D4/D5 concentration in end-exhaled air was observed, which we attributed to the inhalation of the substances during a toilet visit without using inhalation protection devices. When this visit was taken out of the protocol, the sharp increase disappeared. Overall, the results of our study indicate that dermal absorption of D4 and D5 contributes only marginally to internal exposure following dermal applications. As in our study inhalation is the primary route of entry for these compounds, we conclude that its risk assessment should focus on this particular exposure route. PMID:25454240

  6. Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions in Persons with an Intellectual Disability--Development of a Consensus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balogh, Robert S.; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Brownell, Marni; Colantonio, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that the primary care provided for persons with an intellectual disability living in the community has been inadequate. Hospitalization rates for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) conditions are considered an indicator for access to, and quality of, primary care. The objective of this research was to identify ACS…

  7. Person-Centered Care and the Workforce Crisis: A Statewide Professional Development Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coogle, Constance L.; Head, Colleen A.; Parham, Iris A.; Zeman, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    The care of individuals with dementia requires knowledge and competencies across a wide range of physical and psychosocial aspects of the disease. Yet the quality of care for persons with dementia suffers from staff shortages and inadequate training about the treatment and optimal care strategies for individuals with Alzheimer's disease. Attention…

  8. Implementation of Adolescent Family-Based Substance Use Prevention Programmes in Health Care Settings: Comparisons across Conditions and Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aalborg, Annette E.; Miller, Brenda A.; Husson, Gail; Byrnes, Hilary F.; Bauman, Karl E.; Spoth, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine factors that influence the effectiveness and quality of implementation of evidence-based family-focused adolescent substance use prevention programmes delivered in health care settings and to assess the effects of programme choice versus programme assignment on programme delivery. Design: Strengthening Families Program: For…

  9. Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: What Are the Big Questions?

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Murray A.; Brooks, Bryan W.; Caldwell, Daniel J.; Choi, Kyungho; Hickmann, Silke; Innes, Elizabeth; Ostapyk, Kim; Staveley, Jane P.; Verslycke, Tim; Ankley, Gerald T.; Beazley, Karen F.; Belanger, Scott E.; Berninger, Jason P.; Carriquiriborde, Pedro; Coors, Anja; DeLeo, Paul C.; Dyer, Scott D.; Ericson, Jon F.; Gagné, François; Giesy, John P.; Gouin, Todd; Hallstrom, Lars; Karlsson, Maja V.; Larsson, D. G. Joakim; Lazorchak, James M.; Mastrocco, Frank; McLaughlin, Alison; McMaster, Mark E.; Meyerhoff, Roger D.; Moore, Roberta; Parrott, Joanne L.; Snape, Jason R.; Murray-Smith, Richard; Servos, Mark R.; Sibley, Paul K.; Straub, Jürg Oliver; Szabo, Nora D.; Topp, Edward; Tetreault, Gerald R.; Trudeau, Vance L.; Van Der Kraak, Glen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Over the past 10–15 years, a substantial amount of work has been done by the scientific, regulatory, and business communities to elucidate the effects and risks of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment. Objective: This review was undertaken to identify key outstanding issues regarding the effects of PPCPs on human and ecological health in order to ensure that future resources will be focused on the most important areas. Data sources: To better understand and manage the risks of PPCPs in the environment, we used the “key question” approach to identify the principle issues that need to be addressed. Initially, questions were solicited from academic, government, and business communities around the world. A list of 101 questions was then discussed at an international expert workshop, and a top-20 list was developed. Following the workshop, workshop attendees ranked the 20 questions by importance. Data synthesis: The top 20 priority questions fell into seven categories: a) prioritization of substances for assessment, b) pathways of exposure, c) bioavailability and uptake, d) effects characterization, e) risk and relative risk, f ) antibiotic resistance, and g) risk management. Conclusions: A large body of information is now available on PPCPs in the environment. This exercise prioritized the most critical questions to aid in development of future research programs on the topic. PMID:22647657

  10. Nanotechnologies for Removal of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products from Water and Wastewater. A Review.

    PubMed

    Cincinelli, Alessandra; Martellini, Tania; Coppini, Ester; Fibbi, Donatella; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of pharmaceuticals and other hazardous substances in surface waters and drinking water and the long-term exposure may represent a potential risk for both the environment and human health. Many studies have evidenced that conventional technologies used for wastewater treatment do not completely remove pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) residues, which can be detected in receiving waters at concentrations ranging from few ng L(-1) until more than μg L(-1). Nanomaterials are of fundamental importance in the current research efforts to develop more efficient water treatment and remediation systems in place of conventional technologies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most relevant works available in literature reporting the use of nanosorbents (nanotubes and zeolites), nanofiltration (NF) and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for the removal of PPCPs compounds from water and wastewater. The literature review of laboratory- and pilot-scale studies have shown that nanomaterials are promising tools in environmental cleaning processes and water purification, even if more researches are necessary. PMID:26504950

  11. Aggregate exposure approaches for parabens in personal care products: a case assessment for children between 0 and 3 years old.

    PubMed

    Gosens, Ilse; Delmaar, Christiaan J E; Ter Burg, Wouter; de Heer, Cees; Schuur, A Gerlienke

    2014-01-01

    In the risk assessment of chemical substances, aggregation of exposure to a substance from different sources via different pathways is not common practice. Focusing the exposure assessment on a substance from a single source can lead to a significant underestimation of the risk. To gain more insight on how to perform an aggregate exposure assessment, we applied a deterministic (tier 1) and a person-oriented probabilistic approach (tier 2) for exposure to the four most common parabens through personal care products in children between 0 and 3 years old. Following a deterministic approach, a worst-case exposure estimate is calculated for methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butylparaben. As an illustration for risk assessment, Margins of Exposure (MoE) are calculated. These are 991 and 4966 for methyl- and ethylparaben, and 8 and 10 for propyl- and butylparaben, respectively. In tier 2, more detailed information on product use has been obtained from a small survey on product use of consumers. A probabilistic exposure assessment is performed to estimate the variability and uncertainty of exposure in a population. Results show that the internal exposure for each paraben is below the level determined in tier 1. However, for propyl- and butylparaben, the percentile of the population with an exposure probability above the assumed "safe" MoE of 100, is 13% and 7%, respectively. In conclusion, a tier 1 approach can be performed using simple equations and default point estimates, and serves as a starting point for exposure and risk assessment. If refinement is warranted, the more data demanding person-oriented probabilistic approach should be used. This probabilistic approach results in a more realistic exposure estimate, including the uncertainty, and allows determining the main drivers of exposure. Furthermore, it allows to estimate the percentage of the population for which the exposure is likely to be above a specific value. PMID:23801276

  12. Structured Decision-Making: Using Personalized Medicine to Improve the Value of Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Bradford R.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer care is often inconsistently delivered with inadequate incorporation of patient values and objective evidence into decision-making. Utilization of time limited trials of care with predefined decision points that are based on iteratively updated best evidence, tools that inform providers about a patient’s experience and values, and known information about a patient’s disease will allow superior matched care to be delivered. Personalized medicine does not merely refer to the incorporation of genetic information into clinical care, it involves utilization of the wide array of data points relevant to care, many of which are readily available at the bedside today. By pushing uptake of personalized matching available today, clinicians can better address the triple aim of improved health, lowers costs, and enhanced patient experience, and we can prepare the health care landscape for the iterative inclusion of progressively more sophisticated information as newer tests and information become available to support the personalized medicine paradigm. PMID:25562407

  13. An integrated framework of personalized medicine: from individual genomes to participatory health care.

    PubMed

    Evers, Andrea W M; Rovers, Maroeska M; Kremer, Jan A M; Veltman, Joris A; Schalken, Jack A; Bloem, Bas R; van Gool, Alain J

    2012-08-01

    Promising research developments in both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics and participatory health care approaches, have generated widespread interest in personalized medicine among almost all scientific areas and clinicians. The term personalized medicine is, however, frequently used without defining a clear theoretical and methodological background. In addition, to date most personalized medicine approaches still lack convincing empirical evidence regarding their contribution and advantages in comparison to traditional models. Here, we propose that personalized medicine can only fulfill the promise of optimizing our health care system by an interdisciplinary and translational view that extends beyond traditional diagnostic and classification systems. PMID:22911520

  14. Your Health: Prevention, Safety and First Aid, Personal Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Gloria; Torre, Liz

    Information and accompanying exercises are provided in this learning module to reinforce students' basic reading and writing skills and, at the same time, increase their awareness of and motivation toward sound personal health practices. Written at an elementary level, the module considers eleven personal health topics: prevention of illness;…

  15. Teaching with Care: Cultivating Personal Qualities That Make a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandel, Lenore, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    In today's standards-focused environment, a real key to student achievement is often overlooked: teachers' personal qualities. In this collection, respected educators give their views on what it takes to be an outstanding teacher. The essays speak on a personal level, providing novice and experienced teachers with guidance about what it takes to…

  16. How personalized medical data could improve health care.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Niklas; Grinberg, Alice; Okkels, Niels

    2014-10-01

    We present a redesign of medical test results by placing the information of blood samples in the context of the patient's personal clinical data. We predict that implementing personalized data in the treatment of patients will promote engagement in the treatment, motivate patients to take responsibility and lead to greater satisfaction with the patient-doctor relationship. PMID:25117520

  17. A brief patient self-administered substance use screening tool for primary care: two-site validation study of the Substance Use Brief Screen (SUBS)

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, Jennifer; Strauss, Shiela M; Saitz, Richard; Cleland, Charles M; Palamar, Joseph J; Rotrosen, John; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2015-01-01

    Background Substance use screening is widely encouraged in healthcare settings, but the lack of a screening approach that fits easily into clinical workflows has restricted its broad implementation. The Substance Use Brief Screen (SUBS) was developed as a brief, self-administered instrument to identify unhealthy use of tobacco, alcohol, illicit drugs, and prescription drugs. We evaluated the validity and test-retest reliability of the SUBS in adult primary care patients. Methods Adults age 18-65 were enrolled from urban safety net primary care clinics to self-administer the SUBS using touch-screen tablet computers for a test-retest reliability study (n=54) and a two-site validation study (n=586). In the test-retest reliability study, the SUBS was administered twice within a 2-week period. In the validation study, the SUBS was compared to reference standard measures, including self-reported measures and saliva drug tests. We measured test-retest reliability and diagnostic accuracy of the SUBS for detection of unhealthy use and substance use disorder for tobacco, alcohol, and drugs (illicit and prescription drug misuse). Results Test-retest reliability was good or excellent for each substance class. For detection of unhealthy use, the SUBS had sensitivity and specificity of 97.8% (95% CI 93.7 to 99.5) and 95.7% (95% CI 92.4 to 97.8), respectively, for tobacco; and 85.2% (95% CI 79.3 to 89.9) and 77.0% (95% CI 72.6 to 81.1) for alcohol. For unhealthy use of illicit or prescription drugs, sensitivity was 82.5% (95% CI 75.7 to 88.0) and specificity 91.1% (95% CI 87.9 to 93.6). With respect to identifying a substance use disorder, the SUBS had sensitivity and specificity of 100.0% (95% CI 92.7 to 100.0) and 72.1% (95% CI 67.1 to 76.8) for tobacco; 93.5% (95% CI 85.5 to 97.9) and 64.6% (95% CI 60.2 to 68.7) for alcohol; and 85.7% (95% CI 77.2 to 92.0) and 82.0% (95% CI 78.2 to 85.3) for drugs. Analyses of area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) indicated good

  18. DSM-IV schizotypal personality disorder: a taxometric analysis among individuals with and without substance use disorders in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Kerridge, Bradley T.; Saha, Tulshi D.; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the underlying structure of DSM-IV schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) among individuals with and without a substance use disorder. Using a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults, taxometric analyses were conducted on SPD in the total sample and among individuals with and without a substance use disorder. The structure of SPD in the total sample and among individuals without substance use disorders was dimensional (comparison curve fit indices (CCFI): 0.440, 0.365) whereas a taxonic structure was demonstrated among individuals with a substance use disorder (CCFI: 0.679). Taxonicity underlying schizotypy and SPD in prior taxometric research may have been the result of sampling high risk subsamples of the population. Taxometric research on SPD and other personality psychopathology among high risk subgroups of the population can help elucidate the complex etiology of SPD and the role played by comorbid substance use disorders in the expressivity of these disorders. PMID:26322122

  19. Controlled Substance-Related Beliefs and Use: Relationships to Undergraduates' Creative Personality Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plucker, Jonathan A.; McNeely, Andrea; Morgan, Carla

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between creativity and various mind-altering substances--especially alcohol--has been a popular topic among creativity researchers and the public at large. Yet experimental studies have found little evidence that alcohol use has a causal influence on creativity, with most studies of creative production showing negative or neutral…

  20. Substance Use and Personal Adjustment among Disadvantaged Teenagers: A Six-Month Prospective Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luthar, Suniya S.; Cushing, Gretta

    1997-01-01

    Associations between substance abuse and emotional and behavioral adjustment were examined in a two-wave longitudinal design for 138 inner-city ninth graders. Drug use showed associations in expected directions with all indices of adjustment except for peer-related sociability. Implications for interventions are discussed. (SLD)

  1. Unmet health care needs for persons with environmental sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Pamela Reed; Kovach, Shannon; Lupfer, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Studies of unmet health care needs have shown that women, people with poor health, and people with lower socioeconomic status are more likely to report having unmet health care needs. In this study, we examined the types of and reasons for unmet health care needs in 465 people with environmental sensitivities. A second area of inquiry involved negative reactions to general anesthesia. Results showed that the most common barriers to receiving care were the inability to find a provider who understands environmental sensitivities and a lack of accessibility due to chemical and electromagnetic exposures in health care environments. Lower income and poorer health (longer illness, a worsening or fluctuating course of illness, and a higher level of disability) were significantly correlated with the total number of reported unmet health care needs. Some people with environmental sensitivities reported having negative reactions to anesthesia of long duration; most common were nausea and vomiting, fatigue, and reduced cognitive ability. PMID:25670904

  2. Unmet health care needs for persons with environmental sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Pamela Reed; Kovach, Shannon; Lupfer, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Studies of unmet health care needs have shown that women, people with poor health, and people with lower socioeconomic status are more likely to report having unmet health care needs. In this study, we examined the types of and reasons for unmet health care needs in 465 people with environmental sensitivities. A second area of inquiry involved negative reactions to general anesthesia. Results showed that the most common barriers to receiving care were the inability to find a provider who understands environmental sensitivities and a lack of accessibility due to chemical and electromagnetic exposures in health care environments. Lower income and poorer health (longer illness, a worsening or fluctuating course of illness, and a higher level of disability) were significantly correlated with the total number of reported unmet health care needs. Some people with environmental sensitivities reported having negative reactions to anesthesia of long duration; most common were nausea and vomiting, fatigue, and reduced cognitive ability. PMID:25670904

  3. Safety assessment of personal care products/cosmetics and their ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    Nohynek, Gerhard J.; Antignac, Eric; Re, Thomas; Toutain, Herve

    2010-03-01

    We attempt to review the safety assessment of personal care products (PCP) and ingredients that are representative and pose complex safety issues. PCP are generally applied to human skin and mainly produce local exposure, although skin penetration or use in the oral cavity, on the face, lips, eyes and mucosa may also produce human systemic exposure. In the EU, US and Japan, the safety of PCP is regulated under cosmetic and/or drug regulations. Oxidative hair dyes contain arylamines, the most chemically reactive ingredients of PCP. Although arylamines have an allergic potential, taking into account the high number of consumers exposed, the incidence and prevalence of hair dye allergy appears to be low and stable. A recent (2001) epidemiology study suggested an association of oxidative hair dye use and increased bladder cancer risk in consumers, although this was not confirmed by subsequent or previous epidemiologic investigations. The results of genetic toxicity, carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity studies suggest that modern hair dyes and their ingredients pose no genotoxic, carcinogenic or reproductive risk. Recent reports suggest that arylamines contained in oxidative hair dyes are N-acetylated in human or mammalian skin resulting in systemic exposure to traces of detoxified, i.e. non-genotoxic, metabolites, whereas human hepatocytes were unable to transform hair dye arylamines to potentially carcinogenic metabolites. An expert panel of the International Agency on Research of Cancer (IARC) concluded that there is no evidence for a causal association of hair dye exposure with an elevated cancer risk in consumers. Ultraviolet filters have important benefits by protecting the consumer against adverse effects of UV radiation; these substances undergo a stringent safety evaluation under current international regulations prior to their marketing. Concerns were also raised about the safety of solid nanoparticles in PCP, mainly TiO{sub 2} and ZnO in sunscreens

  4. Safety assessment of personal care products/cosmetics and their ingredients.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, Gerhard J; Antignac, Eric; Re, Thomas; Toutain, Herve

    2010-03-01

    We attempt to review the safety assessment of personal care products (PCP) and ingredients that are representative and pose complex safety issues. PCP are generally applied to human skin and mainly produce local exposure, although skin penetration or use in the oral cavity, on the face, lips, eyes and mucosa may also produce human systemic exposure. In the EU, US and Japan, the safety of PCP is regulated under cosmetic and/or drug regulations. Oxidative hair dyes contain arylamines, the most chemically reactive ingredients of PCP. Although arylamines have an allergic potential, taking into account the high number of consumers exposed, the incidence and prevalence of hair dye allergy appears to be low and stable. A recent (2001) epidemiology study suggested an association of oxidative hair dye use and increased bladder cancer risk in consumers, although this was not confirmed by subsequent or previous epidemiologic investigations. The results of genetic toxicity, carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity studies suggest that modern hair dyes and their ingredients pose no genotoxic, carcinogenic or reproductive risk. Recent reports suggest that arylamines contained in oxidative hair dyes are N-acetylated in human or mammalian skin resulting in systemic exposure to traces of detoxified, i.e. non-genotoxic, metabolites, whereas human hepatocytes were unable to transform hair dye arylamines to potentially carcinogenic metabolites. An expert panel of the International Agency on Research of Cancer (IARC) concluded that there is no evidence for a causal association of hair dye exposure with an elevated cancer risk in consumers. Ultraviolet filters have important benefits by protecting the consumer against adverse effects of UV radiation; these substances undergo a stringent safety evaluation under current international regulations prior to their marketing. Concerns were also raised about the safety of solid nanoparticles in PCP, mainly TiO(2) and ZnO in sunscreens. However

  5. Person-centred care: rhetoric and reality in a public healthcare system.

    PubMed

    McCrae, Niall

    Recent scandals in the NHS have undermined confidence in this institution. A key factor in substandard care is the competing demands on practitioners. Individualised care may be hindered by paternalism and collective organisation, while practitioners are expected to pursue evidence-based practice and person-centred care without acknowledging their differing goals. Drawing on a common theme from major philosophical conflicts in health services, this paper argues that instead of increasing managerial control, organisations should be empowering nurses to provide compassionate, person-centred care. PMID:24165406

  6. 75 FR 37463 - Dispensing of Controlled Substances to Residents at Long Term Care Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... stocked with commonly dispensed controlled substances (45 FR 24128, April 9, 1980). These kits are... practitioners with the option of writing prescriptions for controlled substances electronically. 75 FR 16236... steroids, and drugs that are immediate precursors of these classes of substances. The CSA and...

  7. Pubertal Development, Personality, and Substance Use: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study From Childhood to Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Parent, Sophie; Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E.; Séguin, Jean R.

    2013-01-01

    Most research linking early pubertal development to substance use has focused on the effects of pubertal timing (age at which a certain stage of pubertal development is reached or pubertal status at a particular age—related to the maturation disparity hypothesis), but little research has focused on pubertal tempo (rate of growth through pubertal stages—related to the maturation compression hypothesis). However, both timing and tempo have not only been identified as important components of pubertal development, with different predictors, but have also been shown to be independently associated with other adolescent psychopathologies. Using latent growth-curve modeling, this study examined how pubertal status at age 12 and pubertal tempo (between 11 and 13 years) related to substance use from 15 to 16 years in boys from low socioeconomic backgrounds (N = 871). Results showed that both pubertal status at age 12 and tempo were significant predictors of increased levels of substance use and problems in mid to late adolescence. In an attempt to identify mechanisms that may explain the association between pubertal development and substance use it was found that sensation seeking partially mediated the association between pubertal status at age 12 and substance use behaviors. Impulse control was found to moderate the association sensation seeking had with marijuana use frequency, with high sensation-seeking scores predicting higher marijuana use frequency only at low levels of impulse control. These findings highlight the importance of considering multiple sources of individual variability in the pubertal development of boys and provide support for both the maturational disparity and compression hypotheses. PMID:24016016

  8. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY RESEARCH NEEDS FOR MAPPING TRENDS OF PHARMACEUTICAL AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCT POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL USE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The consensus among environmental scientists and risk assessors is that the fate and effects of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPS) in the environment are poorly understood. Many classes of PPCPs have yet to be investigated. Acquisition of trends data for a suite of...

  9. Use of health care services by patients with co-occurring severe mental illness and substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kêdoté, Marius N.; Brousselle, Astrid; Champagne, François

    2016-01-01

    Background To better respond to the health care needs of people with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders, it is vital to understand their itinerary through the health care system. Aim To describe the characteristics of service utilization among patients with co-occurring disorders in a large urban area. Method We used a sample (n = 5467) constituted from administrative and clinical databases. Those identified as having substance use disorders and psychoses were followed over 12 months with respect to their utilization of medical services. A descriptive analysis of the data and a two-step cluster analysis were undertaken. Results Our analyses revealed a relatively high utilization of emergency services, outpatient clinics, private practices and hospitalization among patients with co-occurring disorders of severe mental illness and substance use. The two-step cluster analysis produced four heterogeneous groups in terms of service utilization. Conclusions This study demonstrates the need to develop strategies for organizing health care and services that are adapted to various sites of service utilization and to diverse profiles of patients with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders.

  10. Stepped care: an alternative to routine extended treatment for patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Paris, Joel

    2013-10-01

    This review examined evidence supporting stepped care for borderline personality disorder as an alternative to routine extended treatment. Empirical studies have shown that patients with borderline personality disorder have a heterogeneous course, but symptomatic improvement can sometimes be relatively rapid. Currently, there is no evidence that any long-term treatment is superior to briefer interventions for borderline personality disorder. Long-term therapy may not be necessary for all patients, and its routine use leads to access problems. A stepped-care model, similar to models applied to other severe mental disorders, might provide a better use of resources. Stepped care can be used to limit the use of expensive programs and reduce waiting lists. Not all patients with borderline personality disorder can be treated briefly, but a stepped-care model allows those with less severe symptoms to be managed with fewer resources, freeing up more time and personnel for the treatment of those who need treatment the most. PMID:23945913

  11. [The care of homeless person: reviewing the meanings of health-disease process].

    PubMed

    Rosa, Anderson da Silva; Secco, Maria Garbriela; Brêtas, Ana Cristina Passarela

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative research had the objective of knowing the significance of the health-sickness-care process to homeless person and workers of a community center to homeless people on Sio Paulo city. The dates were collected by the interview with four homeless person and four workers. The interviews were separated in three categories: (1) the apprehension of the health - sickness-care process, (2) the caring of health in the street, (3) advices to survive in the street. The results showed that even with the difference of the homeless person, the street have a specific culture relative of the health-sickness-care person that need to be comprehend by nurses. PMID:17175723

  12. Who Would Take Care of the Person with Alzheimer's Disease If Something Happened to You?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... NAPA) About ADEAR Home Safety for People with Alzheimer's Disease Who Would Take Care of the Person ...

  13. International scientists’ priorities for research on pharmaceutical and personal care products in the environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are widely discharged into the environment via diverse pathways. The effects of PPCPs in the environment have potentially important human and ecosystem health implications, so credible, salient, and legitimate scientific evidence...

  14. Adapted Personalized Cognitive Counseling for Episodic Substance-Using Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Glenn-Milo; Colfax, Grant; Das, Moupali; Matheson, Tim; DeMicco, Erin; Dilley, James; Vittinghoff, Eric; Raiford, Jerris L.; Carry, Monique; Herbst, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Episodic drug use and binge drinking are associated with HIV risk among substance-using men who have sex with men (SUMSM), yet no evidence-based interventions exist for these men. We adapted personalized cognitive counseling (PCC) to address self-justifications for high-risk sex among HIV-negative, episodic SUMSM, then randomized men to PCC (n = 162) with HIV testing or control (n = 164) with HIV testing alone. No significant between-group differences were found in the three primary study outcomes: number of unprotected anal intercourse events (UAI), number of UAI partners, and UAI with three most recent non-primary partners. In a planned subgroup analysis of non-substance dependent men, there were significant reductions in UAI with most recent non-primary partners among PCC participants (RR = 0.56; 95 %CI 0.34–0.92; P = 0.02). We did not find evidence that PCC reduced sexual risk behaviors overall, but observed significant reductions in UAI events among non-dependent SUMSM. PCC may be beneficial among SUMSM screening negative for substance dependence. PMID:24510401

  15. "Being dealt with as a whole person." Care seeking and adherence: the benefits of culturally competent care.

    PubMed

    Schilder, A J; Kennedy, C; Goldstone, I L; Ogden, R D; Hogg, R S; O'Shaughnessy, M V

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the relationship between identity and health care experiences (including antiretroviral therapy utilization) among HIV-positive sexual minority males. This qualitative study used grounded theory with data collection occurring through focus groups and interviews. A questionnaire was used to complete a demographic profile. The study included 47 HIV positive participants from three minorities: gay men, bisexual men and transgendered persons, gender identifying as female and or living as women. Sessions elicited information on: (1) general experiences with health care, (2) experiences with HIV antiretroviral therapies and issues surrounding access, and (3) adherence to these therapies and identity in relation to health care. These textual data revealed three themes: (1) the importance of sexual identity and its social and cultural context, (2) the differences in the health concerns between the sexual minorities and (3) a wide spectrum of experiences with the health care system that provide information surrounding the access to and adequacy of health care. Successful health care providers are aware of different issues that may play a role in the provision of health care to these sexual minorities. Providers awareness of sexual and social identity and the related different cultural values, beliefs and custom enhance care seeking and therapeutic adherence. For sexual minorities, primary care remains the most important entry point into the health care system. Cultural competence of care providers can foster patient's care seeking and adherence to treatment. PMID:11327138

  16. 46 CFR 12.621 - Requirements to qualify for an STCW endorsement as person in charge of medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... person in charge of medical care. 12.621 Section 12.621 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... medical care. (a) To qualify for an STCW endorsement as person in charge of medical care, an applicant... for seafarers designated to take charge of medical care onboard a ship; and (2) Provide evidence...

  17. Enhancing primary care for persons with spinal cord injury: More than improving physical accessibility.

    PubMed

    Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    In Ontario, Canada, legislation exists that mandates that all medical practices be fully accessible by 2025, in an effort to improve access to primary care for persons with physical disabilities. The simple removal of physical barriers may not guarantee improved access to appropriate care. In this clinical note, members of an interprofessional primary care-based Mobility Clinic reflect on opportunities to improve primary care beyond just better physical accessibility for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). The importance of collaborations between funders, researchers, and clinicians are examined. Using a participatory action research model, the unique perspective of consumers and consumer networks are incorporated into the Mobility Clinic's clinical and research efforts to improve primary care for persons with SCI. PMID:26111044

  18. Personal Care Product Use in Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period: Implications for Exposure Assessment.

    PubMed

    Lang, Carly; Fisher, Mandy; Neisa, Angelica; MacKinnon, Leona; Kuchta, Sandra; MacPherson, Susan; Probert, Adam; Arbuckle, Tye E

    2016-01-01

    Concern regarding the potential for developmental health risks associated with certain chemicals (e.g., phthalates, antibacterials) used in personal care products is well documented; however, current exposure data for pregnant women are limited. The objective of this study was to describe the pattern of personal care product use in pregnancy and the post-partum period. Usage patterns of personal care products were collected at six different time points during pregnancy and once in the postpartum period for a cohort of 80 pregnant women in Ottawa, Canada. The pattern of use was then described and groups of personal care product groups commonly used together were identified using hierarchical cluster analysis. The results showed that product use varied by income and country of birth. General hygiene products were the most commonly used products and were consistently used over time while cosmetic product use declined with advancing pregnancy and post-delivery. Hand soaps and baby products were reported as used more frequently after birth. This study is the first to track personal care product use across pregnancy and into the postpartum period, and suggests that pregnant populations may be a unique group of personal care product users. This information will be useful for exposure assessments. PMID:26751460

  19. Personal Care Product Use in Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period: Implications for Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Carly; Fisher, Mandy; Neisa, Angelica; MacKinnon, Leona; Kuchta, Sandra; MacPherson, Susan; Probert, Adam; Arbuckle, Tye E.

    2016-01-01

    Concern regarding the potential for developmental health risks associated with certain chemicals (e.g., phthalates, antibacterials) used in personal care products is well documented; however, current exposure data for pregnant women are limited. The objective of this study was to describe the pattern of personal care product use in pregnancy and the post-partum period. Usage patterns of personal care products were collected at six different time points during pregnancy and once in the postpartum period for a cohort of 80 pregnant women in Ottawa, Canada. The pattern of use was then described and groups of personal care product groups commonly used together were identified using hierarchical cluster analysis. The results showed that product use varied by income and country of birth. General hygiene products were the most commonly used products and were consistently used over time while cosmetic product use declined with advancing pregnancy and post-delivery. Hand soaps and baby products were reported as used more frequently after birth. This study is the first to track personal care product use across pregnancy and into the postpartum period, and suggests that pregnant populations may be a unique group of personal care product users. This information will be useful for exposure assessments. PMID:26751460

  20. POLLUTION FROM PERSONAL ACTIONS, ACTIVITIES, AND BEHAVIORS: PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCIENCE ISSUES RELEVANT TO REGULATORY CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perhaps more so than with any other class of anthropogenic chemicals, the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPS) in the environment highlights the immediate, intimate, and inseparable connection between the personal activities of individual citizens and ...

  1. Youths’ Substance Use and Changes in Parental Knowledge-Related Behaviors During Middle School: A Person-Oriented Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lippold, Melissa A.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Collins, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Parental knowledge is a key protective factor for youths’ risky behavior. Little is known about how longitudinal combinations of knowledge-related behaviors are associated with youths’ substance use. This longitudinal study uses Latent Transition Analysis to identify latent patterns of parental knowledge-related behaviors occurring in mother-youth dyads during middle school and to investigate how changes in knowledge-related patterns are associated with youths’ substance use in Grade 6 and the initiation of substance use from Grade 6 to 8. Using a sample of 536 rural dyads (53% female, 84% White), we assessed mother and youths’ reports of parental knowledge, active parental monitoring efforts, youth disclosure, and parent-youth communication to identify six latent patterns of knowledge-related behaviors: High Monitors, Low Monitors, Communication-Focused, Supervision-Focused, Maternal Over-Estimators, and Youth Over-Estimators. Fifty percent or more of dyads in the High Monitors, Communication-Focused and Youth Over-Estimators were in the same status in both 6th and 8th grade: 98% of Low Monitors in Grade 6 were also in this status in Grade 8. The initiation of alcohol, smoking, and marijuana was associated significantly with transitions between patterns of knowledge-related behaviors. The initiation of alcohol and smoking were associated with increased odds of transitions into the Low Monitors from the Communication-Focused, Supervision-Focused, and Maternal Over-Estimators. However, the initiation of substance use was associated with decreased odds of transitions from the High Monitors to the Low Monitors and with increased odds of transitions from High Monitors to Supervision-Focused. The discussion focuses on the value of using a person-oriented dyadic approach with multiple reporters to study changes in knowledge-related behaviors over the middle school period. PMID:23996214

  2. Improving the Spiritual Dimension of Whole Person Care: Reaching National and International Consensus

    PubMed Central

    Vitillo, Robert; Hull, Sharon K.; Reller, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Two conferences, Creating More Compassionate Systems of Care (November 2012) and On Improving the Spiritual Dimension of Whole Person Care: The Transformational Role of Compassion, Love and Forgiveness in Health Care (January 2013), were convened with the goals of reaching consensus on approaches to the integration of spirituality into health care structures at all levels and development of strategies to create more compassionate systems of care. The conferences built on the work of a 2009 consensus conference, Improving the Quality of Spiritual Care as a Dimension of Palliative Care. Conference organizers in 2012 and 2013 aimed to identify consensus-derived care standards and recommendations for implementing them by building and expanding on the 2009 conference model of interprofessional spiritual care and its recommendations for palliative care. The 2013 conference built on the 2012 conference to produce a set of standards and recommended strategies for integrating spiritual care across the entire health care continuum, not just palliative care. Deliberations were based on evidence that spiritual care is a fundamental component of high-quality compassionate health care and it is most effective when it is recognized and reflected in the attitudes and actions of both patients and health care providers. PMID:24842136

  3. Caregiver Burden and Personal Authority: Differentiation and Connection in Caring for an Elderly Parent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabin, Claire; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Personal authority in family system (PAFS), intergenerational construct linking personal development and family interaction, was hypothesized to predict stress/strain of adult children caring for elderly disabled parents. Caregivers (n=70) completed measures of PAFS and of caregiver burden. Caregiving burden was significantly correlated to…

  4. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  5. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  6. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  7. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  8. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  9. Medical Students' Personal Qualities and Values as Correlates of Primary Care Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Jones, Bonnie J.

    2004-01-01

    Medical schools must use selection methods that validly measure applicants' noncognitive qualities, but primary-care (PC) schools have a particular need. This study correlated entering students' personality and values scores with their professed interest in PC. 93 medical students completed instruments assessing personality (16PF & PSP), values,…

  10. Measuring Person-Centered Care: A Critical Comparative Review of Published Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edvardsson, David; Innes, Anthea

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the study: To present a critical comparative review of published tools measuring the person-centeredness of care for older people and people with dementia. Design and Methods: Included tools were identified by searches of PubMed, Cinahl, the Bradford Dementia Group database, and authors' files. The terms "Person-centered,"…

  11. Risk-adjusting outcomes of mental health and substance-related care: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Richard C; Rollins, Caitlin K; Chan, Jeffrey A

    2007-01-01

    Risk adjustment is increasingly recognized as crucial to refining health care reimbursement and to comparing provider performance in terms of quality and outcomes of care. Risk adjustment for mental and substance use conditions has lagged behind other areas of medicine, but model development specific to these conditions has accelerated in recent years. After describing outcomes of mental health and substance-related care and associated risk factors, we review research studies on risk adjustment meeting the following criteria: (1) publication in a peer-reviewed journal between 1980 and 2002, (2) evaluation of one or more multivariate models used to risk-adjust comparisons of utilization, cost, or clinical outcomes of mental or substance use conditions across providers, and (3) quantitative assessment of the proportion of variance explained by patient characteristics in the model (e.g., R(2) or c-statistic). We identified 36 articles that included 72 models addressing utilization, 74 models of expenditures, and 15 models of clinical outcomes. Models based on diagnostic and sociodemographic information available from administrative data sets explained an average 6.7% of variance, whereas models using more detailed sources of data explained a more robust 22.8%. Results are appraised in the context of the mental health care system's needs for risk adjustment; we assess what has been accomplished, where gaps remain, and directions for future development. PMID:17454175

  12. A Practical Clinical Trial of Coordinated Care Management to Treat Substance Use Disorders among Public Assistance Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Jon; Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Dasaro, Christopher; McKay, James R.

    2011-01-01

    This study tested whether coordinated care management, a continuity of care intervention for substance use disorders (SUD), improved rates of abstinence compared to usual welfare management for substance-using single adults and adults with dependent children applying for public assistance. The study was designed as a practical clinical trial and implemented in partnership with a large city welfare agency. Participants were 421 welfare applicants identified via SUD screening and assigned via an unbiased computerized allocation program to a site that provided either coordinated care management (CCM; n = 232) or usual care (UC; n = 189). Outcomes were assessed for one year post-baseline using self-reports and biological measures of substance use. As hypothesized, for participants not enrolled in methadone maintenance programs (n = 313), CCM clients received significantly more services than UC clients. Non-methadone CCM also showed significantly higher abstinence rates (OR = 1.75; 95% CI = 1.12, 2.76; Cohen’s d = .31) that emerged early in treatment and were sustained throughout follow-up. In contrast, no treatment services or outcome effects were found for methadone maintenance clients (n = 108). Findings suggest that CCM is promising as a wraparound to SUD treatment for welfare recipients. PMID:19309185

  13. Definition of problems of persons in sheltered care environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzner, W. N.

    1979-01-01

    Innovations in health care using aerospace technologies are described. Voice synthesizer and voice recognition technologies were used in developing voice controlled wheel chairs and optacons. Telephone interface modules are also described.

  14. Taking good care of myself: a qualitative study on self-care behavior among Chinese persons with a permanent colostomy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hui; Songwathana, Praneed; Isaramalai, Sang-arun; Wang, Qingxi

    2014-12-01

    In Chinese culture, as a possible consequence of Confucianism, caring for the sick is considered a moral obligation of family members, while self-care is only the basis of fulfilling filial piety. This qualitative study aims to explore the self-care behavior among persons with a permanent colostomy in a Chinese cultural context of emphasizing the role of family caregiving. Data from in-depth interviews with seven Chinese adults at a university hospital in southwest China were analyzed using content analysis. Informants' self-care behavior was characterized by "taking good care of myself," which underlined individuals' efforts to manage colostomy-related impacts involving: (i) taking care of my colostomy with a proper degree of independence; (ii) taking care of my life by dealing with limitations; (iii) taking care of my mood in a positive way. Findings revealed that informants' self-care behavior was linked to their Confucian beliefs in family obligations, and also influenced by a happy-go-lucky outlook of life, a likely product of Taoism. The information is useful for nurses to design a culturally appropriate care plan to improve self-care behavior and proper family caregiving. PMID:25370020

  15. Exploring the Person-Centeredness of an Innovative E-Supportive System Aimed at Person-Centered Care: Prototype Evaluation of the Care Expert.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Filipa; Koinberg, Ingalill; Sawatzky, Richard; Karlsson, Per; Öhlén, Joakim

    2016-05-01

    Integrated in a multiphase development project, the Care Expert is a prototype of a novel e-supportive system aiming to mediate person-centered care in the context of outpatient oncology. At this early stage of development, the current study was conducted aiming at exploring the person-centeredness concept underlying the Care Expert version 1.0 and its usability for patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy for breast cancer. Within a user-centered design, we followed a mixed-methods approach entailing subjective assessment and diagnostic evaluation of the prototype. Four women undergoing outpatient chemotherapy participated in individual sessions and rated highly the system's usability. Their accounts led to identifying three supportive functions: continuous communication, reinforcement of self-driven agency, and cooperative agency with a sense of being looked after. We discuss the results in relation to theoretical fields that might guide further the development of the supportive system and usability recommendations. Care Expert has the potential to mediate person-centered care in outpatient oncology. Nevertheless, additional cycles of iterative development with the software team and of participatory design focusing on oncology nurses' perspectives are required before departing to the feasibility phase in intervention research. PMID:26909537

  16. Type D personality negatively associated with self-care in Chinese heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xi; Wang, Xiu-Hua; Wong, Eliza ML; Chow, Choi Kai; Chair, Sek Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the association between type D personality and self-care behaviors in heart failure (HF) patients. We examined the effect of type D personality on self-care behaviors and self-efficacy among Chinese HF patients. Methods A cross-sectional study with a convenience sample was conducted. All participants completed the questionnaires of the self-care of HF index (V6) and type D personality scale. Demographic and clinical variables were obtained from medical records and patient interviews. The methods used for data analysis included descriptive analysis, independent-sample t-test, χ2 test, and multiple linear regression. Results A total of 127 HF patients were included and 61.4% of them were male. The average age for this study sample was 64.9 ± 12.34 years. The majority of the participants were in a New York Heart Association class III or IV (87%), and the average length of living with HF was 38.24 ± 41.1 months. A total of 33.1% of the participants were identified as having type D personality. No significant differences were determined in the demographic and clinical variables between type D and non-type D patients, except for the mean age and the length of living with HF. Type D patients were younger and had a shorter time of living with HF than their non-type D counterparts. Multiple regression demonstrated significant associations between type D personality and self-care maintenance and self-efficacy after adjusting the demographic and clinical factors. However, type D personality was not significantly associated with self-care management behaviors. Conclusions Type D personality was negatively related to self-care maintenance and self-efficacy in Chinese HF patients. Future study is warranted to develop a tailored intervention to improve engagement in self-care behaviors in HF patients with type D personality. PMID:27594867

  17. Quality and Innovations for Caring Hospitalized Older Persons in the Unites States

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Won; Kim, Sun Jung; Geng, Yan; Shin, Hyun Phil; Nakagawa, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Older persons are occasionally acutely ill and their hospitalizations frequently end up with complications and adverse outcomes. Medicare from U.S. federal government’s payment resource for older persons is facing financial strain. Medicare highlights both cost-saving and high quality of care while older persons are hospitalized. Several health policy changes were initiated to achieve Medicare’s goals. In response to Medicare’s health policy changes, U.S. hospital environments have been changed and these resulted in hospital quality measurements’ improvement. American seniors are facing the challenges during and around their hospital care. Several innovative measures are suggested to overcome these challenges. PMID:24490116

  18. Personalization of health care in England: have the wrong lessons been drawn from the personal health budget pilots?

    PubMed

    Slasberg, Colin; Watson, Nick; Beresford, Peter; Schofield, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The Government has introduced personal health budgets in England's National Health Service (NHS). A three-year programme of pilots has shown that personal health budgets have improved outcomes and are generally cost-effective. They are seen as a key step toward creating a personalized service. However, the Government is attributing the success of the pilots to entirely the wrong factors. It believes that a process similar to the one introduced in social care - where it is called self-directed support - based on the person being given a sum of money 'up-front' with which to plan their own care - is responsible for the better outcomes. However, this is not supported by the evidence from the pilots which points to quite different factors being at play. The consequences are potentially very serious. The success of the pilots will not be repeated in roll out. Further, there is the potential to greatly weaken the service by creating confused process and practice, and additional dysfunctional bureaucracy. The practice and process implications from a correct reading of the reasons for success within the pilots centre on replacing the consumerist concepts underpinning self-directed support with what we have called 'flexibility through partnership'. This will require freeing up the resource base as cash and creating a policy framework to enable decisions about how much resource each person should get within a cash-limited budget that will almost certainly be less than would be required to meet all assessed need. PMID:24700211

  19. How to Get Better Care with Lower Costs? See the Person, Not the Patient.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Erin C; Alkema, Gretchen; Seidel, Rene; Chernof, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. health system perceives people as "patients" almost exclusively as they enter and exit the healthcare system, but with this emphasis on context, have we lost sight of the people who should be in the foreground of care? Does such a view impede care effectiveness and efficiency? How can we shift our frame of reference moving forward? To foster this needed conceptual shift, a group of national thought-leaders convened by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) defined "person-centered care" to reorient the perspective toward individuals remaining in the center of pursuing high-quality care. This article explores how a person-centered care approach can improve healthcare effectiveness and efficiency, particularly for older adults with heightened health and daily living needs, and healthcare costs. The process for supporting a person-centered program is outlined, three critical indicators that define person-centered quality are highlighted, and several models that embrace the person-centered paradigm are briefly noted. Although there is no one-size-fits-all schematic, how and why overall success entails fidelity to essential elements of person-centered programs as the AGS expert panel identified is explained. PMID:26639104

  20. Diverse Family Structures and the Care of Older Persons.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Karen A; Blieszner, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    Demographic and social trends lead to a variety of micro-level and internal structural contexts that influence caregiving in families with older members. The results of macro-level changes have received little focused attention in the aging literature, where much of the caregiving research has addressed issues within the context of traditional family structure. Yet the conventional nuclear family model is increasingly uncommon as new, pluralistic models of family life are emerging in contemporary society. The majority of elder care is provided by relatives, albeit with varying patterns of involvement and responsibility across family structures. Both conventional and pluralistic families face challenges in meeting the care needs of their oldest members, leaving some older adults at risk of having unmet needs. Additional research on family risk and resilience related to the care of older relatives is warranted, particularly with respect to pluralistic models of family life. PMID:26300190

  1. Effects of the Communities That Care System on Cross-Sectional Profiles of Adolescent Substance Use and Delinquency

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Fagan, Abigail A.; Hawkins, J. David; Oesterle, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adolescent substance use and delinquency are major public health problems. Although community–based prevention strategies have been recommended to produce population-level reductions in rates of substance use and delinquency, few models show evidence of effectiveness. Purpose To test the efficacy of a community–based prevention system, Communities That Care (CTC), in reducing community rates of problem behaviors, particularly effects on specific profiles of adolescent substance use and delinquency in eighth and tenth graders. Methods Twenty-four communities were randomized to CTC intervention or control groups. Data were collected from 14,099 eighth and tenth grade students in these communities using anonymous cross-sectional surveys in 2004 and 2010 and analyzed in 2012. Outcomes were four different profiles of self–reported substance use and delinquency in eighth grade and five profiles in tenth grade. Results In the cross-sectional 2010 data, there was no intervention effect on the probability of experimenting with substances or of substance use coupled with delinquent activities for either grade. However, tenth graders in intervention communities were significantly less likely to be alcohol users than those in control communities (OR=0.69, CI=0.48, 1.00). Conclusions Cross–sectional population surveys showed evidence of CTC effects in reducing tenth grade alcohol users but not experimenters. A community-wide reduction in adolescent alcohol use is important because alcohol is the most commonly used illicit substance during adolescence, and early initiation of alcohol use has been associated with alcohol-related disorders in adulthood. Failure to find hypothesized effects on experimenters qualifies these results. PMID:24986217

  2. The coming revolution in personal care robotics: what does it mean for nurses?

    PubMed

    Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C

    2014-01-01

    The business sector provides regular reportage on the development of personal care robots to enable elders and people with disabilities to remain in their homes. Technology in this area is advancing rapidly in Asia, Europe, and North America. To date, the nursing literature has not addressed how nurses will assist these vulnerable populations in the selection and use of robotic technology or how robotics could effect nursing care and patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of development in the area of personal care robotics to address societal needs reflecting demographic trends. Selected relevant issues related to the human-robotic interface including ethical concerns are identified. Implications for nursing education and the delivery of nursing services are identified. Collaboration with engineers in the development of personal care robotic technology has the potential to contribute to the creation of products that optimally address the needs of elders and people with disabilities. PMID:24317027

  3. Assessing Conscientious Personality in Primary Care: An Opportunity for Prevention and Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    The articles in this special section bolster the already strong evidence base that personality differences in the trait of conscientiousness predict health. What is now needed is a research agenda for translating documented risk associations between low conscientiousness and poor health into policies and interventions that improve health outcomes for individuals and populations. In this commentary, we highlight 1 such avenue: introducing brief personality assessment into primary care practice. We provide examples of how conscientiousness assessment may help health care professionals get to know their patients better and potentially serve as a guide for more personalized care. We also raise key considerations for implementation research aimed at examining the feasibility and utility of integrating conscientiousness assessment into primary care settings. PMID:24773110

  4. [Personal and dignified death. The role of pastoral care in palliative medicine].

    PubMed

    Breit-Keßler, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Palliative pastoral care is not about "adding days to life, but about "adding life to days". It does not matter whether the dying process is short or long. What matters is to ensure the best possible quality of life until the very end through mindful companionship. Palliative pastoral care is a path towards a personal dying, dying where the person is taken seriously as an individual until the last moment. Palliative care includes medical assistance, careful care, psychosocial support, and counselling that addresses the spiritual needs of the dying. This palliative care includes inpatient and outpatient hospice work and accompanies not only the patients but also their relatives. It must become the standard procedure in end of life care. The palliative pastoral care also take the needs of medical staff into account: Time-consuming care for the dying exceeds the staff's time budget. A sudden death can be perceived as traumatic. In this case palliative pastoral care must perform the tasks of crisis management, crisis intervention and de-escalation. The debriefing of involved staff can prevent the development of burn-out syndrome. In the view of holistic healthcare, health insurance funds should co-finance pastoral care. Society and humanity benefit from addressing the needs of the dying. In an economically dominated environment it is a social responsibility to make dying humane. PMID:26983110

  5. The impact of organisational culture on the delivery of person-centred care in services providing respite care and short breaks for people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Kirkley, Catherine; Bamford, Claire; Poole, Marie; Arksey, Hilary; Hughes, Julian; Bond, John

    2011-07-01

    Ensuring the development and delivery of person-centred care in services providing respite care and short breaks for people with dementia and their carers has a number of challenges for health and social service providers. This article explores the role of organisational culture in barriers and facilitators to person-centred dementia care. As part of a mixed-methods study of respite care and short breaks for people with dementia and their carers, 49 telephone semi-structured interviews, two focus groups (N= 16) and five face-to-face in-depth interviews involving front-line staff and operational and strategic managers were completed in 2006-2007. Qualitative thematic analysis of transcripts identified five themes on aspects of organisational culture that are perceived to influence person-centred care: understandings of person-centred care, attitudes to service development, service priorities, valuing staff and solution-focused approaches. Views of person-centred care expressed by participants, although generally positive, highlight a range of understandings about person-centred care. Some organisations describe their service as being person-centred without the necessary cultural shift to make this a reality. Participants highlighted resource constraints and the knowledge, attitudes and personal qualities of staff as a barrier to implementing person-centred care. Leadership style, the way that managers' support and value staff and the management of risk were considered important influences. Person-centred dementia care is strongly advocated by professional opinion leaders and is prescribed in policy documents. This analysis suggests that person-centred dementia care is not strongly embedded in the organisational cultures of all local providers of respite-care and short-break services. Provider organisations should be encouraged further to develop a shared culture at all levels of the organisation to ensure person-centred dementia care. PMID:21545358

  6. Skills training groups for men with ADHD in compulsory care due to substance use disorder: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Bihlar Muld, B; Jokinen, J; Bölte, S; Hirvikoski, T

    2016-09-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT)-based skills training has been developed and previously evaluated for adults with ADHD in a psychiatric outpatient context. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of DBT-based skills training as a voluntary intervention for men with ADHD in compulsory care due to severe substance abuse. Forty sufficiently detoxified men with ADHD in compulsory care due to life-threatening substance use disorder (SUD) were included in DBT-based skills training groups. Self- and staff-rating scales were administered before and after the treatment. The refusal rate was 42.9 %. Of those who started the DBT-based skills training, 70 % completed the treatment (attendance at ≥75 % of the sessions). The treatment acceptability was good. Both ADHD and psychiatric symptoms decreased from pre- to post-intervention in self-ratings, but not in staff ratings. The patients reported improved general well-being. The correlation between self- and staff ratings was poor. Motivation for voluntary nonpharmacological treatment was low in a compulsory care context. However, the results indicate that a DBT-based skills training program for adults with ADHD may be feasible for some patients with ADHD in combination with SUD in compulsory care, provided that considerable resources are allocated with adjustments to the target group and compulsory care context. PMID:27059489

  7. Reported lifetime aberrant drug-taking behaviors are predictive of current substance use and mental health problems in primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Michael F.; Davis, James; Passik, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The aim of this report is to determine the frequency of aberrant drug behaviors and their relationship substance abuse disorders in a large primary sample of patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Methods: The data utilized for this report was obtained from 904 chronic pain patients receiving opioid therapy from their primary care physician. A questionnaire was developed based on 12 aberrant drug behaviors reported in the clinical literature. The diagnosis of a current substance use disorder was determined using DSM-IV criteria. Results: The average duration of chronic pain in the sample was 16 years, and for opioid therapy 6.4 years. 80.5% of the sample reported one or more lifetime aberrant drug behaviors. The most frequent behaviors reported included early refills (41.7%), increase dose without physician consent (35.7%) and felt intoxicated from opioids (32.2%). Only 1.1% of subjects with 1-3 aberrant behaviors (n=464, 51.2%) met DSM-IV criteria for current opioid dependence compared to 9.9% of patients with 4 or more behaviors (n=264, 29.3%). Persons with a positive urine toxicology tests for cocaine were 14 times more likely to report 4 or more behaviors than no behaviors (14.1% v.s.1.1%). A logistic model found that subjects who reported four or more aberrant behaviors were more likely to have a current substance use disorder (OR 10.14; 3.72, 27.64), a positive test for cocaine (OR 3.01; 1.74, 15.4), an ASI psychiatric composite score >0.5 (OR 2.38; 1.65, 3.44), male gender (OR 2.08: 1.48, 2.92) and older age (OR 0.69; 0.59, 0.81) compared to subjects with three or fewer behaviors. Pain levels, employment status and morphine equivalent dose do not enter the model. Conclusions: Patients who report 4 or more aberrant drug behaviors are associated with a current substance use disorder and illicit drug use, whereas subjects with up to 3 aberrant behaviors have a very low probability of a current substance abuse disorder. Four behaviors - over

  8. [Palliative care: accompanying persons at the end of life].

    PubMed

    Espinar Cid, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    The philosophy, the essence and the therapeutic goals of palliative care help the health professionals offer the patients a high quality assistance on their last stage of life. With both, a human and scientific view, it's possible to deal with the relief of suffer on all dimensions. PMID:22548665

  9. How to enhance integrated care towards the personal health paradigm?

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd G M E; Pharow, Peter; Norgall, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    For improving quality and efficiency of health delivery under the well-known burdens, the health service paradigm has to change from organization-centered over process-controlled to personal health. The growing complexity of highly distributed and fully integrated healthcare settings can only be managed through an advanced architectural approach, which has to include all dimensions of personal health. Here, ICT, medicine, biomedical engineering, bioinformatics and genomics, legal and administrative aspects, terminology and ontology have to be mentioned. The Generic Component Model allows for different domains' concept representation and aggregation. Framework, requirements, methodology and process design possibilities for such a future-proof and meanwhile practically demonstrated approach are discussed in detail. The deployment of the Generic Component Model and the concept representation to biomedical engineering aspects of eHealth are touched upon as essential issues. PMID:17911701

  10. An Elective Course in Personal Finance for Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To create, implement, and assess an elective course on the principles and applications of personal finance. Design A 1.5 unit (15 hours total) elective course was designed using active-learning pedagogy, lecture, and group discussion. Homework assignments were designed to provide practical tools and materials that students could individualize and apply to their personal financial goals. Assessment Student satisfaction, using a standard course evaluation form, revealed consistent high ratings. Student enrollment increased from 19 students in its initial year to 90 students in its fourth year. Student knowledge, assessed using the Jump$tart Financial Literacy Survey, indicated significant knowledge acquisition. Conclusion Many pharmacy students are ill equipped to effectively handle the complex financial decisions they face after graduation. This course provides students with practical tools to identify appropriate ways to achieve their financial goals and critically evaluate financial advice and advisors. PMID:19513143

  11. Older persons' experiences and perspectives of receiving social care: a systematic review of the qualitative literature.

    PubMed

    de São José, José; Barros, Rosanna; Samitca, Sanda; Teixeira, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The topic of social care for older people has gained increasing attention from the part of academics, professionals, policy makers and media. However, we know little about this topic from the perspectives of older persons, which hinders future developments in terms of theory, empirical research, professional practice and social policy. This article presents and discusses a systematic review of relevant qualitative research-based evidence on the older persons' experiences and perspectives of receiving social care published between 1990 and September 2014. This review aimed to obtain answers to the following questions: How is the reception of social care experienced by the older persons? What are the negative and positive aspects of these experiences? What are the factors which influence the experiences? The synthesis of the findings of reviewed papers identified six analytical themes: asking for care as a major challenge; ambivalences; (dis)engagement in decisions concerning care; multiple losses as outcomes of receiving social care; multiple strategies to deal with losses originated by the ageing process; and properties of 'good care'. These themes are discussed from the point of view of their implications for theory, care practice and social policy, and future research. PMID:25660372

  12. Heterogeneity of interpersonal problems among depressed young adults: Associations with substance abuse and pathological personality traits

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Sindes; Thomas, Katherine M.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Hopwood, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    This study extended previous theory and research on interpersonal heterogeneity in depression by identifying groups of depressed young adults who differ in their type and degree of interpersonal problems, and by examining patterns of pathological personality traits and alcohol abuse among these groups. We examined the interpersonal problems, personality traits, and alcohol-related problems of 172 college students with at least moderate levels of self-reported depression on the Patient Health Questionnaire (Spitzer, Kroenke, & Williams, 1999). Scores from the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems – Short Circumplex (Soldz, Budman, Demby, & Merry, 1995) were subjected to latent profile analysis, which classified individuals into five distinct groups defined by the types of interpersonal problems they experience (dominant, warm, submissive, cold, and undifferentiated). As hypothesized, groups did not differ in depression severity, but did show predicted patterns of differences on normative and maladaptive personality traits, as well as alcohol-related problems. The presence of clinically meaningful interpersonal heterogeneity in depression may have important implications for designing more individualized treatments and prevention efforts for depression that target diverse associated interpersonal problems. PMID:23560433

  13. Positive symptoms, substance use, and psychopathic traits as predictors of aggression in persons with a schizophrenia disorder.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Josanne D M; Buck, Nicole M L; van Marle, Hjalmar J C

    2016-03-30

    It is still not clear what the unique contribution of particular psychopathological factors is in explaining aggression in schizophrenia. The current study examined whether persecutory ideations, psychopathy and substance use are associated with different measures of aggressive behavior. We expected that persecutory ideations are associated with reactive aggression, and psychopathic traits are more associated with proactive aggression of inpatients. 59 inpatients with schizophrenia were included. Persecutory ideations we assessed using the Persecutory Ideation Questionnaire (PIQ), psychopathic traits with the revised version of Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI-R) and substance use was assessed using the Comprehensive Assessment of Symptoms and History (CASH). In addition, aggression was measured with the Reactive and Proactive Aggression Questionnaire (RPQ), in an experimental task using the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (PSAP) and on the ward using the Social Dysfunction and Aggression Scale (SDAS). Results showed that psychopathy explains most of the variance in self-reported proactive and reactive aggression. In contrast, persecutory ideations explain most of the variance in observed aggression on the ward. Results implicate that it is important to acknowledge comorbid factors in patients with schizophrenia for more precise risk assessment and appropriate treatment for aggressive patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26837478

  14. Effect of the act on promotion of personal autonomy and care for dependent persons on their family caregivers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The need of home care services is becoming an increasingly common scenario. These cares are mainly provided by the dependents’ relatives specifically, by the women part of the family. This situation might take years, decreasing the physical and psychological health of the caregiver. In Spain, the Act of Promotion of Personal Autonomy and Care for dependent persons, guarantees those dependent persons and their caregivers to have access to social services or to financial grants. The aim of this study is to Know the possible effects of the benefits provided by this Act in regards to the mental health, the quality of life and use of health services by the family caregivers assisting their relatives in situation of dependency. Methods and design A longitudinal descriptive study following-up a cohort of patients and caregivers. The study shall be carried out in Andalusia. It shall include the baseline assessment of the variables in those caregivers free from the exposure factor (reception of assistance pursuant to the Act). Following, once the benefits have been received, this cohort shall be followed-up. The study shall take three years, and the starting date for its development as well as its funding is January 2011. Discussion The longitudinal assessment of the rate of change of the variables studied shall allow us to know the implications which might be potentially generated as well as the natural evolution of those. PMID:23244337

  15. Personality and coping in first episode psychosis linked to mental health care use.

    PubMed

    Scholte-Stalenhoef, Anne Neeltje; la Bastide-van Gemert, Sacha; van de Willige, Gerard; Dost-Otter, Rianne; Visser, Ellen; Liemburg, Edith J; Knegtering, Henderikus; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Schoevers, Robert A; Pijnenborg, Gerdina H M; Bruggeman, Richard

    2016-04-30

    A body of literature focuses on associations of neuroticism, extraversion, passive coping and active coping with the course of psychotic illness. Less is known about other personality and coping variables - and underlying causal mechanisms between variables remain unclear. We explored causal effects from personality, coping and symptoms on mental health care consumption over two years in 208 first episode patients. Causal inference search algorithms lead to formation of a hypothetical causal model based on presumptions on (non-)mutuality between variables and consistent with data. Structural equation modelling estimated effect sizes conditionally on the causal model. Our observed model implies that none of the coping or personality variables have any effect on the number of days of hospitalisation, whereas general psychopathology symptoms do have a direct positive effect. For ambulatory care it is proposed that openness to experience, depressive symptoms and age have direct positive effects. Reassuring thoughts as a coping strategy seems to have a direct negative effect on the use of ambulatory care and mediates indirect effects of other personality and coping variables on ambulatory care. Furthermore, while previously established relations between personality and symptoms are confirmed by our model, it challenges traditional ideas about causation between personality and symptoms. PMID:27086236

  16. Resident Reactions to Person-Centered Communication by Long-Term Care Staff.

    PubMed

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Sibalija, Jovana; Scotchmer, Emma

    2016-09-01

    Long-term care staff caregivers who are person centered incorporate the life history, preferences, and feelings of residents with dementia during care interactions. Communication is essential for person-centered care. However, little is known about residents' verbal reactions when staff use person-centered communication. Accordingly, this study investigated the impact of person-centered communication and missed opportunities for such communication by staff on resident reactions. Conversations (N = 46) between staff-resident dyads were audio-recorded during routine care tasks over 12 weeks. Staff utterances were coded for person-centered communication and missed opportunities. Resident utterances were coded for positive reactions, such as cooperation, and negative reactions, such as distress. Linear regression analyses revealed that the more staff used person-centered communication, the more likely that residents reacted positively. Additionally, the more missed opportunities in a conversation, the more likely that the residents reacted negatively. Conversation illustrations elaborate on the quantitative findings and implications for staff training are discussed. PMID:26744507

  17. Reactions of Persons with Dementia to Caregivers Singing in Morning Care Situations

    PubMed Central

    Hammar, Lena Marmstål; Emami, Azita; Engström, Gabriella; Götell, Eva

    2010-01-01

    ’Music therapeutic caregiving’, when caregivers sing for or together with persons with severe dementia during care situations, has been suggested as a way to reduce problematic behaviors in dementia care. The present study implemented this technique as an intervention in dementia care. Six caregivers participated in group interviews about their experiences of morning care situations without and with’Music therapeutic caregiving’. Through a qualitative content analysis two themes emerged.’Being in a different reality’ was based on’usual’ morning care situations. The caregivers’ experienced the persons with dementia as absent-minded; communication and cooperation were difficult. The second theme,’Being present’, was based on morning care situations with the intervention. The caregivers described communication as enhanced; the persons with dementia expressed themselves more appropriately, making cooperation possible. The results indicate that’Music therapeutic caregiving’ might lead to a more positive experience of the person with dementia and seems to increase receptivity to caregiving. PMID:21249163

  18. Substance abuse and personality disorders in homeless drop-in center clients: symptom severity and psychotherapy retention in a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ball, Samuel A; Cobb-Richardson, Patricia; Connolly, Adrian J; Bujosa, Cesar T; O'neall, Thomas W

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychiatric symptoms, psychosocial problems, and treatment response of personality-disordered substance abusers receiving services within a homeless drop-in center. Fifty-two homeless clients were assessed after program admission and randomly assigned to receive either individual psychotherapy focused on personality disorder and substance abuse relapse prevention (dual-focus schema therapy [DFST]) or standard group substance abuse counseling (SAC). Client functioning was assessed using measures of personality disorder, psychiatric symptoms, early maladaptive schemas, interpersonal problems, and addiction-related psychosocial impairment. Therapy retention (total weeks in treatment) and utilization (number of weeks in which sessions were attended) were the primary outcomes. Although rates of cluster B personality disorders were comparable to other substance dependent samples, clusters A and C disorders were disproportionately more common. Clients reported significant psychiatric symptoms, criminality, and psychosocial impairment, yet made limited lifetime use of mental health services. Overall, there was greater utilization of individual DFST than group SAC. However, clients with more severe personality disorder symptoms demonstrated better utilization of SAC than DFST. PMID:16122538

  19. Aggregate consumer exposure to UV filter ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate via personal care products.

    PubMed

    Manová, Eva; von Goetz, Natalie; Hungerbuehler, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) filters are substances designed to protect our skin from UV-induced damage and can be found in many categories of personal care products (PCPs). The potential endocrine-disrupting effects attributed to UV filter ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC) are being debated. We evaluated the aggregate exposure of the Swiss-German population (N=1196; ages ≤1-97years) to EHMC via the use of PCPs; thus we provide the first comprehensive information about the current EHMC exposure sources and aggregate exposure levels. In our probabilistic modeling method performed at an individual level, PCP use data obtained by a postal questionnaire were linked to concentration data on EHMC gained from chemical analyses of PCPs used by the questionnaire respondents. The modeled median and 99.9th percentile of the internal aggregate exposure for the general population were 0.012 and 0.873mgday(-1)kg(-1) and 0.008 and 0.122mgday(-1)kg(-1) for the summer/autumn and winter/spring period, respectively. The major contributors to internal aggregate exposure were sunscreen products in summer/autumn (females: 64%; males: 85%; children aged ≤12years 93%). In winter/spring, lip care dominated for females (30%) and sunscreen for males (38%) and children aged ≤12years (50%). Overall, the internal aggregate exposure estimates for the studied population are shown to be below the Derived No Effect Level (DNEL) for EHMC i.e., the level of exposure above which humans should not be exposed; however, when an intense short-term exposure via sunscreen is accounted for during a sunbathing day, at the high-end percentiles (99.9th) the predicted aggregate exposure exceeds the DNEL for thyroid-disrupting effects such as for children aged ≤4years, who might be particularly susceptible to endocrine disrupting events. It is nevertheless critical to acknowledge that quantitative data on transdermal penetration of EHMC from PCPs are currently insufficient. Since long-term effects of endocrine

  20. Foster Care: Agencies Face Challenges Securing Stable Homes for Children of Substance Abusers. Report to the Chairman, Committee on Finance, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div.

    This study examined the extent and characteristics of parental substance abuse among foster care cases, the difficulties agencies face in making timely permanency decisions for foster children with substance abusing parents, and initiatives that address reunifying families or achieving other permanency outcomes in a timely manner for foster…

  1. Aggressivity among sons of substance-abusing fathers: association with psychiatric disorder in the father and son, paternal personality, pubertal development, and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Moss, H B; Mezzich, A; Yao, J K; Gavaler, J; Martin, C S

    1995-05-01

    An association between childhood aggression and risk for subsequent development of a substance abuse disorder is now well-accepted. In order to better understand the relationship between the presence of paternal substance abuse and aggression among their offspring, 10-12 year old sons of fathers with (n = 34) and without (n = 39) a history of a substance abuse disorder were contrasted on demographics, aggressivity, biological indices of reproductive maturation, and the presence of psychiatric diagnoses. In addition, personality factors, the potential for physical abuse, and psychiatric diagnoses were also ascertained among their fathers. Sons of substance-abusing fathers were found to be significantly more aggressive than sons of nonsubstance abusers. However, they also differed from comparison boys on the basis of SES and school grade attained, as well as the proportion with specific psychiatric disorders. Substance-abusing fathers differed from nonsubstance-abusing men in terms of personality factors and the presence of specific psychiatric disorders, including antisocial personality. They also showed significantly higher child abuse potential scores. A multiple regression analysis of factors contributing to aggression in the boys revealed that a paternal personality factor characterized by stress reactivity, alienation, and aggression was the most robust contributor to aggression among the boys. The boys' diagnoses of attention deficit disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and lower household socioeconomic status were also significant predictors of aggressivity. Contrary to expectations, paternal, psychiatric diagnoses, substance abuse status, and potential for physical abuse were noncontributory. The results suggest potential mechanisms by which both aggression and risk for substance abuse may be transmitted from father to son. PMID:7639206

  2. Troubling gifts of care: vulnerable persons and threatening exchanges in Chicago's home care industry.

    PubMed

    Buch, Elana D

    2014-12-01

    By tracing the transformations of troubling exchanges in paid home care, this article examines how differently positioned individuals strive to build caring relations within potentially restrictive regimes of care. In paid home care in Chicago, older adults and their workers regularly participate in exchanges of money, time, and material goods. These gifts play a crucial role in building good care relationships that sustain participants' moral personhood. Amid widespread concern about vulnerable elders, home care agencies compete in a crowded marketplace by prohibiting these exchanges, even as they depend on them to strengthen relationships. Supervisors thus exercise discretion, sometimes reclassifying gift exchanges as punishable thefts. In this context, the commodification of care did not lead to the actual elimination of gift relations, but rather transformed gift relations into a suspicious and troublesome source of value. PMID:25331658

  3. Troubling Gifts of Care: Vulnerable Persons and Threatening Exchanges in Chicago’s Home Care Industry

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Elana

    2015-01-01

    By tracing the transformations of troubling exchanges in paid home care, this article examines how differently positioned individuals strive to build caring relations within potentially restrictive regimes of care. In paid home care in Chicago, older adults and their workers regularly participate in exchanges of money, time, and material goods. These gifts play a crucial role in building good care relationships that sustain participants’ moral personhood. Amid widespread concern about vulnerable elders, home care agencies compete in a crowded marketplace by prohibiting these exchanges, even as they depend on them to strengthen relationships. Supervisors thus exercise discretion, sometimes reclassifying gift exchanges as punishable thefts. In this context, the commodification of care did not lead to the actual elimination of gift relations, but rather transformed gift relations into a suspicious and troublesome source of value. PMID:25331658

  4. Respiratory care billing using a personal digital assistant.

    PubMed

    Howard, William R

    2004-11-01

    In 2003 I reported how my respiratory care department at Tufts-New England Medical Center developed an inexpensive, in-house, computerized clinical-information-management system, in which the respiratory therapists carry handheld computers during their rounds, entering clinical information into the handhelds as they work and later downloading that information to a database in a desktop computer. Now we have added a billing module to our customized software. This article describes the design, use, and attributes of this billing system, including improved charge-capture, which increased department revenue substantially. Our system has several other important advantages over traditional billing systems. PMID:15507169

  5. The relationship between dispositional mindfulness, borderline personality features, and suicidal ideation in a sample of women in residential substance use treatment.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Ryan C; Elmquist, JoAnna; Wolford-Clevenger, Caitlin; Gawrysiak, Michael J; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L

    2016-04-30

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD), which is characterized by unstable moods, behavior, and relationships, is also associated with heightened suicidal ideation. Prior research has demonstrated that BPD and suicidal ideation are prevalent among women in substance use treatment. Efforts to treat substance use in this population are made difficult due to the severity of BPD, and it is possible that mindfulness-based interventions specific to substance use could be an effective approach for this population. However, basic research is needed on the relationship between dispositional mindfulness, BPD, and suicidal ideation among women in treatment for substance use to support their associations, which was the purpose of the present study. Pre-existing medical records were reviewed from a residential substance use treatment center. A total of 81 female patients were included in the current study. Patients completed self-report measures of mindfulness, BPD, suicidal ideation, substance use, and impression management at treatment intake. Findings demonstrated dispositional mindfulness to be negatively associated with BPD features and suicidal ideation. With the exception of self-harm, this negative relationship was found even after controlling for age, substance use, and impression management. Future research should examine whether mindfulness-based interventions are an effective treatment for comorbid substance use and BPD. PMID:27086221

  6. Chiropractic care of the older person: developing an evidence-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Gleberzon, Brian J.

    2001-01-01

    Geriatric care has assumed a more dominant position in the health care delivery system. This article discusses the results of a literature search on geriatric chiropractic care with the ultimate goal of promoting a“best practice” approach. Fifty nine articles were found that discussed geriatric chiropractic education (N = 3), demographic and epidemiological studies (N = 9), case studies (N = 25), clinical trials (N = 4) and clinical guidelines (N = 18). The literature revealed that chiropractic pedagogy has recognized the importance of geriatric education, and epidemiological studies reported an increase in utilization rates of chiropractic care by older persons, along with greater acceptance within the medical community. Most older persons sought out chiropractic care for neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions, with several studies reporting the successful resolution of these conditions with spinal manipulative therapy as well as an eclectic group of other treatment interventions. Many older persons enter a maintenance care program, which they believe to be important to their health. Although the results of this article are encouraging, it underscores the need for continued research, especially in the areas of chiropractic maintenance care and the management of non-NMS conditions.

  7. Quality of Medical Care for Persons with Serious Mental Illness: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    McGinty, EE; Baller, J; Azrin, ST; Juliano-Bult, D; Daumit, GL

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Prior studies suggest variation in the quality of medical care for somatic conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes provided to persons with SMI, but to date no comprehensive review of the literature has been conducted. The goals of this review were to summarize the prior research on quality of medical care for the United States population with SMI; identify potential sources of variation in quality of care; and identify priorities for future research. Methods Peer-reviewed studies were identified by searching four major research databases and subsequent reference searches of retrieved articles. All studies assessing quality of care for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and HIV/AIDs among persons with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder published between January 2000 and December 2013 were included. Quality indicators and information about the study population and setting were abstracted by two trained reviewers. Results Quality of medical care in the population with SMI varied by study population, time period, and setting. Rates of guideline-concordant care tended to be higher among veterans and lower among Medicaid beneficiaries. In many study samples with SMI, rates of guideline adherence were considerably lower than estimated rates for the general US population. Conclusions Future research should identify and address modifiable provider, insurer, and delivery system factors that contribute to poor quality of medical care among persons with SMI and consider how to best use quality performance measures as part of the larger strategy to improve health for this group. PMID:25936686

  8. A review of personal care products in the aquatic environment: environmental concentrations and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Brausch, John M; Rand, Gary M

    2011-03-01

    Considerable research has been conducted examining occurrence and effects of human use pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment; however, relatively little research has been conducted examining personal care products although they are found more often and in higher concentrations than pharmaceuticals. Personal care products are continually released into the aquatic environment and are biologically active and persistent. This article examines the acute and chronic toxicity data available for personal care products and highlights areas of concern. Toxicity and environmental data were synergized to develop a preliminary hazard assessment in which only triclosan and triclocarban presented any hazard. However, numerous PCPs including triclosan, paraben preservatives, and UV filters have evidence suggesting endocrine effects in aquatic organisms and thus need to be investigated and incorporated in definitive risk assessments. Additional data pertaining to environmental concentrations of UV filters and parabens, in vivo toxicity data for parabens, and potential for bioaccumulation of PCPs needs to obtained to develop definitive aquatic risk assessments. PMID:21185057

  9. Health care provision for older persons: the interplay between ageism and elder neglect.

    PubMed

    Band-Winterstein, Tova

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the link between neglect and ageism in health care provision for older persons. Semistructured in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 registered nurses with at least 2 years' experience in 10 long-term care facilities in Israel. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was performed according to the qualitative method. Three main themes emerged: ageism and neglect as the everyday routine (neglect is built into institution life on the platform of ageism); how the institutional system promotes neglect--between institutional and personal ageism (the ways institutions promote neglect in the shadow of ageism); from vision to reality--how neglect can be prevented in an ageist reality. The attempt to demonstrate the link between ageism and neglect and suggesting how to include them as interrelated phenomena in health care provision programs could promote older persons' quality of life. PMID:24652870

  10. A review of systems for the personal aspects of patient care.

    PubMed

    Matthews, D A; Feinstein, A R

    1988-03-01

    Because patients are appropriate judges of the personal aspects of the care received from physicians, the authors conducted lengthy interviews with 50 randomly chosen medical inpatients. They were asked to describe, in an open-ended but semistructured fashion, their favorable and unfavorable impressions and reactions to the personal aspects of care rendered by their physicians. From the specific comments made by the patients in these interviews, we constructed a detailed taxonomy of desired physician attitudes and behaviors. The taxonomy can be used in a manner analogous to a Review of Systems for teaching students and practitioners the elements of personal care and also can be applied for research in patient-physician communication. PMID:3354589

  11. Assessing and improving child care: A personal appearance index for children with autism

    PubMed Central

    McClannahan, Lynn E.; McGee, Gail G.; MacDuff, Gregory S.; Krantz, Patricia J.

    1990-01-01

    An index of children's physical appearance and personal care was developed and used to assess youngsters with autism who lived (a) at home, (b) in an established group home, (c) in new group homes, and (d) in a large institution. Subsequently, a multiple baseline design across participants documented major changes in personal appearance and cleanliness when children moved from an institution to community-based, family-style group homes. Finally, data-based feedback generated by the appearance index was used as a training tool enabling group home staff to further improve child appearance. This research demonstrates how an evaluation instrument can be used to obtain comparative data, measure some effects of different residential placements, and provide ongoing feedback to caregivers to promote high standards of personal care among persons with severe developmental disabilities. PMID:2074237

  12. Predictors of HIV Disclosure in Infected Persons Presenting to Establish Care.

    PubMed

    Elopre, Latesha; Westfall, Andrew O; Mugavero, Michael J; Zinski, Anne; Burkholder, Greer; Hook, Edward W; Van Wagoner, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Persons receiving effective HIV treatment experience longevity and improvement in quality of life. For those infected, social support is associated with improved medication adherence. Disclosure of infection status is likely a prerequisite for social support. However, little research describes patterns of HIV disclosure by infected persons. We retrospectively evaluated factors associated with disclosure among patients initiating HIV care at a university-based clinic from 2007 to 2012. Of 490 persons initiating care, 13 % had not disclosed their HIV infection to anyone. Black race significantly predicted non-disclosure and persons living with a significant other or friends were more likely to have disclosed their HIV infection versus those living alone. CD4 + T lymphocyte count <200 was associated with nondisclosure and disclosure only to family members. Future research is needed to better understand factors associated with disclosure of HIV infection status, because this could enhance receipt of social support and contribute to improved HIV health outcomes. PMID:25855046

  13. Supporting women with substance use issues: trauma-informed care as a foundation for practice in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Marcellus, Lenora

    2014-01-01

    Infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome and their mothers require extended support through health and social service systems. Practitioners are interested in exploring innovative approaches to caring for infants and mothers. There is now compelling evidence linking women's substance use to experiences of trauma and violence. A significant shift in the fields of addiction and mental health has been awareness of the impact of trauma and violence on infants and children, women, their families, and communities. In this article, the current state of knowledge of trauma-informed care is reviewed, in particular for application to practice within the NICU. Trauma survivors are at risk of being retraumatized because of health care providers' limited understanding of how to work effectively with them. Recognizing the impact of trauma and implementing evidence-based trauma-informed practices in the NICU holds promise for improving outcomes for women and their infants. PMID:25391589

  14. Caring for people with dementia in residential aged care: successes with a composite person-centered care model featuring Montessori-based activities.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gail; Morley, Catherine; Walters, Wendy; Malta, Sue; Doyle, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes. PMID:25499658

  15. Young siblings of children with cancer deserve care and a personalized approach.

    PubMed

    Massimo, Luisa M; Wiley, Thomas J

    2008-03-01

    The youngest siblings may be both emotionally vulnerable and often neglected members of the family of a childhood cancer patient. The prompt identification of signs of distress in these subjects allows trained caregivers to intervene with personalized, age-appropriate, attention, and care. A narrative approach, based on personalized listening, writings, and spontaneous drawings, can provide the means to elicit markers of psychological maladjustment in even the youngest of siblings. Two exemplary cases are reported to illustrate this approach. PMID:17009220

  16. Dignity in long-term care for older persons: a Confucian perspective.

    PubMed

    Wah, Julia Tao Lai Po

    2007-01-01

    This article presents Mencius' concept of human dignity in the Chinese Confucian moral tradition, focused on the context of long-term care. The double nature of Mencius' notion of human dignity as an intrinsic quality of human beings qua being human is analyzed and contrasted with the dominant Western account of human dignity as grounded in personhood. Drawing on the heuristic force of an interview with an elder person in Hong Kong, the insights of the Mencian theory of human dignity are used to provide a moral foundation for long-term care for elder persons in a context of diminishing personhood and shrinking autonomy. PMID:17924272

  17. Pittsburgh as a High Risk Population: The Potential Savings of a Personalized Dental Care Plan

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Little evidence exists for the current standard of two annual preventative care visits. The purpose of this study was investigate this claim by modeling the potential savings of implementing a personalized care plan for high risk individuals in the Pittsburgh region. Methods. Using radiographs from 39 patients in the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository database, two models were created to analyse the direct savings of implementing a more aggressive preventative treatment plan and to view the longitudinal cost of increased annual yearly visits. Results. There is a significant decrease (p < 0.001) between original and modeled treatment cost when treatment severity is reduced. In addition, there is a significant decrease in adult lifetime treatment cost (p < 0.001) for up to four annual visits. Conclusions. Patients in high risk populations may see significant cost benefits in treatment cost when a personalized care plan, or higher annual preventative care visits, is implemented. PMID:27006657

  18. Competing ideologies in health care: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Young, A P

    1997-05-01

    With the introduction of general management and then of planned markets into the National Health Service (NHS), health care in the UK has gone through a massive amount of change. The effect on those working for the NHS has been 'challenging' and often confusing. This paper aims to clarify what is happening by taking an ideological perspective: what ideologies exist, how they are changing and the strategies being used to ensure their survival. Ideologies are basically about power. The relationship between market, managerial and professional ideologies is analysed using charters, codes of conduct and other associated documents. A tentative conclusion is reached that professional ideologies are able to adjust to the overriding market/consumerist ideology. However, the managerial ideology is having difficulty in gaining any real ground against the professional ideology and is having to move strategically by using audit, not just of finance, but also of clinical judgement, to gain power. PMID:9233229

  19. Financing systems of care for older persons in Europe.

    PubMed

    Joël, Marie-Eve; Dufour-Kippelen, Sandrine

    2002-08-01

    The growing demand for long-term care is placing significant pressure on traditional funding for health and social services in the European Union. In countries where the social security system is based on the Beveridge model, dependency is essentially community-managed through local services; in some countries in which social protection is based on the Bismarck model, dependency has been recognized as a new risk; in southern Europe and Belgium, dependency leads to tax-funded social assistance. Related positions have been adopted: individual contributions are increasing, and while recourse to private insurance remains marginal but is developing, the need for public financing is not being questioned. The choices made regarding home-maintenance, local intervention levels and caregiver assistance will determine the degree of risk coverage in Europe. If the various European countries adopt similar policies, there can be a convergence of the models of social protection for dependency. PMID:12462375

  20. Doing the right thing: a geriatrician's perspective on medical care for the person with advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Gillick, Muriel R

    2012-01-01

    Developing a reasonable approach to the medical care of older people with dementia will be essential in the coming decades. Physicians are the locus of decision making for persons with dementia. It is the responsibility of the physician to assure that the surrogate understands the nature and trajectory of the disease and then to elicit the desired goal of care. Physicians need to ascertain whether any advance directives are available, and if so, whether they apply to the situation of advanced dementia. Finally, physicians should help surrogates understand how the goals of care are best translated into practice. When the goal is comfort, this is achieved by assuring dignity, minimizing suffering, and promoting caring. In general, comfort should be the default goal of care, best implemented through palliative care or hospice. PMID:22458462

  1. Unearthing the Theoretical Underpinnings of "Green Care" in Mental Health and Substance Misuse Care: Theoretical Underpinnings and Contemporary Clinical Examples.

    PubMed

    Cutcliffe, John R; Travale, Rodger

    2016-03-01

    The concept of "Green Care" can increasingly be found in mental health and addictions literature and some Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurses are practicing in facilities that base their approach on some or all of the underpinning theoretical elements of Green Care. However, Green Care is not yet widely considered to be part of mainstream psychiatry. Unearthing and articulating its theoretical underpinnings and clinical applications may further advance its legitimacy. Accordingly, this article identifies four principal theoretical elements of Green Care: Connectedness; Contact with Nature; Benefits of Exercise; and Occupation/Work as Therapeutic, each of which is explored and articulated by drawing on relevant literature. PMID:26979492

  2. The role of chronic pain and current substance use in predicting negative social support among disadvantaged persons living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mary M; Maragh-Bass, Allysha C; Nguyen, Trang Q; Isenberg, Sarina; Knowlton, Amy R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic pain and substance use can strain the supportive relationships of persons with serious chronic illness, which may increase the likelihood of receiving negative, rather than positive, social support from informal caregivers and social network members. To our knowledge, this is the first study to longitudinally examine the effects of chronic pain and substance use on negative social support. The sample (N = 383) comprised disadvantaged, primarily African-American, persons living with HIV/AIDS with a history of injection drug use, 32.4% of whom reported frequent or constant pain in the prior 6 months. Using factor analysis and structural equation modeling, current substance use and greater levels of chronic pain positively predicted negative social support 12 months later, after controlling for baseline negative support, viral load, age and sex. We also found a significant interaction effect such that among those not using substances, there was a significant positive association between pain and negative support, but no such association among those currently using substances. The findings emphasize the importance of treatment of chronic pain and substance use in the supportive functioning of social networks of a disadvantaged population with serious chronic conditions and persistent health disparities. PMID:27050708

  3. Bringing Person- and Family-Centred Care Alive in Home, Community and Long-Term Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Bender, Danielle; Holyoke, Paul

    2016-01-01

    It is now more important than ever for person- and family-centred care (PFCC) to be at the forefront of program and service design and delivery; yet, to date, very little guidance is available to assist home, community and long-term care (LTC) organizations to operationalize this concept and overcome inherent challenges. This article provides a list of practical strategies for healthcare leaders to promote and support a culture shift towards PFCC in their organizations and identifies and addresses five common concerns. The unique opportunities and challenges for practicing PFCC in home, community and LTC settings are also discussed. PMID:27133612

  4. Implementation of adolescent family-based substance use prevention programs in health care settings: Comparisons across conditions and programs.

    PubMed

    Aalborg, Annette E; Miller, Brenda A; Husson, Gail; Byrnes, Hilary F; Bauman, Karl E; Spoth, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of knowledge related to implementation of family-based substance use prevention programs is based on programs delivered in school and community settings. The aim of this study is to examine procedures related to implementation effectiveness and quality of two family-based universal substance use prevention programs delivered in health care settings, the Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 (SFP) and Family Matters (FM). These evidence-based programs were delivered as part of a larger random control intervention study designed to assess the influence of program choice vs. assignment on study participation and adolescent substance use outcomes. We also assess the effects of program choice (vs. assignment to program) on program delivery. METHODS: A mixed method case study was conducted to assess procedures used to maximize implementation quality and fidelity of family-based prevention programs delivered in health care settings. Families with an 11 year old child were randomly selected for study participation from health plan membership databases of 4 large urban medical centers in the San Francisco Bay Area. Eligible families were initially randomized to a Choice study condition (families choose SFP or FM) or Assigned study condition (assigned to FM, SFP or control group); 494 ethnically diverse families were selected for participation in study programs. RESULTS: Successful implementation of family prevention programs in health care settings required knowledge of the health care environment and familiarity with established procedures for developing ongoing support and collaboration. Ongoing training of program deliverers utilizing data from fidelity assessment appeared to contribute to improved program fidelity over the course of the study. Families who chose FM completed the program in a shorter period (p<.0001) and spent more time implementing program activities (p=0.02) compared to families assigned to FM. SFP "choice

  5. Implementation of adolescent family-based substance use prevention programs in health care settings: Comparisons across conditions and programs

    PubMed Central

    Aalborg, Annette E.; Miller, Brenda A.; Husson, Gail; Byrnes, Hilary F.; Bauman, Karl E.; Spoth, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The majority of knowledge related to implementation of family-based substance use prevention programs is based on programs delivered in school and community settings. The aim of this study is to examine procedures related to implementation effectiveness and quality of two family-based universal substance use prevention programs delivered in health care settings, the Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10–14 (SFP) and Family Matters (FM). These evidence-based programs were delivered as part of a larger random control intervention study designed to assess the influence of program choice vs. assignment on study participation and adolescent substance use outcomes. We also assess the effects of program choice (vs. assignment to program) on program delivery. Methods A mixed method case study was conducted to assess procedures used to maximize implementation quality and fidelity of family-based prevention programs delivered in health care settings. Families with an 11 year old child were randomly selected for study participation from health plan membership databases of 4 large urban medical centers in the San Francisco Bay Area. Eligible families were initially randomized to a Choice study condition (families choose SFP or FM) or Assigned study condition (assigned to FM, SFP or control group); 494 ethnically diverse families were selected for participation in study programs. Results Successful implementation of family prevention programs in health care settings required knowledge of the health care environment and familiarity with established procedures for developing ongoing support and collaboration. Ongoing training of program deliverers utilizing data from fidelity assessment appeared to contribute to improved program fidelity over the course of the study. Families who chose FM completed the program in a shorter period (p<.0001) and spent more time implementing program activities (p=0.02) compared to families assigned to FM. SFP

  6. Thumbnail Sketches: EDTA-Type Chelating Agents in Everyday Consumer Products: Some Medicinal and Personal Care Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, J. Roger

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)-type chelating agents found in ophthalmic products, personal care products, and disinfectants. Also discusses the properties and action of these EDTA agents. (JN)

  7. Sexual Orientation Disparities in Substance Misuse: The Role of Childhood Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence Among Patients in Care at an Urban Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L; Falb, Kathryn L; Van Wagenen, Aimee; Grasso, Chris; Bradford, Judith

    2014-01-01

    This study examined disparities in lifetime substance misuse by sexual orientation among 2,653 patients engaged in care at an urban community health center in Boston, MA, as well as the potential mediating roles of childhood abuse substance misuse, as was identifying as a sexual minority compared to heterosexual. CA and IPV experiences partly explained disparities in substance abuse by sexual orientation with differences seen by sex. Clinicians should assess history of CA and IPV among sexual minorities presenting with a history of substance abuse disorders. The study's limitations are noted. PMID:23368669

  8. Impulsive lifestyle counseling to prevent dropout from treatment for substance use disorders in people with antisocial personality disorder: A randomized study.

    PubMed

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Hesse, Morten

    2016-06-01

    Patients with antisocial personality disorder in outpatient treatment for substance use disorders are at high risk of drop-out. Using a randomized design, this study tested the impact of adding a brief psycho-educational program, the Impulsive Lifestyle Counseling program, to outpatient substance abuse treatment in order to prevent treatment dropout. Patients (N=175) were recruited from 13 municipal treatment centers in Denmark, and assigned to treatment as usual or to the experimental condition. In all, 172 patients could be included in the analyses. In the intent-to-treat analysis, the risk of treatment dropout was reduced among patients randomized to the experimental program (hazard ratio=0.63, p=.031), after controlling for age, gender, and substitution treatment status. The study supported the efficacy of the Impulsive Lifestyle Counseling program as a method for preventing treatment dropout for patients with comorbid antisocial personality disorder in substance abuse treatment. Trial registration #ISRCTN67266318. PMID:26882500

  9. Peer Substance Use Associated with the Co-Occurrence of Borderline Personality Disorder Features and Drug Use Problems in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizzarello, Scott; Taylor, Jeanette

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine if the substance use patterns of one's close friends and romantic partners would be a significant contributor to the co-occurrence of borderline personality disorder (BPD) features and drug use problems above and beyond impulsivity and negative emotionality. Participants: Participants were 2,202 undergraduates who attended…

  10. A Pilot Study of the DBT Coach: An Interactive Mobile Phone Application for Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder and Substance Use Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Shireen L.; Dimeff, Linda A.; Skutch, Julie; Carroll, David; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2011-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has received strong empirical support and is practiced widely as a treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and BPD with comorbid substance use disorders (BPD-SUD). Therapeutic success in DBT requires that individuals generalize newly acquired skills to their natural environment. However, there have…

  11. Diagnostic Efficiency of DSM-IV Criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder: An Evaluation in Hispanic Men and Women with Substance Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Becker, Daniel F.; Anez, Luis Miguel; McGlashan, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined diagnostic efficiency of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV), criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD). One hundred thirty monolingual Hispanic adults (90 men, 40 women) at an outpatient psychiatric and substance abuse clinic were assessed with the Spanish-Language Version of…

  12. Variable- and Person-Centered Approaches to the Analysis of Early Adolescent Substance Use: Linking Peer, Family, and Intervention Effects with Developmental Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Arin M.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2006-01-01

    This 4-year study of 698 young adolescents examined the covariates of early onset substance use from Grade 6 through Grade 9. The youth were randomly assigned to a family-centered Adolescent Transitions Program (ATP) condition. Variable-centered (zero-inflated Poisson growth model) and person-centered (latent growth mixture model) approaches were…

  13. Just caring: assessing the ethical and economic costs of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Leonard M

    2014-02-01

    Personalized medicine has been touted as a revolutionary form of cancer care. It has been portrayed as precision medicine, targeting with deadly accuracy cancer cells and sparing patients the debilitating broad-spectrum side effects of more traditional forms of cancer therapy. But personalized medicine still has its costs to patients and society, both moral and economic costs. How to recognize and address those issues will be the focus of this essay. We start with these questions: Does everyone faced with cancer have a moral right to the most effective cancer care available, no matter what the cost, no matter whether a particular individual has the personal ability to pay for that care or not? Or are there limits to the cancer care that anyone has a right to at social expense? If so, what are those limits and how are those limits to be determined? Are those limits a matter of both morality and economics? I will answer this last question in the affirmative. This is what I refer to as the "Just Caring" problem in health care. PMID:24445288

  14. Personal Continuity of Care in a University-Based Primary Care Practice: Impact on Blood Pressure Control.

    PubMed

    Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Abdullah, Adina; Lee, Ping Yein; Liew, Su May; Chia, Yook Chin; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2015-01-01

    Continuity of care is an important quality outcome of patient care. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between personal continuity and blood pressure (BP) control among the patients with hypertension in an academic primary care centre. Between January and May 2012, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of patients with hypertension who had been followed up for at least 1 year in the Primary Care Clinic, University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. In this setting, doctors who provided care for hypertension included postgraduate family medicine trainees, non-trainee doctors and academic staff. Systematic random sampling (1:4) was used for patient selection. BP control was defined as less than 130/80 mm Hg for patients with diabetes mellitus, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease and less than 140/90 mm Hg for all other patients. Continuity of care was assessed using the usual provider continuity index (UPCI), which is the ratio of patient visits to the usual provider to the total number of visits to all providers in 1 year. A UPC index of zero denotes no continuity while an index of one reflects perfect continuity with only the usual provider. We reviewed a total of 1060 medical records. The patients' mean age was 62.0 years (SD 10.4). The majority was women (59.2%) and married (85.7%). The mean number of visits in a year was 3.85 (SD 1.36). A total of 72 doctors had provided consultations (55 postgraduate family medicine trainees, 8 non-trainee doctors and 9 academic staff). The mean UPCI was 0.43 (SD 0.34). Target BP was achieved in 42% of the patients. There was no significant relationship between BP control and personal continuity after adjustment for total number of visits. Continuity of care was not associated with BP control in our centre. Further studies are needed to explore the reasons for this. PMID:26214304

  15. Part 1: The Theoretical Basis for Recovery-Oriented Management of Substance Use Disorders in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Fornili, Katherine S

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence in the literature that screening and brief counseling interventions are effective in detecting alcohol problems and decreasing alcohol consumption among patients in primary care settings but somewhat weaker evidence regarding screening and brief intervention for drug problems. In 2014, two published studies made news and caused concern among proponents of substance Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) programs, when their authors concluded that brief interventions were not effective for decreasing drug use among primary care patients identified through screening, and advised that widespread adoption of screening and brief intervention for drug use was not warranted.An evaluation of the theoretical foundations for evidence-based SBIRT services was conducted to produce possible explanations for why traditional SBIRT works well for individuals with unhealthy alcohol use but not as well for those with more serious substance use disorders, including drug use and alcohol/drug dependence. Smith and Liehr's evaluation framework for middle-range theory was utilized to analyze the Chronic Care Model, which was featured prominently in early SBIRT literature, and the newer Recovery Management model, which provides a philosophical framework for organizing modern addictions services and quality-of-life enhancements (Part 1 of this two-part series).Programs are more likely to succeed if guided by theory, and examination of relevant components of theory-based interventions can be useful in developing practical strategies for meeting program objectives. A new, theory-based, recovery-oriented framework for primary care SBIRT is introduced in Part 2 ("SBIRT+RM(C): A Proposed Model for Recovery-Oriented Primary Care"). PMID:27272991

  16. Mental health care in post-genocide Rwanda: evaluation of a program specializing in posttraumatic stress disorder and substance abuse

    PubMed Central

    Ng, L. C.; Harerimana, B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following the genocide, millions of Rwandans are likely living with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Le Centre Psychothérapeutique Icyizere provides the only specialized treatment for PTSD in the Rwandan healthcare system. Methods Demographics, diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and scores on assessments of functioning and PTSD were recorded from clinical charts of all patients receiving care between October 2013 and 2014. Descriptive statistics and within-group t tests comparing functional impairment and PTSD symptoms at intake to discharge and follow-up were calculated. Results A total of 719 patients (55.08% male) received care. Patients were more educated, more likely to live in the capital, and less likely to be married than the general population. Patients reported high desire for, and strong satisfaction with, care. Most patients (55.60%) were still in care by the end of the program evaluation. Functioning improved from intake to discharge (p < 0.001), and improvements were sustained at follow-up (p < 0.001). Most adults were diagnosed with psychotic disorders, substance use disorders, or depression. Only 20 patients were diagnosed with PTSD, and symptoms were improved at discharge (p = 0.003). Conclusions This program evaluation demonstrated the utility of a low-resource information management system to provide clarity about the patient population and outcomes. Results suggest that services are effective and sustainable, although people with PTSD were not the primary recipients of care. Disparities in care by diagnosis, education, marital status, and geography are discussed. Results have contributed to changes in service delivery and care and efforts to increase access to care. PMID:27610238

  17. WEBPAGE ON ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR CHEMICALS, PHARMACEUTICALS, AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS - UPDATE 6/28/02

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of endocrine disruptors, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products in the environment and in drinking waters is a growing concern in the US. The definition of endocrine disruptors is a matter of debate, however, a simple definition is that endocrine disruptors are ...

  18. Personal Care Chemistry as a Bridge to Careers in Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabrouk, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes several activities in personal care chemistry that provide middle school girls with opportunities to learn firsthand about science and engineering technology. These activities--the preparation of lip balm and hand lotion--are fun, easy to do, and make use of relatively inexpensive, safe, environmentally…

  19. Some Aspects of the Effects of Day Care on Infants' Emotional and Personality Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Minta M.

    To identify any differences in emotional/personality development of a group of infants reared at home and a matched groups of infants enrolled in a day care center, data were obtained on behaviors of two groups of infants. The sample consisted of 15 demographically matched pairs of infants, ages 3-24 months at entrance. Data were collected through…

  20. Reenacted Case Scenarios for Undergraduate Healthcare Students to Illustrate Person-Centered Care in Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Sandra L.; De Bellis, Anita; Guerin, Pauline; Walters, Bonnie; Wotherspoon, Alison; Cecchin, Maggie; Paterson, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare practitioners have suggested that interpreting person-centered care for people who have dementia to undergraduate students requires guidance in practical application. This article describes the production of a written and digital interdisciplinary educational resource for tertiary students. It uses real-life case scenarios provided by…

  1. Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: What are the Big Questions?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past 10-15 years, a significant amount of work has been done by the scientific, regulatory and business communities into effects and risks of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment. It is now timely to review the current knowledge and to...

  2. Beliefs about Promoting Cognitive Health among Filipino Americans Who Care for Persons with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Tseng, Winston; Price, Anna E.; Ivey, Susan L.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Liu, Rui; Wu, Bei; Logsdon, Rebecca G.; Beard, Renee L.

    2012-01-01

    We examined beliefs about promoting cognitive health among Filipino Americans who care for persons with dementia, their awareness of media information about cognitive health, and their suggestions for communicating such information to other caregivers. We conducted three focus groups (25 participants). The constant comparison method compared…

  3. Mortality in Persons with Developmental Disabilities after Transfer into Community Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, David; Shavelle, Robert; Baumeister, Alfred; Anderson, Terence W.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 1,878 persons with developmental disabilities who had been transferred from California state institutions into community care found the mortality rates for movers exceeded institutional rates by 51%. The effect was largest shortly after the move and in subjects who had moved most recently. (Author/CR)

  4. How Personality and Gender May Relate to Individual Attitudes toward Caring for and about Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruf, Deborah L.; Radosevich, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Heightened global awareness and caring are reported as attributes of high intelligence. But we noted enough exceptions in our gifted clientele to question whether feelings of global concern are further related to personality type and gender. A nonrandom sample of 124 bright adults responded to author-developed Likert scale online survey questions…

  5. Surveying Community Nursing Support for Persons with an Intellectual Disability and Palliative Care Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Maria; Doody, Owen; Lyons, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care services have developed over the years to support all persons with life-limiting conditions. Moreover, services for people with an intellectual disability have moved from the traditional institutional setting to supporting people with an intellectual disability to live in their own community and family home. The expansion of…

  6. Role for a Labor-Management Partnership in Nursing Home Person-Centered Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leutz, Walter; Bishop, Christine E.; Dodson, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how a partnership between labor and management works to change the organization and focus of nursing home frontline work, supporting a transition toward person-centered care (PCC) in participating nursing homes. Design and Methods: Using a participatory research approach, we conducted case studies of 2 nursing homes…

  7. The Experience of Care-Giving for a Person with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogard, Connie Lynn

    2010-01-01

    As the population continues to become more aged and at risk for chronic illness, there will be a growing need for caregivers. Caregivers to persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) face the challenge of providing care over many years due to the chronic progressive nature of this neurological disorder. The purpose of this study was to understand and…

  8. Nurses' Judgment as They Care for Persons Who Exhibit Impaired Judgment: A Phenomenonological Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doona, Mary Ellen

    1995-01-01

    A study looked at the process by which psychiatric nurses (n=6) make judgments as they care for people with impaired judgment. Results revealed an overarching theme--judgment as personal responsibility--and four major themes: closeness to clinical data, critical reflection, respect for one's knowledge and ignorance, and the existential nature of…

  9. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie; Mullins, C. Daniel; Novak, Priscilla; Thomas, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Designing culturally sensitive personalized interventions is essential to sustain patients' involvement in their treatment and encourage patients to take an active role in their own health and health care. We consider patient activation and empowerment as a cyclical process defined through patient accumulation of knowledge, confidence, and…

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY OF PHARMACEUTICAL AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS: THE SEPARATIONS FOCUS TURNS TO POLAR ANALYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the scope of a number of emerging contaminant issues in environmental analysis, one area that has received a great deal of public interest has been the assessment of the role of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) as stressors and agents of change in ecosyst...

  11. Work Stress, Burnout, and Social and Personal Resources among Direct Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray-Stanley, Jennifer A.; Muramatsu, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Work stress is endemic among direct care workers (DCWs) who serve people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Social resources, such as work social support, and personal resources, such as an internal locus of control, may help DCWs perceive work overload and other work-related stressors as less threatening and galvanize them to cope…

  12. Psychometric Properties of a Korean Measure of Person-Directed Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jae-Sung; Lee, Minhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the validity and reliability of a person-directed care (PDC) measure for nursing homes in Korea. Method: Managerial personnel from 223 nursing homes in 2010 and 239 in 2012 were surveyed. Results: Item analysis and exploratory factor analysis for the first sample generated a 33-item PDC measure with eight factors.…

  13. Agreement between Older Persons and their Surrogate Decision Makers Regarding Participation in Advance Care Planning

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Terri R.; Redding, Colleen A.; Robbins, Mark L.; O'Leary, John R.; Iannone, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine agreement between older persons and their surrogates regarding participation in advance care planning (ACP). Design Observational cohort study. Setting Community Participants Persons age ≥ 65 and the individual they identified as most likely to make treatment decisions on their behalf. Measurements Older persons were asked about participation in four activities: 1. Completion of living will; 2. Completion of health care proxy; 3. Communication regarding views about life-sustaining treatment; 4. Communication regarding views about quality versus quantity of life. Surrogates were asked whether they believed the older person had completed these activities. Results Of 216 pairs, 81% agreed about whether a living will had been completed [k = .61, 95% confidence interval (CI) .51, .72]. Only 68% of pairs agreed about whether a health care proxy had been completed (k = .39, 95% CI .29, .50), 64% agreed about whether they had communicated regarding life-sustaining treatment (k = .22, 95% CI .09, .35), and 62% agreed about whether they had communicated regarding quality versus quantity of life (k = .23, 95% CI .11, .35). Conclusions While agreement between older persons and their surrogates regarding living will completion was good, agreement about participation in other aspects of ACP was fair to poor. Additional study is necessary to determine who is providing the most accurate report of objective ACP components and whether agreement regarding participation in ACP is associated with greater shared understanding of patients’ preferences. PMID:21649619

  14. Knowledge about persons with disability act (1995) among health care professionals dealing with persons affected by disabilities.

    PubMed

    Berry, B S; Devapitchai, K S; Raju, M S

    2009-01-01

    To assess the level of awareness about the different provisions of the persons with Disability Act (1995) among the health care professionals, 201 health care professionals dealing with the disabled persons from different parts of India were interviewed using structured interview checklist. The data were analysed through statistical package of social sciences software. Chi-square test were applied on the variables and the Pvalues were ascertained. The results show that 48.3% knew about administration hierarchy, 53.7% of respondents were aware of the free education available for the disabled, 68.5% were aware of the employment scheme, 62.7% about poverty alleviation schemes, 59.2% know about the traveling benefits, 56.2% of professionals were aware of the benefits for people with low vision. Only 29.9% of respondents knew about provisions to overcome architectural barriers. 43.8% of them knew about the least disability percentage whereas only 28.4% were aware of research and manpower schemes. Regarding affirmative action, 32.17% told correctly and 52.7% of the professionals responded correctly with respectto non- discrimination schemes. The level of awareness among the professionals working in rural regions is lower with regard to administration hierarchy and poverty alleviation schemes. Informations regarding disabled friendly environments and research and manpower development were found to be low among respondents of all professions which need to be effectively intervened. Gender did not show any influence with respect to the components of the act. The study showed that there is an ample need for educational interventions among the health care professionals in all socio-demography. Inclusion of PWD Act in the curriculum of medical schools as a topic in conferences and workshops for health care professionals are suggested. PMID:20329362

  15. [Inefficient management of personal health in oral anticoagulation. Home nursing care in primary health care].

    PubMed

    López Castañón, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes an 83 year-old immobilised patient with multiple diseases and on polypharmacy. Nursing care is developed at home. The patient is included in patient care programs for the anticoagulated and polymedicated patient. Nursing assessments were made using the Marjory Gordon functional health patterns, by which we identified, among others, problems related to non-compliance with the pharmacological treatment. The Nurse's Diagnosis was: Ineffective Management of own health. With the support of NANDA, NOC and NIC taxonomy we determined the nursing objectives and interventions. The expected results of the Care Plan were achieved. Polypharmacy in the elderly can lead to treatment problems, increasing hospital admissions, morbidity and mortality and health expenditure Nursing care at home is a continuous development process and is increasing due to aging of the population, the prevalence of chronic diseases, as well as the increased life expectancy. It is estimated that in 2030, 24% of the Spanish population will be over 64 years. The physical, sensory, cognitive and chronic disabilities of aging make this type of care necessary. It is a major element in the comprehensive care of these patients, by checking the correct use of medication, symptom control, helping them to be autonomous in managing their disease and establishing a fluid relationship between the patients and their family. PMID:22284363

  16. Nonfamily Experience and Receipt of Personal Care in a Rapidly Changing Context

    PubMed Central

    Yarger, Jennifer; Brauner-Otto, Sarah R.

    2013-01-01

    Scholars and policy makers have expressed concern that social and economic changes occurring throughout Asia are threatening the well-being of older adults by undercutting their systems of family support. Using a sample of 1,654 men and women aged 45 and older from the Chitwan Valley Family Study in Nepal, we evaluated the relationship between individuals’ nonfamily experiences, such as education, travel, and nonfamily living, and their likelihood of receiving personal care in older adulthood. Overall, we found that among individuals in poor health, those who had received more education, traveled to the capital city, or lived away from their families were less likely to have received personal care in the previous two weeks than adults who had not had these experiences. Our findings provide evidence that although familial connections remain strong in Nepal, experiences in new nonfamily social contexts are tied to lower levels of care receipt. PMID:24999289

  17. A Personal Health Network for Chemotherapy Care Coordination: Evaluation of Usability Among Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Katherine K; Bell, Janice F; Bold, Richard; Davis, Andra; Ngo, Victoria; Reed, Sarah C; Joseph, Jill G

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a top concern globally. Cancer care suffers from lack of coordination, silos of information, and high cost. Interest is emerging in person-centered technology to assist with coordination to address these challenges. This study evaluates the usability of the "personal health network" (PHN), a novel solution leveraging social networking and mobile technologies, among individuals undergoing chemotherapy and receiving care coordination. Early results from interviews of 12 participants in a randomized pragmatic trial suggest that they feel more connected to the healthcare team using the PHN, find value in access to the patient education library, and are better equipped to organize the many activities that occur during chemotherapy. Improvements are needed in navigation, connectivity, and integration with electronic health records. Findings contribute to improvements in the PHN and informs a roadmap for potentially greater impact in technology-enabled cancer care coordination. PMID:27332197

  18. Introducing an Equal Rights Framework for Older Persons in Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    Jönson, Håkan; Harnett, Tove

    2016-01-01

    This article reconceptualizes residential care for older persons by introducing a framework developed from a rights-based principle of disability policies: the normalization principle. This principle is part of the social model and states that society should make available for people who have impairments living conditions that are as close as possible to those of “others.” Using the framework on the case of eldercare in Sweden shows that although disability policies have used people without impairments as a comparative (external) reference group for claiming rights, eldercare policies use internal reference groups, basing comparisons on other care users. The article highlights the need for external comparisons in eldercare and suggests that the third age, which so far has been a normative reference group for older people, could be a comparative reference group when older persons in need of care claim rights to equal conditions. PMID:26035884

  19. Personal care product use and urinary levels of phthalate metabolites in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Romero-Franco, Michelle; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Calafat, Antonia M; Cebrián, Mariano E; Needham, Larry L; Teitelbaum, Susan; Wolff, Mary S; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2011-07-01

    Sources of phthalates other than Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) related products are scarcely documented in Mexico. The objective of our study was to explore the association between urinary levels of nine phthalate metabolites and the use of personal care products. Subjects included 108 women who participated as controls in an ongoing population-based case-control study of environmental factors and genetic susceptibility to breast cancer in northern Mexico. Direct interviews were performed to inquire about sociodemographic characteristics, reproductive history, use of personal care products, and diet. Phthalate metabolites measured in urine by high performance liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry were monoethyl phthalate (MEP), monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP), mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP), mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP) as well as mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl phthalate (MEOHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate (MEHHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate (MECPP) that are metabolites of di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Detectable urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites varied from 75% (MEHP) to 100% (MEP, MBP, MEOHP, MEHHP and MECPP). Medians of urinary concentrations of some phthalate metabolites were significantly higher among users of the following personal care products compared to nonusers: body lotion (MEHHP, MECPP and sum of DEHP metabolites (ΣDEHP)), deodorant (MEHP and ΣDEHP), perfume (MiBP), anti-aging facial cream (MEP, MBP and MCPP) and bottled water (MCPP, MEHHP and MEOHP). Urinary concentrations of MEP showed a positive relationship with the number of personal care products used. Our results suggest that the use of some personal care products contributes to phthalate body burden that deserves attention due to its potential health impact. PMID:21429583

  20. A Reemerging Political Space for Linking Person and Community Through Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Bazemore, Andrew; Phillips, Robert L.; Etz, Rebecca S.; Stange, Kurt C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to understand how national policy key informants perceive the value and changing role of primary care in the context of emerging political opportunities. Methods. We conducted 13 semistructured interviews in May 2011 with leaders of federal agencies, think tanks, nonprofits, and quality standard–defining organizations with influence over health care reform policies and implementation. We recorded the interviews and used an editing and immersion–crystallization analysis approach to identify themes. Results. We identified 4 themes: (1) affirmation of primary care as the foundation of a more effective health care system, (2) the patient-centered medical home as a transitional step to foster practice innovation and payment reform, (3) the urgent need for an increased focus on community and population health in primary care, and (4) the ongoing need for advocacy and research efforts to keep primary care on public and policy agendas. Conclusions. Current efforts to reform primary care are only intermediate steps toward a system with a greater focus on community and population health. Transformed and policy-enabled primary care is an essential link between personalized care and population health. PMID:22690969

  1. Risk Factors for Borderline Personality Disorder in Treatment Seeking Patients with a Substance Use Disorder: An International Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Wapp, Manuela; van de Glind, Geurt; van Emmerik-van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Dom, Geert; Verspreet, Sofie; Carpentier, Pieter Jan; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Skutle, Arvid; Bu, Eli-Torlid; Franck, Johan; Konstenius, Maija; Kaye, Sharlene; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Barta, Csaba; Fatséas, Melina; Auriacombe, Marc; Johnson, Brian; Faraone, Stephen V.; Levin, Frances R.; Allsop, Steve; Carruthers, Susan; Schoevers, Robert A.; Koeter, Maarten W.J.; van den Brink, Wim; Moggi, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) often co-occur, partly because they share risk factors. In this international multicenter study, risk factors for BPD were examined for SUD patients. In total, 1,205 patients were comprehensively examined by standardized interviews and questionnaires on psychiatric diagnosis and risk factors, and it was found that 1,033 (85.7%) had SUDs without BPD (SUD) and 172 (14.3%) had SUD with BPD (SUD + BPD). SUD + BPD patients were significantly younger, more often females and more often diagnosed with comorbid adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. SUD + BPD patients did not differ from SUD patients on most risk factors typical for SUD such as maternal use of drugs during pregnancy or parents having any SUD. However, SUD + BPD patients did have a higher risk of having experienced emotional and physical abuse, neglect, or family violence in childhood compared to SUD patients, suggesting that child abuse and family violence are BPD-specific risk factors in patients with SUDs. PMID:25832736

  2. Psychophysiological assessment of emotional processing in patients with borderline personality disorder with and without comorbid substance use.

    PubMed

    Baschnagel, Joseph S; Coffey, Scott F; Hawk, Larry W; Schumacher, Julie A; Holloman, Garland

    2013-07-01

    This study assessed physiological measures for the study of emotional dysregulation associated with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Two patient groups, the first comprised of individuals with BPD only (n = 16) and the second, individuals with BPD and co-occurring substance-use disorder (SUD; n = 35), and a group of healthy controls (n = 45) were shown standardized pictures of varying valance and arousal levels. Affective modification of startle eye-blink responses, heart rate, facial electromyography (EMG, including corrugator and zygomatic activity), and skin-conductance responses were collected during picture presentation and during a brief recovery period. Startle data during picture presentation indicated a trend toward the expected increase in startle response magnitude to negative stimuli, to be moderated by group status, with patients with BPD-SUD showing a lack of affective modification and the BPD-only group showing similar affective modification to that of controls. Heart-rate data suggested lower reactivity to negative pictures for both patient groups. Differences in facial EMG responses did not provide a clear pattern, and skin-conductance responses were not significantly different between groups. The data did not suggest differences between groups in recovery from exposure to the emotional stimuli. The startle and heart-rate data suggest a possible hyporeactivity to emotional stimuli in BPD. PMID:23088207

  3. Reducing care-resistant behaviors during oral hygiene in persons with dementia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nursing home residents with dementia are often dependent on others for mouth care, yet will react with care-resistant behavior when receiving assistance. The oral health of these elders deteriorates in the absence of daily oral hygiene, predisposing them to harmful systemic problems such as pneumonia, hyperglycemia, cardiac disease, and cerebral vascular accidents. The purpose of this study is to determine whether care-resistant behaviors can be reduced, and oral health improved, through the application of an intervention based on the neurobiological principles of threat perception and fear response. The intervention, called Managing Oral Hygiene Using Threat Reduction, combines best mouth care practices with a constellation of behavioral techniques that reduce threat perception and thereby prevent or de-escalate care-resistant behaviors. Methods/Design Using a randomized repeated measures design, 80 elders with dementia from 5 different nursing homes will be randomized at the individual level to the experimental group, which will receive the intervention, or to the control group, which will receive standard mouth care from research team members who receive training in the proper methods for providing mouth care but no training in resistance recognition or prevention/mediation. Oral health assessments and care-resistant behavior measurements will be obtained during a 7-day observation period and a 21-day intervention period. Individual growth models using multilevel analysis will be used to estimate the efficacy of the intervention for reducing care-resistant behaviors in persons with dementia, and to estimate the overall efficacy of the intervention using oral health outcomes. Activity-based costing methods will be used to determine the cost of the proposed intervention. Discussion At the conclusion of this study, the research team anticipates having a proven intervention that prevents and reduces care-resistant within the context of mouth care. Long

  4. 25 CFR 900.193 - Does FTCA coverage extend to individuals who provide health care services under a personal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... health care services under a personal services contract providing services in a facility that is owned... provide health care services under a personal services contract providing services in a facility that is... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  5. Testing a bedside personal computer Clinical Care Classification System for nursing students using Microsoft Access.

    PubMed

    Feeg, Veronica D; Saba, Virginia K; Feeg, Alan N

    2008-01-01

    This study tested a personal computer-based version of the Sabacare Clinical Care Classification System on students' performance of charting patient care plans. The application was designed as an inexpensive alternative to teach electronic charting for use on any laptop or personal computer with Windows and Microsoft Access. The data-based system was tested in a randomized trial with the control group using a type-in text-based-only system also mounted on a laptop at the bedside in the laboratory. Student care plans were more complete using the data-based system over the type-in text version. Students were more positive but not necessarily more efficient with the data-based system. The results demonstrate that the application is effective for improving student nursing care charting using the nursing process and capturing patient care information with a language that is standardized and ready for integration with other patient electronic health record data. It can be implemented on a bedside stand in the clinical laboratory or used to aggregate care planning over a student's clinical experience. PMID:19047883

  6. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Mullins, C. Daniel; Novak, Priscilla; Thomas, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Designing culturally-sensitive personalized interventions is essential to sustain patients’ involvement in their treatment, and encourage patients to take an active role in their own health and health care. We consider patient activation and empowerment as a cyclical process defined through patient accumulation of knowledge, confidence, and self-determination for their own health and health care. We propose a patient-centered, multi-level activation and empowerment framework (individual-, health care professional-, community-, and health care delivery system-level) to inform the development of culturally informed personalized patient activation and empowerment (P-PAE) interventions to improve population health, and reduce racial and ethnic disparities. We discuss relevant Affordable Care Act payment and delivery policy reforms, and how they impact patient activation and empowerment. Such policies include Accountable Care Organizations and Value Based Purchasing, Patient Centered Medical Homes, and the Community Health Benefit. Challenges and possible solutions to implementing the P-PAE are discussed. Comprehensive and longitudinal data sets with consistent P-PAE measures are needed to conduct comparative effectiveness analyses to evaluate the optimal P-PAE model. We believe the P-PAE model is timely and sustainable, and will be critical to engaging patients in their treatment, developing patients’ abilities to manage their health, helping patients to express concerns and preferences regarding treatment, empowering patients to ask questions about treatment options, and building up strategic patient-provider partnerships through shared decision making. PMID:25845376

  7. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Mullins, C Daniel; Novak, Priscilla; Thomas, Stephen B

    2016-02-01

    Designing culturally sensitive personalized interventions is essential to sustain patients' involvement in their treatment and encourage patients to take an active role in their own health and health care. We consider patient activation and empowerment as a cyclical process defined through patient accumulation of knowledge, confidence, and self-determination for their own health and health care. We propose a patient-centered, multilevel activation and empowerment framework (individual-, health care professional-, community-, and health care delivery system-level) to inform the development of culturally informed personalized patient activation and empowerment (P-PAE) interventions to improve population health and reduce racial and ethnic disparities. We discuss relevant Affordable Care Act payment and delivery policy reforms and how they affect patient activation and empowerment. Such policies include Accountable Care Organizations and value-based purchasing, patient-centered medical homes, and the community health benefit. Challenges and possible solutions to implementing the P-PAE are discussed. Comprehensive and longitudinal data sets with consistent P-PAE measures are needed to conduct comparative effectiveness analyses to evaluate the optimal P-PAE model. We believe the P-PAE model is timely and sustainable and will be critical to engaging patients in their treatment, developing patients' abilities to manage their health, helping patients express concerns and preferences regarding treatment, empowering patients to ask questions about treatment options, and building up strategic patient-provider partnerships through shared decision making. PMID:25845376

  8. Examining the Role of Antisocial Personality Disorder in Intimate Partner Violence Among Substance Use Disorder Treatment Seekers With Clinically Significant Trauma Histories.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Rita E; Schumacher, Julie A; Mota, Natalie; Coffey, Scott F

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the associations among posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) diagnosis, and intimate partner violence (IPV) in a sample of 145 substance abuse treatment-seeking men and women with positive trauma histories; sex was examined as a moderator. ASPD diagnosis significantly predicted both verbal and physical aggression; sex moderated the association between ASPD diagnosis and physical violence. PTSD symptom severity significantly predicted engaging in verbal, but not physical, aggression. Overall, these results suggest that an ASPD diagnosis may be an important risk factor for engaging in IPV among women seeking treatment for a substance use disorder. PMID:26084544

  9. Commentary: Personalized health planning and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: an opportunity for academic medicine to lead health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dinan, Michaela A; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Snyderman, Ralph

    2010-11-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) mandates the exploration of new approaches to coordinated health care delivery--such as patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, and disease management programs--in which reimbursement is aligned with desired outcomes. PPACA does not, however, delineate a standardized approach to improve the delivery process or a specific means to quantify performance for value-based reimbursement; these details are left to administrative agencies to develop and implement. The authors propose that coordinated care can be implemented more effectively and performance quantified more accurately by using personalized health planning, which employs individualized strategic health planning and care relevant to the patient's specific needs. Personalized health plans, developed by providers in collaboration with their patients, quantify patients' health and health risks over time, identify strategies to mitigate risks and/or treat disease, deliver personalized care, engage patients in their care, and measure outcomes. Personalized health planning is a core clinical process that can standardize coordinated care approaches while providing the data needed for performance-based reimbursement. The authors argue that academic health centers have a significant opportunity to lead true health care reform by adopting personalized health planning to coordinate care delivery while conducting the research and education necessary to enable its broad clinical application. PMID:20844424

  10. Personalized commissioning, public spaces: the limits of the market in English social care services

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The article explores the implications of personal budgets within English social care services, which position the individual as market actor. Rooting the research in the broader personalization agenda, the study looks at the limitations of the market in relation to individual purchase of private goods (e.g. home care), in the pooling of funds to purchase group services and in the provision of public goods such as building-based services. Method The article takes a multi-method approach, combining an interpretive focus on the framing of the personal budget-holder by advocates of personalization with national evaluation data, and data from a small survey of day centre workers. Results The article identifies three framings of the individual budget-holder articulated by advocates of personalization. The first is that personal budget-holders will be empowered market actors, commissioning the services they need. The second is that budget-holders will pool resources with others to purchase group services in order to broaden the range of options available to them. The third is that services which cannot be disaggregated into individual or group budgets – such as day centres – are not valued by service users. The article looks at the evaluation data on these three claims in turn. It identifies four limitations to the capacity of people to purchase care goods on an individual basis: lack of transparency in allocating budgets, complexity in managing a budget, excessive auditing of spending and lack of responsiveness from the provider market. Pooling of budgets to purchase collective services is found to be underdeveloped, and hampered by the complexity which is a broader limitation on personal budgets. Day centres are found to be closing not in response to commissioning decisions by individual budget-holders but because of decommissioning by local authorities, minimising the scope for individuals to express a preference for this type of care. The survey

  11. Person-Centered Care in the Home Setting for Parkinson's Disease: Operation House Call Quality of Care Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hack, Nawaz; Akbar, Umer; Monari, Erin H; Eilers, Amanda; Thompson-Avila, Amanda; Hwynn, Nelson H; Sriram, Ashok; Haq, Ihtsham; Hardwick, Angela; Malaty, Irene A; Okun, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Objective. (1) To evaluate the feasibility of implementing and evaluating a home visit program for persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) in a rural setting. (2) To have movement disorders fellows coordinate and manage health care delivery. Background. The University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration established Operation House Call to serve patients with PD who could not otherwise afford to travel to an expert center or to pay for medical care. PD is known to lead to significant disability, frequent hospitalization, early nursing home placement, and morbidity. Methods. This was designed as a quality improvement project. Movement disorders fellows travelled to the home(s) of underserved PD patients and coordinated their clinical care. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease was confirmed using standardized criteria, and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale was performed and best treatment practices were delivered. Results. All seven patients have been followed up longitudinally every 3 to 6 months in the home setting, and they remain functional and independent. None of the patients have been hospitalized for PD related complications. Each patient has a new updatable electronic medical record. All Operation House Call cases are presented during video rounds for the interdisciplinary PD team to make recommendations for care (neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychology, psychiatry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and social work). One Operation House Call patient has successfully received deep brain stimulation (DBS). Conclusion. This program is a pilot program that has demonstrated that it is possible to provide person-centered care in the home setting for PD patients. This program could provide a proof of concept for the construction of a larger visiting physician or nurse program. PMID:26078912

  12. Person-Centered Care in the Home Setting for Parkinson's Disease: Operation House Call Quality of Care Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Umer; Eilers, Amanda; Thompson-Avila, Amanda; Malaty, Irene A.; Okun, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. (1) To evaluate the feasibility of implementing and evaluating a home visit program for persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) in a rural setting. (2) To have movement disorders fellows coordinate and manage health care delivery. Background. The University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration established Operation House Call to serve patients with PD who could not otherwise afford to travel to an expert center or to pay for medical care. PD is known to lead to significant disability, frequent hospitalization, early nursing home placement, and morbidity. Methods. This was designed as a quality improvement project. Movement disorders fellows travelled to the home(s) of underserved PD patients and coordinated their clinical care. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease was confirmed using standardized criteria, and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale was performed and best treatment practices were delivered. Results. All seven patients have been followed up longitudinally every 3 to 6 months in the home setting, and they remain functional and independent. None of the patients have been hospitalized for PD related complications. Each patient has a new updatable electronic medical record. All Operation House Call cases are presented during video rounds for the interdisciplinary PD team to make recommendations for care (neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychology, psychiatry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and social work). One Operation House Call patient has successfully received deep brain stimulation (DBS). Conclusion. This program is a pilot program that has demonstrated that it is possible to provide person-centered care in the home setting for PD patients. This program could provide a proof of concept for the construction of a larger visiting physician or nurse program. PMID:26078912

  13. Cleveland Clinic's Center for personalized healthcare: setting the stage for value-based care.

    PubMed

    Teng, Kathryn; DiPiero, Jennifer; Meese, Thad; Doerr, Megan; Leonard, Mandy; Daly, Thomas; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Chalmers, Jeff; Stowe, David; Knoer, Scott; Hicks, J Kevin

    2014-04-01

    Cleveland Clinic (OH, USA) launched the Center for Personalized Healthcare in 2011 to establish an evidence-based system for individualizing care by incorporating unique patient characteristics, including but not limited to genetic and family health history information, into the standard medical decision-making process. Using MyFamily, a web-based tool integrated into our electronic health record, a patient's family health history is used as a surrogate for genetic, environmental and behavioral risks to identify those with an elevated probability of developing disease. Complementing MyFamily, the Personalized Medication Program was created for the purpose of identifying gene-drug pairs for integration into clinical practice and developing the implementation tools needed to incorporate pharmacogenomics into the clinical workflow. We have successfully implemented the gene-drug pairs HLA-B*57:01-abacavir and TPMT-thiopurines into patient care. Our efforts to establish personalized medical care at Cleveland Clinic may serve as a model for large-scale integration of personalized healthcare. PMID:24798715

  14. Care of adolescents and young adults with diabetes - much more than transitional care: a personal view.

    PubMed

    Winocour, Peter H

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing recognition that type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) acquired in childhood and adolescence requires a sophisticated approach that facilitates better self-management through adherence to generic principles in managing chronic disease in this age group, allied to the complex clinical needs of managing T1DM and related conditions. Transitional care should be seen as a process over time supported by both paediatric and adult diabetologists within a multidisciplinary team, given the complementary skills that can be brought to bear. Undoubtedly, there is a need for more effective training of all healthcare professionals working in this service. However, the accumulation of older teenagers over time and new diagnoses in those aged 19 years or more confirms that a new paradigm is necessary for the successful care of young adults beyond transitional care. Traditional clinical models will often not work for those in employment and higher education, with evidence that ongoing engagement following transfer to adult services often ceases. The alarming evidence of progressive complications in T1DM of longer duration in patients under the age of 40 years is a wake-up call to transform the care of this most vulnerable group. PMID:24889572

  15. Latent Class Analysis of Gambling Activities in a Sample of Young Swiss Men: Association with Gambling Problems, Substance Use Outcomes, Personality Traits and Coping Strategies.

    PubMed

    Studer, Joseph; Baggio, Stéphanie; Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Simon, Olivier; Daeppen, Jean-Bernard; Gmel, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    The study aimed to identify different patterns of gambling activities (PGAs) and to investigate how PGAs differed in gambling problems, substance use outcomes, personality traits and coping strategies. A representative sample of 4989 young Swiss males completed a questionnaire assessing seven distinct gambling activities, gambling problems, substance use outcomes, personality traits and coping strategies. PGAs were identified using latent class analysis (LCA). Differences between PGAs in gambling and substance use outcomes, personality traits and coping strategies were tested. LCA identified six different PGAs. With regard to gambling and substance use outcomes, the three most problematic PGAs were extensive gamblers, followed by private gamblers, and electronic lottery and casino gamblers, respectively. By contrast, the three least detrimental PGAs were rare or non-gamblers, lottery only gamblers and casino gamblers. With regard to personality traits, compared with rare or non-gamblers, private and casino gamblers reported higher levels of sensation seeking. Electronic lottery and casino gamblers, private gamblers and extensive gamblers had higher levels of aggression-hostility. Extensive and casino gamblers reported higher levels of sociability, whereas casino gamblers reported lower levels of anxiety-neuroticism. Extensive gamblers used more maladaptive and less adaptive coping strategies than other groups. Results suggest that gambling is not a homogeneous activity since different types of gamblers exist according to the PGA they are engaged in. Extensive gamblers, electronic and casino gamblers and private gamblers may have the most problematic PGAs. Personality traits and coping skills may predispose individuals to PGAs associated with more or less negative outcomes. PMID:25929440

  16. Comparison of treatment outcomes in severe personality disorder patients with or without substance use disorders: a 36-month prospective pragmatic follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Lana, Fernando; Sánchez-Gil, Carmen; Adroher, Núria D; Pérez, Víctor; Feixas, Guillem; Martí-Bonany, Josep; Torrens, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Background Concurrent personality disorder (PD) and substance use disorder (SUD) are common in clinical practice. However, SUD is the main criterion for study exclusion in most psychotherapeutic studies of PD. As a result, data on treatment outcomes in patients with concurrent PD/SUD are scarce. Methods The study sample consisted of 51 patients diagnosed with severe PD and admitted for psychotherapeutic treatment as a part of routine mental health care. All patients were diagnosed with PD according to the Structured Clinical Interview for PD. Patients were further assessed (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) to check for the presence of concurrent SUD, with 28 patients diagnosed with both disorders (PD-SUD). These 28 cases were then compared to the 23 patients without SUD (PD-nSUD) in terms of psychiatric hospitalizations and psychiatric emergency room (ER) visits before and during the 6-month therapeutic intervention and every 6 months thereafter for a total of 36 months. Results The baseline clinical characteristics correspond to a sample of PD patients (78% met DSM-IV criteria for borderline PD) with poor general functioning and a high prevalence of suicide attempts and self-harm behaviors. Altogether, the five outcome variables – the proportion and the number of psychiatric inpatient admissions, the number of days hospitalized, and the proportion and the number of psychiatric ER visits – improved significantly during the treatment period, and this improvement was maintained throughout the follow-up period. Although PD-SUD patients had more psychiatric hospitalizations and ER visits than PD-nSUD patients during follow-up, the differences between these two groups remained stable over the study period indicating that the treatment was equally effective in both groups. Conclusion Specialized psychotherapy for severe PD can be effectively applied in patients with concurrent PD-SUD under usual practice conditions. These findings suggest that exclusion of patients with

  17. Developing personal values: trainees' attitudes toward strikes by health care providers.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Ting T; Srinivasan, Malathi; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Kravitz, Richard L; Wilkes, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Worldwide, health care providers use strikes and job actions to influence policy. For health care providers, especially physicians, strikes create an ethical tension between an obligation to care for current patients (e.g., to provide care and avoid abandonment) and an obligation to better care for future patients by seeking system improvements (e.g., improvements in safety, to access, and in the composition and strength of the health care workforce). This tension is further intensified when the potential benefit of a strike involves professional self-interest and the potential risk involves patient harm or death. By definition, trainees are still forming their professional identities and values, including their opinions on fair wages, health policy, employee benefits, professionalism, and strikes. In this article, the authors explore these ethical tensions, beginning with a discussion of reactions to a potential 2005 nursing strike at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. The authors then propose a conceptual model describing factors that may influence health care providers' decisions to strike (including personal ethics, personal agency, and strike-related context). In particular, the authors explore the relationship between training level and attitudes toward taking a job action, such as going on strike. Because trainees' attitudes toward strikes continue to evolve during training, the authors maintain that open discussion around the ethics of health care professionals' strikes and other methods of conflict resolution should be included in medical education to enhance professionalism and systems-based practice training. The authors include sample case vignettes to help initiate these important discussions. PMID:21436671

  18. Reaching out to Ray: delivering palliative care services to a homeless person in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    MacWilliams, Judy; Bramwell, Michael; Brown, Sally; O'Connor, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    Most terminally ill people express a preference for dying at home. Within established models of palliative care, achieving death at home is a particular challenge for homeless people. This paper describes a quality-improvement project undertaken by a community-based palliative care service in Melbourne, Australia, to understand homeless people's palliative care needs and the challenges that workers face. Six semi-structured interviews with workers in hospital and community-based settings were undertaken and a case study documented. The results were used to initiate discussion about how policy and protocols for the community-based palliative care service might serve this population more effectively. The findings confirmed that homeless people have complex psychosocial and medical needs. They may be periodically uncontactable or living in unsafe settings, experience isolation from social support networks, and have issues of compliance with treatment protocols exacerbated by mental health problems and/or substance abuse. Service providers had particular challenges in meeting the palliative care needs of homeless people. A flexible, compassionate, and coordinated response is required, and more work is needed to explore how the needs of this particular group can be met. PMID:24577214

  19. Cost-effectiveness of assertive community treatment versus standard case management for persons with co-occurring severe mental illness and substance use disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R E; Teague, G B; Ricketts, S K; Bush, P W; Xie, H; McGuire, T G; Drake, R E; McHugo, G J; Keller, A M; Zubkoff, M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost-effectiveness of Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) in comparison to Standard Case Management (SCM) for persons with severe mental illness and substance use disorders. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING: Original data on the effectiveness and social costs of ACT and SCM that were collected between 1989 and 1995. Seven community mental health centers in New Hampshire provided both types of treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Persons with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder and a concurrent substance use disorder were randomly assigned to ACT or SCM and followed for three years. The primary variables assessed were substance use, psychiatric symptoms, functioning, quality of life, and social costs. DATA COLLECTION METHODS: Effectiveness data were obtained from interviews at six-month intervals with persons enrolled in treatment and with their service providers. Social cost and service utilization data came from client reports; interviews with informal caregivers; provider information systems and Medicaid claims; law enforcement agencies; courts; and community service providers. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants in both groups showed significant reductions in substance use over time. Focusing on quality of life and substance use outcomes, ACT and SCM were not significantly different in cost-effectiveness over the entire three-year study period. Longitudinal analyses showed that SCM tended to be more efficient during the first two years but that ACT was significantly more efficient than SCM during the final year of the study. CONCLUSIONS: In an adequately funded system, ACT is not more cost-effective than SCM. However, ACT efficiency appears to improve over time. PMID:9865221

  20. Hospitalisation Rates for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions for Persons with and without an Intellectual Disability--A Population Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balogh, R.; Brownell, M.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.; Colantonio, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that persons with an intellectual disability (ID) face barriers to primary care; however, this has not been extensively studied at the population level. Rates of hospitalisation for ambulatory care sensitive conditions are used as an indicator of access to, and quality of, primary care. The objective of the study was…

  1. “Like a Dance”: Performing Good Care for Persons with Dementia Living in Institutions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dementia care is demanding, and health care workers can become emotionally exhausted and frustrated. Particularly, demanding aspects of dementia care include patient agitation and care-resistant behaviour. The aim of this study is to describe skilled staff's understanding of high-quality praxis in dementia care units in nursing homes. Eight nurses and care workers were individually interviewed, and a qualitative design was used. Participants were recruited from two nursing homes in two towns in eastern Norway. The data were analysed following the hermeneutic tradition inspired by Kvale. The analyses revealed three main findings describing good care: (a) to find: to identify the patient's personal characteristics, state, and needs, (b) to follow: to choose the right time and the tempo and to adapt to the patient's sensitivity, and (c) to lead: to be in the forefront and prepared and to change the patient's state. An overall interpretation of the findings is described by the metaphor of a dance between the patient and the caregiver. PMID:25349732

  2. Are we ready for personalized cancer risk management? The view from breast-care providers.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Hiroko; Yagasaki, Kaori

    2014-02-01

    Personalized medicine, the tailoring of prevention and treatment, is the future of routine clinical practice. This approach has started to appear in genetic testing for predisposition to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). We explored how breast-care providers perceived HBOC risk management, using grounded theory. This study found that the frontline healthcare providers perceived HBOC risk management as still being neglected in breast cancer care. Emerging challenges included treatment priority, hesitancy to deal with sensitive issues, easily missed risks, genetic data not being shared among multidisciplinary professionals, and patients being lost to follow-up. Oncology nurses are ideally placed to facilitate communication and utilization of genetic information among multidisciplinary professionals. Specialized outpatient clinics need to be established to follow up individuals at high risk. There is a need to create a system to meet the future demands of personalized medicine in nursing practice. PMID:24580974

  3. The Model of Whole-Person Caring: creating and sustaining a healing environment.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Lucia

    2005-01-01

    At Three Rivers Community Hospital, Grants Pass, Ore, the theoretical Model of Whole-Person Caring has resulted in quantifiable and sustainable results in the areas of increased patient and employee satisfaction and decreased nursing turnover, and serves as the foundation for a comprehensive healing environment. The model is a useful framework for healthcare education and its utilization as the theoretical construct for The New England School of Whole-Health Education illustrates its congruency in an educational setting. PMID:15923936

  4. Calibrating the physician. Personal awareness and effective patient care. Working Group on Promoting Physician Personal Awareness, American Academy on Physician and Patient.

    PubMed

    Novack, D H; Suchman, A L; Clark, W; Epstein, R M; Najberg, E; Kaplan, C

    1997-08-13

    Physicians' personal characteristics, their past experiences, values, attitudes, and biases can have important effects on communication with patients; being aware of these characteristics can enhance communication. Because medical training and continuing education programs rarely undertake an organized approach to promoting personal awareness, we propose a "curriculum" of 4 core topics for reflection and discussion. The topics are physicians' beliefs and attitudes, physicians' feelings and emotional responses in patient care, challenging clinical situations, and physician self-care. We present examples of organized activities that can promote physician personal awareness such as support groups, Balint groups, and discussions of meaningful experiences in medicine. Experience with these activities suggests that through enhancing personal awareness physicians can improve their clinical care and increase satisfaction with work, relationships, and themselves. PMID:9256226

  5. The Effect of Neighborhood Context on the Relationship Between Substance Misuse and Weapons Aggression in Urban Adolescents Seeking ED Care

    PubMed Central

    Goldstick, Jason Elliott; Lipton, Robert I.; Carter, Patrick; Stoddard, Sarah A.; Newton, Manya F.; Reischl, Thomas; Walton, Maureen; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Frameworks for studying the ecology of human behavior suggest that multiple levels of the environment influence behavior and that these levels interact. Applied to studies of weapons aggression, this suggests proximal risk factor (e.g., substance use) effects may differ across neighborhoods. Objectives To estimate how the association between weapons aggression and substance use varies as a function of several community-level variables. Methods Individual-level measures (demographics, behavioral measures) were obtained from a survey of youth aged 14–24 years old seeking care at a Level-1 ED in Flint, Michigan. Community-level variables were obtained from public sources. Logistic generalized additive models were used to test whether community-level variables (crime rates, alcohol outlets, demographics) modify the link between individual-level substance use variables and the primary outcome measure: self-reported past 6-month weapon (firearm/knife) related aggression. Results The effect of marijuana misuse on weapons aggression varied significantly as a function of five community-level variables: racial composition, vacant housing rates, female headed household rates, density of package alcohol outlets, and nearby drug crime rates. The effect of high-risk alcohol use did not depend on any of the eight community variables tested. Conclusions The relationship between marijuana misuse and weapons aggression differed across neighborhoods with generally less association in more disadvantaged neighborhoods, while high-risk alcohol use showed a consistently high association with weapons aggression that did not vary across neighborhoods. The results aid in understanding the contributions of alcohol and marijuana use to the etiology of weapon-related aggression among urban youth, but further study in the general population is required. PMID:25607807

  6. Novel database for exposure to fragrance ingredients in cosmetics and personal care products.

    PubMed

    Comiskey, D; Api, A M; Barratt, C; Daly, E J; Ellis, G; McNamara, C; O'Mahony, C; Robison, S H; Safford, B; Smith, B; Tozer, S

    2015-08-01

    Exposure of fragrance ingredients in cosmetics and personal care products to the population can be determined by way of a detailed and robust survey. The frequency and combinations of products used at specific times during the day will allow the estimation of aggregate exposure for an individual consumer, and to the sample population. In the present study, habits and practices of personal care and cosmetic products have been obtained from market research data for 36,446 subjects across European countries and the United States in order to determine the exposure to fragrance ingredients. Each subject logged their product uses, time of day and body application sites in an online diary for seven consecutive days. The survey data did not contain information on the amount of product used per occasion or body measurements, such as weight and skin surface area. Nevertheless, this was found from the literature where the likely amount of product used per occasion or body measurement could be probabilistically chosen from distributions of data based on subject demographics. The daily aggregate applied consumer product exposure was estimated based on each subject's frequency of product use, and Monte Carlo simulations of their likely product amount per use and body measurements. Statistical analyses of the habits and practices and consumer product exposure are presented, which show the robustness of the data and the ability to estimate aggregate consumer product exposure. Consequently, the data and modelling methods presented show potential as a means of performing ingredient safety assessments for personal care and cosmetics products. PMID:26003515

  7. Reduction of nutrients, microbes, and personal care products in domestic wastewater by a benchtop electrocoagulation unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symonds, E. M.; Cook, M. M.; McQuaig, S. M.; Ulrich, R. M.; Schenck, R. O.; Lukasik, J. O.; van Vleet, E. S.; Breitbart, M.

    2015-03-01

    To preserve environmental and human health, improved treatment processes are needed to reduce nutrients, microbes, and emerging chemical contaminants from domestic wastewater prior to discharge into the environment. Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment is increasingly used to treat industrial wastewater; however, this technology has not yet been thoroughly assessed for its potential to reduce concentrations of nutrients, a variety of microbial surrogates, and personal care products found in domestic wastewater. This investigation's objective was to determine the efficiency of a benchtop EC unit with aluminum sacrificial electrodes to reduce concentrations of the aforementioned biological and chemical pollutants from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. EC treatment resulted in significant reductions (p < 0.05, α = 0.05) in phosphate, all microbial surrogates, and several personal care products from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. When wastewater was augmented with microbial surrogates representing bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens to measure the extent of reduction, EC treatment resulted in up to 7-log10 reduction of microbial surrogates. Future pilot and full-scale investigations are needed to optimize EC treatment for the following: reducing nitrogen species, personal care products, and energy consumption; elucidating the mechanisms behind microbial reductions; and performing life cycle analyses to determine the appropriateness of implementation.

  8. Reduction of nutrients, microbes, and personal care products in domestic wastewater by a benchtop electrocoagulation unit

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, E. M.; Cook, M. M.; McQuaig, S. M.; Ulrich, R. M.; Schenck, R. O.; Lukasik, J. O.; Van Vleet, E. S.; Breitbart, M.

    2015-01-01

    To preserve environmental and human health, improved treatment processes are needed to reduce nutrients, microbes, and emerging chemical contaminants from domestic wastewater prior to discharge into the environment. Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment is increasingly used to treat industrial wastewater; however, this technology has not yet been thoroughly assessed for its potential to reduce concentrations of nutrients, a variety of microbial surrogates, and personal care products found in domestic wastewater. This investigation's objective was to determine the efficiency of a benchtop EC unit with aluminum sacrificial electrodes to reduce concentrations of the aforementioned biological and chemical pollutants from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. EC treatment resulted in significant reductions (p < 0.05, α = 0.05) in phosphate, all microbial surrogates, and several personal care products from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. When wastewater was augmented with microbial surrogates representing bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens to measure the extent of reduction, EC treatment resulted in up to 7-log10 reduction of microbial surrogates. Future pilot and full-scale investigations are needed to optimize EC treatment for the following: reducing nitrogen species, personal care products, and energy consumption; elucidating the mechanisms behind microbial reductions; and performing life cycle analyses to determine the appropriateness of implementation. PMID:25797885

  9. Reduction of nutrients, microbes, and personal care products in domestic wastewater by a benchtop electrocoagulation unit.

    PubMed

    Symonds, E M; Cook, M M; McQuaig, S M; Ulrich, R M; Schenck, R O; Lukasik, J O; Van Vleet, E S; Breitbart, M

    2015-01-01

    To preserve environmental and human health, improved treatment processes are needed to reduce nutrients, microbes, and emerging chemical contaminants from domestic wastewater prior to discharge into the environment. Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment is increasingly used to treat industrial wastewater; however, this technology has not yet been thoroughly assessed for its potential to reduce concentrations of nutrients, a variety of microbial surrogates, and personal care products found in domestic wastewater. This investigation's objective was to determine the efficiency of a benchtop EC unit with aluminum sacrificial electrodes to reduce concentrations of the aforementioned biological and chemical pollutants from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. EC treatment resulted in significant reductions (p < 0.05, α = 0.05) in phosphate, all microbial surrogates, and several personal care products from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. When wastewater was augmented with microbial surrogates representing bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens to measure the extent of reduction, EC treatment resulted in up to 7-log10 reduction of microbial surrogates. Future pilot and full-scale investigations are needed to optimize EC treatment for the following: reducing nitrogen species, personal care products, and energy consumption; elucidating the mechanisms behind microbial reductions; and performing life cycle analyses to determine the appropriateness of implementation. PMID:25797885

  10. Community Care Workers, Poor Referral Networks and Consumption of Personal Resources in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sips, Ilona; Haeri Mazanderani, Ahmad; Schneider, Helen; Greeff, Minrie; Barten, Francoise; Moshabela, Mosa

    2014-01-01

    Although home-based care (HBC) programs are widely implemented throughout Africa, their success depends on the existence of an enabling environment, including a referral system and supply of essential commodities. The objective of this study was to explore the current state of client referral patterns and practices by community care workers (CCWs), in an evolving environment of one rural South African sub-district. Using a participant triangulation approach, in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 CCWs, 32 HBC clients and 32 primary caregivers (PCGs). An open-ended interview guide was used for data collection. Participants were selected from comprehensive lists of CCWs and their clients, using a diversified criterion-based sampling method. Three independent researchers coded three sets of data – CCWs, Clients and PCGs, for referral patterns and practices of CCWs. Referrals from clinics and hospitals to HBC occurred infrequently, as only eight (25%) of the 32 clients interviewed were formally referred. Community care workers showed high levels of commitment and personal investment in supporting their clients to use the formal health care system. They went to the extent of using their own personal resources. Seven CCWs used their own money to ensure client access to clinics, and eight gave their own food to ensure treatment adherence. Community care workers are essential in linking clients to clinics and hospitals and to promote the appropriate use of medical services, although this effort frequently necessitated consumption of their own personal resources. Therefore, risk protection strategies are urgently needed so as to ensure sustainability of the current work performed by HBC organizations and the CCW volunteers. PMID:24781696

  11. Community care workers, poor referral networks and consumption of personal resources in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sips, Ilona; Haeri Mazanderani, Ahmad; Schneider, Helen; Greeff, Minrie; Barten, Francoise; Moshabela, Mosa

    2014-01-01

    Although home-based care (HBC) programs are widely implemented throughout Africa, their success depends on the existence of an enabling environment, including a referral system and supply of essential commodities. The objective of this study was to explore the current state of client referral patterns and practices by community care workers (CCWs), in an evolving environment of one rural South African sub-district. Using a participant triangulation approach, in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 CCWs, 32 HBC clients and 32 primary caregivers (PCGs). An open-ended interview guide was used for data collection. Participants were selected from comprehensive lists of CCWs and their clients, using a diversified criterion-based sampling method. Three independent researchers coded three sets of data - CCWs, Clients and PCGs, for referral patterns and practices of CCWs. Referrals from clinics and hospitals to HBC occurred infrequently, as only eight (25%) of the 32 clients interviewed were formally referred. Community care workers showed high levels of commitment and personal investment in supporting their clients to use the formal health care system. They went to the extent of using their own personal resources. Seven CCWs used their own money to ensure client access to clinics, and eight gave their own food to ensure treatment adherence. Community care workers are essential in linking clients to clinics and hospitals and to promote the appropriate use of medical services, although this effort frequently necessitated consumption of their own personal resources. Therefore, risk protection strategies are urgently needed so as to ensure sustainability of the current work performed by HBC organizations and the CCW volunteers. PMID:24781696

  12. The Counseling, Self-Care, Adherence Approach to Person-Centered Care and Shared Decision Making: Moral Psychology, Executive Autonomy, and Ethics in Multi-Dimensional Care Decisions.

    PubMed

    Herlitz, Anders; Munthe, Christian; Törner, Marianne; Forsander, Gun

    2016-08-01

    This article argues that standard models of person-centred care (PCC) and shared decision making (SDM) rely on simplistic, often unrealistic assumptions of patient capacities that entail that PCC/SDM might have detrimental effects in many applications. We suggest a complementary PCC/SDM approach to ensure that patients are able to execute rational decisions taken jointly with care professionals when performing self-care. Illustrated by concrete examples from a study of adolescent diabetes care, we suggest a combination of moral and psychological considerations to support the claim that standard PCC/SDM threatens to systematically undermine its own goals. This threat is due to a tension between the ethical requirements of SDM in ideal circumstances and more long-term needs actualized by the context of self-care handled by patients with limited capacities for taking responsibility and adhere to their own rational decisions. To improve this situation, we suggest a counseling, self-care, adherence approach to PCC/SDM, where more attention is given to how treatment goals are internalized by patients, how patients perceive choice situations, and what emotional feedback patients are given. This focus may involve less of a concentration on autonomous and rational clinical decision making otherwise stressed in standard PCC/SDM advocacy. PMID:26756477

  13. The impact of managed care on substance abuse treatment: a report of the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

    PubMed

    Galanter, M; Keller, D S; Dermatis, H; Egelko, S

    2000-01-01

    This report examines the impact of managed care (MC) and related developments on substance abuse treatment, and evaluates how it has been associated with a decline in the availability of proper treatment for many addicted patients. A trend toward carve-out and for-profit MC organizations is associated with lower financial incentives for intensive treatment than in earlier staff-model and not-for-profit MC organizations. The value of substance abuse insurance coverage has declined by 75% between 1988 and 1998 for employees of mid-to large-size companies, compared with only an 11.5% decline for general health insurance. The shift towards MC has also been associated with a drastic reduction in frequency and duration of inpatient hospitalization, and there is no clear evidence that this reduction has been offset by a corresponding increase in outpatient support. In a survey of physicians treating addiction, the majority felt that MC had a negative impact on detoxification and rehabilitation, and on their ethical practice of addiction medicine. PMID:11076117

  14. Economic valuation of environmental benefits of removing pharmaceutical and personal care products from WWTP effluents by ozonation.

    PubMed

    Molinos-Senante, M; Reif, R; Garrido-Baserba, M; Hernández-Sancho, F; Omil, F; Poch, M; Sala-Garrido, R

    2013-09-01

    Continuous release of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) present in effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is nowadays leading to the adoption of specific measures within the framework of the Directive 2000/60/EC (Water Framework Directive). The ozonation process, normally employed for drinking water production, has also proven its potential to eliminate PPCPs from secondary effluents in spite of their low concentrations. However, there is a significant drawback related with the costs associated with its implementation. This lack of studies is especially pronounced regarding the economic valuation of the environmental benefits associated to avoid the discharge of these pollutants into water bodies. For the first time the shadow prices of 5 PPCPs which are ethynilestradiol, sulfamethoxazole, diclofenac, tonalide and galaxolide from treated effluent using a pilot-scale ozonation reactor have been estimated. From non-sensitive areas their values are -73.73; -34.95; -42.20; -10.98; and -8.67 respectively and expressed in €/kg. They represent a proxy to the economic value of the environmental benefits arisen from undischarged pollutants. This paper contributes to value the environmental benefits of implementing post-treatment processes aimed to achieve the quality standards required by the Priority Substances Directive. PMID:23747556

  15. Pharmacogenetics in primary care: the promise of personalized medicine and the reality of racial profiling.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Linda M; Kreiner, Meta J

    2013-03-01

    Many anticipate that expanding knowledge of genetic variations associated with disease risk and medication response will revolutionize clinical medicine, making possible genetically based Personalized Medicine where health care can be tailored to individuals, based on their genome scans. Pharmacogenetics has received especially strong interest, with many pharmaceutical developers avidly working to identify genetic variations associated with individual differences in drug response. While clinical applications of emerging genetic knowledge are becoming increasingly available, genetic tests for drug selection are not as yet widely accessible, and many primary care clinicians are unprepared to interpret genetic information. We conducted interviews with 58 primary care clinicians, exploring how they integrate emerging pharmacogenetic concepts into their practices. We found that in their current practices, pharmacogenetic innovations have not led to individually tailored treatment, but instead have encouraged use of essentialized racial/ethnic identity as a proxy for genetic heritage. Current manifestations of Personalized Medicine appear to be reinforcing entrenched notions of inherent biological differences between racial groups, and promoting the belief that racial profiling in health care is supported by cutting-edge scientific authority. Our findings raise concern for how pharmacogenetic innovations will actually affect diverse populations, and how unbiased treatment can be assured. PMID:23264029

  16. The Terry Fox Research Institute’s Ontario Dialogue: how will personalized medicine change health care?

    PubMed Central

    Curwin, K.; Paige, C.J.; Sutcliffe, S.

    2011-01-01

    This is the final instalment in a series of three articles by the Terry Fox Research Institute about its pan-Canadian dialogue series, Cancer: Let’s Get Personal, a public research and outreach project undertaken in 2010. The dialogues served to launch a national and continuing conversation on personalized medicine with the medical and scientific communities and the public, including cancer survivors, patients, and caregivers. Participants at the Ontario dialogue, held in Toronto, October 18, 2010, discussed the challenges that Canadians and the health care system face as they move forward on a pathway created by advanced science and technology that will phenomenally transform cancer care and treatment. The one-size-fits-all approach to treating cancer patients is being rapidly eclipsed by an approach that treats patients and their tumours as individually as possible. As a result, a paradigm shift is occurring both in the laboratory and in the clinic, creating new approaches to conducting research and delivering treatment and care that place each and every patient—and tumour—at the centre of treatment. New approaches and practices in health care are necessary to ensure successful uptake and implementation of these advances for the benefit of all Canadians. Participating partners and supporters of the Ontario dialogue were the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and the University Health Network.

  17. Measuring Self-Care in Persons With Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Xu, Jiayun; Zhao, Weigang; Han, Hae-Ra

    2016-06-01

    This systematic review examines the characteristics and psychometric properties of the instruments used to assess self-care behaviors among persons with type 2 diabetes. Electronic databases were searched for relevant studies published in English within the past 20 years. Thirty different instruments were identified in 75 articles: 18 original instruments on type 2 diabetes mellitus self-care, 8 translated or revised version, and 4 not specific but relevant to diabetes. Twenty-one instruments were multidimensional and addressed multiple dimensions of self-care behavior. Nine were unidimensional: three focusing exclusively on medication taking, three on diet, one on physical activity, one on self-monitoring of blood glucose, and one on oral care. Most instruments (22 of 30) were developed during the last decade. Only 10 were repeated more than once. Nineteen of the 30 instruments reported both reliability and validity information but with varying degrees of rigor. In conclusion, most instruments used to measure self-care were relatively new and had been applied to only a limited number of studies with incomplete psychometric profiles. Rigorous psychometric testing, operational definition of self-care, and sufficient explanation of scoring need to be considered for further instrument development. PMID:26130465

  18. Engaging Primary Care Patients to Use a Patient-Centered Personal Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.; Woolf, Steven H.; Bello, Ghalib A.; Sabo, Roy T.; Longo, Daniel R.; Kashiri, Paulette; Etz, Rebecca S.; Loomis, John; Rothemich, Stephen F.; Peele, J. Eric; Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Health care leaders encourage clinicians to offer portals that enable patients to access personal health records, but implementation has been a challenge. Although large integrated health systems have promoted use through costly advertising campaigns, other implementation methods are needed for small to medium-sized practices where most patients receive their care. METHODS We conducted a mixed methods assessment of a proactive implementation strategy for a patient portal (an interactive preventive health record [IPHR]) offered by 8 primary care practices. The practices implemented a series of learning collaboratives with practice champions and redesigned workflow to integrate portal use into care. Practice implementation strategies, portal use, and factors influencing use were assessed prospectively. RESULTS A proactive and customized implementation strategy designed by practices resulted in 25.6% of patients using the IPHR, with the rate increasing 1.0% per month over 31 months. Fully 23.5% of IPHR users signed up within 1 day of their office visit. Older patients and patients with comorbidities were more likely to use the IPHR, but blacks and Hispanics were less likely. Older age diminished as a factor after adjusting for comorbidities. Implementation by practice varied considerably (from 22.1% to 27.9%, P <.001) based on clinician characteristics and workflow innovations adopted by practices to enhance uptake. CONCLUSIONS By directly engaging patients to use a portal and supporting practices to integrate use into care, primary care practices can match or potentially surpass the usage rates achieved by large health systems. PMID:25354405

  19. Residential Stability Reduces Unmet Health Care Needs and Emergency Department Utilization among a Cohort of Homeless and Vulnerably Housed Persons in Canada.

    PubMed

    Jaworsky, Denise; Gadermann, Anne; Duhoux, Arnaud; Naismith, Trudy E; Norena, Monica; To, Matthew J; Hwang, Stephen W; Palepu, Anita

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the association of housing status over time with unmet physical health care needs and emergency department utilization among homeless and vulnerably housed persons in Canada. Homeless and vulnerably housed individuals completed interviewer-administered surveys on housing, unmet physical health care needs, health care utilization, sociodemographic characteristics, substance use, and health conditions at baseline and annually for 4 years. Generalized logistic mixed effects regression models examined the association of residential stability with unmet physical health care needs and emergency department utilization, adjusting for potential confounders. Participants were from Vancouver (n = 387), Toronto (n = 390), and Ottawa (n = 396). Residential stability was associated with lower odds of having unmet physical health needs (adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 0.82; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.67, 0.98) and emergency department utilization (AOR, 0.74; 95 % CI, 0.62, 0.88) over the 4-year follow-up period, after adjusting for potential confounders. Residential stability is associated with fewer unmet physical health care needs and lower emergency department utilization among homeless and vulnerably housed individuals. These findings highlight the need to address access to stable housing as a significant determinant of health disparities. PMID:27457795

  20. Personal risking: lesbian self-disclosure of sexual orientation to professional health care providers.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, J M; Wilson, H S

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-three lesbians ranging in age from 18-68 participated as respondents in this qualitative, theory-generating study. Data were obtained through a written demographic questionnaire and in-depth taped interviews. Findings revealed a two-phase basic social process (BSP) identified as personal risking that is used by lesbians to secure their physical and/or psychological safety within the health care system. In the anticipatory phase, the risk of self-disclosure is calculated using both imaginative and cognitive strategies to determine a disclosure stance. In the interactional phase, scanning and monitoring enable the lesbian client to reevaluate the stance assumed. The data confirm that lesbians are uncomfortable in many health care situations and suggest provider responses to improve their comfort and the level of health care they receive. PMID:1584662

  1. Health care rationing affecting older persons: rejected in principle but implemented in fact.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Marshall B

    2002-01-01

    Health care resources are finite and, therefore, need to be rationed among potential users. Over the past decade and a half in the United States, a variety of explicit, official rationing schemes have been proposed, including some in which chronological age would play a significant role. For ethical and political reasons, it is very unlikely that any age-based rationing schemes will be adopted explicitly and officially. However, various de facto forms of health care rationing are occurring at present. This article outlines the implications of payer behavior, physician practice patterns, the development of evidence-based clinical practice parameters or guidelines, and reliance on consumer choice of health plans as unofficial and generally unacknowledged mechanisms of health care rationing that may exert an important impact on the accessibility of health services for older persons. PMID:12557992

  2. Implementation and evaluation of a harm-reduction model for clinical care of substance using pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) use during pregnancy is associated with many pregnancy complications, including preterm birth, small for gestational age, preeclampsia, and abruption. Hawaii has lead the nation in MA use for many years, yet prior to 2007, did not have a comprehensive plan to care for pregnant substance-using women. In 2006, the Hawaii State Legislature funded a pilot perinatal addiction clinic. The Perinatal Addiction Treatment Clinic of Hawaii was built on a harm-reduction model, encompassing perinatal care, transportation, child-care, social services, family planning, motivational incentives, and addiction medicine. We present the implementation model and results from our first one hundred three infants (103) seen over 3 years of operation of the program. Methods Referrals came from community health centers, hospitals, addiction treatment facilities, private physician offices, homeless outreach services and self-referral through word-of-mouth and bus ads. Data to describe sample characteristics and outcome was obtained prospectively and retrospectively from chart abstraction and delivery data. Drug use data was obtained from the women's self-report and random urine toxicology during the pregnancy, as well as urine toxicology at the time of birth on mothers, and urine and meconium toxicology on the infants. Post-partum depression was measured in mothers with the Edinburgh Post-Partum depression scale. Data from Path clinic patients were compared with a representative cohort of women delivering at Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children during the same time frame, who were enrolled in another study of pregnancy outcomes. Ethical approval for this study was obtained through the University of Hawaii Committee for Human Studies. Results Between April 2007 and August 2010, 213 women with a past or present history of addiction were seen, 132 were pregnant and 97 delivered during that time. 103 live-born infants were delivered. There were 3 first

  3. Primary care for persons with spinal cord injury - not a novel idea but still under-developed.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H

    2016-09-01

    Primary care for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) has long been recognized as an important issue. Over the last two decades, there has not been any consensus on its contents, pathway or delivery model. Despite the lack of attention on this issue, various health care organizations and settings have successfully developed their own version of primary care for persons with SCI. On the other hand, persons with SCI have also found different ways to obtain primary care through Family Physicians and specialists, often depending on the health care structure of their country. This has blurred the line between what is traditionally seen as primary vs. specialist care. The "medical home" model may be ideal for SCI primary care, and it may be establishsed in different care settings. In order to create this model, health care funding structure, appropriate access to physical facility and SCI knowledge, interdisciplinary provider availability and collaboration, as well as active engagement with persons with SCI are necessary. The SCI community should endorse SCI primary care with effective advocacy and implementation. PMID:27463240

  4. You eat what you are: personality-dependent filial cannibalism in a fish with paternal care.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Martin; Grom, Christina; Kalb, Nadine; Sprenger, Dennis; Anthes, Nils; Lindström, Kai; Heubel, Katja U

    2016-03-01

    Many animal parents invest heavily to ensure offspring survival, yet some eventually consume some or all of their very own young. This so-called filial cannibalism is known from a wide range of taxa, but its adaptive benefit remains largely unclear. The extent to which parents cannibalize their broods varies substantially not only between species, but also between individuals, indicating that intrinsic behavioral differences, or animal personalities, might constitute a relevant proximate trigger for filial cannibalism. Using a marine fish with extensive paternal care, the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps), we investigated the influence of animal personality on filial cannibalism by assessing (1) behavioral consistency across a breeding and a nonbreeding context; (2) correlations between different breeding (egg fanning; filial cannibalism) and nonbreeding (activity) behaviors, and, in a separate experiment; (3) whether previously established personality scores affect filial cannibalism levels. We found consistent individual differences in activity across contexts. Partial filial cannibalism was independent of egg fanning but correlated strongly with activity, where active males cannibalized more eggs than less active males. This pattern was strong initially but vanished as the breeding season progressed. The incidence of whole clutch filial cannibalism increased with activity and clutch size. Our findings indicate that filial cannibalism cannot generally be adjusted independently of male personality and is thus phenotypically less plastic than typically assumed. The present work stresses the multidimensional interaction between animal personality, individual plasticity and the environment in shaping filial cannibalism. PMID:27087921

  5. Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don E

    2003-01-01

    Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII) offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential to correct these shortcomings. Better health and a better health system are within our reach. Discussion A national health information infrastructure for the United States should address the needs of personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and research. It should also address relevant global dimensions (e.g., standards for sharing data and knowledge across national boundaries). The public and private sectors will need to collaborate to build a robust national health information infrastructure, essentially a 'paperless' health care system, for the United States. The federal government should assume leadership for assuring a national health information infrastructure as recommended by the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. Progress is needed in the areas of funding, incentives, standards, and continued refinement of a privacy (i.e., confidentiality and security) framework to facilitate personal identification for health purposes. Particular attention should be paid to NHII leadership and change management challenges. Summary A national health information infrastructure is a necessary step for improved health in the U.S. It will require a concerted, collaborative effort by both public and private sectors. If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin PMID:12525262

  6. Volatile methylsiloxanes in personal care products - Using QuEChERS as a "green" analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Capela, Daniela; Homem, Vera; Alves, Arminda; Santos, Lúcia

    2016-08-01

    Organosiloxanes, namely volatile methylsiloxanes (VMSs) are one of the most relevant classes of ingredients incorporated in personal care products (PCPs), such as creams and lotions, bath soaps and hair care products. Their use has caused concern among the scientific community due to their potential toxic behaviour to human health and environment. This manuscript reports the first application of QuEChERS ("Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe") extraction followed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis to determine VMSs in cosmetics and personal care products. Eight VMSs, four linear (L2-L5) and four cyclic (D3-D6) were investigated in 36 samples. The validated method was able to remove the interfering matrix components, conducting to high recovery percentages (74-104%) and low relative standard deviations (<18%). A linear behaviour was observed in the range of 0.005-2.50mgL(-1) (correlation coefficient, R(2)>0.996) and limits of detection ranged from 0.17ngg(-1) (L2) to 3.75ngg(-1) (L5). Matrix effects were also investigated for all analysed compounds and matrices and showed not to be significant. Global uncertainty of the proposed methodology was also estimated using a bottom-up approach being between 5% and 35% (on average). Finally, the method was satisfactorily applied to the analysis of 36 personal care products. As expected, results showed the existence of VMSs in all analysed samples in concentrations up to 754µgg(-1). D4 and D5 were more frequently detected while body moisturizers, facial creams and shampoos showed the highest levels of VMSs. PMID:27216661

  7. The Social Context of Homeless Men’s Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Harmony; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Tucker, Joan S.; Kennedy, David P.; Green, Harold D.; Zhou, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Background Homeless men may be at particular risk for the negative health effects of substance use. This cross-sectional study investigates the individual and personal network risk factors associated with substance use in this vulnerable population. Methods Participants were a representative probability sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men interviewed from meal programs in the Skid Row region of Los Angeles, California. Interviews assessed individual, personal network, and substance use characteristics. Logistic regression examined individual and personal network predictors of the three most prevalent substances. Results In the past six months, the three most prevalent substances were marijuana (56%), crack (40%), and alcohol to intoxication (38%). The mental health status of homeless men was associated with substance use, with PTSD more common among those who used crack. Riskier networks (comprised of a larger proportion of drug users) were associated with marijuana use, and normative social ties (family, employed and school/work contacts) were associated with a decreased likelihood of crack use. Conclusions Mental health problems and riskier personal networks are associated with homeless men’s substance use. These findings underscore the importance of interventions that focus on improving mental health, mitigating the drug-using norms of personal networks, and helping men to maintain contact with normative, low-risk alters. Mental health care and peer-based, network interventions to reduce substance use should be a priority for heterosexually active homeless men. PMID:21601380

  8. Un/Paid Labor: Medicaid Home and Community Based Services Waivers That Pay Family as Personal Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Carli; Rizzolo, Mary C

    2016-08-01

    The United States long-term services and supports system is built on largely unpaid (informal) labor. There are a number of benefits to allowing family caregivers to serve as paid personal care providers including better health and satisfaction outcomes, expanded workforces, and cost effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to examine how Medicaid HCBS Section 1915(c) waivers for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities allocate personal care services to pay family caregivers. Our analysis revealed about two thirds of waivers in fiscal year (FY) 2014 allowed for family caregivers to potentially be paid for personal care services. This amounted to up to $2.71 billion of projected spending, which is slightly more than half of all personal care service expenditures in FY 2014. PMID:27494123

  9. Personalized Health Care System with Virtual Reality Rehabilitation and Appropriate Information for Seniors

    PubMed Central

    Páez, Diego Gachet; Aparicio, Fernando; de Buenaga, Manuel; Padrón, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the information society is now a common one, as opposed to the industrial society that dominated the economy during the last years. It is assumed that all sectors should have access to information and reap its benefits. Elderly people are, in this respect, a major challenge, due to their lack of interest in technological progress and their lack of knowledge regarding the potential benefits that information society technologies might have on their lives. The Naviga Project (An Open and Adaptable Platform for the Elderly and Persons with Disability to Access the Information Society) is a European effort, whose main goal is to design and develop a technological platform allowing elder people and persons with disability to access the internet and the information society. Naviga also allows the creation of services targeted to social networks, mind training and personalized health care. In this paper we focus on the health care and information services designed on the project, the technological platform developed and details of two representative elements, the virtual reality hand rehabilitation and the health information intelligent system. PMID:22778598

  10. Screening for intellectual disability in persons with a substance abuse problem: Exploring the validity of the Hayes Ability Screening Index in a Dutch-speaking sample.

    PubMed

    To, Wing Ting; Vanheule, Stijn; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Audenaert, Kurt; Vandevelde, Stijn

    2014-11-12

    There is an increasing interest in screening instruments to detect intellectual disability (ID) in a quick and accurate way in mental health services as well as in the criminal justice system in order to provide appropriate support for people with undetected needs caused by ID. An instrument that has been proven to be useful in both settings is the Hayes Ability Screening Index (HASI). This study assessed the validity of the Dutch version of the HASI in persons with a substance abuse problem residing in mental health services, whether or not mandated to treatment by court order. The HASI was conducted along with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale III as the criterion for validity to 90 participants. Additionally, the influence of psychiatric disorder and medication use on the HASI result was examined. A significant positive relationship was found between the two instruments, demonstrating convergent validity. Using a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the discriminative ability of the HASI with a cut-off score of 85 was found to be adequate, yielding in a good balance between sensitivity and specificity. The HASI was not distorted by the presence of the substance abuse problem or other psychiatric illnesses and medication did not influence the HASI scores in this study. These findings indicate that the HASI provides a time-efficient and resource-conscious way to detect ID in persons with a substance problem, thus addressing a critical need in mental health settings. PMID:25462510

  11. Differences in the Experience of Caregiver Strain between Families Caring for Youth with Substance Use Disorders and Families of Youth with Mental Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heflinger, Craig Anne; Brannan, Ana Maria

    2006-01-01

    This study examined caregiver strain (i.e., burden of care, caregiver burden) among families of adolescents in treatment for substance abuse disorders compared to youth with mental health problems. We used descriptive and regression analyses to compare groups and to examine the youth and family variables associated with caregiver strain across the…

  12. Substance Use and Delinquency among Middle School Girls in Foster Care: A Three-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyoun K.; Leve, Leslie D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study evaluated the efficacy of the Middle School Success intervention (MSS) for reducing substance use and delinquency among girls in foster care, using a randomized controlled trial design. The program was designed to fill a service gap during the summer prior to the middle school transition and to prevent delinquency,…

  13. A Roadmap for Adapting an Evidence-Based HIV Prevention Intervention: Personal Cognitive Counseling (PCC) for Episodic Substance-Using Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Das, Moupali; DeMicco, Erin; Raiford, Jerris L.; Matheson, Tim; Shook, Alic; Antunez, Erin; Santos, Glenn-Milo; Dadasovich, Rand; Dilley, James W.; Colfax, Grant N.; Herbst, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Episodic (less than weekly) drug use and binge drinking increase HIV-related sexual risk behaviors among men who have sex with men (MSM), yet no evidence-based interventions exist for these men. We describe an adaptation process of the Personalized Cognitive Counseling (PCC) intervention for utilization with high-risk, HIV-negative episodic, substance-using MSM. Participants (N=59) were racially diverse, and reported unprotected anal intercourse and concurrent binge drinking (85 %), use of poppers (36 %), methamphetamine (20 %) and cocaine (12 %). Semi-structured interviews with 20 episodic, substance-using MSM elicited sexual narratives for engaging in unprotected anal intercourse while using alcohol or drugs. Emergent qualitative themes were translated into self-justifications and included in a revised PCC self-justification elicitation instrument (SJEI). The adapted SJEI was pretested with 19 episodic, substance-using MSM, and the final adapted PCC was pilot-tested for acceptability and feasibility with 20 episodic, substance-using MSM. This process can be used as a roadmap for adapting PCC for other high-risk populations of MSM. PMID:23412947

  14. The Family's Experience of Sharing the Care of a Person with Dementia with the Services in Specialized Day-Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Gústafsdóttir, Margrét

    2014-01-01

    Background Services in specialized day-care units for individuals with dementia are set up to enable these persons to live in their own home. The purpose of this paper is to discern the experiences of families with these services while caring for a close relative with dementia. Method Longitudinal interviews with 8 family members were conducted. In total, 25 interviews were carried out over a period of 5 years. Results The experience of these families of looking after a close person with dementia appeared to be influenced by (a) the multifaceted meaning of ties, (b) the perception of purposeful relief of the day-care services and (c) the progress of the disease. Conclusion All families found the services of specialized day-care units both useful and pleasant. This kind of resource was shown to make everyday life much more manageable for all persons involved, most importantly for the patient with dementia. PMID:25337077

  15. 'Innovation' in health care coverage decisions: all talk and no substance?

    PubMed

    Bryan, Stirling; Lee, Helen; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    There has been much discussion recently about 'innovation', or more precisely the lack of it, in pharmaceuticals and devices in health care. The concern has been expressed by national guideline bodies, such as the Common Drugs Review in Canada and the National Institute for Health & Clinical Excellence in the UK, applying strict cost-effectiveness criteria in their decision-making and, therefore, failing adequately to recognize the full benefits that come from innovation. In order to explore the legitimacy of such claims, we first define innovation, and second, explore the basis for assuming an independent and separable social value associated with innovation. We conclude that demands relating to innovation, such as relaxation of thresholds and premium prices for innovatory products, remain hollow until we have a compelling case on the demand side for a separable social value on 'innovation'. We see no such case currently. PMID:22977184

  16. Is personal continuity of care compatible with free choice of doctor? Patients' views on seeing the same doctor.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, G K; Richards, S C

    1993-01-01

    While much has been written about the benefits of personal continuity of care there has been little research about the views of patients. In this cross sectional study 111 patients from three group practices (one of which ran a personal list system) were interviewed at home within a week of consulting a general practitioner. Patients were selected randomly from a systematic series of consulting sessions and a semi-structured interview was administered. Patients receiving more personal continuity of care were likely to be older, to have booked their most recent appointment further in advance, to desire personal continuity of care, to have an external health locus of control and to have a lower extroversion score. In the practice with a personal list, patients had a high level of continuity of care, were satisfied and showed little interest in having a choice of doctor. In the combined list practices patients valued their choice of doctor but often could not exercise it enough and they were more critical. They made more suggestions for change than those in the practice with a personal list system, mostly about receptionists and appointments. It is concluded that most patients like to see the same doctor, but they may not be willing to wait two days for this if there is a quicker option. It may be difficult to deliver both personal continuity of care and choice in group practice. PMID:8312019

  17. Understanding the neurobiology, assessment, and treatment of substances of abuse and dependence: a guide for the critical care nurse.

    PubMed

    Genung, Vanessa

    2012-03-01

    What do I as a critical care nurse do? Nurses, by virtue of being trained in health promotion, and also because they interact with patients, families, and communities, have firsthand opportunities to play an active role in practicing primary prevention. To avoid the first occurrence of substance abuse, assess community need, assess facility needs, and identify potential risk. Identify the magnitude of the problem. Intervene early with the youth and at-risk populations. Refer patients and their families to mental health specialists. Provide education to patients, families, communities. To reduce occurrences of substance abuse, practicing secondary prevention requires prompt action in the earliest moments of recognizing a problem and directing patients to early intervention and rehabilitation. Screening your patients, providing brief education, and prompt referral constitutes early intervention. To retard the progress of the disease, practice tertiary prevention by providing education, counseling, and support to the afflicted in achieving and maintaining sobriety through medication compliance and rehabilitative group and counseling work. The goal of intervention in the lives of substance abusers is to stop drug use, avoid relapse, and sustain recovery. After years of research, NIDA has identified 13 fundamental principles to effective drug abuse treatment. 1. Addiction is a complex but treatable disease that affects brain function and behavior. 2. No single treatment is appropriate for everyone. 3. Treatment needs to be readily available. 4. Effective treatment attends to multiple needs of the individual, not just his or her drug abuse. 5. Remaining in treatment for an adequate period of time is critical. 6. Counseling--individual and/or group--and other behavioral therapies are the most commonly used forms of drug abuse treatment. 7. Medications are an important element of treatment for many patients, especially when combined with counseling and other behavioral

  18. Personality Impact on Experiences of Strain among Staff Exposed to Violence in Care of People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundstrom, Mats; Graneheim, Ulla H.; Eisemann, Martin; Richter, Jorg; Astrom, Sture

    2007-01-01

    Explored are the relationships among personality and emotional reactions, work-related strain, and experiences of burnout among staff exposed vs. not exposed to violence when caring for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Questionnaires measuring personality, emotional reactions, strain and burnout, and exposure to violence were…

  19. Sharing personal health information via service-oriented computing: a case of long-term care.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Hsiu; Chen, Rong-Rong; Guo, Sophie Huey-Ming; Chiang, Su-Chien; Chang, Her-Kun

    2012-12-01

    Sharing personal health information among healthcare providers is a crucial business process not only for saving limited healthcare resources but also for increasing patient's healthcare quality. Building an effective personal health information sharing process from established healthcare systems is a challenge in terms of coordination different business operations among healthcare providers and restructuring technical details existed in different healthcare information systems. This study responds this challenge with a service-oriented approach and develops a business software application to describe how the challenge can be alleviated from both managerial and technical perspectives. The software application in this study depicts personal health information sharing process among different providers in a long-term care setting. The information sharing scenario is based on an industrial initiative, such as Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) from healthcare domain and the technologies for implementing the scenario are Web Service technologies from Service-oriented computing paradigm. The implementation in this study can inform healthcare researchers and practitioners applying technologies from service-oriented computing to design and develop healthcare collaborative systems to meet the increasing need for personal health information sharing. PMID:22366977

  20. Personality adjustment and social support of parents who care for children with pervasive developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Weiss, S J

    1991-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the degree of personality adjustment and perceived social support of parents who care for children with pervasive developmental disorders. Data were collected with the California Q-Set (a personality measure) and the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire. Personality adjustment of the parents was found to be significantly less than optimal, with a high degree of anxiety, minimal ego resilience, and use of defensive coping processes. Siblings of the child with the disorder and mothers of the parents were those most frequently identified as providing support to the caregiver, although friends, special education teachers, and daycare staff were the individuals whose support was most significantly related to greater amounts of perceived affection and affirmation, tangible aid, and concrete caregiving assistance. In fact, the more the caregivers depended upon their families for support, the less well adjusted were the caregivers on the personality measure. The implications of the findings for caregivers and their families are discussed. PMID:2039277

  1. The Effect of a Personalized Dementia Care Intervention for Caregivers From Australian Minority Groups.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; De Bellis, Anita; Kyriazopoulos, Helena; Draper, Brian; Ullah, Shahid

    2016-02-01

    Most caregiver interventions in a multicultural society are designed to target caregivers from the mainstream culture and exclude those who are unable to speak English. This study addressed the gap by testing the hypothesis that personalized caregiver support provided by a team led by a care coordinator of the person with dementia would improve competence for caregivers from minority groups in managing dementia. A randomised controlled trial was utilised to test the hypothesis. Sixty-one family caregivers from 10 minority groups completed the trial. Outcome variables were measured prior to the intervention, at 6 and 12 months after the commencement of trial. A linear mixed effect model was used to estimate the effectiveness of the intervention. The intervention group showed a significant increase in the caregivers' sense of competence and mental components of quality of life. There were no significant differences in the caregivers' physical components of quality of life. PMID:25805891

  2. The relevance of personal characteristics in health care rationing: what the Australian public thinks and why.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Malcolm; Richardson, Jeff; McKie, John; Iezzi, Angelo; Khan, Munir

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the preferences of the general public in Australia regarding health care resource allocation. While previous studies have revealed that the public is willing to give priority to particular groups of patients based on their personal characteristics, the present article goes beyond previous efforts in attempting to explain these results. In the present study, there was strong support among respondents for giving “equal priority” to people regardless of their personal characteristics. However, respondents did reveal a preference for married patients over single, for children over adults, for carers of children and the elderly, sole breadwinners, and good community contributors. Further, they would give a lower priority to those perceived as “self-harmers”—smokers, individuals with unhealthy diets, and those who rarely exercise. Variation in the answers according to broad economic and social beliefs across seven different categories (“factors”) influenced the pattern of the public's attitudes towards rationing. The Principal Components Analysis (PCA) indicated that most of the items in our survey are associated with seven factors that explain or capture much of the variation. These relate to a patient's avoidance of self-harm behaviors (Safe Living), their Life Style (diet, exercise, etc.), their contribution to the community through caring for others (Caring), their talents (Gifted), their sexual behavior (Sexuality), their age and marital status (Family), and whether they are an Australian citizen or employed (Citizen). The strength of social preferences—e.g., how strongly respondents would “discriminate” against a recreational drug user or preference a person with a healthy diet—is related to the particular class of preferences. PMID:21322896

  3. Personal care products and endocrine disruption: A critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Witorsch, Raphael J; Thomas, John A

    2010-11-01

    This article reviews laboratory and epidemiological research into the endocrine disruptive effects of components of personal care products, namely, phthalate esters, parabens, ultraviolet (UV) filters, polycyclic musks, and antimicrobials. High doses of phthalates in utero can produce “phthalate syndrome,” demasculinizing effects in male rat offspring due to impaired testosterone production by fetal testes. However, evidence linking phthalate exposure to similar effects in humans appears inconclusive. Furthermore, phthalate exposure derived from personal care products is within safe limits and its principal bioavailable phthalate, diethyl phthalate (DEP), does not produce “phthalate syndrome.” Parabens exhibit very weak estrogen activity in vitro and in vivo, but evidence of paraben-induced developmental and reproductive toxicity in vivo lacks consistency and physiological coherence. Evidence attempting to link paraben exposure with human breast cancer is nonexistent. Select UV filters at high doses produce estrogenic, antithyroid, and other effects in rats in vivo. Again, no evidence links UV filter exposure to endocrine disruptive effects in humans. Some polycyclic musks weakly bind to estrogen, androgen, or progestin receptors and exhibit primarily antagonistic activity in vitro, which for the most part, has yet to be confirmed in vivo in mammals. The antimicrobials triclocarban and triclosan evoke weak responses mediated by aryl hydrocarbon, estrogen, and androgen receptors in vitro, which require confirmation in vivo. Preliminary observations suggest a novel interaction between triclocarban and testosterone. In conclusion, although select constituents exhibit interactions with the endocrine system in the laboratory, the evidence linking personal care products to endocrine disruptive effects in humans is for the most part lacking. PMID:20932229

  4. Work Stress, Burnout, and Social and Personal Resources among Direct Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Gray-Stanley, Jennifer A.; Muramatsu, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    Work stress is endemic among direct care workers (DCWs) who serve people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Social resources, such as work social support, and personal resources, such as an internal locus of control, may help DCWs perceive work overload and other work-related stressors as less threatening and galvanize them to cope more effectively to prevent burnout. However, little is known about what resources are effective for coping with what types of work stress. Thus, we examined how work stress and social and personal resources are associated with burnout for DCWs. We conducted a survey of DCWs (n = 323) from five community-based organizations that provide residential, vocational, and personal care services for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Participants completed a self-administered survey about their perceptions of work stress, work social support, locus of control, and burnout relative to their daily work routine. We conducted multiple regression analysis to test both the main and interaction effects of work stress and resources with respect to burnout. Work stress, specifically work overload, limited participation decision-making, and client disability care was positively associated with burnout (p < .001). The association between work social support and burnout depended on the levels of work overload (p < .05), and the association between locus of control and burnout depended on the levels of work overload (p < .05) and participation in decision-making (p < .05). Whether work social support and locus of control make a difference depends on the kinds and the levels of work stressors. The findings underscore the importance of strong work-based social support networks and stress management resources for DCWs. PMID:21316918

  5. Consumption and occurrence of pharmaceutical and personal care products in the aquatic environment in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz de García, Sheyla; Pinto Pinto, Gilberto; García Encina, Pedro; Irusta Mata, Rubén

    2013-02-01

    The occurrence of sixty pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), twenty metabolites and eight personal care products (PCPs) in the aquatic environment in Spain and their predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) were calculated and compared with measured environmental concentrations (MECs) obtained from relevant published research. The occurrence in the aquatic environment was calculated through a mass balance approach considering the following: the number of pharmaceutical prescriptions issued, the amount of pharmaceutical discharged without consumption, consumption, self-medication, pharmacokinetics, treatment in wastewater facilities and discharged to aquatic environment. The estimation of consumption of active compounds of pharmaceuticals was conducted by at least one of the following methodologies: number of commercial packages sold, data for the number of defined daily dose per 1000 inhabitants per day (DHD), and pattern of treatment. Comparison of these methodologies for some compounds showed similar estimated consumption ranges. The highest pharmaceutical occurrence in the aquatic environment was for acetaminophen glucuronide, Galaxolide®, Iso-E-super®, acetaminophen, valsartan, amoxicillin, 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen, iopromide, omeprazole, carbamazepine 10, 11-epoxide, iopamidol, salicylic β-d-O-glucuronide acid, Tonalide®, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), clarithromycin and iohexol, with releases between 5 and 600 ty(-1). The relation of PEC/MEC was calculated for 58% of the compounds under study, and 64.7% of them had PEC/MEC ratios between 0.5 and 2. PEC values were mostly overestimated (57.4%). The predicted concentrations for pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) that had a high occurrence in the aquatic environment were very close to the measured concentrations. This research provides information that had not been calculated and analyzed previously, at least for Spain. Estimation of the PECs for pharmaceutical, personal care products and

  6. Burden of Care on Caregivers of Schizophrenia Patients: A Correlation to Personality and Coping

    PubMed Central

    Geriani, Disha; Savithry, Kochukarottil Satish Babu; Shivakumar, Seemanthini

    2015-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is a mental disorder where the caregivers are likely to face increasing levels of burden and stress. The present study aims to explore the relation between burden of care on the caregivers of schizophrenic patients with various psychological parameters including their coping strategies, personality type, overall quality of life and socio-demographic details. Materials and Methods: The participants included in the study (n=110) were administered a socio-demographic data sheet and questionnaires to assess their personality type, burden, quality of life, and coping mechanisms of having a schizophrenic in the family. These questionnaires were administered in individual setting. Their informed consent was taken prior to the administration of tools and their privacy was taken care of. The data obtained was analysed statistically. Results: Most of the caregivers were females. The caregivers were observed to have moderate and high levels of burden. Burden on the caregivers showed a significant correlation with psychoticism and their overall quality of life. A significant correlation was seen between the levels of coping and extrovert type of personality, and also with the environmental health of the caregivers. Caregivers belonging to nuclear families coped better than those of joint families. Conclusion: The study concludes that certain personality traits like psychoticism and certain social traits such as living in joint families can increase the risk of caregiver burden in looking after family members suffering from schizophrenia. A need for psychological assistance for the vulnerable caregivers to help them reduce the burden levels and employ positive coping strategies has, therefore, been emphasized in our study. PMID:25954685

  7. Integrated Personal Health Records: Transformative Tools for Consumer-Centric Care

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Raymond, Brian; Tang, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Integrated personal health records (PHRs) offer significant potential to stimulate transformational changes in health care delivery and self-care by patients. In 2006, an invitational roundtable sponsored by Kaiser Permanente Institute, the American Medical Informatics Association, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was held to identify the transformative potential of PHRs, as well as barriers to realizing this potential and a framework for action to move them closer to the health care mainstream. This paper highlights and builds on the insights shared during the roundtable. Discussion While there is a spectrum of dominant PHR models, (standalone, tethered, integrated), the authors state that only the integrated model has true transformative potential to strengthen consumers' ability to manage their own health care. Integrated PHRs improve the quality, completeness, depth, and accessibility of health information provided by patients; enable facile communication between patients and providers; provide access to health knowledge for patients; ensure portability of medical records and other personal health information; and incorporate auto-population of content. Numerous factors impede widespread adoption of integrated PHRs: obstacles in the health care system/culture; issues of consumer confidence and trust; lack of technical standards for interoperability; lack of HIT infrastructure; the digital divide; uncertain value realization/ROI; and uncertain market demand. Recent efforts have led to progress on standards for integrated PHRs, and government agencies and private companies are offering different models to consumers, but substantial obstacles remain to be addressed. Immediate steps to advance integrated PHRs should include sharing existing knowledge and expanding knowledge about them, building on existing efforts, and continuing dialogue among public and private sector stakeholders. Summary Integrated PHRs promote active, ongoing

  8. [The host community of a child with food allergies: the personalized care project (PCP)].

    PubMed

    Rancé, F

    2010-12-01

    The personalized care project (PCP) can manage allergic emergencies that may occur during school hours. Other objectives are to facilitate academic achievement, social and professional integration of children and adolescents with chronic illness such as food allergy, by promoting education through certain changes. The PCP is derived from official files including Circular N(o) 2003-135 of September 8 and the inter-ministerial circular of 25 June 2001. The family must request a protocol with the host school principal or school head. Then, the doctor of Education organizes the drafting of the document based on information provided by the physician (or allergist). PMID:21074388

  9. [Research progress of pharmaceutical and personal care products on ecological and human health].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinping; Zhu, Lingyan; Li, Jingguang

    2009-03-01

    EU (European Union) and Center of Water Pollution and Control in the United States have continued to measure persistent bioaccumulate and toxic (PB&T) chemicals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) since the 1970s. In resent years, Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) have raised more concern among chemists and toxicologists. The present paper introduced the main properties of PPCPs and their present situation of research. Additionally, the potential toxicites of PPCPs to ecological and human health were detailedly reviewed in this article. PMID:19408672

  10. Nonprofit ownership and quality in Medicaid's longterm care program for persons with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Brown, Samuel L

    2002-01-01

    To assess ownership-related differences in the Intermediate Care Facility Program for persons with Mental Retardation (ICF/MR) Industry, this article analyzes a nationally representative sample of data on Medicaid certified facilities from the Health Care Financing Administration On-line Survey and Certification Reporting System. This study found that nonprofit providers provided a higher level of quality than for-profit facilities when organizational size and facility-mix were controlled. The size and case-mix composition of these facilities were also influenced by nonprofit ownership type. Nonprofit providers offered smaller facilities, on average, and were more likely to enroll heavy case-mix residents than their for-profit counterparts. PMID:15188998

  11. Testing family-centered, function-focused care in hospitalized persons with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Boltz, Marie; Chippendale, Tracy; Resnick, Barbara; Galvin, James E

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Hospital-acquired disability causes decreased quality of life for patients with dementia and family caregivers, and increased societal costs. Materials & methods A comparative, repeated measures study tested the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the family-centered, function-focused care intervention (Fam-FFC) in dyads of hospitalized, medical patients with dementia and family caregivers (FCGs). Results The intervention group demonstrated better activities of daily living and walking performance, and less severity/duration of delirium and hospital readmissions, but no significant differences in gait/balance. FCGs showed increased preparedness for caregiving and less anxiety but no significant differences in depression, strain and mutuality. Conclusion Fam-FFC presents a possible pathway to meeting the Triple Aim of improved patient care, improved patient health and reduced costs for persons with dementia. PMID:26107319

  12. Personality Assessment Screener, Childhood Abuse, and Adult Partner Violence in African American Women Using Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Porcerelli, John H; Hurrell, Kristen; Cogan, Rosemary; Jeffries, Keturah; Markova, Tsveti

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the relationship between psychopathology with the Personality Assessment Screener (PAS) and childhood physical and sexual abuse and adult physical and sexual partner violence in a primary care sample of 98 urban-dwelling African American women. Patients completed the PAS, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and the Conflict Tactics Scale. The PAS total score significantly correlated with all measures of childhood and adult abuse. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that PAS element scores of Suicidal Thinking and Hostile Control significantly predicted a history of childhood physical abuse; Suicidal Thinking, Hostile Control, and Acting Out significantly predicted a history of childhood sexual abuse; Suicidal Thinking, Negative Affect, and Alienation significantly predicted current adult partner physical violence; and Psychotic Features, Alcohol Problems, and Anger Control significantly predicted current adult sexual partner violence. The PAS appears to be a useful measure for fast-paced primary care settings for identifying patients who need a more thorough assessment for abuse. PMID:26374084

  13. What is the potential for improving care and lowering cost for persons with dementia?

    PubMed

    Davis, Karen; Willink, Amber; Amjad, Halima

    2016-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of dementia with population aging has heightened interest in understanding patterns of utilization and health expenditures in persons with dementia (PWD) among policy officials, practicing physicians, and health system. While a substantial part of this interest is concerned with the high costs of care for people diagnosed with dementia (Kelley et al., 2015), less attention has been focused on the costs and consequences of missed or delayed diagnosis in those who screen positive for dementia. The article on "Healthcare resource utilization and cost in dementia: are there differences between patients screened positive for dementia with and those without a formal diagnosis of dementia in primary care in Germany?" by Michalowsky and colleagues (Michalowsky et al., 2015) in this issue makes a particularly important contribution in this regard. PMID:26888736

  14. Leisure or therapeutics? Snoezelen and the care of older persons with dementia.

    PubMed

    Burns, I; Cox, H; Plant, H

    2000-06-01

    Snoezelen is the registered tradename for a multisensory environment approach initially established for purposes of leisure or therapeutics in the special education arena, but now expanding into a variety of client groups and settings, most notably in the care of older persons. Snoezelen is making its way into Australia at a rapid rate despite a lack of evidence-based research. This paper looks at the Snoezelen phenomenon and searches the literature to review the history and contemporary use of this multisensory environmental work. While most articles indicate positive outcomes Snoezelen is not without its critics, some of whom focus on the lack of rigorous research while others critique the artificiality. As a leisure approach Snoezelen appears to add quality to the culture of the care environment. PMID:11249409

  15. 38 CFR 3.360 - Service-connected health-care eligibility of certain persons administratively discharged under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Service-connected health-care eligibility of certain persons administratively discharged under other than honorable condition. (a) General. The health-care and related benefits authorized by chapter 17 of title 38... bars listed in § 3.12(c) applies. (c) Eligibility criteria. In making determinations of...

  16. Allowing Spouses to Be Paid Personal Care Providers: Spouse Availability and Effects on Medicaid-Funded Service Use and Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomer, Robert J.; Kang, Taewoon; Doty, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Medicaid service use and expenditure and quality of care outcomes in California's personal care program known as In-Home Supportive Service (IHSS) are described. Analyses investigated Medicaid expenditures, hospital use, and nursing home stays, comparing recipients who have paid spouse caregivers with those having other…

  17. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  18. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  19. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  20. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  1. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  2. Medicaid Personal Care Services for Children with Intellectual Disabilities: What Assistance Is Provided? When Is Assistance Provided?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Timothy R.; Patnaik, Ashweeta; Naiser, Emily; Fournier, Constance J.; McMaughan, Darcy K.; Dyer, James A.; Phillips, Charles D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nature and timing of services provided to children with an intellectual disability (ID) identified by a new comprehensive assessment and care planning tool used to evaluate children's needs for Medicaid Personal Care Services (PCS) in Texas. The new assessment procedure resulted from a legal settlement with the advocacy…

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Staff Training Program on Palliative Care for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Joan E.; Cadogan, Mary P.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) face barriers and disparities at end of life. Among these barriers are limited educational opportunities and a paucity of targeted training materials on palliative care for staff who provide their day-to-day care. This paper reports on a three-phase project undertaken to develop,…

  4. Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Personal Practices regarding Colorectal Cancer Screening among Health Care Professionals in Rural Colorado: A Pilot Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rim, Sun Hee; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M.; Overholser, Linda; Froshaug, Desiree; Coughlin, Steven S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study reports the baseline knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and personal practices of health care professionals regarding colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in the High Plains Research Network (HPRN) of rural Colorado prior to a community-based educational intervention. It also examines the association between health care staff members'…

  5. The Psychological Effects of Providing Personal Care to a Partner: A Multidimensional Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Thomas; Slagsvold, Britt

    2013-04-18

    The expected increasing demand for informal care in aging societies underscores the importance of understanding the psychological implications of caregiving. This study explores the effect of providing regular help with personal care to a partner on different aspects of psychological well-being. We use cross-sectional data from the Norwegian Life Course, Ageing and Generation study (n. ~15,000; age 40-84) and two-wave panel data from the Norwegian study on Life Course, Ageing and Generation (n. ~3000; age 40-84). To separate the effects of providing care from those of the partner's disability, caregivers are contrasted with non-caregivers with both disabled and nondisabled partners. We separate outcomes into cognitive well-being (life satisfaction), psychological functioning (self-esteem, mastery), and affective well-being (happiness, depression, loneliness). Findings show that caregiving has important cross-sectional and longitudinal detrimental psychological effects. These effects are fairly consistent across all aspects of well-being, demonstrating that caregiving has a broad-based negative impact. Among women, however, these effects are similar to if not weaker than the effects of a partner's disability. Caregiving effects are constant by age, education, and employment status, but stronger among caregivers with health problems. Providing personal care to a partner is associated with marked adverse psychological effects for men and women irrespective of age and socio-economic status. Hence, no sociodemographic group is immune from caregiving stress, so programs should be targeted generally. The results also suggest that the health needs of caregivers demand more attention. PMID:26973910

  6. The Role of Depression in Retention in Care for Persons Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Julie Ann; Yoo-Jeong, Moka; Dai, Tian; Guo, Ying; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna

    2016-01-01

    Individuals infected with HIV experience high rates of depression when compared to their sero-negative counterparts. Although symptoms of depression have been consistently linked to poor medication adherence among persons living with HIV/AIDS, their relation to retention in care are less well-known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether clusters of depressive symptoms influence retention in care and if so, whether these clusters had different relations to retention in care. This is a secondary data analysis of a larger study that investigated the role of health literacy, cognitive impairment, and social determinants on retention in HIV care. Individuals with HIV were recruited from South Florida from August 2009 to May 2011. A total of 210 participants were included in the current analyses. A measure of visit constancy was calculated to represent the number of 4-month intervals with at least one kept visit. Individual items on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale short form (CES-D10) and factor analysis of the CES-D10 were independent variables. Overall, there was a high prevalence of depressive symptoms in the study participants. Furthermore, factor analysis showed that certain clusters of depressive symptoms were significantly associated with visit constancy. Specifically, negative mood/somatic symptoms were associated with a greater odds of missing a visit in any of the observed 4-month time periods than positive mood factor. Those patients reporting somatic symptoms and negative mood may need additional intervention and support to be effectively retained in care and successfully follow through with appointments and care. PMID:26544915

  7. Updated forecasts of the costs of medical care for persons with AIDS, 1989-93.

    PubMed Central

    Hellinger, F J

    1990-01-01

    Data on the number of AIDS cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) from January 1984 to June 1989 are used to predict the number of AIDS cases that will be diagnosed during the years 1989 through 1993. Using quadratic and linear models with the most recent data, it is projected that about 44,000 cases will be diagnosed in 1989, 56,000 in 1990, 70,000 in 1991, 87,000 in 1992, and 104,000 in 1993. These projections are lower than estimates derived using data from January 1984 to June 1988, and they are similar to estimates derived by the CDC. The lifetime medical care cost of treating a person with AIDS is estimated to be about $75,000 (all estimates are in 1988 dollars) assuming that the average length of survival is 15 months and that the intensity of care (that is, the cost of medical care per month) does not fall as longevity rises. This total, $75,000, reflects recent increases in the length of survival and the diffusion of costly drug therapies (for example, AZT and aerosol pentamidine). This study forecasts that the cumulative lifetime medical care costs of treating all people diagnosed with AIDS during a given year to be about $3.3 billion in 1989, $4.3 billion in 1990, $5.3 billion in 1991, $6.5 billion in 1992, and $7.8 billion in 1993. PMID:2106697

  8. [The health care system requires individuals to take more personal responsibility].

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Corinna; Weißbach, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    In the health care context, the phrase "personal responsibility" is frequently used as a euphemism for restricting publicly funded health care services. The concept of responsibility, however, primarily comprises the individual's own autonomous choices in consideration of their possible implications. In order to be able to act responsibly in respect to health care issues, the individual must rely on objective information about the possible consequences of his or her decision. The current profit-oriented competitive medical care environment prevents the distribution of objective information. A mutually supportive community benefits from its members acting responsibly, since citizens are capable of supporting themselves before they avail themselves of community support. This requires the State to respect the individual and his or her autonomous decision-making. If the community established rules as to what is considered a healthy lifestyle or even required people to adopt one, it would, to a large part, take away the citizens' autonomy and thus prevent them to assume responsibility. PMID:22682416

  9. Engagement and Substance Dependence in a Primary Care-Based Addiction Treatment Program for People Infected with HIV and People at High-Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Walley, Alexander Y; Palmisano, Joseph; Sorensen-Alawad, Amy; Chaisson, Christine; Raj, Anita; Samet, Jeffrey H; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2015-12-01

    To improve outcomes for people with substance dependence and HIV infection or at risk for HIV infection, patients were enrolled in a primary care-based addiction treatment program from 2008-2012 that included a comprehensive substance use assessment, individual and group counseling, addiction pharmacotherapy and case management. We examined whether predisposing characteristics (depression, housing status, polysubstance use) and an enabling resource (buprenorphine treatment) were associated with engagement in the program and persistent substance dependence at 6 months. At program enrollment 61% were HIV-infected, 53% reported heroin use, 46% reported alcohol use, 37% reported cocaine use, and 28% reported marijuana use in the past 30 days, 72% reported depression, 19% were homeless, and 53% had polysubstance use. Within 6-months 60% had been treated with buprenorphine. Engagement (defined as 2 visits in first 14 days and 2 additional visits in next 30 days) occurred in 64%; 49% had substance dependence at 6-months. Receipt of buprenorphine treatment was associated with engagement (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 8.32 95% CI: 4.13-16.77). Self-reported depression at baseline was associated with substance dependence at 6-months (AOR 3.30 95% CI: 1.65-6.61). Neither housing status nor polysubstance use was associated with engagement or substance dependence. The FAST PATH program successfully engaged and treated patients in a primary care-based addiction treatment program. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, was a major driver of addiction treatment engagement. Given depression's association with adverse outcomes in this clinical population, including mental health treatment as part of integrated care holds potential to improve addiction treatment outcomes. PMID:26298399

  10. Personal health management systems: applying the full power of software to improve the quality and efficiency of care.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Peter; Mundie, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Electronic medical records and personal health records have made good progress in reducing costs and inefficiencies, but the key to building a health care delivery system for the twenty-first century is to evolve toward personal health management systems that apply the full power of software to improve patient care. Such systems can enable better outcomes and improve the satisfaction of consumers and providers alike. Through technology innovation, sensible policy approaches, and industrywide collaboration, we can empower individuals to take control of their health while enabling providers and payers to broaden access to higher-quality, more affordable care. PMID:19275994

  11. Mirror mirror on the ward, who’s the most narcissistic of them all? Pathologic personality traits in health care

    PubMed Central

    Bucknall, Vittoria; Burwaiss, Suendoss; MacDonald, Deborah; Charles, Kathy; Clement, Rhys

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stereotypes in medicine have become exaggerated for the purpose of workplace amusement. Our objective was to assess the levels of “dark triad” personality traits expressed by individuals working in different health care specialties in comparison with the general population. Methods: We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional study within multiple departments of a UK secondary care teaching hospital. A total of 248 health care professionals participated, and 159 members of the general population were recruited as a comparison group. We measured 3 personality traits — narcissism, Machiavellianism and psychopathy — through the validated self-reported personality questionnaires Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI), MACH-IV and the Levenson Self-Report Psychopathy Scale (LSRP), respectively. Results: Health care professionals scored significantly lower on narcissism, Machiavellianism and psychopathy (mean scores 12.0, 53.0 and 44.7, respectively) than the general population (p < 0.001). Nursing professionals exhibited a significantly higher level of secondary psychopathy than medical professionals (p = 0.04, mean LSRP score 20.3). Within the cohort of medical professionals, surgeons expressed significantly higher levels of narcissism (p = 0.03, mean NPI score 15.0). Interpretation: Health care professionals expressed low levels of dark triad personality traits. The suggestion that health care professionals are avaricious and untrustworthy may be refuted, even for surgeons. PMID:26644545

  12. Influence of seasonal climate differences on the pharmaceutical, hormone and personal care product removal efficiency of a drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Abdelmonaim; Ballesteros, Evaristo

    2013-11-01

    The potential presence of pharmaceuticals, hormones and personal care products in drinking water supplies has raised concerned over the efficiency with which these substances are removed by water treatment processes. In this work, we analyzed samples of raw, unprocessed water collected in different periods and found them to contain higher levels of these contaminants in the colder periods (viz. 12-314 ng L(-1) in autumn and winter as compared to 8-127 ng L(-1) in spring and summer) as a result of their biodegradation being favoured by high temperatures and solar irradiance. We also assessed the efficiency with which these contaminants are removed from drinking water by a water treatment plant operating in south-eastern Spain. Preoxidation with potassium permanganate and chloramination with sodium hypochlorite in the presence of highly concentrated ammonia were found to be the treatment steps most markedly contributing to the removal of pharmaceuticals, hormones and personal care products from drinking water (especially in the warmer periods, where these contaminants were completely removed from the water). By contrast, water treated in the colder periods (autumn and winter) still contained small amounts of ibuprofen and carbamazepine (0.09-0.5 ng L(-1)) which, however, accounted for less than 0.2% of their original concentrations in the water prior to treatment. PMID:23942020

  13. Evidence-based medicine meets person-centred care: a collaborative perspective on the relationship.

    PubMed

    Price, Amy I; Djulbegovic, Ben; Biswas, Rakesh; Chatterjee, Pranab

    2015-12-01

    In a recent list-serve, the way forward for evidence-based medicine was discussed. The purpose of this paper was to share the reflections and multiple perspectives discussed in this peer-to-peer encounter and to invite the reader to think with a mind for positive change in the practice of health care. Let us begin with a simple question. What if we dared to look at evidence-based medicine (EBM) and informed shared decision making like two wheels on a bike? They both need to be full of substance, well connected, lubricated and working in balance, propelled and guided by a competent driver, with good vision to get the bike where we want it to go. We need all the tools in the toolkit for the bike to stay operational and to meet the needs of the driver. By the same rationale, evidence alone is necessary but not sufficient for decision making; values are necessary and if neglected, may default to feelings based on social pressures and peer influence. Medical decisions, even shared ones, lack focus without evidence and application. Just as a bike may need a tune up from time to time to maintain optimal performance, EBM may benefit from a tune up where we challenge ourselves to move away from general assumptions and traditions and instead think clearly about the issues we face and how to ask well-formed, specific questions to get the answers to meet the needs we face in health care. PMID:26358758

  14. Infectious Disease Management through Point-of-Care Personalized Medicine Molecular Diagnostic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Luc; Bergeron, Michel G.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious disease management essentially consists in identifying the microbial cause(s) of an infection, initiating if necessary antimicrobial therapy against microbes, and controlling host reactions to infection. In clinical microbiology, the turnaround time of the diagnostic cycle (>24 hours) often leads to unnecessary suffering and deaths; approaches to relieve this burden include rapid diagnostic procedures and more efficient transmission or interpretation of molecular microbiology results. Although rapid nucleic acid-based diagnostic testing has demonstrated that it can impact on the transmission of hospital-acquired infections, we believe that such life-saving procedures should be performed closer to the patient, in dedicated 24/7 laboratories of healthcare institutions, or ideally at point of care. While personalized medicine generally aims at interrogating the genomic information of a patient, drug metabolism polymorphisms, for example, to guide drug choice and dosage, personalized medicine concepts are applicable in infectious diseases for the (rapid) identification of a disease-causing microbe and determination of its antimicrobial resistance profile, to guide an appropriate antimicrobial treatment for the proper management of the patient. The implementation of point-of-care testing for infectious diseases will require acceptance by medical authorities, new technological and communication platforms, as well as reimbursement practices such that time- and life-saving procedures become available to the largest number of patients. PMID:25562799

  15. Marketing of Personalized Cancer Care on the Web: An Analysis of Internet Websites

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Angel; Bair, Elizabeth; Lindeman, Neal; Viswanath, Vish; Janeway, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Internet marketing may accelerate the use of care based on genomic or tumor-derived data. However, online marketing may be detrimental if it endorses products of unproven benefit. We conducted an analysis of Internet websites to identify personalized cancer medicine (PCM) products and claims. A Delphi Panel categorized PCM as standard or nonstandard based on evidence of clinical utility. Fifty-five websites, sponsored by commercial entities, academic institutions, physicians, research institutes, and organizations, that marketed PCM included somatic (58%) and germline (20%) analysis, interpretive services (15%), and physicians/institutions offering personalized care (44%). Of 32 sites offering somatic analysis, 56% included specific test information (range 1–152 tests). All statistical tests were two-sided, and comparisons of website content were conducted using McNemar’s test. More websites contained information about the benefits than limitations of PCM (85% vs 27%, P < .001). Websites specifying somatic analysis were statistically significantly more likely to market one or more nonstandard tests as compared with standard tests (88% vs 44%, P = .04). PMID:25745021

  16. Chemical Pollutants Sorbed to Ingested Microbeads from Personal Care Products Accumulate in Fish.

    PubMed

    Wardrop, Peter; Shimeta, Jeff; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Morrison, Paul D; Miranda, Ana; Tang, Min; Clarke, Bradley O

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of microplastics (<5 mm) in natural environments has become a widely recognized global problem. Microplastics have been shown to sorb chemical pollutants from their surrounding environment, thus raising concern as to their role in the movement of these pollutants through the food chain. This experiment investigated whether organic pollutants sorbed to microbeads (MBs) from personal care products were assimilated by fish following particle ingestion. Rainbow fish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis) were exposed to MBs with sorbed polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs; BDE-28, -47, -100, -99, -153, -154, -183, 200 ng g(-1); BDE-209, 2000 ng g(-1)) and sampled at 0, 21, 42, and 63 days along with two control treatments (food only and food + clean MBs). Exposed fish had significantly higher Σ8PBDE concentrations than both control treatments after just 21 days, and continued exposure resulted in increased accumulation of the pollutants over the experiment (ca. 115 pg g(-1) ww d(-1)). Lower brominated congeners showed the highest assimilation whereas higher brominated congeners did not appear to transfer, indicating they may be too strongly sorbed to the plastic or unable to be assimilated by the fish due to large molecular size or other factors. Seemingly against this trend, however, BDE-99 did not appear to bioaccumulate in the fish, which may be due to partitioning from the MBs or it being metabolized in vivo. This work provides evidence that MBs from personal care products are capable of transferring sorbed pollutants to fish that ingest them. PMID:26963589

  17. Women’s exposure to phthalates in relation to use of personal care products

    PubMed Central

    Parlett, Lauren E.; Calafat, Antonia M.; Swan, Shanna H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several phthalates, particularly diethyl phthalate (DEP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), can be used in personal care products (PCPs) to fix fragrance and hold color. We investigated associations between women’s reported use of personal care products within the 24 hours prior to urine collection and concentrations of several urinary phthalate metabolites. Methods Between 2002–2005, 337 women provided spot urine samples and answered questions regarding their use of thirteen PCPs at a follow-up visit 3–36 months after pregnancy. We examined associations between urinary concentrations of several phthalate metabolites and use of PCPs using linear regression. Results Use of individual PCPs ranged from 7% (nail polish) to 91% (deodorant). After adjusting for age, education, and urinary creatinine, women reporting use of perfume had 2.92 times higher (95% CI: 2.20–3.89) concentration of monoethyl phthalate (MEP, the primary metabolite of diethyl phthalate) than other women. Other PCPs that were significantly associated with MEP included: hair spray, nail polish, and deodorant. MEP concentrations increased with the number of PCPs used. Conclusion PCP use was widespread in this group of recently pregnant women. Women’s use of PCPs, particularly of perfumes and fragranced products, was positively associated with urinary concentration of multiple phthalate metabolites. PMID:23168567

  18. Marketing of personalized cancer care on the web: an analysis of Internet websites.

    PubMed

    Gray, Stacy W; Cronin, Angel; Bair, Elizabeth; Lindeman, Neal; Viswanath, Vish; Janeway, Katherine A

    2015-05-01

    Internet marketing may accelerate the use of care based on genomic or tumor-derived data. However, online marketing may be detrimental if it endorses products of unproven benefit. We conducted an analysis of Internet websites to identify personalized cancer medicine (PCM) products and claims. A Delphi Panel categorized PCM as standard or nonstandard based on evidence of clinical utility. Fifty-five websites, sponsored by commercial entities, academic institutions, physicians, research institutes, and organizations, that marketed PCM included somatic (58%) and germline (20%) analysis, interpretive services (15%), and physicians/institutions offering personalized care (44%). Of 32 sites offering somatic analysis, 56% included specific test information (range 1-152 tests). All statistical tests were two-sided, and comparisons of website content were conducted using McNemar's test. More websites contained information about the benefits than limitations of PCM (85% vs 27%, P < .001). Websites specifying somatic analysis were statistically significantly more likely to market one or more nonstandard tests as compared with standard tests (88% vs 44%, P = .04). PMID:25745021

  19. Monitoring of emerging contaminants (pharmaceuticals, Personal Care Products, surfactants and heavy metals) in a quaternary detritic aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, L.; Valdes-Abellan, J.; Jiménez-Martínez, J.

    2012-04-01

    The presence of 209 emerging compounds, surfactants, priority substances according to the 2008/105/EC Directive, 10 heavy metals and microbiological organisms in blended water and aquifer samples was investigated in a quaternary aquifer. The effects of these compounds over the environment are not clear in many cases, but many of them have been classified as endocrine disruptor compounds, EDC. Their presence in the media is controlled in one hand by their transformation and/or removal rates and, on the other hand, by their continuous release into the media, due to the broad use of these in many human activities (pharmaceuticals, personal care products, pesticides, heavy metals, LAS and others). The attention of this work focusses on the presence and fate of these substances in the vadose zone and the aquifer. The aquifer catchment (81km2) located in SE Spain presents a high natural salinity (with EC values of ~7,500 μS cm-1, and high concentrations of chloride, sulphate and sodium), making it unsuitable to be used as drinking water or irrigation. Two sampling campaigns (February and June 2011) in wells and springs have been carried out top characterize physic-chemical, microbiological and emerging contaminants presence in the aquifer. A total of 209 emerging pollutants grouped into the following classes were analysed: 125 pharmaceutical compounds (Phs), 20 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Dioxins, 46 pesticides, 3 volatile priority pollutants as well as the most commonly used anionic surfactants were identified for further analysis. Heavy metals included: Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Ni, Zn, Sn, Pt, Pd and Tl. Results showed that 39 out of all compounds were detected: 11 pharmaceuticals, 9 PAHs, 19 pesticides, 4 surfactants and 4 heavy metals. Two of the compounds, endosulfan-α and Ni, were detected in concentrations above the allowed regulation. Although results are limited to 2 sampling campaigns, it is important to note that surfactants (LAS), pesticides PAHs and

  20. Exploring Massachusetts Health Care Reform Impact on Fee-for-Service-Funded Substance Use Disorder Treatment Providers.

    PubMed

    Fields, Dail; Pruett, Jana; Roman, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is forecast to increase the demand for and utilization of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. Massachusetts implemented health reforms similar to the ACA in 2006-2007 that included expanding coverage for SUD treatment. This study explored the impact of Massachusetts health reforms from 2007 to 2010 on SUD treatment providers in Massachusetts, who relied on fee-for-service billings for more than 50% of their revenue. The changes across treatment facilities located in Massachusetts were compared to changes in other similar fee-for-service-funded SUD treatment providers in Northeast states bordering Massachusetts and in all other states across the US. From 2007-2010, the percentage changes for Massachusetts based providers were significantly different from the changes among providers located in the rest of the US for admissions, outpatient census, average weeks of outpatient treatment, residential/in-patient census, detoxification census, length of average inpatient and outpatient stays, and provision of medication-assisted treatment. Contrary to previous studies of publicly funded treatment providers, the results of this exploratory study of providers dependent on fee-for-service revenues were consistent with some predictions for the overall effects of the ACA. PMID:26514378

  1. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tanya R.; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  2. Care available to severely disabled older persons living at home in Florence, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Di Bari, Mauro; Pecchioli, Alessandro; Mazzaglia, Giampiero; Marini, Monica; Maciocco, Gavino; Ferrucci, Luigi; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2009-01-01

    Aims To characterize the epidemiology of disability in, and the level of care available to, older community-dwellers in an Italian urban sample. Methods In a 2-phase survey, persons aged 65+ years, randomly selected from the patients lists of 98 primary care physicians (PCP), were screened (phase I) by their PCP with a structured questionnaire to detect the presence of: 1) need of help in performing Basic and 2) Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (BADL, IADL); 3) poor vision or 4) hearing; 5) weight loss; 6) use of homecare services; 7) self-perceived inadequacy of income. Subjects reporting 2+ problems were further evaluated in face-to-face structured interviews (phase II). Results Of 5445 participants, 597 (11%) screened positive in phase I and 416 were interviewed in phase II. Of these, 4, 29, 19 and 49% were disabled in 1-2 IADL, 3+ IADL, 1-2 BADL, and 3+ BADL. The extent of the support network increased with disability severity (p<0.01). The 274 participants with BADL disability received most of their help from close relatives (58.3±2.5%), followed by salaried assistants (20.5±2.1%), other relatives (19.5±1.9%), and public healthcare services (0.6±0.36%). Of the 397 care-givers interviewed, one-third were willing to institutionalize the older participants in case of further functional deterioration. This propensity was predicted only by a self-reported poor attitude towards caring. Conclusion Many severely disabled older Italians receive care in their home by highly supportive family members. The level of assistance provided to them by public healthcare services is minimal. PMID:18283226

  3. A person-focused model of care for the twenty-first century: a system-of-systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Greene, Robert A; Dasso, Edwin; Ho, Sam; Genaidy, Ash M

    2014-06-01

    The US health care system is challenged to provide high-quality care and is burdened with unsustainable expenditures, making it difficult for health care participants (patients, payers, providers, caregivers) to create value. This communication presents the theoretical foundation for a person-focused model of care that addresses a number of these challenges. The model integrates aspects of prior models of chronic care with new empiric findings and complex adaptive system (CAS) theory. The model emphasizes the relationship among all health care stakeholders. The health care delivery process is examined in terms of the role of each stakeholder and the value each adds to and receives from the process. The authors present pilot results illustrating the implications of CAS theory in regard to multi-morbidity, disease management programs, multi-morbid households, and person- and household-focused care. The model incorporates the physical, mental, and social dimensions of health, and operationalizes an individual patient's health as a CAS, identifying CASs for each of the other stakeholders as well. Health care can then be conceptualized as a system-of-systems with a person's health as its output. Deploying the model need not require major infrastructure investments or changes. It can be implemented by repurposing, aligning, and better integrating currently available interventions. The authors believe that the model creates not only survival value (health) but also purposeful value. The model offers a unifying focus for all participants in the health care delivery process, thereby constructing a health care system that is structurally person-focused and meaningful for all participants. PMID:24720637

  4. Parental Substance Abuse As an Early Traumatic Event. Preliminary Findings on Neuropsychological and Personality Functioning in Young Drug Addicts Exposed to Drugs Early

    PubMed Central

    Parolin, Micol; Simonelli, Alessandra; Mapelli, Daniela; Sacco, Marianna; Cristofalo, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Parental substance use is a major risk factor for child development, heightening the risk of drug problems in adolescence and young adulthood, and exposing offspring to several types of traumatic events. First, prenatal drug exposure can be considered a form of trauma itself, with subtle but long-lasting sequelae at the neuro-behavioral level. Second, parents' addiction often entails a childrearing environment characterized by poor parenting skills, disadvantaged contexts and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), leading to dysfunctional outcomes. Young adults born from/raised by parents with drug problems and diagnosed with a Substance Used Disorder (SUD) themselves might display a particularly severe condition in terms of cognitive deficits and impaired personality function. This preliminary study aims to investigate the role of early exposure to drugs as a traumatic event, capable of affecting the psychological status of young drug addicts. In particular, it intends to examine the neuropsychological functioning and personality profile of young adults with severe SUDs who were exposed to drugs early in their family context. The research involved three groups, each consisting of 15 young adults (aged 18–24): a group of inpatients diagnosed with SUDs and exposed to drugs early, a comparison group of non-exposed inpatients and a group of non-exposed youth without SUDs. A neuropsychological battery (Esame Neuropsicologico Breve-2), an assessment procedure for personality disorders (Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure-200) and the Symptom CheckList-90-Revised were administered. According to present preliminary results, young drug addicts exposed to drugs during their developmental age were characterized by elevated rates of neuropsychological impairments, especially at the expense of attentive and executive functions (EF); personality disorders were also common but did not differentiate them from non-exposed youth with SUDs. Alternative multi-focused prevention and

  5. Parental Substance Abuse As an Early Traumatic Event. Preliminary Findings on Neuropsychological and Personality Functioning in Young Drug Addicts Exposed to Drugs Early.

    PubMed

    Parolin, Micol; Simonelli, Alessandra; Mapelli, Daniela; Sacco, Marianna; Cristofalo, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Parental substance use is a major risk factor for child development, heightening the risk of drug problems in adolescence and young adulthood, and exposing offspring to several types of traumatic events. First, prenatal drug exposure can be considered a form of trauma itself, with subtle but long-lasting sequelae at the neuro-behavioral level. Second, parents' addiction often entails a childrearing environment characterized by poor parenting skills, disadvantaged contexts and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), leading to dysfunctional outcomes. Young adults born from/raised by parents with drug problems and diagnosed with a Substance Used Disorder (SUD) themselves might display a particularly severe condition in terms of cognitive deficits and impaired personality function. This preliminary study aims to investigate the role of early exposure to drugs as a traumatic event, capable of affecting the psychological status of young drug addicts. In particular, it intends to examine the neuropsychological functioning and personality profile of young adults with severe SUDs who were exposed to drugs early in their family context. The research involved three groups, each consisting of 15 young adults (aged 18-24): a group of inpatients diagnosed with SUDs and exposed to drugs early, a comparison group of non-exposed inpatients and a group of non-exposed youth without SUDs. A neuropsychological battery (Esame Neuropsicologico Breve-2), an assessment procedure for personality disorders (Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure-200) and the Symptom CheckList-90-Revised were administered. According to present preliminary results, young drug addicts exposed to drugs during their developmental age were characterized by elevated rates of neuropsychological impairments, especially at the expense of attentive and executive functions (EF); personality disorders were also common but did not differentiate them from non-exposed youth with SUDs. Alternative multi-focused prevention and

  6. Developing integrated health and social care services for older persons in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Leichsenring, Kai

    2004-01-01

    service development, various approaches and instruments can be observed. Different national frameworks, in particular with respect to financing and organisation, systemic development, professionalisation and professional cultures, basic societal values (family ethics), and political approaches have to be taken into account during the second phase of PROCARE during which transversal and transnational analysis will be undertaken based on an in-depth analysis of two model ways of working in each country. Discussion Far from a European vision concerning integrated care, national health and social care systems remain—at best—loosely coupled systems that are facing increasing difficulties, given the current challenges, in particular in long-term care for older persons: increasing marketisation, lack of managerial knowledge (co-operation, co-ordination), shortage of care workers and a general trend towards down-sizing of social care services continue to hamper the first tentative pathways towards integrated care systems. PMID:16773149

  7. The Continuing Care Model of Substance Use Treatment: What Works, and When Is “Enough,” “Enough?”

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Steven L.; Herschman, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    There is little disagreement in the substance use treatment literature regarding the conceptualization of substance dependence as a cyclic, chronic condition consisting of alternating episodes of treatment and subsequent relapse. Likewise, substance use treatment efforts are increasingly being contextualized within a similar disease management framework, much like that of other chronic medical conditions (diabetes, hypertension, etc.). As such, substance use treatment has generally been viewed as a process comprised of two phases. Theoretically, the incorporation of some form of lower intensity continuing care services delivered in the context of outpatient treatment after the primary treatment phase (e.g., residential) appears to be a likely requisite if all stakeholders aspire to successful long-term clinical outcomes. Thus, the overarching objective of any continuing care model should be to sustain treatment gains attained in the primary phase in an effort to ultimately prevent relapse. Given the extant treatment literature clearly supports the contention that treatment is superior to no treatment, and longer lengths of stay is associated with a variety of positive outcomes, the more prudent question appears to be not whether treatment works, but rather what are the specific programmatic elements (e.g., duration, intensity) that comprise an adequate continuing care model. Generally speaking, it appears that the duration of continuing care should extend for a minimum of 3 to 6 months. However, continuing care over a protracted period of up to 12 months appears to be essential if a reasonable expectation of robust recovery is desired. Limitations of prior work and implications for routine clinical practice are also discussed. PMID:24839597

  8. Factors associated with co-occurring borderline personality disorder among inner-city substance users: the roles of childhood maltreatment, negative affect intensity/reactivity, and emotion dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Kim L; Tull, Matthew T; Baruch, David E; Bornovalova, Marina A; Lejuez, C W

    2008-01-01

    The co-occurrence of borderline personality disorder (BPD) among individuals with substance use disorders is a common and clinically relevant phenomenon in need of further empirical investigation. The present study adds to the extant literature on the factors associated with co-occurring BPD among substance users, examining the relationships between childhood maltreatment (in the form of sexual, physical, and emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect), negative affect intensity/reactivity, emotion dysregulation, and BPD pathology (both diagnostic status and symptom count) among a sample of 76 inner-city treatment-seeking substance users. Emotion dysregulation was expected to mediate the relationships between childhood maltreatment and negative affect intensity/reactivity (and their interaction) and BPD pathology. Results indicate that the presence of a BPD diagnosis was associated with higher levels of both childhood maltreatment and negative affect intensity/reactivity. However, only childhood maltreatment emerged as a unique predictor of BPD diagnostic status. Conversely, both childhood maltreatment and negative affect intensity/reactivity accounted for unique variance in the number of endorsed BPD symptoms. Moreover, emotion dysregulation fully mediated the relationships between maltreatment and negative affect intensity/reactivity and BPD symptom count, as well as the relationship between emotional abuse in particular and BPD diagnostic status. Contrary to hypotheses, results provided no support for the interaction between maltreatment and negative affect intensity/reactivity in the prediction of BPD pathology (diagnosis or symptom count), above and beyond the main effects of these factors. PMID:18970909

  9. A pilot study of the DBT coach: an interactive mobile phone application for individuals with borderline personality disorder and substance use disorder.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Shireen L; Dimeff, Linda A; Skutch, Julie; Carroll, David; Linehan, Marsha M

    2011-12-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has received strong empirical support and is practiced widely as a treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and BPD with comorbid substance use disorders (BPD-SUD). Therapeutic success in DBT requires that individuals generalize newly acquired skills to their natural environment. However, there have been only a limited number of options available to achieve this end. The primary goal of this research was to develop and test the feasibility of the DBT Coach, a software application for a smartphone, designed specifically to enhance generalization of a specific DBT skill (opposite action) among individuals with BPD-SUD. We conducted a quasiexperimental study in which 22 individuals who were enrolled in DBT treatment programs received a smartphone with the DBT Coach for 10 to 14 days and were instructed to use it as needed. Participants used the DBT Coach an average of nearly 15 times and gave high ratings of helpfulness and usability. Results indicate that both emotion intensity and urges to use substances significantly decreased within each coaching session. Furthermore, over the trial period, participants reported a decrease in depression and general distress. Mobile technology offering in vivo skills coaching may be a useful tool for reducing urges to use substances and engage in other maladaptive behavior by directly teaching and coaching in alternative, adaptive coping behavior. PMID:22035988

  10. 'Personal Care' and General Practice Medicine in the UK: A qualitative interview study with patients and General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent policy and organisational changes within UK primary care have emphasised graduated access to care, speed of access to the first available general practitioner (GP) and care being provided by a range of healthcare professionals. These trends have been strengthened by the current GP contract and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF). Concern has been expressed that the potential for personal care is being diminished as a result and that this will reduce quality standards. This paper presents data from a study that explored with patients and GPs what personal care means and whether it has continuing importance to them. Methods A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview participants and Framework Analysis supported analysis of emerging themes. Twenty-nine patients, mainly women with young children, and twenty-three GPs were interviewed from seven practices in Lothian, Scotland, ranged by practice size and relative deprivation score. Results and Discussion Personal care was defined mainly, though not exclusively, as care given within the context of a continuing relationship in which there is an interpersonal connection and the doctor adopts a particular consultation style. Defined in this way, it was reported to have benefits for both health outcomes and patients' experience of care. In particular, such care was thought to be beneficial in attending to the emotions that can be elicited when seeking and receiving health care and in enabling patients to be known by doctors as legitimate seekers of care from the health service. Its importance was described as being dependent upon the nature of the health problem and patients' wider familial and social circumstances. In particular, it was found to provide support to patients in their parenting and other familial caring roles. Conclusion Personal care has continuing salience to patients and GPs in modern primary care in the UK. Patients equate the experience of care, not just outcomes, with high

  11. Coaching Family Caregivers to Become Better Problem Solvers When Caring for Persons with Advanced Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Lyons, Kathleen D; Akyar, Imatullah; Bakitas, Marie A

    2016-01-01

    Family caregivers of persons with advanced cancer often take on responsibilities that present daunting and complex problems. Serious problems that go unresolved may be burdensome and result in negative outcomes for caregivers' psychological and physical health and affect the quality of care delivered to the care recipients with cancer, especially at the end of life. Formal problem-solving training approaches have been developed over the past several decades to assist individuals with managing problems faced in daily life. Several of these problem-solving principles and techniques were incorporated into ENABLE (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life End), an "early" palliative care telehealth intervention for individuals diagnosed with advanced cancer and their family caregivers. A hypothetical case resembling the situations of actual caregiver participants in ENABLE that exemplifies the complex problems that caregivers face is presented, followed by presentation of an overview of ENABLE's problem-solving key principles, techniques, and steps in problem-solving support. Though more research is needed to formally test the use of problem-solving support in social work practice, social workers can easily incorporate these techniques into everyday practice. PMID:27143574

  12. NovaMedTech - a regional program for supporting new medical technologies in personalized health care.

    PubMed

    Ask, Per; Ekstrand, Kristina; Hult, Peter; Lindén, Maria; Pettersson, Nils-Erik

    2012-01-01

    NovaMedTech is an initiative funded from EU structural funds for supporting new medical technologies for personalized health care. It aims at bringing these technologies into clinical use and to the health care market. The program has participants from health care, industry and academia in East middle Sweden. The first three year period of the program was successful in terms of product concepts tried clinically, and number of products brought to a commercialization phase. Further, the program has led to a large number of scientific publications. Among projects supported, we can mention: Intelligent sensor networks; A digital pen to collect medical information about health status from patients; A web-based intelligent stethoscope; Methodologies to measure local blood flow and nutrition using optical techniques; Blood flow assessment from ankle pressure measurements; Technologies for pressure ulcer prevention; An IR thermometer for improved accuracy; A technique that identifies individuals prone to commit suicide among depressed patients; Detection of infectious disease using an electronic nose; Identification of the lactate threshold from breath; Obesity measurements using special software and MR camera; and An optical probe guided tumor resection. During the present three years period emphasis will be on entrepreneurial activities supporting the commercialization and bringing products to the market. PMID:22942033

  13. Surgery in the older person: Training needs for the provision of multidisciplinary care.

    PubMed

    Pearce, L; Bunni, J; McCarthy, K; Hewitt, J

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Many older surgical patients are exposed to high risks of morbidity and mortality when undergoing both elective and emergency surgery. Methods We provide an overview of perioperative care teams and the educational opportunities available to surgeons who undertake surgery in the older person. Findings The number of older people undergoing surgery is increasing at a rate faster than the proportion of older people in the overall population. Management of the older surgical patient throughout the surgical pathway forms part of the Specialty Training Curriculum for Geriatric Medicine. While 'surgery in childhood' continues to form part of the general surgical higher training syllabus, surgery in the later years of life does not. There are limited postgraduate courses and training opportunities currently available to surgeons in this field. There is clear societal need to address perioperative care for older surgical patients, which has proved successful in some centers. Moreover, surgical trainees support the inclusion of geriatric medicine issues into their training. Conclusions The ageing population requires a multidisciplinary perioperative approach, with dedicated and appropriately trained clinicians and allied health care professionals to improve outcomes. PMID:27269239

  14. Health Care Experiences when Pain Substance Use Disorder Coexist: “Just Because I’m an Addict Doesn’t Mean I Don’t Have Pain

    PubMed Central

    St Marie, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the healthcare experiences of 34 individuals with coexisting substance use disorder (SUD) and chronic pain. Design Narrative inquiry qualitative study of 90-minute interviews. Setting: Midwest metropolitan methadone clinic. Subjects All individuals had SUD, were treated for SUD with methadone. They all self- identified as having pain greater than 6 months. Methods This qualitative design allowed exploration of how participants made sense of events related to living with SUD and chronic pain. Narrative inquiry gives a consistent story from the participants’ perspective and researchers can perform additional analysis using the storyline. Thematic analysis occurred of their healthcare experiences. Results Results revealed that participants (a) spoke about how they used deception to obtain opioids when their addiction was out of control, (b) were disturbed by health care providers having little understanding or ability to help them with their painful condition, (c) felt they wanted to abuse opiates again when receiving poor treatment by the health care team, (d) related what went well in their health care to help them maintain their sobriety, and (e) recommended improvements on health care interventions that included effective treatment of pain. Conclusions Coexisting chronic pain and SUD create unique health care needs by mutually activating and potentiating the other. There are very few comparable studies exploring the experiences of individuals when pain and substance use disorder coexist. The health care team can better develop treatment plans and test interventions sensitive to their unique needs when they understand the experiences of this population. PMID:25041442

  15. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS): A Three-Factor Model of Psychopathology in Marginally Housed Persons with Substance Dependence and Psychiatric Illness

    PubMed Central

    Giesbrecht, Chantelle J.; O’Rourke, Norm; Leonova, Olga; Strehlau, Verena; Paquet, Karine; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel; Panenka, William J.; MacEwan, G. William; Smith, Geoffrey N.; Thornton, Allen E.; Honer, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Rates of psychopathology are elevated in marginalized and unstably housed persons, underscoring the need for applicable clinical measures for these populations. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) is a clinical instrument principally developed for use in schizophrenia to identify the presence and severity of psychopathology symptoms. The current study investigates whether a reliable and valid PANSS factor structure emerges in a marginally housed, heterogeneous sample recruited from the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver where substance use disorders and psychiatric illness are pervasive. Participants (n = 270) underwent structured clinical assessments including the PANSS and then were randomly assigned to either exploratory (EFA) or confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) subsamples. EFA pointed to a novel three factor PANSS. This solution was supported by CFA. All retained items (28 out of 30) load significantly upon hypothesized factors and model goodness of fit analyses are in the acceptable to good range. Each of the three first-order factor constructs, labeled Psychosis/Disorganized, Negative Symptoms/Hostility, and Insight/Awareness, contributed significantly to measurement of a higher-order psychopathology construct. Further, the latent structure of this 3-factor solution appears temporally consistent over one-year. This PANSS factor structure appears valid and reliable for use in persons with multimorbidity, including substance use disorders. The structure is somewhat distinct from existing solutions likely due to the unique characteristics of this marginally housed sample. PMID:26999280

  16. Examining the relationship between personality and affect-related attributes and adolescents' intentions to try smoking using the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale.

    PubMed

    Memetovic, Jasmina; Ratner, Pamela A; Gotay, Carolyn; Richardson, Christopher G

    2016-05-01

    Assessments of adolescents' smoking intentions indicate that many are susceptible to smoking initiation because they do not have resolute intentions to abstain from trying smoking in the future. Although researchers have developed personality and affect-related risk factor profiles to understand risk for the initiation of substance use and abuse (e.g., alcohol), few have examined the extent to which these risk factors are related to the tobacco use intentions of adolescents who have yet to try tobacco smoking. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships between personality and affect-related risk factors measured by the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) and smoking intentions in a sample of adolescents who have not experimented with tobacco smoking. Data is based on responses from 1352 participants in the British Columbia Adolescent Substance Use Survey (56% female, 76% in Grade 8) who had never tried smoking tobacco. Of these 1352 participants, 29% (n=338) were classified as not having resolute intentions to not try smoking. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the relationship between each SURPS dimension (Anxiety Sensitivity, Hopelessness, Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking) and the intention to try cigarettes in the future. Hopelessness (AOR 1.06, 95% CI [1.03, 1.10], p<.001), Impulsivity (AOR 1.07 [1.03, 1.11], p<.001) and Sensation Seeking (AOR 1.05 95% CI [1.02, 1.09], p<.01) had independent statistically significant associations with having an intention to try smoking. These findings may be used to inform a prevention-oriented framework to reduce susceptibility to tobacco smoking. PMID:26803399

  17. Typologies of substance use and illegal behaviors: A comparison of emerging adults with histories of foster care and the general population

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Susan M.; Medeiros, Rose Anne

    2016-01-01

    This study used latent class analysis (LCA) to explore whether patterns of substance use and illegal behaviors among emerging adults, 18 to 28 years old, differ depending on whether they have a prior history in foster care. The study sample, consisting of 316 respondents who had previously been in foster care and 14,301 respondents without a foster care history, was drawn from the third wave of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. A multiple-group LCA compared former foster youth to their peers in the general population. The following four classes were identified: illegal behaviors, substance use, illegal behaviors with problematic substance use and normative behaviors. Most of the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. However, within the illegal behavior class former foster youth were less likely to have bought, sold, or held stolen goods; injured someone in a fight so that she or he needed medical attention; to have sold drugs; and to have been drunk at school or work. Additionally, in the illegal behaviors with problematic substance use class emerging adults in the general population were more likely to have used cocaine. Within the normative behaviors class, former foster youth were more likely to be current smokers, and to have injured someone in a fight so that he or she required medical attention. Within the substance use class, emerging adults from the general population were more likely to have taken place in a fight where one group fought another. Additional statistically significant, but very small differences were also identified.

  18. DSM-IV Antisocial Personality Disorder and Conduct Disorder: Evidence for Taxonic Structures Among Individuals With and Without Substance Use Disorders in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Kerridge, Bradley T; Saha, Tulshi D; Hasin, Deborah S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The categorical-dimensional status of DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) conduct disorder (CD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is a source of controversy. This study examined whether the underlying structure of DSM-IV CD and ASPD was dimensional or categorical (taxonic) among individuals with and without substance use disorders. Method: Using a national large representative survey of U.S. adults (n = 43,093), taxometric analyses of DSM-IV CD and ASPD diagnostic criteria were conducted on the total sample and among those with and without substance use disorders. Results: Results of three taxometric procedures were consistent in showing that the structures underlying DSM-IV CD and ASPD were clearly taxonic in the total sample and among individuals with and without substance use disorders. Comparison curve fit indices exceeded 0.57 for each model. Conclusions: Taxonic findings of the present study were in contrast to the dimensional results of prior taxometric research among incarcerated samples with substantial comorbidity of antisocial syndromes and substance use disorders. Results supported the categorical representation and diagnostic thresholds of ASPD and CD as defined in DSM-IV and DSM-5. That the structure of ASPD and CD may be taxonic suggests that further research on these disorders use group comparative designs in which samples with and without these disorders are compared in terms of sociodemographic and clinical correlates, comorbidity, and treatment utilization. The taxonic structure of ASPD and CD may contribute to future research on causal processes through which these antisocial syndromes develop. PMID:24766762

  19. Experiences of care by Australians with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, J.

    2015-01-01

    Accessible summary Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a complex and challenging mental health condition for the person and service providers who support them.This paper reports on the results of a survey of 153 people with a diagnosis of BPD about their experiences of attempting to receive support in managing this mental health condition. It provides their perceptions of a range of experiences not reported in the existing literature, including general practitioner roles, urban and rural differences, public and private hospital differences, and comparison of usefulness of support across multiple support types.People with a diagnosis of BPD continue to experience significant discrimination when attempting to get their needs met within both public and private health services. Further education for nurses and other health professionals is indicated to address pervasive negative attitudes towards people with a diagnosis of BPD. Abstract There is limited understanding of the experience of seeking and receiving treatment and care by people with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD), their perceptions of barriers to care and the quality of services they receive. This study aimed to explore these experiences from the perspective of Australians with this diagnosis. An invitation to participate in an online survey was distributed across multiple consumer and carer organizations and mental health services, by the Private Mental Health Consumer Carer Network (Australia) in 2011. Responses from 153 people with a diagnosis of BPD showed that they experience significant challenges and discrimination when attempting to get their needs met within both public and private health services, including general practice. Seeking help from hospital emergency departments during crises was particularly challenging. Metropolitan and rural differences, and gender differences, were also apparent. Community supports were perceived as inadequate to meet their needs. This study

  20. Personalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca Martin

    1996-01-01

    Describes how a typical high school in Huntington Beach, California, curbed disruptive student behavior by personalizing the school experience for "problem" students. Through mostly volunteer efforts, an adopt-a-kid program was initiated that matched kids' learning styles to adults' personality styles and resulted in fewer suspensions and numerous…