Science.gov

Sample records for pesticide degradation products

  1. A Test House Study of Pesticides and PesticideDegradation Products Following an Indoor Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preexisting pesticide degradates are a concern for pesticide biomonitoring studies as exposure to them may result in overestimation of pesticide exposure. The purpose of this research was to determine whether there was significant formation and movement, of pesticide degradates o...

  2. Pesticides and pesticide degradation products in stormwater runoff: Sacramento River Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.

    1996-01-01

    Pesticides in stormwater runoff, within the Sacramento River Basin, California, were assessed during a storm that occurred in January 1994. Two organophosphate insecticides (diazinon and methidathion), two carbamate pesticides (molinate and carbofuran), and one triazine herbicide (simazine) were detected. Organophosphate pesticide concentrations increased with the rising stage of the hydrographs; peak concentrations were measured near peak discharge. Diazinon oxon, a toxic degradation product of diazinon, made up approximately 1 to 3 percent of the diazinon load. The Feather River was the principal source of organophosphate pesticides to the Sacramento River during this storm. The concentrations of molinate and carbofuran, pesticides applied to rice fields during May and June, were relatively constant during and after the storm. Their presence in surface water was attributed to the flooding and subsequent drainage, as a management practice to degrade rice stubble prior to the next planting. A photodegradation product of molinate, 4-keto molinate, was in all samples where molinate was detected and made up approximately 50 percent of the total molinate load. Simazine, a herbicide used in orchards and to control weeds along the roadways, was detected in the storm runoff, but it was not possible to differentiate the two sources of that pesticide to the Sacramento River.

  3. THERMAL DEGRADATION CHARACTERISTICS OF ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE PESTICIDE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thermal decomposition properties of the active ingredient of 16 pesticides have been theoretically examined. xperimental studies on 6 pesticide related materials were also conducted under controlled laboratory testing. xperimental studies of the high-temperature oxidation and...

  4. MECHANISMS OF PESTICIDE DEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project was initiated with the overall objective of determining (1) the chemical structures of toxic components of toxaphene, (2) to study anaerobic metabolism to degrade toxaphene and other pesticides, and (3) to understand toxic action mechanism of chlordimeform. ...

  5. Light Induced Degradation of Eight Commonly Used Pesticides Adsorbed on Atmospheric Particles: Kinetics and Product Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Durand, A.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.; Quivet, E.

    2014-12-01

    Pesticides are widely used all over the world whether in agricultural production or in non-agricultural settings. They may pose a potential human health effects and environmental risks due to their physico-chemical properties and their extensive use which is growing every year. Pesticides are found in the atmosphere removed from the target area by volatilization or wind erosion, and carried over long distances. These compounds are partitioned between the gaseous and particulate atmospheric phases. The increasingly used pesticides are semi-volatile compounds which are usually adsorbed on the surface of the atmospheric particles. These pesticides may undergo chemical and photo-chemical transformation. New compounds may then be formed that could be more hazardous than the primary pesticides. The atmospheric fate and lifetime of adsorbed pesticides on particles are controlled by the these (photo)chemical processes. However, there is a lack of kinetic data regarding the pesticides in the particle phase. This current work focuses on the photolytic degradation of commonly used pesticides in particulate phase. It aims at estimating the photolytic rates and thus the lifetimes of pesticides adsorbed on silica particles as a proxy of atmospheric particles. The following eight commonly used pesticides, cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin, tetraconazole, were chosen because of their physico-chemical properties. The photolysis rates of tetraconazole and permethrin were extremely slow ≤ 1.2 · 10-6 s-1. The photolysis rates for the other pesticides were determined in the range of: (5.9 ± 0.3) · 10-6 < k < (1.7 ± 0.1) · 10-4 s-1 from slowest to the fastest: pendimethalin < cyprodinil < deltamethrin < difenoconazole < oxadiazon < fipronil. Finally, the identification of the surface products upon light irradiation was performed, using GC-(QqQ)-MS/MS and LC-(Q-IMS-ToF)-MS/MS. The potentially formed gas-phase products during these photolysis processes were followed continuously and on-line by PTR-ToF-MS. We hope that the obtained results from this study will help in the development of future environmental strategies to better understand and control phyto-sanitary product application and human exposure.

  6. Occurrence of pesticides and some of their degradation products in waters in a Spanish wine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Hernández, E.; Andrades, M. S.; Álvarez-Martín, A.; Pose-Juan, E.; Rodríguez-Cruz, M. S.; Sánchez-Martín, M. J.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryA multi-residual analytical method based on solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was developed to monitor pesticides in natural waters. Fifty-eight compounds, including herbicides, fungicides, insecticides and some of their degradation products, were surveyed to evaluate the quality of natural waters throughout the wine-growing region of La Rioja (Rioja DOCa). Ninety-two sampling points were selected, including surface and ground waters that could be affected by agricultural activities covering the region's three sub-areas. Different parameters that may affect the efficiency of the SPE procedure were optimised (sorbent type, elution solvent and sample volume), and matrix-matched standards were used to eliminate the variable matrix effect and ensure good quantification. The developed method allows the determination of target compounds below the level established by the European Union for waters for human use with suitable precision (relative standard deviations lower than 18%) and accuracy (with recoveries over 61%). Forty compounds included in this study (six insecticides, 12 herbicides, 16 fungicides and six degradation products) were detected in one or more samples. The herbicides terbuthylazine, its metabolite desethyl terbuthylazine, fluometuron and ethofumesate and the fungicides pyrimethanil and tebuconazole were the compounds most frequently detected in water samples (present in more than 60% of the samples). Concentrations above 0.1 μg L-1 were detected for 37 of the compounds studied, and in several cases recorded values of over 18 μg L-1. The results reveal the presence of pesticides in most of the samples investigated. In 64% of groundwaters and 62% of surface waters, the sum of compounds detected was higher than 0.5 μg L-1 (the limit established by EU legislation for the sum of all pesticides detected in waters for human use).

  7. Degradation of pesticides by actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    De Schrijver, A; De Mot, R

    1999-01-01

    Actinomycetes have considerable potential for the biotransformation and biodegradation of pesticides. Members of this group of Gram-positive bacteria have been found to degrade pesticides with widely different chemical structures, including organochlorines, s-triazines, triazinones, carbamates, organophosphates, organophosphonates, acetanilides, and sulfonylureas. A limited number of these xenobiotic pesticides can be mineralized by single isolates, but often consortia of bacteria are required for complete degradation. Cometabolism of pesticides is frequently observed within this group of bacteria. When compared with pesticide degradation by Gram-negative bacteria, much less information about molecular mechanisms involved in biotransformations of pesticides by actinomycetes is available. Progress in this area has been seriously hampered by a lack of suitable molecular genetic tools for most representatives of this major group of soil bacteria. Overcoming this constraint would enable a better exploitation of the biodegradation and biotransformation abilities of actinomycetes for applications such as bioremediation and construction of transgenic herbicide-resistant crops. PMID:10405795

  8. Pesticide Degradation in Thermal Foggers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal foggers are used in many parts of the world for vector control. Since thermal foggers use heat to create and help propel adulticide clouds, there is reason to examine the stability of pesticides in both diesel and water-based formulations. This study examined the degradation of 5 pesticide...

  9. Enhanced degradation of five organophosphorus pesticides in skimmed milk by lactic acid bacteria and its potential relationship with phosphatase production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Hua; Xu, Di; Liu, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Xin-Huai

    2014-12-01

    Skimmed milk spiked with five organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), chlorpyrifos, diazinon, fenitrothion, malathion and methyl parathion, was fermented by ten lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and four strain combinations at 42°C for 24h. OPPs left in the samples at different times were extracted, purified, detected by gas chromatography and calculated for degradation rate constants, based on a first-order reaction model. OPPs degradation was enhanced by the inoculated LAB, resulting in 0.8-225.4% increase in the rate constants. Diazinon and methyl parathion were more stable whereas chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion and malathion were more labile. Lactobacillus brevis 1.0209 showed the strongest acceleration on OPPs degradation while strain combination could bring about a synergy between the strains of lower ability. Phosphatase production of the strains might be one of the key factors responsible for the enhanced OPPs degradation, as the detected phosphatase activities were positively correlated to the measured degradation rate constants of OPPs (r=0.636-0.970, P<0.05). PMID:24996321

  10. Detection of pyrethroid pesticides and their environmental degradation products in duplicate diet samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract is for an oral presentation at the Asilomar Conference on Mass Spectrometry: Mass Spectrometry in Environmental Chemistry, Toxicology, and Health. It describes analytical method development and sample results for determination of pyrethroid pesticides and environme...

  11. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS DURING DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free chlorine has been found to react with organophosphate (OP) pesticides resulting in the more toxic oxon products. We will discuss OP pesticide degradation pathways and modeling in the presence of chlorine and chloramines, as well as present a relationship between structure a...

  12. Single and mixture effects of pesticides and a degradation product on fluvial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Tiam, Sandra Kim; Libert, Xavier; Morin, Soizic; Gonzalez, Patrice; Feurtet-Mazel, Agnès; Mazzella, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    The Morcille River located in the Beaujolais vineyard area (Eastern France) is subjected to strong vine-growing pressure leading to the contamination by a range of herbicides and fungicides of the surrounding freshwater environment. Particularly high concentrations of norflurazon, desmethyl norflurazon and tebuconazole were recorded in spring 2010 at the downstream site of the river. Despite their occurrence in rivers, scarce toxicity data are available for these products, in particular in the case of desmethyl norflurazon (main norflurazon degradation product). Furthermore, the toxicity data are generally available only for single compounds and are issued from single species toxicity tests, leading to a lack of ecological relevance. Consequently, this study was undertaken to evaluate the toxic effects of norflurazon, desmethyl norflurazon and tebuconazole singly and in a ternary mixture on fluvial biofilm. Toxicity tests were performed in microplates for 48 h. Photosynthetic endpoints were measured using pulse amplitude-modulated fluorometry; diatom densities and taxonomic composition were determined. After 48 h of exposure, significant effects on optimal quantum yield (F v/F m) for desmethyl norflurazon and mixture were observed. PMID:24549942

  13. Low pressure UV/H2O2 treatment for the degradation of the pesticides metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop - Kinetics and reaction product formation.

    PubMed

    Semitsoglou-Tsiapou, Sofia; Templeton, Michael R; Graham, Nigel J D; Hernández Leal, Lucía; Martijn, Bram J; Royce, Alan; Kruithof, Joop C

    2016-03-15

    The degradation kinetics of three pesticides - metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop - by ultraviolet photolysis and hydroxyl radical oxidation by low pressure ultraviolet hydrogen peroxide (LP-UV/H2O2) advanced oxidation was determined. Mecoprop was susceptible to both LP-UV photolysis and hydroxyl radical oxidation, and exhibited the fastest degradation kinetics, achieving 99.6% (2.4-log) degradation with a UV fluence of 800 mJ/cm(2) and 5 mg/L hydrogen peroxide. Metaldehyde was poorly degraded by LP-UV photolysis while 97.7% (1.6-log) degradation was achieved with LP-UV/H2O2 treatment at the maximum tested UV fluence of 1000 mJ/cm(2) and 15 mg/L hydrogen peroxide. Clopyralid was hardly susceptible to LP-UV photolysis and exhibited the lowest degradation by LP-UV/H2O2 among the three pesticides. The second-order reaction rate constants for the reactions between the pesticides and OH-radicals were calculated applying a kinetic model for LP-UV/H2O2 treatment to be 3.6 × 10(8), 2.0 × 10(8) and 1.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop, respectively. The main LP-UV photolysis reaction product from mecoprop was 2-(4-hydroxy-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid, while photo-oxidation by LP-UV/H2O2 treatment formed several oxidation products. The photo-oxidation of clopyralid involved either hydroxylation or dechlorination of the ring, while metaldehyde underwent hydroxylation and produced acetic acid as a major end product. Based on the findings, degradation pathways for the three pesticides by LP-UV/H2O2 treatment were proposed. PMID:26803264

  14. Disposal and degradation of pesticide waste.

    PubMed

    Felsot, Allan S; Racke, Kenneth D; Hamilton, Denis J

    2003-01-01

    Generation of pesticide waste is inevitable during every agricultural operation from storage to use and equipment cleanup. Large-scale pesticide manufacturers can afford sophisticated recovery, treatment, and cleanup techniques. Small-scale pesticide users, for example, single farms or small application businesses, struggle with both past waste problems, including contaminated soils, and disposal of unused product and equipment rinsewater. Many of these problems have arisen as a result of inability to properly handle spills during, equipment loading and rinsewater generated after application. Small-scale facilities also face continued problems of wastewater handling. Old, obsolete pesticide stocks are a vexing problem in numerous developing countries. Pesticide waste is characterized by high concentrations of a diversity of chemicals and associated adjuvants. Dissipation of chemicals at elevated concentrations is much slower than at lower concentrations, in part because of microbial toxicity and mass transfer limitations. High concentrations of pesticides may also move faster to lower soil depths, especially when pore water becomes saturated wish a compound. Thus, if pesticide waste is not properly disposed of, groundwater and surface water contamination become probable. The Waste Management Hierarchy developed as an Australian Code of Practice can serve as a guide for development of a sound waste management plan. In order of desirability, the course of actions include waste avoidance, waste reduction, waste recycling, waste treatment, and waste disposal. Proper management of pesticide stocks, including adequate storage conditions, good inventory practices, and regular turnover of products,. will contribute to waste avoidance and reduction over the long-term. Farmers can also choose to use registered materials that have the lowest recommended application rates or are applied in the least volume of water. Wastewater that is generated during equipment rinsing can be recycled by spraying it onto cropland, thus avoiding a soil contamination problem. If it is not feasible to spray out rinsates, then water treatment becomes necessary. However, for small waste generators, practical technology is still too experimental and not easily implemented on an individual farm or at a small application business. Nevertheless, research has been quite active in application of advanced oxidation processes (UV/ozonation: photoassisted Fenton reaction: photocatalysis using TiO2). Obsolete pesticide stocks in developing countries are being packaged and shipped to developed countries for incineration. Contaminated soil can also be incinerated, but this is not practical nor affordable for small waste generators. Chemical degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides may be amenable to dechlorination by alkali polyethylene glycol treatment, but further study is needed to make the technique practical for small waste generators. Contaminated soils may be amenable to cleanup by one of several biological treatment methods, including composting, landfarming, and bioaugmentation/ biostimulation. Composting and landfarming (which may be used in combination with biostimulation) may be the most practical of the biological methods that is immediately ready for implementation by small-scale pesticide waste generators. PMID:12666819

  15. PESTICIDE PRODUCT INFORMATION SYSTEM (PPIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticide Product Information System (PPIS) contains information concerning all pesticide products registered in the United States. It includes registrant name and address, chemical ingredients, toxicity category, product names, distributor brand names, site/pest uses, pestic...

  16. Organochlorinated pesticide degrading microorganisms isolated from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lovecka, Petra; Pacovska, Iva; Stursa, Petr; Vrchotova, Blanka; Kochankova, Lucie; Demnerova, Katerina

    2015-01-25

    Degradation of selected organochlorinated pesticides (γ-hexachlorocyclohexane - γ-HCH, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane - DDT, hexachlorobenzene - HCB) by soil microorganisms was studied. Bacterial strains isolated from contaminated soil from Klatovy-Luby, Hajek and Neratovice, Czech Republic, capable of growth on the selected pesticides were isolated and characterised. These isolates were subjected to characterisation and identification by MS MALDI-TOF of whole cells and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The isolates were screened by gas chromatography for their ability to degrade the selected pesticides. Some isolates were able to degrade pesticides, and the formation of degradation products (γ-pentachlorocyclohexane (γ-PCCH), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD)) observed in liquid culture confirmed their degradation capability. The isolates and DNA samples isolated from the contaminated soil were also screened for the bphA1 gene (encoding biphenyl-2,3-dioxygenase, the first enzyme in the PCB degradation pathway) and its occurrence was demonstrated. The isolates were also screened for the presence of linA, encoding dehydrochlorinase, the first enzyme of the HCH degradation pathway. The linA gene could not be found in any of the tested isolates, possibly due to the high specificity of the primers used. The isolates with the most effective degradation abilities could be used for further in situ bioremediation experiments with contaminated soil. PMID:25094051

  17. Particulate matter formation from photochemical degradation of organophosphorus pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.; Vera, T.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-01

    Several experiments were performed in the European Photo-reactor - EUPHORE - for studying aerosol formation from organophosphorus pesticides such as diazinon, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-methyl and pirimiphos-methyl. The mass concentration yields obtained (Y) were in the range 5 - 44% for the photo-oxidation reactions in the presence and the absence of NOx. These results confirm the importance of studying pesticides as significant precursors of atmospheric particulate matter due to the serious risks associated to them. The studies based on the use of EUPHORE photoreactor provide useful data about atmospheric degradation processes of organophosphorus pesticides to the atmosphere. Knowledge of the specific degradation products, including the formation of secondary particulate matter, could complete the assessment of their potential impact, since the formation of those degradation products plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry, global climate change, radiative force, and are related to health effects.

  18. Results of analyses of the fungicide Chlorothalonil, its degradation products, and other selected pesticides at 22 surface-water sites in five Southern states, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Elisabeth A.; Orlando, James L.; Battaglin, William A.; Sandstrom, Mark; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    In accordance with the mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Toxic Substances Hydrology Program, a pesticide study was conducted during 2003-04 to determine the occurrence of the fungicide chlorothalonil and its degradation products at 22 surface-water sites in five Southern States. Water-quality samples were collected during the peanut-growing season (June-September) in 2003. During the peanut-growing season in 2004, samples were collected after large storms. An analytical method was developed at the USGS Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, to measure chlorothalonil and its degradation products by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Chlorothalonil was detected in 4 of the 113 surface-water samples. The primary degradation product of chlorothalonil, 4-hydroxy-chlorothalonil, was detected in 26 of the 113 samples with concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 0.930 microgram per liter. The chlorothalonil degradation products, 1-amide-4-hydroxy-chorothalonil and 1,3-diamide-chlorothalonil, were detected in one water sample each at 0.020 and 0.161 microgram per liter, respectively. The USGS Methods and Research Development Group, Lakewood, Colorado, developed a custom method for chlorothalonil using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in an effort to achieve a lower laboratory reporting level (LRL) than the USGS National Water-Quality Laboratory (NWQL) schedule 2060, which analyzes the compound chlorothalonil at a LRL of 0.035 ?g/L. The group succeeded in achieving a lower GC/MS reporting level of 0.01 ?g/L. Chlorothalonil was detected in 5 of 68 water samples analyzed using the custom GC/MS method, whereas chlorothalonil was detected in 2 of 21 water samples analyzed using NWQL schedule 2060. In addition to analysis of chlorothalonil and its degradation products, samples were analyzed using the USGS NWQL schedules 2001 and 2060 for about 114 pesticides and their degradation products. Samples also were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon, suspended sediment, and percentage of silt- and clay-sized particles. Overall, it was found that chlorothalonil was detected only infrequently and at relatively low concentrations. Chlorothalonil's major degradation product, 4-hydroxy-chlorothalonil, was detected most frequently, occurred generally at higher concentrations in water samples than did the parent fungicide, and the data from this study reaffirmed that it is the dominant degradation product of chlorothalonil in the peanut-growing environment.

  19. Regulation of pesticide degradation in the detritusphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagel, Holger; Poll, Christian; Ingwersen, Joachim; Ditterich, Franziska; Gebala, Aurelia; Kandeler, Ellen; Streck, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    The detritusphere is a microbial hot spot of C turnover and degradation of pesticides in soils. We aimed at an improved understanding of the regulation mechanisms, which are responsible for stimulated degradation of the herbicide MCPA (2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid) in response to increased C availability in the detritusphere. We combined a microcosm experiment with biogeochemical modeling and linked genetic information on abundances of total bacteria, fungi and specific pesticide degraders in soil to the coupled biogeochemical dynamics of C and MCPA. As a result of diffusive and convective C transport from litter into the adjacent soil we found increased dissolved organic C (DOC) in soil up to a 6 mm distance to litter (detritusphere). In the detritusphere, we observed increased microbial C and accelerated MCPA degradation. These dynamics were accurately reproduced by the model. Whereas the observed increase of bacteria and pesticide degrader populations in the detritusphere was simulated satisfactorily, the model could not reproduce the steep increase of fungi indicated by the fungal marker gene. Our simulations suggest that bacterial MCPA degraders mostly benefited from high-quality DOC, whereas fungal activity and growth were specifically stimulated by low-quality DOC. According to the simulations, MCPA was predominantly degraded via fungal co-metabolism. Our study demonstrates that biogeochemical processes in soil hotspots are regulated by the interaction of transport processes and microbial dynamics. It further reveals that mathematical modelling is as powerful tool to gain comprehensive insight into the microbial regulation of matter cycling in soil. Genetic information has a high potential to parameterize and evaluate complex mechanistic models, but model approaches must be improved based on extended information on gene dynamics at the cellular level.

  20. Polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) uptake rates for 17 polar pesticides and degradation products: laboratory calibration.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Imtiaz; Togola, Anne; Gonzalez, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) are useful for monitoring a wide range of chemicals, including polar pesticides, in water bodies. However, few calibration data are available, which limits the use of these samplers for time-weighted average concentration measurements in an aquatic medium. This work deals with the laboratory calibration of the pharmaceutical configuration of a polar organic chemical integrative sampler (pharm-POCIS) for calculating the sampling rates of 17 polar pesticides (1.15 ≤  logK(ow) ≤ 3.71) commonly found in water. The experiment, conducted for 21 days in a continuous water flow-through exposure system, showed an integrative accumulation of all studied pesticides for 15 days. Three compounds (metalaxyl, azoxystrobine, and terbuthylazine) remained integrative for the 21-day experiment. The sampling rates measured ranged from 67.9 to 279 mL day(-1) and increased with the hydrophobicity of the pesticides until reaching a plateau where no significant variation in sampling rate is observed when increasing the hydrophobicity. PMID:23135754

  1. The effects of pesticide mixtures on degradation of pendimethalin in soils.

    PubMed

    Swarcewicz, Maria K; Gregorczyk, Andrzej

    2012-05-01

    Most agronomic situations involve a sequence of herbicide, fungicide, and insecticide application. On the other hand, use of pesticidal combinations has become a standard practice in the production of many agricultural crops. One of the most important processes influencing the behavior of a pesticide in the environment is its degradation in soil. It is known that due to several pesticide applications in one vegetation season, the pesticide may be present in mixtures with other pesticides or xenobiotics in soil. This study examines the role which a mixture of chemicals plays in pesticide degradation. The influence of other pesticides on the rate of pendimethalin (PDM) degradation in soil was measured in controlled conditions. Mixtures of PDM with mancozeb or mancozeb and thiamethoxam significantly influenced the degradation of pendimethalin under controlled conditions. The second type of mixtures, with metribuzin or thiamethoxam, did not affect the behavior of pendimethalin in soil. Also, we determined the influence of water content on the rate of pendimethalin degradation alone in two soils and compared it to the rate in three pesticide mixtures. We compared two equations to evaluate the predictors of the rate of herbicide dissipation in soil: the first-order kinetic and the non-linear empirical models. We used the non-linear empirical model assuming that the degradation rate of a herbicide in soil is proportional to the difference of the observed concentration of herbicide in soil at time and concentration of herbicide in the last day of measurement. PMID:21713483

  2. 78 FR 9688 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Antimicrobial Pesticide Products With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... (77 FR 74003) (FRL-9362-3). In that document, EPA requested comment on a draft PR notice that provided... AGENCY Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Antimicrobial Pesticide Products With Mold... for Antimicrobial Pesticide Products with Mold-Related Label Claims. This document extends the...

  3. Assessing the ecotoxicity of pesticide transformation products.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Chris J; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2003-10-15

    Once released to the environment, pesticides may be degraded by abiotic and biotic processes. While parent compounds are assessed in detail in many regulatory schemes, the requirements for the assessment of transformation products are less well developed. This study was therefore performed to explore the relationships between the toxicity of transformation products and their parent compounds and to develop a pragmatic approach for use in the risk assessment of transformation products. Data were obtained on the properties and ecotoxicity of transformation products arising from a wide range of pesticides. Generally, transformation products were less toxic to fish, daphnids, and algae than their parent compound. In instances where a product was more toxic, the increase in toxicity could be explained by either (1) the presence of a pesticide toxicophore; (2) the fact that the product is the active part of a propesticide; (3) the product is accumulated to a greater extent than the parent compound; or (4) the product has a more potent mode of action than the parent. On the basis of the findings, an approach has been proposed to estimate the ecotoxicity of transformation products based on chemical structure and data on the toxicity of the parent compound. The assessments can be performed at an early stage in the risk assessment process to identify those substances that require further testing. PMID:14594370

  4. 76 FR 17644 - Pesticide Product; Registration Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Pesticide Product; Registration Application AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION.... Registration Applications EPA has received an application to register a pesticide product containing...

  5. 75 FR 5077 - Pesticide Product; Registration Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Product; Registration Application AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... identified. II. Registration Applications EPA received an application as follows to register a pesticide... a sustainable agriculture community, registration of a pheromone-based product is of importance...

  6. Sorption-desorption behavior of pesticides and their degradation products in volcanic and nonvolcanic soils: interpretation of interactions through two-way principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Báez, María E; Espinoza, Jeannette; Silva, Ricardo; Fuentes, Edwar

    2015-06-01

    Sorption-desorption behavior of six pesticides and some degradation products was assessed on seven agricultural volcanic and nonvolcanic soils belonging to Andisol, Ultisol, Mollisol, and Alfisol orders. The global interpretation of sorption data was performed by principal component analysis. Results showed exceptionally high sorption of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) (the breakdown product) on volcanic soils (K f > 1500 μg(1 - 1 / n) mL(1 / n) g(-1)) related mainly to contents of amorphous aluminum oxides (Andisols) and crystalline minerals (Ultisols). The lower sorption on nonvolcanic soils was associated to low organic matter contents and lack of significant minerals. Metsulfuron-methyl and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (metabolite of chlorpyrifos) were weakly to substantially sorbed on Andisols and Ultisols, but the first one was not sorbed at pH > 6.4, including nonvolcanic soils. The metabolite of diazinon, 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine, was weakly sorbed on all soils (K f = 0.4 to 3.6 μg(1 - 1 / n) mL(1 / n) g(-1)). Acidic compounds would be lixiviated in Mollisols and Alfisols, but they could leach also in Andisols and Ultisols if they reach greater depths. Atrazine and deethylatrazine sorption was related to organic carbon content; therefore, they were weakly retained on nonvolcanic soils (K f = 0.7 to 2.2 μg(1 - 1 / n) mL(1 / n) g(-1)). Chlorpyrifos was highly sorbed on all soils reaching K OC values of >8000. Finally, the significant retention of chlorothalonil and diazinon on Mollisols and Alfisols in spite of their low OC contents showed the contribution of clay minerals in the sorption process. PMID:25561264

  7. Inverse modeling of pesticide degradation and pesticide-degrading population size dynamics in a bioremediation system: parameterizing the Monod model.

    PubMed

    Sniegowski, Kristel; Mertens, Jan; Diels, Jan; Smolders, Erik; Springael, Dirk

    2009-05-01

    Pesticide degradation models are compared which simulate the response of biofilters for treatment of pesticide-contaminated waste water to time-irregular pesticide supply in which the pesticide is used for growth and mineralized. Biofilter microcosms containing a mixture of straw, peat and soil and harboring micropopulations which uses the herbicide linuron for growth, were irrigated with linuron for 28 weeks with a stop in its supply between week 12 and 17. Matrix samples were regularly taken to assay linuron mineralization. A first-order approximation of the Monod model was used to simulate the observed mineralization data, while an inverse modeling framework combining a sensitivity analysis (Morris Sensitivity Analysis) with an inverse modeling approach (Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis) adopted to parameterize the model. Lag times in linuron mineralization decreased during the initial weeks of linuron irrigation but increased after supply of linuron ceased. The model well-simulated the lag time dynamics which were related to the dynamics of the predicted linuron-degrading population size in the microcosms. It was predicted that the population size decreased at a rate of 0.031 d(-1) after pesticide supply ceased to reach its initial population size after 25 weeks. We conclude that modeling pesticide degradation in biofilters should incorporate biomass dynamics in case the pesticide is used as C-source. First-order approaches without incorporating biomass dynamics could lead to underestimation of the risk of pesticide leaching. PMID:19232428

  8. Household Products Database: Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Types of Products Manufacturers Ingredients About the Database FAQ Product Recalls Help Glossary Contact Us More ... holders. Information is extracted from Consumer Product Information Database 2001-2015 by DeLima Associates. All rights reserved. ...

  9. 76 FR 38160 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Benbow, Registration Division (7505P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency... deadline identified. II. Registration Applications EPA has received applications to register...

  10. 75 FR 24694 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Hill, Registration Division (7504P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency... deadline identified. II. Registration Applications EPA has received applications to register...

  11. 75 FR 23759 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Hill, Registration Division (7504P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency... deadline identified. II. Registration Applications EPA has received applications to register...

  12. 75 FR 26754 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... number specified for the pesticide of interest as shown in the registration application summaries. EPA's... telephone number is (703) 305-5805. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tawanda Maignan, Registration...

  13. Potential risks of pesticide degradates to aquatic life

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boxall, Alistair; Sinclair, C.; Koplin, Dana W.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in analytical methodology and greater access to analytical standards have led to the detection of degradates from a wide variety of pesticides and other compounds in surface water, ground water, precipitation, air, and sediment (Boxall and others, 2004). Many of these degradates are more persistent in the environment than their parent compounds, and many are more mobile, as well.

  14. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cause harm to crops, people, or animals. Pesticides can help get rid of them. Pesticides are not just insect killers. They also include ... mildew, germs, and more. Many household products contain pesticides. Pesticides can protect your health by killing germs, ...

  15. 40 CFR 168.69 - Registered export pesticide products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Registered export pesticide products. 168.69 Section 168.69 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE... Pesticides § 168.69 Registered export pesticide products. (a) Each export pesticide product that...

  16. 40 CFR 168.69 - Registered export pesticide products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Registered export pesticide products. 168.69 Section 168.69 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE... Pesticides § 168.69 Registered export pesticide products. (a) Each export pesticide product that...

  17. 40 CFR 168.70 - Unregistered export pesticide products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unregistered export pesticide products. 168.70 Section 168.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE... Pesticides § 168.70 Unregistered export pesticide products. (a) Any export pesticide product that does...

  18. 75 FR 3235 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ..., Collierville, TN 38017. Product name: Carbon Power Concentrate. Plant growth regulator. Active ingredient... formulating agricultural pesticide formulations, plant growth, regulators, herbicides, fungicides, seed... Biosciences, Inc. Product name: Carbon Power . Plant growth regulator. Active ingredient:...

  19. 75 FR 4384 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ...This notice announces receipt of applications to register pesticide products containing new active ingredients not included in any currently registered products pursuant to the provisions of section 3(c)(4) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), as...

  20. 75 FR 6656 - Pesticide Product; Registration Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Product; Registration Application AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... comments to the docket ID number specified for the pesticide of interest as shown in the registration..., consult the person listed at the end of the registration application summary using the...

  1. 75 FR 10259 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... comments to the docket ID number specified for the pesticide of interest as shown in the registration... of each registration application summary and may be contacted by telephone or e-mail. The...

  2. 75 FR 24695 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... number specified for the pesticide of interest as shown in the registration application summaries. EPA's... registration application summary and may be contacted by telephone or e-mail. The mailing address for...

  3. 75 FR 71695 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency ACTION... comments to the docket ID number specified for the pesticide of interest as shown in the registration... indicate to which Registration Number(s)/File Symbol(s) your comment applies. ii. Follow directions....

  4. 75 FR 76463 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... number specified for the pesticide of interest as shown in the registration application summaries. EPA's... registration application summary and may be contacted by telephone or e-mail. The mailing address for...

  5. 75 FR 56105 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... comments to docket ID number specified for the pesticide of interest as shown in the registration... of each registration application summary and may be contacted by telephone or e-mail. The...

  6. 76 FR 26291 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... number specified for the pesticide of interest as shown in the registration application summaries. EPA's... registration application summary and may be contacted by telephone or e-mail. The mailing address for...

  7. 75 FR 53692 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... comments to the docket ID number specified for the pesticide of interest as shown in the registration... of each registration application summary and may be contacted by telephone or e-mail. The...

  8. 75 FR 71697 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ...-RR) was published in a separate notice (see 75 FR 11175; March 10, 2010; FRL-8811-6). File symbol... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... identified. II. Registration Applications EPA has received applications to register pesticide...

  9. 76 FR 17645 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... (703) 305-5805. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kimberly Nesci, Registration Division (7505P), Office.... viii. Make sure to submit your comments by the comment period deadline identified. II....

  10. 75 FR 19388 - Pesticide Product; Registration Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Pesticide Product; Registration Application AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... deadline identified. II. Registration Applications EPA has received an application to register a...

  11. 75 FR 4383 - Pesticide Products: Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Pesticide Products: Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... comments by the comment period deadline identified. II. Registration Applications EPA received...

  12. Degradation of nitenpyram pesticide in aqueous solution by low-temperature plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, S P; Jiang, Y Y; Cao, X H; Dong, Y W; Dong, M; Xu, J

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the new technique of plasma wastewater treatment, the degradation behaviour ofnitenpyram (NTP) pesticide was investigated in a low-temperature plasma formed during a dielectric barrier discharge process. The reactor was a radial flow sedimentation tank centred around the water inlet. We studied the effect of pesticide concentration and input power of the dielectric barrier discharge, together with the effect of external factors on the degradation of nitenpyram pesticide wastewater such as conductivity and the use of various of catalysts, and the reaction products were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The results showed that NTP could be effectively removed from aqueous solution by low-temperature plasma. Increasing the input power could improve the efficiency of degradation, conforming to a first-order kinetic model. Use of a suitable catalyst clearly improved the degradation process, as also did low conductivity. The pH of NTP was reduced with discharge time. PMID:24191496

  13. THE DEGRADATION OF SELECTED PESTICIDES IN SOIL: A REVIEW OF THE PUBLISHED LITERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report contains a literature summary on the degradation of forty-five pesticides in soil. The point of beginning of each literature review is the year of issue of the patent for the particular pesticide. After compilation of the literature data for each pesticide, conclusion...

  14. SnO(2)-based materials for pesticide degradation.

    PubMed

    Malpass, Geoffroy R P; Miwa, Douglas W; Machado, Sérgio A S; Motheo, Artur J

    2010-08-15

    This study presents the results of the degradation of the pesticide atrazine using electrochemical and photo-assisted electrochemical degradation techniques using SnO(2)-containing electrode of nominal composition electrodes of composition Ti/Ru(X)Sn(1-X)O(2) (where X=0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25 and 0.30). The materials were characterized ex situ and in situ in order to correlate the observed atrazine removal rates with electrode morphology/composition. The results obtained demonstrate the effectiveness of the photo-assisted electrochemical degradation. Using purely electrochemical methods the rate of atrazine removal is almost zero at all the electrodes studied. However, the application of photo-assisted degradation results in almost complete atrazine removal in 1h of electrolysis. The efficiency of atrazine degradation does not seem to be greatly affected by the electrode material or by SnO(2) content, but the overall COD removal is dependent on the SnO(2) content. Overall, the SnO(2)-containing electrodes do not reach the level of COD removal (maximum approximately 21%) seen for the Ti/Ru(0.3)Ti(0.7)O(2) electrode. An interesting correlation between the morphology factor (phi) and chemical oxygen demand removal is observed. PMID:20430526

  15. Microbiological degradation of pesticides in yard waste composting.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, A M; Tuovinen, O H

    1991-01-01

    Changes in public opinion and legislation have led to the general recognition that solid waste treatment practices must be changed. Solid-waste disposal by landfill is becoming increasingly expensive and regulated and no longer represents a long-term option in view of limited land space and environmental problems. Yard waste, a significant component of municipal solid waste, has previously not been separated from the municipal solid-waste stream. The treatment of municipal solid waste including yard waste must urgently be addressed because disposal via landfill will be prohibited by legislation. Separation of yard waste from municipal solid waste will be mandated in many localities, thus stressing the importance of scrutinizing current composting practices in treating grass clippings, leaves, and other yard residues. Yard waste poses a potential environmental health problem as a result of the widespread use of pesticides in lawn and tree care and the persistence of the residues of these chemicals in plant tissue. Yard waste containing pesticides may present a problem due to the recalcitrant and toxic nature of the pesticide molecules. Current composting processes are based on various modifications of either window systems or in-vessel systems. Both types of processes are ultimately dependent on microbial bioconversions of organic material to innocuous end products. The critical stage of the composting process is the thermophilic phase. The fate and mechanism of removal of pesticides in composting processes is largely unknown and in need of comprehensive analysis. PMID:1886519

  16. 40 CFR 158.2081 - Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. 158.2081 Section 158.2081 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2081 Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data...

  17. 75 FR 28012 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on False or Misleading Pesticide Product...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... availability of this draft PR Notice for public comment (67 FR 14941; FRL-6809-9) on March 28, 2002 and... Brand Names AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The... Notice (PR Notice) entitled ``False or Misleading Pesticide Product Brand Names.'' PR Notices are...

  18. 75 FR 34448 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on False or Misleading Pesticide Product...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... of May 19, 2010 (75 FR 28012) (FRL-8824-8). In that document, the Agency announced the availability... Brand Names; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice...) entitled ``False or Misleading Pesticide Product Brand Names.'' This document extends the comment...

  19. [Isolation and identification of degradation bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes for pyrethriods pesticide residues and its degradation characteristics].

    PubMed

    Liao, Min; Zhang, Hai-jun; Xie, Xiao-mei

    2009-08-15

    By incubation experiment, the bacterial strain labeled as M6R9 was isolated from the tame sludge in water course of Pesticide Factory of Hangzhou, and was identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, which had highly efficient degradation for Bifenthrin, Fenpropathrin and Cypermethrin. By investigating the physiological characteristics of the strain, the results show that the bacterium is a gram-negative aerobe bacilli, size is (0.8-1.9) microm x (0.5-1.0) microm, and is capable of utilizing Bifenthrin, Fenpropathrin and Cypermethrin as sole carbon source. Under the condition of ventilation, (25-30) degrees C, inoculated amount at D(415 nm) 0.2, pH 7.0, pesticide concentration 100 mg x L(-1) and vibrational speed 180 r x min(-1), the degradation efficiencies to Bifenthrin, Fenpropathrin and Cypermethrin are the highest by strain M6R9. Under such condition, in the mixture culture medium with 100 mg x L(-1) Bifenthrin, Fenpropathrin and Cypermethrin, the degradation ratios are 55.74%, 55.11% and 55.96% after culturing 3 d, respectively, the degradation processes are fitted for first-order kinetic equation and the half lives (t(1/2)) are 65.4,70.7 and 68.6 h respectively. The degradation ability of Enterobacter aerogenes M6R9 on Bifenthrin, Fenpropathrin and Cypermethrin is positively correlated to inoculated amount,vibrational speed and ventilation. PMID:19799315

  20. Minimal pesticide-primed soil inoculum density to secure maximum pesticide degradation efficiency in on-farm biopurification systems.

    PubMed

    Sniegowski, Kristel; Bers, Karolien; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Jaeken, Peter; Spanoghe, Pieter; Springael, Dirk

    2012-08-01

    Addition of pesticide-primed soil containing adapted pesticide degrading bacteria to the biofilter matrix of on farm biopurification systems (BPS) which treat pesticide contaminated wastewater, has been recommended, in order to ensure rapid establishment of a pesticide degrading microbial community in BPS. However, uncertainties exist about the minimal soil inoculum density needed for successful bioaugmentation of BPS. Therefore, in this study, BPS microcosm experiments were initiated with different linuron primed soil inoculum densities ranging from 0.5 to 50 vol.% and the evolution of the linuron mineralization capacity in the microcosms was monitored during feeding with linuron. Successful establishment of a linuron mineralization community in the BPS microcosms was achieved with all inoculum densities including the 0.5 vol.% density with only minor differences in the time needed to acquire maximum degradation capacity. Moreover, once established, the robustness of the linuron degrading microbial community towards expected stress situations proved to be independent of the initial inoculum density. This study shows that pesticide-primed soil inoculum densities as low as 0.5 vol.% can be used for bioaugmentation of a BPS matrix and further supports the use of BPS for treatment of pesticide-contaminated wastewater at farmyards. PMID:22682360

  1. 77 FR 12295 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Registration Division 352-ILA, 352-ILT, 352- harris.thomas@epa.gov.... (7505P), Office of ILO, 352-IAN, 352-ILI... comments by the comment period deadline identified. II. Registration Applications EPA has...

  2. 77 FR 6560 - Pesticide Product Registration Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... the Federal Register of June 10, 2009 (74 FR 27541) (FRL-8413-2), which announced that Lubrizol, 29400... AGENCY Pesticide Product Registration Approval AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... scientific information used to support registration, except for material specifically protected by section...

  3. 75 FR 66095 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... interest as shown in the registration application summaries. EPA's policy is that all comments received... INFORMATION CONTACT: A contact person is listed at the end of each registration application summary and may...

  4. [Spectrum study of organochlorine pesticides after nano TiO2 photocatalytic degradation in AgNO3 medium].

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-jin; Qiu, Bin; Guo, Guang-mei; Liu, Mei-hua; Chen, Xi

    2008-06-01

    A study on a nano anatase TiO2 production from the hydrolysis of TiCl4 was presented. In the nano TiO2 suspending medium, the photocatalytic behaviors for some organochlorine pesticides including alpha, beta, gamma, delta-BHC, DDT, dieldrin, dicofol and agroceres were compared and studied under UV irradiation in the air. Owing to structural difference of C--Cl in the molecule, the degradation efficiencies for the organochlorine pesticides presented an obvious difference with the order of dicofol>dieldrin> DDT>agroceres and alpha-BHC>gamma-BHC>delta-BHC>beta-BHC. Accordingly, the nano TiO2 material was applied as a photocatalyzer, which catalyzed transformation of organochlorine pesticide to chlorine ion. Nanoparticle of silver chloride with a maximal absorbance at the wavelength of 260 nm were prepared in the surfactant polyvinyl alcohol solution. Organochlorine pesticides could be determined according to the concentration of silver chloride. PMID:18800724

  5. 40 CFR 165.23 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... this section, a pesticide product must be packaged in compliance with 49 CFR 173.24. If the pesticide product meets the definition of a hazardous material in 49 CFR 171.8, the Department of Transportation requires it to be packaged according to 49 CFR parts 171-180. (f) What does “pesticide product”...

  6. 40 CFR 165.23 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... this section, a pesticide product must be packaged in compliance with 49 CFR 173.24. If the pesticide product meets the definition of a hazardous material in 49 CFR 171.8, the Department of Transportation requires it to be packaged according to 49 CFR parts 171-180. (f) What does “pesticide product”...

  7. 40 CFR 165.23 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... this section, a pesticide product must be packaged in compliance with 49 CFR 173.24. If the pesticide product meets the definition of a hazardous material in 49 CFR 171.8, the Department of Transportation requires it to be packaged according to 49 CFR parts 171-180. (f) What does “pesticide product”...

  8. 40 CFR 165.23 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... this section, a pesticide product must be packaged in compliance with 49 CFR 173.24. If the pesticide product meets the definition of a hazardous material in 49 CFR 171.8, the Department of Transportation requires it to be packaged according to 49 CFR parts 171-180. (f) What does “pesticide product”...

  9. 40 CFR 165.23 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... this section, a pesticide product must be packaged in compliance with 49 CFR 173.24. If the pesticide product meets the definition of a hazardous material in 49 CFR 171.8, the Department of Transportation requires it to be packaged according to 49 CFR parts 171-180. (f) What does “pesticide product”...

  10. 75 FR 30829 - Antimicrobial Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... AGENCY Antimicrobial Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection... deadline identified. II. Registration Applications EPA has received an application to register a pesticide... the Agency on this application. Registration Number/File Symbol: 85249-R. Docket Number: EPA-HQ-...

  11. ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS DURING DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work was to investigate organophosphorus (OP) pesticide transformation pathways as a class in the presence of aqueous chlorine. Seven priority OP pesticides were examined for their reactivity with aqueous chlorine: chlorpyrifos (CP), parathion (PA), diazino...

  12. Compound specific isotope analysis to investigate pesticide degradation in lysimeter experiments at field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabenko, Evgenia; Elsner, Martin; Bakkour, Rani; Hofstetter, Thomas; Torrento, Clara; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The frequent detection of organic micropollutants such as pesticides, consumer care products or pharmaceuticals in water is an increasing concern for human and ecosystem health. Degradation analysis of these compounds can be challenging in complex systems due to the fact that metabolites are not always found and mass balances frequently cannot be closed. Many abiotic and biotic degradation pathways cause, however, distinct isotope fractionation, where light isotopes are transferred preferentially from the reactant to the product pool (normal isotope fractionation). Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of multiple elements is a particularly powerful method to evaluate organic micropollutant transformation, because it can even give pathway-specific isotope fractionation (1,2). Available CSIA field studies, however, have focused almost exclusively on volatile petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons, which are present in high concentrations in the environment and can be extracted easily from water for GC-IRMS analysis. In the case of micropollutants, such as pesticides, CSIA in more challenging since it needs to be conducted at lower concentrations and requires pre-concentration, purification and high chromatographic performance (3). In this study we used lysimeters experiments to analyze transformation of atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor and chloridazone by studying associated isotope fractionation. The project combines a) analytical method development for CSIA, b) identification of pathways of micropollutant degradation and c) quantification of transformation processes under field condition. The pesticides were applied both, at the soil surface and below the top soil under field-relevant concentrations in May 2014. After typical irrigation of the lysimeters, seepage water was collected in 50L bottles and stored for further SPE and CSIA. Here we present the very first result of a) analytical method development, b) improvement of SPE methods for complex pesticide mixtures and c) transformation of pesticides in lysimeters during the year 2014. 1 Elsner, M. Stable isotope fractionation to investigate natural transformation mechanisms of organic contaminants: principles, prospects and limitations. J. Environ. Monit. 12, 2005-2031 (2010). 2 Hofstetter, T. B. & Berg, M. Assessing transformation processes of organic contaminants by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30, 618-627 (2011). 3 Elsner, M. et al. Current challenges in compound-specific stable isotope analysis of environmental organic contaminants. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 403, 2471-2491, doi:10.1007/s00216-011-5683-y (2012).

  13. Potential Transport and Degradation of “Aged” Pesticide Residues in Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased pesticide residence time in soil, or “aging”, has been shown to affect the sorption-desorption of pesticides in the soil, which in turn can control transport and degradation processes. Aging effects have been characterized by batch sequential extraction methods, in which sorption coefficie...

  14. 40 CFR 152.10 - Products that are not pesticides because they are not intended for a pesticidal purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Products that are not pesticides... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.10 Products that are not pesticides because they are not intended for...

  15. 40 CFR 152.10 - Products that are not pesticides because they are not intended for a pesticidal purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Products that are not pesticides... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.10 Products that are not pesticides because they are not intended for...

  16. 40 CFR 152.10 - Products that are not pesticides because they are not intended for a pesticidal purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Products that are not pesticides... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.10 Products that are not pesticides because they are not intended for...

  17. 40 CFR 152.10 - Products that are not pesticides because they are not intended for a pesticidal purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Products that are not pesticides... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.10 Products that are not pesticides because they are not intended for...

  18. 40 CFR 152.10 - Products that are not pesticides because they are not intended for a pesticidal purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Products that are not pesticides... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.10 Products that are not pesticides because they are not intended for...

  19. Kinetics of pesticide degradation by human fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in vitro.

    PubMed

    von der Wellen, Jens; Bierwisch, Anne; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2016-02-26

    There is an ongoing debate about the benefit of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) infusion in organophosphorus (OP) pesticide-poisoned patients. This prompted us to investigate the kinetics of OP pesticide degradation by FFP with an enzymatic assay in vitro. Degradation was rapid with shortest half-lives of 19.5s for chlorpyrifos-oxon, 6.3min for paraoxon-ethyl and 17.9min for dichlorvos. Heptenophos (78.0min), mevinphos (101.8min), profenofos (162.3min) and malaoxon (179.7min) showed half-lives of up to 3h. Substantial longer degradation half-lives of 69.7-80.8h were determined with chlorfenvinphos and bromfenvinphos. Methamidophos and omethoate showed no degradation by FFP indicated by half-lives similar to spontaneous hydrolysis. In conclusion, degradation by FFP depends on the particular OP pesticide and the used FFP batch. PMID:26220518

  20. 77 FR 74003 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Antimicrobial Pesticide Products With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... referred to as ``mold-related pesticides''). ``Fungicides'' are antimicrobial pesticides that destroy fungi... efficacy data when any specific species of fungus is listed on the label of fungicides, or when...

  1. Calculation of pesticide degradation in decaying cotton gin trash.

    PubMed

    Crossan, Angus N; Kennedy, Ivan R

    2008-10-01

    Pesticide residues were measured in stockpiled cotton gin trash (CGT) over a 2-year period. Samples were analysed by GC/MS/MS and interpretation of the results was aided by the presence of DDE residues, remnant from prior DDT use. Fourteen pesticide residues from current agricultural practice were detected in CGT. Several of these, including indoxacarb, profenofos, chlorpyrifos, propargite, bifenthrin, ethion and cyhalothrin, were more persistent than expected on the basis of published data for soil dissipation. The results showed a complex pattern of pesticide residue decay over time because of the simultaneous decomposition of the CGT matrix. PMID:18651089

  2. Effects of halving pesticide use on wheat production.

    PubMed

    Hossard, L; Philibert, A; Bertrand, M; Colnenne-David, C; Debaeke, P; Munier-Jolain, N; Jeuffroy, M H; Richard, G; Makowski, D

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides pose serious threats to both human health and the environment. In Europe, farmers are encouraged to reduce their use, and in France a recent environmental policy fixed a target of halving the pesticide use by 2018. Organic and integrated cropping systems have been proposed as possible solutions for reducing pesticide use, but the effect of reducing pesticide use on crop yield remains unclear. Here we use a set of cropping system experiments to quantify the yield losses resulting from a reduction of pesticide use for winter wheat in France. Our estimated yield losses resulting from a 50% reduction in pesticide use ranged from 5 to 13% of the yield obtained with the current pesticide use. At the scale of the whole country, these losses would decrease the French wheat production by about 2 to 3 millions of tons, which represent about 15% of the French wheat export. PMID:24651597

  3. Effects of halving pesticide use on wheat production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossard, L.; Philibert, A.; Bertrand, M.; Colnenne-David, C.; Debaeke, P.; Munier-Jolain, N.; Jeuffroy, M. H.; Richard, G.; Makowski, D.

    2014-03-01

    Pesticides pose serious threats to both human health and the environment. In Europe, farmers are encouraged to reduce their use, and in France a recent environmental policy fixed a target of halving the pesticide use by 2018. Organic and integrated cropping systems have been proposed as possible solutions for reducing pesticide use, but the effect of reducing pesticide use on crop yield remains unclear. Here we use a set of cropping system experiments to quantify the yield losses resulting from a reduction of pesticide use for winter wheat in France. Our estimated yield losses resulting from a 50% reduction in pesticide use ranged from 5 to 13% of the yield obtained with the current pesticide use. At the scale of the whole country, these losses would decrease the French wheat production by about 2 to 3 millions of tons, which represent about 15% of the French wheat export.

  4. Effects of halving pesticide use on wheat production

    PubMed Central

    Hossard, L.; Philibert, A.; Bertrand, M.; Colnenne-David, C.; Debaeke, P.; Munier-Jolain, N.; Jeuffroy, M. H.; Richard, G.; Makowski, D.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides pose serious threats to both human health and the environment. In Europe, farmers are encouraged to reduce their use, and in France a recent environmental policy fixed a target of halving the pesticide use by 2018. Organic and integrated cropping systems have been proposed as possible solutions for reducing pesticide use, but the effect of reducing pesticide use on crop yield remains unclear. Here we use a set of cropping system experiments to quantify the yield losses resulting from a reduction of pesticide use for winter wheat in France. Our estimated yield losses resulting from a 50% reduction in pesticide use ranged from 5 to 13% of the yield obtained with the current pesticide use. At the scale of the whole country, these losses would decrease the French wheat production by about 2 to 3 millions of tons, which represent about 15% of the French wheat export. PMID:24651597

  5. Simultaneous degradation of toxic refractory organic pesticide and bioelectricity generation using a soil microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xian; Song, Hai-liang; Yu, Chun-yan; Li, Xian-ning

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the soil microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were constructed in the topsoil contaminated with toxic refractory organic pesticide, hexachlorobenzene (HCB). The performance of electricity generation and HCB degradation in the soil-MFCs were investigated. The HCB degradation pathway was analyzed based on the determination of degradation products and intermediates. Experimental results showed that the HCB removal efficiencies in the three groups (soil MFCs group, open circuit control group and no adding anaerobic sludge blank group) were 71.15%, 52.49% and 38.92%, respectively. The highest detected power density was 77.5 mW/m(2) at the external resistance of 1000 Ω. HCB was degraded via the reductive dechlorination pathway in the soil MFC under anaerobic condition. The existence of the anode promoted electrogenic bacteria to provide more electrons to increase the metabolic reactions rates of anaerobic bacteria was the main way which could promote the removal efficiencies of HCB in soil MFC. PMID:25864035

  6. Does mechanistic modeling of filter strip pesticide mass balance and degradation processes affect environmental exposure assessments?

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Ritter, Amy; Fox, Garey A; Perez-Ovilla, Oscar

    2015-11-01

    Vegetative filter strips (VFS) are a widely adopted practice for limiting pesticide transport from adjacent fields to receiving waterbodies. The efficacy of VFS depends on site-specific input factors. To elucidate the complex and non-linear relationships among these factors requires a process-based modeling framework. Previous research proposed linking existing higher-tier environmental exposure models with a well-tested VFS model (VFSMOD). However, the framework assumed pesticide mass stored in the VFS was not available for transport in subsequent storm events. A new pesticide mass balance component was developed to estimate surface pesticide residue trapped in the VFS and its degradation between consecutive runoff events. The influence and necessity of the updated framework on acute and chronic estimated environmental concentrations (EECs) and percent reductions in EECs were investigated across three, 30-year U.S. EPA scenarios: Illinois corn, California tomato, and Oregon wheat. The updated framework with degradation predicted higher EECs than the existing framework without degradation for scenarios with greater sediment transport, longer VFS lengths, and highly sorbing and persistent pesticides. Global sensitivity analysis (GSA) assessed the relative importance of mass balance and degradation processes in the context of other input factors like VFS length (VL), organic-carbon sorption coefficient (Koc), and soil and water half-lives. Considering VFS pesticide residue and degradation was not important if single, large runoff events controlled transport, as is typical for higher percentiles considered in exposure assessments. Degradation processes become more important when considering percent reductions in acute or chronic EECs, especially under scenarios with lower pesticide losses. PMID:26218348

  7. 78 FR 32245 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications To Register New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... register new uses for pesticide products containing currently registered active ingredients pursuant to the... uses for pesticide products containing currently registered active ingredients. Pursuant to the... following applications to register new uses for pesticide products containing currently registered...

  8. 75 FR 35805 - Pesticide Product Registrations; Conditional Approvals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... published a notice of receipt in the Federal Register of July 25, 2007 (72 FR 40876) (FRL-8129-7), which... AGENCY Pesticide Product Registrations; Conditional Approvals AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... conditional registrations for the pesticide products, MON 89034 and MON 89034 x MON 88017, containing...

  9. 40 CFR 152.15 - Pesticide products required to be registered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pesticide products required to be...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.15 Pesticide products required to be registered. No person may distribute or sell any pesticide product that...

  10. 40 CFR 152.15 - Pesticide products required to be registered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pesticide products required to be...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.15 Pesticide products required to be registered. No person may distribute or sell any pesticide product that...

  11. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2070 Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...

  12. 40 CFR 158.2160 - Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Microbial pesticides product... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2160 Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...

  13. 40 CFR 152.15 - Pesticide products required to be registered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pesticide products required to be...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.15 Pesticide products required to be registered. No person may distribute or sell any pesticide product that...

  14. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2070 Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...

  15. 40 CFR 158.2160 - Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Microbial pesticides product... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2160 Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...

  16. 40 CFR 152.15 - Pesticide products required to be registered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pesticide products required to be...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.15 Pesticide products required to be registered. No person may distribute or sell any pesticide product that...

  17. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2070 Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...

  18. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2070 Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...

  19. 40 CFR 158.2160 - Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Microbial pesticides product... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2160 Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...

  20. 40 CFR 152.15 - Pesticide products required to be registered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pesticide products required to be...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.15 Pesticide products required to be registered. No person may distribute or sell any pesticide product that...

  1. 40 CFR 158.2160 - Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Microbial pesticides product... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2160 Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...

  2. [Isolation and identification of a bacterial strain JS018 capable of degrading several kinds of organophosphate pesticides].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu-Ji; Deng, You-Jin; Liu, Xin-Rui; Xie, Bao-Gui; Hu, Fang-Ping

    2006-06-01

    Organophosphate pesticides are used widely all over the world and play an important role in plant pest control. However these pesticides are considered as pollutants and harmful to human health. To search for microorganisms that can degrade organophosphate pesticides with high efficiency, a bacterial strain, coded as JS018, was isolated and screened from the soil in the vicinity of Shanming Pesticides Factory, Shanming, Fujian. Laboratory tests showed that the bacterium could degrade several kinds of organophosphate pesticides, such as Parathion-methyl and phoxin. The strain's degrading rates on phoxin, Parathion-methyl, hostathion and dichlorvos in LB liquid fermentation medium for 36 h were 99%, 96%, 80.4% and 69.0% respectively. The bacterial colonies on LB plate appeared shiny and pale-pink in color. The bacteria were Gram-negative coccoids, 0.5 - 0.7 microm in diameter. They grew well at 30 - 38 degrees C and pH 7.0 - 9.0. The optimal temperature and pH for cell growth was 32 degrees C and pH 7.5 - 8.0, respectively. They did not grow in medium containing 6% or more NaCl. The antibiotic susceptibility tests showed that the strain was resistant to ampicillin, penicillin and lincomycin. It was sensitive to kanamycin, tetracycline and gentamicin. Laboratory tests also showed that the strain could ferment D-glucose, trehalose, melezitose and ethanol. It was negative in the production of indole and hydrogen sulfide. It could not liquefy gelatin, utilize citrate, nor ferment L-arabinose, sucrose, D-mannitol, D-xylose, fructose, D-galactose, maltose or lactose. The catalase, urease and nitrate reduction were positive. Based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical properties as well as the 16S rDNA sequence analysis result, the strain was tentatively identified as Roseomonas sp. PMID:16933622

  3. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE DEGRADATION UNDER DRINKING WATER TREATMENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) of 1996 requires that all tolerances for pesticide chemical residuals in or on food be considered for anticipated exposure. Drinking water is considered a potential pathway for dietary exposure and there is reliable monitoring data for the ...

  4. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE DEGRADATION UNDER DRINKING WATER TREATMENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorpyrifos (CP) was used as a model compound to develop experimental methods and prototype modeling tools to forecast the fate of organophosphate (OP) pesticides under drinking water treatment conditions. CP was found to rapidly oxidize to chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) in the presen...

  5. 40 CFR 158.2120 - Microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Microbial pesticides product analysis... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2120 Microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table. (a) General. Sections 158.100 through...

  6. 40 CFR 158.2171 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticides product analysis data requirements table. 158.2171 Section 158.2171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2171 Experimental use permit microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements...

  7. 40 CFR 158.2030 - Biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2030 Biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. (a) General. (1)...

  8. 40 CFR 158.2120 - Microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Microbial pesticides product analysis... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2120 Microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table. (a) General. Sections 158.100 through...

  9. 40 CFR 158.2171 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pesticides product analysis data requirements table. 158.2171 Section 158.2171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2171 Experimental use permit microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements...

  10. 40 CFR 158.2171 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pesticides product analysis data requirements table. 158.2171 Section 158.2171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2171 Experimental use permit microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements...

  11. 40 CFR 158.2171 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pesticides product analysis data requirements table. 158.2171 Section 158.2171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2171 Experimental use permit microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements...

  12. 40 CFR 158.2120 - Microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Microbial pesticides product analysis... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2120 Microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table. (a) General. Sections 158.100 through...

  13. 40 CFR 158.2120 - Microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Microbial pesticides product analysis... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2120 Microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table. (a) General. Sections 158.100 through...

  14. 40 CFR 158.2120 - Microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Microbial pesticides product analysis... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2120 Microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table. (a) General. Sections 158.100 through...

  15. 40 CFR 158.2171 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pesticides product analysis data requirements table. 158.2171 Section 158.2171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2171 Experimental use permit microbial pesticides product analysis data requirements...

  16. 40 CFR 165.65 - Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products in refillable containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pesticide products in refillable containers. 165.65 Section 165.65 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL Standards for Repackaging Pesticide Products into Refillable Containers § 165.65 Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide...

  17. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    PubMed Central

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil. PMID:25538691

  18. Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherma, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

  19. Determination of impurities in pesticides and their degradation products formed during the wine-making process by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography with detection by electron impact mass spectrometry. I. Vinclozoline, procymidone and fenitrothion.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan José; Bernal, José Luis; Del Nozal, M Jesús; Arias, Elena; Bernal, José

    2004-01-01

    The presence of degradation products of vinclozoline, procymidone and fenitrothion, and of impurities from their commercial formulations, was studied in white and red wines elaborated from spiked must. After solid-phase extraction the nature of the residues was established by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The structures of several degradation products and impurities are discussed and elucidated on the basis of their electron impact spectra. In elaborated wines the concentrations of the degradation products and impurities are lower than those of the original active ingredients. Aminofenitrothion and acetylamino-formyl-fenitrothion-oxon are the main residues of fenitrothion in wine. For dicarboximides, an alcohol derivative of vinclozoline was found in addition to 3,5-dichloroaniline. PMID:15052576

  20. Effect of process intensifying parameters on the hydrodynamic cavitation based degradation of commercial pesticide (methomyl) in the aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Raut-Jadhav, Sunita; Saini, Daulat; Sonawane, Shirish; Pandit, Aniruddha

    2016-01-01

    Methomyl, a carbamate pesticide, is classified as a pesticide of category-1 toxicity and hence shows harmful effects on both human and aquatic life. In the present work, the degradation of methomyl has been studied by using hydrodynamic cavitation reactor (HC) and its combination with intensifying agents such as H2O2, fenton reagent and ozone (hybrid processes). Initially, the optimization of operating parameters such pH and inlet pressure to the cavitating device (circular venturi) has been carried out for maximizing the efficacy of hydrodynamic cavitation. Further degradation study of methomyl by the application of hybrid processes was carried out at an optimal pH of 2.5 and the optimal inlet pressure of 5 bar. Significant synergetic effect has been observed in case of all the hybrid processes studied. Synergetic coefficient of 5.8, 13.41 and 47.6 has been obtained by combining hydrodynamic cavitation with H2O2, fenton process and ozone respectively. Efficacy of individual and hybrid processes has also been obtained in terms of energy efficiency and extent of mineralization. HC+Ozone process has proved to be the most effective process having highest synergetic coefficient, energy efficiency and the extent of mineralization. The study has also encompassed the identification of intermediate by-products generated during the degradation and has proposed the probable degradation pathway. It has been conclusively established that hydrodynamic cavitation in the presence of intensifying agents can effectively be used for complete degradation of methomyl. PMID:26384910

  1. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pesticide Safety: Elementary School Curriculum (4MB) Pesticide Safety: Preschool Curriculum (Bilingual) (5MB) Related Topics Agricultural Health Children's Health Dioxins Endocrine Disruptors Reproductive Health Related Links ...

  2. Pesticides removal in the process of drinking water production.

    PubMed

    Ormad, M P; Miguel, N; Claver, A; Matesanz, J M; Ovelleiro, J L

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this research work was to study the effectiveness of the treatments commonly used in drinking water plants in Spain to degrade 44 pesticides systematically detected in the Ebro River Basin. The pesticides studied are: alachlor, aldrin, ametryn, atrazine, chlorfenvinfos, chlorpyrifos, pp'-DDD, op'-DDE, op'-DDT, pp'-DDT, desethylatrazine, 3,4-dichloroaniline, 4,4'-dichlorobenzophenone, dicofol, dieldrin, dimethoate, diuron, alpha-endosulphan, endosulphan-sulphate, endrin, alpha-HCH, beta-HCH, gamma-HCH, delta-HCH, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide A, heptachlor epoxide B, hexachlorobenzene, isodrin, 4-isopropylaniline, isoproturon, metholachlor, methoxychlor, molinate, parathion methyl, parathion ethyl, prometon, prometryn, propazine, simazine, terbuthylazine, terbutryn, tetradifon and trifluralin. The techniques applied are: preoxidation by chlorine or ozone, chemical precipitation with aluminium sulphate and activated carbon adsorption. Oxidation by chlorine removes 60% of the studied pesticides, although combining this technique with a coagulation-flocculation-decantation process is more effective. The disadvantage of this treatment is the formation of trihalomethanes. Oxidation by ozone removes 70% of the studied pesticides. Although combination with a subsequent coagulation-flocculation-decantation process does not improve the efficiency of the process, combination with an activated-carbon absorption process gives rise to 90% removal of the studied pesticides. This technique was found to be the most efficient among the techniques studied for degrading the majority of the studied pesticides. PMID:18023468

  3. Effect of different soil textures on leaching potential and degradation of pesticides in biobeds.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Paul; Boxall, Alistair B A; Walker, Allan; Jukes, Andrew

    2004-09-01

    Biobeds can be used to intercept pesticide-contaminated runoff from the mixing/washdown area, creating optimum conditions for sorption and biodegradation such that the amount of pesticide reaching adjacent water bodies is significantly reduced. The biobed is built on the farm using locally available materials, which include, straw, compost, and topsoil. The topsoil acts as the inoculum for the system and is likely to vary in terms of its physical, chemical, and microbiological characteristics from one farm to another. This study therefore investigated the effects of using different soil types on the degradation and leaching potential from biobeds. Three contrasting topsoils were investigated. Leaching studies were performed using isoproturon, dimethoate, and mecoprop-P, which were applied at simulated disposal rates to 1.5 m deep biobeds. Annual average concentrations were similar for each soil type with leaching losses of even the most mobile (Koc = 12-25) pesticide <1.64% of the applied dose. Greater than 98% of the retained pesticides were degraded in all matrices. Degradation studies investigated the persistence of individual pesticides and pesticide mixtures in the different matrices. DT50 values for isoproturon, chlorothalonil, mecoprop-P, and metsulfuron-methyl applied at 4 times the maximum approved rate were similar across the biomix types and were all less than or equal to reported DT50 values for soil treated at approved rates. When applied as a mixture, DT50 values in each biomix increased, indicating that interactions between pesticides are possible. However, DT90 values of <167 days were obtained in all circumstances, indicating a negligible risk of accumulation. Studies therefore indicate that substrate will have little impact on biobed performance so it should be possible to use local soils in the construction process. PMID:15373405

  4. Degradation of pesticides chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin and chlorothalonil in aqueous solution by TiO2 photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Affam, Augustine Chioma; Chaudhuri, Malay

    2013-11-30

    Degradation of pesticides chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin and chlorothalonil in aqueous solution by TiO2 photocatalysis under UVA (365 nm) irradiation was examined. Enhancement of degradation and improvement in biodegradability index (BOD5/COD ratio) by H2O2 addition were also evaluated. UVA irradiation per se produced insignificant degradation of the pesticides. In UV/TiO2 photocatalysis (TiO2 1.5 g L(-1), pH 6 and 300 min irradiation), COD and TOC removal were 25.95 and 8.45%, respectively. In UV/TiO2/H2O2 photocatalysis (TiO2 1.5 g L(-1), H2O2 100 mg L(-1), pH 6 and 300 min irradiation), COD and TOC removal were 53.62 and 21.54%, respectively and biodegradability index improved to 0.26. Ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N) decreased from 22 to 7.8 mg L(-1) and nitrate-nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) increased from 0.7 to 13.8 mg L(-1) in 300 min, indicating mineralization. Photocatalytic degradation followed pseudo-first order kinetics with rate constant (k) of 0.0025 and 0.0008 min(-1) for COD and TOC removal, respectively. FTIR spectra indicated degradation of the organic bonds of the pesticides. UV/TiO2/H2O2 photocatalysis is effective in degradation of pesticides chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin and chlorothalonil in aqueous solution. UV/TiO2/H2O2 photocatalysis may be applied as pretreatment of a chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin and chlorothalonil pesticide wastewater at pH 6, for biological treatment. PMID:24076516

  5. Transport and degradation of pesticides in a biopurification system under variable flux, Part I: a microcosm study.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, Tineke; Spanoghe, Pieter; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Jaeken, Peter; Springael, Dirk

    2010-10-01

    The efficiency of a biopurification system, developed to treat pesticide contaminated water, is to a large extent determined by the chemical and hydraulic load. Insight into the behaviour of pesticides under different fluxes is necessary. The behaviour of metalaxyl, bentazone, linuron, isoproturon and metamitron was studied under three different fluxes with or without the presence of pesticide-primed soil in column experiments. Due to the time-dependent sorption process, retention of the pesticides with intermediate mobility was significantly influenced by the flux. The higher the flux, the slower pesticides will be sorbed, which resulted in a lower retention. Degradation of the intermediate mobile pesticides was also submissive to variations in flux. An increase in flux, led to a decrease in retention, which in turn decreased the opportunity time for biodegradation. Finally, the presence of pesticide-primed soil was only beneficial for the degradation of metalaxyl. PMID:20696513

  6. Potential transport and degradation of “Aged” pesticide residues in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    “Aging” has been shown to affect the sorption-desorption of pesticides in the soil, which in turn can control transport and degradation processes. Aging effects have been characterized by batch sequential extraction methods, in which sorption coefficients (i.e. Kd) are determined for the chemical re...

  7. 40 CFR 158.2081 - Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. 158.2081 Section 158.2081 Protection of Environment... Pesticides § 158.2081 Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements... product chemistry data requirements for a particular biochemical pesticide product. Notes that apply to...

  8. 40 CFR 158.2081 - Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. 158.2081 Section 158.2081 Protection of Environment... Pesticides § 158.2081 Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements... product chemistry data requirements for a particular biochemical pesticide product. Notes that apply to...

  9. 40 CFR 158.2081 - Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. 158.2081 Section 158.2081 Protection of Environment... Pesticides § 158.2081 Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements... product chemistry data requirements for a particular biochemical pesticide product. Notes that apply to...

  10. 40 CFR 158.2081 - Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. 158.2081 Section 158.2081 Protection of Environment... Pesticides § 158.2081 Experimental use permit biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements... product chemistry data requirements for a particular biochemical pesticide product. Notes that apply to...

  11. 40 CFR 165.63 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to... bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime. (ii) The labeling of the pesticide product...

  12. 40 CFR 165.63 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to... bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime. (ii) The labeling of the pesticide product...

  13. 40 CFR 165.63 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to... bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime. (ii) The labeling of the pesticide product...

  14. 40 CFR 165.63 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to... bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime. (ii) The labeling of the pesticide product...

  15. 40 CFR 165.63 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to... bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime. (ii) The labeling of the pesticide product...

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE FLUX OF AN ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING DICARBOXIMIDE AND ITS DEGRADATION PRODUCTS FROM THE SOIL TO THE LOWER TROPOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for measuring the atmospheric flux of the antiandrogenic dicarboxirnide, vinclozolin, and its degradation products was investigated. A nitric oxide laboratory chamber was modified to measure the flux of semi-volatile compounds. Pesticide application systems and soil in...

  17. Bioremediation of pesticide contaminated water using an organophosphate degrading enzyme immobilized on nonwoven polyester textiles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Truong, Yen Bach; Cacioli, Paul; Butler, Phil; Kyratzis, Ilias Louis

    2014-01-10

    Bioremediation using enzymes has become an attractive approach for removing hazardous chemicals such as organophosphate pesticides from the environment. Enzymes immobilized on solid carriers are particularly suited for such applications. In this study, the organophosphate degrading enzyme A (OpdA) was covalently immobilized on highly porous nonwoven polyester fabrics for organophosphate pesticide degradation. The fabrics were first activated with ethylenediamine to introduce free amine groups, and the enzyme was then attached using the bifunctional crosslinker glutaraldehyde. The immobilization only slightly increased the Km (for methyl parathion, MP), broadened the pH profile such that the enzyme had significant activity at acidic pH, and enhanced the stability of the enzyme. The OpdA-functionalized fabrics could be stored in a phosphate buffer or in the dry state at 4C for at least 4 weeks without a large loss of activity. When used in batch mode, the functionalized textiles could degrade 20 ?M MP in un-buffered water at liquor to fabric ratios as high as 5000:1 within 2h, and could be used repeatedly. The fabrics could also be made into columns for continuous pesticide degradation. The columns were able to degrade 50 ?M MP at high flow rates, and could be used repeatedly over 2 months. These results demonstrate that OpdA immobilized on nonwoven polyester fabrics is useful in environmental remediation of organophosphate compounds. PMID:24267566

  18. Degradation of terbuthylazine, difenoconazole and pendimethalin pesticides by selected fungi cultures.

    PubMed

    Pinto, A P; Serrano, C; Pires, T; Mestrinho, E; Dias, L; Teixeira, D Martins; Caldeira, A T

    2012-10-01

    Contamination of waters by xenobiotic compounds such as pesticides presents a serious environmental problem with substantial levels of pesticides now contaminating European water resources. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of the fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus oryzae, Lentinula edodes, Penicillium brevicompactum and Lecanicillium saksenae, for the biodegradation of the pesticides terbuthylazine, difenoconazole and pendimethalin in batch liquid cultures. These pesticides are common soil and water contaminants and terbuthylazine is considered the most persistent triazine herbicide in surface environments. P. brevicompactum and L. saksenae were achieved by enrichment, isolation and screening of fungi capable to metabolize the pesticides studied. The isolates were obtained from two pesticide-primed materials (soil and biomixture). Despite the relatively high persistence of terbuthylazine, the results obtained in this work showed that the fungi species studied have a high capability of biotransformation of this xenobiotic, comparatively the results obtained in other similar studies. The highest removal percentage of terbuthylazine from liquid medium was achieved with A. oryzae (~80%), although the major biodegradation has been reached with P. brevicompactum. The higher ability of P. brevicompactum to metabolize terbuthylazine was presumably acquired through chronic exposure to contamination with the herbicide. L. saksenae could remove 99.5% of the available pendimethalin in batch liquid cultures. L. edodes proved to be a fungus with a high potential for biodegradation of pesticides, especially difenoconazole and pendimethalin. Furthermore, the metabolite desethyl-terbuthylazine was detected in L. edodes liquid culture medium, indicating terbuthylazine biodegradation by this fungus. The fungi strains investigated could prove to be valuable as active pesticide-degrading microorganisms, increasing the efficiency of biopurification systems containing wastewaters contaminated with the xenobiotics studied or compounds with similar intrinsic characteristics. PMID:22878100

  19. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... room while the pesticide takes effect. Open the windows to clear the air when you return. Remove or cover food, cooking utensils, and personal items from the area being treated, then clean ... before using the pesticide. Cover fish ponds, barbecues, ...

  20. Degradation of organophosphorus pesticide parathion methyl on nanostructured titania-iron mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henych, Jiří; Štengl, Václav; Slušná, Michaela; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Janoš, Pavel; Kuráň, Pavel; Štastný, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Titania-iron mixed oxides with various Ti:Fe ratio were prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis of aqueous solutions of titanium(IV) oxysulphate and iron(III) sulphate with urea as a precipitating agent. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman and infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, XRF analysis, specific surface area (BET) and porosity determination (BJH). These oxides were used for degradation of organophosporus pesticide parathion methyl. The highest degradation efficiency approaching <70% was found for the samples with Ti:Fe ratio 0.25:1 and 1:0.25. Contrary, parathion methyl was not degraded on the surfaces of pure oxides. In general, the highest degradation rate exhibited samples consisted of the iron or titanium oxide containing a moderate amount of the admixture. However, distinct correlations between the degradation rate and the sorbent composition were not identified.

  1. Concentrations of pesticides and pesticide degradates in the Croton River Watershed in southeastern New York, July-September 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Patrick; Bode, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-seven pesticides and (or) pesticide degradates were detected in baseflow samples collected from 47 stream sites in the Croton River Watershed (374 square miles) in southeastern New York in the summer of 2000. The Croton Reservoir provides about 10 percent of New York City's water supply. Maximum concentrations of most pesticides detected did not exceed 0.1 ?g/L (micrograms per liter). This study, by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, was conducted from July through September 2000 and entailed analysis of the samples for more than 150 pesticides and their degradates. Nine compounds were detected at a concentration greater than 0.10 ?g/L; three of these were insecticides (diazinon, carbaryl, and imidacloprid), one was a fungicide (mycobutanil), and five were herbicides (simazine, 2,4-D, diuron, hexazinone, and 2,4-D methyl esther). Only two of these compounds (simazine and 2,4-D) were detected at a concentration exceeding 1 ?g/L; the simazine concentration exceeded the New York State surface-water standard of 0.5 ?g/L. Two insecticides (diazinon and azinphos-methyl) exceeded aquatic-life-protection standard in one sample each. Concentrations of three insecticides (chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, and malathion) were more than 50 percent of the aquatic-life-protection standards in one sample each. Total concentrations of insecticides and herbicides (the sum of the concentrations, whereby all concentrations below the detection limit were set to zero), and the concentrations of the herbicide prometon and the insecticide diazinon, were highest in samples from watersheds with population densities greater than 510 per square mile (21 sites); therefore, the presence of these compounds is attributable to urban, residential, and other developed land uses. The data obtained in this study are useful for making general comparisons among watersheds with differing land uses, but the concentrations represent baseflow conditions and, thus, are probably lower than the annual maximum concentrations in these streams. A July baseflow sample had total insecticide and fungicide concentrations of less than 0.03 ?g/L, whereas a stormflow sample collected at the same site 2 weeks later had a corresponding concentration greater than 0.10 ?g/L. Total herbicide concentrations for the July baseflow and stormflow samples were around 0.03 ?g/L, but that for a stormflow sample collected at the same site 2 months later was greater than 20 ?g/L.

  2. 40 CFR 165.67 - Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products to refillers for repackaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticide products to refillers for repackaging. 165.67 Section 165.67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL Standards for Repackaging Pesticide Products into Refillable Containers § 165.67 Registrants who distribute or...

  3. 40 CFR 165.67 - Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products to refillers for repackaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pesticide products to refillers for repackaging. 165.67 Section 165.67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL Standards for Repackaging Pesticide Products into Refillable Containers § 165.67 Registrants who distribute or...

  4. 40 CFR 165.67 - Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products to refillers for repackaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pesticide products to refillers for repackaging. 165.67 Section 165.67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL Standards for Repackaging Pesticide Products into Refillable Containers § 165.67 Registrants who distribute or...

  5. 40 CFR 165.67 - Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products to refillers for repackaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pesticide products to refillers for repackaging. 165.67 Section 165.67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL Standards for Repackaging Pesticide Products into Refillable Containers § 165.67 Registrants who distribute or...

  6. 40 CFR 168.66 - Labeling of pesticide products and devices intended solely for export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Labeling of pesticide products and... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS STATEMENTS OF ENFORCEMENT POLICIES AND INTERPRETATIONS Export Policy and Procedures for Exporting Pesticides § 168.66 Labeling of pesticide products and...

  7. 40 CFR 165.67 - Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products to refillers for repackaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pesticide products to refillers for repackaging. 165.67 Section 165.67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL Standards for Repackaging Pesticide Products into Refillable Containers § 165.67 Registrants who distribute or...

  8. 40 CFR 168.66 - Labeling of pesticide products and devices intended solely for export.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Labeling of pesticide products and... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS STATEMENTS OF ENFORCEMENT POLICIES AND INTERPRETATIONS Export Policy and Procedures for Exporting Pesticides § 168.66 Labeling of pesticide products and...

  9. 40 CFR 165.65 - Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products in refillable containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products in refillable containers. 165.65 Section 165.65 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL Standards for Repackaging Pesticide Products into...

  10. Input dynamics of pesticide transformation products into surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Susanne; Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane; Schwarzenbach, René P.; Fenner, Kathrin

    2010-05-01

    Some pesticide transformation products have been observed to occur in higher concentrations and more frequently than the parent active pesticide in surface water and groundwater. These products are often more mobile and sometimes more stable than the parent pesticide. If they also represent the major product into which the parent substance is transformed, these transformation products may dominate observed pesticide occurrences in surface water and groundwater. Their potential contribution to the overall risk to the aquatic environment caused by the use of the parent pesticide should therefore not be neglected in chemical risk and water quality assessments. The same is true for transformation products of other compound classes that might reach the soil environment, such as veterinary pharmaceuticals. However, the fate and input pathways of transformation products of soil-applied chemicals into surface water are not yet well understood, which largely prevents their appropriate inclusion into chemical risk and water quality assessments. Here, we studied whether prioritization methods based on available environmental fate data from pesticide registration dossiers in combination with basic fate models could help identify transformation products which can be found in relevant concentrations in surface and groundwater and which should therefore be included into monitoring programs. A three-box steady state model containing air, soil, and surface water compartments was used to predict relative inputs of pesticide transformation products into surface waters based on their physico-chemical and environmental fate properties. The model predictions were compared to monitoring data from a small Swiss river located in an intensely agricultural catchment (90 km2) which was flow-proportionally sampled from May to October 2008 and screened for 74 pesticides as well as 50 corresponding transformation products. Sampling mainly occurred during high discharge, but additional samples during baseflow conditions were also taken. The analytical measurements included solid phase extraction, liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-HR-MS/MS). Quantification was achieved using reference standards and internal standards. Besides the well-known transformation products of triazine and chloroacetanilide herbicides, transformation products of other compound classes such as azoxystrobin acid (from azoxystrobin, strobilurin fungicide), chloridazon-desphenyl and chloridazon-methyl-desphenyl (from chloridazon, pyridazinone herbicide), and metamitron-desamino (from metamitron, triazinone herbicide) were analyzed in surface water. For a selection of widely used pesticides in the catchment, modelled ratios of transformation product versus parent pesticide concentrations were compared to the measured concentration ratios in the river for the application period and for two 2-month periods following application. Concentration ratios agreed within a factor of 10 for all pairs of parent pesticides and transformation products, and for all seasons, with a single exception. The ratio of chloridazon-desphenyl to chloridazon was under-predicted by a factor of approximately 20. The data revealed that chloridazon-desphenyl was also found in elevated concentrations in all baseflow samples, indicating its presence in the groundwater component of the catchment. The same was true for other transformation products (e.g., metamitron-desamino, chloridazon-methly-desphenyl, metolachlor-ESA), but to a lesser degree. Based on baseflow separation of the hydrograph, the concentration ratio estimation model was supplemented with an additional baseflow component. The concentrations in the baseflow component were estimated with a simple leaching relationship that was compared against measured baseflow concentrations and groundwater findings in Switzerland. The final model yielded good agreement for all compounds and is therefore deemed suitable for prioritization of transformation products with a relevant exposure potential. It also clearly indicated the contribution of groundwater to the overall occurrence of pesticides and their transformation products in Swiss surface waters.

  11. Effect of biochar and digestate on microbial respiration and pesticide degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Santanu; Tappe, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Diana; Köppchen, Stephan; Disko, Ulrich; Weihermüller, Lutz; Burauel, Peter; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    To overcome the problem of on farm point sources of pollution stemming from improper handling, spillages, and leakages of pesticides during filling and cleaning of spraying equipment, environmental friendly and low cost technology filter systems are currently under development. Based on a laboratory screening approach, where different biomixtures (soil, with biochar and/or digestate) are tested a full scale outdoor system will be developed. Therefore, different fundamental processes like pesticide mineralization, metabolization, sorption-desorption, and transport behavior of three radiolabelled pesticides (Bentazone, Boscalid and Pyrimethanil) will be investigated. Biochar and digestate mixtures with two contrasting soils (sandy and silt loam) had been used as a novel biofilter material for respiration study instead of conventional soil and straw mixtures. To analyze the pesticide degradation potential and to gain information about the temporal evolution of the degradation process of the biochar and digestate soil mixtures microbial respiration was measured over the course of three month. As expected, digestate acts as an easily available C-source leading to highest release of CO2 compared to other biomixtures used. In contrast, the addition of even small amounts (1 %) of biochar caused a profound suppression in the CO2 release from digestate based mixtures. The exact driving mechanism for this suppression can be manifold likes negative priming or chemisorption of CO2 on biochar or NH3 toxicity induced by the large amount of digestate applied in the experiment (30 %) or can be combination of all effects. Surprisingly, a repeated experiment with same but aged digestate did not show such negative priming. On the other hand, the fate of applied organic contaminants to biomixtures depends on several factors like soil properties and climatic conditions as well as biological degradation. To analyze the degradation potential of the different soil/amendment mixtures a degradation study was performed to determine the effects of biochar and digestate in different mixing rates on the metabolization behavior of the studied pesticides, and to identify and quantify the metabolites derived during the degradation process. The results from the 14C Bentazone study indicate that 5 % digestate and 5 % biochar mixture showed highest (nearly~ 15 %) and 1 % biochar lowest rate of mineralization (~1 %), whereby highest microbial activity was measured in the soil/digestate mixture.

  12. Compound-specific stable isotope analysis of pesticides: a combined monitoring and modeling approach to assess pesticide fate and degradation at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breukelen, B. M.; Lutz, S.; Van der Velde, Y.; Elsayed, O. F.; LeFrancq, M.; Payraudeau, S.; Imfeld, G.

    2014-12-01

    Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) has proven useful in asessing the fate of groundwater contamination. However, although evidence of diffuse pesticide degradation is crucial, and CSIA methods have been developed for several pesticides, there is a clear lack of field CSIA data of pesticides. This study now presents the first analysis of field CSIA data from a 47-ha agricultural headwater catchment (Alteckendorf, Alsace, France) in the period March to August 2012. Measured stream concentrations of the two investigated chloroacetanilide herbicides (S-metolachlor and acetochlor) were highest (65 μg/L) following an intense rainfall event in the first month after herbicide application. Carbon isotope ratios increased with more than 2 ‰ in 3 months, which indicates the occurrence of herbicide degradation during transport to the stream. Previously, field CSIA data have also been simulated with reactive transport models to evaluate degradation of groundwater contaminants. This study now presents such a model-assisted interpretation of CSIA data for the first time at catchment scale, which aims at exploring the added value of CSIA in monitoring and modelling of pesticide pollution. The conceptual mathematical model succeeded in reproducing the general trend in concentrations and carbon isotope ratios of metolachlor. It also allowed for the quantification of metolachlor degradation (above 70 % during the study period), and yielded a mass export of 1.8 % of the applied pesticide, which is in agreement with the measured pesticide export. The field concentration and CSIA data informed the model building by indicating the importance of overland flow, and slow pesticide degradation in groundwater compared to the upper soil zone. Moreover, incorporation of the field CSIA data into model calibration slightly reduced model uncertainty in the quantification of pesticide degradation. We suggest that a finer temporal CSIA resolution than possible in this study, especially during base flow conditions, would result in a more significant reduction of model uncertainty. Nonetheless, these results demonstrate how a combined monitoring and modelling approach of concentration and CSIA data can result in an improved understanding of pesticide transport and degradation at catchment scale.

  13. An optical instrument to test pesticide residues in agricultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhengjun; Zheng, Wenzhong; Fang, Hui; He, Yong

    2005-10-01

    Pesticide is one of the indispensability materials in modern agricultural management, however the excessive use of pesticides has threatened the ecological environment and people's health. This paper introduced an optical instrument to test the pesticide residues in agricultural products based on the inhibition rate of organophosphates against acrtyl-cholinesterase (AchE). The instrument consists mainly of a solid light source with 410nm wavelength, a sampling container, an optical sensor, a temperature sensor, and a MCU based data acquisition board. The light illuminated through the liquid in the sampling container, and the absorptivity was determined by the amount of the pesticide residues in the liquid. This paper involves the design of optical testing system, the data acquisition and calibration of the optical sensor, the design of microcontroller-based electrical board. Tests were done to reveal the affection of temperature and reacting time on AchE, to establish the relationship between the amount of methamidophos and dichlorvos with AchE. The results showed that the absorption rate was related to the pesticide residues and it could be concluded that the pesticide residues exceeded the normal level when the inhibition rate was over 50 percent. The instrument has potential application in vegetable markets.

  14. 76 FR 31606 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... pesticide. A separate Federal Register Notice (75 FR 28019, May 19, 2010) (FRL-8825-7), announced the... health use products separately. Several resmethrin products included in the August 25, 2010 (75 FR 52330...%. 073049-00109 SBP-1382 Residual Resmethrin. Aqueous Presurized Ant and Roach Spray 0.35%. 073049-00110...

  15. Estimation of pesticide and transformation product export pathways in a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, Matthias; Olsson, Oliver; Stamm, Christian; Weiler, Markus; Lange, Jens; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Following their application, pesticide residues are exported towards rivers along several hydrological pathways in agricultural areas. The importance of each pathway is influenced by the substances' physico-chemical characteristics, mainly sorption and degradation. Incomplete mineralization results in the formation of transformation products (TPs) which have generally different environmental fate characteristics than their parent compounds (PCs). Therefore, the export pathways of pesticides and their transformation products towards rivers may also be different. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we extended a distributed process-based hydrological model (ZIN-AgriTra) by the environmental fate of pesticides and their TPs. The process-based nature of the model allowed for an analysis of PC and TP export pathways including overland flow, lateral preferential flow in soils and soil water flow to tile drains. The model was applied to a Swiss headwater catchment using three pesticides and their TPs as test substances. It was successfully calibrated to three sampling stations in the catchment. At the end of the simulated three-months period, most of the applied pesticides were either fully mineralized or incompletely transformed. Less than 2% of each pesticide was exported to the river as PC or TP. Although all three pesticides could be classified as slightly mobile they remained in the top soil layer during the whole period, whereas the more mobile TPs were additionally leached through the soil towards tile drains. Accordingly, PCs were exported largely by surface runoff, while a larger share of TPs was exported via tile drains. Additionally, the delayed formation and degradation of TPs led to an export under different hydrological conditions resulting in an increased subsurface export of TPs towards the end of the simulation period. A consequence of the different export pathways of PCs and TPs could be shown by an assessment of critical source areas (CSA) in the study catchment: CSA for PCs were restricted to small areas whereas CSA for TPs were more equally distributed in the catchment. Our study demonstrates that PCs and their TPs have generally different export pathways in catchments because of their different physico-chemical properties and the delayed formation of TPs. We suggest that these results should be considered in risk assessment of pesticide residues export to adjacent rivers and that catchment scale models should be extended to include both PCs and TPs.

  16. Degradation of four organophosphorous pesticides catalyzed by chitosan-metal coordination complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Bo; Meng, Xianghong; Huang, Lin; Wang, Dongfeng

    2015-10-01

    Three types of chitosan with high (3.40 × 10(6)), medium (2.11 × 10(5)), and low (5.89 × 10(4)) molecular weights were chosen as ligands to synthesize chitosan magnesium, calcium, iron(III), and zinc coordination complexes. Degradation of four organophosphorous pesticides (dichlorvos, omethoate, dimethoate, and chlorpyrifos) by the above complexes in a heterogeneous system was studied using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography (GC). The degradation effect is related to the different types of chitosan, metal, and organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). Complexes of transition metals and the low molecular weight chitosan showed high hydrolytic activity. The chitosan-iron(III) complex was further used to study its catalytic kinetics on the hydrolysis of OPs. At pH 7.0 and 20 °C, the half-life of dichlorvos hydrolyzed by chitosan iron(III) was 52 h, whereas that of spontaneous dichlorvos hydrolysis was 105 h. The degradation ratio of omethoate and dimethoate increased to 38 and 52 %, respectively, which were 34 and 48 % higher than the control after 6 days at pH 7.0 and 20 °C. For all tested conditions, an increase of pH and temperature resulted in a higher degradation rate. PMID:26003089

  17. Zinc(II) phthalocyanines immobilized in mesoporous silica Al-MCM-41 and their applications in photocatalytic degradation of pesticides.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Silva M; Calvete MJ; Gonalves NP; Burrows HD; Sarakha M; Fernandes A; Ribeiro MF; Azenha ME; Pereira MM

    2012-09-30

    In the present study the authors investigated a set of three new zinc(II) phthalocyanines (zinc(II) tetranitrophthalocyanine (ZnTNPc), zinc(II) tetra(phenyloxy)phthalocyanine (ZnTPhOPc) and the tetraiodide salt of zinc(II)tetra(N,N,N-trimethylaminoethyloxy) phthalocyaninate (ZnTTMAEOPcI)) immobilized into Al-MCM-41 prepared via ship-in-a-bottle methodology. The samples were fully characterized by diffuse reflectance-UV-vis spectroscopy (DRS-UV-vis), luminescence, thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DSC), N(2) adsorption techniques and elemental analysis. A comparative study was made on the photocatalytic performance upon irradiation within the wavelength range 320-460nm of these three systems in the degradation of pesticides fenamiphos and pentachlorophenol. ZnTNPc@Al-MCM-41 and ZnTTMAEOPcI@Al-MCM-41 were found to be the most active systems, with the best performance observed with the immobilized cationic phthalocyanine, ZnTTMAEOPcI@Al-MCM-41. This system showed high activity even after three photocatalytic cycles. LC-MS product characterization and mechanistic studies indicate that singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)), produced by excitation of these immobilized photosensitizers, is a key intermediate in the photocatalytic degradation of both pesticides.

  18. Zinc(II) phthalocyanines immobilized in mesoporous silica Al-MCM-41 and their applications in photocatalytic degradation of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Silva, M; Calvete, M J F; Gonalves, N P F; Burrows, H D; Sarakha, M; Fernandes, A; Ribeiro, M F; Azenha, M E; Pereira, M M

    2012-09-30

    In the present study the authors investigated a set of three new zinc(II) phthalocyanines (zinc(II) tetranitrophthalocyanine (ZnTNPc), zinc(II) tetra(phenyloxy)phthalocyanine (ZnTPhOPc) and the tetraiodide salt of zinc(II)tetra(N,N,N-trimethylaminoethyloxy) phthalocyaninate (ZnTTMAEOPcI)) immobilized into Al-MCM-41 prepared via ship-in-a-bottle methodology. The samples were fully characterized by diffuse reflectance-UV-vis spectroscopy (DRS-UV-vis), luminescence, thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DSC), N(2) adsorption techniques and elemental analysis. A comparative study was made on the photocatalytic performance upon irradiation within the wavelength range 320-460nm of these three systems in the degradation of pesticides fenamiphos and pentachlorophenol. ZnTNPc@Al-MCM-41 and ZnTTMAEOPcI@Al-MCM-41 were found to be the most active systems, with the best performance observed with the immobilized cationic phthalocyanine, ZnTTMAEOPcI@Al-MCM-41. This system showed high activity even after three photocatalytic cycles. LC-MS product characterization and mechanistic studies indicate that singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)), produced by excitation of these immobilized photosensitizers, is a key intermediate in the photocatalytic degradation of both pesticides. PMID:22835771

  19. 78 FR 53139 - Pesticide Product Registration; Receipt of Application for New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Product Registration; Receipt of Application for New Uses AGENCY: Environmental... new food uses on previously registered pesticide products containing the insecticide flonicamid... suggest alternatives. vii. Explain your views as clearly as possible, avoiding the use of profanity...

  20. Structure-Guided Engineering of Molinate Hydrolase for the Degradation of Thiocarbamate Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Ana M.; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Matias, Pedro M.; Nunes, Olga C.; Gales, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Molinate is a recalcitrant thiocarbamate used to control grass weeds in rice fields. The recently described molinate hydrolase, from Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4T, plays a key role in the only known molinate degradation pathway ending in the formation of innocuous compounds. Here we report the crystal structure of recombinant molinate hydrolase at 2.27 Å. The structure reveals a homotetramer with a single mononuclear metal-dependent active site per monomer. The active site architecture shows similarities with other amidohydrolases and enables us to propose a general acid-base catalysis mechanism for molinate hydrolysis. Molinate hydrolase is unable to degrade bulkier thiocarbamate pesticides such as thiobencarb which is used mostly in rice crops. Using a structural-based approach, we were able to generate a mutant (Arg187Ala) that efficiently degrades thiobencarb. The engineered enzyme is suitable for the development of a broader thiocarbamate bioremediation system. PMID:25905461

  1. Structure-guided engineering of molinate hydrolase for the degradation of thiocarbamate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Leite, José P; Duarte, Márcia; Paiva, Ana M; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Matias, Pedro M; Nunes, Olga C; Gales, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Molinate is a recalcitrant thiocarbamate used to control grass weeds in rice fields. The recently described molinate hydrolase, from Gulosibacter molinativorax ON4T, plays a key role in the only known molinate degradation pathway ending in the formation of innocuous compounds. Here we report the crystal structure of recombinant molinate hydrolase at 2.27 Å. The structure reveals a homotetramer with a single mononuclear metal-dependent active site per monomer. The active site architecture shows similarities with other amidohydrolases and enables us to propose a general acid-base catalysis mechanism for molinate hydrolysis. Molinate hydrolase is unable to degrade bulkier thiocarbamate pesticides such as thiobencarb which is used mostly in rice crops. Using a structural-based approach, we were able to generate a mutant (Arg187Ala) that efficiently degrades thiobencarb. The engineered enzyme is suitable for the development of a broader thiocarbamate bioremediation system. PMID:25905461

  2. The influence of pH on the degradation kinetics of some organophosphorous pesticides in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Repetto, R; Martinez, D; Repetto, M

    1994-06-01

    This paper reports on the stability of 6 organophosphorous insecticides in ethanol-water at pH 2.0, 7.5 and 8.5. The kinetics of insecticide degradation and the corresponding parameters were calculated from the data obtained by analyses of the residual parental compounds. Pesticide degradation was found to proceed by 2 distinct mechanisms. PMID:8066964

  3. 77 FR 8863 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... published for comment in the Federal Register issue of November 23, 2011 (76 FR 72405) (FRL-9327-2). The... AGENCY Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations AGENCY: Environmental Protection... registrations. In the November 23, 2011, notice, EPA indicated that it would issue an order implementing...

  4. 77 FR 10515 - Pesticide Product Registrations; Conditional Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Federal Register of March 31, 2010, (75 FR 16109) (FRL-8806-9), which announced that the company, HeiQ... AGENCY Pesticide Product Registrations; Conditional Approval AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... registration, except for material specifically protected by section 10 of FIFRA, are also available for...

  5. 76 FR 551 - Pesticide Product Registrations; Conditional Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... EPA issued a notice, published in the Federal Register of February 26, 2010 (75 FR 8939) (FRL-8812-8... 26, 2010 (75 FR 8939), which announced that Bayer CropScience and Bayer Environmental Science had... AGENCY Pesticide Product Registrations; Conditional Approval AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

  6. Pesticide residue monitoring in Korean agricultural products, 2003-05.

    PubMed

    Cho, T H; Kim, B S; Jo, S J; Kang, H G; Choi, B Y; Kim, M Y

    2009-01-01

    Between 2003 and 2005, a total of 11,716 samples were collected and analysed to determine the level of pesticides residues. Multi-residue methods (MRMs) capable of simultaneously determining 250 pesticides were used. Of the 11,716 samples, 89.1% had no detectable residues and 1.7% had violative residues. The detection rates by commodity group were 11.4, 8.6, 0.3, and 0.02% for vegetables, fruit, grain, mushrooms, and the others, respectively. Agricultural products with pesticide residues were pepper, Perilla frutescens, leafy lettuce and spinach in decreasing order. Of the 250 pesticides that were monitored, 70 pesticides were actually found. Procymidone, endosulfan, chlorfenapyr, metalaxyl, and diethofencarb were frequently detected. Of the samples, parsley, Petasites hybridus, Aster scaber and leek had high violative rates of 23.1, 12.6, 8.2, and 7.9%, respectively. From violative samples, procymidone, endosulfan, metalaxyl, diazinon and chlorpyrifos were frequently detected. The violation rates were 1.71, 1.68, and 1.76% in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively, and the detection rates were 8.5, 12.0, and 13.3% in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively. PMID:24784964

  7. Degradation and adsorption of pesticides in compost-based biomixtures as potential substrates for biobeds in southern Europe.

    PubMed

    Karanasios, Evangelos; Tsiropoulos, Nikolaos G; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G; Ehaliotis, Constantinos

    2010-08-25

    Biobeds have been used in northern Europe for minimizing point source contamination of water resources by pesticides. However, little is known regarding their use in southern Europe where edaphoclimatic conditions and agriculture practices significantly differ. A first step toward their adaptation in southern Europe is the use of low-cost and easily available substrates as biomixture components. This study investigated the possibility of replacing peat with agricultural composts in the biomixture. Five composts from local substrates including olive leaves, cotton crop residues, cotton seeds, spent mushroom substrate, and commercial sea wrack were mixed with topsoil and straw (1:1:2). Degradation of a mixture of pesticides (dimethoate, indoxacarb, buprofezin, terbuthylazine, metribuzin, metalaxyl-M, iprodione, azoxystrobin) at two dose rates was tested in the compost biomixtures (BX), in corresponding peat biomixtures (OBX), and in soil. Adsorption-desorption of selected pesticides were also studied. Pesticide residues were determined by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detector, except indoxacarb, which was determined with a microelectron capture detector. Overall, BX degraded the studied pesticides at rates markedly higher than those observed in soil and OBX, in which the slowest degradation rates were evident. Overall, the olive leaf compost biomixture showed the highest degradation capacity. Adsorption studies showed that OBX and BX had higher adsorption affinity compared to soil. Desorption experiments revealed that pesticide adsorption in biomixtures was not entirely reversible. The results suggest that substitution of peat with local composts will lead to optimization of the biobed system for use in Mediterranean countries. PMID:20666446

  8. Exploring the potential of novel biomixtures and Lentinula edodes fungus for the degradation of selected pesticides. Evaluation for use in biobed systems.

    PubMed

    Pinto, A P; Rodrigues, S C; Caldeira, A T; Teixeira, D M

    2016-01-15

    An approach to reduce the contamination of water sources with pesticides is the use of biopurificaction systems. The active core of these systems is the biomixture. The composition of biomixtures depends on the availability of local agro-industrial wastes and design should be adapted to every region. In Portugal, cork processing is generally regarded as environmentally friendly and would be interesting to find applications for its industry residues. In this work the potential use of different substrates in biomixtures, as cork (CBX); cork and straw, coat pine and LECA (Light Expanded Clay Aggregates), was tested on the degradation of terbuthylazine, difenoconazole, diflufenican and pendimethalin pesticides. Bioaugmentation strategies using the white-rot fungus Lentinula edodes inoculated into the CBX, was also assessed. The results obtained from this study clearly demonstrated the relevance of using natural biosorbents as cork residues to increase the capacity of pesticide dissipation in biomixtures for establishing biobeds. Furthermore, higher degradation of all the pesticides was achieved by use of bioaugmented biomixtures. Indeed, the biomixtures inoculated with L. edodes EL1 were able to mineralize the selected xenobiotics, revelling that these white-rot fungi might be a suitable fungus for being used as inoculum sources in on-farm sustainable biopurification system, in order to increase its degradation efficiency. After 120 days, maximum degradation of terbuthylazine, difenoconazole, diflufenican and pendimethalin, of bioaugmented CBX, was 89.9%, 75.0%, 65.0% and 99.4%, respectively.. The dominant metabolic route of terbuthylazine in biomixtures inoculated with L. edodes EL1 proceeded mainly via hydroxylation, towards production of terbuthylazine-hydroxy-2 metabolite. Finally, sorption process to cork by pesticides proved to be a reversible process, working cork as a mitigating factor reducing the toxicity to microorganisms in the biomixture, especially in the early stages. PMID:26479911

  9. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pesticide chemicals and other residues... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.16 Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products. (a) Nonmeat ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or...

  10. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pesticide chemicals and other residues... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.16 Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products. (a) Nonmeat ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or...

  11. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pesticide chemicals and other residues... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.16 Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products. (a) Nonmeat ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or...

  12. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pesticide chemicals and other residues... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.16 Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products. (a) Nonmeat ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or...

  13. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pesticide chemicals and other residues... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.16 Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products. (a) Nonmeat ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or...

  14. Degradation and persistence of cotton pesticides in sandy loam soils from Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad Ilyas; Afzal, Shahzad; Hussain, Ishtiaq

    2006-02-01

    The present study evaluated the influence of temperature, moisture, and microbial activity on the degradation and persistence of commonly used cotton pesticides, i.e., carbosulfan, carbofuran, lambda-cyhalothrin, endosulfan, and monocrotophos, with the help of laboratory incubation and lysimeter studies on sandy loam soil (Typic Ustocurepts) in Pakistan. Drainage from the lysimeters was sampled on days 49, 52, 59, 73, 100, 113, and 119 against the pesticide application on days 37, 63, 82, 108, and 137 after the sowing of cotton. Carbofuran, monocrotophos, and nitrate were detected in the drainage samples, with an average value, respectively, of 2.34, 2.6 microg/L, and 15.6 mg/L for no-tillage and 2.16, 2.3 microg/L, and 13.4 mg/L for tillage. In the laboratory, pesticide disappearance kinetics were measured with sterile and nonsterile soils from 0 to 10 cm in depth at 15, 25, and 35 degrees C and 50% and 90% field water capacities. Monocrotophos and carbosulfan dissipation followed first-order kinetics while others followed second-order kinetics. The results of incubation studies showed that temperature and moisture contents significantly reduced the t(1/2) (half-life) values of pesticides in sterile and nonsterile soil, but the effect of microbial activity was nearly significant that might be due to less organic carbon (0.3%). The presence of carbofuran and monocrotophos in the soil profile (0-10, 10-30, 30-60, 60-90, 90-150 cm) and the higher concentrations of endosulfan and lambda-cyhalothrin in the top layer (0-10 cm) showed the persistence of the pesticides. The detection of endosulfan and lambda-cyhalothrin in the 10-30 cm soil layer might be due to preferential flow. The data generated from this study could be helpful for risk assessment studies of pesticides and for validating pesticide transport models for sandy loam soils in cotton-growing areas of Pakistan. PMID:16009361

  15. [Validation study on a multi-residue analysis of pesticides in agricultural products by using phosphoric acid treatment and GC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Makabe, Yuhki; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Tomoko; Aikawa, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method for multi-residue determination of pesticides in agricultural products was validated. The sample was cut into pieces and placed into a mixer cup containing half weight amount of 10% phosphoric acid in order to suppress degradation of easily degraded pesticides, represented by captan, and then homogenized. Pesticides in the phosphoric acid-treated sample were extracted with acetonitrile using a homogenizer, followed by salting out with anhydrous magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride. The extract was cleaned up on a C18 and graphite carbon black/PSA mini-cartridge column. Some pesticides gave tailing peaks, but these peaks became sharp and symmetrical when polyethylene glycol (PEG) 300 was added to the test solution. Recovery tests were performed on nine kinds of agricultural products (brown rice, soybean, spinach, cabbage, potato, orange, apple, strawberry, and Japanese pear) fortified with 170 pesticides at 0.01 and 0.1 μg/g. Each concentration of pesticide residue was extracted from 2 samples on 5 separate days. The trueness of the method for 147-164 pesticides in each sample was 70-120% with satisfactory repeatability and within-run reproducibility. This method is expected to useful for multi-residue analysis of pesticides in agricultural products. PMID:25212821

  16. Sorption and degradation of chlorophenols, nitrophenols and organophosphorus pesticides in the subsoil under landfills laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Kjlholt, Jesper; Schultz, Birgit; Christensen, Thomas H.; Tjell, Jens Christian

    1990-09-01

    Landfills and old industrial plant sites have been identified in an increasing number of cases as point sources of groundwater pollution, dissipating a wide range of industrial chemicals and pesticides. To study the fate of co-disposed chemicals in the subsoil of landfills, anaerobic soil columns loaded with anaerobic leachate from a municipal landfill were set up. The leachate was spiked with eleven compounds representing three groups of chemicals: chlorophenols, nitrophenols and organophosphates. Two subsoils were used in the study. The columns were maintained at Danish groundwater temperature (8-10C), and were run for a period of 10 months. Analysis of the influent leachate concentrations of the spiked compounds showed that the concentrations were constant during the entire experimental period. Many of the compounds showed delayed breakthrough (compared to chloride breakthrough) in both soils, followed by a constant effluent concentration ratio of less than unity indicating that degradation was occuring. The velocities for the chloro- and nitrophenols were in the range of 10-100% of the water velocity in the two subsoils. The distribution coefficient for the specific phenol, the acidity and the pH of the soil apparently governed the retardation of the phenolic compounds. Degradation of most of the phenols was observed with half-like values of 30-150 days. The four organophosphorus pesticides, Dimethoate , Malathion , Sulfotep and Fenitrothion , showed relative velocities from < 10% to ? 100%. Malathion and Sulfotep were degraded with half-life values of 10-20 days, while Dimethoate was not significantly degraded in the two soil columns. Fenitrothion did not appear in the effluent from the columns within the experimental period of time, probably due to high retardation.

  17. Biodegradation of pesticides. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biological degradation of pesticides. Pesticides such as malathion, parathion and DDT, organophosphates and carbamates, herbicides, fungicides, and rodenticides are examined. Coverage includes the isolation of enzymes specifically able to degrade pesticides, field studies of natural degradation and migration of pesticides, and test tube examination of microbial organisms with the ability to digest pesticides. Degradation products, effects of available nutrients on microbial degradation, and pesticide resistance in natural ecosystems are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 190 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. 75 FR 11175 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... Incorporated, 3406 Pomona Boulevard, Pomona, CA 91768. Product Name: Technical Salicylic Acid. Active Ingredient: Salicylic Acid at 98.7%. Proposed Classification/Use: Manufacturing-use product for...

  19. Pesticides and pesticide degradates in the East Fork Little Miami River and William H. Harsha Lake, southwestern Ohio, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, Jason M.; Reutter, David C.; Rowe, Gary L.

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 and 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program conducted a national pilot study of pesticides and degradates in drinking-water supplies, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). William H. Harsha Lake, which provides drinking water for several thousand people in southwestern Ohio, was selected as one of the drinking-water supplies for this study. East Fork Little Miami River is the main source of water to Harsha Lake and drains a predominantly agricultural basin. Samples were collected from the East Fork Little Miami River upstream from Harsha Lake, at the drinking-water intake at Harsha Lake, at the outfall just below Harsha Lake, and from treated water at the Bob McEwen Treatment Plant. These samples were analyzed using standardized methods developed for the NAWQA Program. In all, 42 pesticide compounds (24 herbicides, 4 insecticides, 1 fungicide, and 13 degradates) were detected at least once in samples collected during this study. No compound in the treated water samples exceeded any drinking-water standard, although atrazine concentrations in untreated water exceeded the USEPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for drinking water (3 ?g/L) on four occasions. At least eight compounds were detected with greater than 60 percent frequency at each sampling location. Herbicides, such as atrazine, alachlor, acetochlor, cyanazine, metolachlor, and simazine, were detected most frequently. Rainfall affected the pesticide concentrations in surface waters of the East Fork Little Miami River Basin. Drought conditions from May through November 1999 led to lower streamflow and pesticide concentrations throughout southwestern Ohio. More normal climate conditions during 2000 resulted in higher streamflows and seasonally higher concentrations in the East Fork Little Miami River and Harsha Lake for some pesticides Comparison of pesticide concentrations in untreated lake water and treated drinking water supplied by the Bob McEwen Treatment Plant suggests that treatment processes employed by the plant (chlorination, activated carbon) reduced pesticide concentrations to levels well below USEPA drinking-water standards. In particular, the percentage of pesticides remaining in treated water samples decreased significantly for several frequently occurring pesticides when the plant replaced the use of powdered activated carbon with granular activated carbon in November 1999. For example, the median percentage of atrazine remaining after treatment that included powdered activated carbon was 63 percent, whereas the median percentage of atrazine remaining after the switch to granular activated carbon was 2.4 percent.

  20. 76 FR 63298 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... ingredient: Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 variant soil at 1.57%. Proposed classification/Use: None...: Insecticide. Active ingredient: Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain VBTS 2546 fermentation solids... Insecticide. Product type: Insecticide. Active ingredient: Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain...

  1. 77 FR 38285 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... products for indoor greenhouse use on ornamental plants. Contact: Clayton Myers, Registration Division, (703) 347-8874, email address: myers.clayton@epa.gov . 2. File Symbol: 71711-GT. Docket Number: EPA-HQ... 20.0%. Proposed classification/use: Indoor greenhouse use on ornamental plants. Contact:...

  2. 77 FR 14362 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... pea), cereal grains (except rice and wild rice), and rapeseed group. Contact: Dominic Schuler... Park, N.C. 27709. Product Name: 5307 Corn. Active ingredient: Plant-Incorporated Protectant with... elements of vector pSYN12274) in 5307 Corn (SYN- 53 7-1) at 0.01782%. ] Proposed Use:...

  3. Structural elucidation of gemifloxacin mesylate degradation product.

    PubMed

    Paim, Clésio Soldateli; Führ, Fernanda; Martins, Magda Targa; Gnoatto, Simone; Bajerski, Lisiane; Garcia, Cássia Virginia; Steppe, Martin; Schapoval, Elfrides Eva Scherman

    2016-03-01

    Gemifloxacin mesylate (GFM), chemically (R,S)-7-[(4Z)-3-(aminomethyl)-4-(methoxyimino)-1-pyrrolidinyl]-1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxylic acid methanesulfonate, is a synthetic broad-spectrum antibacterial agent. Although many papers have been published in the literature describing the stability of fluorquinolones, little is known about the degradation products of GFM. Forced degradation studies of GFM were performed using radiation (UV-A), acid (1 mol L(-1) HCl) and alkaline conditions (0.2 mol L(-1) NaOH). The main degradation product, formed under alkaline conditions, was isolated using semi-preparative LC and structurally elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (proton - (1) H; carbon - (13) C; correlate spectroscopy - COSY; heteronuclear single quantum coherence - HSQC; heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation - HMBC; spectroscopy - infrared, atomic emission and mass spectrometry techniques). The degradation product isolated was characterized as sodium 7-amino-1-pyrrolidinyl-1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxylate, which was formed by loss of the 3-(aminomethyl)-4-(methoxyimino)-1-pyrrolidinyl ring and formation of the sodium carboxylate. The structural characterization of the degradation product was very important to understand the degradation mechanism of the GFM under alkaline conditions. In addition, the results highlight the importance of appropriate protection against hydrolysis and UV radiation during the drug-development process, storage, handling and quality control. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26205148

  4. The Fate of Organophosphorus Pesticides during Camellia Oil Production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihua; Mo, Runhong; Zhong, Donglian; Shen, Danyu; Ni, Zhanglin; Tang, Fubin

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fate of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) during camellia oil production process, from camellia fruit to the final oil product. The results showed that the OPs were mainly distributed in the peel of camellia fruit, basically above 40% after the pesticide application of 7 d (P < 0.05). A small amount of OPs could enter into the seed and convert to crude camellia oil, with the concentration of 19.5 to 548.2 mg/L. In addition, metabolites of OPs (25.7 to 768.9 mg/L) could be detected in the crude camellia oil. Moreover, the refining process (degumming, deacidfying, bleaching) had a significant effect on the removal of OPs from the crude camellia oil (P < 0.05), and the effect was related to the octanol-water partition constant (LogP) of pesticide. The larger the LogP, the more stable the OPs were during refining process. The final refined camellia oil was found to have no detectable levels of OPs metabolite. PMID:26130455

  5. Distinguishing the effects of habitat degradation and pesticide stress on benthic invertebrates using stressor-specific metrics.

    PubMed

    von der Ohe, Peter Carsten; Goedkoop, Willem

    2013-02-01

    Hydromorphological degradation is a well known stressor for running waters, while the effects of elevated levels of pesticides are widely ignored. Hence, distinguishing between the effects of these two stressors is an urgent task for water managers that aim at appropriate remediation measures. We used a large monitoring data set on benthic invertebrates, habitat descriptors, and physico-chemical variables to develop the SPEAR[%](habitat) metric that indicates the effects of in-stream habitat degradation. SPEAR[%](habitat) correlated significantly with the habitat degradation score (HDS; based on substratum and vegetation coverage), while it did not respond to any physico-chemical variables (r(2)=0.20). This relationship improved for streams with low modeled pesticide inputs (r(2)=0.33), and improved even further for a subset of streams dominated by soft-bottom substrata, i.e. for similar stream-types (r(2)=0.65). These relationships were confirmed for an independent dataset that was not used in the derivation of the HDS (r(2)=0.57 and r(2)=0.65, respectively). These findings show that the SPEAR[%](habitat) had a high degree of specificity for the effects of habitat degradation. Conversely, neither the commonly used EPT and ASPT metrics, nor the German Fauna Index or SPEAR[%](pesticides) showed significant relationships with HDS. These metrics instead correlated significantly with the run-off potential (RP), a proxy of pesticide contamination of streams. Similarly, RP was also the most important explanatory variable for SPEAR[%](pesticides), followed by alkalinity and the number of forested upstream stretches (r(2)=0.61). The latter are expected to alleviate pesticide effects, as indicated by higher SPEAR[%](pesticides) values. These findings show that an integrated analysis of the two stressor-specific SPEAR-metrics in combination with the metrics of general ecological degradation can help water managers to distinguish between the effects of habitat degradation and pesticide stress, two co-occurring stressors in agricultural landscapes. PMID:23291651

  6. Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of pesticides using decatungstate intercalated macroporous layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Eliana S; Prevot, Vanessa; Forano, Claude; Wong-Wah-Chung, Pascal; Burrows, Hugh D; Sarakha, Mohamed

    2014-10-01

    Decatungstate W10O32(4-) was efficiently intercalated between the layers of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous Mg2Al-layered double hydroxide. The structural and textural properties of as-prepared intercalated compound were characterized using different solid-state characterization techniques such as X-ray powder diffraction, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies and electronic microscopy. The photocatalytic properties of immobilized W10O32 (4-) within Mg2Al structure were investigated using 2-(1-naphthyl) acetamide (NAD) as a model of pesticide. The influence of different parameters such as amount of catalyst, pH and oxygen concentration were investigated. An optimal NAD degradation was obtained for a photocatalyst concentration of 60 mg l(-1). Under our experimental conditions, this heterogeneous photocatalyst induces photodegradation of 60 % of NAD after 17 h of irradiation at 365 nm and at pH 6.6. Interestingly, pesticide photodegradation leads to the mineralization of substrates to H2O and CO2 and the photocatalyst can be recycled and reused without any loss of activity over four cycles. PMID:24838128

  7. 40 CFR 152.8 - Products that are not pesticides because they are not for use against pests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Products that are not pesticides... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.8 Products that are not pesticides because they are not for use against pests. A...

  8. 40 CFR 152.8 - Products that are not pesticides because they are not for use against pests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Products that are not pesticides... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.8 Products that are not pesticides because they are not for use against pests. A...

  9. 40 CFR 152.8 - Products that are not pesticides because they are not for use against pests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Products that are not pesticides... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.8 Products that are not pesticides because they are not for use against pests. A...

  10. 40 CFR 152.8 - Products that are not pesticides because they are not for use against pests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Products that are not pesticides... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.8 Products that are not pesticides because they are not for use against pests. A...

  11. 40 CFR 152.8 - Products that are not pesticides because they are not for use against pests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Products that are not pesticides... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES General Provisions § 152.8 Products that are not pesticides because they are not for use against pests. A...

  12. Identification and ecotoxicity of degradation products of chloroacetamide herbicides from UV-treatment of water.

    PubMed

    Souissi, Yasmine; Bouchonnet, Stéphane; Bourcier, Sophie; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Sablier, Michel; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-08-01

    The widespread occurrence of chlorinated herbicides and their degradation products in the aquatic environment raises health and environmental concerns. As a consequence pesticides, and to a lesser degree their degradation products, are monitored by authorities both in surface waters and drinking waters. In this study the formation of degradation products from ultraviolet (UV) treatment of the three chloroacetamide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor and metolachlor and their biological effects were investigated. UV treatment is mainly used for disinfection in water and wastewater treatments. First, the chemical structures of the main UV-degradation products were identified using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main transformation reactions were dechlorination, mono- and multi-hydroxylation and cyclizations. The ecotoxicity of the mixed photoproducts formed by UV-treatment until 90% of the original pesticide was converted was compared to the toxicity of chloroacetamides using the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, the crustacean Daphnia magna and the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri as test organisms. UV-treatment of alachlor and metolachlor increased the toxicity compared to the parent compounds while an equal toxicity was found for photolysis products of acetochlor. This suggests that toxic photodegradation products are generated from chloroacetamides under UV-treatment. An important perspective of this finding is that the photolysis products are at least as toxic as the parent compounds. PMID:23707723

  13. Long-term lessons on pesticide leaching obtained via the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbom, A. E.; Olsen, P.; Plauborg, F.; Grant, R.; Juhler, R. K.; Brüsch, W.; Kjær, J.

    2014-12-01

    To avoid any unacceptable influence on the environment posed by pesticides and their degradation products, all pesticides used in the European Union needs authorization. The authorization procedure includes assessing the leaching risk of both pesticides and their degradation products to the groundwater. There are shortcomings to the procedure, however, as revealed by the results of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme from the period 1990/2000 to 2012 (app. twelve years). This monitoring program has for this period assessed leaching into groundwater via the variably-saturated zone of 43 pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations on sandy and loamy agricultural fields, and 47 of their degradation products. Three types of leaching scenario were not fully captured by the authorization procedure: i) long-term leaching of degradation products of pesticides applied on potato crops cultivated in sandy soils, ii) leaching of strongly sorbing pesticides after autumn application on loamy soils, and iii) leaching of various pesticides and their degradation products following early summer application on loamy soils. The monitoring data revealed that the authorization procedure was unable to predict leaching scenarios for a number of pesticides in hydrogeological settings dominated by rapid preferential transport via e.g. biopores that bypasses the retardation (sorption and degradation) of the plow layer. Such settings are primarily present in the autumn, but can also occur during the early summer in connection with the formation of a structural seal on the soil surface.

  14. 40 CFR 158.2160 - Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements. 158.2160 Section 158.2160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Microbial pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...

  15. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. 158.2070 Section 158.2070 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. Product performance data must be developed...

  16. 40 CFR 165.65 - Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products in refillable containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... product into a refillable container up to the rated capacity of the container. In addition, there are no... a reaction or interaction between the pesticide product being repackaged and the residue remaining... removal procedure before repackaging the pesticide product into the refillable container. In...

  17. 40 CFR 165.65 - Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products in refillable containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... product into a refillable container up to the rated capacity of the container. In addition, there are no... a reaction or interaction between the pesticide product being repackaged and the residue remaining... removal procedure before repackaging the pesticide product into the refillable container. In...

  18. 40 CFR 165.65 - Registrants who distribute or sell pesticide products in refillable containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... product into a refillable container up to the rated capacity of the container. In addition, there are no... a reaction or interaction between the pesticide product being repackaged and the residue remaining... removal procedure before repackaging the pesticide product into the refillable container. In...

  19. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE DEGRADATION IN THE PRESENCE OF NATURALLY OCCURRING AQUATIC CONSTITUENTS UNDER DRINKING WATER TREATMENT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little work to date has solely investigated the kinetics and pathways of pesticide transformations under drinking water treatment conditions. Free chlorine has been found to react with s-triazine, carbamate, and organophosphate pesticides. However, these experimental conditions...

  20. Influence of parameters on the heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of pesticides and phenolic contaminants in wastewater: a short review.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Saber; Rasul, M G; Brown, R; Hashib, M A

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, the application of heterogeneous photocatalytic water purification processes has gained wide attention due to its effectiveness in degrading and mineralizing the recalcitrant organic compounds as well as the possibility of utilizing the solar UV and visible-light spectrum. This paper aims to review and summarize the recent works on the titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) photocatalytic oxidation of pesticides and phenolic compounds, predominant in storm and wastewater effluents. The effects of various operating parameters on the photocatalytic degradation of pesticides and phenols are discussed. Results reported here suggest that the photocatalytic degradation of organic compounds depends on the type and composition of the photocatalyst and, light intensity, initial substrate concentration, amount of catalyst, pH of the reaction medium, ionic components in water, solvent types, oxidizing agents/electron acceptors, catalyst application mode, and calcination temperature in the water environment. A substantial amount of research has focused on the enhancement of TiO(2) photocatalysis by modification with metal, non-metal and ion doping. Recent developments in TiO(2) photocatalysis for the degradation of various pesticides and phenols are also highlighted in this review. It is evident from the literature survey that photocatalysis has good potential to remove a variety of organic pollutants. However, there is still a need to determine the practical utility of this technique on a commercial scale. PMID:20950926

  1. Lethal and sublethal effects of pesticides on Chrysoperla carnea larvae (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and the influence of rainfastness in their degradation pattern over time.

    PubMed

    Maia, Jader Braga; Carvalho, Geraldo Andrade; Medina, Pilar; Garzón, Agustín; Gontijo, Pablo da Costa; Viñuela, Elisa

    2016-07-01

    The predator Chrysoperla carnea is a model species for the study of non-target effects of pesticides under different scenarios: registration of plant protection products under the European Union and effects of the Bt toxin. Laboratory and persistence studies were carried out with six pesticides currently used in corn crops in Spain that were applied at their maximum field recommended concentrations. The assessed end-points were larval mortality, survivorship until adult stage, duration of the larval and pupal periods, fecundity, fertility and sex ratio of the emerged adults. Based on the total effect (lethal and sublethal) caused to L3 larvae in contact with fresh residues in the laboratory, pendimethalin was harmless (IOBC 1), lambda-cyhalothrin, abamectin, and hexythiazox were slightly harmful (IOBC 2), deltamethrin was moderately harmful (IOBC 3) and chlorpyrifos was harmful (IOBC 4). Afterwards, the residues of the two most toxic pesticides in the lab (deltamethrin and chlorpyrifos) were aged under greenhouse conditions (22 ± 2 °C, 40 ± 10 % R.H., 16.9 μmol m(-2) s(-1) UV radiation) in the presence and absence of artificial rainfall (10 l m(-2) h(-1), applied 24 h after pesticide application). Deltamethrin was classified as short lived (IOBC A) in both cases. However, degradation of chlorpyrifos residues was accelerated in the presence of rainfall, leading to the classification as slightly persistent (IOBC B), while in absence of rainfall it behaved as persistent (IOBC D). Every pesticide can be recommended for inclusion in corn IPM programs where the predator is present except chlorpyrifos that exhibited high direct toxicity in the lab and prolonged residual action even in the presence of rainfall. PMID:26975320

  2. MEASURING THE TRANSPORT OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING DICARBOXIMIDES AND DEGRADATION PRODUCTS FROM THE SOIL TO THE LOWER TROPOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for measuring the atmospheric flux of a dicarboximide and its degradation products was investigated. A volatile gas laboratory chamber was modified to measure the flux of semi-volatile fungicides. Pesticide application systems and soil incorporation systems were desig...

  3. 78 FR 32246 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications for New Active Ingredients

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...EPA has received several applications to register pesticide products containing active ingredients not included in any currently registered pesticide products. Pursuant to the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), EPA is hereby providing notice of receipt and opportunity to comment on these...

  4. 75 FR 6386 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications for a New Active Ingredient Chemical; Demiditraz

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... pesticide products. Pursuant to the provisions of section 3(c)(4) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and... included in any previously registered pesticide products. Pursuant to the provisions of section 3(c)(4) of... operation (8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays). Special...

  5. Productivity, pesticides, and management of the Peregrine Falcon in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    In the decade since research commenced with the Peregrine in Arizona, over 60 sites have been identified which historically or presently are occupied by breeding pairs. Productivity was determined for about 120 breeding attempts from 1975-85. Almost all sites, for which productivity information is available for two or more years, have hatched young. Average values for fledging success were ca. 1.4 young/attempt for all active sites and ca. 2.3 young/attempt for successful sites. Eggshell thickness values were highly varied, but few samples reflect thinning sufficient to cause reproductive failure, and the population appears to be increasing slightly. Management practices which can further benefit the falcon include: controlling pesticide use, habitat protection, and information management.

  6. Pesticide and transformation product detections and age-dating relations from till and sand deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, K.L.; Morrow, W.S.

    2007-01-01

    Pesticide and transformation product concentrations and frequencies in ground water from areas of similar crop and pesticide applications may vary substantially with differing lithologies. Pesticide analysis data for atrazine, metolachlor, alachlor, acetochlor, and cyanazine and their pesticide transformation products were collected at 69 monitoring wells in Illinois and northern Indiana to document occurrence of pesticides and their transformation products in two agricultural areas of differing lithologies, till, and sand. The till is primarily tile drained and has preferential fractured flow, whereas the sand primarily has surface water drainage and primary porosity flow. Transformation products represent most of the agricultural pesticides in ground water regardless of aquifer material - till or sand. Transformation products were detected more frequently than parent pesticides in both the till and sand, with metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid being most frequently detected. Estimated ground-water recharge dates for the sand were based on chlorofluorocarbon analyses. These age-dating data indicate that ground water recharged prior to 1990 is more likely to have a detection of a pesticide or pesticide transformation product. Detections were twice as frequent in ground water recharged prior to 1990 (82%) than in ground water recharged on or after 1990 (33%). The highest concentrations of atrazine, alachlor, metolachlor, and their transformation products, also were detected in samples from ground water recharged prior to 1990. These age/pesticide detection relations are opposite of what would normally be expected, and may be the result of preferential flow and/or ground-water mixing between aquifers and aquitards as evident by the detection of acetochlor transformation products in samples with estimated ground-water ages predating initial pesticide application. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  7. Chemical degradation of trimethyl phosphate as surrogate for organo-phosporus pesticides on nanostructured metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Štengl, Václav Henych, Jiří; Grygar, Tomáš; Pérez, Raúl

    2015-01-15

    Nanostructured TiO{sub 2} and mixed oxides of Ti and Fe, Hf, In, Mn or Zr -were prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis of aqueous solution of metal sulphates with urea. The oxides were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, particle size distribution, surface area and porosity. The oxide materials consists of a few nanometre primary crystals (mainly anatase) arranged in a few micrometre regular spherical agglomerates with specific surface area 133–511 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. The FTIR diffuse spectroscopy was used for monitoring chemical degradation of trimethylphosphate (TMP) as a surrogate for organo-phosphorus pesticides under ambient and higher temperatures. Undoped TiO{sub 2} and Ti,Mn-mixed oxide were most active in cleavage (hydrolysis) of CH{sub 3}O from TMP at room temperature and 100 °C. Cleavage of CH{sub 3}O in the other studied mixed oxides was not complete until temperature exceeds the boiling point of TMP.

  8. Assessment of model uncertainty during the river export modelling of pesticides and transformation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, Matthias; Olsson, Oliver; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    The modelling of organic pollutants in the environment is burdened by a load of uncertainties. Not only parameter values are uncertain but often also the mass and timing of pesticide application. By introducing transformation products (TPs) into modelling, further uncertainty coming from the dependence of these substances on their parent compounds and the introduction of new model parameters are likely. The purpose of this study was the investigation of the behaviour of a parsimonious catchment scale model for the assessment of river concentrations of the insecticide Chlorpyrifos (CP) and two of its TPs, Chlorpyrifos Oxon (CPO) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) under the influence of uncertain input parameter values. Especially parameter uncertainty and pesticide application uncertainty were investigated by Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) and the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) method, based on Monte-Carlo sampling. GSA revealed that half-lives and sorption parameters as well as half-lives and transformation parameters were correlated to each other. This means, that the concepts of modelling sorption and degradation/transformation were correlated. Thus, it may be difficult in modelling studies to optimize parameter values for these modules. Furthermore, we could show that erroneous pesticide application mass and timing were compensated during Monte-Carlo sampling by changing the half-life of CP. However, the introduction of TCP into the calculation of the objective function was able to enhance identifiability of pesticide application mass. The GLUE analysis showed that CP and TCP were modelled successfully, but CPO modelling failed with high uncertainty and insensitive parameters. We assumed a structural error of the model which was especially important for CPO assessment. This shows that there is the possibility that a chemical and some of its TPs can be modelled successfully by a specific model structure, but for other TPs, the model structure may not be suitable. Concluding, this study confirmed that the introduction of TPs into pesticide fate and export modelling from hydrological catchments amplifies parameter uncertainty and model structure uncertainty.

  9. Bioaccumulation and degradation of pesticide fluroxypyr are associated with toxic tolerance in green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Qiu, Chong Bin; Zhou, You; Jin, Zhen Peng; Yang, Hong

    2011-03-01

    The herbicide fluroxypyr is widely used for controlling weeds and insects but intensive use of fluroxypyr has resulted in its widespread contamination in soils and aquatic ecosystems. To evaluate the eco-toxicity of fluroxypyr to green algae, bioaccumulation and degradation of fluroxypyr in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a model unicellular alga, along with its biological adaptation to fluroxypyr toxicity were investigated. The microalgae were treated with fluroxypyr at 0.05-1.00 mg l(-1) for 2 days or 0.50 mg l(-1) for 1-5 days. The growth of C. reinhardtii was stimulated at low levels of fluroxypyr (0.05-0.5 mg l(-1)) but inhibited at high concentrations (0.75-1.00 mg l(-1)). Fluroxypyr was significantly accumulated by C. reinhardtii. Interestingly, the accumulated fluroxypyr could be rapidly degraded in the cells. On day 5 more than 57% of cellular fluroxypyr was degraded. Our results indicated that accumulation and degradation of fluroxypyr occurred simultaneously. Treatment with 0.05-1.00 mg l(-1) fluroxypyr for 30 min induced significant production of reactive oxygen species and as a consequence resulted in accumulation of peroxides and DNA degradation. Additionally, activities of several major antioxidant enzymes were activated in C. reinhardtii exposed to high levels of fluroxypyr. Overall, the present studies represent the initial comprehensive analyses of the green alga C. reinhardtii in adaptation to the fluroxypyr-contaminated aquatic ecosystems. PMID:21153053

  10. Mechanism and kinetic properties for OH-initiated atmospheric degradation of the organophosphorus pesticide diazinon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Sun, Xiaoyan; Gao, Rui; Hu, Jingtian

    2011-06-01

    Diazinon is a member of the organophosphorus class of insecticides. It has been regarded as an important atmospheric pollutant because of its high detection-frequency in the air and potential adverse effects on humans and wildlife. In this paper, the reaction mechanism and possible degradation products for the OH-initiated atmospheric degradation of diazinon were investigated and the rate constants of crucial elementary steps over the temperature range of 180-370 K were predicted. Present results show that OH addition to C4 atom in the pyrimidyl ring, H abstraction from the -CH- moiety as well as OH addition to P atom are the dominant pathways for the reaction of diazinon with OH radicals. The dominant degradation products are diazoxon, SO 2, P3, CH 3CHO, P4, CH 3CO, P14 as well as CH 3CHCH 3. This work provides a comprehensive investigation of the OH-initiated atmospheric degradation of diazinon and should help to clarify its potential risk to non-targets.

  11. Determination of pesticides and pesticide degradates in filtered water by direct aqueous-injection liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Kanagy, Leslie K.; Anderson, Cyrissa A.; Kanagy, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Mean recoveries of most analytes (223 of 229) were within data-quality objectives of 100±30 percent at spike concentrations above method detection levels (MDLs) in all four matrices. The calculated MDLs ranged from 1 to 103 nanograms per liter (ng/L) for 182 analytes analyzed in the ESI positive mode, and from 2 to 106 ng/L for 42 analytes analyzed in the ESI negative mode. Five analytes had MDLs between 100 and 250 ng/L. The stability studies in reagent water demonstrated that the largest number of the pesticide compounds (227 of 229) were stable after 14 days of storage at 4 degrees Celsius, so these were selected as the practical holding time and storage temperature for routine sample processing. The use of antimicrobial reagent citric acid to adjust the sample pH to about 4 also resulted in lower recoveries of some analytes, so it should not be used as a routine sample preservative.

  12. SORPTION, DEGRADATION, AND MINERALIZATION OF CARBARYL IN SOILS, FOR SINGLE-PESTICIDE AND MULTIPLE-PESTICIDE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption, degradation, and mineralization of carbaryl (1-naphthyl N-methylcarbamate) alone and in mixtures with atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) and diuron (N1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N, N-dimethylurea) were characterized for two topsoils and their re...

  13. Pesticides and Health in Vegetable Production in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Macharia, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of pesticide-related cost of illness (COI) and acute symptoms, using a balanced panel of 363 farmers interviewed from seven major vegetable producing districts of Kenya. Finding shows that the incidences of pesticide-related health impairments have increased. Variation in number of symptoms and symptom severity significantly explained COI. The personal protective equipment (PPE), education level, record keeping, and geographical location considerably determined health impairments. Encouraging the proper use of PPE and record keeping of pesticide use could greatly reduce poisoning cases and COI. PMID:26783515

  14. Determination of Vapor Pressure-Temperature Relationships of Current Use Pesticides and Transformation Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sub-cooled liquid vapor pressures of current use organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos methyl, diazinon, fipronil) and selected transformation products (chlorpyrifos oxon, heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol) were determined at multiple...

  15. DETERMINATION OF HEAVY METALS AND PESTICIDES IN GINSENG PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Medicinal plants may carry residuals of environmentally persistent pesticides or assimilate heavy metals in varying degrees. Several factors may influence contaminant accumulation, including species, level and duration of contaminant exposure, and topography. As part of a progra...

  16. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a halotolerant strain of Penicillium chrysogenum: antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Guedes, Sumaya; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture has prompted intensive research on chemical and biological methods in order to protect contamination of water and soil resources. In this paper the degradation of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was studied in batch cultures. Co-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with additives such as sugar and intermediates of pesticide metabolism was also investigated. Penicillium chrysogenum in solid medium was able to grow at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with sucrose. Meanwhile, supplementation of the solid medium with glucose and lactose led to fungal growth at concentrations up to 500 mg/L of herbicide. Batch cultures of 2,4-D at 100 mg/L were developed under aerobic conditions with the addition of glucose, lactose and sucrose, showing sucrose as the best additional carbon source. The 2,4-D removal was quantified by liquid chromatography. The fungus was able to use 2,4-D as the sole carbon and energy source under 0%, 2% and 5.9% NaCl. The greatest 2,4-D degradation efficiency was found using alpha-ketoglutarate and ascorbic acid as co-substrates under 2% NaCl at pH 7. Penicillin production was evaluated in submerged cultures by bioassay, and higher amounts of beta-lactam antibiotic were produced when the herbicide was alone. Taking into account the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain could be an interesting tool for 2,4-D herbicide remediation in saline environments. PMID:22629643

  17. Low environmentally relevant levels of bioactive xenobiotics and associated degradation products cause cryptic perturbations of metabolism and molecular stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Nuttens, Andréïna; Larvor, Vanessa; Renault, David; Couée, Ivan; Sulmon, Cécile; Gouesbet, Gwenola

    2013-07-01

    Anthropic changes and chemical pollution confront wild plant communities with xenobiotic combinations of bioactive molecules, degradation products, and adjuvants that constitute chemical challenges potentially affecting plant growth and fitness. Such complex challenges involving residual contamination and mixtures of pollutants are difficult to assess. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was confronted by combinations consisting of the herbicide glyphosate, the fungicide tebuconazole, the glyphosate degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), and the atrazine degradation product hydroxyatrazine, which had been detected and quantified in soils of field margins in an agriculturally intensive region. Integrative analysis of physiological, metabolic, and gene expression responses was carried out in dose-response experiments and in comparative experiments of varying pesticide combinations. Field margin contamination levels had significant effects on plant growth and metabolism despite low levels of individual components and the presence of pesticide degradation products. Biochemical and molecular analysis demonstrated that these less toxic degradation products, AMPA and hydroxyatrazine, by themselves elicited significant plant responses, thus indicating underlying mechanisms of perception and transduction into metabolic and gene expression changes. These mechanisms may explain observed interactions, whether positive or negative, between the effects of pesticide products (AMPA and hydroxyatrazine) and the effects of bioactive xenobiotics (glyphosate and tebuconazole). Finally, the metabolic and molecular perturbations induced by low levels of xenobiotics and associated degradation products were shown to affect processes (carbon balance, hormone balance, antioxidant defence, and detoxification) that are likely to determine environmental stress sensitivity. PMID:23645866

  18. Production of apple-based baby food: changes in pesticide residues.

    PubMed

    Kovacova, Jana; Kocourek, Vladimir; Kohoutkova, Jana; Lansky, Miroslav; Hajslova, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Apples represent the main component of most fruit-based baby food products. Since not only fruit from organic farming, but also conventionally grown fruit is used for baby food production, the occurrence of pesticide residues in the final product is of high concern. To learn more about the fate of these hazardous compounds during processing of contaminated raw material, apples containing altogether 21 pesticide residues were used for preparation of a baby food purée both in the household and at industrial scale (in the baby food production facility). Within both studies, pesticide residues were determined in raw apples as well as in final products. Intermediate product and by-product were also analysed during the industrial process. Determination of residues was performed by a sensitive multi-detection analytical method based on liquid or gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The household procedure involved mainly the cooking of unpeeled apples, and the decrease of residues was not extensive enough for most of the studied pesticides; only residues of captan, dithianon and thiram dropped significantly (processing factors less than 0.04). On the other hand, changes in pesticide levels were substantial for all tested pesticides during apple processing in the industrial baby food production facility. The most important operation affecting the reduction of residues was removal of the by-products after pulping (rest of the peel, stem, pips etc.), while subsequent sterilisation has an insignificant effect. Also in this case, captan, dithianon and thiram were identified as pesticides with the most evident decrease of residues. PMID:24720736

  19. PR notice 87-6. Notice to manufacturers, formulators, procedures, and registrants of pesticide products

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    The document is one in the series of Pesticide Regulatory Notices, usually called PR Notices, which supplement the laws and regulations governing pesticide regulation in the US. These notices clarify, interpret and explain regulatory requirements and policies. They are directed at pesticide registrants and other parties interested in detailed procedures of regulation. This notice announces certain policies designed to reduce the potential for adverse effects from the use of pesticide products containing toxic inert ingredients. The agency is encouraging the use of the least toxic inert ingredient available and requiring the development of data necessary to determine the conditions of safe use of products containing toxic inert ingredients. In support of these policies, the Agency has categorized inert ingredients according to toxicity.

  20. [Role of bacterial metabolism in transformation of non-mutagenic compounds into mutagens. II. Participation of bacteria producing urease in degradation of pesticides--urea derivatives].

    PubMed

    Szarapińska-Kwaszewska, J; Mikucki, J

    1992-01-01

    Participation of bacteria producing urease: Proteus mirabilis and Staphylococcus epidermidis in degradation of pesticides--urea derivatives, was investigated. Four new compounds were studies: N-/(3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl/N'-(2-cyanoethyl)-urea (IPO 6584), N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N'-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N'-ethylurea (PO 6236), N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N'-(2-hydroxyethyl), N'-propyl-urea (IPO 6237), N-(2-hydroxyethyl), N-methyl-N'-(3,4 dichlorophenyl)-urea (IPO 3102), pesticide reference standard--thiram fungicide--tetramethyl-bis-thiocarbamyl disulfide, and rodenticide-alpha-naphthylthiourea (ANTU). Investigated compounds were incubated with cells of P. mirabilis 4508 ans S. epidermidis CCM 2448 and commercial preparation of urease from beans. Mutagenicity of resulting metabolites was then studies by the Ames test. All compounds were decomposed by bacteria used in this study, as well with beans urease with different activity. Reaction products did not exhibit mutagenic activity for test strains S. typhimurium his- TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102. PMID:1297032

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A STRUCTURE-SEARCHABLE DATABASE FOR PESTICIDE METABOLITES AND ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA is modifying and enhancing existing software for the depiction of metabolic maps to provide access via structures to metabolism information and associated data in EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP). The database includes information submitted to EPA in support of pest...

  2. Target product profile choices for intra-domiciliary malaria vector control pesticide products: repel or kill?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The most common pesticide products for controlling malaria-transmitting mosquitoes combine two distinct modes of action: 1) conventional insecticidal activity which kills mosquitoes exposed to the pesticide and 2) deterrence of mosquitoes away from protected humans. While deterrence enhances personal or household protection of long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual sprays, it may also attenuate or even reverse communal protection if it diverts mosquitoes to non-users rather than killing them outright. Methods A process-explicit model of malaria transmission is described which captures the sequential interaction between deterrent and toxic actions of vector control pesticides and accounts for the distinctive impacts of toxic activities which kill mosquitoes before or after they have fed upon the occupant of a covered house or sleeping space. Results Increasing deterrency increases personal protection but consistently reduces communal protection because deterrent sub-lethal exposure inevitably reduces the proportion subsequently exposed to higher lethal doses. If the high coverage targets of the World Health Organization are achieved, purely toxic products with no deterrence are predicted to generally provide superior protection to non-users and even users, especially where vectors feed exclusively on humans and a substantial amount of transmission occurs outdoors. Remarkably, this is even the case if that product confers no personal protection and only kills mosquitoes after they have fed. Conclusions Products with purely mosquito-toxic profiles may, therefore, be preferable for programmes with universal coverage targets, rather than those with equivalent toxicity but which also have higher deterrence. However, if purely mosquito-toxic products confer little personal protection because they do not deter mosquitoes and only kill them after they have fed, then they will require aggressive "catch up" campaigns, with behaviour change communication strategies that emphasize the communal nature of protection, to achieve high coverage rapidly. PMID:21798023

  3. Infusion fluids contain harmful glucose degradation products

    PubMed Central

    Bryland, Anna; Broman, Marcus; Erixon, Martin; Klarin, Bengt; Lindén, Torbjörn; Friberg, Hans; Wieslander, Anders; Kjellstrand, Per; Ronco, Claudio; Carlsson, Ola

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Glucose degradation products (GDPs) are precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that cause cellular damage and inflammation. We examined the content of GDPs in commercially available glucose-containing infusion fluids and investigated whether GDPs are found in patients’ blood. Methods The content of GDPs was examined in infusion fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. To investigate whether GDPs also are found in patients, we included 11 patients who received glucose fluids (standard group) during and after their surgery and 11 control patients receiving buffered saline (control group). Blood samples were analyzed for GDP content and carboxymethyllysine (CML), as a measure of AGE formation. The influence of heat-sterilized fluids on cell viability and cell function upon infection was investigated. Results All investigated fluids contained high concentrations of GDPs, such as 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG). Serum concentration of 3-DG increased rapidly by a factor of eight in patients receiving standard therapy. Serum CML levels increased significantly and showed linear correlation with the amount of infused 3-DG. There was no increase in serum 3-DG or CML concentrations in the control group. The concentration of GDPs in most of the tested fluids damaged neutrophils, reducing their cytokine secretion, and inhibited microbial killing. Conclusions These findings indicate that normal standard fluid therapy involves unwanted infusion of GDPs. Reduction of the content of GDPs in commonly used infusion fluids may improve cell function, and possibly also organ function, in intensive-care patients. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-1873-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20397009

  4. DETERMINATION OF AZOXYSTROBIN AND DIFENOCONAZOLE IN PESTICIDE PRODUCTS.

    PubMed

    Lazić, S; Šunjka, D

    2015-01-01

    In this study a high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC-DAD) procedure has been developed for the simultaneous determination of azoxystrobin and difenoconazole in suspension concentrate pesticide formulations, with the aim of the product quality control. Azoxystrobin, strobilurin fungicide and difenoconazole (cis,trans-3-chloro-4-[4-methyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl]phenyl 4-chlorophenyl ether), triazole fungicide, are used for the protection of plants from wide spectrum of fungal diseases. For the analysis LC system an Agilent Technologies 1100 Series was used. Good separation was achieved on a Zorbax SB-C18 column (5 μm, 250 mm x 3 mm internal diameter) using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile/ultrapure water (90:10, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.9 ml/minute and UV detection at 218 nm. Column temperature was 25 degrees C, injected volume was 1 μl. Retention times for azoxystrobin and difenoconazole were 2.504 min and 1.963 min, respectively. This method is validated according to the requirements for new methods, which include linearity, precision, accuracy and selectivity. The method demonstrates good linearity with r2 > 0.997. The repeatability of the method, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD, %), was found to be 1.9% for azoxystrobin and 0.5% for difenoconazole. The precision of the method was also considered to be acceptable as the experimental repeatability relative standard deviation (RSD) was lower than the RSD calculated using the Horwitz equation of 1.7% and 1.4% for azoxystrobin and difenoconazole, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was determined from recovery experiments through standard addition procedure. The average recoveries of the three fortification levels were 101.9% for azoxystrobin and 103.2% for difenoconazole with RSDs of 1.1% and 1.2%. The method described in this paper is simple, precise, accurate and selective and represents a new and reliable way of simultaneous determination of azoxystrobin and difenoconazole in formulated products. PMID:27141734

  5. SAFE PESTICIDES/SAFE PRODUCTS MULTI-YEAR PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Additional research on pesticides and toxics provides results that support the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). EPA's multi-year research plan establishes four long-term goals, designed to enhance the Agency's Off...

  6. Particulate and gas-phase products from the atmospheric degradation of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás, Esther; Ródenas, Milagros; Vázquez, Mónica; Vera, Teresa; Muñoz, Amalia

    2015-12-01

    The phosphorothioate structure is highly present in several pesticides. However, there is a lack of information about its degradation process in air and the secondary pollutants formed. Herein, the atmospheric reactions of chlorpyrifos, one of the most world-used insecticide, and its main degradation product - chlorpyrifos-oxon - are described. The photo-oxidation under the presence of NOx was studied in a large outdoor simulation chamber for both chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon, observing a rapid degradation (Half lifetime < 3.5 h for both compounds). Also, the photolysis reactions of both were studied. The formation of particulate matter (aerosol mass yield ranged 6-59%) and gaseous products were monitored. The chemical composition of minor products was studied, identifying 15 multi-oxygenated derivatives. The most abundant products were ring-retaining molecules such as 3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-ol and ethyl 3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-yl hydrogen phosphate. An atmospheric degradation mechanism has been amplified based on an oxidation started with OH-nucleophilic attack to Pdbnd S bond.

  7. EXPOSURE OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN TO CHLORPYRIFOS AND ITS DEGRADATION PRODUCT 3,5,6-TRICHLORO-2-PYRIDINOL IN THEIR EVERYDAY ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) study, we investigated the exposures of preschool children to chlorpyrifos and its degradation product 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) in their everyday environment...

  8. National Pesticide Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    National Pesticide Information Center npic@ace.orst.edu 1.800.858.7378 Index A B C D E F ... Your Pest Control Your Pest Integrated Pest Management Pesticide Ingredients Active Ingredients Other/Inert Ingredients Pesticide Products ...

  9. Degradation of the pesticide carbofuran on clay and soil surfaces upon sunlight exposure.

    PubMed

    Mountacer, H; Atifi, A; Wong-Wah-Chung, P; Sarakha, M

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the photolysis of carbofuran has been undertaken under sunlight conditions and at the surface of model supports such as clay films and different soils collected from two different sites in Morocco (Tirs and Dahs). In all conditions, an efficient degradation occurred owing to direct light absorption and also to photoinduced processes involving either clays or natural organic matter moities. On kaolin films, the photodegradation kinetics appears to follow a first-order process that clearly depends on the film thickness. The diffusion of carbofuran from the lower part to the illuminated surface was found to be negligible when compared to the photolysis process within the range of 20-70 μm. Thus, the photolysis rate constant at the surface of the solid support, k (0), was evaluated to be 7.0 × 10(-3) min(-1). Under these experimental conditions, the quantum yield was found equal to 2.1 × 10(-4). On soil surfaces, the disappearance rate constant was mainly attributed to photoinduced processes arising from natural organic matter. From the analytical point of view, the products were formed through (1) hydroxylation on the aromatic ring, (2) homolytic scission of the carbamate C-O bond leading to radical species formation, and (3) photohydrolysis of the carbamate C-O bond. PMID:24243162

  10. 40 CFR 158.2030 - Biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chemistry data requirements table. 158.2030 Section 158.2030 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 158.2030 Biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. (a) General. (1) Sections 158.100 through 158.130 describe how to use this table to determine the product chemistry...

  11. 40 CFR 158.2030 - Biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chemistry data requirements table. 158.2030 Section 158.2030 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 158.2030 Biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. (a) General. (1) Sections 158.100 through 158.130 describe how to use this table to determine the product chemistry...

  12. 40 CFR 158.2030 - Biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chemistry data requirements table. 158.2030 Section 158.2030 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 158.2030 Biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. (a) General. (1) Sections 158.100 through 158.130 describe how to use this table to determine the product chemistry...

  13. 40 CFR 158.2030 - Biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chemistry data requirements table. 158.2030 Section 158.2030 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 158.2030 Biochemical pesticides product chemistry data requirements table. (a) General. (1) Sections 158.100 through 158.130 describe how to use this table to determine the product chemistry...

  14. Research of the degradation products of chitosan's angiogenic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianyun; Chen, Yuanwei; Ding, Yulong; Shi, Guoqi; Wan, Changxiu

    2008-11-01

    Angiogenesis is of great importance in tissue engineering and has gained large attention in the past decade. But how it will be influenced by the biodegradable materials, especially their degradation products, remains unknown. Chitosan (CS) is a kind of naturally occurred polysaccharide which can be degraded in physiological environment. In order to gain some knowledge of the influences of CS degradation products on angiogenesis, the interaction of vascular endothelial cells with the degradation products was investigated in the present study. The CS degradation products were prepared by keeping CS sample in physiological saline aseptically at 37 °C for 120 days. Endothelial cells were co-cultured with the degradation products and the angiogenic cell behaviors, including cell proliferation, migration and tube-like structure (TLS) formation, were tested by MTT assay, cell migration quantification method (CMQM), and tube-like structure quantification method (TLSQM) respectively. Furthermore, mRNA expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metallo proteinase (MMP-2) were determined by real-time reverse transcriptional polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Physiological saline served as a negative control. As the results showed, the degradation products obtained from 20th to 60th day significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration, and TLS formation of endothelial cells. However, degradation products of the first 14 days and the last 30 days were found to be proangiogenic. At the molecular level, the initial results indicated that the mRNA expressions of VEGF and MMP-2 were increased by the degradation products of 7th day, but were decreased by the ones of 60th day. According to all the results, it could be concluded that the angiogenic behaviors of endothelial cells at both cellular and molecular level could be significantly stimulated or suppressed by the degradation products of CS and the influences are quite time-dependent.

  15. Variation in pesticide hazard from vegetable production in Great Britain from 1991 to 2003.

    PubMed

    Cross, Paul; Edwards-Jones, Gareth

    2006-11-01

    Pesticides pose a difficult problem for policy makers as society generally seeks to reduce any adverse impacts of their use, while industry claims they are important contributors to economic success. Attempts to direct policy according to scientific findings are hampered by the multidimensionality of the potential impacts of pesticides which may affect consumers, operators, wildlife and the environment. Pesticide risk indices seek to reduce these multidimensional impacts into a single dimension and have been increasingly used to understand variation in the hazard posed by pesticides at both field and regional level. This study uses one such risk index, the environmental impact quotient (EIQ), to estimate the hazard posed by pesticide usage from 1991 to 2003 on several vegetable crops grown in the UK. Results are reported for the EIQ and for the environmental impact (EI) for brassicas, peas, beans, onions, leeks, lettuce and endives. The EIQ is a dimensionless estimate of the toxicity of a product, while the EI, which combines the EIQ with data on actual usage, estimates the overall hazard of the use of a product. The exact trends in EIQ and EI varied with crop over the period 1991-2003, but overall the EIQ decreased by 19% and the EI decreased by 34%. However, the mean EI per hectare decreased by only 3%. This suggests that some of the observed reduction in EI at the national level may be related more to decrease in crop area than changes in pesticide use and management. If these observed losses in crop area are being replaced by vegetable imports from overseas, then this raises the possibility that the UK is effectively exporting any problems related to pesticide use. The ethics of this remain unclear. PMID:16886234

  16. Rapid detection of chlorpyrifos pesticide residue concentration in agro-product using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Peng, Yankun; Li, Yongyu; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Zhang, Leilei; Xu, Tianfeng

    2014-05-01

    Different chemicals are sprayed in fruits and vegetables before and after harvest for better yield and longer shelf-life of crops. Cases of pesticide poisoning to human health are regularly reported due to excessive application of such chemicals for greater economic benefit. Different analytical technologies exist to detect trace amount of pesticides in fruits and vegetables, but are expensive, sample destructive, and require longer processing time. This study explores the application of Raman spectroscopy for rapid and non-destructive detection of pesticide residue in agricultural products. Raman spectroscopy with laser module of 785 nm was used to collect Raman spectral information from the surface of Gala apples contaminated with different concentrations of commercially available organophosphorous (48% chlorpyrifos) pesticide. Apples within 15 days of harvest from same orchard were used in this study. The Raman spectral signal was processed by Savitzky-Golay (SG) filter for noise removal, Multiplicative Scatter Correction (MSC) for drift removal and finally polynomial fitting was used to eliminate the fluorescence background. The Raman spectral peak at 677 cm-1 was recognized as Raman fingerprint of chlorpyrifos. Presence of Raman peak at 677 cm-1 after fluorescence background removal was used to develop classification model (presence and absence of pesticide). The peak intensity was correlated with actual pesticide concentration obtained using Gas Chromatography and MLR prediction model was developed with correlation coefficient of calibration and validation of 0.86 and 0.81 respectively. Result shows that Raman spectroscopy is a promising tool for rapid, real-time and non-destructive detection of pesticide residue in agro-products.

  17. Pesticide residues in grapes, wine, and their processing products.

    PubMed

    Cabras, P; Angioni, A

    2000-04-01

    In this review the results obtained in the 1990s from research on the behavior of pesticide residues on grapes, from treatment to harvest, and their fate in drying, wine-making, and alcoholic beverage processing are reported. The fungicide residues on grapes (cyproconazole, hexaconazole, kresoxim-methyl, myclobutanil, penconazole, tetraconazole, and triadimenol), the application rates of which were of a few tens of grams per hectare, were very low after treatment and were not detectable at harvest. Pyrimethanil residues were constant up to harvest, whereas fluazinam, cyprodinil, mepanipyrim, azoxystrobin, and fludioxonil showed different disappearance rates (t(1/2) = 4.3, 12, 12.8, 15.2, and 24 days, respectively). The decay rate of the organophosphorus insecticides was very fast with t(1/2) ranging between 0.97 and 3.84 days. The drying process determined a fruit concentration of 4 times. Despite this, the residue levels of benalaxyl, phosalone, metalaxyl, and procymidone on sun-dried grapes equalled those on the fresh grape, whereas they were higher for iprodione (1.6 times) and lower for vinclozolin and dimethoate (one-third and one-fifth, respectively). In the oven-drying process, benalaxyl, metalaxyl, and vinclozolin showed the same residue value in the fresh and dried fruit, whereas iprodione and procymidone resides were lower in raisins than in the fresh fruit. The wine-making process begins with the pressing of grapes. From this moment onward, because the pesticide on the grape surface comes into contact with the must, it is in a biphasic system, made up of a liquid phase (the must) and a solid phase (cake and lees), and will be apportioned between the two phases. The new fungicides have shown no effect on alcoholic or malolactic fermentation. In some cases the presence of pesticides has also stimulated the yeasts, especially Kloeckera apiculata, to produce more alcohol. After fermentation, pesticide residues in wine were always smaller than those on the grapes and in the must, except for those pesticides that did not have a preferential partition between liquid and solid phase (azoxystrobin, dimethoate, and pyrimethanil) and were present in wine at the same concentration as on the grapes. In some cases (mepanipyrim, fluazinam, and chlorpyrifos) no detectable residues were found in the wines at the end of fermentation. From a comparison of residues in wine obtained by vinification with and without skins, it can be seen that their values were generally not different. Among the clarifying substances commonly used in wine (bentonite, charcoal, gelatin, polyvinylpolypyrrolidone, potassium caseinate, and colloidal silicon dioxide), charcoal allowed the complete elimination of most pesticides, especially at low levels, whereas the other clarifying substances were ineffective. Wine and its byproducts (cake and lees) are used in the industry to produce alcohol and alcoholic beverages. Fenthion, quinalphos, and vinclozolin pass into the distillate from the lees only if present at very high concentrations, but with a very low transfer percantage (2, 1, and 0.1%, respectively). No residue passed from the cake into the distillate, whereas fenthion and vinclozolin pass from the wine, but only at low transfer percentages (13 and 5%, respectively). PMID:10775335

  18. Eleven-year trend in acetanilide pesticide degradates in the Iowa River, Iowa.

    PubMed

    Kalkhoff, Stephen J; Vecchia, Aldo V; Capel, Paul D; Meyer, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Trends in concentration and loads of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor and their ethanasulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OXA) acid degradates were studied from 1996 through 2006 in the main stem of the Iowa River, Iowa and in the South Fork Iowa River, a small tributary near the headwaters of the Iowa River. Concentration trends were determined using the parametric regression model SEAWAVE-Q, which accounts for seasonal and flow-related variability. Daily estimated concentrations generated from the model were used with daily streamflow to calculate daily and yearly loads. Acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor, and their ESA and OXA degradates were generally present in >50% of the samples collected from both sites throughout the study. Their concentrations generally decreased from 1996 through 2006, although the rate of decrease was slower after 2001. Concentrations of the ESA and OXA degradates decreased from 3 to about 23% yr. The concentration trend was related to the decreasing use of these compounds during the study period. Decreasing concentrations and constant runoff resulted in an average reduction of 10 to >3000 kg per year of alachlor and metolachlor ESA and OXA degradates being transported out of the Iowa River watershed. Transport of acetochlor and metolachlor parent compounds and their degradates from the Iowa River watershed ranged from <1% to about 6% of the annual application. These trends were related to the decreasing use of these compounds during the study period, but the year-to-year variability cannot explain changes in loads based on herbicide use alone. The trends were also affected by the timing and amount of precipitation. As expected, increased amounts of water moving through the watershed moved a greater percentage of the applied herbicides, especially the relatively soluble degradates, from the soils into the rivers through surface runoff, shallow groundwater inflow, and subsurface drainage. PMID:23099949

  19. Eleven-year trend in acetanilide pesticide degradates in the Iowa River, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, Stephen J.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Capel, Paul D.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Trends in concentration and loads of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor and their ethanasulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OXA) acid degradates were studied from 1996 through 2006 in the main stem of the Iowa River, Iowa and in the South Fork Iowa River, a small tributary near the headwaters of the Iowa River. Concentration trends were determined using the parametric regression model SEAWAVE-Q, which accounts for seasonal and flow-related variability. Daily estimated concentrations generated from the model were used with daily streamflow to calculate daily and yearly loads. Acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor, and their ESA and OXA degradates were generally present in >50% of the samples collected from both sites throughout the study. Their concentrations generally decreased from 1996 through 2006, although the rate of decrease was slower after 2001. Concentrations of the ESA and OXA degradates decreased from 3 to about 23% yr-1. The concentration trend was related to the decreasing use of these compounds during the study period. Decreasing concentrations and constant runoff resulted in an average reduction of 10 to >3000 kg per year of alachlor and metolachlor ESA and OXA degradates being transported out of the Iowa River watershed. Transport of acetochlor and metolachlor parent compounds and their degradates from the Iowa River watershed ranged from <1% to about 6% of the annual application. These trends were related to the decreasing use of these compounds during the study period, but the year-to-year variability cannot explain changes in loads based on herbicide use alone. The trends were also affected by the timing and amount of precipitation. As expected, increased amounts of water moving through the watershed moved a greater percentage of the applied herbicides, especially the relatively soluble degradates, from the soils into the rivers through surface runoff, shallow groundwater inflow, and subsurface drainage.

  20. 78 FR 21945 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications To Register New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ...This notice announces receipt of applications to register new uses for pesticide products containing currently registered active ingredients pursuant to the provisions of section 3(c) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), as amended. This notice provides the public with an opportunity to comment on the...

  1. 78 FR 78356 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications To Register New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...This notice announces receipt of applications to register new uses for pesticide products containing currently registered active ingredients pursuant to the provisions of section 3(c) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), as amended. This notice provides the public with an opportunity to comment on the...

  2. 77 FR 13599 - Pesticide Products; Receipt of Applications To Register New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ...This notice announces receipt of applications to register new uses for pesticide products containing currently registered active ingredients, pursuant to the provisions of section 3(c) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), as amended. EPA is publishing this Notice of such applications, pursuant to section 3(c)(4) of...

  3. Development of smart spray systems to enhance delivery of pesticides in field nursery production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two smart sprayer prototypes have been developed and are being evaluated with a goal of increasing pesticide application efficiency and minimizing environmental impact in field nursery production sites. The first prototype, a modified hydraulic vertical boom system, utilizes ultrasonic sensors to d...

  4. 76 FR 69732 - Pesticide Products; Receipt of Applications To Register New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...This notice announces receipt of applications to register new uses for pesticide products containing currently registered active ingredients, pursuant to the provisions of section 3(c) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), as amended. EPA is publishing this notice of such applications, pursuant to section 3(c)(4) of...

  5. 76 FR 69730 - Pesticide Products; Receipt of Applications to Register New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...This notice announces receipt of applications to register new uses for pesticide products containing currently registered active ingredients, pursuant to the provisions of section 3(c) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), as amended. EPA is publishing this Notice of applications, pursuant to section 3(c)(4) of...

  6. Field solar degradation of pesticides and emerging water contaminants mediated by polymer films containing titanium and iron oxide with synergistic heterogeneous photocatalytic activity at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Mazille, F; Schoettl, T; Klamerth, N; Malato, S; Pulgarin, C

    2010-05-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of phenol, nalidixic acid, mixture of pesticides, and another of emerging contaminants in water was mediated by TiO(2) and iron oxide immobilized on functionalized polyvinyl fluoride films (PVF(f)-TiO(2)-Fe oxide) in a compound parabolic collector (CPC) solar photoreactor. During degradation, little iron leaching (<0.2mgL(-1)) was observed. Phenol was efficiently degraded and mineralized at operational pH<5 and nalidixic acid degradation was complete even at pH 7, but mineralization stopped at 35%. Pesticide mixture was slowly degraded (50%) after 150min of irradiation. Degradation of the emergent contaminant mixture was successful for eight compounds and less efficient for six other compounds. The significant reactivity differences between tested compounds were assigned to the differences in structure namely that the presence of complexing or chelating groups enhanced the rates. PVF(f)-TiO(2)-Fe oxide photoactivity gradually increased during 20 days of experiments. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements revealed significant changes on the catalyst surface. These analyses confirm that during photocatalysis mediated by PVF(f)-TiO(2)-Fe oxide, some iron leaching led to enlargement of the TiO(2) surface exposed to light, increasing its synergy with iron oxides and leading to enhanced pollutant degradation. PMID:20362319

  7. Sorption of pesticides by a mineral sand mining by-product, neutralised used acid (NUA).

    PubMed

    Oliver, Danielle P; Pan, Yi Fong; Anderson, Jenny S; Lin, Tsair Fuh; Kookana, Rai S; Douglas, Grant B; Wendling, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the sorption-desorption behaviour of four pesticides by a by-product from mineral sand mining, commonly referred to as neutralised used acid (NUA). In batch studies the average amount of pesticide removed after 6h was 69% for atrazine, 89% for diuron, 61% for 2,4-D and 83% for chlorpyrifos. The lower sorption of 2,4-D to NUA compared with the other pesticides studied is most likely to be due to the high pH of the solutions (7.8 to 8.8) which would have resulted in 2,4-D being predominantly in an anionic form. The presence of other pesticides only significantly decreased the amount of 2,4-D sorbed from 59% to 34% when present in a mixture. Little (2 to 17%) diuron, chlorpyrifos, atrazine or 2,4-D were found to desorb from the NUA. The presence of nitrate or phosphate had minimal effect on the amount of diuron or atrazine sorbed to the NUA. However, all phosphate and nitrate treatments significantly (P<0.05) decreased the amount of 2,4-D sorbed (<50%) compared with when 2,4-D was present alone (65%). This study has shown that NUA has potential to be used as a sorbent for pesticides. PMID:23178829

  8. Organophosphorus (OP) Pesticide Degradation in the Presence of Chlorinated Oxidants: Kinetics, Modeling, and Structure-Activity Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rates and pathways for pesticide transformation during drinking water treatment are known for only a few pesticides and under limited conditions. The resulting oxons are more toxic than the parent pesticides. The transformation rates and pathways for chlorpyrifos, an OP pest...

  9. The austral peregrine falcon: Color variation, productivity, and pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The austral peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus cassini) was studied in the Andean foot- hills and across the Patagonian steppe from November to December 1981. The birds under study (18 pairs) were reproducing at or near normal (pre-DDT) levels for other races. Pesticide residues, while elevated, were well below the values associated with reproductive failure in other populations. With one exception, eggshells were not abnormally thin. The peregrine falcon in Patagonia exhibits extreme color variation. Pallid birds are nearly pure white below (light cream as juveniles), whereas normally pigmented birds are black-crowned and conspicuously barred with black ventrally. Rare individuals of the Normal Phase display black heads, broad black ventral barring, and warm reddish-brown ventral background coloration.

  10. Novel Chryseobacterium sp. PYR2 degrades various organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and achieves enhancing removal and complete degradation of DDT in highly contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jie; Xu, Yang; Ai, Guo-Min; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2015-09-15

    Long term residues of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in soils are of great concerning because they seriously threaten food security and human health. This article focuses on isolation of OCP-degrading strains and their performance in bioremediation of contaminated soil under ex situ conditions. A bacterium, Chryseobacterium sp. PYR2, capable of degrading various OCPs and utilizing them as a sole carbon and energy source for growth, was isolated from OCP-contaminated soil. In culture experiments, PYR2 degraded 80-98% of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) or 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis (4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) isomers (50 mg L(-1)) in 30 days. A pilot-scale ex situ bioremediation study of highly OCP-contaminated soil augmented with PYR2 was performed. During the 45-day experimental period, DDT concentration was reduced by 80.3% in PYR2-augmented soils (35.37 mg kg(-1) to 6.97 mg kg(-1)) but by only 57.6% in control soils. Seven DDT degradation intermediates (metabolites) were detected and identified in PYR2-augmented soils: five by GC/MS: 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDD), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (4-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDE), 1-chloro-2,2-bis (4-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDMU), 1-chloro-2,2-bis (4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDMS), and dichlorobenzophenone (DBP); and two by LC/MS: 4-chlorobenzoic acid (PCBA) and 4-chlorophenylacetic acid (PCPA). Levels of metabolites were fairly stable in control soils but varied greatly with time in PYR2-augmented soils. Levels of DDD, DDMU, and DDE in PYR2-augmented soils increased from day 0 to day 30 and then decreased by day 45. A DDT biodegradation pathway is proposed based on our identification of DDT metabolites in PYR2-augmented systems. PYR2 will be useful in future studies of OCP biodegradation and in bioremediation of OCP-contaminated soils. PMID:26203874

  11. Surface water pesticide modelling for decision support in drinking water production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, Nele; Dams, Jef; Bronders, Jan; Peleman, Gisèle; Verdickt, Liesbeth

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of pesticides and other contaminants in river systems may compromise the use of surface water for drinking water production. To reduce the cost of removal of pesticides from the raw water, drinking water companies can: search for other raw water sources, invest in water storage capacity to overcome periods with high pesticide concentrations (often related to the application period), or impose measures to reduce the emission of pesticides to surface water (i.e. sustainable application strategies or use restrictions). To select the most appropriate water management options, the costs and effects of the aforementioned actions need to be evaluated. This evaluation requires knowledge on the concentrations and loads of pesticides at the point of drinking water abstraction, as well as insight in the contribution and the temporal variability of different sources or subbasins. In such a case, a modelling approach can assist in generating measurement-based datasets and to compare different scenarios for water management. We illustrate how a modelling approach can provide decision support for water management related to drinking water abstraction from surface water in a catchment that suffers from elevated pesticide concentrations. The study area is a water production center (WPC) located in northwestern Belgium. The WPC abstracts raw water from the river IJzer or from a natural pond and its connected streams. The available quantities as well as the quality of the water vary throughout the year. The WPC uses a reservoir of 3 million m³ to capture and store raw water to overcome periods with limited water availability and/or poor water quality. However, the pressure on water increases and in the future this buffering capacity might be no longer sufficient to fulfill the drinking water production demand. A surface water quality model for the area is set up using InfoWorks RS. The model is applied to obtain insight in the concentrations and loads at the different points of drinking water abstraction (river IJzer and Blankaart pond), the contribution of the subbasins, and the seasonal dynamics. The model is also applied for scenario analysis related to water management and varying climatological conditions. Especially in summer, the availability of raw water of good quality for the WPC is limited. The discharge of the river IJzer is low and a minimum level is required for navigation, and the pond is part of a nature reserve where a minimum water level is imposed for conservation of aquatic habitats, and application of pesticides on the surrounding agricultural lands results in high pesticide concentrations (e.g. bentazon > 1µg/L).

  12. Gas-phase and particulate products from the atmospheric degradation of an isoxazole fungicide.

    PubMed

    Tortajada-Genaro, Luis Antonio; Borrás, Esther; Muñoz, Amalia

    2013-08-01

    The isoxazole structure is present in several pesticides. However, there is a lack of information about its degradation products after the release to the atmosphere. The main atmospheric reactions of hymexazol (5-methylisoxazol-3-ol), selected as representative model, were investigated at a large outdoor simulation chamber. The predominant products of atmospheric degradations were gaseous nitrogen derivates (nitric acid, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxide, nitrous acid, and peroxyacetylnitrate), ozone, and small oxygenated compounds (formic acid, formaldehyde, and methylglyoxal). The aerosol yields were lower than 5%, and an OH rate-dependence was observed in the nucleation, particle growth, and size distribution. Also, the chemical composition of minor multi-oxygenated products was studied for OH-photo-oxidations. More than 20 products were detected in the gas or particulate phase. The most abundant were heterocyclic cleavage products with C4-chain and oxygenated moieties at positions 1 and 3, such as 3,4-dioxobutanoic acid, 3-oxobutanoic acid, and 3-oxobutanal. The suggested reaction pathway is the opening of heterocycle ring by the cleavage of N-O bond and C-N bond, releasing nitrogen oxides. PMID:23602658

  13. Pesticide Movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pesticides generally include herbicides, insecticides and fungicides that play an important role in maintaining worldwide food and fiber production by controlling weeds that compete for water and nutrients or by eliminating pests that reduce yields. In the future, the role of pesticides and fertili...

  14. Multiresidue method for the quantitation of 20 pesticides in aquatic products.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ha Ra; Park, Jun Seo; Kim, Junghyun; Han, Sang Beom; Choi, Yong Seok

    2015-12-01

    As the consumption of aquatic products increased, the need for regulation of pesticide residues in aquatic products also emerged. Thus, in this study, a scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (sMRM) method employing a novel extraction and purification step based on QuEChERS with EDTA was developed for the simultaneous quantitation of 20 pesticides (alachlor, aldicarb, carbofuran, diazinon, dimethoate, dimethomorph, ethoprophos, ferimzone, fluridone, hexaconazole, iprobenfos, malathion, methidathion, methiocarb, phenthoate, phosalone, phosmet, phosphamidon, pirimicarb, and simazine) in aquatic products. Additionally, the present method was validated in the aspects of specificity, linearity (r ≥ 0.980), sensitivity (the limit of quantitation (LOQ) ≤ 5 ng/g), relative standard deviation, RSD (1.0% ≤ RSD ≤ 19.4%), and recovery (60.1% ≤ recovery ≤ 117.9%). Finally, the validated method was applied for the determination of the 20 pesticide residues in eel and shrimp purchased from local food markets. In the present study, QuEChERS with EDTA was successfully expanded to residual pesticide analysis for the first time. The present method could contribute to the rapid and successful establishment of the positive list system in South Korea. PMID:26466578

  15. Computational Enzymology and Organophosphorus Degrading Enzymes: Promising Approaches Toward Remediation Technologies of Warfare Agents and Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Teodorico C; de Castro, Alexandre A; Silva, Daniela R; Cristina Silva, Maria; Franca, Tanos C C; Bennion, Brian J; Kuca, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    The re-emergence of chemical weapons as a global threat in hands of terrorist groups, together with an increasing number of pesticides intoxications and environmental contaminations worldwide, has called the attention of the scientific community for the need of improvement in the technologies for detoxification of organophosphorus (OP) compounds. A compelling strategy is the use of bioremediation by enzymes that are able to hydrolyze these molecules to harmless chemical species. Several enzymes have been studied and engineered for this purpose. However, their mechanisms of action are not well understood. Theoretical investigations may help elucidate important aspects of these mechanisms and help in the development of more efficient bio-remediators. In this review, we point out the major contributions of computational methodologies applied to enzyme based detoxification of OPs. Furthermore, we highlight the use of PTE, PON, DFP, and BuChE as enzymes used in OP detoxification process and how computational tools such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations and combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics have and will continue to contribute to this very important area of research. PMID:26898655

  16. Toxicity of pesticides associated with potato production, including soil fumigants, to snapping turtle eggs (Chelydra serpentina).

    PubMed

    de Solla, Shane Raymond; Palonen, Kimberley Elizabeth; Martin, Pamela Anne

    2014-01-01

    Turtles frequently oviposit in soils associated with agriculture and, thus, may be exposed to pesticides or fertilizers. The toxicity of a pesticide regime that is used for potato production in Ontario on the survivorship of snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) eggs was evaluated. The following treatments were applied to clean soil: 1) a mixture of the pesticides chlorothalonil, S-metolachlor, metribuzin, and chlorpyrifos, and 2) the soil fumigant metam sodium. Turtle eggs were incubated in soil in outdoor plots in which these mixtures were applied at typical and higher field application rates, where the eggs were subject to ambient temperature and weather conditions. The pesticide mixture consisting of chlorothalonil, S-metolachlor, metribuzin, and chlorpyrifos did not affect survivorship, deformities, or body size at applications up to 10 times the typical field application rates. Hatching success ranged between 87% and 100% for these treatments. Metam sodium was applied at 0.1¯ times, 0.3¯ times, 1 times, and 3 times field application rates. Eggs exposed to any application of metam sodium had 100% mortality. At typical field application rates, the chemical regime associated with potato production does not appear to have any detrimental impacts on turtle egg development, except for the use of the soil fumigant metam sodium, which is highly toxic to turtle eggs at the lowest recommended application rate. PMID:24105794

  17. Screening of nerve agent degradation products by MALDI-TOFMS.

    PubMed

    Shu, You-Ren; Su, An-Kai; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2006-07-01

    A novel method for the rapid screening of degradation products derived from nerve agents by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is described. Five standard products were selected as model compounds, including isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA), pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid (PMPA), ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA), isobutyl methylphosphonic acid (i-BuMPA), and cyclohexyl methylphosphonic acid (CHMPA), which are degradation products of Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), VX, Russian VX (RVX), and GF, respectively. For comparison, CHCA (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) and DCCA (7-(diethylamino)coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) were used as the MALDI-matrix when the third harmonic generation (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser and a hydrogen Raman laser (multifrequency laser) were used, respectively. The method permitted the five nerve agent degradation products to be screened rapidly and successfully, suggesting that it has the potential for use as a routine monitoring tool. PMID:16808484

  18. Dioxin/POPs legacy of pesticide production in Hamburg: part 1--securing of the production area.

    PubMed

    Weber, Roland; Varbelow, Hans Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    ?-Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), ?-HCH, and ?-HCH (lindane) were recently included as new persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Stockholm Convention. Therefore, the chemicals need to be globally addressed, including the disposal of historic wastes. At most sites, the approximately 85% of HCH waste isomers were dumped. At a former lindane factory in Hamburg and some other factories the HCH, waste was recycled producing residues with high polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/PCDF) levels. The soil and ground water under the former pesticide factory was/is highly contaminated with HCH (260 tons), chlorobenzenes (550 tons), and PCDD/PCDF (6 kg toxic equivalents (TEQ)). This contamination did not result from disposal operations but from spillages and leakages during the 30 years of the factory's production history. A containment wall has been constructed around the production area to prevent the dispersal of the pollutants. The ground water is managed by a pump and treat system. Over the last 15 years, approximately 10-30 tons of this pollution reservoir has been pumped and incinerated. For the contaminated production buildings, specific assessment and demolition technologies have been applied. In addition to their HCH waste isomer deposition, former lindane/HCH productions need to be assessed for possible recycling practice of HCH and related PCDD/PCDF contamination of the production area and buildings. Since such recycling activities have taken place at several factories in different countries, the experience of assessment and management of the described production area and contaminated buildings could be valuable. Such assessment could be addressed within the frame of the Stockholm Convention. PMID:22777609

  19. Qualitative Profiling of Polyglucose Degradation Products in Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids.

    PubMed

    Gensberger, Sabrina; Knabner, Carina; Waibel, Reiner; Huppert, Jochen; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2015-06-16

    Heat sterilization of peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids leads to partial degradation of the osmotic agent to form reactive carbonyl structures, which significantly reduce the biocompatibility of PD fluids and impair long-term PD therapy. Hence, it is important to know the exact composition of the degradation products to improve biocompatibility of PD fluids. Our study conducted targeted screening for degradation products in polyglucose (icodextrin)-containing PD fluids (pGDPs) by applying o-phenylenediamine (OPD) to form stable derivatives, which were analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with hyphenated diode array tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-DAD-MS/MS). For the first time, specific degradation products of polyglucose, namely, 4-deoxyglucosone (4-DG) and 3,4-dideoxypentosone (3,4-DDPS), could be identified in PD fluids. Further, a reaction product of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and OPD could be characterized to be (5-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)furan-2-yl)methanol. Additionally, 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) and 3-deoxygalactosone (3-DGal), both known to be present in glucose-based PD fluids, were also detected in polyglucose-containing fluids. Trapping a hitherto unknown degradation product with OPD yielded 1,4-bis(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-3,4-dihydroxybutan-1-one, which was present in heat- as well as filter-sterilized PD fluids. PMID:25970747

  20. 78 FR 59019 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ..., 2013 (78 FR 12313) (FRL-9378-7). The comment period closed on August 21, 2013. VI. Provisions for...). Table 1--Product Cancellations EPA Registration No. Product name Chemical name 000241-00391 Pendulum...

  1. Community air monitoring for pesticides. Part 1: selecting pesticides and a community.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Randy; Levine, Johanna; Neal, Rosemary; Brattesani, Madeline

    2014-03-01

    The CA Department of Pesticide Regulation (CDPR) developed methods to select pesticides and a community to fulfill criteria for an ambient air monitoring study it conducted as part of the CA Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Justice Action Plan. Using a scoring system, CDPR evaluated 100 pesticides based on statewide-reported pesticide use, volatility, and priority in CDPR's risk assessment process (indicators of exposure and toxicity) to produce a list of pesticides to consider as candidates for monitoring. The CDPR also evaluated and scored 83 communities based on demographics and health factors, availability of cumulative impacts data, and reported pesticide use to create a list of community candidates. The scores provide relative rankings to distinguish more highly impacted communities from less impacted ones and to identify which pesticides might contribute most to potential adverse health effects. These methods use criteria that can be quantified, validated, and verified in order to provide a transparent and fair selection process. Based on public comments and highest scores, CDPR recommended 40 pesticides (including some of their degradation products) and one community for its yearlong monitoring study. The CDPR then further refined its list of pesticides by soliciting input from local and technical advisory groups. The CDPR plans to use these methods to select pesticides and communities in future monitoring activities. PMID:24362496

  2. A multi-residue method for the analysis of pesticides and pesticide degradates in water using HLB solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, M.L.; Smalling, K.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    A method was developed for the analysis of over 60 pesticides and degradates in water by HLB solid-phase extraction and gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry. Method recoveries and detection limits were determined using two surface waters with different dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. In the lower DOC water, recoveries and detection limits were 80%-108% and 1-12 ng/L, respectively. In the higher DOC water, the detection limits were slightly higher (1-15 ng/L). Additionally, surface water samples from four sites were analyzed and 14 pesticides were detected with concentrations ranging from 4 to 1,200 ng/L. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  3. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Microbial adaption to a pesticide in agricultural soils: Accelerated degradation of 14C-atrazine in field soils from Brazil and Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, Nicolai David; Martinazzo, Rosane; Hamacher, Georg; Accinelli, Cesare; Köppchen, Stephan; Langen, Ulrike; Linden, Andreas; Krause, Martina; Burauel, Peter

    2010-05-01

    An increasing demand for food, feed and bioenergy, and simultaneously a decline of arable land will require an intensive agricultural production including the use of pesticides. With an increasing use of pesticides the occurrence of an accelerated degradation potential has to be assessed. Atrazine [2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine] is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world. Even though its use was banned in several countries it is still widely used throughout America and the Asia-Pacific region. Atrazine is the most widely used herbicide in maize plantations in Brazil and the US. The use of atrazine in Belgium and all EU member states was banned in September 2004, with the permission to consume existing stocks until October 2005. Atrazine and its residues are still regularly detected in soil, ground and surface waters even years after its prohibition. Its persistence in soil and in association with organic particles might become crucial in terms of erosion due to climate and environmental changes. Due to its potential microbiological accessibility, the microbial mineralization of atrazine competes with chemical/physical interaction such as sorption and binding processes of the chemical molecule in the soil matrix. Binding or intrusion of the chemical on soil components results in a decrease of its accessibility for soil microbes, which does not necessarily exclude the molecule from environmental interactions. In the present study the accelerated atrazine degradation in agriculturally used soils was examined. Soil samples were collected from a Rhodic Ferralsol, Campinas do Sul, South Brazil, and Geric Ferralsol, Correntina, Northeastern Brazil. The sampling site of the Rhodic Ferralsol soil has been under crop rotation (soybean/wheat/maize/oat) since 1990. The Geric Ferralsol site has alternately been cultivated with maize and soybean since 2000. Both areas have been treated biennially with atrazine at recommended doses of 1.5 - 3.0 kg ha-1. Additionally, samples were taken from a Belgian field which was used for corn-plantations and which was regularly treated with atrazine for the last 30 years in varying doses of 0.5 - 3.0 kg ha-1. The experiment was performed using 14C-labelled and unlabelled atrazine in accordance to a field application dose of 3 mg kg-1 for the Brazilian soils, and 1 mg kg-1 for the Belgian soil, equaling approximately 3.0 and 1.0 kg ha-1, respectively. All soils with atrazine application history showed a high extent of atrazine mineralization, indicating a highly adapted microbial community being able to mineralize this pesticide. After 15 days of incubation, about 75 % of the initially applied 14C-atrazine was mineralized in the Rhodic Ferralsol, while in the Geric Ferralsol it did not exceed 15 % of the total applied 14C-activity. After a total incubation time of 85 days, the amount mineralized reached 82 % in the Rhodic Ferralsol and 74 % in the Geric Ferralsol. In the Belgian soil, after a total incubation time of 92 days, the mineralized amount of atrazine reached 83% of the initially applied 14C-activity in the atrazine treated soil for the slurry setup. A maximum of atrazine mineralization was observed in the treated field soil between 6 and 7 days of incubation for both, 50% WHCmax and slurry setups. The total 14C-atrazine mineralization was equally high for 50% WHCmax in the atrazine treated soil, totaling 81%. The formation of desorbable metabolites as well as the formation of unextractable, bound atrazine residues during the incubation process was monitored by desorption and accelerated solvent extraction, and successive LC-MSMS and LSC analyses, subsequent to sample oxidation. With increasing incubation time the presence of atrazine metabolites increased in the extracts, with hydroxyl-atrazine as the main metabolite.

  5. A fish of many scales: extrapolating sublethal pesticide exposures to the productivity of wild salmon populations.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David H; Spromberg, Julann A; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2009-12-01

    For more than a decade, numerous pesticides have been detected in river systems of the western United States that support anadromous species of Pacific salmon and steelhead. Over the same interval, several declining wild salmon populations have been listed as either threatened or endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). Because pesticides occur in surface waters that provide critical habitat for ESA-listed stocks, they are an ongoing concern for salmon conservation and recovery throughout California and the Pacific Northwest. Because pesticide exposures are typically sublethal, a key question is whether toxicological effects at (or below) the scale of the individual animal ultimately reduce the productivity and recovery potential of wild populations. In this study we evaluate how the sublethal impacts of pesticides on physiology and behavior can reduce the somatic growth of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and, by extension, subsequent size-dependent survival when animals migrate to the ocean and overwinter in their first year. Our analyses focused on the organophosphate and carbamate classes of insecticides. These neurotoxic chemicals have been widely detected in aquatic environments. They inhibit acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme in the salmon nervous system that regulates neurotransmitter-mediated signaling at synapses. Based on empirical data, we developed a model that explicitly links sublethal reductions in acetylcholinesterase activity to reductions in feeding behavior, food ration, growth, and size at migration. Individual size was then used to estimate size-dependent survival during migration and transition to the sea. Individual survival estimates were then integrated into a life-history population projection matrix and used to calculate population productivity and growth rate. Our results indicate that short-term (i.e., four-day) exposures that are representative of seasonal pesticide use may be sufficient to reduce the growth and size at ocean entry of juvenile chinook. The consequent reduction in individual survival over successive years reduces the intrinsic productivity (lambda) of a modeled ocean-type chinook population. Overall, we show that exposures to common pesticides may place important constraints on the recovery of ESA-listed salmon species, and that simple models can be used to extrapolate toxicological impacts across several scales of biological complexity. PMID:20014574

  6. 75 FR 48669 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Federal Register of January 26, 2010 (75 FR 4072) (FRL- 8808-2). The comment period closed on July 26... Killer 004822-00155 Product 29 Garden Pyrethrins Insect Killer 004822-00311 Pyrethrum Extract...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7320 - Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay. 864....7320 Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay. (a) Identification. A fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay is a device used to detect and measure fibrinogen degradation products and...

  8. Development of a sensor for polypropylene degradation products.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Hochrein, James Michael; Dirk, Shawn M.; Bernstein, Robert; Washburn, Cody M.; Graf, Darin C.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the development of a sensor to detect the oxidative and radiation induced degradation of polypropylene. Recently we have examined the use of crosslinked assemblies of nanoparticles as a chemiresistor-type sensor for the degradation products. We have developed a simple method that uses a siloxane matrix to fabricate a chemiresistor-type sensor that minimizes the swelling transduction mechanism while optimizing the change in dielectric response. These sensors were exposed with the use of a gas chromatography system to three previously identified polypropylene degradation products including 4-methyl-2-pentanone, acetone, and 2-pentanone. The limits of detection 210 ppb for 4-methy-2-pentanone, 575 ppb for 2-pentanone, and the LoD was unable to be determined for acetone due to incomplete separation from the carbon disulfide carrier.

  9. Assessment of the plasma desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique for pesticide adsorption and degradation on 'as-received' treated soil samples.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J P; Nsouli, B; Darwish, T; Fallavier, M; Khoury, R; Wehbé, N

    2005-01-01

    The assessment of the plasma desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PD-TOFMS) technique as a tool for direct characterization of pesticides adsorbed on agricultural soil is made for the first time in this study. Pellets of soils impregnated by solutions of three pesticides, namely norflurazon, malathion and oxyfluorfen, as well as deposits of these solutions onto aluminum surfaces, were investigated to this end. The yield values of the most characteristic peaks of the negative ion mass spectra were used to determine both the lowest concentrations detected on soils and limits of detection from thin films. The lowest values on soils are for malathion (1000 ppm range), and the largest for norflurazon (20,000 ppm), which is close to the limit of detection (LOD) found for the pesticide on the aluminum substrate (approximately 0.2 microg . cm(-2)). Different behaviors were observed as a function of time of storage in the ambient atmosphere or under vacuum; norflurazon adsorbed on soil exhibited high stability for a long period of time, and a rapid degradation of malathion with the elapsed time was clearly observed. The behavior of oxyfluorfen was also investigated but segregation processes seem to occur after several days. Although by far less sensitive than conventional methods based on extraction processes and used for real-world analytical applications, this technique is well suited to the study of the transformations occurring at the sample surface. A discussion is presented of the future prospects of such experiments in degradation studies. PMID:16047317

  10. Identification of degradation products of indigoids by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Witkoś, Katarzyna; Lech, Katarzyna; Jarosz, Maciej

    2015-11-01

    The study concerns identification of photodegradation products of indigotin, indirubin and isoindigo. Experimental methodology consists of degradation of standard solutions of indigoids in a solar box and analysis of samples taken at different aging time by using capillary high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric and spectrophotometric detectors. Identification of the formed compounds was based on careful interpretation of the electrospray ionization MS/MS spectra. Apart from the well-known degradation products of indigoids: isatin, isatoic anhydride and anthranilic acid, another seven species were also identified, and their proposed structures were confirmed by high-resolution molecular masses measurements; according to the best knowledge of authors, they have not been reported so far. The obtained results formed the basis for postulating mechanism of the process. Moreover, the MRM (Multiple Reaction Monitoring) method was developed for the identification of natural dyes and their degradation products in textiles of historical value. Apart from such colorants as indigotin and flavonoids, also presence of degradation products of indigoids was confirmed. PMID:26505769

  11. ISOLATION AND PURIFICATION OF CRUCIFER GLUCOSINOLATE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The crucifer family, Brassicaceae, is an economically important family for its many food crops. Crucifers are characterized by the presence of a group of secondary compounds called glucosinolates, which with their degradation products are primarily responsible for the characteristic aromas and flav...

  12. Management Practices to Improve Productivity of Degraded/Eroded Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Productivity of degraded/eroded soils can be restored by using organic amendment, such as manure, and improved soil management. A study is being conducted near Hays, KS, to investigate and compare restorative potential of two nitrogen (N) sources. Dried beef manure and urea fertilizer were each appl...

  13. 75 FR 57019 - Pesticide Product Registrations; Conditional Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... Form EPA issued a notice, published in the Federal Register of November 18, 2009 (74 FR 59536) (FRL... products for use on apples and soybeans. 2. TOPGUARD Fungicide (EPA registration number 4787-55) was... leaf spot, leaf spot, powdery mildew, and soybean rust, and on apples to control cedar apple...

  14. 78 FR 57850 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... Register issue of June 12, 2013 (78 FR 35268) (FRL-9388-5). The comment period closed on July 12, 2013. VI... request for voluntary cancellation of tralkoxydim registrations. The comment was submitted by Dow Agro... products 000100-0114 and 000100-01130 identified in Table 1 of Unit II., except for export in...

  15. 75 FR 44247 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ...This notice announces EPA's order for the cancellations, voluntarily requested by the registrants and accepted by the Agency, of the products listed in Table 1, pursuant to section 6(f)(1) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), as amended. This cancellation order follows a December 30, 2009 Federal Register Notice of Receipt of Requests from the registrants listed......

  16. 78 FR 8513 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ...This notice announces EPA's order for the cancellations, voluntarily requested by the registrants and accepted by the Agency, of the products listed in Table 1 and Table 2 of Unit II., pursuant to the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). This cancellation order follows a July 6, 2012 Federal Register Notice of Receipt of Requests from the registrants listed in Table 3......

  17. Development of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay and an Immunochromatographic Assay for Detection of Organophosphorus Pesticides in Different Agricultural Products

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xiude; Yang, Jifei; Wang, Limin; Fang, Qingkui; Zhang, Gaiping; Liu, Fengquan

    2012-01-01

    Objective Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are considered hazardous substances because of their high toxicity to nontarget species and their persistence in the environment and agricultural products. Therefore, it is important to develop a rapid, sensitive, and economical method for detecting OP pesticides and their residues in food and the environment. Methods A broad, selective monoclonal antibody (MAb) for organophosphorus pesticides was produced. Based on the MAb, an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an immunochromatography assay (ICA) for detecting OP pesticides in different agricultural products were developed using a binding inhibition format on microtiter plates and a membrane strip, respectively. Results Under the optimized conditions, the IC50 values of the ELISA ranged from 3.7 to 162.2 ng mL–1 for the 8 OP pesticides. The matrix interferences of Apple, Chinese cabbage, and greengrocery were removed by 40-fold dilution, the recoveries from spiked samples ranged from 79.1% to 118.1%. The IC50 values of ICA for the 8 OP pesticides ranged from 11.8 to 470.4 ng mL−1. The matrix interference was removed from the Chinese cabbage and Apple samples with 5-fold dilution, and the interference was removed from the greengrocery samples with 20-fold dilution. The recoveries from the spiked samples ranged between 70.6 and 131.9%. The established ELISA and ICA were specific selectivity for the 8 OP pesticides. Conclusions The established ELISA is a sensitive screening method for the detection of OP pesticides, but the ELISA detection method depends on a laboratory platform and requires a relative long assay time and several steps operation. The established ICA is very useful as a screening method for the quantitative, semi-quantitative or qualitative detection of OP pesticides in agricultural products, and it has advantages over ELISA methods with regard to factors such as the testing procedure, testing time, and matrix interferences, among others. PMID:23300869

  18. Identification and measurement of pesticide contaminants in food products by electron impact GC/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tusa, Florina; Moldovan, Zaharie; Vlassa, Mircea

    2009-08-01

    The paper concern is determination of eight pesticides in food products samples. The target compounds are: Lindane, Heptachlor, Aldrin, o,p-DDE, Dieldrin, Endrin, p,p'-DDT, and Methoxychlor. The compounds quantities were performed from chromatographic area obtained in full scan GC/MS mode after baseline separation and by comparation with surrogate internal standard area (Diphenylamine). The samples were concentrated by extraction with organic solvents (acetone) by Solid-Liquid Extraction (SLE) procedures the recovery factors being better than 80% except for Heptachlors. The coefficient of correlation of detector response function was better than 0.913 and LOQ under 0.015 μg/g. The method enables to determine pesticides at low μg/g in food supplements.

  19. Gas-phase and particulate products from the atmospheric degradation of the organothiophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos-methyl.

    PubMed

    Borrás, Esther; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis Antonio; Ródenas, Milagros; Vera, Teresa; Coscollá, Clara; Yusá, Vicent; Muñoz, Amalia

    2015-11-01

    The phosphorothioate structure is highly present in several organophosphorus pesticides. However, there is insufficient information about its degradation process after the release to the atmosphere and the secondary pollutants formed. Herein, the atmospheric reaction of chlorpyrifos-methyl (o,o-dimethyl o-(3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-yl) phosphorothioate), is described for semi-urban or rural locations. The photo-oxidation under low NOx conditions (5-55 ppbV) was reproduced in a large outdoor simulation chamber, observing a rapid degradation (lifetime<3.5 h). The formation of gaseous products and particulate matter (aerosol yield 2-8%) was monitored. The chemical composition of minor products (gaseous and particulate) was studied, identifying 15 multi-oxygenated derivatives. The most abundant products were ring-retaining molecules such as o,o-dimethyl o-(3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-yl) phosphorothioate, dimethyl 3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-yl phosphate, o-methyl o-(3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-yl) hydrogen phosphorothioate, 3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-yl dihydrogen phosphate, 3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-ol, and 3,5,6-trichloropyridine-2,4-diol. An atmospheric degradation mechanism has been proposed based on an oxidation started with OH-nucleophilic attack to P=S bond. The results have been extrapolated to other organothiophosphorus molecules, such as malathion, parathion, diazinon and methidathion, among many others, to estimate their photo-oxidative degradation and the expected products. PMID:25548033

  20. High Modulus Biodegradable Polyurethanes for Vascular Stents: Evaluation of Accelerated in vitro Degradation and Cell Viability of Degradation Products.

    PubMed

    Sgarioto, Melissa; Adhikari, Raju; Gunatillake, Pathiraja A; Moore, Tim; Patterson, John; Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Malherbe, François

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported the mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation behavior of a series of NovoSorb™ biodegradable polyurethanes (PUs) prepared by varying the hard segment (HS) weight percentage from 60 to 100. In this study, the in vitro degradation behavior of these PUs with and without extracellular matrix (ECM) coating was investigated under accelerated hydrolytic degradation (phosphate buffer saline; PBS/70°C) conditions. The mass loss at different time intervals and the effect of aqueous degradation products on the viability and growth of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were examined. The results showed that PUs with HS 80% and below completely disintegrated leaving no visual polymer residue at 18 weeks and the degradation medium turned acidic due to the accumulation of products from the soft segment (SS) degradation. As expected the PU with the lowest HS was the fastest to degrade. The accumulated degradation products, when tested undiluted, showed viability of about 40% for HUVEC cells. However, the viability was over 80% when the solution was diluted to 50% and below. The growth of HUVEC cells is similar to but not identical to that observed with tissue culture polystyrene standard (TCPS). The results from this in vitro study suggested that the PUs in the series degraded primarily due to the SS degradation and the cell viability of the accumulated acidic degradation products showed poor viability to HUVEC cells when tested undiluted, however particles released to the degradation medium showed cell viability over 80%. PMID:26000274

  1. High Modulus Biodegradable Polyurethanes for Vascular Stents: Evaluation of Accelerated in vitro Degradation and Cell Viability of Degradation Products

    PubMed Central

    Sgarioto, Melissa; Adhikari, Raju; Gunatillake, Pathiraja A.; Moore, Tim; Patterson, John; Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Malherbe, François

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported the mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation behavior of a series of NovoSorb™ biodegradable polyurethanes (PUs) prepared by varying the hard segment (HS) weight percentage from 60 to 100. In this study, the in vitro degradation behavior of these PUs with and without extracellular matrix (ECM) coating was investigated under accelerated hydrolytic degradation (phosphate buffer saline; PBS/70°C) conditions. The mass loss at different time intervals and the effect of aqueous degradation products on the viability and growth of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were examined. The results showed that PUs with HS 80% and below completely disintegrated leaving no visual polymer residue at 18 weeks and the degradation medium turned acidic due to the accumulation of products from the soft segment (SS) degradation. As expected the PU with the lowest HS was the fastest to degrade. The accumulated degradation products, when tested undiluted, showed viability of about 40% for HUVEC cells. However, the viability was over 80% when the solution was diluted to 50% and below. The growth of HUVEC cells is similar to but not identical to that observed with tissue culture polystyrene standard (TCPS). The results from this in vitro study suggested that the PUs in the series degraded primarily due to the SS degradation and the cell viability of the accumulated acidic degradation products showed poor viability to HUVEC cells when tested undiluted, however particles released to the degradation medium showed cell viability over 80%. PMID:26000274

  2. Sources and Input Pathways of Glyphosate and its Degradation Product AMPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischofberger, S.; Hanke, I.; Wittmer, I.; Singer, H.; Stamm, C.

    2009-04-01

    Despite being the pesticide used in the largest quantities worldwide, the environmental relevance of glyphosate has been considered low for many years. Reasons for this assessment were the observations that glyphosate degrades quickly into its degradation product AMPA and that it sorbs strongly to soil particles. Hence, little losses to water bodies had been expected. Research during the last few years however contradicts this expectation. Although glyphosate is a dominant pesticide used in agriculture, recent studies on other pesticides revealed that urban sources may play a significant role for water quality. Therefore this study compares glyphosate input into streams from agricultural and urban sources. For that purpose, a catchment of an area of 25 km2 was selected. It has by about 12'000 inhabitants and about 15 % of the area is used as arable land. Four sampling sites were selected in the river system in order to reflect different urban and agricultural sources. Additionally, we sampled a combined sewer overflow, a rain sewer and the outflow of a waste water treatment plant. At each site discharge was measured continuously from March to November 2007. During 16 rain events samples were taken by automatic devices at a high temporal resolution. To analyze the concentration of glyphosate and its degradation product AMPA, the samples were derivatized with FMOC-Cl at low pH conditions and then filtrated. The solid phase extraction was conducted with Strata-X sorbent cartridge. Glyphosate and AMPA were detected with API 4000 after the chromatography with X bridge column C18. To assure the data quality, interne standards of Glyphosate and AMPA were added to every sample. The limit of detection and quantification for glyphosate and AMPA are bellow 1ng/l. We analyzed two rain events at a high resolution for all stations and several events at the outlet of the catchment. We measured high glyphosate concentration in urban and agriculture dominated catchments with up to 3'600ng/l in the rainwater sewer and 2'500ng/l from agricultural origin. The highest glyphosate concentrations were detected during peak flow. The input of the waste water treatment plant (WWTP) was up to 500ng/l. We detected glyphosate above the detection limit in all samples throughout the sampling period. Even after the vegetation period in November, glyphosate peak flow concentration in the outlet of the entire catchment was 137 ng/l exceeding the Swiss water quality criteria for single pesticides. The AMPA concentrations were generally lower than those of Glyphosate except for the WWTP. Generally, AMPA concentrations varied less during a rain event than glyphosate concentrations. Despite the strong sorption to soil particles and short half-life, glyphosate occurs in high concentrations in surface waters affected by urban and agricultural sources. Concentrations were even higher than those of other widely used herbicides like atrazine and mecoprop.

  3. Pesticide occurrence in groundwater in areas of high-density row crop production in Alabama, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moreland, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    High-density row crop production occurs in three areas of Alabama that are underlain by productive aquifers, northern Alabama, southeastern Alabama, and Baldwin County in southwestern Alabama. The U.S. Geological Survey collected five groundwater samples from each of these three areas during 2009 for analysis of selected pesticides. Results of these analyses showed detections for 37 of 152 analytes. The three most frequently detected compounds were atrazine, 2-Chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-triazine (CIAT), and metolachlor. The highest concentration for any analyte was 4.08 micrograms per liter for metolachlor.

  4. New Trends in Pesticide Residue Analysis in Cereals, Nutraceuticals, Baby Foods, and Related Processed Consumer Products.

    PubMed

    Raina-Fulton, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Pesticide residue methods have been developed for a wide variety of food products including cereal-based foods, nutraceuticals and related plant products, and baby foods. These cereal, fruit, vegetable, and plant-based products provide the basis for many processed consumer products. For cereal and nutraceuticals, which are dry sample products, a modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) method has been used with additional steps to allow wetting of the dry sample matrix and subsequent cleanup using dispersive or cartridge format SPE to reduce matrix effects. More processed foods may have lower pesticide concentrations but higher co-extracts that can lead to signal suppression or enhancement with MS detection. For complex matrixes, GC/MS/MS or LC/electrospray ionization (positive or negative ion)-MS/MS is more frequently used. The extraction and cleanup methods vary with different sample types particularly for cereal-based products, and these different approaches are discussed in this review. General instrument considerations are also discussed. PMID:26525234

  5. Neonicotinoid pesticide reduces bumble bee colony growth and queen production.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, Penelope R; O'Connor, Stephanie; Wackers, Felix L; Goulson, Dave

    2012-04-20

    Growing evidence for declines in bee populations has caused great concern because of the valuable ecosystem services they provide. Neonicotinoid insecticides have been implicated in these declines because they occur at trace levels in the nectar and pollen of crop plants. We exposed colonies of the bumble bee Bombus terrestris in the laboratory to field-realistic levels of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, then allowed them to develop naturally under field conditions. Treated colonies had a significantly reduced growth rate and suffered an 85% reduction in production of new queens compared with control colonies. Given the scale of use of neonicotinoids, we suggest that they may be having a considerable negative impact on wild bumble bee populations across the developed world. PMID:22461500

  6. Pesticide use in banana and plantain production and risk perception among local actors in Talamanca, Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Barraza, Douglas; Technology and Agrarian Development Group, Wageningen University ; Jansen, Kees; Wendel de Joode, Berna van; Wesseling, Catharina

    2011-07-15

    The Talamanca County in Costa Rica has large-scale banana and small-scale plantain production, probably causing pesticide exposure in indigenous children. We explored to what extent different community actors are aware of children's pesticide hazards and how their awareness related to socio-economical and cultural conditions. Methods comprised eight focus groups with fathers and mothers separately, 27 semi-structured interviews to key actors, and field observations. As a whole, the indigenous plantain farmers and banana plantation workers had some general knowledge of pesticides concerning crop protection, but little on acute health effects, and hardly any on exposure routes and pathways, and chronic effects. People expressed vague ideas about pesticide risks. Inter-community differences were related to pesticide technologies used in banana and plantain production, employment status on a multinational plantation versus smallholder status, and gender. Compared to formalized practices on transnational company plantations, where workers reported to feel protected, pesticide handling by plantain smallholders was not perceived as hazardous and therefore no safety precautions were applied. Large-scale monoculture was perceived as one of the most important problems leading to pesticide risks in Talamanca on banana plantations, and also on neighboring small plantain farms extending into large areas. Plantain farmers have adopted use of highly toxic pesticides following banana production, but in conditions of extreme poverty. Aerial spraying in banana plantations was considered by most social actors a major determinant of exposure for the population living nearby these plantations, including vulnerable children. We observed violations of legally established aerial spraying distances. Economic considerations were most mentioned as the underlying reason for the pesticide use: economic needs to obtain the production quantity and quality, and pressure to use pesticides by other economic agents such as middlemen. Risk perceptions were modulated by factors such as people's tasks and positions in the production process, gender, and people's possibilities to define their own social conditions (more fatalistic perceptions among banana workers). The challenge for the future is to combine these insights into improved health risk assessment and management that is culturally adequate for each particular community and agricultural context. - Research highlights: {yields} A first study on pesticide risk perception in Costa Rica. {yields} One of the few studies performed in the indigenous populations in Talamanca. {yields} Economic considerations prevailed above health risks in both communities. {yields} Our findings provide valuable information for multiple social actors.

  7. Pesticides in Ground Water of Central and Western Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, Scott W.; Reyes, Betzaida

    2008-01-01

    Selected pesticides and degradates (products of pesticide degradation) are detectable in ground water in many parts of central and western Maryland, although concentrations are generally less than 0.1 micrograms per liter. Ground-water samples collected recently (1994-2003) from 72 wells in areas of Maryland underlain by consolidated carbonate, crystalline, or siliciclastic aquifers (areas north and west of the Fall Line) were analyzed for selected pesticides and degradates. Pesticides were typically detected in mixtures of multiple compounds in ground water, and degradates were commonly detected, often at greater concentrations than their respective parent compounds. No pesticides were observed at concentrations greater than established standards for drinking water, and nearly all observed concentrations were below other health-based guidelines. Although such standards and guidelines are generally much greater than measured concentrations in ground water, they do not exist for many detected compounds (particularly degradates), or for mixtures of multiple compounds. The distribution of pesticides and degradates in ground water is related to application practices, as well as chemical and environmental factors that affect the fate and movement of individual compounds.

  8. Cadmium(II) complexes: mimics of organophosphate pesticide degrading enzymes and metallo-β-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Daumann, Lena J; Gahan, Lawrence R; Comba, Peter; Schenk, Gerhard

    2012-07-16

    Cadmium(II) complexes of ethyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-bis(((2-hydroxyethyl)(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)methyl)benzoate (CO(2)EtH(3)L1) and ethyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-bis(((2-methoxyethyl)(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)methyl)benzoate (CO(2)EtHL2) are described. The two ligands possess an ethyl ester (CO(2)Et-) at the position para to the phenolic -OH; CO(2)EtHL2, with methyl ether donors in contrast to potentially nucleophilic alkoxide donors in CO(2)EtH(3)L1, offers a direct comparison of potential ligand-centered nucleophiles. The complex with CO(2)EtH(3)L1 was characterized using (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and microanalysis; X-ray crystallography defined a tetranuclear structure [Cd(4)(CO(2)EtH(2)L1)(2)(CH(3)COO)(3.75)Cl(0.25)(H(2)O)(2)](PF(6))(2). Functional studies of the cadmium(II) complexes were undertaken with the substrates bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl)phosphate (BDNPP), and nitrocefin to assess their phosphatase and β-lactamase activities, respectively. The complexes with CO(2)EtH(3)L1 and CO(2)EtHL2 are competent phosphoesterase mimics with K(M) = 9.4 ± 2.1 mM and 10.1 ± 3.4 mM, k(cat) = 9.4 ± 0.2 × 10(-3) s(-1) and 9.7 ± 2.7 × 10(-3) s(-1), respectively. Use of a solvent mixture containing H(2)(18)O/H(2)(16)O in the reaction with BDNPP showed that for the complex with CO(2)EtH(3)L1 the (18)O label was incorporated in the reaction product suggesting that the nucleophile involved is a Cd-OH moiety and not a metal bound alkoxide; for CO(2)EtHL2 the presence of the methyl-ether dictates that the active nucleophile must also be a hydroxide. The cadmium(II) complex with CO(2)EtH(3)L1 was furthermore found to be a competent β-lactamase mimic with k(cat) = 1.39 × 10(-2) ± 3 × 10(-3) s(-1), K(M) = 0.11 ± 0.03 mM, and pK(a) = 7.9 ± 0.1. Mass spectral evidence suggested that the active nucleophile in this reaction is the alkoxide; lack of β-lactamase activity of the complex with CO(2)EtHL2 supports this assignment. Similar to enzyme-catalyzed reactions, a blue reaction intermediate in the β-lactamase reaction of the CO(2)EtH(3)L1 complex was also identified. It is proposed that the Cd(II) complexes of CO(2)EtH(3)L1 and CO(2)EtHL2 react identically as phosphatases, with a terminal hydroxide as the nucleophile; the former exhibits β-lactamase activity with the alkoxide as a nucleophile, while the latter, without a potentially nucleophilic alkoxide, is inactive. PMID:22758396

  9. Conversion of pesticides to biologically active products on urban hard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiying; Gan, Jay

    2016-06-15

    Impervious pavements such as concrete are a dominant feature of urban landscapes, but their role in the fate of environmental contaminants is largely ignored. This study considered the case of urban-use pesticides, and demonstrated for the first time that surfaces such as concrete were capable of converting pesticides to other biologically active intermediates. Rapid transformation of pesticides was observed in both bench and field scale setups. Under outdoor conditions, permethrin, a heavily used pyrethroid insecticide, quickly formed 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) that is a known endocrine disruptor, and the level of 3-PBA was >100μg/L in the runoff water even 3months after the treatment. Fipronil, a product used for termite and ant control, was quickly transformed to desulfinyl and sulfone derivatives, with the desulfinyl level exceeding that of parent in the runoff water only 1week after treatment. Fipronil derivatives have aquatic toxicity similar or even greater than the parent fipronil. Direct sampling of deposited particles from residential exterior pavements revealed widespread presence of fipronil sulfone and desulfinyl and demonstrated their in-situ formation and accumulation on concrete. The extensive transformations were likely caused by the alkalinity and metal oxides in concrete and conducive photolytic conditions at the hard surfaces. The study findings highlight the role of urban pavements and urbanization in the geochemical cycling of anthropogenic contaminants. PMID:26971210

  10. Cloning and expression of ophB gene encoding organophosphorus hydrolase from endophytic Pseudomonas sp. BF1-3 degrades organophosphorus pesticide chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Barman, Dhirendra Nath; Haque, Md Azizul; Islam, Shah Md Asraful; Yun, Han Dae; Kim, Min Keun

    2014-10-01

    Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphate pesticide that has adverse effect on animals and plants. We isolated endophytic bacterial strain, Pseudomonas sp. BF1-3, from balloon flower root which can hydrolyze chlorpyrifos. A gene (ophB) encoding a protein involved in chlorpyrifos degradation from this strain was cloned into Escherichia coli DH5α for confirming enzyme activity. After sequencing, total 1024bp nucleotide sequences were found in the open reading frame of ophB. The chlorpyrifos degradation patterns by E. coli DH5α (ophB) were observed. During incubation in minimal salt (M9) medium supplemented with chlorpyrifos (100mgL(-1)), the E. coli DH5α harboring ophB degraded about 97% initial chlorpyrifos (100mgL(-1)) and accumulated 86mgL(-1) 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) within 9 days. In addition, optical density (OD) of E. coli DH5α (ophB) culture at 600nm was increased from 0.172 to 1.118 within 2 days of inoculation in the chlorpyrifos supplemented M9 medium. The estimated molecular weight of purified OphB protein was determined to be 31.4kDa by SDS-PAGE. The OphB enzyme was most active at pH 8 and an optimal temperature around 35°C. These results indicate that endophytic bacteria are supposed to be useful for biological control of environments contaminated with pesticides. PMID:25062445

  11. DEGRADATION AND MIGRATION OF VINCLOZOLIN IN SAND AND SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The migration of the dicarboximide fungicide vinclozolin and its principal degradation products through porous media was experimentally determined by simulating pesticide applications to a 23-30 mesh Ottawa sand and a North Carolina Piedmont, aquic hapludult soil in laboratory ...

  12. Degradation of glucagon in isolated liver endosomes. ATP-dependence and partial characterization of degradation products.

    PubMed Central

    Authier, F; Desbuquois, B

    1991-01-01

    Endosomes have recently been identified as one major site of glucagon degradation in intact rat liver. In this study, a cell-free system has been used to assess the role of ATP-dependent acidification in endosomal glucagon degradation and identify the glucagon products generated. Percoll gradient fractionation of Golgi-endosomal fractions prepared 10-30 min after injection of [125I]iodoglucagon showed a time-dependent shift of the radioactivity towards high densities. Regardless of time, the radioactivity was less precipitable by trichloroacetic acid (Cl3Ac) at high densities than at low densities. Chloroquine treatment slightly increased the density shift of the radioactivity and decreased its Cl3Ac-precipitability throughout the gradient. Incubation of endosomal fractions containing [125I]iodoglucagon in 0.15 M-KCl at 30 degrees C resulted in a time- and pH-dependent generation of Cl3Ac-soluble radioactivity, with a maximum at pH 4 (t1/2, 7 min). At pH 5, 1,10-phenanthroline, bacitracin and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid partially inhibited [125I]iodoglucagon degradation. At pH 6-7, ATP stimulated [125I]iodoglucagon degradation by 5-10-fold and caused endosomal acidification as judged from Acridine Orange uptake. The effects of ATP were inhibited by chloroquine, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide and dansylcadaverine. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) precipitation of the radioactivity associated with endosomes showed that lowering the pH below 5.5 caused dissociation of the glucagon-receptor complex, and that, regardless of incubation conditions, all degraded [125I]iodoglucagon diffused extraluminally. On h.p.l.c., at least three products less hydrophobic than [125I]iodoglucagon were identified in incubation mixtures along with monoiodotyrosine. Radiosequence analysis of the products revealed one major cleavage located C-terminally to Tyr-13 and two minor cleavages affecting Thr-5-Phe-6 and Phe-6-Thr-7 bonds. It is concluded that glucagon degradation in liver endosomes is functionally linked to ATP-dependent endosomal acidification and involves several cleavages in the glucagon sequence. PMID:1741749

  13. Counteraction of antibiotic production and degradation stabilizes microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Kelsic, Eric D.; Zhao, Jeffrey; Vetsigian, Kalin; Kishony, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Summary A major challenge in theoretical ecology is understanding how natural microbial communities support species diversity1-8, and in particular how antibiotic producing, sensitive and resistant species coexist9-15. While cyclic “rock-paper-scissors” interactions can stabilize communities in spatial environments9-11, coexistence in unstructured environments remains an enigma12,16. Here, using simulations and analytical models, we show that the opposing actions of antibiotic production and degradation enable coexistence even in well-mixed environments. Coexistence depends on 3-way interactions where an antibiotic degrading species attenuates the inhibitory interactions between two other species. These 3-way interactions enable coexistence that is robust to substantial differences in inherent species growth rates and to invasion by “cheating” species that cease producing or degrading antibiotics. At least two antibiotics are required for stability, with greater numbers of antibiotics enabling more complex communities and diverse dynamical behaviors ranging from stable fixed-points to limit cycles and chaos. Together, these results show how multi-species antibiotic interactions can generate ecological stability in both spatial and mixed microbial communities, suggesting strategies for engineering synthetic ecosystems and highlighting the importance of toxin production and degradation for microbial biodiversity. PMID:25992546

  14. Routine low-level monitoring of polar pesticides and pesticide degradates by HPLC/ESI-MS: Evaluating long-term performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, E.T.; Martin, J.D.; Werner, S.L.; Gates, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity and selective determination of polar pesticides were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS). The effects of multiple operators and instruments on method performance were evaluated using 440 pairs of fortified reagent-water and blank reagent-water samples. The influence of varying environmental matrices on recovery and precision were also analyzed using 200 fortified ambient water samples and duplicate ambient water samples. The results show that compound stability in filtered water was matrix-, chemical class- and compound-dependent which ranged from 1 day to 2 weeks.

  15. 75 FR 52329 - Corn Event MON 863 and MON 863 x MON 810; Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Register issued on June 26, 1991 (56 FR 29362), as those stocks of registered pesticide products which are... Cry3Bb1 protein and the genetic material necessary for its production (vector PV-ZMIR13L) in MON 863 corn... thuringiensis Cry1Ab protein and the genetic material necessary for its production (vector PV-ZMCT01) in MON...

  16. Modern pesticides and bobwhite populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) are frequently used as test animals for wildlife tests of pesticides. The organophosphate and carbamate pesticides that have replaced the organochlorines have many desirable properties, but they span a wide range of acute toxicities and some of them affe,ct survival, reproduction, food consumption, behavior, and nervous system enzymes in laboratory tests. Applying these laboratory findings to the field requires assumptions about the severity of exposure in the field. Direct field measurements show that birds may be exposed to significant amounts of these pesticides or even more toxic degradation products under some conditions. Adverse population effects may also result from depression of insect populations during the seasons when bobwhites rely on insects for food.

  17. Exploring the functional diversity of the supraglacial environment: Microbial degradation of the pesticide 2,4-D on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stibal, M.; Bælum, J.; Holben, W. E.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The surface of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) harbours a diverse community of heterotrophic microorganisms. Organic compounds of anthropogenic origin, including pesticides, are deposited on the GrIS; however, the fate of these compounds in the ice is currently unknown. In this study we determine the potential of the microbial community from the surface of the GrIS to mineralise the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). It is one of the most easily degraded compounds among the phenoxyacetic acid pesticides, and the ability to mineralise 2,4-D has been found to be widespread in microbial communities around the globe. Functional genes involved in the degradation pathway have also been characterised. Thus, 2,4-D represents a very suitable model compound to use in order to gain an insight into pollutant degradation dynamics in the rapidly changing Arctic region. We collected surface ice cores on the GrIS and incubated them for up to 529 days in microcosms simulating in situ conditions. We measured mineralisation of side-chain- and ring-labelled 14C-2,4-D in the samples and performed quantitative PCR targeting the tfdA gene, encoding an enzyme catalysing the first step in the degradation pathway of 2,4-D, in the DNA extracted from the ice after the experiments. We show that the microbial community on the surface of the GrIS is of low diversity, but contains microbes capable of degrading 2,4-D. The low diversity of the community and the similarity of the detected clones to those from other icy environment clones suggest that the bacterial community on the GrIS is selected from a pool of propagules deposited on the surface of the ice sheet, based on the level of adaptation to the conditions in the surface ice. The 2,4-D degraders are likely present in very low numbers, and they can mineralise 2,4-D at a rate of up to 1 nmol per m2 per day, equivalent to ~26 ng C m-2 d-1. We contend that the surface of the GrIS should not be considered to be a mere reservoir of all atmospheric contaminants, as it is likely that some deposited compounds will be removed from the system via biodegradation processes before their potential release due to the accelerated melting of the ice sheet.

  18. Challenges and opportunities of the bio-pesticides production by solid-state fermentation: filamentous fungi as a model.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz Quiroz, Reynaldo; Roussos, Sevastianos; Hernández, Daniel; Rodríguez, Raúl; Castillo, Francisco; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, production and use of bio-pesticides have increasing and replacing some synthetic chemical pesticides applied to food commodities. In this review, biological control is focused as an alternative, to some synthetic chemical treatments that cause environmental, human health, and food quality risks. In addition, several phytopathogenic microorganisms have developed resistance to some of these synthetic chemicals and become more difficult to control. Worldwide, the bio-pesticides market is growing annually at a rate of 44% in North America, 20% in Europe and Oceania, 10% in Latin and South American countries and 6% in Asia. Use of agro-industrial wastes and solid-state fermentation (SSF) technology offers an alternative to bio-pesticide production with advantages versus conventional submerged fermentations, as reduced cost and energy consumption, low production of residual water and high stability products. In this review, recent data about state of art regarding bio-pesticides production under SSF on agroindustrial wastes will be discussed. SSF can be defined as a microbial process that generally occurs on solid material in the absence of free water. This material has the ability to absorb water with or without soluble nutrients, since the substrate must have water to support the microorganism's growth and metabolism. Changes in water content are analyzed in order to select the conditions for a future process, where water stress can be combined with the best spore production conditions, obtaining in this way an inexpensive biotechnological option for modern agriculture in developing countries. PMID:24494699

  19. Are pesticide residues associated to rice production affecting oyster production in Delta del Ebro, NE Spain?

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Victoria; Riva, Carmen; Faria, Melissa; Köck-Schulmeyer, Marianne; de Alda, Miren López; Barceló, Damià; Fernandez Tejedor, Margarita; Roque, Ana; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barata, Carlos

    2012-10-15

    Pesticide usage in Delta del Ebro (NE Spain) during the rice growing season has been associated with oyster episodes of mortality that occur early in summer. However, there are no studies that have directly evaluated pesticide levels and effects in oysters (Crassotrea gigas) cultured in Ebro's Bays. In this study pesticide levels in water, metal body burdens and up to 12 different biochemical markers were monitored in gills and digestive glands of oysters transplanted from May to June in 2008 and 2009. Biochemical responses evidenced clear differences in oysters from 2008 and 2009. Oysters transplanted in 2009 showed their antioxidant defenses unaffected from May to June and consequently increased levels of tissue damage measured as lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks and of mortality rates. Conversely oysters transplanted in 2008 increase their antioxidant defenses from May to June, had low levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA damage and low mortality rates. Some pesticides in water such as bentazone and propanil together with high temperatures and salinity levels were related with tissue damage in oyster transplanted in 2008 but the observed large differences between years indicate that abiotic factors alone could not explain the high mortalities observed in 2009. An analysis of recent reported studies pointed out in the direction that in addition to abiotic factors the use of oysters sensitive to diseases may explain the observed responses. PMID:22940045

  20. Pesticide use in banana and plantain production and risk perception among local actors in Talamanca, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Douglas; Jansen, Kees; van Wendel de Joode, Berna; Wesseling, Catharina

    2011-07-01

    The Talamanca County in Costa Rica has large-scale banana and small-scale plantain production, probably causing pesticide exposure in indigenous children. We explored to what extent different community actors are aware of children's pesticide hazards and how their awareness related to socio-economical and cultural conditions. Methods comprised eight focus groups with fathers and mothers separately, 27 semi-structured interviews to key actors, and field observations. As a whole, the indigenous plantain farmers and banana plantation workers had some general knowledge of pesticides concerning crop protection, but little on acute health effects, and hardly any on exposure routes and pathways, and chronic effects. People expressed vague ideas about pesticide risks. Inter-community differences were related to pesticide technologies used in banana and plantain production, employment status on a multinational plantation versus smallholder status, and gender. Compared to formalized practices on transnational company plantations, where workers reported to feel protected, pesticide handling by plantain smallholders was not perceived as hazardous and therefore no safety precautions were applied. Large-scale monoculture was perceived as one of the most important problems leading to pesticide risks in Talamanca on banana plantations, and also on neighboring small plantain farms extending into large areas. Plantain farmers have adopted use of highly toxic pesticides following banana production, but in conditions of extreme poverty. Aerial spraying in banana plantations was considered by most social actors a major determinant of exposure for the population living nearby these plantations, including vulnerable children. We observed violations of legally established aerial spraying distances. Economic considerations were most mentioned as the underlying reason for the pesticide use: economic needs to obtain the production quantity and quality, and pressure to use pesticides by other economic agents such as middlemen. Risk perceptions were modulated by factors such as people's tasks and positions in the production process, gender, and people's possibilities to define their own social conditions (more fatalistic perceptions among banana workers). The challenge for the future is to combine these insights into improved health risk assessment and management that is culturally adequate for each particular community and agricultural context. PMID:21396636

  1. [Determination of low-level pesticide residues in agricultural products by ion-trap GC/MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomoko; Sasaki, Saori; Uchikawa, Seiji; Hirahara, Yoshichika; Shiomi, Yukihiro; Tonogai, Yasuhide

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the utility of ion-trap GC/MS/MS for the analysis of pesticides in extracted matrices from various agricultural products. Identification and quantitative analysis of pesticides in matrices were performed by quadrupole GC/MS and ion-trap GC/MS/MS. Chlorpyrifos was added to the matrix of spinach, soybean in the pod or corn, and aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, alpha-BHC, beta-BHC, gamma-BHC, delta-BHC, p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDT were added to each matrix of green tea, black tea or oolong tea. Although most of the pesticides in the matrix could not be determined by quadrupole GC/MS-Scan analysis at 0.1 microgram/mL, every pesticide was identified from the mass spectrum using ion-trap GC/MS/MS at the same concentration. The quantitation limit of every pesticide in each matrix by ion-trap GC/MS/MS analysis was higher than that by GC/MS-SIM analysis. The calibration curves obtained by GC/MS/MS were linear in the range of 0.01-0.25 microgram/mL of each pesticide. The recoveries of each pesticide from four kinds of samples spiked at the levels of 0.01 ppm to 0.02 ppm in extracts were 61.2-138.3% with SD values in the range from 1.2 to 15.4%. This study revealed that ion-trap GC/MS/MS was useful for the identification and quantitative analysis of low-level pesticides residues in matrices of agricultural products. PMID:15038113

  2. Occurrence of Selected Pharmaceuticals, Personal-Care Products, Organic Wastewater Compounds, and Pesticides in the Lower Tallapoosa River Watershed near Montgomery, Alabama, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oblinger, Carolyn J.; Gill, Amy C.; McPherson, Ann K.; Meyer, Michael T.; Furlong, Edward T.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic and natural organic compounds derived from agricultural operations, residential development, and treated and untreated sanitary and industrial wastewater discharges can contribute contaminants to surface and ground waters. To determine the occurrence of these compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed, Alabama, new laboratory methods were used that can detect human and veterinary antibiotics; pharmaceuticals; and compounds found in personal-care products, food additives, detergents and their metabolites, plasticizers, and other industrial and household products in the environment. Well-established methods for detecting 47 pesticides and 19 pesticide degradates also were used. In all, 186 different compounds were analyzed by using four analytical methods. The lower Tallapoosa River serves as the water-supply source for more than 100,000 customers of the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board. Source-water protection is a high priority for the Board, which is responsible for providing safe drinking water. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board, conducted this study to provide baseline data that could be used to assess the effects of agriculture and residential development on the occurrence of selected organic compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Twenty samples were collected at 10 sites on the Tallapoosa River and its tributaries. Ten samples were collected in April 2005 during high base streamflow, and 10 samples were collected in October 2005 when base streamflow was low. Thirty-two of 186 compounds were detected in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Thirteen compounds, including atrazine, 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT), hexazinone, metalaxyl, metolachlor, prometryn, prometon, simazine, azithromycin, oxytetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and tylosin, had measurable concentrations above their laboratory reporting levels. Concentrations were estimated for an additional 19 compounds that were detected below their laboratory reporting levels. The two most frequently detected compounds were the pesticides atrazine (19 of 20 samples) and simazine (13 of 20 samples). Tylosin, a veterinary antibiotic, was detected in 8 of 20 samples. Other compounds frequently detected at very low concentrations included CIAT and hexazinone (a degradate of atrazine and a pesticide, respectively); camphor (derived from personal-care products or flavorants), para-cresol (various uses including solvent, wood preservative, and in household cleaning products), and N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET, an insect repellent).

  3. Comparative responses of sperm cells and embryos of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) to exposure to metolachlor and its degradation products.

    PubMed

    Mai, Huong; Gonzalez, Patrice; Pardon, Patrick; Tapie, Nathalie; Budzinski, Hélène; Cachot, Jérôme; Morin, Bénédicte

    2014-02-01

    Metolachlor is one of the most intensively used chloroacetanilide herbicides in agriculture. Consequently, it has been frequently detected in coastal waters as well as its major degradation products, metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and metolachlor oxanilic acid (MOA) which are encountered at higher concentrations than metolachlor. Although a few studies of metolachlor toxicity have been conducted on marine organisms, little is known about the environmental toxicity of metolachlor degradation products. In this study, the deleterious effects of metolachlor and its degradation products on spermatozoa and embryos of Crassostrea gigas have been compared using biomarkers of developmental defects, DNA damage and gene transcription levels. After 24h exposure, significant increases in the percentage of abnormal D-larvae and DNA damage were observed from 0.01 μg L(-1) for S-metolachlor and 0.1 μg L(-1) for MESA and MOA. Results showed that S-metolachlor was more embryotoxic and genotoxic than its degradation products. Oyster sperm was also very sensitive to metolachlor exposure and followed the pattern: metolachlor (0.01 μg L(-1))>MOA (0.1 μg L(-1))>MESA (1 μg L(-1)). Metolachlor and MESA mainly triggered variations in the transcription level of genes encoding proteins involved in oxidative stress responses (mitochondrial superoxide dismutase and catalase). Overall, no significant variation in transcription levels could be detected in C. gigas embryos exposed to MOA. This study demonstrates that metolachlor and its main degradation products have the potential to impact several steps of oyster development and therefore recruitment in coastal areas exposed to chronic inputs of pesticides. PMID:24378469

  4. Halotolerance, ligninase production and herbicide degradation ability of basidiomycetes strains

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, R.L.; Monteiro, D.A.; Boscolo, M.; Dasilva, R.; Gomes, E.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi have been recently recognized as organisms able to grow in presence of high salt concentration with halophilic and halotolerance properties and their ligninolytic enzyme complex have an unspecific action enabling their use to degradation of a number of xenobiotic compounds. In this work, both the effect of salt and polyols on growth of the basidiomycetes strains, on their ability to produce ligninolytic enzyme and diuron degradation were evaluated. Results showed that the presence of NaCl in the culture medium affected fungal specimens in different ways. Seven out of ten tested strains had growth inhibited by salt while Dacryopinax elegans SXS323, Polyporus sp MCA128 and Datronia stereoides MCA167 fungi exhibited higher biomass production in medium containing 0.5 and 0.6 mol.L−1 of NaCl, suggesting to be halotolerant. Polyols such as glycerol and mannitol added into the culture media improved the biomass and ligninases production by D. elegans but the fungus did not reveal consumption of these polyols from media. This fungus degraded diuron in medium control, in presence of NaCl as well as polyols, produced MnP, LiP and laccase. PMID:24688513

  5. [Microbial degradation of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid--A review].

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiqin; Liu, Shuliang; Yao, Kai

    2015-09-01

    3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) with estrogen toxicity is one of the intermediate products of most pyrethroid pesticides. 3-PBA is difficult to degrade in the natural environment, and threatens food safety and human health. Microbial degradation of pyrethroids and their intermediate product (3-PBA) has become a hot topic in recent years. Here, we reviewed microbial species, degrading enzymes and degradation genes, degradation pathways of 3-PBA degrading and the application of 3-PBA degradation strains. This article provides references for the study of 3-PBA degradation by microorganisms. PMID:26762020

  6. Identification of new aqueous chemical degradation products of isophosphoramide mustard.

    PubMed

    Breil, S; Martino, R; Gilard, V; Malet-Martino, M; Niemeyer, U

    2001-06-01

    NMR (31P, 1H and 13C) spectroscopy was used to study the products of the degradation of isophosphoramide mustard (IPM) in buffered solutions at pH ranging from 1 to 13. At pH < or = 1, the only degradation compounds detected were phosphate ion (Pi) and chloroethylammonium chloride (CEA-HCl), resulting from the breakdown of the two P-N bonds (pathway Ia). At pH 9.3 and 13, only the products of 1,3-cyclization of the N-chloroethyl group (monoaziridinylIPM (monoAzIPM) and a very low level of bisaziridinylIPM (bisAzIPM)) were found after approximately 15 h of reaction (pathway II). At intermediate pH, the two pathways coexist. At pH 3.5 and 5.0, the P-N bond hydrolysis is the major pathway, but two final phosphorylated products were detected, Pi which represented 67% (pH 3.5) and 17% (pH 5.0) of all the IPM phosphorylated degradation products after approximately 15 h of reaction, and phosphorylethanolamine (PEA) which represented 16% (pH 3.5) and 46% (pH 5.0) of the same sum. PEA formation can be explained by the 1,5-cyclization of a transient compound giving a 1,3,2-oxazaphospholidine intermediate whose P-N bond is exclusively cleaved in acidic medium. The presence of monohydroxyIPM (monoOHIPM) (whose percentage increases with pH from 5% (pH 3.5) to approximately 28% (pH 5.0) of all the IPM phosphorylated degradation compounds), probably coming from the alkylation by water of an aziridine/aziridinium intermediate, demonstrates the occurrence of pathway II. At pH 7.0 and 7.4, the pathway II is initiated first, leading to 1,3-cyclization(s), followed by water alkylation of the aziridines formed. The sequences are IPM 1-->monoAzIPM 5-->bisAzIPM 9; IPM 1-->monoAzIPM 5-->monoOHIPM 6-->monoAzIPM with a N-hydroxyethylchain (presumed structure) 7-->dihydroxyIPM 8. Nevertheless, PEA and Pi are the final products observed, which implies the P-N bond hydrolysis of products 5-9 as demonstrated by the presence in the medium of CEA, aziridine and ethanolamine. PMID:11377048

  7. ANALYTICAL METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR ALACHLOR ESA AND OTHER ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1998, USEPA published a Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) of 50 chemicals and 10 microorganisms. "Alachlor ESA and other acetanilide herbicide degradation products" is listed on the the 1998 CCL. Acetanilide degradation products are generally more water soluble...

  8. DETERMINATION OF INTERFERING TRIAZINE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ION TRAP MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deethyl atrazine (DEA), along with other triazine degradation products, has been added to the US Environmental Protection Agency's Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). In its gas chromatographic (GC) analysis, deethyl atrazine, a degradation product of atrazine, can ...

  9. Management technologies can reduce the environmental risk of pesticides in agricultural production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pesticide use in agriculture, the potential risk posed by pesticides when they are transported beyond the intended target, and their effects on human and environmental health have been of public concern for many years. We utilized 5 years of field data, quantifying pesticide transport with runoff fr...

  10. Amino Acid Degradations Produced by Lipid Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-06-10

    Differently to amino acid degradations produced by carbohydrate-derived reactive carbonyls, amino acid degradations produced by lipid oxidation products are lesser known in spite of being lipid oxidation a major source of reactive carbonyls in food. This article analyzes the conversion of amino acids into Strecker aldehydes, α-keto acids, and amines produced by lipid-derived free radicals and carbonyl compounds, as well as the role of lipid oxidation products on the reactions suffered by these compounds: the formation of Strecker aldehydes and other aldehydes from α-keto acids; the formation of Strecker aldehydes and olefins from amines; the formation of shorter aldehydes from Strecker aldehydes; and the addition reactions suffered by the olefins produced from the amines. The relationships among all these reactions and the effect of reaction conditions on them are discussed. This knowledge should contribute to better control food processing in order to favor the formation of desirable beneficial compounds and to inhibit the production of compounds with deleterious properties. PMID:25748518

  11. Degradation Products of Benzophenone-3 in Chlorinated Seawater Swimming Pools.

    PubMed

    Manasfi, Tarek; Storck, Veronika; Ravier, Sylvain; Demelas, Carine; Coulomb, Bruno; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-01

    Oxybenzone (2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenone, benzophenone-3) is one of the UV filters commonly found in sunscreens. Its presence in swimming pools and its reactivity with chlorine has already been demonstrated but never in seawater swimming pools. In these pools, chlorine added for disinfection results in the formation of bromine, due to the high levels of bromide in seawater, and leads to the formation of brominated disinfection byproducts, known to be more toxic than chlorinated ones. Therefore, it seems important to determine the transformation products of oxybenzone in chlorinated seawater swimming pools; especially that users of seawater swimming pools may apply sunscreens and other personal-care products containing oxybenzone before going to pools. This leads to the introduction of oxybenzone to pools, where it reacts with bromine. For this purpose, the reactivity of oxybenzone has been examined as a function of chlorine dose and temperature in artificial seawater to assess its potential to produce trihalomethanes and to determine the byproducts generated following chlorination. Increasing doses of chlorine and increasing temperatures enhanced the formation of bromoform. Experiments carried out with excess doses of chlorine resulted in the degradation of oxybenzone and allowed the determination of the degradation mechanisms leading to the formation of bromoform. In total, ten transformation products were identified, based on which the transformation pathway was proposed. PMID:26167727

  12. The Occurrence of Chlorothalonil, its Transformation Products, and Selected Other Pesticides in Texas and Oklahoma Streams, 2003-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglin, W. A.; Kuivila, K. M.; Winton, K. T.; Meyer, M. T.

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the fungicide chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-isophthalonitrile) or three of its transformation products are transported to surface water after use on peanuts or other crops. Chlorothalonil is classified as a probable carcinogen, and the 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product is more soluble, stable, and toxic than its parent compound. In 2003, 14 water samples were collected from three sites in Texas and two sites in Oklahoma. In 2004, six samples were collected from the two Oklahoma sites. Chlorothalonil was not detected in any sample. The 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product was detected in three of the six samples collected in 2004, with a maximum concentration of 0.018 μg/L; the other two transformation products were not detected in any sample. In addtion, samples were analyzed for as many as 109 other pesticides and transformation products. Atrazine was detected in 13 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.122 μg/L. Deethyatrazine was detected in 10 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.04 μg/L. Metolachlor was detected in 8 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.019 μg/L. Fifteen other pesticides or pesticide transformation products including 2,4-D, carbaryl, simazine, oryzalin, prometon, tebuthiuron were detected in four or fewer samples. In general, concentrations of pesticides were less than is commonly observed in Midwestern streams.

  13. Community air monitoring for pesticides. Part 3: using health-based screening levels to evaluate results collected for a year.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Pamela; Segawa, Randy; Schreider, Jay; Federighi, Veda; Neal, Rosemary; Brattesani, Madeline

    2014-03-01

    The CA Department of Pesticide Regulation (CDPR) and the CA Air Resources Board monitored 40 pesticides, including five degradation products, in Parlier, CA, to determine if its residents were exposed to any of these pesticides and, if so, in what amounts. They included 1,3-dichloropropene, acrolein, arsenic, azinphos-methyl, carbon disulfide, chlorpyrifos and its degradation product, chlorthalonil, copper, cypermethrin, diazinon and its degradation product, dichlorvos, dicofol, dimethoate and its degradation product, diuron, endosulfan and its degradation product, S-ethyl dipropylcarbamothioate (EPTC), formaldehyde, malathion and its degradation product, methyl isothiocyanate (MITC), methyl bromide, metolachlor, molinate, norflurazon, oryzalin, oxyfluorfen, permethrin, phosmet, propanil, propargite, simazine, SSS-tributylphosphorotrithioate, sulfur, thiobencarb, trifluralin, and xylene. Monitoring was conducted 3 days per week for a year. Twenty-three pesticides and degradation products were detected. Acrolein, arsenic, carbon disulfide, chlorpyrifos, copper, formaldehyde, methyl bromide, MITC, and sulfur were detected in more than half the samples. Since no regulatory ambient air standards exist for these pesticides, CDPR developed advisory, health-based non-cancer screening levels (SLs) to assess acute, subchronic, and chronic exposures. For carcinogenic pesticides, CDPR assessed risk using cancer potency values. Amongst non-carcinogenic agricultural use pesticides, only diazinon exceeded its SL. For carcinogens, 1,3-dichloropropene concentrations exceeded its cancer potency value. Based on these findings, CDPR has undertaken a more comprehensive evaluation of 1,3-dichloropropene, diazinon, and the closely related chlorpyrifos that was frequently detected. Four chemicals-acrolein, arsenic, carbon disulfide, and formaldehyde-sometimes used as pesticides were detected, although no pesticidal use was reported in the area during this study. Their presence was most likely due to vehicular or industrial emissions. PMID:24370859

  14. Pesticides use by smallholder farmers in vegetable production in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed Central

    Ngowi, A.V.F.; Mbise, T.J.; Ijani, A.S.M.; London, L.; Ajayi, O. C.

    2007-01-01

    Small-scale farmers in Northern Tanzania grow vegetables that include tomatoes, cabbages and onions and use many types of pesticides to control pests and diseases that attack these crops. Based on the use of questionnaires and interviews that were conducted in Arumeru, Monduli, Karatu, and Moshi rural districts, this study investigates farmers’ practices on vegetable pest management using pesticides and related cost and health effects. The types of pesticides used by the farmers in the study areas were insecticides (59%), fungicides (29%) and herbicides (10%) with the remaining 2% being rodenticides. About a third of the farmers applied pesticides in mixtures. Up to 90% had a maximum of 3 pesticides in a mixture. In all cases there were no specific instructions either from the labels or extension workers regarding these tank mixtures. Fifty three percent of the farmers reported that the trend of pesticide use was increasing, while 33% was constant and 14% was decreasing. More than 50 percent of the respondents applied pesticides up to 5 times or more per cropping season depending on the crop. Insecticides and fungicides were routinely applied by 77% and 7%, respectively by these farmers. Sixty eight percent of farmers reported having felt sick after routine application of pesticides. Pesticide-related health symptoms that were associated with pesticides use included skin problems and neurological system disturbances (dizziness, headache). Sixty one percent of farmers reported spending no money on health due to pesticides. These results can be used to develop a tool to quantify the cost of pesticide use in pest management by small-scale vegetable farmers in Northern Tanzania and contribute to the reformation of pesticide policy for safe and effective use of pesticides. PMID:18528532

  15. Fibrinogen Degradation Products and Periodontitis: Deciphering the Connection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fibrinogen degradation products (e.g. D-dimer) arise from digested fibrin clots and fibrinogen. Elevated concentrations accompany activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis and indicate chronic inflammatory diseases. D-Dimer tests are a quick, noninvasive method to rule out abnormal clotting. Periodontitis strongly affects the haemostatic system and evokes a procoagulant state. Correlation of chronic periodontitis with early indicators of disease (biomarkers) might be useful. Aim The aim of the study was to examine whether the plasma D-dimer concentration reflects the progression of chronic periodontitis and the beneficial effect of periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods Forty randomly selected subjects were divided into four groups, Group I: 10 healthy subjects, Group II: 10 with mild periodontitis, Group III: 10 with moderate periodontitis, Group IV: 10 with severe periodontitis. After thorough dental and periodontal examination, 3 mL of venous blood was collected for measurement of fibrinogen degradation products. Results The patients with moderate and chronic periodontitis exhibited high concentrations of D-dimer (mean value 434.98–535.52 mcg/mL), whereas subjects with mild or no periodontitis exhibited values of 329.78–211.29 mcg/mL. Concentrations of D-dimer were significantly reduced after therapy of all classes of periodontitis. Conclusion Periodontal treatment can reduce amount of D-dimer in the plasma. A higher than normal concentration is observed in chronic periodontitis. PMID:26816985

  16. Adsorption of ionisable pesticides in soils.

    PubMed

    Kah, M; Brown, C D

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the fate of a pesticide in soil is fundamental to the accurate assessment of its environmental behaviour and vital in ensuring the safe use of new and existing products. Ionisable pesticides comprise a significant proportion of both existing and new active substances registered for use in agriculture worldwide. This group of pesticides includes chemicals that are frequently found in groundwater and surface waters in many different countries. Despite this, approaches to predict the influence of soil properties on the behaviour of ionisable pesticides in soils are poorly developed. Current regulatory assessments frequently default to methods developed for nonionic chemicals, although it is evident that ionisable compounds do not often react like neutral molecules. This review presents the state of knowledge on the adsorption of ionisable pesticides in soils. It first introduces the issues concerning adsorption and the characteristics of this particular kind of chemical. The mechanisms postulated for the adsorption of ionisable pesticides are then described: these are hydrophobic partitioning, ionic exchange, charge transfer, ligand exchange, cation or water bridging, and the formation of bound residues. Relatively little experimental evidence is available, and we are still unable to determine the quantitative contribution of each process in a particular situation. Knowledge is still lacking concerning phenomena occurring at the surfaces of soil particles. Measurements do not allow determination of the operative pH at the surface of soil particles or in microenvironments, and the influence of ionic strength or competition effects is difficult to assess. Subsequently, the review focuses on the influence of soil properties on adsorption and on potential to predict the behaviour of ionisable pesticides in soils. Unlike hydrophobic compounds, adsorption of ionisable pesticides is highly sensitive to variation in pH. This relationship mainly derives from the different proportion of ionic and neutral forms of the pesticide present at each pH level but also from the presence of surfaces with pH-dependent charges in soils. Soil organic matter generally promotes adsorption, although a negative influence has sometimes been reported. Clay and oxides can also play a significant role in some cases. So far, no modelling approach has been applied successfully to a range of ionisable pesticides to predict their adsorption in soils. The standardization of experimental settings and the application of approaches specific to a particular class of pesticide or different type of soil might be necessary to describe the complexity of interactions among ionisable molecules. Degradation of ionisable pesticides is influenced by soil pH in a particular way that relates to changes in sorption, changes in composition and activity of the microbial community, and to shifts in the balance between different degradative mechanisms. PMID:17016919

  17. Pyrethroid Pesticides and Their Metabolites in Vacuum Cleaner Dust Collected from Homes and Day-Care Centers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the concentrations of 13 selected pyrethroid pesticides and their degradation products in samples of indoor dust that had been collected in vacuum cleaner bags during the Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persis...

  18. Pesticides and their breakdown products in Lake Waxahachie, Texas, and in finished drinking water from the lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ging, Patricia B.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1991, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program has collected pesticide data from streams and aquifers throughout the Nation (Gilliom and others, 1995). However, little published information on pesticides in public drinking water is available. The NAWQA Program usually collects data on the sources of drinking water but not on the finished drinking water. Therefore, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), in conjunction with the NAWQA Program, has initiated a nationwide pilot project to collect information on concentrations of pesticides and their breakdown products in finished drinking water, in source waters such as reservoirs, and in the basins that contribute water to the reservoirs. The pilot project was designed to collect water samples from finished drinking-water supplies and the associated source water from selected reservoirs that receive runoff from a variety of land uses. Lake Waxahachie, in Ellis County in north-central Texas, was chosen to represent a reservoir receiving water that includes runoff from cotton cropland. This fact sheet presents the results of pesticide sampling of source water from Lake Waxahachie and in finished drinking water from the lake. Analyses are compared to indicate differences in pesticide detections and concentrations between lake water and finished drinking water.

  19. Occurrence of Chlorothalonil, Its Transformation Products, and Selected Other Pesticides in Texas and Oklahoma Streams, 2003-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Winton, Kim; Meyer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study described in this report was to determine if the fungicide chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloroisophthalonitrile), three of its transformation products, or selected other pesticides are transported to surface water after use on peanuts or other crops in Texas and Oklahoma. The results summarized here are part of a larger study that includes data from sites in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. Chlorothalonil is classified as a probable carcinogen, and the 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product is more soluble, more stable, and, for some species, more toxic than its parent compound. In 2003, water samples were collected from three surface-water sites in Texas and two surface-water sites in Oklahoma; in 2004, samples were collected from the two Oklahoma sites. Chlorothalonil was not detected in any of the 20 samples analyzed. The 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product was detected in three samples collected in 2004, with a maximum concentration of 0.018 microgram per liter (?g/L); the other two transformation products (diamide chlorothalonil and 1-amide-4-hydroxy chlorothalonil) were not detected in any sample. In addition, 19 samples were analyzed for as many as 109 other pesticides and transformation products. Atrazine was detected in 13 samples and had a maximum concentration of 0.122 ?g/L. Deethylatrazine was detected in 10 samples and had a maximum concentration of 0.04 ?g/L. Metolachlor was detected in eight samples and had a maximum concentration of 0.019 ?g/L. Fifteen other pesticides or pesticide transformation products also were detected. In general, concentrations of pesticides were less than concentrations that are commonly observed in Midwestern streams. The results indicate that the use of chlorothalonil on peanut crops has not resulted in substantial contamination of the studied streams in Texas and Oklahoma.

  20. The investigation of the LED-activated FeFNS-TiO2 nanocatalyst for photocatalytic degradation and mineralization of organophosphate pesticides in water.

    PubMed

    Hossaini, Hiwa; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Farrokhi, Mehrdad

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the preparation and characterization of an efficient doped TiO2 as a novel catalyst for degradation of diazinon model pesticide using LED-activated photocatalysis. TiO2 was doped using N, NS, FeNS, and FeFNS. The FeFNS-doped TiO2 showed the highest catalytic activity in LED/photocatalysis. FeFNS-doped TiO2 is a mesoporous nanocrystal powder with a mean pore diameter of 10.2 nm, a specific surface area of 104.4 m(2)/g and a crystallite size of 6.7 nm. LED/photocatalysis using FeFNS-doped TiO2 improved diazinon degradation by 52.3% over that of as-made plain TiO2 at an optimum solution pH of 7. The diazinon degradation in LED/photocatalysis using FeFNS-doped TiO2 increased from 44.8% to 96.3% when the catalyst concentration increased from 25% to 300%at a reaction time of 100 min. The degradation and mineralization of diazinon during LED/photocatalysis with FeFNS-doped TiO2 catalyst followed the pseudo-first-order reaction model with the rate constants of 0.973 h(-1) and 0.541 h(-1), respectively. The FeFNS-doped TiO2 was found to be an efficient catalyst that was photoactivated using UV-LED lamps. LED/photocatalysis with FeFNS-doped TiO2 catalyst is a promising alternative to conventional UV/TiO2photocatalysis for producing free OH radicals for use in the degradation and mineralization of water toxic contaminants. PMID:24793111

  1. Relationship between bacterial diversity and function under biotic control: the soil pesticide degraders as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Monard, Cécile; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Le Bot, Barbara; Binet, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    In soil, the way biotic parameters impact the relationship between bacterial diversity and function is still unknown. To understand these interactions better, we used RNA-based stable-isotope probing to study the diversity of active atrazine-degrading bacteria in relation to atrazine degradation and to explore the impact of earthworm-soil engineering with respect to this relationship. Bulk soil, burrow linings and earthworm casts were incubated with 13C-atrazine. The pollutant degradation was quantified by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry for 8 days, whereas active atrazine degraders were identified at 2 and 8 days by sequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA in the 13C-RNA fractions from the three soil microsites. An original diversity of atrazine degraders was found. Earthworm soil engineering greatly modified the taxonomic composition of atrazine degraders with dominance of α-, β- and γ-proteobacteria in burrow linings and of Actinobacteria in casts. Earthworm soil bioturbation increased the γ-diversity of atrazine degraders over the soil microsites generated. Atrazine degradation was enhanced in burrow linings in which primary atrazine degraders, closely related to Pelomonas aquatica, were detected only 2 days after atrazine addition. Atrazine degradation efficiency was not linearly related to the species richness of degraders but likely relied on keystone species. By enhancing soil heterogeneity, earthworms sustained high phylogenetic bacterial diversity and exerted a biotic control on the bacterial diversity–function relationships. Our findings call for future investigations to assess the ecological significance of biotic controls on the relationships between diversity and function on ecosystem properties and services (for example, soil detoxification) at larger scales. PMID:21160539

  2. Isolation and characterization of soybean waste-degrading microorganisms and analysis of fertilizer effects of the degraded products.

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, M; Okajima, J; Hasumi, F

    1994-01-01

    Two microorganisms which could degrade soybean lees efficiently were isolated and identified as Bacillus circulans and B. stearothermophilus. These two strains secreted thermostable proteases into the medium and could digest soybean lees rapidly and completely at 50 degrees C. Initially, the soybean lees were degraded to proteins in approximately 20 h by these two strains, after which time the concentrations of peptides in the medium gradually increased. The degraded products from soybean lees contained abundant nitrogen compounds, such as peptides, amino acids, and amides. Approximately 10 times more fresh plant weight was obtained (in the case of Brassica campestris) when these degraded products were applied than when water was applied for 42 days. These stimulatory effects of the soybean lees products were almost equal to those of a chemically synthesized fertilizer. Images PMID:8117080

  3. Magnesium degradation products: effects on tissue and human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seitz, J-M; Eifler, R; Bach, Fr-W; Maier, H J

    2014-10-01

    Owing to their mechanical properties, metallic materials present a promising solution in the field of resorbable implants. The magnesium metabolism in humans differs depending on its introduction. The natural, oral administration of magnesium via, for example, food, essentially leads to an intracellular enrichment of Mg(2+) . In contrast, introducing magnesium-rich substances or implants into the tissue results in a different decomposition behavior. Here, exposing magnesium to artificial body electrolytes resulted in the formation of the following products: magnesium hydroxide, magnesium oxide, and magnesium chloride, as well as calcium and magnesium apatites. Moreover, it can be assumed that Mg(2+) , OH(-) ions, and gaseous hydrogen are also present and result from the reaction for magnesium in an aqueous environment. With the aid of physiological metabolic processes, the organism succeeds in either excreting the above mentioned products or integrating them into the natural metabolic process. Only a burst release of these products is to be considered a problem. A multitude of general tissue effects and responses from the Mg's degradation products is considered within this review, which is not targeting specific implant classes. Furthermore, common alloying elements of magnesium and their hazardous potential in vivo are taken into account. PMID:24222399

  4. Modeling Degradation Product Partitioning in Chlorinated-DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroumand, A.; Ramsburg, A.; Christ, J.; Abriola, L.

    2009-12-01

    Metabolic reductive dechlorination degrades aqueous phase contaminant concentrations, increasing the driving force for DNAPL dissolution. Results from laboratory and field investigations suggest that accumulation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) may occur within DNAPL source zones. The lack of (or slow) degradation of cis-DCE and VC within bioactive DNAPL source zones may result in these dechlorination products becoming distributed among the solid, aqueous, and organic phases. Partitioning of cis-DCE and VC into the organic phase may reduce aqueous phase concentrations of these contaminants and result in the enrichment of these dechlorination products within the non-aqueous phase. Enrichment of degradation products within DNAPL may reduce some of the advantages associated with the application of bioremediation in DNAPL source zones. Thus, it is important to quantify how partitioning (between the aqueous and organic phases) influences the transport of cis-DCE and VC within bioactive DNAPL source zones. In this work, abiotic two-phase (PCE-water) one-dimensional column experiments are modeled using analytical and numerical methods to examine the rate of partitioning and the capacity of PCE-DNAPL to reversibly sequester cis-DCE. These models consider aqueous-phase, nonaqueous phase, and aqueous plus nonaqueous phase mass transfer resistance using linear driving force and spherical diffusion expressions. Model parameters are examined and compared for different experimental conditions to evaluate the mechanisms controlling partitioning. Biot number, a dimensionless number which is an index of the ratio of the aqueous phase mass transfer rate in boundary layer to the mass transfer rate within the NAPL, is used to characterize conditions in which either or both processes are controlling. Results show that application of a single aqueous resistance is capable to capture breakthrough curves when DNAPL is distributed in porous media as low-saturation ganglia, while diffusion within the DNAPL should be considered for larger NAPL pools. These results offer important insights to the monitoring and interpretation of bioremediation strategies employed within DNAPL source zones.

  5. General evaluation of risk associated with the use of pesticides and other chemical substances on animal breeding and plant production farms.

    PubMed

    Pomorska, K

    1999-01-01

    A general characteristic of chemical risk on plant production farms in Poland is presented. The paper describes risk associated with the natural occurrence of chemical substances (such as ammonium and hydrogen sulfide) in the process of animal breeding and risk connected with the use of artificial fertilizers and pesticides. Pesticides are briefly described taking into consideration toxicity classes and the toxic effect of individual compounds. Exposure to pesticides is presented for individual methods and related activities. Finally, the author discusses pesticide risk on fruit-growing farms and in greenhouses. PMID:10602659

  6. Capillary electrophoresis separation of the desamino degradation products of oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Creamer, Jessica S.; Krauss, Shannon T.; Lunte, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin is an endogenous and therapeutic hormone necessary for maternal health. It is also the subject of fast growing research in the field of behavioral science. This article describes a rapid capillary electrophoresis method using UV detection at 214 nm for the determination of the deamidation products of oxytocin. Deamidation is the most common degradation pathway of peptides and proteins and can lead to reduced therapeutic efficiency of biopharmaceuticals. To achieve a separation of the seven structurally similar desamino peptides from oxytocin, 11 mM sulfobutyl ether β-cyclodextrin and 10% v/v MeOH were added to a background electrolyte of 50 mM phosphate buffer at pH 6.0. The assay is linear within ≤5-100 μM for all species with a total analysis time of 12 min. The method was then applied to monitor the heat-stress degradation of oxytocin at 70°C, where all seven desamino species were observed over a 96 h period. PMID:24166826

  7. Stability and Effects of Some Pesticides in Soil1

    PubMed Central

    Bartha, Richard; Lanzilotta, R. P.; Pramer, David

    1967-01-01

    The influence of 29 pesticides on CO2 production and nitrification by soil microorganisms was determined. A few compounds were stable but without significant effect in soil (chlorinated hydrocarbons), some persisted and depressed respiration and nitrification (carbamates, cyclodienes, phenylureas, thiolcarbamates), and others displayed toxicity but were transformed by soil microorganisms (amides, anilides, organophosphates, phenylcarbamates, triazines). Some compounds of the last type induced an initial increase and subsequent decrease in CO2 production by soil. No simple explanation of this effect is possible, but the results of studies of model systems having established activities suggest that in soil any one or a combination of the following mechanisms is responsible for the observed complex relation of CO2 production to time: (i) a pesticide acts to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation in a manner analogous to 2,4-dinitrophenol; (ii) a pesticide lacking antimicrobial action is oxidized in part and transformed to a stable and toxic product; (iii) a pesticide that is selectively toxic inhibits CO2 production by sensitive microorganisms but is subject to oxidation without detoxification by other members of the microbial population that are resistant to its initial action. Pesticide concentrations greatly in excess of those recommended for agricultural and home use were required to produce an effect, and supplementary organic matter (glucose) tended to reduce pesticide toxicity and increase the microbial degradation of pesticides in soil. PMID:6031443

  8. Effect of handling and processing on pesticide residues in food- a review.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Usha; Sandhu, Kulwant Singh

    2014-02-01

    Pesticides are one of the major inputs used for increasing agricultural productivity of crops. The pesticide residues, left to variable extent in the food materials after harvesting, are beyond the control of consumer and have deleterious effect on human health. The presence of pesticide residues is a major bottleneck in the international trade of food commodities. The localization of pesticides in foods varies with the nature of pesticide molecule, type and portion of food material and environmental factors. The food crops treated with pesticides invariably contain unpredictable amount of these chemicals, therefore, it becomes imperative to find out some alternatives for decontamination of foods. The washing with water or soaking in solutions of salt and some chemicals e.g. chlorine, chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, ozone, acetic acid, hydroxy peracetic acid, iprodione and detergents are reported to be highly effective in reducing the level of pesticides. Preparatory steps like peeling, trimming etc. remove the residues from outer portions. Various thermal processing treatments like pasteurization, blanching, boiling, cooking, steaming, canning, scrambling etc. have been found valuable in degradation of various pesticides depending upon the type of pesticide and length of treatment. Preservation techniques like drying or dehydration and concentration increase the pesticide content many folds due to concentration effect. Many other techniques like refining, fermentation and curing have been reported to affect the pesticide level in foods to varied extent. Milling, baking, wine making, malting and brewing resulted in lowering of pesticide residue level in the end products. Post harvest treatments and cold storage have also been found effective. Many of the decontamination techniques bring down the concentration of pesticides below MRL. However, the diminution effect depends upon the initial concentration at the time of harvest, substrate/food and type of pesticide. There is diversified information available in literature on the effect of preparation, processing and subsequent handling and storage of foods on pesticide residues which has been compiled in this article. PMID:24493878

  9. Enhancing the Promiscuous Phosphotriesterase Activity of a Thermostable Lactonase (GkaP) for the Efficient Degradation of Organophosphate Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Ye, Wei; Yang, Guangyu; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Hai-Feng; Cui, Li

    2012-01-01

    The phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) enzymes in the amidohydrolase superfamily hydrolyze various lactones and exhibit latent phosphotriesterase activities. These enzymes serve as attractive templates for in vitro evolution of neurotoxic organophosphates (OPs) with hydrolytic capabilities that can be used as bioremediation tools. Here, a thermostable PLL from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) was targeted for joint laboratory evolution with the aim of enhancing its catalytic efficiency against OP pesticides. By a combination of site saturation mutagenesis and whole-gene error-prone PCR approaches, several improved variants were isolated. The most active variant, 26A8C, accumulated eight amino acid substitutions and demonstrated a 232-fold improvement over the wild-type enzyme in reactivity (kcat/Km) for the OP pesticide ethyl-paraoxon. Concomitantly, this variant showed a 767-fold decrease in lactonase activity with δ-decanolactone, imparting a specificity switch of 1.8 × 105-fold. 26A8C also exhibited high hydrolytic activities (19- to 497-fold) for several OP pesticides, including parathion, diazinon, and chlorpyrifos. Analysis of the mutagenesis sites on the GkaP structure revealed that most mutations are located in loop 8, which determines substrate specificity in the amidohydrolase superfamily. Molecular dynamics simulation shed light on why 26A8C lost its native lactonase activity and improved the promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity. These results permit us to obtain further insights into the divergent evolution of promiscuous enzymes and suggest that laboratory evolution of GkaP may lead to potential biological solutions for the efficient decontamination of neurotoxic OP compounds. PMID:22798358

  10. alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone: production and degradation

    PubMed Central

    D’Agostino, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is a polypeptide hormone precursor that is expressed in the brain and in peripheral tissues such as in the pituitary gland, immune system, and skin. In the brain, POMC is processed to form several peptides including alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH). alpha-MSH is expressed in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and in the nucleus tractus solitarius of the brainstem where it has a crucial role in the regulation of metabolic functions. Specifically, α-MSH is an anorexigenic peptide. Its production and maturation processes have been shown to be regulated according to the metabolic condition of the organism. This review summarizes our current knowledge on α-MSH processing including its maturation and degradation processes and pharmacological aspects of its manipulation. PMID:20617297

  11. Enzymatic degradation of plutonium-contaminated cellulose products

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, C.E.; Rainwater, K.A.; Swift, L.M.; Barnes, D.L.; Worl, L.A.

    1999-06-01

    Enzyme solutions produced for commercial purposes unrelated to waste management have the potential for reducing the volume of wastes in streams containing cellulose, lipid and protein materials. For example, the authors have shown previously that cellulases used in denim production and in detergent formulations are able to digest cellulose-containing sorbents and other cellulose-based wastes contaminated either with crude oil or with uranium. This presentation describes the use of one such enzyme preparation (Rapidase{trademark}, manufactured by Genencor, Rochester, NY) for the degradation of cotton sorbents intentionally contaminated with low levels of plutonium. This is part of a feasibility study to determine if such treatments have a role in reducing the volume of low level and transuranic wastes to minimize the amount of radionuclide-contaminated waste destined for costly disposal options.

  12. Enzymatic degradation of plutonium-contaminated cellulose products

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, C.E.; Rainwater, K.A.; Swift, L.M.; Barnes, D.L.; Worl, L.; Avens, L.

    1999-03-01

    Enzyme solutions produced for commercial purposes unrelated to waste management have the potential for reducing the volume of wastes in streams containing cellulose, lipid and protein materials. For example, the authors have shown that cellulases used in denim production and in detergent formulations are able to digest cellulose-containing sorbents and other cellulose-based wastes contaminated either with crude oil or with radionuclides. This presentation describes the use of one such enzyme preparation (Rapidase{trademark}) for the degradation of cotton sorbents intentionally contaminated with low levels of plutonium. This is part of a feasibility study to determine if such treatments have a role in reducing the volume of low level and transuranic wastes to minimize the amount of radionuclide-contaminated waste that must be disposed of in secured storage areas.

  13. Toxicology of atmospheric degradation products of selected hydrochlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminsky, Laurence S.

    1990-01-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is a liquid with a sharp biting odor. It has been proposed as the product of environmental degradation of the hydrochlorofluorocarbons HCFC-123, HCFC-124, HFC-134a, and HFC-125. Compounds HCFC-141b and HCFC-142b could yield mixed fluorochloroacetic acids, for which there is no available toxicologic data. The release of hydrochlorofluorocarbons into the environment could also give rise to HF, but the additional fluoride burden (1 to 3 ppb) in rainwater is trivial compared to levels in fluoridated drinking water (1 ppm), and would provide an insignificant risk to humans. Thus, in this paper only the toxocologic data on TFA is reviewed to assess the potential risks of environmental exposure.

  14. Glucose degradation products in peritoneal dialysis: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Jörres, Achim

    2003-01-01

    In continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients, treatment success is inextricably linked to the functional and morphological integrity of the peritoneal membrane. This membrane, however, is repeatedly exposed to peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDFs) with unphysiological composition (e.g., acidic pH, high glucose content, hyperosmolarity). More recently, attention of researchers and clinicians has been focused on the presence of glucose degradation products (GDPs) that are generated during heat sterilization of PDF. These GDPs were found to adversely affect peritoneal cell function both acutely and chronically. Recently, a new family of multi-chambered PDFs has been introduced into clinical practice. By keeping the glucose in a separate compartment at very low pH, the generation of GDPs during heat sterilization is markedly reduced. Initial clinical studies indicate that treatment with these novel PDFs may lead to improved clinical outcomes. The current article reviews recent experimental and clinical experience with both conventional and multi-chambered PDFs. PMID:12771536

  15. Production of degradable polymers from food-waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.P.: Coleman, R.D.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Moon, S.H.

    1992-07-01

    In the United States, billions of pounds of cheese whey permeate and approximately 10 billion pounds of potatoes processed each year are typically discarded or sold as cattle feed at $3{endash}6/ton; moreover, the transportation required for these means of disposal can be expensive. As a potential solution to this economic and environmental problem, Argonne National Laboratory is developing technology that: Biologically converts existing food-processing waste streams into lactic acid and uses lactic acid for making environmentally safe, degradable polylactic acid (PLA) and modified PLA plastics and coatings. An Argonne process for biologically converting high-carbohydrate food waste will not only help to solve a waste problem for the food industry, but will also save energy and be economically attractive. Although the initial substrate for Argonne`s process development is potato by-product, the process can be adapted to convert other food wastes, as well as corn starch, to lactic acid. Proprietary technology for biologically converting greater than 90% of the starch in potato wastes to glucose has been developed. Glucose and other products of starch hydrolysis are subsequently fermented by bacteria that produce lactic acid. The lactic acid is recovered, concentrated, and further purified to a polymer-grade product.

  16. Production of degradable polymers from food-waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.P.: Coleman, R.D.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Moon, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    In the United States, billions of pounds of cheese whey permeate and approximately 10 billion pounds of potatoes processed each year are typically discarded or sold as cattle feed at $3{endash}6/ton; moreover, the transportation required for these means of disposal can be expensive. As a potential solution to this economic and environmental problem, Argonne National Laboratory is developing technology that: Biologically converts existing food-processing waste streams into lactic acid and uses lactic acid for making environmentally safe, degradable polylactic acid (PLA) and modified PLA plastics and coatings. An Argonne process for biologically converting high-carbohydrate food waste will not only help to solve a waste problem for the food industry, but will also save energy and be economically attractive. Although the initial substrate for Argonne's process development is potato by-product, the process can be adapted to convert other food wastes, as well as corn starch, to lactic acid. Proprietary technology for biologically converting greater than 90% of the starch in potato wastes to glucose has been developed. Glucose and other products of starch hydrolysis are subsequently fermented by bacteria that produce lactic acid. The lactic acid is recovered, concentrated, and further purified to a polymer-grade product.

  17. Design of an optimized biomixture for the degradation of carbofuran based on pesticide removal and toxicity reduction of the matrix.

    PubMed

    Chin-Pampillo, Juan Salvador; Ruiz-Hidalgo, Karla; Masís-Mora, Mario; Carazo-Rojas, Elizabeth; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E

    2015-12-01

    Pesticide biopurification systems contain a biologically active matrix (biomixture) responsible for the accelerated elimination of pesticides in wastewaters derived from pest control in crop fields. Biomixtures have been typically prepared using the volumetric composition 50:25:25 (lignocellulosic substrate/humic component/soil); nonetheless, formal composition optimization has not been performed so far. Carbofuran is an insecticide/nematicide of high toxicity widely employed in developing countries. Therefore, the composition of a highly efficient biomixture (composed of coconut fiber, compost, and soil, FCS) for the removal of carbofuran was optimized by means of a central composite design and response surface methodology. The volumetric content of soil and the ratio coconut fiber/compost were used as the design variables. The performance of the biomixture was assayed by considering the elimination of carbofuran, the mineralization of (14)C-carbofuran, and the residual toxicity of the matrix, as response variables. Based on the models, the optimal volumetric composition of the FCS biomixture consists of 45:13:42 (coconut fiber/compost/soil), which resulted in minimal residual toxicity and ∼99% carbofuran elimination after 3 days. This optimized biomixture considerably differs from the standard 50:25:25 composition, which remarks the importance of assessing the performance of newly developed biomixtures during the design of biopurification systems. PMID:26250812

  18. Selectivity of Pesticides used in Integrated Apple Production to the Lacewing, Chrysoperla externa

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Alexandre Pinho; Carvalho, Geraldo Andrade; Moscardini, Valéria Fonseca; Lasmar, Olinto; Rezende, Denise Tourino; Marques, Márcio Candeias

    2010-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the toxicity of the pesticides abamectin 18 CE (0.02 g a.i. L-1), carbaryl 480 SC (1.73 g a.i. L-1), sulfur 800 GrDA (4.8 g a.i. L-1), fenitrothion 500 CE (0.75 g a.i. L-1), methidathion 400 CE (0.4 g a.i. L-1), and trichlorfon 500 SC (1.5 g a.i. L-1) as applied in integrated apple production in Brazil on the survival, oviposition capacity, and egg viability of the lacewing, Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) from Bento Gonçalves and Vacaria, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. An attempt was made to study morphological changes caused by some of these chemicals, by means of ultrastructural analysis, using a scanning electronic microscope. Carbaryl, fenitrothion, and methidathion caused 100% adult mortality for both populations, avoiding evaluation of pesticides' effects on predator reproductive parameters. Abamectin and sulfur also affected the survival of these individuals with mortality rates of 10% and 6.7%, respectively, for adults from Bento Gonçalves, and were harmless to those from Vacaria at the end of evaluation. Trichlorfon was also harmless to adults from both populations. No compound reduced oviposition capacity. C. externa from Vacaria presented higher reproductive potential than those from Bento Gonçalves. In relation to egg viability, sulfur was the most damaging compound to both populations of C. externa. Ultrastructural analyses showed morphological changes in the micropyle and the chorion of eggs laid by C. externa treated with either abamectin or sulfur. The treatment may have influenced the fertilization of C. externa eggs and embryonic development. Sulfur was responsible for malformations in the end region of the abdomen and genitals of treated females. When applied to adults, abamectin, sulfur, and trichlorfon were harmless, while carbaryl, fenitrothion, and methidathion were harmful, according to the IOBC classification. PMID:20879916

  19. Identifying high production, low production and degraded rangelands in Senegal with normalized difference vegetation index data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tappan, G. Gray; Wood, Lynette; Moore, Donald G.

    1993-01-01

    Seasonal herbaceous vegetation production on Senegal's native rangelands exhibits high spatial and temporal variability. This variability can be monitored using normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data computed from 1-km resolution Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) image data. Although annual fluctuations in rainfall account for some of the variability, numerous long-term production patterns are evident in the AVHRR time-series data. Different n productivity reflect variations in the region's climate, topography, soils, and land use. Areas of overgrazing and intensive cultivation have caused long-term soil and vegetation degradation. Rangelands of high and low productivity, and degraded rangelands were identified using NDVI. Time-series image data from 1987 though 1992 were used to map relative rangeland productivity. The results were compared to detailed resource maps on soils, vegetation and land use. Much of the variation in rangeland productivity correlated well to the known distribution of resources. The study developed an approach that identified a number of areas of degraded soils and low vegetation production.

  20. Physico-chemical characteristics affect the spatial distribution of pesticide and transformation product loss to an agricultural brook.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, M; Olsson, O; Stamm, C; Weiler, M; Kümmerer, K

    2015-11-01

    Diffuse entry of pesticide residues from agriculture into rivers is spatially unevenly distributed. Therefore, the identification of critical source areas (CSAs) may support water quality management in agricultural catchments. In contrast to former studies, we followed the hypothesis that not only hydrological and topographical characteristics but also physico-chemical properties of pesticide residues have a major influence on their loss to rivers and on corresponding formation of CSAs. We designed a virtual experiment, i.e. a numerical experiment as close as possible to environmental conditions, in a headwater catchment where pronounced spatial differences in hydrological transport processes were identified in the past. 144 scenarios with different combinations of adsorption coefficients (KOC = 10-1000 ml/g) and transformation half-lives (DT50 = 3-60 days) for pesticide parent compounds (PCs) and their transformation products (TPs) were simulated using the catchment-scale spatially distributed reactive transport model ZIN-AgriTra. Export fractions of substances in the virtual experiment ranged from 0.001-15% for pesticides and 0.001-1.8% for TPs. The results of the scenario investigations suggest that more of the calculated export mass variability could be attributed to KOC than to DT50 for both PCs and TPs. CSAs for TPs were spatially more equally distributed in the catchment than for PC export which was likely an effect of changing physico-chemical properties during transformation. The ranking of highest export fields was different between PCs and TPs for most of the investigated scenarios but six fields appeared among the top ten export fields in 95% of the scenarios, which shows the influence of site characteristics such as tile drains or soil properties in the catchment. Thus, the highest export fields were determined by a combination of site characteristics and substance characteristics. Therefore, despite the challenge of widely differing physico-chemical characteristics of pesticides on the market, these characteristics are an important consideration when delineating pesticide residue CSAs. PMID:26119387

  1. Multiresidue method for the fast determination of pesticides in nutraceutical products (Camellia sinensis) by GC coupled to triple quadrupole MS.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Domínguez, Gerardo; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Romero-González, Roberto; Frenich, Antonia Garrido

    2014-03-01

    A method based on QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) has been developed and validated for the determination and quantification of more than 140 pesticides in nutraceutical products obtained from green tea (Camellia sinensis). Extraction was performed with acidified acetonitrile (acetic acid 1%, v/v) and a clean-up step using primary secondary amine (50 mg), graphitized black carbon (100 mg) and magnesium sulfate (200 mg) was needed. Pesticide determination was achieved utilizing GC coupled to triple quadrupole MS/MS using the selective-reaction monitoring mode. The total run time was 23 min. Pesticides were quantified using matrix-matched calibration. Recoveries ranged from 70 to 120% and relative SD was lower than 25% at 10, 50, and 100 μg/kg. LOQs were lower than 10 μg/kg. 148 pesticides were validated. The validated method was applied to commercial nutraceutical products, detecting 4,4-dichlorobenzophenone (28 μg/kg), o,p'-dicofol (38 μg/kg) and p,p-dicofol (44 μg/kg) in a few samples. PMID:24532456

  2. Evaluation of vegetable production management practices to reduce the ecological risk of pesticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of agricultural management practices to reduce the ecological risks of pesticides was evaluated. Risk quotients, a mathematical description of the relationship between exposure and toxicity, and hazard ratings, a rank of potential risk of pesticides to aquatic environments, were calculat...

  3. 77 FR 77077 - Pesticide Product Registration; Receipt of Applications for New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... affected by this action if you are an agricultural producer, food manufacturer, or pesticide manufacturer... (NAICS code 112). Food manufacturing (NAICS code 311). Pesticide manufacturing (NAICS code 32532). B.... Docket ID Number: EPA-HQ-OPP-2012- 0981. Applicant: Y-Tex Corporation, P.O. Box 1450, 1825 Big Horn...

  4. Pesticide Flow Analysis to Assess Human Exposure in Greenhouse Flower Production in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R.

    2013-01-01

    Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area. PMID:23528812

  5. Pesticide flow analysis to assess human exposure in greenhouse flower production in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R

    2013-04-01

    Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area. PMID:23528812

  6. Forced Degradation Behaviour of Fluphenazine Hydrochloride by LC and Characterization of its Oxidative Degradation Product by LC–MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Thummar, Kashyap N.; Ghava, Dilip J.; Mistry, Anvi; Vachhani, Ashish; Sheth, Navin R.

    2015-01-01

    A novel, stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method is delivered for the determination of fluphenazine hydrochloride (FPZ) and its degradation products. The forced degradation testing of FPZ was carried out for hydrolytic, oxidative, photolytic, and thermal degradation. The degradation appeared using a reversed-phase C18 column at ambient temperature with a mobile phase comprised of methanol : acetonitrile : (10 mM) ammonium acetate (70:15:15, v/v/v) pH 6.0, adjusted with acetic acid, having a flow rate of 1 ml min−1 and a detection wavelength at 259 nm. Primarily, the maximum degradation products were formed under oxidative stress conditions. The product was distinguished through LC-MS/MS fragmentation studies. Based on the results, a more complete degradation pathway for the drug could be proposed. The modernized method was found to be precise, accurate, specific, and selective. The method was found to be suitable for the quality control of fluphenazine hydrochloride in the tablet as well as in stability-indicating studies. PMID:26839816

  7. Intensification of degradation of methomyl (carbamate group pesticide) by using the combination of ultrasonic cavitation and process intensifying additives.

    PubMed

    Raut-Jadhav, Sunita; Pinjari, Dipak V; Saini, Daulat R; Sonawane, Shirish H; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, the degradation of methomyl has been carried out by using the ultrasound cavitation (US) and its combination with H2O2, Fenton and photo-Fenton process. The study of effect of operating pH and ultrasound power density has indicated that maximum extent of degradation of 28.57% could be obtained at the optimal pH of 2.5 and power density of 0.155W/mL. Application of US in combination with H2O2, Fenton and photo-Fenton process has further accelerated the rate of degradation of methomyl with complete degradation of methomyl in 27min, 18min and 9min respectively. Mineralization study has proved that a combination of US and photo-Fenton process is the most effective process with maximum extent of mineralization of 78.8%. Comparison of energy efficiency and cost effectiveness of various processes has indicated that the electrical cost of 79892.34Rs./m(3) for ultrasonic degradation of methomyl has drastically reduced to 2277.00Rs./m(3), 1518.00Rs./m(3) and 807.58Rs./m(3) by using US in combination with H2O2, Fenton and photo-Fenton process respectively. The cost analysis has also indicated that the combination of US and photo-Fenton process is the most energy efficient and cost effective process. PMID:26964933

  8. Pyrene degradation accelerated by constructed consortium of bacterium and microalga: effects of degradation products on the microalgal growth.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shusheng; Chen, Baowei; Lin, Li; Wang, Xiaowei; Tam, Nora Fung-Yee; Luan, Tiangang

    2014-12-01

    Abundant microbes including bacteria, fungi, or algae are capable of biodegrading polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, pure cultures never occur in the contaminated environments. This study aimed to understand the general potential mechanisms of interactions between microbes under pollution stress by constructing a consortium of PAH-degrading microalga (Selenastrum capricornutum) and bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain A1-PYR). Bacteria alone could grow on the pyrene, whereas the growth of algae alone was substantially inhibited by the pyrene of 10 mg L(-1). In the mixing culture of algae and bacteria, the growth rate of algae was significantly increased from day 4 onward. Rapid bacterial degradation of pyrene might mitigate the toxicity of pyrene to algae. Phenolic acids, the bacterial degradation products of pyrene, could serve as the phytohormone for promoting algal growth in the coculture of algae and bacteria. In turn, bacterial growth was also enhanced by the algae presented in the mixing culture. Consequently, the fastest degradation of pyrene among all biodegradation systems was achieved by the consortium of algae and bacteria probably due to such interactions between the two species by virtue of degradation products. This study reveals that the consortium containing multiple microbial species is high potential for microbial remediation of pyrene-contaminated environments, and provides a new strategy to degrade the recalcitrant PAHs. PMID:25382552

  9. 75 FR 74713 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ...), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION.... List of Subjects Environmental protection. Dated: November 22, 2010. Richard P. Keigwin, Jr.,...

  10. Reflectance model for quantifying chlorophyll a in the presence of productivity degradation products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Hawes, S. K.; Steward, R. G.; Baker, K. A.; Smith, R. C.; Mitchell, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    A reflectance model developed to estimate chlorophyll a concentrations in the presence of marine colored dissolved organic matter, pheopigments, detritus, and bacteria is presented. Nomograms and lookup tables are generated to describe the effects of different mixtures of chlorophyll a and these degradation products on the R(412):R(443) and R(443):R(565) remote-sensing reflectance or irradiance reflectance ratios. These are used to simulate the accuracy of potential ocean color satellite algorithms, assuming that atmospheric effects have been removed. For the California Current upwelling and offshore regions, with chlorophyll a not greater than 1.3 mg/cu m, the average error for chlorophyll a retrievals derived from irradiance reflectance data for degradation product-rich areas was reduced from +/-61 percent to +/-23 percent by application of an algorithm using two reflectance ratios rather than the commonly used algorithm applying a single reflectance ratio.

  11. Biochar efficiency in pesticides sorption as a function of production variables--a review.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Saba; Malakahmad, Amirhossein; Sapari, Nasiman B

    2015-09-01

    Biochar is a stabilized, carbon-rich by-product derived from pyrolysis of biomass. Recently, biochar has received extensive attentions because of its multi-functionality for agricultural and environmental applications. Biochar can contribute to sequestration of atmosphere carbon, improvement of soils quality, and mitigation of environmental contaminations. The capability of biochar for specific application is determined by its properties which are predominantly controlled by source material and pyrolysis route variables. The biochar sorption potential is a function of its surface area, pores volume, ash contents, and functional groups. The impacts of each production factors on these characteristics of biochar need to be well-understood to design efficient biochars for pesticides removal. The effects of biomass type on biochar sorptive properties are determined by relative amounts of its lingo-cellulosic compounds, minerals content, particles size, and structure. The highest treatment temperature is the most effective pyrolysis factor in the determination of biochar sorption behavior. The expansion of micro-porosity and surface area and also increase of biochar organic carbon content and hydrophobicity mostly happen by pyrolysis peak temperature rise. These changes make biochar suitable for immobilization of organic contaminants. Heating rate, gas pressure, and reaction retention time after the pyrolysis temperatures are sequentially important pyrolysis variables effective on biochar sorptive properties. This review compiles the available knowledge about the impacts of production variables on biochars sorptive properties and discusses the aging process as the main factor in post-pyrolysis alterations of biochars sorption capacity. The drawbacks of biochar application in the environment are summarized as well in the last section. PMID:26250816

  12. Control of workers’ exposure to xylene in a pesticide production factory

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadyan, M; Baharfar, Y

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute and chronic exposure to xylene can result in a range of negative health effects. However, xylene is widely used and emitted in the air of workplaces. Objectives: To evaluate xylene vapor concentrations to guide the design and evaluation of a local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system to reduce exposure in a pesticide production factory. Method: A real time volatile organic compound (VOC) monitor was used to determine the workers’ time-weighted average (TWA) exposure. A LEV system was designed, and then, workers’ exposure to xylene vapor was evaluated. Results: We found that worker’s exposure to xylene (4.7±5.5 ppm) was lower than the standards recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) and the Occupational safety and health administration (OSHA). Despite the low TWA exposures, the short-term exposures for some workers were higher than STEL levels. Three canopy hoods were designed and installed with capture velocities of 0.508 m second−1 and duct velocity of 10.16 m second−1. Conclusion: We found that an exhaust ventilation system had a significantly reduced occupational exposure to xylene vapor. PMID:25487643

  13. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pesticide Registration Main menu Learn the Issues Air Chemicals and Toxics Climate Change Emergencies Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology ...

  14. Agricultural Pesticides and Selected Degradation Products in Five Tidal Regions and the Mainstem of Chesapeake Bay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrients, sediment, air pollution, and toxics from the water sources and the surrounding airshed are major problems contributing to poor water quality in many regions of the Chesapeake Bay (CB). Toxics are defined as chemicals that may affect the reproduction, development, and ultimately, the surv...

  15. Detection of explosives and their degradation products in soil environments.

    PubMed

    Halasz, A; Groom, C; Zhou, E; Paquet, L; Beaulieu, C; Deschamps, S; Corriveau, A; Thiboutot, S; Ampleman, G; Dubois, C; Hawari, Jalal

    2002-07-19

    Polynitro organic explosives [hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)] are typical labile environmental pollutants that can biotransform with soil indigenous microorganisms, photodegrade by sunlight and migrate through subsurface soil to cause groundwater contamination. To be able to determine the type and concentration of explosives and their (bio)transformation products in different soil environments, a comprehensive analytical methodology of sample preparation, separation and detection is thus required. The present paper describes the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2), acetonitrile (MeCN) (US Environmental Protection Agency Method 8330) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for the extraction of explosives and their degradation products from various water, soil and plant tissue samples for subsequent analysis by either HPLC-UV, capillary electrophoresis (CE-UV) or GC-MS. Contaminated surface and subsurface soil and groundwater were collected from either a TNT manufacturing facility or an anti-tank firing range. Plant tissue samples were taken fromplants grown in anti-tank firing range soil in a greenhouse experiment. All tested soil and groundwater samples from the former TNT manufacturing plant were found to contain TNT and some of its amino reduced and partially denitrated products. Their concentrations as determined by SPME-GC-MS and LC-UV depended on the location of sampling at the site. In the case of plant tissues, SC-CO2 extraction followed by CE-UV analysis showed only the presence of HMX. The concentrations of HMX (<200 mg/kg) as determined by supercritical fluid extraction (SC-CO2)-CE-UV were comparable to those obtained by MeCN extraction, although the latter technique was found to be more efficient at higher concentrations (>300 mg/kg). Modifiers such as MeCN and water enhanced the SC-CO2 extractability of HMX from plant tissues. PMID:12187997

  16. Seasonal exposures to triazine and other pesticides in surface waters in the western Highveld corn-production region in South Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Preez, L.H.; Jansen Van Rensburg, P.J.; Jooste, A.M.; Carr, J.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Gross, T.S.; Kendall, R.J.; Smith, E.E.; Van Der Kraak, G.; Solomon, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize concentrations of atrazine, terbuthylazine, and other pesticides in amphibian habitats in surface waters of a corn-production area of the western Highveld region (North-West Province) of South Africa. The study was conducted from November 2001 to June 2002, coinciding with the corn-production season. Pesticide residues were measured at regular intervals in surface water from eight ponds, three in a non-corn-growing area (NCGA) and five within the corn-growing area (CGA). Measured atrazine concentrations differed significantly among sites and between samples. In the five CGA sites, the maximum atrazine concentrations measured during the study ranged from 1.2 to 9.3 ??g/L. Although no atrazine was recorded as being applied in the catchment of the three NCGA sites, maximum concentrations from 0.39 to 0.84 ??g/L were measured during the study, possibly as a result of atmospheric transport. Maximum measured concentrations of terbuthylazine ranged from 1.22 to 2.1 ??g/L in the NCGA sites and from 1.04 to 4.1 ??g/L in the CGA sites. The source of terbuthylazine in the NCGA sites may have been in use other than in corn. The triazine degradation products, deisopropylatrazine (DIA) and deethylatrazine (DEA) and diaminochlorotriazine (DACT) were also found in water from both the CGA and NCGA sites. Concentrations of DIA were ??? 1 ??g/L throughout the season, while DEA concentrations were mostly 2 ??g/L in some locations. Concentrations of DACT were highly variable (LOD to 8 ??g/L) both before and after planting and application, suggesting that they resulted from historical use of triazines in the area. Other herbicides such as simazine and acetochlor were only detected infrequently and pesticides such as S-metolachlor, cypermethrin, monocrotophos, and terbuphos, known to be used in the CGA, were not detected in any of the samples. Because of dilution by higher than normal rainfall in the study period, these concentrations may not be predictive of those in years of normal rainfall. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Pesticide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Ferrer, A

    2003-01-01

    Pesticides are one of the families of chemical products most widely used by man. They have been used above all to combat pests because of their effect on harvests and as vectors of transmissible diseases. Pesticides can be classified according to their use (insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, raticides em leader ) or by their chemical family (organochlorates, organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, Bipyridilium compounds, inorganic salts em leader ). All of them are biocides, which normally implies a high toxicity for humans, which has been a cause for concern since the mid-XX century due to the widespread and indiscriminate use of these products. Exposure to pesticides can have effects that are acute, chronic and long-term. Some organochlorate compounds (such as DDT) were the first to be used in massive fumigations to fight malaria and have had to be banned because of their capacity for bioaccumulation and environmental persistence. The danger represented by the widespread presence of these agents has been demonstrated in numerous episodes of human toxic epidemics, producers of a high morbidity/mortality, described for nearly all chemical families: organochlorate insecticides and fungicides, organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, organomercurial fungicides and inorganic salts. These episodes have above all been caused through the ingestion of foodstuffs and in the occupational field. Other causes of health concern are their carcinogenic capacity and occasional reproductive alterations. The principal characteristics of some of the most relevant families are presented. PMID:12813483

  18. Toxicity of pesticide and fertilizer mixtures simulating corn production to eggs of snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina).

    PubMed

    de Solla, Shane Raymond; Martin, Pamela Anne; Mikoda, Paul

    2011-09-15

    Many reptiles oviposit in soils associated with agricultural landscapes. We evaluated the toxicity of a pesticide and fertilizer regime similar to those used in corn production in Ontario on the survivorship of exposed snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) eggs. The herbicides atrazine, dimethenamid, and glyphosate, the pyrethroid insecticide tefluthrin, and the fertilizer ammonia, were applied to clean soil, both as partial mixtures within chemical classes, as well as complete mixtures. Eggs were incubated in the soil in a garden plot in which these mixtures were applied at a typical field application rate, and higher rates. Otherwise, the eggs were unmanipulated and were subject to ambient temperature and weather conditions. Eggs were also exposed at male producing temperatures in the laboratory in covered bins in the same soil, where there was less opportunity for loss through volatilization or leaching. Egg mortality was 100% at 10× the typical field application rate of the complete mixture, both with and without tefluthrin. At typical field application rates, hatching success ranged between 91.7 and 95.8%. Eggs exposed only to herbicides were not negatively affected at any application rates. Although fertilizer treatments at typical field application rates did not affect eggs, mortality was remarkably higher at three times this rate, and 100% at higher rates. The frequency of deformities of hatchlings was elevated at the highest application rate of the insecticide tefluthrin. The majority of the toxicity of the mixture was not due to the herbicides or insecticide, but was due to the ammonia fertilizer. At typical field application rates, the chemical regime associated with corn production does not appear to have any detrimental impacts upon turtle egg development; however toxicity dramatically increases if this threshold is passed. PMID:21831407

  19. Degradation and monitoring of acetamiprid, thiabendazole and their transformation products in an agro-food industry effluent during solar photo-Fenton treatment in a raceway pond reactor.

    PubMed

    Carra, Irene; Sirtori, Carla; Ponce-Robles, Laura; Sánchez Pérez, José Antonio; Malato, Sixto; Agüera, Ana

    2015-07-01

    In this study, pesticides acetamiprid and thiabendazole and their transformation products (TPs), seven from each pesticide, were successfully monitored during solar photo-Fenton treatment in a real secondary effluent from an agro-food industry spiked with 100μgL(-1) of each pesticide. To this end, a highly sensitive procedure was developed, based on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (QqLIT-MS). In addition, finding low-cost and operational technology for the application of AOPs would then facilitate their use on a commercial level. Simple and extensive photoreactors such as raceway pond reactors (RPRs) are therefore proposed as an alternative for the application of solar photo-Fenton. Results showed that high degradation could be achieved in a complex water matrix (>99% TBZ and 91% ACTM in 240min) using a 120-L RPR pilot plant as novel technology. The analyses indicated that after the treatment only three TPs from ACTM were still present in the effluent, while the others had been removed. The study showed that the goal of either just removing the parent compounds, or going one step further and removing all the TPs, can significantly change the treatment time, which would affect process costs. PMID:25841181

  20. Effects of pesticides on songbird productivity in conjunction with pecan cultivation in southern Georgia: A multiple-exposure experimental design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patnode, K.A.; White, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    A prototypic experimental design was used to assess sublethal effects of multiple and varied organophosphates and carbamates on reproduction in birds. The design allowed for classification of pesticide exposure according to toxicity of applied compounds and type and frequency of applications. Daily survival rates (DSRs) of nests, eggs, and nestlings were determined for northern mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos), brown thrashers (Toxostoma rufum), and northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) nesting along edges of pecan orchards and row crops in southern Georgia [USA]. Egg and nestling DSRs for all species combined varied inversely (P 0.05) among three exposure levels. Brain cholinesterase activities were age-dependent and substantiated adult, but not nestling, exposure. Results suggest that increasing exposure to pesticides may reduce songbird productivity.

  1. Runoff loss of pesticides and soil: a comparison between vegetative mulch and plastic mulch in vegetable production systems.

    PubMed

    Rice, P J; McConnell, L L; Heighton, L P; Sadeghi, A M; Isensee, A R; Teasdale, J R; Abdul-Baki, A A; Harman-Fetcho, J A; Hapeman, C J

    2001-01-01

    Current vegetable production systems use polyethylene (plastic) mulch and require multiple applications of agrochemicals. During rain events, runoff from vegetable production is enhanced because 50 to 75% of the field is covered with an impervious surface. This study was conducted to quantify off-site movement of soil and pesticides with runoff from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plots containing polyethylene mulch and a vegetative mulch, hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth). Side-by-side field plots were instrumented with automated flow meters and samplers to measure and collect runoff, which was filtered, extracted, and analyzed to determine soil and pesticide loss. Seasonal losses of two to four times more water and at least three times as much sediment were observed from plots with polyethvlene mulch (55.4 to 146 L m(-2) and 247 to 535 g m(-2), respectively) versus plots with hairy vetch residue (13.7 to 75.7 L m(-2) and 32.8 to 118 g m(-2), respectively). Geometric means (+/-standard deviation) of total pesticide loads for chlorothalonil (tetrachloroisophthalonitrile) and alpha-and beta-endosulfan (6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro6,9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepin 3-oxide) for a runoff event were 19, 6, and 9 times greater from polyethylene (800+/-4.6, 17.6+/-3.9, and 39.1+/-4.9 microg m(-2), respectively) than from hairy vetch mulch plots (42+/-6.0, 2.8+/-5.0, and 4.3+/-4.6 microg m(-2), respectively) due to greater concentrations and larger runoff volumes. The increased runoff volume, soil loss, and off-site loading of pesticides measured in runoff from the polyethylene mulch suggests that this management practice is less sustainable and may have a harmful effect on the environment. PMID:11577890

  2. RESISTANCE TO PESTICIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The occurrence of pesticide resistance stands as one of the most chronic and formidable problems for crop production and public health worldwide. The evolution of different resistance mechanisms by pestiferous organisms has diminished the lethal action of pesticides and led to greater difficulties ...

  3. Characteristics and kinetics of catalpol degradation and the effect of its degradation products on free radical scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-dong; Wen, Xue-sen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The dried and steamed roots of Rehmannia glutinosa have different pharmacological functions and indications. Catalpol, the main active component of the dried root, was found to be entirely degraded together with amino acids and some oligosaccharides during preparation of the steamed root. Its degradation may contribute to the differences between dried and steamed roots. Objective: To reveal the characteristics and kinetics of catalpol degradation, and evaluate its influence on the antioxidant properties of steamed Rehmannia roots. Materials and Methods: Purified catalpol was heated under different pH and temperature values for different times, alone or with sugars or amino acids. Catalpol concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Browning was expressed by the absorbance at 420 nm (A420), and antioxidation was displayed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging ability (SADPPH). Activation energy was calculated using Arrhenius plotting. Results: Catalpol was stable in neutral conditions and sensitive to acidic pH under high temperatures. Sugars had no influence on catalpol degradation; however, most amino acids, except for proline, could promote the degradation, and were associated with an increase in A420 and SADPPH values. These changes were proved to be mainly related with catalpol aglycone and were dependent on the presence of amino acids. Catalpol degradation was found to obey first-order kinetics. The activation energies were 81.7, 88.8 and 98.7 kJ/mol at pH 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 respectively, and 70.7 kJ/mol at pH 4.0 value and in the presence of glycine. Conclusions: Catalpol degradation, especially, in the presence of amino acids can substantially boost antioxidant properties of the products; therefore, the traditional method for processing Rehmannia root seems rather apt. PMID:24914291

  4. [Pesticide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Harry, P

    2000-02-15

    Pesticide intoxications are mainly accidental with a benign course, such as ingestions of diluted fertilizers or low concentration antivitamin K rodenticides, ant-killing products or granules of molluscicides containing 5% metaldehyde. Voluntary intoxications by chloralose, strychnine, organophosphorus or organochlorine insecticides, concentrated anti-vitamin K products, herbicides such as paraquat, chlorophenoxy compounds, glyphosate or chlorates may be severe. Toxicity is due to active substances but also to solvents or surfactants included in the composition. Analysis done in a toxicology laboratory help in establishing diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. Poison centres may be called constantly to help for the evaluation of these intoxications. PMID:10748667

  5. The role of purine degradation in methane biosynthesis and energy production in Methanococcus vannielii

    SciTech Connect

    DeMoll, E.

    1990-10-22

    Research continues on the role of purine degradation in methane biosynthesis and energy production in Methanococcus vannielii. This report summarizes current progress of the research. Topics include: A survey of other methanogens for the purine degradation pathway; isolate and characterize the enzyme and products of formiminoglycine cleavage; ascertain the fate of glycine from the formiminoglycine cleavage; elucidate the route of incorporation of the formyl moiety of formiminoglycine into methane biosynthesis; determine the percent methane and amino acid synthesis from purine degradation; and related studies on xanthine dehydrogenase and pyrimidine degradation of M. Vannielii. (SM)

  6. Identification of transformation products of pesticides and veterinary drugs in food and related matrices: use of retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pérez, María Luz; Romero-González, Roberto; Vidal, José Luis Martínez; Frenich, Antonia Garrido

    2015-04-10

    Retrospective analysis has been applied in different samples, including honey, meat, feed and nutraceutical products from ginkgo biloba, soya, royal jelly and green tea, with the aim of searching transformation products of pesticides and veterinary drugs, which were not included in an initial analysis. Generic extraction and analytical procedures based on high resolution mass spectrometry (Exactive-Orbitrap analyser was used) have been applied. All obtained data have been reprocessed and some compounds as anhydroerythromycin in honey and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol in feed have been detected, demonstrating the applicability and the utility of the procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of retrospective approach have been highlighted. PMID:25748536

  7. Solid state compatibility study and characterization of a novel degradation product of tacrolimus in formulation.

    PubMed

    Rozman Peterka, Tanja; Grahek, Rok; Hren, Jure; Bastarda, Andrej; Bergles, Jure; Urleb, Uroš

    2015-06-10

    Tacrolimus is macrolide drug that is widely used as a potent immunosuppressant. In the present work compatibility testing was conducted on physical mixtures of tacrolimus with excipients and on compatibility mixtures prepared by the simulation of manufacturing process used for the final drug product preparation. Increase in one major degradation product was detected in the presence of magnesium stearate based upon UHPLC analysis. The degradation product was isolated by preparative HPLC and its structure was elucidated by NMR and MS studies. Mechanism of the formation of this degradation product is proposed based on complementary degradation studies in a solution and structural elucidation data. The structure was proven to be alpha-hydroxy acid which is formed from the parent tacrolimus molecule through a benzilic acid type rearrangement reaction in the presence of divalent metallic cations. Degradation is facilitated at higher pH values. PMID:25804434

  8. Pesticide mass budget in a stormwater wetland.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Elodie; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands are reactive landscape zones that provide ecosystem services, including the improvement of water quality. Field studies distinguishing pesticide degradation from retention to evaluate the sink and source functions of wetlands are scarce. This study evaluated based on a complete mass budget the partitioning, retention, and degradation of 12 pesticides in water, suspended solids, sediments, and organisms in a wetland receiving contaminated runoff. The mass budget showed the following: (i) dissolved pesticides accounted for 95% of the total load entering the wetland and the pesticide partitioning between the dissolved phase and the suspended solids varied according to the molecules, (ii) pesticides accumulated primarily in the <250 μm bed sediments during spring and late summer, and (iii) the hydrological regime or the incoming pesticide loads did not influence the pesticide dissipation, which varied according to the molecules and the wetland biogeochemical conditions. The vegetation enhanced the pesticide degradation during the vegetative phase and the pesticides were released during plant senescence. The dithiocarbamates were degraded under oxic conditions in spring, whereas glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) degradation occurred under reducing conditions during the summer. The complete pesticide mass budget indicates the versatility of the pesticide sink and source functions of wetland systems. PMID:25003558

  9. Detection of Pesticides and Pesticide Metabolites Using the Cross Reactivity of Enzyme Immunoassays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Aga, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay is an important environmental analysis method that may be used to identify many pesticide analytes in water samples. Because of similarities in chemical structure between various members of a pesticide class, there often may be an unwanted response that is characterized by a percentage of cross reactivity. Also, there may be cross reactivity caused by degradation products of the target analyte that may be present in the sample. In this paper, the concept of cross reactivity caused by degradation products or by nontarget analytes is explored as a tool for identification of metabolites or structurally similar compounds not previously known to be present in water samples. Two examples are examined in this paper from various water quality studies. They are alachlor and its metabolite, alachlor ethane sulfonic acid, and atrazine and its class members, prometryn and propazine. A method for using cross reactivity for the detection of these compounds is explained in this paper.

  10. Transfer of pesticides and copper in a stormwater wetland receiving contaminated runoff from a vineyard catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, E.; Babcsanyi, I.; Payraudeau, S.; Imfeld, G.

    2012-04-01

    Wetlands can collect contaminated runoff from urban and agricultural catchments, and have intrinsic physical, chemical and biological processes useful for mitigating pesticides. However, knowledge about the ability of wetlands to mitigate pesticide mixtures in runoff is currently very limited. Our results show that stormwater wetlands that primarily serve for flood protection can also be effective tools for reducing concentrations and loads of runoff-related pesticides. Concentrations and loads of 20 pesticides and degradation products, as well as copper were continuously recorded during the period of pesticide application (April to September 2009, 2010 and 2011) at the inlet, the outlet and in sediments of a stormwater wetland that collects runoff from a vineyard catchment. Removal rates of dissolved loads ranged from 39% (simazine) to 100% (cymoxanil, gluphosinate, kresoxim methyl and terbuthylazine). Dimethomorph, diuron, glyphosate and metalaxyl were more efficiently removed in spring than in summer. The calculation of sedimentation rates from discharge measurements and total suspended solids (TSS) values revealed that the wetland retained more than 77% of the input mass of suspended solids, underscoring the capability of the wetland to trap pesticide-laden particles. Only flufenoxuron was frequently detected in the wetland sediments. An inter-annual comparison showed that changes in the removal of aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA, a degradation product of glyphosate), isoxaben or simazine can be attributed mainly to the larger vegetation cover in 2010 compared to 2009. More than 80% of the copper load entering the wetland was retained in the sediments and the plants. Our results demonstrate that stormwater wetlands can efficiently remove pesticide mixtures and copper in agricultural runoff during critical periods of pesticide application. Nevertheless, fluctuations in the runoff regime, as well as the vegetation and hydrochemical characteristics affect the removal rate of individual pesticides and copper in stormwater wetlands. Therefore the use of stormwater wetlands as a management practice targeting pesticide and copper mitigation should not be conceived as a unique solution to treat pesticide runoff.

  11. Morphological and biochemical characteristics in the experimentally treated rats with indigenous synthetical products used as pesticides.

    PubMed

    Filipescu, G; Codorean, E; Laky, D; Tănase, C; Ciotaru, L

    1991-01-01

    In acute experimental intoxication with 3 indigenous pesticides (Tripinacloraz, Lemax and Maleic Hydrazide-Na salt) the changes of some biochemical parameters, reflecting the degree of hepatic structural alterations, were studied. The pesticides were administered by gastric gavage in a single dose close to DL50 to Wistar male rats. The morphological alterations were in good correlation with a different hepatocellular levels localization. Reversible morphological lesions (granulovascuolar like dystrophy and circulatory disorders) without any pathological significance on dose-effect correlation induced a progressive response especially on serum ceruloplasmine, leucinaminopeptidase and lactatdehydrogenase. PMID:1801979

  12. Evaluation of serum pesticide residue levels and liver function in persons exposed to dairy products contaminated with heptachlor

    SciTech Connect

    Stehr-Green, P.A.; Wohlleb, J.C.; Royce, W.; Head, S.L.

    1988-01-15

    The authors studied a group of 45 dairy farm family members who had consumed undiluted raw milk products known to be contaminated with residues of the pesticide heptachlor at concentrations as high as 89.2 ppm (fat basis). They compared results of serum pesticide assays for these exposed persons with results for an unexposed group of 94 persons from the same geographic area and the results from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The exposed group had significantly higher mean levels of primary heptachlor metabolites-i.e., heptachlor epoxide and oxychlordane than the unexposed group. In the exposed group, 21.2% had evaluated serum concentrations of these same metabolites; this rate was significantly greater than the rates in both the unexposed farm family members (heptachlor epoxide, 3.8%; oxychlordane, 6.3%) and the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey sample (2.5% for both metabolites). However they found no evidence of related acute and/or subacute hepatic effects in these exposed persons regardless of their serum concentrations of pesticide residues.

  13. Selection of an actinobacteria mixed culture for chlordane remediation. Pesticide effects on microbial morphology and bioemulsifier production.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, María S; Colin, Verónica L; Amoroso, María J; Benimeli, Claudia S

    2016-02-01

    Chlordane bioremediation using actinobacteria mixed culture is an attractive clean-up technique. Their ability to produce bioemulsifiers could increase the bioavailability of this pesticide. In order to select a defined actinobacteria mixed culture for chlordane remediation, compatibility assays were performed among six Streptomyces strains. The strains did not show growth inhibition, and they were assayed for chlordane removal, either as pure or as mixed cultures. In pure cultures, all of the strains showed specific dechlorination activity (1.42-24.20 EU mg(-1) ) and chlordane removal abilities (91.3-95.5%). The specific dechlorination activity was mainly improved with cultures of three or four microorganisms. The mixed culture consisting of Streptomyces sp. A2-A5-A13 was selected. Their ability to produce bioemulsifiers in the presence of glucose or chlordane was tested, but no significant differences were observed (p > 0.05). However, the stability of the emulsions formed was linked to the carbon source used. Only in chlordane presence the emulsions retained 100% of their initial height. Finally, the selected consortium showed a high degree of sporulation in the pesticide presence. This is the first study on the effects that chlordane exerts on microbe morphology and emulsifier production for a defined mixed culture of Streptomyces with ability to remediate the pesticide. PMID:26554742

  14. [Screening method for the determination of 199 pesticides in agricultural products by gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS)].

    PubMed

    Hirahara, Yoshichika; Kimura, Mika; Inoue, Tomoko; Uchikawa, Seiji; Otani, Shoji; Hirose, Hideaki; Suzuki, Sosuke; Uchida, Yukinori

    2006-10-01

    A screening method is described for determining 200 pesticides, except dimethipin, divided into four groups by means of gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) using an ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with automated gain control (AGC). The quantitation limit for 194 pesticides was 0.01 mg/kg on a crop basis, except for allidochlor, dimethoate, hexythiazox, methamidophos and triadimenol. The calibration curve of each pesticide was linear in the range of 0.04-5.0 microg/mL. One hundred and ninety-nine pesticides were added to matrix of potato, spinach, cabbage, apple, orange, soybean and unpolished rice at twice the limits of quantitation. The recoveries of 194 pesticides from all crops were satisfactory (50-150%) for screening purposes. Although some pesticides in apple and orange were not determined by selected ion monitoring (SIM) analysis at the limits of quantitation, all of them were identified by ion-trap GC/MS/MS at the same concentration. Thus, the ion trap GC/MS/MS technique is useful for the screening of residual pesticides present at low levels in agricultural products. PMID:17128871

  15. Chiral pesticides: identification, description, and environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Elin M; Morrison, Candice N; Goldsmith, Michael R; Foreman, William T

    2012-01-01

    Of the 1,693 pesticides considered in this review, 1,594 are organic chemicals, 47 are inorganic chemicals, 53 are of biological origin (largely non chemical; insect,fungus, bacteria, virus, etc.), and 2 have an undetermined structure. Considering that the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs found 1,252 pesticide active ingredients(EPA Pesticides Customer Service 2011), we consider this dataset to be comprehensive; however, no direct comparison of the compound lists was undertaken. Of all pesticides reviewed, 482 (28%) are chiral; 30% are chiral when considering only the organic chemical pesticides. A graph of this distribution is shown in Fig. 7a. Each pesticide is classified with up to three pesticidal utilities (e.g., fungicide, plant growth regulator, rodenticide, etc.), taken first from the Pesticide Manual as a primary source, and the Compendium of Common Pesticide Names website as a secondary source. Of the chiral pesticides, 195 (34%) are insecticides (including attractants, pheromones, and repellents), 150 (27%) are herbicides (including plant growth regulators and herbicide safeners), 104 (18%) are fungicides, and 55 (10%)are acaricides. The distribution of chiral pesticides by utility is shown in Fig. 7b,including categories of pesticides that make up 3%t or less of the usage categories.Figure 7c shows a similar distribution of non chiral pesticide usage categories. Of the chiral pesticides, 270 (56%) have one chiral feature, 105 (22%) have two chiral features, 30 (6.2%) have three chiral features, and 29 (6.0%) have ten or more chiral features.Chiral chemicals pose many difficulties in stereospecific synthesis, characterization, and analysis. When these compounds are purposely put into the environment,even more interesting complications arise in tracking, monitoring, and predicting their fate and risks. More than 475 pesticides are chiral, as are other chiral contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, synthetic musks, and their degradates (Kallenborn and Hiihnerfuss 2001;Heeb et al. 2007; Hihnerfuss and Shah 2009). The stereoisomers of pesticides can have widely different efficacy, toxicity to nontarget organisms, and metabolic rates in biota. For these reasons, it is important to first be aware of likely fate and effect differences, to incorporate molecular asymmetry insights into research projects, and to study the individual stereoisomers of the applied pesticide material.With the advent of enantioselective chromatography techniques, the chirality of pesticides has been increasingly studied. While the ChirBase (Advanced ChemistryDevelopment 1997-2010) database does not include all published chiral analytical separations, it does contain more than 3,500 records for 146 of the 482 chiral pesticides (30%). The majority of the records are found in the liquid chromatography database (2,677 or 76%), followed by the gas chromatography database (652 or 18%),and the capillary electrophoresis database (203 or 6%). The finding that only 30% of the chiral pesticides covered in this review have entries in ChirBase highlights the need for expanded efforts to develop additional enantioselective chromatographic methods. Other techniques (e.g., nuclear magnetic resonance and other spectroscopy)are available for investigation of chiral compounds, but often are not utilized because of cost, complexity, or simply not recognizing that a pesticide is chiral.In this review, we have listed and have briefly described the general nature of chiral fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, and other miscellaneous classes. A data-set generated for this review contains 1,693 pesticides, the number of enantioselective separation records in ChirBase, pesticide usage class, SMILES structure string and counts of stereogenic centers. This dataset is publically available for download at the following website: http://www.epa.gov/heasd/products/products.html. With the information herein coupled to the publically accessible dataset, we can begin to develop the tools to handle molecular asymmetry as it applies to agrochemicals.Additional structure-based resources would allow further analysis of key parameters (e.g., exposure, toxicity, environmental fate, degradation, and risks) for individual stereoisomers of chiral compounds. PMID:22350557

  16. Degradation of methylparathion in aqueous solution by electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vlyssides, Apostolos; Barampouti, Elli Maria; Mai, Sofia; Arapoglou, Dimitris; Kotronarou, Anastasia

    2004-11-15

    The electrochemical degradation of methylparathion has been investigated by using Ti/Pt as anode, Stainless Steel 304 as cathode, and sodium chloride as electrolyte. The pesticide is rapidly degraded, but full mineralization is not observed. Degradation products have been monitored through gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, and the overall degradation process has been monitored through dissolved and particulate organic carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus measurements. Several intermediates have been identified, and oxalic, formic, and acetic acids as well as tetraphosphorus trisulfide have been recognized as final products of the degradation process. A proposed mechanism of the process is presented. PMID:15573616

  17. Heterogeneous photo-oxidation of pesticides and its implication to their environmental fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubowski, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The environmental fate and impact of pesticides strongly depend on their post application degradation processes. While most existing knowledge on pesticides degradation refers to processes within bulk soil and water, applied pesticides may remain on treated surfaces (and on airborn particles) for long duration, exposed to atmospheric oxidants and solar radiation. The resulting photo-oxidation processes may have significant effect on their fate, especially in semiarid regions where pesticide applications take place during the long dry season and targeted irrigation is common. Here we present our studies on heterogeneous photo-oxidation of few commonly used pesticides (e.g., cypermethrin, methyl parathion, and chlorpyrifos), using novel laboratory setups enabling simultaneous monitoring of both phases. Experiments focused on kinetics, quantum yields, and identification of gaseous and condensed products. In addition, the reactivity of the selected pesticides was investigated as a function of their matrix (analytical vs. commercial formula), their phase (thin film vs. airborne aerosols), and the substrate they are sorbed on (leaf, soil, and glass). Complimentarily to these laboratory studies, field measurements of selected pesticides concentrations in few streams in northern Israel during the first rain events were also conducted and showed the important role of surface processes on these pesticides fate and transport in semi-arid climate.

  18. Factors Affecting the Occurrence and Distribution of Pesticides in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Henry M.

    2007-01-01

    The Yakima River Basin is a major center of agricultural production. With a cultivated area of about 450,000 ha (hectares), the region is an important producer of tree fruit, grapes, hops, and dairy products as well as a variety of smaller production crops. To control pest insects, weeds, and fungal infections, about 146 pesticide active ingredients were applied in various formulations during the 2000 growing season. Forty-six streams or drains in the Yakima River Basin were sampled for pesticides in July and October of 2000. Water samples also were collected from 11 irrigation canals in July. The samples were analyzed for 75 of the pesticide active ingredients applied during the 2000 growing season - 63 percent of the pesticides were detected. An additional 14 pesticide degradates were detected, including widespread occurrence of 2 degradates of DDT. The most frequently detected herbicide was 2,4-D, which was used on a variety of crops and along rights-of-way. It was detected in 82 percent of the samples collected in July. The most frequently detected insecticide was azinphos-methyl, which was used primarily on tree fruit. It was detected in 37 percent of the samples collected in July. All occurrences of azinphos-methyl exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency recommended chronic concentration for the protection of aquatic organisms. More than 90 percent of the July samples and 79 percent of the October samples contained two or more pesticides, with a median of nine in July and five in October. The most frequently occurring herbicides in mixtures were atrazine, 2,4-D, and the degradate deethylatrazine. The most frequently occurring insecticides in mixtures were azinphos-methyl, carbaryl, and p,p'-DDE (a degradate of DDT). A greater number of pesticides and higher concentrations were found in July than in October, reflecting greater usage and water availability for transport during the summer growing and irrigation season. Most of the samples collected in October (baseflow conditions) contained at least one pesticide. The mass ratio of instream pesticide load and application (pesticide loss) was used to explore spatial and temporal patterns of pesticide occurrence. Losses of pesticides with large organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients (Koc) values, which adhere strongly to sediment and plant surfaces, were smallest in catchments where sprinkler and drip irrigation systems were widely used. In contrast, losses of pesticides with low Koc values did not relate well with irrigation method.

  19. The role of fibrinogen, fibrin and fibrin(ogen) degradation products (FDPs) in tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Kołodziejczyk, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Participation of fibrin, fibrinogen, and their degradation products in pathogenesis and progression of cancer may lead to complications of thromboembolic events. The tumor may be a source of fibrinogen. Fibrinogen inside the tumor is one of the factors of its growth and metastasis. Fibrinogen, fibrin and their degradation products possess proinflammatory activity. They indirectly stimulate endothelium to secrete von Willebrand factor, leading to activation of platelets accompanying neoplastic disorders. Fragments E and D are the end products of fibrin(ogen) degradation and E and DD are the end products of stabilized fibrin. E stimulates proliferation, migration and differentiation of endothelial cells, contributing to tumor vasculature. Increased levels of DD are observed in malignant neoplasms, such as breast, lung, colon and ovary cancers. In breast cancers DD correlates with progression of disease and metastasis. The role of fibrinogen and the products of its degradation in the progression of various tumors is not sufficiently understood. PMID:23788975

  20. [Applicability of GC, GC/MS and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry to screening for 140 pesticides in agricultural products].

    PubMed

    Hirahara, Yoshichika; Kimura, Mika; Inoue, Tomoko; Uchikawa, Seiji; Otani, Shoji; Hirose, Hideaki; Suzuki, Sosuke; Uchida, Yukinori

    2006-10-01

    The applicability of GC, GC/MS and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to screening for 140 pesticides in agricultural products was examined. Validation of multi-residue screening methods for the determination of 88 pesticides in 12 crops (asparagus, cauliflower, burdock, carrot, broccoli, spinach, matsutake mushroom, orange, soybean, sesame, millet and tea) was done by GC and GC/MS. Of the 88 pesticides, 63 were obtained with recoveries in the range from 50 to 150% at the 0.1 microg/g level in the 12 crops. Applicability of the official methods in Japan to 74 pesticides, including 22 pesticides with low recovery (< 50%) by GC or GC/MS analysis, was also examined by LC/MS/MS. LC/MS/MS acquisition parameters were established for 67 pesticides in positive and negative electrospray ionization (ESI) modes. Of 67 pesticides validated in 7 crops using LC/MS/MS at the 0.1 microg/g level, 44 showed recoveries in the range from 50 to 150%. The occurrence of matrix interference in LC/MS/MS can lead to false-positive detection of MCPA in spinach, cabbage and orange and false-negative detection of four pesticides in orange, spinach, apple and unpolished rice. Good linearity was observed in the studied ranges by GC, GC/MS (r > 0.990) and LC/MS/MS (r > 0.995). Of the total of 140 pesticides validated by GC, GC/MS and LC/MS/MS, 107 were newly recognized as suitable subjects for screening. PMID:17128873

  1. 78 FR 55695 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications To Register New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... manufacturer, or pesticide manufacturer. The following list of North American Industrial Classification System..., agent on behalf of Mitsui Chemicals Agro, Inc., 1-5-2, Higashi-Shimbashi, Minato-Ku Tokyo, 105-7117... participation process for registration actions, there will be an additional opportunity for a 30-day...

  2. CHEMICAL NATURE AND IMMUNOTOXICOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF ARACHIDONIC ACID DEGRADATION PRODUCTS FORMED BY EXPOSURE TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (O3) exposure in vivo has been reported to degrade arachidonic acid (AA) in the lungs of rodents. The O3-degraded AA products may play a role in the lung responses to this toxicant. In order to study the chemical nature and biological activity of O3-exposed AA, we exposed A...

  3. A stability indicating HPLC method for the determination of clobazam and its basic degradation product characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clobazam is used for the treatment of different types of seizure and epilepsy. The present research is undertaken to study the systematic forced degradation of clobazam and to identify its main degradation product under basic conditions. Methods The degradation of clobazam was studied under different conditions. Clobazam and its degradation products were separated using a Nova-Pak C18 column and a mixture of KH2PO4 50 mM (pH 8.5) and acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) as the mobile phase with UV detection at 230 nm. Results The within-day and between-day precision values in the calibration range of 0.1-20 μg/ml were within 0.5-1.5%. Clobazam was relatively stable in solid from under exposure to visible and UV light and also heat. The clobazam aqueous solution of clobazam was more labile under exposure to visible and UV light. The bulk drug was significantly degraded under exposure to 2 M HCl, 0.1 M NaOH or 3% H2O2. Using the tablet powder, higher degradation rates were observed under different stress conditions. The main degradation product of clobazam under basic condition was subsequently characterized. Conclusion The developed method could be used for the determination of clobazam in the presence of its degradation products with acceptable precision and accuracy. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated in commercial dosage forms analysis. PMID:24919821

  4. Microbial degradation and humification of the lawn care pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid during the composting of yard trimmings.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, F C; Reddy, C A; Forney, L J

    1995-01-01

    The fate of the widely used lawn care herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) during the composting of yard trimmings consisting of primarily leaves and grass is an important unexplored question. In this study, we determined the extent of 2,4-D mineralization, incorporation into humic matter, volatilization, and sorption during the composting of yard trimmings. Yard trimmings (2:1 [wt/wt] leaves-grass) were amended with 14C-ring-labeled 2,4-D (17 mg/kg of dry weight) and composted in a temperature-controlled laboratory scale compost system. During composting, thermophilic microbes were numerically dominant, reaching a maximum of 2 x 10(11)/g. At the end of composting, 46% of the organic matter (OM) present in the yard trimmings was lost and the compost was stable, with an oxygen uptake rate of 0.09 mg of O2 per g of OM per h, and was well humified (humification index, 0.39). Mineralization of the OM temporally paralleled mineralization of 2,4-D. In the final compost, 47% of the added 2,4-D carbon was mineralized, about 23% was complexed with high-molecular-weight humic acids, and about 20% was not extractable (humin fraction). Less than 1% of the added 14C was present in water expressed from the finished compost, suggesting a low potential for leaching of 2,4-D. Very little volatilization of 2,4-D occurred during composting. It is of interest that our results indicate active mineralization of 2,4-D at composting temperatures of 60 degrees C because microbial 2,4-D degradation at thermophilic temperatures has not been previously documented. PMID:7618868

  5. Photocatalytic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene by iron oxides and identification of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Himanshu; Gupta, Bina

    2015-11-01

    Photocatalytic decay profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have been investigated on various synthesized iron oxides and on soil surfaces under a set of diverse conditions. Samples were analysed using the developed HPLC procedure. Results of the present study demonstrate fastest photodisintegration of B[a]P on goethite followed by haematite, magnetite, akaganeite and maghemite, respectively. The effect of soil pH, irradiation wavelength and iron oxide and oxalic acid dose on the degradation of B[a]P was evaluated. The studies revealed enhancement in photodegradation in the presence of oxalic acid due to the occurrence of fenton like reaction. The results showed faster B[a]P degradation under short wavelength UV radiation. Rate constants in acidic, neutral and alkaline soils under optimum dissipation conditions were 1.11×10(-2), 7.69×10(-3) and 9.97×10(-3) h(-1), respectively. The study indicates that iron oxides along with oxalic acid are effective photocatalyst for the remediation of benzo[a]pyrene contaminated soil surfaces. The degradation products of B[a]P in the soils of different pH in presence of goethite were identified and degradation pathways proposed. Peaks due to toxic metabolites such as diones, diols and epoxides disappear after 120 h in all the three soils. PMID:25576129

  6. Glucagon degradation by a product of the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zepp, E.A.

    1986-03-05

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats (125-150g) were implanted (im.) with the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma. After both 7 and 10 days, plasma levels of glucagon in tumor-bearing rats were approximately half the level seen in control rats (P < 0.01) even though fasting plasma glucose levels were slightly (but not significantly) less in the tumor-bearing rats. To determine if the tumor degrades the hormone, tumor cells were incubated at room temperature with /sup 125/I-glucagon (0.075 ..mu..Ci, 2200 Ci/mmol) in 20mM TRIS-HCl buffer (pH 7.4) with 2.5% bovine serum albumin (total volume of 750 ..mu..l) for 45 min. After incubation with tumor cells, only about 25% of the total radiolabel was TCA-precipitable vs 97% in the control (minus tumor cells) incubations. It also appears that the tumor cells may release a substance which degrades hormone. If tumor cells are preincubated for 60 min at 37/sup 0/ then removed from the medium, the incubation medium contains a factor which degrades subsequently added /sup 125/I-glucagon (57% TCA-precipitable vs 98% in control incubations). That this factor is a protease is suggested by the results of another experiment in which aprotinin (a protease inhibitor, 1 mg/ml), when added along with the labeled glucagon, virtually eliminated degradation by a factor released from the tumor cells (79% TCA-precipitable in the absence of aprotinin vs 94% in its presence and 98% in controls).

  7. Fungal degradation of coal as a pretreatment for methane production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; SanFilipo, John R.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; Tatu, Calin A.; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Akhtar, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    Coal conversion technologies can help in taking advantage of huge low rank coal reserves by converting those into alternative fuels like methane. In this regard, fungal degradation of coal can serve as a pretreatment step in order to make coal a suitable substrate for biological beneficiation. A fungal isolate MW1, identified as Penicillium chrysogenum on the basis of fungal ITS sequences, was isolated from a core sample of coal, taken from a well drilled by the US. Geological Survey in Montana, USA. The low rank coal samples, from major coal fields of Pakistan, were treated with MW1 for 7 days in the presence of 0.1% ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source and 0.1% glucose as a supplemental carbon source. Liquid extracts were analyzed through Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) to obtain qualitative estimates of solubilized coal; these analyses indicated the release of complex organic functionalities. In addition, GC–MS analysis of these extracts confirmed the presence of single ring aromatics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic nitrogen compounds and aliphatics. Subsequently, the released organics were subjected to a bioassay for the generation of methane which conferred the potential application of fungal degradation as pretreatment. Additionally, fungal-mediated degradation was also prospected for extracting some other chemical entities like humic acids from brown coals with high huminite content especially from Thar, the largest lignite reserve of Pakistan.

  8. Pesticide exposure--Indian scene.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P K

    2004-05-20

    Use of pesticides in India began in 1948 when DDT was imported for malaria control and BHC for locust control. India started pesticide production with manufacturing plant for DDT and benzene hexachloride (BHC) (HCH) in the year 1952. In 1958, India was producing over 5000 metric tonnes of pesticides. Currently, there are approximately 145 pesticides registered for use, and production has increased to approximately 85,000 metric tonnes. Rampant use of these chemicals has given rise to several short-term and long-term adverse effects of these chemicals. The first report of poisoning due to pesticides in India came from Kerala in 1958 where, over 100 people died after consuming wheat flour contaminated with parathion. Subsequently several cases of pesticide-poisoning including the Bhopal disaster have been reported. Despite the fact that the consumption of pesticides in India is still very low, about 0.5 kg/ha of pesticides against 6.60 and 12.0 kg/ha in Korea and Japan, respectively, there has been a widespread contamination of food commodities with pesticide residues, basically due to non-judicious use of pesticides. In India, 51% of food commodities are contaminated with pesticide residues and out of these, 20% have pesticides residues above the maximum residue level values on a worldwide basis. It has been observed that their long-term, low-dose exposure are increasingly linked to human health effects such as immune-suppression, hormone disruption, diminished intelligence, reproductive abnormalities, and cancer. In this light, problems of pesticide safety, regulation of pesticide use, use of biotechnology, and biopesticides, and use of pesticides obtained from natural plant sources such as neem extracts are some of the future strategies for minimizing human exposure to pesticides. PMID:15138033

  9. Herbicides and herbicide degradation products in upper midwest agricultural streams during august base-flow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Lee, K.E.; Porter, S.D.; Terrio, P.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Herbicide concentrations in streams of the U.S. Midwest have been shown to decrease through the growing season due to a variety of chemical and physical factors. The occurrence of herbicide degradation products at the end of the growing season is not well known. This study was conducted to document the occurrence of commonly used herbicides and their degradation products in Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota streams during base-flow conditions in August 1997. Atrazine, the most frequently detected herbicide (94%), was present at relatively low concentrations (median 0.17 μg L−1). Metolachlor was detected in 59% and cyanazine in 37% of the samples. Seven of nine compounds detected in more than 50% of the samples were degradation products. The total concentration of the degradation products (median of 4.4 μg L−1) was significantly greater than the total concentration of parent compounds (median of 0.26 μg L−1). Atrazine compounds were present less frequently and in significantly smaller concentrations in streams draining watersheds with soils developed on less permeable tills than in watersheds with soils developed on more permeable loess. The detection and concentration of triazine compounds was negatively correlated with antecedent rainfall (April–July). In contrast, acetanalide compounds were positively correlated with antecedant rainfall in late spring and early summer that may transport the acetanalide degradates into ground water and subsequently into nearby streams. The distribution of atrazine degradation products suggests regional differences in atrazine degradation processes.

  10. ANALYSIS OF GLUCOSINOLATES AND GLUCOSINOLATE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS IN SPROUTING BROCCOLI SEEDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total glucosinolate content and glucosinolate degradation products were examined in unsprouted `Marathon' broccoli (Brassica oleracea L., Italica group) seeds and in 1-, 2-, 3-, 5-, 7-, and 10-day-old sprouts. Glucosinolates identified were glucoiberin, glucoraphanin, gluconapin, glucoiberverin, 4-...

  11. Determination of trace amounts of chemical warfare agent degradation products in decontamination solutions with NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Harri; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Kuitunen, Marja-Leena; Vanninen, Paula

    2007-12-01

    Decontamination solutions are used for an efficient detoxification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). As these solutions can be composed of strong alkaline chemicals with hydrolyzing and oxidizing properties, the analysis of CWA degradation products in trace levels from these solutions imposes a challenge for any analytical technique. Here, we present results of application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for analysis of trace amounts of CWA degradation products in several untreated decontamination solutions. Degradation products of the nerve agents sarin, soman, and VX were selectively monitored with substantially reduced interference of background signals by 1D 1H-31P heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectrometry. The detection limit of the chemicals was at the low part-per-million level (2-10 microg/mL) in all studied solutions. In addition, the concentration of the degradation products was obtained with sufficient confidence with external standards. PMID:17973498

  12. [The stability of bromhexine and the structure of its degradation products].

    PubMed

    Göber, B; Lisowski, H; Franke, P

    1988-01-01

    Refluxed acid or neutral aqueous solutions of Bromhexine (1) show four degradation products. 1 is decomposed at room temperature (20 degrees C; 1 year) less than 1%. Degradation products of crystalline 1 are not detectable in the temperature-moisture-test. Under normal storage conditions a 5-year stability for aqueous solutions and a more than 10-year stability for crystalline 1 are estimated. Very small amounts of three degradation products were isolated by TLC. According to MS-, UV- and IR-analysis their structures are 3-cyclohexyl-6,8-dibromo-chinazoline-4-one (2a), 3-cyclohexyl-6,8-dibromo-chinazoline (2b) and 3-amino-4,6-dibromo-benzaldehyde (3). The structure of N-Methylcyclohexylamine is supposed for a further product. Ms fragmentation and degradation mechanisms are discussed. PMID:3375295

  13. SULFUR PESTICIDE REGISTRATION STANDARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document contains information regarding reregistration of pesticide products containing the subject active ingredient. The document includes how to register under a registration standard, regulatory position and rationale, and summaries of data requirements and data gaps. Als...

  14. Photochemical Attenuation of Pesticides in Prairie Potholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, T.; Arnold, W. A.

    2013-12-01

    Prairie potholes are small, shallow, glacially-derived wetlands scattered across a vast region extending from Midwestern United States into south central Canada known as the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR). They constitute one of the largest inland wetland systems on Earth and play a prominent role in sustaining the regional biodiversity and productivity. Throughout the PPR, historic and contemporary conversion of native prairie for agriculture resulted in a pronounced loss of potholes. Remaining potholes have become interspersed within a matrix of agricultural landscape and trap nonpoint source pollutants such as pesticides from adjacent farmland, which has raised concerns regarding negative impacts on the water quality of downstream water bodies. The fate and persistence of pesticides in potholes, however, remains largely unexplored. Prairie potholes are typically characterized by shallow depth (i.e., large photic zone) and high levels of dissolved organic matter (DOM), making them ideal for photochemical reactions. In this context, we collected pothole water samples from North Dakota to investigate the rates and mechanisms of sunlight-induced attenuation of pesticides. The photodegradation kinetics and pathways of sixteen pesticides in the pothole water were monitored under both simulated and natural sunlight. For most pesticides, photolysis accelerated in the pothole water relative to the buffer control, which pointed to the importance of photosensitized processes (i.e., indirect photolysis). Upon solar irradiation, a mixture of photochemically produced reactive intermediates (PPRIs), such as carbonate radical, hydroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, and triplet-excited state DOM, formed in the pothole water. The major pathways through which pesticides degraded were inferred from the relative contribution attributable to specific PPRIs via quencher experiments. Different classes of pesticides exhibited contrasting photochemical behavior, but singlet oxygen and triplet DOM appeared to exert the largest effects on the overall photodegradation. Furthermore, a suite of second-order rate constants for reactions of pesticides with PPRIs were derived based on the quenching effect on observed reaction rate constants and measured steady-state concentrations of PPRIs. These rate constants may find practical utility for estimating DOM photochemical reaction rates in addition to data traditionally estimated from model compounds. Overall, our work contributed to a systematic evaluation of the potential for photochemical attenuation of pesticides in near-surface pothole water. Given recent incentives to expand agriculture in the PPR for production of organic crops and corn-based biofuels, this research also calls for the need to properly conserve prairie potholes and to develop regionally-specific, sustainable water resource management and land use strategies.

  15. Toxicity and physical properties of atrazine and its degradation products: A literature survey

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, K.C.

    1994-10-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority`s Environmental Research Center has been developing a means of detoxifying atrazine waste waters using TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis. The toxicity and physical properties of atrazine and its degradation products will probably be required information in obtaining permits from the United States Environmental Protection Agency for the demonstration of any photocatalytic treatment of atrazine waste waters. The following report is a literature survey of the toxicological and physical properties of atrazine and its degradation products.

  16. Dependence of transformation product formation on pH during photolytic and photocatalytic degradation of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Salma, Alaa; Thoröe-Boveleth, Sven; Schmidt, Torsten C; Tuerk, Jochen

    2016-08-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with five pH dependent species in aqueous medium, which makes its degradation behavior difficult to predict. For the identification of transformation products and prediction of degradation mechanisms, a new experimental concept making use of isotopically labeled compounds together with high resolution mass spectrometry was successfully established. The utilization of deuterated ciprofloxacin (CIP-d8) facilitated the prediction of three different degradation pathways and the corresponding degradation products, four of which were identified for the first time. Moreover, two molecular structures of previously reported transformation products were revised according to the mass spectra and product ion spectra of the deuterated transformation products. Altogether, 18 transformation products have been identified during the photolytic and photocatalytic reactions at different pH values (3, 5, 7 and 9). In this work the influence of pH on both reaction kinetics and degradation mechanism was investigated for direct ultraviolet photolysis (UV-C irradiation) and photocatalysis (TiO2/UV-C). It could be shown that the removal rates strongly depended on pH with highest removal rates at pH 9. A comparison with those at pH 3 clearly indicated that under acidic conditions ciprofloxacin cannot be easily excited by UV irradiation. We could confirm that the first reaction step for both oxidative treatment processes is mainly defluorination, followed by degradation at the piperazine ring of CIP. PMID:27054664

  17. Modeling potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts due to pesticide use in biofuel feedstock production: the cases of maize, rapeseed, salix, soybean, sugar cane, and wheat.

    PubMed

    Nordborg, Maria; Cederberg, Christel; Berndes, Gran

    2014-10-01

    The inclusion of ecotoxicity impacts of pesticides in environmental assessments of biobased products has long been hampered by methodological challenges. We expanded the pesticide database and the regional coverage of the pesticide emission model PestLCI v.2.0, combined it with the impact assessment model USEtox, and assessed potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts (PFEIs) of pesticide use in selected biofuel feedstock production cases, namely: maize (Iowa, US, two cases), rapeseed (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany), Salix (South Central Sweden), soybean (Mato Grosso, Brazil, two cases), sugar cane (So Paulo, Brazil), and wheat (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany). We found that PFEIs caused by pesticide use in feedstock production varied greatly, up to 3 orders of magnitude. Salix has the lowest PFEI per unit of energy output and per unit of cultivated area. Impacts per biofuel unit were 30, 750, and 1000 times greater, respectively, for the sugar cane, wheat and rapeseed cases than for Salix. For maize genetically engineered (GE) to resist glyphosate herbicides and to produce its own insecticidal toxin, maize GE to resist glyphosate, soybeans GE to resist glyphosate and conventional soybeans, the impacts were 110, 270, 305, and 310 times greater than for Salix, respectively. The significance of field and site-specific conditions are discussed, as well as options for reducing negative impacts in biofuel feedstock production. PMID:25207789

  18. Electrochemical biosensors for rapid determination of pesticide residues in agricultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xuesong; Wang, Jianping; Ying, Yibin; Ye, Zunzhong; Li, Yanbin

    2005-11-01

    The biosensors, consisting of immobilized antibodies which were for specific recognition to target molecules and electrodes which were able to convert the binding event between antigen and antibody to a detectable signal, were developed for rapid detection of organophosphate (OPs) pesticides. Anti-OPs antibodies were immobilized onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated interdigitated microsensor electrodes (IMEs). The Faradaic impedance spectra, presented as Nyquist plots (Z' vs Z'') and Bode diagrams, (impedance vs frequency) were recorded in the frequency range from 1Hz to 100 kHz respectively. A linear relationship between the electron-transfer resistance and concentrations of OPs pesticide was found ranging from 0.1 ppm to 100 ppm. The regression equations were Y = 658 X +1861, with the correlation coefficient of 0.977. The biosensing procedure was simple and rapid, and could be completed within 1 h.

  19. Pesticides and Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information —> Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose in society. Pesticides ... pesticides than others. To reduce the risk of health problems from pesticides there are several things you ...

  20. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Moderate-Use Pesticides and Selected Degradates in Water by C-18 Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Stroppel, Max E.; Foreman, William T.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    A method for the isolation and analysis of 21 parent pesticides and 20 pesticide degradates in natural-water samples is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase-extraction columns that contain octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the analytes. The columns are dried by using nitrogen gas, and adsorbed analytes are eluted with ethyl acetate. Extracted analytes are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 2 micrograms per liter (?g/L) for most analytes. Single-operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.00 1 to 0.057 ?g/L. Validation data also are presented for 14 parent pesticides and 20 degradates that were determined to have greater bias or variability, or shorter holding times than the other compounds. The estimated maximum holding time for analytes in pesticide-grade water before extraction was 4 days. The estimated maximum holding time for analytes after extraction on the dry solid-phase-extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time. The method complements existing U.S. Geological Survey Method O-1126-95 (NWQL Schedules 2001 and 2010) by using identical sample preparation and comparable instrument analytical conditions so that sample extracts can be analyzed by either method to expand the range of analytes determined from one water sample.

  1. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... menu Learn the Issues Air Chemicals and Toxics Climate Change Emergencies Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology Air Climate Change Ecosystems Health Land, Waste and Cleanup Pesticides Substances ...

  2. Heterogeneous oxidation of pesticides on aerosol condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, Joanna; Durand, Amandine; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Ravier, Sylvain; Gligorovski, Sasho; Wortham, Henri; Quivet, Etienne

    2015-04-01

    Pesticides are widely used all over the world. It is known that they exhibit adverse health effects and environmental risks due to their physico-chemical properties and their extensive use which is growing every year. They are distributed in the atmosphere, an important vector of dissemination, over long distances away from the target area. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences their atmospheric fate. Most of the pesticides are semi-volatile compounds, emphasizing the importance of assessing their heterogeneous reactivity towards atmospheric oxidants. These reactions are important because they are involved in, among others, direct and indirect climate changes, adverse health effects from inhaled particles, effects on cloud chemistry and ozone production. In this work, the importance of atmospheric degradation of pesticides is evaluated on the surface of aerosol deliquescent particles. The photolysis processing and heterogeneous reactivity towards O3 and OH, was evaluated of eight commonly used pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin, tetraconazole) adsorbed on silica particles. Silicate particles are present in air-borne mineral dust in atmospheric aerosols, and heterogeneous reactions can be different in the presence of these mineral particles. Depending on their origin and conditioning, aerosol particles containing pesticides can have complex and highly porous microstructures, which are influenced by electric charge effects and interaction with water vapour. Therefore, the kinetic experiments and consecutive product studies were performed at atmospherically relevant relative humidity (RH) of 55 %. The identification of surface bound products was performed using GC-(QqQ)-MS/MS and LC-(Q-ToF)-MS/MS and the gas-phase products were on-line monitored by PTR-ToF-MS. Based on the detected and identified reaction products, it was observed that water plays a crucial role in the reaction mechanism of ozone and hydroxyl radical with the adsorbed pesticides on the silica particles. The obtained results will allow better understanding of the impact of pesticides and their degradation products on human health, and to make recommendations in order to reduce population exposure to the pesticide plume and the pollution by phyto-sanitary products on the regional scale, which constitutes a necessary step in the development of environmental strategies.

  3. QuEChERS Adaptability for the Analysis of Pesticide Residues in Beehive Products Seeking the Development of an Agroecosystem Sustainability Monitor.

    PubMed

    Niell, Silvina; Jesús, Florencia; Pérez, Cecilia; Mendoza, Yamandú; Díaz, Rosana; Franco, Jorge; Cesio, Verónica; Heinzen, Horacio

    2015-05-13

    Beehive products could be powerful monitors of pesticide residues originating in agroecosystems during production cycles. Their ready availability provides enough samples to perform analytical determinations, but their chemical complexity makes residue analysis a real challenge. Taking advantage of the plasticity of QuEChERS coupled to LC-MS/MS, validated methodologies were developed for bees, honey, beeswax, and pollen and applied to real samples for the simultaneous determination of 19 of the most employed pesticides in intensive cropping fields. Beehives placed in Uruguayan agroecosystems accumulated the pesticides thiacloprid, imidacloprid, methomyl, carbaryl, hexythiazox, azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, tebuconazole, and haloxyfop-methyl at 0.0001-0.01 mg/kg levels. The oscillations on the amount and occurrence of residue findings for specific apiaries were correlated statistically with the sampling season and the agroecosystem where the beehives were located, showing the potential of bees and bee products to record relevant information to survey the chemicals applied in their surroundings. PMID:25880394

  4. Poly(L-lactide)-degrading enzyme production by Actinomadura keratinilytica T16-1 in 3 L airlift bioreactor and its degradation ability for biological recycle.

    PubMed

    Sukkhum, Sukhumaporn; Tokuyama, Shinji; Kitpreechavanich, Vichien

    2012-01-01

    The optimal physical factors affecting enzyme production in an airlift fermenter have not been studied so far. Therefore, the physical parameters such as aeration rate, pH, and temperature affecting PLA-degrading enzyme production by Actinomadura keratinilytica strain T16-1 in a 3 l airlift fermenter were investigated. The response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize PLA-degrading enzyme production by implementing the central composite design. The optimal conditions for higher production of PLA-degrading enzyme were aeration rate of 0.43 vvm, pH of 6.85, and temperature at 46° C. Under these conditions, the model predicted a PLA-degrading activity of 254 U/ml. Verification of the optimization showed that PLA-degrading enzyme production of 257 U/ml was observed after 3 days cultivation under the optimal conditions in a 3 l airlift fermenter. The production under the optimized condition in the airlift fermenter was higher than un-optimized condition by 1.7 folds and 12 folds with un-optimized medium or condition in shake flasks. This is the first report on the optimization of environmental conditions for improvement of PLA-degrading enzyme production in a 3 l airlift fermenter by using a statistical analysis method. Moreover, the crude PLA-degrading enzyme could be adsorbed to the substrate and degraded PLA powder to produce lactic acid as degradation products. Therefore, this incident indicates that PLA-degrading enzyme produced by Actinomadura keratinilytica NBRC 104111 strain T16-1 has a potential to degrade PLA to lactic acid as a monomer and can be used for the recycle of PLA polymer. PMID:22297224

  5. Non-Aqueous Electromigration Analysis of Some Degradation Products of Carvedilol

    PubMed Central

    Jouyban, Abolghasem; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    A capillary electrophoresis method was used for assay of some degradation products of carvedilol. The optimized parameters were as; running buffer 80 mM acetate dissolved in methanol/ethanol mixture (65:35% v/v), applied voltage of 19 kV, temperature is 20 ºC and the wavelength range of 200-350 nm. The results indicate that the proposed capillary electrophoresis method could effectively separate carvedilol from its degradation products and can be employed as a stability indicating assay method. In addition, the presence of a new unknown degradation product was discovered by this method. In addition, capillary electrophoresis behaviour of carvedilol in photo/force degradation conditions gave valuable information concerning the dissimilarities of their ionization. Results indicated that the capillary electrophoresis proposed method can be used for the determination of carvedilol in human serum. Finally, accuracy of the proposed method was established by recovery experiments from spiked human serum samples. PMID:25237342

  6. A review of the photodegradability and transformation products of 13 pharmaceuticals and pesticides relevant to sewage polishing treatment.

    PubMed

    Mathon, Baptiste; Choubert, Jean-Marc; Miege, Cécile; Coquery, Marina

    2016-05-01

    Many xenobiotics are only partially treated by conventional wastewater treatment plants. Photodegradation is one promising solution currently being investigated to improve their removal from effluents. We present an in-depth review of the photodegradation kinetic parameters of selected pesticides and pharmaceuticals and assess whether the data available in the literature are applicable to polishing treatment processes under sunlight. We made a thorough inventory of literature data describing the photodegradation of pesticides and pharmaceuticals in water, the laboratory, pilot plants, and in situ conditions. To this end, we built a database compiling results on photodegradation experiments from 70 scientific publications covering 13 xenobiotics commonly found in secondary effluents. Special care was taken to compile reliable data on photolysis kinetic parameters (half-life and kinetic rate constant) and removal efficiencies. We also include a comprehensive description of experimental operating conditions and an up-to-date inventory of known phototransformation products. As practical outputs we (i) propose a classification for the xenobiotics according to their photodegradability: fast-, medium- and slow-photodegradable, (ii) compare kinetic parameters in direct and indirect photodegradation conditions, and (iii) list 140 phototransformation products formed by direct or indirect photodegradation. We conclude by identifying gaps in the literature that need to be filled to adapt these available results to the conditions of polishing processes. PMID:26907739

  7. [Surface-enhanced Raman spectra analysis of trace degradation products from goat horn].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yan-Ting; Ao, Ning-Jian; Shan, Guang-Hua; Zhang, Gang-Ping; Zhang, Quan-Bin; Yang, Ji-Wang; He, Chun-Lan; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2014-04-01

    Nano-silver colloid was synthesized by using microwave method on the mixtures of sodium citrate solution and silver nitrate solution. The method has advantages of fast heating speed, uniform temperature distribution and easily controlled reaction conditions. The sizes and size distributions of the silver particles were characterized by means of quasi-elastic laser scattering (QLS). The average particles size was (53.27 +/- 2.65) nm and the size of the particles was mainly distributed around 56 nm. Surface-enhanced Raman spectra of the degradation products from goat horn were obtained with silver colloid as active substrate. It was observed that the Raman signal of SERS was enhanced significantly compared with that of regular Raman spectrum, especially at the Raman bands of 659, 830, 850, 929, 999, 1 028, 1 280, 1 439 and 1 599 cm(-1) which reflect the biochemical components in degradation products. The characteristic Raman bands of degradation products from goat horn were preliminary assigned. The assignments showed that the main constituents of the degradation products from goat horn were amino acids and polypeptides. It was for the first time that Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy was used to detect trace degradation products from the horns. Raman signal enhancement can be obtained with high sensitivity for the trace concentrations as low as ppm level. It is concluded that surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy can provide a fast, direct and precise detecting method for the detection of trace degradation solution from horns. PMID:25007614

  8. Identification and in vitro cytotoxicity of ochratoxin A degradation products formed during coffee roasting.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Benedikt; Königs, Maika; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2008-07-23

    The mycotoxin ochratoxin A is degraded by up to 90% during coffee roasting. In order to investigate this degradation, model heating experiments with ochratoxin A were carried out, and the reaction products were analyzed by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS/MS. Two ochratoxin A degradation products were identified, and their structure and absolute configuration were determined. As degradation reactions, the isomerization to 14-(R)-ochratoxin A and the decarboxylation to 14-decarboxy-ochratoxin A were identified. Subsequently, an analytical method for the determination of these compounds in roasted coffee was developed. Quantification was carried out by HPLC-MS/MS and the use of stable isotope dilution analysis. By using this method for the analysis of 15 coffee samples from the German market, it could be shown that, during coffee roasting, the ochratoxin A diastereomer 14-(R)-ochratoxin A was formed in amounts of up to 25.6% relative to ochratoxin A. The decarboxylation product was formed only in traces. For toxicity evaluations, first preliminary cell culture assays were performed with the two new substances. Both degradation products exhibited higher IC50 values and caused apoptotic effects with higher concentrations than ochratoxin A in cultured human kidney epithelial cells. Thus, these cell culture data suggest that the degradation products are less cytotoxic than ochratoxin A. PMID:18588316

  9. Identification of degradation products of erythromycin A arising from ozone and advanced oxidation process treatment.

    PubMed

    Luiz, Danielle B; Genena, Aziza K; Virmond, Elaine; José, Humberto J; Moreira, Regina F P M; Gebhardt, Wilhelm; Schröder, Horst Fr

    2010-01-01

    The degradation products of the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin A (ERY) arising from direct ozone attack and hydroxyl radical attack are presented for the first time. Ozone treatment was carried out by spiking ozone stock solutions to solutions containing ERY-ERY:O3 = 1:5 and 1:10 (M:M), while, in parallel, t-BuOH was used as a hydroxyl radical (*OH) scavenger. The advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) O3/UV, O3/H2O2, and UV/H2O2 were carried out to recognize and verify possible differences between their primary degradation products; the initial concentrations were ERY:O3 = 1:5 (M:M), ERY:O3:H202 = 1:5:5 (M:M:M), or ERY:H202 = 1:5 (M:M), respectively. Six degradation products were identified from ozonation-one originates from direct ozone attack on the tertiary amine group, while the others arise from radical ion attack, which might be formed during degradation of O3 in water. Fewer primary degradation products were observed arising from *OH-based treatments (AOP) than from ozonation, possibly because the reaction of *OH radicals is non-selective and typically is diffusion-controlled. Four degradation products were detected by *OH radical attacks; two of them already were observed during ozonation, with one as an oxidized ERY molecule and the other as a non-oxidized fragment of the ERY molecule. PMID:20942335

  10. [Analysis of characteristics and products of chlorobenzene degradation with dielectric barrier discharge].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-Ying; Cao, Shu-Ling; Zhu, Run-Ye; Chen, Jian-Meng; Su, Fei

    2015-03-01

    For non-biodegradable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with low water solubility, the tradition biological method can not achieve a satisfactory removal efficiency, so development of high efficiency pre-treatment technology is a hot issue of research. In this experiment, using poor biodegradable chlorobenzene as the target pollutant and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) non-thermal plasma as the pretreatment technology for biotrickling filter (BTF) , the effect of DBD on the degradation of chlorobenzene was studied by adjusting the technical parameters of DBD. The effects of the inlet concentration, residence time, humidity and peak voltage on decomposition efficiency were investigated and the decomposition products of chlorobenzene were analyzed. Experimental results showed that DBD could effectively remove waste gaseous chlorobenzene, the removal rate of chlorobenzene increased with the increasing peak voltage. When the peak voltage was ≥ 12kV, less effect of residence time on the degradation of chlorobenzene was found. The optimal humidity range of degradation chlorobenzene was 65% - 75%. Through the analysis of degradation products, the species and concentrations of degradation products increased with the increase of discharge voltage. The products were mainly consisted of organic acids and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The water solubility of degradation products was preferable. Furthermore, with the increase of discharge voltage, the biodegradability of degradation products became higher and higher and the biological toxicity was reduced. It had a promoting effect on the degradation of chlorobenzene when the voltage reached 20 kV. Meanwhile, the O3 concentration increased with the increasing discharge voltage and also enhanced with the rising humidity under the same voltage. PMID:25929048

  11. Activity of Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) Seed Meal Glucolimnanthin Degradation Products against Soil-Borne Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    ZASADA, INGA A; WEILAND, JERRY E; REED, RALPH L; STEVENS, JAN F

    2014-01-01

    Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba L.) is a herbaceous winter-spring annual grown as a commercial oil seed crop. The meal remaining after oil extraction from the seed contains up to 4% of the glucosinolate, glucolimnanthin. Degradation of glucolimnanthin yields toxic breakdown products and therefore the meal may have potential in the management of soil-borne pathogens. To maximize the pest suppressive potential of meadowfoam seed meal, it would be beneficial to know the toxicity of individual glucolimnanthin degradation products against specific soil-borne pathogens. Meloidogyne hapla second-stage juveniles (J2) and Pythium irregulare and Verticillium dahliae mycelial cultures were exposed to glucolimnanthin as well as its degradation products. Glucolimnanthin and its degradation product, 2-(3-methoxyphenyl)acetamide, were not toxic to any of the soil-borne pathogens at concentrations up to 1.0 mg/mL. Two other degradation products, 2-(3-methoxymethyl)ethanethioamide and 3-methoxyphenylacetonitrile, were toxic to M. hapla and P. irregulare but not V. dahliae. The predominant enzyme degradation product, 3-methoxybenzyl isothiocyanate was the most toxic compound against all of the soil-borne pathogens with M. hapla being the most sensitive with EC50 values (0.0025 ± 0.0001 to 0.0027 ± 0.0001 mg/mL) 20 to 40 times lower than estimated EC50 mortality values generated for P. irregulare and V. dahliae (0.05 and 0.1 mg/mL, respectively). The potential exists to manipulate meadowfoam seed meal to promote the production of specific degradation products. The conversion of glucolimnanthin into its corresponding isothiocyanate should optimize the biopesticidal properties of meadowfoam seed meal against M. hapla, P. irregulare, and V. dahliae. PMID:22142246

  12. The degradation products of UV filters in aqueous and chlorinated aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Santos, A Joel M; Miranda, Margarida S; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2012-06-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) filters are vital constituents of sunscreens and other personal care products since they absorb, reflect and/or scatter UV radiation, therefore protecting us from the sun's deleterious UV radiation and its effects. However, they suffer degradation, mainly through exposure towards sunlight and from reactions with disinfectant products such as chlorine. On the basis of their increasing production and use, UV filters and their degradation products have already been detected in the aquatic environment, especially in bathing waters. This paper presents a comprehensive review on the work done so far as to identify and determine the by-products of UV filter photodegradation in aqueous solutions and those subsequent to disinfection-induced degradation in chlorinated aqueous solutions, namely swimming pools. PMID:22513303

  13. Degradation of triketone herbicides, mesotrione and sulcotrione, using advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Jovi?, Milica; Manojlovi?, Dragan; Stankovi?, Dalibor; Doj?inovi?, Biljana; Obradovi?, Bratislav; Gai?, Uro; Rogli?, Goran

    2013-09-15

    Degradation of two triketone herbicides, mesotrione and sulcotrione, was studied using four different advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): ozonization, dielectric barrier discharge (DBD reactor), photocatalysis and Fenton reagent, in order to find differences in mechanism of degradation. Degradation products were identified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD) and UHPLC-Orbitrap-MS analyses. A simple mechanism of degradation for different AOP was proposed. Thirteen products were identified during all degradations for both pesticides. It was assumed that the oxidation mechanisms in the all four technologies were not based only on the production and use of the hydroxyl radical, but they also included other kinds of oxidation mechanisms specific for each technology. Similarity was observed between degradation mechanism of ozonation and DBD. The greatest difference in the products was found in Fenton degradation which included the opening of benzene ring. When degraded with same AOP pesticides gave at the end of treatment the same products. Global toxicity and COD value of samples was determined after all degradations. Real water sample was used to study influence of organic matter on pesticide degradation. These results could lead to accurate estimates of the overall effects of triketone herbicides on environmental ecosystems and also contributed to the development of improved removal processes. PMID:23892174

  14. 40 CFR 152.166 - Labeling of restricted use products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Classification of Pesticides § 152... formulation into other pesticide products) is not subject to the labeling requirements of this subpart....

  15. 40 CFR 152.166 - Labeling of restricted use products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Classification of Pesticides § 152... formulation into other pesticide products) is not subject to the labeling requirements of this subpart....

  16. 40 CFR 152.166 - Labeling of restricted use products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Classification of Pesticides § 152... formulation into other pesticide products) is not subject to the labeling requirements of this subpart....

  17. 40 CFR 152.166 - Labeling of restricted use products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Classification of Pesticides § 152... formulation into other pesticide products) is not subject to the labeling requirements of this subpart....

  18. 40 CFR 152.166 - Labeling of restricted use products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Classification of Pesticides § 152... formulation into other pesticide products) is not subject to the labeling requirements of this subpart....

  19. Emerging contaminants (pharmaceuticals, personal care products, a food additive and pesticides) in waters of Sydney estuary, Australia.

    PubMed

    Birch, G F; Drage, D S; Thompson, K; Eaglesham, G; Mueller, J F

    2015-08-15

    The current investigation of marine water from 30 sites adjacent to stormwater outlets across the entire Sydney estuary is the first such research in Australia. The number of analytes detected were: 8/59 pharmaceutical compounds (codeine, paracetamol, tramadol, venlafaxine, propranolol, fluoxetine, iopromide and carbamazepine), 7/38 of the pesticides (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 3,4-dichloroaniline, carbaryl, diuron, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), mecoprop and simazine) and 0/3 of the personal care products (PCPs) analysed. An artificial sweetener (acesulfame) was detected, however none of the nine antibiotics analysed were identified. Sewage water is not discharged to this estuary, except infrequently as overflow during high-precipitation events. The presence of acesulfame (a recognised marker of domestic wastewater) and pharmaceuticals in water from all parts of the estuary after a dry period, suggests sewage water is leaking into the stormwater system in this catchment. The pesticides are applied to the environment and were discharged via stormwater to the estuary. PMID:26130525

  20. Development of phage immuno-loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for organophosphorus pesticides in agro-products.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xiude; Yin, Wei; Shi, Haiyan; Li, Ming; Wang, Yanru; Wang, Hong; Ye, Yonghao; Kim, Hee Joo; Gee, Shirley J; Wang, Minghua; Liu, Fengquan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2014-08-19

    Two immuno-loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays (iLAMP) were developed by using a phage-borne peptide that was isolated from a cyclic eight-peptide phage library. One assay was used to screen eight organophosphorus (OP) pesticides with limits of detection (LOD) between 2 and 128 ng mL(-1). The iLAMP consisted of the competitive immuno-reaction coupled to the LAMP reaction for detection. This method provides positive results in the visual color of violet, while a negative response results in a sky blue color; therefore, the iLAMP allows one to rapidly detect analytes in yes or no fashion. We validated the iLAMP by detecting parathion-methyl, parathion, and fenitrothion in Chinese cabbage, apple, and greengrocery, and the detection results were consistent with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In conclusion, the iLAMP is a simple, rapid, sensitive, and economical method for detecting OP pesticide residues in agro-products with no instrumental requirement. PMID:25135320

  1. Bridging the gap between life cycle inventory and impact assessment for toxicological assessments of pesticides used in crop production.

    PubMed

    van Zelm, Rosalie; Larrey-Lassalle, Pyrène; Roux, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    In Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), the Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) provides emission data to the various environmental compartments and Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) determines the final distribution, fate and effects. Due to the overlap between the Technosphere (anthropogenic system) and Ecosphere (environment) in agricultural case studies, it is, however, complicated to establish what LCI needs to capture and where LCIA takes over. This paper aims to provide guidance and improvements of LCI/LCIA boundary definitions, in the dimensions of space and time. For this, a literature review was conducted to provide a clear overview of available methods and models for both LCI and LCIA regarding toxicological assessments of pesticides used in crop production. Guidelines are provided to overcome the gaps between LCI and LCIA modeling, and prevent the overlaps in their respective operational spheres. The proposed framework provides a starting point for LCA practitioners to gather the right data and use the proper models to include all relevant emission and exposure routes where possible. It is also able to predict a clear distinction between efficient and inefficient management practices (e.g. using different application rates, washing and rinsing management, etc.). By applying this framework for toxicological assessments of pesticides, LCI and LCIA can be directly linked, removing any overlaps or gaps in between the two distinct LCA steps. PMID:24314898

  2. ATMOSPHERIC REACTION PRODUCTS FROM HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT DEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project was undertaken to investigate the products of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as they react in the atmosphere. Many hazardous or potentially hazardous organic compounds are emitted into the atmosphere and are subject to chemical change by photolysis...

  3. PRODUCTION OF HIGHLY ACTIVE LIGNOCELLULOSE-DEGRADING ENZYMES OF ANAEROBIC FUNGI BY INDUSTRIALLY RELEVANT FUNGI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most anaerobic fungi isolated from the digestive tracts of herbivorous animals secrete highly active lignocellulose-degrading enzymes, but the levels of production are usually low (e.g., <50 mg per liter). Fungi such as Trichoderma and Aspergillus, that are commonly used for commercial production o...

  4. Inhibition performance of lignocellulose degradation products on industrial cellulase enzymes during cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xinyun; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Bao, Jie

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the inhibition performance by the major lignocellulose degradation products, including organic acids, furan derivatives, lignin derivatives, and ethanol, on a broadly used commercial cellulase enzyme Spezyme CP (Genencor International, Rochester, NY, USA) to cellulose hydrolysis at both the well-mixing state (shaking flask) and the static state (test tube). The cellulase activity in the cellulase complex of Spezyme CP was assumed to be one single "cellulase", and the apparent kinetic parameters of this cellulase enzyme were measured as an approximate index of the inhibitory effect to the industrial cellulase enzyme. The inhibition performance of these degradation products was compared and analyzed using the determined apparent kinetic parameters. All the degradation products strongly inhibit the cellulose hydrolysis by cellulase enzyme, and the inhibitions on cellulase were all competitive type. The order of the inhibition strength by the lignocellulose degradation products to cellulase is lignin derivatives > furan derivatives > organic acids > ethanol. This study gave a quantitative view to the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose under the inhibition performance of the lignocellulose degradation products and will help to understand the lignocellulose recalcitrance to enzyme hydrolysis. PMID:19184544

  5. Toxicity of thermal degradation products of spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, W. H.; Turner, J. E.; Sanford, C.; Foster, S.; Baldwin, E.; Oconnor, J.

    1982-01-01

    Three polymeric materials were evaluated for relative toxicity of their pyrolysis products to rats by inhalation: Y-7683 (LS 200), Y-7684 (Vonar 3 on Fiberglass), and Y-7685 (Vonar 3 on N W Polyester). Criteria employed for assessing relative toxicity were (1) lethality from in-chamber pyrolysis, (2) lethality from an outside-of-chamber pyrolysis MSTL Procedure, and (3) disruption of trained rats' shock-avoidance performance during sub-lethal exposures to in-chamber pyrolysis of the materials.

  6. Occurrence and potential risk of currently used pesticides in sediments of the Alqueva reservoir (Guadiana Basin).

    PubMed

    Palma, P; Köck-Schulmeyer, M; Alvarenga, P; Ledo, L; de Alda, M López; Barceló, D

    2015-05-01

    The evaluation of sediments, concerning to pesticides, constitutes an important step for the understanding of the principal sources of contamination of the surface water. Hence, the purpose of this study was to evaluate for the first time the occurrence, distribution and risk of pesticides in sediments of the Alqueva reservoir, the largest reservoir in the Europe. For this purpose, the occurrence of 22 pesticides and some of their degradation products was determined in surficial sediments of the Alqueva reservoir. To assess the potential risk on ecosystem, the measured concentrations of pesticides were compared with regulatory and toxicological benchmarks. Of the 22 pesticides analysed, only 8 were detected. Diuron was the pesticide detected in greater concentration, followed by terbuthylazine and chlortoluron. The sediments most polluted by pesticides were from Lucefécit, constituted totally by fine particles (<0.063 mm) and with high values of organic matter, and are located nearby large agricultural fields. The risk assessment allowed us to conclude that the sediments from the Alqueva reservoir presented low risk, concerning to pesticides, for the various communities that integrate the aquatic ecosystems. However, some of the compounds detected present a high potential for bioaccumulation that may lead to their bioamplification in the trophic chain, reaching concentrations higher than their acceptable daily intake, putting, in this way the populations at risk. PMID:25874427

  7. Chiral Pesticides: Identification, Description and Environmental Implications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic chemicals, including pesticides, are a major source of contamination and pollution in the environment. Pesticides have many positive uses: increased food production, decreased damage to crops and structures, reduced disease vector populations, and more. Nevertheless...

  8. Evaluation of anaerobic degradation, biogas and digestate production of cereal silages using nylon-bags.

    PubMed

    Negri, Marco; Bacenetti, Jacopo; Fiala, Marco; Bocchi, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the degradation efficiency and the biogas and digestate production during anaerobic digestion were evaluated for the cereal silages most used to feed biogas plants. To this purpose, silages of: maize from the whole plant, maize from the ear, triticale and wheat were digested, inside of nylon bags, in laboratory scale digesters, for 75days. Overall, the test involved 288 nylon bags. After 75days of digestion, the maize ear silage shows the highest degradation efficiency (about 98%) while wheat silage the lowest (about 83%). The biogas production ranges from 438 to 852Nm(3)/t of dry matter for wheat and ear maize silage, respectively. For all the cereal silages, the degradation as well as the biogas production are faster at the beginning of the digestion time. Digestate mass, expressed as percentage of the fresh matter, ranges from 38% to 84% for wheat and maize ear silage, respectively. PMID:26946439

  9. Environmental, biochemical and genetic drivers of DMSP degradation and DMS production in the Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Levine, Naomi Marcil; Varaljay, Vanessa A; Toole, Dierdre A; Dacey, John W H; Doney, Scott C; Moran, Mary Ann

    2012-05-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is a climatically relevant trace gas produced and cycled by the surface ocean food web. Mechanisms driving intraannual variability in DMS production and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) degradation in open-ocean, oligotrophic regions were investigated during a 10-month time-series at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site in the Sargasso Sea. Abundance and transcription of bacterial DMSP degradation genes, DMSP lyase enzyme activity, and DMS and DMSP concentrations, consumption rates and production rates were quantified over time and depth. This interdisciplinary data set was used to test current hypotheses of the role of light and carbon supply in regulating upper-ocean sulfur cycling. Findings supported UV-A-dependent phytoplankton DMS production. Bacterial DMSP degraders may also contribute significantly to DMS production when temperatures are elevated and UV-A dose is moderate, but may favour DMSP demethylation under low UV-A doses. Three groups of bacterial DMSP degraders with distinct intraannual variability were identified and niche differentiation was indicated. The combination of genetic and biochemical data suggest a modified 'bacterial switch' hypothesis where the prevalence of different bacterial DMSP degradation pathways is regulated by a complex set of factors including carbon supply, temperature and UV-A dose. PMID:22324779

  10. Osteogenic Responses in Fibroblasts Activated by Elastin Degradation Products and Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Simionescu, Agneta; Simionescu, Dan T.; Vyavahare, Narendra R.

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to establish the role of fibroblasts in medial vascular calcification, a pathological process known to be associated with elastin degradation and remodeling. Rat dermal fibroblasts were treated in vitro with elastin degradation products and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, factors usually present in deteriorated matrix environments. Cellular changes were monitored at the gene and protein level by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescence, and von Kossa staining for calcium deposits. By 21 days, multicellular calcified nodules were formed in the presence of elastin degradation products and TGF-β1 separately and to a significantly greater extent when used together. Before mineralization, cells expressed α-smooth muscle actin and large amounts of collagen type I and matrix metalloproteinase-2, characteristic features of myofibroblasts, key elements in tissue remodeling and repair. Stimulated cells expressed increased levels of core-binding factor α1, osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and osteoprotegerin, representative bone-regulating proteins. For most proteins analyzed, TGF-β1 synergistically amplified responses of fibroblasts to elastin degradation products. In conclusion, elastin degradation products and TGF-β1 promote myofibroblastic and osteogenic differentiation in fibroblasts. These results support the idea that elastin-related calcification involves dynamic remodeling events and suggest the possibility of a defective tissue repair process. PMID:17591959

  11. Evaluation of a recent product to remove lipids and other matrix co-extractives in the analysis of pesticide residues and environmental contaminants in foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study demonstrates the application of a novel lipid removal product to the residue analysis of 65 pesticides and 52 environmental contaminants in kale, pork, salmon, and avocado by fast, low pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LPGC-MS/MS). Sample preparation involves QuEChE...

  12. The sources, fate, and toxicity of chemical warfare agent degradation products.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, N B; Talmage, S S; Griffin, G D; Waters, L C; Watson, A P; King, J F; Hauschild, V

    1999-01-01

    We include in this review an assessment of the formation, environmental fate, and mammalian and ecotoxicity of CW agent degradation products relevant to environmental and occupational health. These parent CW agents include several vesicants: sulfur mustards [undistilled sulfur mustard (H), sulfur mustard (HD), and an HD/agent T mixture (HT)]; nitrogen mustards [ethylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN1), methylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN2), tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3)], and Lewisite; four nerve agents (O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), tabun (GA), sarin (GB), and soman (GD)); and the blood agent cyanogen chloride. The degradation processes considered here include hydrolysis, microbial degradation, oxidation, and photolysis. We also briefly address decontamination but not combustion processes. Because CW agents are generally not considered very persistent, certain degradation products of significant persistence, even those that are not particularly toxic, may indicate previous CW agent presence or that degradation has occurred. Of those products for which there are data on both environmental fate and toxicity, only a few are both environmentally persistent and highly toxic. Major degradation products estimated to be of significant persistence (weeks to years) include thiodiglycol for HD; Lewisite oxide for Lewisite; and ethyl methyl phosphonic acid, methyl phosphonic acid, and possibly S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioic acid (EA 2192) for VX. Methyl phosphonic acid is also the ultimate hydrolysis product of both GB and GD. The GB product, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid, and a closely related contaminant of GB, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, are also persistent. Of all of these compounds, only Lewisite oxide and EA 2192 possess high mammalian toxicity. Unlike other CW agents, sulfur mustard agents (e.g., HD) are somewhat persistent; therefore, sites or conditions involving potential HD contamination should include an evaluation of both the agent and thiodiglycol. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:10585900

  13. The sources, fate, and toxicity of chemical warfare agent degradation products.

    PubMed

    Munro, N B; Talmage, S S; Griffin, G D; Waters, L C; Watson, A P; King, J F; Hauschild, V

    1999-12-01

    We include in this review an assessment of the formation, environmental fate, and mammalian and ecotoxicity of CW agent degradation products relevant to environmental and occupational health. These parent CW agents include several vesicants: sulfur mustards [undistilled sulfur mustard (H), sulfur mustard (HD), and an HD/agent T mixture (HT)]; nitrogen mustards [ethylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN1), methylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN2), tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3)], and Lewisite; four nerve agents (O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), tabun (GA), sarin (GB), and soman (GD)); and the blood agent cyanogen chloride. The degradation processes considered here include hydrolysis, microbial degradation, oxidation, and photolysis. We also briefly address decontamination but not combustion processes. Because CW agents are generally not considered very persistent, certain degradation products of significant persistence, even those that are not particularly toxic, may indicate previous CW agent presence or that degradation has occurred. Of those products for which there are data on both environmental fate and toxicity, only a few are both environmentally persistent and highly toxic. Major degradation products estimated to be of significant persistence (weeks to years) include thiodiglycol for HD; Lewisite oxide for Lewisite; and ethyl methyl phosphonic acid, methyl phosphonic acid, and possibly S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioic acid (EA 2192) for VX. Methyl phosphonic acid is also the ultimate hydrolysis product of both GB and GD. The GB product, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid, and a closely related contaminant of GB, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, are also persistent. Of all of these compounds, only Lewisite oxide and EA 2192 possess high mammalian toxicity. Unlike other CW agents, sulfur mustard agents (e.g., HD) are somewhat persistent; therefore, sites or conditions involving potential HD contamination should include an evaluation of both the agent and thiodiglycol. PMID:10585900

  14. Study of fungal degradation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using gas chromatography with ion trap mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Cajthaml, Toms; Mder, Monika; Kacer, Petr; Sasek, Vclav; Popp, Peter

    2002-10-18

    Representatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were degraded by ligninolytic fungus Irpex lacteus. The products were analyzed by GC-Ion trap mass spectrometry. The combination of full scan mass spectra, product ion scans (MS-MS) and derivatization of the degradation products of anthracene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene provided further insight in the degradation mechanism initiated by I. lacteus. Particularly, the product ion scans enabled the interpretation of unknown degradation products, even though they were only produced at trace level. Most of the structures suggested were later confirmed with authentic standards. PMID:12458938

  15. Pesticide bioconcentration modelling for fruit trees.

    PubMed

    Paraíba, Lourival Costa

    2007-01-01

    The model presented allows simulating the pesticide concentration evolution in fruit trees and estimating the pesticide bioconcentration factor in fruits. Pesticides are non-ionic organic compounds that are degraded in soils cropped with woody species, fruit trees and other perennials. The model allows estimating the pesticide uptake by plants through the water transpiration stream and also the time in which maximum pesticide concentration occur in the fruits. The equation proposed presents the relationships between bioconcentration factor (BCF) and the following variables: plant water transpiration volume (Q), pesticide transpiration stream concentration factor (TSCF), pesticide stem-water partition coefficient (K(Wood,W)), stem dry biomass (M) and pesticide dissipation rate in the soil-plant system (k(EGS)). The modeling started and was developed from a previous model "Fruit Tree Model" (FTM), reported by Trapp and collaborators in 2003, to which was added the hypothesis that the pesticide degradation in the soil follows a first order kinetic equation. The FTM model for pesticides (FTM-p) was applied to a hypothetic mango plant cropping (Mangifera indica) treated with paclobutrazol (growth regulator) added to the soil. The model fitness was evaluated through the sensitivity analysis of the pesticide BCF values in fruits with respect to the model entry data variability. PMID:17092536

  16. Analytical approaches for the determination of pesticide residues in nutraceutical products and related matrices by chromatographic techniques coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Domínguez, Gerardo; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Romero-González, Roberto; Garrido-Frenich, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    A review of sample preparation and analytical techniques currently used to analyze pesticides in nutraceutical products is shown. Different sample treatments are commented, and the QuEChERS method is the most used (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe). For the chromatographic determination, gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC) are evaluated. Different detection modes are discussed, and simple quadrupole mass spectrometry (Q-MS) and triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS/MS) are the most used. Finally, a review of the occurrence of pesticides (from the revised literature) in real samples is presented, evaluating several matrices, such as nutraceuticals, dietary supplements, medicinal plants, and fish oil. The occurrence of several pesticides was reported: γ-HCH (lindane), endosulfan, procymidone, azoxystrobin, p,p'-DDE, metalaxyl, quintozene, tolclofos-methyl, chlorpyrifos and hexachlorobenzene. PMID:24274299

  17. [Stability of medicine: its relationship with their expiration date and with degradation products].

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Ferrero A

    2006-05-01

    The expiration date of medicines is an application and direct interpretation of the knowledge obtained from stability studies, which are conducted under rigorous conditions, employing appropriate statistical and conceptual procedures. Instability of an active compound may result on one hand in efficacy decrease and on other in the possible presence of toxic degradation products. In this review, we analyze the reasons underlying the definition of the expiration date of medicines and their relationship with the stability, we mention the essays that must be performed to support this definition and finally give examples of degradation products and of their possible adverse effects.

  18. Characterisation and comparison of the uptake of ionizable and polar pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products by POCIS and Chemcatchers.

    PubMed

    Kaserzon, S L; Hawker, D W; Kennedy, K; Bartkow, M; Carter, S; Booij, K; Mueller, J F

    2014-11-01

    Growing concern about the environmental impact of ionizable and polar organic chemicals such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products has lead to the inclusion of some in legislative and regulatory frameworks. It is expected that future monitoring requirements for these chemicals in aquatic environments will increase, along with the need for low cost monitoring and risk assessment strategies. In this study the uptake of 13 neutral and 6 ionizable pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products by modified POCIS (with Strata™-X sorbent) and Chemcatchers™ (SDB-RPS or SDB-XC) was investigated under controlled conditions at pH = 6.5 for 26 days. The modified POCIS and Chemcatcher™ (SDB-RPS) samplers exhibited similar performance with the uptake of the majority of the 19 chemicals of interest categorised as linear over the 26 day deployment. Only a few ionized herbicides (picloram and dicamba) and triclosan showed negligible accumulation. Chemcatcher™ with SDB-XC sorbent performed relatively poorly with only carbamazepine having a linear accumulation profile, and 8 compounds showing no measurable accumulation. Differences in the uptake behavior of chemicals were not easily explained by their physico-chemical properties, strengthening the requirement for detailed calibration data. PES membranes accumulated significant amount of some compounds (i.e. triclosan and diuron), even after extended deployment (i.e. 26 days). At present there is no way to predict which compounds will demonstrate this behavior. Increasing membrane pore size from 0.2 to 0.45 μm for Chemcatcher™ (SBD-RPS) caused an average increase in Rs of 24%. PMID:25208684

  19. Quantitative analysis of production loss due to fracture fluid degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Rahim, Z.; Holditch, S.A.; Davidson, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    During 1992--93, Davidson et al. conducted intense quality control (IQC) operations on 54 hydraulic fracture treatments. Their number one conclusion was that ``Modern fracture fluid systems are very complex with viscous properties that are not fully understood``. Even though a variety of problems can occur in the field, the most common and most serious problems were usually with the crosslinker and/or the breaker systems. If the gel is overcrosslinked or undercrosslinked, the fluid viscosity decreases, and the created fracture dimensions and proppant transport characteristics are diversely affected. If too much breaker is added, the fluid viscosity decreases, once again adversely affecting both the created fracture dimensions and proppant transport. If too little breaker is added, the fluid may never break or may never clean up. This can significantly reduce the productivity or injectivity of the well. To further illustrate the benefits, the authors have thoroughly reviewed the field data collected by Davidson et al, and have used their results to construct examples illustrating how IQC can affect the ultimate recovery and economics from typical gas wells. In this paper, they want to illustrate how these variations in fluid properties actually affect the fracture dimensions, gas flow rates vs time, and the economics of producing low permeability wells that require fracture treatments to produce under optimal conditions.

  20. Adverse effects of air pollutants on wood products and a method for preventing resulting degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, W.Y.

    1992-01-01

    A study of wood surface in hostile environments was undertaken to elucidate the degradation mechanism and develop a method to protect wood in outdoor applications. In this investigation, wood was exposed to SO[sub 2] and NO[sub 2] in the presence and absence of ultraviolet light for up to 4 weeks. The effect of the simulated acid rain on wood with and without an epoxy film was evaluated by intermittent spraying of the wood with either sulfuric, nitric acid or water and irradiated with and without the xenon light in a weatherometer for up to 8 weeks. The surface properties of degraded wood and protective epoxy films were analyzed. UV light changed the wood color. The samples lost weight and generated water-soluble degradation products after the photoirradiation. Sulfur dioxide lighted the wood color; nitrogen dioxide changed wood color to brown. Wood increased its weight during the exposure of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub 2], however, the presence of such gases triggered photo-induced degradation. Lignin was degraded and carbonyl groups were formed at irradiated wood. Sulfur and nitrogen dioxides reduced the intensity of carbonyl groups due to degradative hydrolysis. Water-soluble products were derived from polysaccharides and lignin, nitric acid, sulfuric acid and its dissociated ions. During the simulated acidic weathering, xenon light changed the wood color. The color change rate of earlywood was greater than latewood. The presence of acids and water facilitated the wood degradation, and eventually caused leaching. The primary photodegradation phenomena of lignin was confirmed by the FTIR and UV analyses of the irradiated samples. Transparent anhydride-cured epoxy films partially protected wood against the acidic degradation and photoirradiation. Epoxy film cracked, yellowed and had O-ring shapes cavities after the exposure. Salol-added film provided the best protection for wood, followed by a film without an UV stabilizer and Tinuvin 770-added film last.

  1. Trypsin-Catalyzed Deltamethrin Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Chunrong; Fang, Fujin; Chen, Lin; Yang, Qinggui; He, Ji; Zhou, Dan; Shen, Bo; Ma, Lei; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Donghui; Zhu, Changliang

    2014-01-01

    To explore if trypsin could catalyze the degradation of non-protein molecule deltamethrin, we compared in vitro hydrolytic reactions of deltamethrin in the presence and absence of trypsin with ultraviolet-visible (UV/Vis) spectrophotometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In addition, acute oral toxicity of the degradation products was determined in Wistar rats. The results show that the absorption peak of deltamethrin is around 264 nm, while the absorption peaks of deltamethrin degradation products are around 250 nm and 296 nm. In our GC setting, the retention time of undegraded deltamethrin was 37.968 min, while those of deltamethrin degradation products were 15.289 min and 18.730 min. The LD50 of deltamethrin in Wistar rats is 55 mg/kg, while that of deltamethrin degradation products is 3358 mg/kg in female rats and 1045 mg/kg in male rates (61-fold and 19-fold reductions in toxicity), suggesting that trypsin could directly degrade deltamethrin, which significantly reduces the toxicity of deltamethrin. These results expand people's understanding of the functions of proteases and point to potential applications of trypsin as an attractive agent to control residual pesticides in the environment and on agricultural products. PMID:24594869

  2. Modification of Water-Soluble Coal-Derived Products by Dibenzothiophene-Degrading Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, D. L.; Wey, J. E.; Barrett, K. B.; Jolley, J. G.; Wright, R. B.; Dugan, P. R.

    1990-01-01

    To study mechanisms by which microorganisms oxidize thiophenic sulfur in coal, we tested bacterial cultures for the ability to degrade dibenzothiophene (DBT), DBT-5-oxide, and DBT-sulfone and to modify water-soluble coal products derived from Illinois no. 6 and Ugljevik coals. In yeast extract medium, the majority of selected isolates degraded DBT and accumulated DBT-5-oxide in culture fluids; all but one of the cultures degraded DBT-5-oxide, and none of them degraded DBT-sulfone. Elemental analysis data indicated that the microbial cultures were able to decrease the amount of sulfur in soluble coal products derived from Illinois no. 6 and Ugljevik coals. However, these data suggested that microbially mediated sulfur removal from soluble Ugljevik coal occurred by nonspecific mechanisms. That is, extensive degradation of the carbon structure was concurrent with the loss of sulfur. This conclusion was supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data which indicated that the reduced sulfur forms in the soluble Ugljevik coal product was not oxidized by microbial treatment. PMID:16348275

  3. The effects of grassland degradation on plant diversity, primary productivity, and soil fertility in the alpine region of Asia's headwaters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuexia; Dong, Shikui; Yang, Bing; Li, Yuanyuan; Su, Xukun

    2014-10-01

    A 3-year survey was conducted to explore the relationships among plant composition, productivity, and soil fertility characterizing four different degradation stages of an alpine meadow in the source region of the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers, China. Results showed that plant species diversity, productivity, and soil fertility of the top 30-cm soil layer significantly declined with degradation stages of alpine meadow over the study period. The productivity of forbs significantly increased with degradation stages, and the soil potassium stock was not affected by grassland degradation. The vegetation composition gradually shifted from perennial graminoids (grasses and sedges) to annual forbs along the degradation gradient. The abrupt change of response in plant diversity, plant productivity, and soil nutrients was demonstrated after heavy grassland degradation. Moreover, degradation can indicate plant species diversity and productivity through changing soil fertility. However, the clear relationships are difficult to establish. In conclusion, degradation influenced ecosystem function and services, such as plant species diversity, productivity, and soil carbon and nitrogen stocks. Additionally, both plant species diversity and soil nutrients were important predictors in different degradation stages of alpine meadows. To this end, heavy degradation grade was shown to cause shift of plant community in alpine meadow, which provided an important basis for sustaining ecosystem function, manipulating the vegetation composition of the area and restoring the degraded alpine grassland. PMID:25023744

  4. Pesticide tolerance of Paenibacillus sp. D1 and its chitinase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Ghodke, Indrajeet; Chhatpar, H S

    2009-01-01

    Excessive use of pesticides in agriculture has led to several problems pertaining to loss of soil fertility and environmental degradation. Biological control agents offer the best alternative to reduce use of toxic pesticides. Paenibacillus sp. D1 isolated from the effluent treatment plant of a seafood processing industry exhibited broad spectrum tolerance towards a number of pesticides at concentrations higher than recommended for field applications. The isolate showed enhanced growth and chitinase production in the presence of some protectant fungicides. None of the tested demethylase inhibitor (DMI) fungicides inhibited growth and chitinase production except triadimefon. The isolate was also tolerant to most commonly used insecticides belonging to the organophosphate, carbamate and cyclodiene organochloride classes. Chitinase of Paenibacillus sp. D1 was found to be more tolerant than the organism itself and was highly stable in the presence of pesticides at the temperature under field conditions in Gujarat, India, i.e. 40 degrees C. This was suggestive of its potential in integrated pest management (IPM) to significantly reduce the use of harmful chemicals. To our knowledge this is the first extensive study on pesticide tolerance of the Paenibacillus species and its chitinase. PMID:19758745

  5. Identification, characterization and cytotoxicity in vitro assay of nitazoxanide major degradation product.

    PubMed

    Malesuik, Marcelo Donadel; Gonçalves, Heloísa Mazotti Lopes; Garcia, Cássia Virginia; Trein, Márcia Rodrigues; Nardi, Nance Beyer; Schapoval, Elfrides Eva Scherman; Steppe, Martin

    2012-05-15

    Stress studies of the broad-spectrum antiparasitic nitazoxanide were conducted in order to isolate and elucidate the major degradation product involved in thermal, acid, alkaline, oxidative and photolytic decomposition of the drug in solution and solid state. The major degradation product was identified and characterized using techniques namely LC-DAD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR, and MS/MS. The stability of nitazoxanide raw material and nitazoxanide in tablets and in suspension powder was studied under different conditions and the results suggest the formation of the same deacetylated degradation product occur in all cases. This product was also studied in order to determine the preliminary cytotoxicity in vitro with mononuclear cells. Compared with nitazoxanide, the degradation product showed a higher cytotoxicity at a concentration of 40 μg mL(-1) after 48 h of incubation, under tested conditions. Therefore, stress studies showed that special care must be taken during the preparation, manufacture, and storage of this pharmaceutical drug. PMID:22483900

  6. Contribution to the food products' analysis: A research and evaluation on the hemolytic effect of some pesticides used in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Al-Alam, Josephine; Millet, Maurice; Chbani, Asma; Fajloun, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Pesticides are a real concern for the society as their use has become critical, leading sometimes to their accumulation as residues in fruits and vegetables. After examining the pesticides sold in Northern Lebanon, this study is focused on the analysis and identification of pesticides residues in fruits and vegetables that are harvested in this region and treated with the locally sold pesticides. Results show: first, (i) a use of Zineb by the name of another pesticide Micronized Sulfur to avoid prosecution; (ii) a significant presence of Metalaxyl in lemons and oranges; (iii) a significant presence of Trifluralin in strawberries; and (iv) a significant presence of Zineb in lemons and tomatoes. Second, with the use of hemolytic tests on human blood results show: (i) a critical concentration and a significant hemolytic effect of some pesticides used in Lebanon; and (ii) an absence of hemolytic effect in the collected fractions of the different analyzed fruit extracts containing pesticides. Finally, this work is the first step for pesticides' analysis in vegetables and fruits in Lebanon, initiating a wider analytical study in order to control and examine the use of pesticides which, according to our results, could have an adverse effect on human health over a long term. PMID:26357889

  7. Isolation and structure elucidation of degradation products in the potential anticancer drug PAC-1.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhen; Chen, Xiaohui; Zhang, Di; Gong, Ping; Bi, Kaishun

    2010-03-11

    PAC-1 was subjected to acid degradation conditions at 80 degrees C for 10h. Four unknown degradation products were isolated from PAC-1 by semi-preparative high performance liquid chromatography using isocratic elution conditions. Based on the ESI-MS and NMR spectral data the structures of these four degradation products were characterized as 2-allyl-6-((E)-((E)-(2-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxypropyl)benzylidene)hydrazono)methyl)phenol, 2-hydroxy-3-(2-propenyl)-[[2-hydroxy-3-(2-propenyl)phenyl]methylene]hydrazone, 6,6'-(1E,1'E)-hydrazine-1,2-diylidenebis(methan-1-yl-1-ylidene)bis(2-(2-hydroxypropyl)phenol) and 2-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxypropyl)benzaldehyde. PMID:19889506

  8. The degA gene product accelerates degradation of Bacillus subtilis phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bussey, L B; Switzer, R L

    1993-01-01

    A search for genes involved in the inactivation and degradation of enzymes in sporulating Bacillus subtilis led to identification of the B. subtilis degA gene, whose product stimulates degradation of B. subtilis glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase in Escherichia coli cells. degA encodes a 36.7-kDa protein that has sequence similarity to several E. coli and B. subtilis regulatory proteins of the LacI class. B. subtilis degA::cat insertional inactivation mutants had no detectable defect in the inactivation or degradation of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase in glucose- or lysine-starved B. subtilis cells, however. We suggest that degA encodes either a novel protease or, more likely, a gene that stimulates production of such a protease. PMID:8407808

  9. Photocatalytic degradation of molinate in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Bizani, E; Lambropoulou, D; Fytianos, K; Poulios, I

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the degradation of molinate through heterogeneous photocatalysis, using two different types of the semiconductor TiO2 as photocatalyst, as well as through homogeneous treatment, applying the photo-Fenton reaction, has been investigated. As far as heterogeneous photocatalysis is concerned, the degradation of the pesticide follows apparent first-order kinetics, while the type of the catalyst and the pH value of the solution affect the degradation rate. The effect of the addition of electron scavengers (H2O2 and K2S2O8) was also studied. In the case of photo-Fenton-assisted system, the degradation also follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Parameters such as iron's and electron scavenger's concentration and inorganic ions strongly affect the degradation rate. The extent of pesticide mineralization was investigated using dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements. The toxicity of the treated solution was evaluated using the Microtox test based on the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The detoxification and mineralization efficiency was found to be dependent on the system studied, and although it did not follow the rate of pesticide disappearance, it took place in considerable extent. The study of the photodegradation treatment was completed by the determination of the intermediate by-products formed during the process, which was carried out using LC-MS/MS technique and led to similar compounds with both processes. PMID:24928378

  10. Soil analyses for 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-DCP), sodium n-methyldithiocarbamate (metam-sodium), and their degradation products near Fort Hall Idaho, September 1999 through March 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parliman, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Between September 1999 and March 2000, soil samples from the Fort Hall, Idaho, area were analyzed for two soil fumigants, 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-DCP) and sodium n-methyldithiocarbamate (metam-sodium), and their degradation products. Ground water is the only source of drinking water at Fort Hall, and the purpose of the investigation was to determine potential risk of ground-water contamination from persistence and movement of these pesticides in cropland soils. 1,3-DCP, metam-sodium, or their degradation products were detected in 42 of 104 soil samples. The samples were collected from 1-, 2-, and 3-foot depths in multiple backhoe trenches during four sampling events—before pesticide application in September; after application in October; before soil freeze in December; and after soil thaw in March. In most cases, concentrations of the pesticide compounds were at or near their laboratory minimum reporting limits. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 5035 was used as the guideline for soil sample preparation and analyses, and either sodium bisulfate (NaHSO4), an acidic preservative, or pesticide-free water was added to samples prior to analyses. Addition of NaHSO4 to the samples resulted in a greater number of compound detections, but pesticide-free water was added to most samples to avoid the strong reactions of soil carbonate minerals with the NaHSO4. As a result, nondetection of compounds in samples containing pesticide-free water did not necessarily indicate that the compounds were absent. Detections of these compounds were inconsistent among trenches with similar soil characteristics and histories of soil fumigant use. Compounds were detected at different depths and different trench locations during each sampling event. Overall results of this study showed that the original compounds or their degradation products can persist in soil 6 months or more after their application and are present to at least 3 feet below land surface in some areas. A few of the soil analyses results were unexpected. Degradation products of metam-sodium were detected in samples from croplands with a history of 1,3-DCP applications only, and were not detected in samples from croplands with a history of metam-sodium applications. Although 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) has not been used in the area for many years, EDB was detected in a few soil samples. The presence of EDB in soil could be caused by irrigation of croplands with EDBcontaminated ground water. Analyses of these soil samples resulted in many unanswered questions, and further studies are needed. One potential study to determine vertical extent of pesticide compound migration in sediments, for example, would include analysis of one or more columns of soil and sediments (land surface to ground water, about 35 to 50 feet below land surface) in areas with known soil contamination. Another study would expand the scope of soil contamination to include broader types of cropland conditions and compound analyses.

  11. Determination of pesticides associated with suspended sediments in the San Joaquin River, California, USA, using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Baston, D.S.; Crepeau, K.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    An analytical method useful for the quantification of a range of pesticides and pesticide degradation products associated with suspended sediments was developed by testing a variety of extraction and cleanup schemes. The final extraction and cleanup methods chosen for use are suitable for the quantification of the listed pesticides using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry and the removal of interfering coextractable organic material found in suspended sediments. Methylene chloride extraction followed by Florisil cleanup proved most effective for separation of coextractives from the pesticide analytes. Removal of elemental sulfur was accomplished with tetrabutylammonium hydrogen sulfite. The suitability of the method for the analysis of a variety of pesticides was evaluated, and the method detection limits (MDLs) were determined (0.1-6.0 ng/g dry weight of sediment) for 21 compounds. Recovery of pesticides dried onto natural sediments averaged 63%. Analysis of duplicate San Joaquin River suspended-sediment samples demonstrated the utility of the method for environmental samples with variability between replicate analyses lower than between environmental samples. Eight of 21 pesticides measured were observed at concentrations ranging from the MDL to more than 80 ng/g dry weight of sediment and exhibited significant temporal variability. Sediment-associated pesticides, therefore, may contribute to the transport of pesticides through aquatic systems and should be studied separately from dissolved pesticides.

  12. Atmospheric deposition of current-use and historic-use pesticides in snow at National Parks in the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, K.J.; Simonich, S.L.; Campbell, D.H.; Wilson, G.R.; Landers, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) National Park Service has initiated research on the atmospheric deposition and fate of semi-volatile organic compounds in its alpine, sub-Arctic, and Arctic ecosystems in the Western U.S. Results for the analysis of pesticides in seasonal snowpack samples collected in spring 2003 from seven national parks are presented herein. From a target analyte list of 47 pesticides and degradation products, the most frequently detected current-use pesticides were dacthal, chlorpyrifos, endosulfan, and ??- hexachlorocyclohexane, whereas the most frequently detected historic-use pesticides were dieldrin, ??-hexachlorocyclohexane, chlordane, and hexachlorobenzene. Correlation analysis with latitude, temperature, elevation, particulate matter, and two indicators of regional pesticide use reveal that regional current and historic agricultural practices are largely responsible for the distribution of pesticides in the national parks in this study. Pesticide deposition in the Alaskan parks is attributed to long-range transport because there are no significant regional pesticide sources. The percentage of total pesticide concentration due to regional transport (%RT) was calculated for the other parks. %RT was highest at parks with higher regional cropland intensity and for pesticides with lower vapor pressures and shorter half-lives in air. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  13. Degradation of nonylphenol in spiked soils and in soils treated with organic waste products.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Gerda Krog; Kure, Liv Kerstin

    2003-04-01

    Widespread application of sewage sludge to agricultural soils in Denmark has led to concern about the accumulation and effects of nonylphenol (NP) in the soil ecosystem. We have thus studied the degradation of NP and possible uptake in agricultural plants in greenhouse pot experiments. Different waste products including anaerobic and aerobic sludge, compost, and pig manure were incorporated into a sandy soil. In addition, NP was used to spike soil to known concentrations. Rape (Brassica napus L. cv Hyola 401) was sown in the pots and harvested after 30 d. In order to investigate the influence of plant growth on the degradation, plant-free pots were established. The concentrations in the soil were between 13 and 534 ppb dry weight. No plant uptake was observed above the detection limit at 100 ppb dry weight. When NP was added as waste to the soil, plant growth significantly stimulated the degradation. In experiments with anaerobic and aerobic sludge, respectively, 13 and 8.3% of NP remained in the soil from pots planted with rape compared with 26 and 18% in soil without plant growth. When NP was added as a spike to soil, the degradation was more complete and plant growth did not influence the degradation. Percentages of 2.2 and 1.8 were still in the soil at harvest for planted and plant-free pots, respectively. The degradation of NP was more extensive in sludge-amended soil compared with compost. PMID:12685703

  14. Metabolic labeling of RNA uncovers principles of RNA production and degradation dynamics in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Rabani, Michal; Levin, Joshua Z; Fan, Lin; Adiconis, Xian; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Garber, Manuel; Gnirke, Andreas; Nusbaum, Chad; Hacohen, Nir; Friedman, Nir; Amit, Ido; Regev, Aviv

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of RNA levels is determined through the interplay between RNA production, processing and degradation. However, since most global studies of RNA regulation do not distinguish the separate contributions of these processes, relatively little is known about how they are temporally integrated to determine changes in RNA levels. In particular, while some studies emphasize the role of changes in the rate of transcription, others suggest a prominent involvement of time-varying degradation rates. Here, we combine metabolic labeling of RNA at high temporal resolution with advanced RNA quantification assays and computational modeling to estimate RNA transcription and degradation rates during the model response of immune dendritic cells (DCs) to pathogens. We find that changes in transcription rates determine the majority of temporal changes in RNA levels, but that changes in degradation rate are important for shaping sharp ‘peaked’ responses. Furthermore, transcription rate changes precede corresponding changes in RNA level by a small lag (15-30 min), which is shorter for induced than for repressed genes. We used massively parallel sequencing of the newly-transcribed RNA population – including non-polyadenylated transcripts – to estimate constant RNA degradation and processing rates. We find that temporally constant degradation rates vary significantly between genes and contribute substantially to the observed differences in the dynamic response, and that specific groups of transcripts, mostly cytokines and transcription factors, are undergoing faster mRNA maturation. Our study provides a new quantitative approach to study key steps in the integrative process of RNA regulation. PMID:21516085

  15. Activity of meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) seed meal glucolimnanthin degradation products against soilborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba L.) is a herbaceous winter-spring annual grown as a commercial oilseed crop. The meal remaining after oil extraction from the seed contains up to 4% of the glucosinolate glucolimnanthin. Degradation of glucolimnanthin yields toxic breakdown products, and therefore the mea...

  16. Identification of a new degradation product of the antifouling agent Irgarol 1051 in natural samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    A main degradation product of Irgarol [2-(methylthio)-4-(tert-butylamino)-6-(cyclopropylamino)-s-triazine], one of the most widely used compounds in antifouling paints, was detected at trace levels in seawater and sediment samples collected from several marinas on the Mediterranean coast. This degradation product was identified as 2-methylthio-4-tert-butylamino-s-triazine. The unequivocal identification of this compound in seawater samples was carried out by solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled on-line with liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). SPE was carried out by passing 150 ml of seawater sample through a cartridge containing a polymeric phase (PLRP-s), with recoveries ranging from 92 to 108% (n=5). Using LC-MS detection in positive ion mode, useful structural information was obtained by increasing the fragmentor voltage, thus permitting the unequivocal identification of this compound in natural samples. Method detection limits were in the range of 0.002 to 0.005 ??g/l. Overall, the combination of on-line SPE and LC-APCI-MS represents an important advance in environmental analysis of herbicide degradation products in seawater, since it demonstrates that trace amounts of new polar metabolites may be determined rapidly. This paper reports the LC-MS identification of the main degradation product of Irgarol in seawater and sediment samples. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS AFFECTING THE TROPOSPHERIC FLUX OF VINCLOZOLIN AND ITS DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory chamber was used to determine hydrologic conditions that lead to the tropospheric flux of a suspected anti-androgenic dicarboximide fungicide, vinclozolin (3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-5-vinyl-oxzoli-dine-2,4-dione) and three degradation products from sterilized...

  18. Bacteria-based polythene degradation products: GC-MS analysis and toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Shahnawaz, Mohd; Sangale, Manisha K; Ade, Avinash B

    2016-06-01

    Polythene degradation leads to the production of various by-products depending upon the type of degradation process. The polythene degradation products (PEDP) in the culture supernatant of the two bacteria (Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain VASB14/WL and Bacillus cereus strain VASB1/TS) were analyzed with GC-MS technique. The major by-products in the PEDP in the culture supernatant of L. fusiformis strain VASB14/WL (1,2,3,4 tetra methyl benzene) and B. cereus strain VASB1/TS (1,2,3 trimethyl benzene, 1 ethyl 3,5-dimethyl benzene, 1,4 di methyl 2 ethyl benzene, and dibutyl phthalate) dissolved in diethyl ether were recorded. To assess the environmental applicability of polythene degradation using L. fusiformis strain VASB14/WL and B. cereus strain VASB1/TS at in vitro level. The effect of PEDP produced after 2 months of regular shaking at room temperature on both plants and animal system was studied. No significant decrease in the percent seed germination was recorded with the PEDP of both the bacteria. PEDP produced by L. fusiformis strain VASB14/WL did not report any significant change in germination index (GI) at 10 and 25 %, but least GI (39.66 ± 13.94) was documented at 50 % concentration of PEDP. Highest elongation inhibition rate (53.83 ± 15.71) of Sorghum was also recorded with L. fusiformis and at the same concentration. PMID:26888528

  19. 21 CFR 864.7320 - Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay. 864.7320 Section 864.7320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  20. Detecting and quantifying lewisite degradation products in environmental samples using arsenic speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D.A.; Yaeger, J.S.; Kiely, J.T.; Crain, J.S.; Shem, L.M.; O`Neill, H.J.; Gowdy, M.J.; Besmer, M.; Mohrman, G.B.

    1995-12-31

    This report describes a unique method for identifying and quantifying lewisite degradation products using arsenic (III) and arsenic (IV) speciation in solids and in solutions. Gas chromatographic methods, as well as high-performance liquid chromatographic methods are described for separation of arsenic species. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrographic methods are presented for the detection of arsenic.

  1. Meiothermus ruber H328 enhances the production of membrane vesicles for feather degradation.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Akito; Kataoka, Maachi; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Emiko; Shigeri, Yasushi; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    The thermophilic bacterium Meiothermus ruber H328 aggressively degrades chicken feathers. When feathers were added to culture medium, the cells significantly exfoliated membrane vesicles from the outer membrane as observed by electron microscopy of ultrathin sections. This is the first report of membrane vesicle production associated with keratinolytic activity by Meiothermus sp. PMID:25209513

  2. Study on degradation kinetics of 2-(2-hydroxypropanamido) benzoic acid in aqueous solutions and identification of its major degradation product by UHPLC/TOF-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qili; Guan, Jiao; Rong, Rong; Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Zhiguo

    2015-08-10

    A RP-HPLC method was developed and validated for the degradation kinetic study of 2-(2-hydroxypropanamido) benzoic acid (HPABA), a promising anti-inflammatory drug, which would provide a basis for further studies on HPABA. The effects of pH, temperature, buffer concentration and ionic strength on the degradation kinetics of HPABA were discussed. Experimental parameters such as degradation rate constants (k), activation energy (Ea), acid and alkali catalytic constants (k(ac), k(al)), shelf life (t1/2) and temperature coefficient (Q10) were calculated. The results indicated that degradation kinetics of HPABA followed zero-order reaction kinetics; degradation rate constants (k) of HPABA at different pH values demonstrated that HPABA was more stable in neutral and near-neutral conditions; the function of temperature on k obeyed the Arrhenius equation (r = 0.9933) and HPABA was more stable at lower temperature; with the increase of ionic strength and buffer concentration, the stability of HPABA was decreased. The major unknown degradation product of HPABA was identified by UHPLC/TOF-MS/MS with positive electrospray ionization. Results demonstrated that the hydrolysis product was the primary degradation product of HPABA and it was deduced as anthranilic acid. PMID:25935790

  3. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry characterization of ergocristam degradation products.

    PubMed

    Olsovská, Jana; Sulc, Miroslav; Novák, Petr; Pazoutová, Sylvie; Flieger, Miroslav

    2008-10-01

    The UPLC method with diode array UV detection was developed for qualitative determination of ergocristine and ergocristam including degradation products. The mechanism of the ergocristam disruptive reaction was described based on MS/MS characterization of ammonolytic product, N-(d-lysergyl)-l-valinamide (A1) and two methanolytic products, methyl ester of N-(d-lysergyl)-l-valine (M2), and N-[N-(d-lysergyl)-l-valyl]-l-phenylalanyl-d-prolyl methyl ester (M1). The influence of extraction conditions on epimerization and degradation of ergocristine and ergocristam was tested and conditions for reproducible decomposition of ergocristam were found. The presented method could potentially be applied for ergot alkaloids determination in sclerotia, fermentation broth, mycelium, and possibly contaminated food products, i.e. corn, flour, bread, etc., and feeding stuffs containing ungrounded cereals. PMID:18774762

  4. Chemical nature and immunotoxicological properties of arachidonic acid degradation products formed by exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M.C.; Friedman, M.; Hanley, N.; Siegler, E.; Quay, J.; Becker, S.; Devlin, R.; Koren, H.S. )

    1993-06-01

    Ozone (O3) exposure in vivo has been reported to degrade arachidonic acid (AA) in the lungs of rodents. The O3-degraded AA products may play a role in the responses to this toxicant. To study the chemical nature and biological activity of O3-exposed AA, we exposed AA in a cell-free, aqueous environment to air, 0.1 ppm O3, or 1.0 ppm O3 for 30-120 min. AA exposed to air was not degraded. All O3 exposures degraded > 98% of the AA to more polar products, which were predominantly aldehydic substances (as determined by reactivity with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and subsequent separation by HPLC) and hydrogen peroxide. The type and amount of aldehydic substances formed depended on the O3 concentration and exposure duration. A human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B, S6 subclone) exposed in vitro to either 0.1 ppm or 1.0 ppm O3 for 1 hr produced AA-derived aldehydic substances, some of which eluted with similar retention times as the aldehydic substances derived from O3 degradation of AA in the cell-free system. In vitro, O3-degraded AA induced an increase in human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) polarization, decreased human peripheral blood T-lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and decreased human peripheral blood natural killer cell lysis of K562 target cells. The aldehydic substances, but not hydrogen peroxide, appeared to be the principal active agents responsible for the observed effects. O3-degraded AA may play a role in the PMN influx into lungs and in decreased T-lymphocyte mitogenesis and natural killer cell activity observed in humans and rodents exposed to O3.

  5. Chemical nature and immunotoxicological properties of arachidonic acid degradation products formed by exposure to ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Madden, M C; Friedman, M; Hanley, N; Siegler, E; Quay, J; Becker, S; Devlin, R; Koren, H S

    1993-01-01

    Ozone (O3) exposure in vivo has been reported to degrade arachidonic acid (AA) in the lungs of rodents. The O3-degraded AA products may play a role in the responses to this toxicant. To study the chemical nature and biological activity of O3-exposed AA, we exposed AA in a cell-free, aqueous environment to air, 0.1 ppm O3, or 1.0 ppm O3 for 30-120 min. AA exposed to air was not degraded. All O3 exposures degraded > 98% of the AA to more polar products, which were predominantly aldehydic substances (as determined by reactivity with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and subsequent separation by HPLC) and hydrogen peroxide. The type and amount of aldehydic substances formed depended on the O3 concentration and exposure duration. A human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B, S6 subclone) exposed in vitro to either 0.1 ppm or 1.0 ppm O3 for 1 hr produced AA-derived aldehydic substances, some of which eluted with similar retention times as the aldehydic substances derived from O3 degradation of AA in the cell-free system. In vitro, O3-degraded AA induced an increase in human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) polarization, decreased human peripheral blood T-lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and decreased human peripheral blood natural killer cell lysis of K562 target cells. The aldehydic substances, but not hydrogen peroxide, appeared to be the principal active agents responsible for the observed effects. O3-degraded AA may play a role in the PMN influx into lungs and in decreased T-lymphocyte mitogenesis and natural killer cell activity observed in humans and rodents exposed to O3. PMID:8354202

  6. Pesticide Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Kevin P.

    1976-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency chose the American Society of Testing and Materials to develop standardized guidelines for pesticide registration. Since the numbers and uses of pesticides is so wide, establishing ecological and public health guidelines may be difficult. Strong industry and government representation might also hamper the…

  7. Enhanced sulfamethoxazole degradation through ammonia oxidizing bacteria co-metabolism and fate of transformation products.

    PubMed

    Kassotaki, Elissavet; Buttiglieri, Gianluigi; Ferrando-Climent, Laura; Rodriguez-Roda, Ignasi; Pijuan, Maite

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of the widely-used antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SFX) in wastewaters and surface waters has been reported in a large number of studies. However, the results obtained up-to-date have pointed out disparities in its removal. This manuscript explores the enhanced biodegradation potential of an enriched culture of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) towards SFX. Several sets of batch tests were conducted to establish a link between SFX degradation and specific ammonia oxidation rate. The occurrence, degradation and generation of SFX and some of its transformation products (4-Nitro SFX, Desamino-SFX and N(4)-Acetyl-SFX) was also monitored. A clear link between the degradation of SFX and the nitrification rate was found, resulting in an increased SFX removal at higher specific ammonia oxidation rates. Moreover, experiments conducted under the presence of allylthiourea (ATU) did not present any removal of SFX, suggesting a connection between the AMO enzyme and SFX degradation. Long term experiments (up to 10 weeks) were also conducted adding two different concentrations (10 and 100 μg/L) of SFX in the influent of a partial nitrification sequencing batch reactor, resulting in up to 98% removal. Finally, the formation of transformation products during SFX degradation represented up to 32%, being 4-Nitro-SFX the most abundant. PMID:26938496

  8. 77 FR 59186 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications To Register New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    .... Corporation, P.O. Box 8025, Walnut Creek, CA 94596. Active ingredient: Clothianidin. Product Type: Insecticide... Creek, CA 94596. Active ingredient: Clothianidin. Product Type: Insecticide. Proposed Uses: Expansion...

  9. 77 FR 75152 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... Agrochemicals, Ltd., Active ingredient: Prohydrojasmon (PDJ) at 98%. Product type: Plant Growth Regulator....25%. Product type: Plant Growth Regulator. Proposed use: Fruit color development/color enhancement...

  10. Spatial modeling of personalized exposure dynamics: the case of pesticide use in small-scale agricultural production landscapes of the developing world

    PubMed Central

    Leyk, Stefan; Binder, Claudia R; Nuckols, John R

    2009-01-01

    Background Pesticide poisoning is a global health issue with the largest impacts in the developing countries where residential and small-scale agricultural areas are often integrated and pesticides sprayed manually. To reduce health risks from pesticide exposure approaches for personalized exposure assessment (PEA) are needed. We present a conceptual framework to develop a spatial individual-based model (IBM) prototype for assessing potential exposure of farm-workers conducting small-scale agricultural production, which accounts for a considerable portion of global food crop production. Our approach accounts for dynamics in the contaminant distributions in the environment, as well as patterns of movement and activities performed on an individual level under different safety scenarios. We demonstrate a first prototype using data from a study area in a rural part of Colombia, South America. Results Different safety scenarios of PEA were run by including weighting schemes for activities performed under different safety conditions. We examined the sensitivity of individual exposure estimates to varying patterns of pesticide application and varying individual patterns of movement. This resulted in a considerable variation in estimates of magnitude, frequency and duration of exposure over the model runs for each individual as well as between individuals. These findings indicate the influence of patterns of pesticide application, individual spatial patterns of movement as well as safety conditions on personalized exposure in the agricultural production landscape that is the focus of our research. Conclusion This approach represents a conceptual framework for developing individual based models to carry out PEA in small-scale agricultural settings in the developing world based on individual patterns of movement, safety conditions, and dynamic contaminant distributions. The results of our analysis indicate our prototype model is sufficiently sensitive to differentiate and quantify the influence of individual patterns of movement and decision-based pesticide management activities on potential exposure. This approach represents a framework for further understanding the contribution of agricultural pesticide use to exposure in the small-scale agricultural production landscape of many developing countries, and could be useful to evaluate public health intervention strategies to reduce risks to farm-workers and their families. Further research is needed to fully develop an operational version of the model. PMID:19331690

  11. Analysis of atrazine and four degradation products in the pore water of the vadose zone, central Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panshin, S.Y.; Carter, D.S.; Bayless, E.R.

    2000-01-01

    A new method is described for the analysis of atrazine and four of its degradation products (desethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, didealkylatrazine, and hydroxyatrazine) in water. This method uses solid- phase extraction on a graphitized carbon black cartridge, derivatization of the eluate with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This method was used to analyze lysimeter samples collected from a field in central Indiana in 1994 and 1995. Atrazine and its degradation products were transported rapidly through the vadose zone. Maximum values of atrazine ranged from 2.61 to 8.44 ??g/L and occurred from 15 to 57 days after application. Maximum concentrations of the degradation products occurred from 11 to 140 days after atrazine application. The degradation products were more persistent than atrazine in pore water. Desethylatrazine was the dominant degradation product detected in the first year, and didealkylatrazine was the dominant degradation product detected in the second year. Concentrations of atrazine and the degradation products sorbed onto soil were estimated; maximum concentrations ranged from 7.3 to 24 ??g/kg for atrazine and were less than 5 ??g/kg for all degradation products. Degradation of atrazine and transport of all five compounds were simulated by the vadose zone flow model LEACHM. LEACHM was run as a Darcian-flow model and as a non-Darcian-flow model.

  12. [Validation study on a multi-residue method for determination of pesticide residues in agricultural products by new automatic pretreatment equipment (FASRAC) and GC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Okuda, Taiki; Koshi, Naohiro; Matsumura, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Reo; Oyanagi, Tatsuya; Matsuda, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Hatakeyama, Osamu; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    A validation study was performed on a multiresidue method for determination of pesticide residues in agricultural products according to the method validation guideline of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. FASRAC (Food Automatic Analytical Systems for Residual Agricultural Chemicals) automatically performs extraction of pesticide residues from agricultural products with acetonitrile, filtration, constant volume, mixing with the use of air, mixing acetonitrile with buffer solvent, separation, and dehydration with sodium sulfate. The extract was purified with a GC/NH2 column. For wheat flour and soybeans, a purification step with a C18 column was added before a GC/NH2 column. After removal of the solvent, the extract was resolved in n-hexane/acetone solvent for GC-MS/MS analysis. In the case of manual analysis, pesticide residues were analyzed according to official multiresidue methods and purification steps were the same as in FASRAC. Recovery tests were performed with wheat flour, soybeans, spinach and apples, by addition of 302 pesticides at the concentrations 0.01 mg/kg. The results indicate that automatic extraction using FASRAC is superior to manual analysis in trueness, repeatability and within-run reproducibility. Specially, automatic extraction using FASRAC is superior to manual analysis in trueness because it is optimized in various respects, for example reextraction at salting-out. PMID:25743385

  13. Exploring the potential of biobeds for the depuration of pesticide-contaminated wastewaters from the citrus production chain: laboratory, column and field studies.

    PubMed

    Omirou, M; Dalias, P; Costa, C; Papastefanou, C; Dados, A; Ehaliotis, C; Karpouzas, D G

    2012-07-01

    The high wastewater volumes produced during citrus production at pre- and post-harvest level presents serious pesticide point-source pollution for groundwater bodies. Biobeds are used for preventing such point-source pollution occurring at farm level. We explored the potential of biobeds for the depuration of wastewaters produced through the citrus production chain following a lab-to-field experimentation. The dissipation of pesticides used pre- or post-harvest was studied in compost-based biomixtures, soil, and a straw-soil mixture. A biomixture of composted grape seeds and skins (GSS-1) showed the highest dissipation capacity. In subsequent column studies, GSS-1 restricted pesticides leaching even at the highest water load (462 Lm(-3)). Ortho-phenylphenol was the most mobile compound. Studies in an on-farm biobed filled with GSS-1 showed that pesticides were fully retained and partially or fully dissipated. Overall biobeds could be a valuable solution for the depuration of wastewaters produced at pre- and post-harvest level by citrus fruit industries. PMID:22465978

  14. Repression and recuperation of brood production in Bombus terrestris bumble bees exposed to a pulse of the neonicotinoid pesticide imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Laycock, Ian; Cresswell, James E

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there is concern about declining bee populations and some blame the residues of neonicotinoid pesticides in the nectar and pollen of treated crops. Bumble bees are important wild pollinators that are widely exposed to dietary neonicotinoids by foraging in agricultural environments. In the laboratory, we tested the effect of a pulsed exposure (14 days 'on dose' followed by 14 days 'off dose') to a common neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, on the amount of brood (number of eggs and larvae) produced by Bombus terrestris L. bumble bees in small, standardised experimental colonies (a queen and four adult workers). During the initial 'on dose' period we observed a dose-dependent repression of brood production in colonies, with productivity decreasing as dosage increased up to 98 µg kg(-1) dietary imidacloprid. During the following 'off dose' period, colonies showed a dose-dependent recuperation such that total brood production during the 28-day pulsed exposure was not correlated with imidacloprid up to 98 µg kg(-1). Our findings raise further concern about the threat to wild bumble bees from neonicotinoids, but they also indicate some resilience to a pulsed exposure, such as that arising from the transient bloom of a treated mass-flowering crop. PMID:24224015

  15. Repression and Recuperation of Brood Production in Bombus terrestris Bumble Bees Exposed to a Pulse of the Neonicotinoid Pesticide Imidacloprid

    PubMed Central

    Laycock, Ian; Cresswell, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there is concern about declining bee populations and some blame the residues of neonicotinoid pesticides in the nectar and pollen of treated crops. Bumble bees are important wild pollinators that are widely exposed to dietary neonicotinoids by foraging in agricultural environments. In the laboratory, we tested the effect of a pulsed exposure (14 days ‘on dose’ followed by 14 days ‘off dose’) to a common neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, on the amount of brood (number of eggs and larvae) produced by Bombus terrestris L. bumble bees in small, standardised experimental colonies (a queen and four adult workers). During the initial ‘on dose’ period we observed a dose-dependent repression of brood production in colonies, with productivity decreasing as dosage increased up to 98 µg kg−1 dietary imidacloprid. During the following ‘off dose’ period, colonies showed a dose-dependent recuperation such that total brood production during the 28-day pulsed exposure was not correlated with imidacloprid up to 98 µg kg−1. Our findings raise further concern about the threat to wild bumble bees from neonicotinoids, but they also indicate some resilience to a pulsed exposure, such as that arising from the transient bloom of a treated mass-flowering crop. PMID:24224015

  16. Biodegradation of organophosphorus pesticides by soil bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pasquale, C.; Fodale, R.; Lo Piccolo, L.; Palazzolo, E.; Alonzo, G.; Quatrini, P.

    2009-04-01

    A number of studies in the 1980s and 1990s showed that crop-protection products, applied to drained fields, could move downwards through the soil profile and to the groundwater. Organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are used all over the world for crop protection, for other agricultural practices such as sheep dipping and, in aquaculture, for the control of sea lice. Ops besides showing a specific neurotoxicity and have also been related to various modern diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) and the Gulf War syndrome. Although OPs are less persistent than Organoclorine pesticides (OCs), they still constitute an environmental risks thus increasing the social concern about their levels in soils, surface waters, and ground waters. Degradation of OPs by microorganisms has been assessed for a few bacterial strains. In the present study the OPs degrading potential of indigenous soil microorganisms was investigated. Using enrichment cultures in which parathion was the only C and energy sources many bacterial strains were isolated from OPs contaminated and pristine agricultural soils characterized by different physico-chemical properties. More than 40 potential OPs degraders were isolated and grouped in operational taxonomic units (OTU) using analysis of polymorphism showed by the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Partial sequencing of 16S rRNA gene of representative isolates of each OTU revealed that most of them belong to Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. All the analyzed soils showed the presence of putative OPs degraders: the highest diversity was found in organic cultivated soils, the lowest in chemically cultivated soils. Degradation of different OPs, characterized by different physical and chemical properties, was obtained by different selected representative strains using SPME GC-MS analysis on water and soil microcosms. The results showed that, after the incubation period, the amount of pesticide residues were in the range 20-80%. Some of the isolates bacterial species are currently unknown as OPs degraders.

  17. Degradation of the pharmaceuticals diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole and their transformation products under controlled environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Poirier-Larabie, S; Segura, P A; Gagnon, C

    2016-07-01

    Contamination of the aquatic environment by pharmaceuticals via urban effluents is well known. Several classes of drugs have been identified in waterways surrounding these effluents in the last 15years. To better understand the fate of pharmaceuticals in ecosystems, degradation processes need to be investigated and transformation products must be identified. Thus, this study presents the first comparative study between three different natural environmental conditions: photolysis and biodegradation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions both in the dark of diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole, two common drugs present in significant amounts in impacted surface waters. Results indicated that degradation kinetics differed depending on the process and the type of drug and the observed transformation products also differed among these exposure conditions. Diclofenac was nearly degraded by photolysis after 4days, while its concentration only decreased by 42% after 57days of exposure to bacteria in aerobic media and barely 1% in anaerobic media. For sulfamethoxazole, 84% of the initial concentration was still present after 11days of exposure to light, while biodegradation decreased its concentration by 33% after 58days of exposure under aerobic conditions and 5% after 70days of anaerobic exposure. In addition, several transformation products were observed and persisted over time while others degraded in turn. For diclofenac, chlorine atoms were lost primarily in the photolysis, while a redox reaction was promoted by biodegradation under aerobic conditions. For sulfamethoxazole, isomerization was favored by photolysis while a redox reaction was also favored by the biodegradation under aerobic conditions. To summarize this study points out the occurrence of different transformation products under variable degradation conditions and demonstrates that specific functional groups are involved in the tested natural attenuation processes. Given the complexity of environmental samples more analytical effort is needed to fully identify new products of potential toxicity. PMID:26999369

  18. Degradation of atrazine by UV/chlorine: Efficiency, influencing factors, and products.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiujuan; Jiang, Jin; Ma, Jun; Yang, Yi; Liu, Weili; Liu, Yulei

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the degradation of atrazine by the combination of UV and chlorine (UV/chlorine) due to the formation of radicals during chlorine photolysis was systematically investigated in terms of efficiency, factors that influence the degradation kinetics, as well as oxidation products. It was found that the degradation efficiency of atrazine was enhanced by UV/chlorine compared to UV or chlorine alone. The degradation efficiency of atrazine was favorable at a lower pH, but was inhibited in the presence of natural organic matters. Meanwhile, the initial chlorine dosage, alkalinity, and chloride barely influenced the degradation efficiency under neutral pH conditions. The degradation of atrazine by UV/chlorine was inhibited in real waters (i.e., surface water and ground water) compared to in deionized water but was still more effective than UV alone. The oxidation products of atrazine resulting from de-alkylation, dechlorination-hydroxylation, alkylic-hydroxylation, alkylic-oxidation, alkylic-hydroxylation-dehydration, deamination-hydroxylation, and dechlorination-hydrogenation in UV/chlorine process were detected, which were slightly different from those formed in UV/H2O2 (commonly used UV-based advanced oxidation process). Particularly, the yields of three primary transformation products (desethyl-atrazine (DEA), desisopropyl-atrazine (DIA), and desethyl-desisopropyl-atrazine (DEIA)) were comparatively quantified in these two processes. The different trend of them formed in UV/chlorine system (DEA:DIA≈4) compared to that formed in UV/H2O2 system (DEA:DIA≈1) could be ascribed to the different reaction reactivities and mechanisms between HO• and Cl• with atrazine. PMID:26724435

  19. Efficacy of Several Pesticide Products on Brown Widow Spider (Araneae: Theridiidae) Egg Sacs and Their Penetration Through the Egg Sac Silk.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Richard S; Tarango, Jacob; Campbell, Kathleen A; Tham, Christine; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Choe, Dong-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Information on pesticide effects on spiders is less common than for insects; similar information for spider egg sacs is scarcer in the open literature. Spider egg sacs are typically covered with a protective silk layer. When pesticides are directly applied to egg sacs, the silk might prevent active ingredients from reaching the eggs, blocking their insecticidal effect. We investigated the impact of six water-based pesticide sprays and four oil-based aerosol products against egg sacs of brown widow spiders, Latrodectus geometricus C. L. Koch. All water-based spray products except one failed to provide significant mortality to egg sacs, resulting in successful spiderling emergence from treated egg sacs at a similar rate to untreated egg sacs. In contrast to water-based sprays, oil-based aerosols provided almost complete control, with 94-100% prevention of spiderling emergence. Penetration studies using colored pesticide products indicated that oil-based aerosols were significantly more effective in penetrating egg sac silk than were the water-based sprays, delivering the active ingredients on most (>99%) of the eggs inside the sac. The ability of pesticides to penetrate spider egg sac silk and deliver lethal doses of active ingredients to the eggs is discussed in relation to the chemical nature of egg sac silk proteins. Our study suggests that pest management procedures primarily relying on perimeter application of water-based sprays might not provide satisfactory control of brown widow spider eggs. Determination of the most effective active ingredients and carrier characteristics warrant further research to provide more effective control options for spider egg sacs. PMID:26530954

  20. Relation of pesticide concentrations to season, streamflow, and land use in seven New Jersey streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiser, Robert G.

    1999-01-01

    The presence and variability of pesticides in seven New Jersey streams was documented by analyzing 146 samples collected from the streams from April 1996 through June 1998. The samples were analyzed for 85 pesticides, including 50 herbicides, 28 insecticides, and 7 degradation products, at method detection limits that ranged from 0.001 to 0.018 μg/L (micrograms per liter). Pesticides were frequently detected; however, concentrations were generally low. The pesticides most frequently detected were atrazine, in 97 percent of the samples; prometon, 96 percent; metolachlor, 95 percent; desethyl-atrazine, 91 percent; simazine, 88 percent; diazinon, 58 percent; alachlor, 56 percent; and carbaryl, 54 percent. Detection frequencies were highest during the growing season (April-September). At least one pesticide was detected in all but one of these samples, and 49 percent of the samples contained 9 or more pesticides. The numbers of pesticides detected at a given site ranged from 13 to 29. Ten pesticides were detected at concentrations that exceeded established water-quality criteria. Thirty-one of these detections were in samples collected during the growing season and one during the nongrowing season. The pesticides that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) maximum contaminant level for drinking water were atrazine, which exceeded 3 μg/L in four samples, and alachlor, 2 μg/L in two samples. Cyanazine exceeded the USEPA liftime health advisory level (HAL) of 1 μg/L in two samples. These eight detections occurred during runoff shortly after spring pesticide applications and represent a potential threat to municipal water supplies in the Raritan River basin. Concentrations of chlorpyrifos, chlorthalonil, diazinon, ethyl-parathion, and methyl-azinphos exceeded the chronic life criteria for the protection of aquatic life (ACQR) in 20 samples at four sites during the growing season. Dieldrin was detected in four samples and DDE in two samples at concentrations that exceeded New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) human health criteria. Individual and total-pesticide concentrations and total numbers of pesticides detected in the samples varied with season and flow conditions. Median and maximum concentrations of most of the pesticides were highest during runoff in the growing season. Pesticide concentrations were typically lower and less variable in the nongrowing season than in the growing season, regardless of changes in hydrologic conditions; however, median concentrations of most pesticides were slightly lower during runoff than during base flow. The median total-pesticide concentration and median total number of pesticides detected were highest and most variable in runoff samples in the growing season. In the nongrowing season, the median total-pesticide concentration was lowest in runoff samples and least variable during base-flow conditions. Median total numbers of pesticides were lowest and least varibale in the nongrowing season during base-flow conditions at most sites. The highest total-pesticide concentrations were detected in samples from the two small agricultural basins (greater than 25 percent of land use is agricultural) during runoff in late spring and early summer. In general, insecticides were detected more frequently and in greater concentrations at urban sites. Concentrations of agricultural herbicides generally decreased with increasing flow at the four sites with less than 10 percent agriculture land use and increased with increasing flow at the three sites with more than 25 percent agricultural land use. Most of the pesticides that correlated positively with streamflow were detected at sites where land use in the basin would indicate the use of those particular pesticides. Most of the pesticides that correlated negatively with streamflow were present at the site in the Coastal Plain or at sites in which the land use in the basin would not indicate heavy u

  1. Reduction of hazardous organic solvent in sample preparation for hydrophilic pesticide residues in agricultural products with conventional liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiki; Kobara, Yuso; Baba, Koji; Eun, Heesoo

    2013-05-22

    An original extraction method using water as an extractant has been established for environmentally friendly sample preparation procedures for hydrophilic pesticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, flonicamid, imidacloprid, methomyl, pymetrozine, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) in agricultural samples with conventional HPLC. Water-based extraction and cleanup with two solid-phase extraction cartridges can recover target hydrophilic pesticides quantitatively. The matrix effects of tested samples on the proposed method developed herein were negligibly small. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries of almost all tested pesticides were 70-120% with satisfactory precision (%CV < 20%). The analytical data are in good accordance with Japanese or European Union guidelines for pesticide residue analysis. The reduction rate of hazardous organic solvents used for the proposed method and by reducing the sample size for extraction was about 70% compared with the Japanese authorized reference method used in this work. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed sample preparation procedures for hydrophilic pesticides. PMID:23614723

  2. Pesticide Residues in Food: Your Daily Dose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, Lawrie

    1985-01-01

    Extensive use of pesticides during food production has created concerns for certain involuntary risks. Examines these concerns: government role in control and monitoring pesticide use, proposals for reform, and how consumer awareness might be an effective pressure for finding remedies. A table listing produce and pesticide residues is included.…

  3. Characterization of radiolytically generated degradation products in the strip section of a TRUEX flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Gary S. Groenewold; Rocklan G. McDowell; Richard D. Tillotson; Jack D. Law

    2013-08-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet the FCRD level 2 milestone M3FT-13IN0302053, “Identification of TRUEX Strip Degradation.” The INL radiolysis test loop has been used to identify radiolytically generated degradation products in the strip section of the TRUEX flowsheet. These data were used to evaluate impact of the formation of radiolytic degradation products in the strip section upon the efficacy of the TRUEX flowsheet for the recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from acidic solution. The nominal composition of the TRUEX solvent used in this study is 0.2 M CMPO and 1.4 M TBP dissolved in n-dodecane and the nominal composition of the TRUEX strip solution is 1.5 M lactic acid and 0.050 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Gamma irradiation of a mixture of TRUEX process solvent and stripping solution in the test loop does not adversely impact flowsheet performance as measured by stripping americium ratios. The observed increase in americium stripping distribution ratios with increasing absorbed dose indicates the radiolytic production of organic soluble degradation compounds.

  4. [Degradation Kinetics and Formation of Disinfection By-products During Linuron Chlorination in Drinking Water].

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao; Hu, Chen-yan; Cheng, Ming; Gu, Jian

    2015-05-01

    Chlorination degradation of linuron was studied using the common disinfectant sodium hypochlorite, the effects of chlorine dosage, pH value, bromine ion concentrationand temperature were systematically investigated, and the formation characteristics of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during the chlorination reaction was analyzed. The results showed that the chlorination degradation kinetics of linuron by sodium hypochlorite could be well described by the second-order kinetic model. Moreover, pH values had a great impact on the degradation reaction, and the rate constant reached the maximum level at pH 7, and the base elementary reaction rate constants of HOCl and OCl- with linuron were 4.84 x 10(2) L · (mol · h)(-1) and 3.80 x 10(2) L · (mol · h)(-1), respectively. The reaction rate decreased with the addition of bromide ion and increased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, many kinds of disinfection by- products were produced during the chlorination degradation of linuron, including CF, DCAN, TCNM and halogen acetone. Under conditions of different solution pH and different bromide ion concentrations, there would be significant difference in the types and concentrations of disinfection by-products. PMID:26314114

  5. A validated stability-indicating RP-HPLC method for levofloxacin in the presence of degradation products, its process related impurities and identification of oxidative degradant.

    PubMed

    Lalitha Devi, M; Chandrasekhar, K B

    2009-12-01

    The objective of current study was to develop a validated specific stability indicating reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method for the quantitative determination of levofloxacin as well as its related substances determination in bulk samples, pharmaceutical dosage forms in the presence of degradation products and its process related impurities. Forced degradation studies were performed on bulk sample of levofloxacin as per ICH prescribed stress conditions using acid, base, oxidative, water hydrolysis, thermal stress and photolytic degradation to show the stability indicating power of the method. Significant degradation was observed during oxidative stress and the degradation product formed was identified by LCMS/MS, slight degradation in acidic stress and no degradation was observed in other stress conditions. The chromatographic method was optimized using the samples generated from forced degradation studies and the impurity spiked solution. Good resolution between the peaks corresponds to process related impurities and degradation products from the analyte were achieved on ACE C18 column using the mobile phase consists a mixture of 0.5% (v/v) triethyl amine in sodium dihydrogen orthophosphate dihydrate (25 mM; pH 6.0) and methanol using a simple linear gradient. The detection was carried out at 294 nm. The limit of detection and the limit of quantitation for the levofloxacin and its process related impurities were established. The stressed test solutions were assayed against the qualified working standard of levofloxacin and the mass balance in each case was in between 99.4 and 99.8% indicating that the developed LC method was stability indicating. Validation of the developed LC method was carried out as per ICH requirements. The developed LC method was found to be suitable to check the quality of bulk samples of levofloxacin at the time of batch release and also during its stability studies (long term and accelerated stability). PMID:19632800

  6. Biodegradation of Leonardite by an alkali-producing bacterial community and characterization of the degraded products.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tong-Guo; Jiang, Feng; Yang, Jin-Shui; Li, Bao-Zhen; Yuan, Hong-Li

    2012-03-01

    In this study, three bacterial communities were obtained from 12 Leonardite samples with the aim of identifying a clean, effective, and economic technique for the dissolution of Leonardite, a type of low-grade coal, in the production of humic acid (HA). The biodegradation ability and characteristics of the degraded products of the most effective bacterial community (MCSL-2), which degraded 50% of the Leonardite within 21 days, were further investigated. Analyses of elemental composition, (13)C NMR, and Fourier transform infrared revealed that the contents of C, O, and aliphatic carbon were similar in biodegraded humic acid (bHA) and chemically (alkali) extracted humic acid (cHA). However, the N and carboxyl carbon contents of bHA was higher than that of cHA. Furthermore, a positive correlation was identified between the degradation efficiency and the increasing pH of the culture medium, while increases of manganese peroxidase and esterase activities were also observed. These data demonstrated that both alkali production and enzyme reactions were involved in Leonardite solubilization by MCSL-2, although the former mechanism predominated. No fungus was observed by microscopy. Only four bacterial phylotypes were recognized, and Bacillus licheniformis-related bacteria were identified as the main group in MCSL-2 by analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes, thus demonstrating that Leonardite degradation ability has a limited distribution in bacteria. Hormone-like bioactivities of bHA were also detected. In this study, a bacterial community capable of Leonardite degradation was identified and the products characterized. These data implicate the use of such bacteria for the exploitation of Leonardite as a biofertilizer. PMID:22075634

  7. Radiolytic degradation mechanism of gallic acid and its end-products.

    PubMed

    Melo, R P; Leal, J P; Botelho, M L

    2011-01-15

    Gallic acid is one of the most representative biorecalcitrant phenolic compounds present in cork processing wastewater. In this communication, chemical oxidation of gallic acid was studied by gamma irradiation as an advanced oxidation process. This technology turns out to be an advantageous tool for the degradation of gallic acid. The results obtained by UV-Vis and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques are in agreement concerning the suitability of this technique to degrade gallic acid. ESI-MS and ESI-MS(2) monitoring of the non-irradiated and irradiated gallic acid solutions leads to the identification of the main intermediate products. Based on the overall results obtained a consistent mechanism of radiolytic degradation of gallic acid is proposed. The application of radiation as a tool to increase the biodegradability of wastewaters is an important issue from the perspective of Green Chemistry. PMID:21157866

  8. LC method for determination of prasugrel and mass spectrometry detection for thermal and alkaline degradation products.

    PubMed

    Rigobello, C; Barden, A T; Steppe, M

    2015-08-01

    A stability-indicating RP-LC method for the determination of prasugrel in tablets was developed and validated. Stress testing of prasugrel was carried out in accordance with ICH guidelines, where the drug was submitted to acidic and basic hydrolysis, oxidative, thermal and photolytic conditions. Prasugrel was unstable under all the conditions and the degradations products were analyzed by HPLC-UV. Furthermore, two main degradation products found under alkaline and thermal conditions were investigated by LC-MS. Based on the fragmentation patterns, two products resulted from hydrolysis of the acetate ester moiety of prasugrel were observed. Due the chemical equilibrium, tautomerism occurs between the ketone and alcohol functions justifying the similar molecular weight and fragment pattern obtained in degradation products analysis. Successful separation was achieved on a RP-18 octadecyl silane column using acetonitrile and triethylamine 0.5% mixture (50:50, v/v) as the mobile phase at 25 degrees C. The flow rate was 1.0 mL/min and the detector wavelength was 263 nm. The method proposed in this work was successfully applied to quality control of prasugrel and contribute to stability assessment of pharmaceutical products containing this drug. PMID:26380520

  9. Penetration of hydrogen peroxide and degradation rate of different bleaching products.

    PubMed

    Marson, F C; Gonçalves, R S; Silva, C O; Cintra, L T Â; Pascotto, R C; Santos, P H Dos; Briso, A L F

    2015-01-01

    This study's aim was to evaluate the degradation rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and to quantify its penetration in tooth structure, considering the residence time of bleaching products on the dental enamel. For this study, bovine teeth were randomly divided according to the bleaching product received: Opalescence Xtra Boost 38%, White Gold Office 35%, Whiteness HP Blue 35%, Whiteness HP Maxx 35%, and Lase Peroxide Sensy 35%. To analyze the degradation of H2O2, the titration of bleaching agents with potassium permanganate was used, while the penetration of H2O2 was measured via spectrophotometric analysis of the acetate buffer solution, collected from the artificial pulp chamber. The analyses were performed immediately as well as 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 45 minutes after product application. The data of degradation rate of H2O2 were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests, while ANOVA and Fisher tests were used for the quantification of H2O2, at the 5% level. The results showed that all products significantly reduced the concentration of H2O2 activates at the end of 45 minutes. It was also verified that the penetration of H2O2 was enhanced by increasing the residence time of the product on the tooth surface. It was concluded that the bleaching gels retained substantial concentrations of H2O2 after 45 minutes of application, and penetration of H2O2 in the dental structure is time-dependent. PMID:24828134

  10. 77 FR 72342 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ...)-methanol (CHNP) at 96.5%. Product type: Plant regulator. Proposed uses: Manufacturing Use Only. Contact...) and its metabolite (5- chloro-4-nitro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)-methanol (CHNP) at17%. Product type:...

  11. Determination of pesticide residues in fruit-based soft drinks.

    PubMed

    García-Reyes, Juan F; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2008-12-01

    Here we report the first worldwide reconnaissance study of the presence and occurrence of pesticides in fruit-based soft drinks. While there are strict regulations and exhaustive controls for pesticides in fruits, vegetables, and drinking water, scarce attention has been paid to highly consumed derivate products, which may contain these commodities as ingredients. In the case of the fruit-based soft drinks industry, there are no clear regulations, relating to pesticides, which address them, even when there is significant consumption in vulnerable groups such as children. In this work, we have developed a screening method to search automatically for up to 100 pesticides in fruit-based soft drinks extracts based on the application of liquid chromatography-electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF MS). The sample extracts injected were obtained by a preliminary sample treatment step based on solid-phase extraction using hydrophilic-lipophilic balanced polymer-based reverse phase cartridges and methanol as eluting solvent. Subsequent identification, confirmation, and quantitation were carried out by LC-TOF MS analysis: the confirmation of the target species was based on retention time matching and accurate mass measurements of protonated molecules ([M + H]+) and fragment ions (obtaining accuracy errors typically lower than 2 ppm). With the proposed method, we measured over 100 fruit-based soft drink samples, purchased from 15 different countries from companies with brands distributed worldwide and found relatively large concentration levels of pesticides in most of the samples analyzed. The concentration levels detected were of the micrograms per liter level, low when considering the European maximum residue levels (MRLs) set for fruits but very high (i.e., 300 times) when considering the MRLs for drinking or bottled water. The detected pesticides (carbendazim, thiabendazole, imazalil and its main degradate, prochloraz and its main degradate, malathion, and iprodione) are mainly those applied to crops in the final stages of production (postharvest treatment), some of them contain chlorine atoms in their structures. Therefore, steps should be taken with the aim of removing any traces of pesticides in these products, in order to avoid this source of pesticide exposure on the consumer, particularly on vulnerable groups with higher exposure, such as children. PMID:19551973

  12. Biodegradation of carbamate pesticides by natural river biofilms in different seasons and their effects on biofilm community structure.

    PubMed

    Tien, Chien-Jung; Lin, Mon-Chu; Chiu, Wan-Hsin; Chen, Colin S

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the ability of natural river biofilms from different seasons to degrade the carbamate pesticides methomyl, carbaryl and carbofuran in single and multiple pesticide systems, and the effects of these pesticides on algal and bacterial communities within biofilms. Spring biofilms had the lowest biomass of algae and bacteria but showed the highest methomyl degradation (>99%) and dissipation rates, suggesting that they might contain microorganisms with high methomyl degradation abilities. Degradation of carbofuran (54.1-59.5%) by biofilms in four seasons was similar, but low degradation of carbaryl (0-27.5%) was observed. The coexistence of other pesticides was found to cause certain effects on pesticide degradation and primarily resulted in lower diversity of diatoms and bacteria than when using a single pesticide. The tolerant diatoms and bacteria potentially having the ability to degrade test pesticides were identified. River biofilms could be suitable biomaterials or used to isolate degraders for bioremediating pesticide-contaminated water. PMID:23665845

  13. 75 FR 51053 - Propetamphos; Notice of Receipt of Requests to Voluntarily Cancel Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... AGENCY Propetamphos; Notice of Receipt of Requests to Voluntarily Cancel Pesticide Registrations AGENCY... products containing the pesticide propetamphos. The requests would terminate the last propetamphos products... . Follow the on-line instructions for submitting comments. Mail: Office of Pesticide Programs...

  14. Degradation and Sorption of Imidacloprid in Dissimilar Surface and Subsurface Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degradation and sorption/desorption are important processes affecting the leaching of pesticides through soil. Once pesticides move past the surface soil layers, subsurface soil physical, chemical, and biological properties significantly affect pesticide fate and the potential for groundwater contam...

  15. Biodegradation of the alkaline cellulose degradation products generated during radioactive waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Rout, Simon P; Radford, Jessica; Laws, Andrew P; Sweeney, Francis; Elmekawy, Ahmed; Gillie, Lisa J; Humphreys, Paul N

    2014-01-01

    The anoxic, alkaline hydrolysis of cellulosic materials generates a range of cellulose degradation products (CDP) including α and β forms of isosaccharinic acid (ISA) and is expected to occur in radioactive waste disposal sites receiving intermediate level radioactive wastes. The generation of ISA's is of particular relevance to the disposal of these wastes since they are able to form complexes with radioelements such as Pu enhancing their migration. This study demonstrates that microbial communities present in near-surface anoxic sediments are able to degrade CDP including both forms of ISA via iron reduction, sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, without any prior exposure to these substrates. No significant difference (n = 6, p = 0.118) in α and β ISA degradation rates were seen under either iron reducing, sulphate reducing or methanogenic conditions, giving an overall mean degradation rate of 4.7 × 10(-2) hr(-1) (SE ± 2.9 × 10(-3)). These results suggest that a radioactive waste disposal site is likely to be colonised by organisms able to degrade CDP and associated ISA's during the construction and operational phase of the facility. PMID:25268118

  16. Biodegradation of the Alkaline Cellulose Degradation Products Generated during Radioactive Waste Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Rout, Simon P.; Radford, Jessica; Laws, Andrew P.; Sweeney, Francis; Elmekawy, Ahmed; Gillie, Lisa J.; Humphreys, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    The anoxic, alkaline hydrolysis of cellulosic materials generates a range of cellulose degradation products (CDP) including α and β forms of isosaccharinic acid (ISA) and is expected to occur in radioactive waste disposal sites receiving intermediate level radioactive wastes. The generation of ISA's is of particular relevance to the disposal of these wastes since they are able to form complexes with radioelements such as Pu enhancing their migration. This study demonstrates that microbial communities present in near-surface anoxic sediments are able to degrade CDP including both forms of ISA via iron reduction, sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, without any prior exposure to these substrates. No significant difference (n = 6, p = 0.118) in α and β ISA degradation rates were seen under either iron reducing, sulphate reducing or methanogenic conditions, giving an overall mean degradation rate of 4.7×10−2 hr−1 (SE±2.9×10−3). These results suggest that a radioactive waste disposal site is likely to be colonised by organisms able to degrade CDP and associated ISA's during the construction and operational phase of the facility. PMID:25268118

  17. Acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in ground water and surface water of the United States, 1993-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Elisabeth A.; Dietze, Julie E.; Thurman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    During 1993 through 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a number of studies to investigate and document the occurrence, fate, and transport of acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in ground and surface water. As part of these studies, approximately 5,100 water samples were collected and analyzed for the acetamide parent herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, dimethenamid, flufenacet, and metolachlor and their degradation products ethanesulfonic acid, oxanilic acid, and sulfinyl acetic acid. During this period, various analytical methods were developed to detect and measure concentrations of acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in ground water and surface water. Results showed that the degradation products of acetamide herbicides in ground water were detected more frequently and occurred at higher concentrations than their parent compounds. Further study showed that the acetamide herbicides and their degradation products were detected more frequently in surface water than in ground water. In general, the parent compounds were detected at similar or greater frequencies than the degradation products in surface water. The developed methods and data were valuable for acquiring information about the occurrence, fate, and transport of the herbicides and their degradation products and the importance of analyzing for both parent compounds and their degradate products in water-quality studies.

  18. Refined methodology for the determination of neonicotinoid pesticides and their metabolites in honey bees and bee products by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Kamel, Alaa

    2010-05-26

    An analytical method was refined for the extraction and determination of neonicotinoid pesticide residues and their metabolites in honey bees and bee products. Samples were extracted with 2% triethylamine (TEA) in acetonitrile (ACN) followed by salting out, solid phase extraction (SPE) cleanup, and detection using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The method was validated in triplicate at three fortification concentrations in each matrix. Good recoveries were observed for most analytes and ranged between 70 and 120% with relative standard deviations between replicates of <20% in most cases. The method limits of detection were 0.2 ng/g for the parent neonicotinoid pesticides and ranged between 0.2 and 15 ng/g for the neonicotinoid metabolites. This refined method provides lower detection limits and improved recovery of neonicotinoids and their metabolites, which will help researchers evaluate subchronic effects of these pesticides, address data gaps related to colony collapse disorder (CCD), and determine the role of pesticides in pollinator decline. PMID:20163114

  19. (Pesticide chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1990-09-04

    This report summarizes a trip by L. W. Barnthouse of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), where he participated in the 7th International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry. He chaired a workshop on experimental systems for determining effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms and gave an oral presentation at a symposium on pesticide risk assessment. Before returning to the United States, Dr. Barnthouse visited the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Texel, the Netherlands.

  20. Method for determination of methyl tert-butyl ether and its degradation products in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, C.D.; Isabelle, L.M.; Pankow, J.F.; Rose, D.L.; Tratnyek, P.G.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical method is described that can detect the major alkyl ether compounds that are used as gasoline oxygenates (methyl tert-butyl ether, MTBE; ethyl tert-butyl ether, ETBE; and tert-amyl methyl ether, TAME) and their most characteristic degradation products (tert-butyl alcohol, TBA; tert-butyl formate, TBF; and tert-amyl alcohol, TAA) in water at sub-ppb concentrations. The new method involves gas chromatography (GC) with direct aqueous injection (DAI) onto a polar column via a splitless injector, coupled with detection by mass spectrometry (MS). DAI-GC/MS gives excellent agreement with conventional purge-and-trap methods for MTBE over a wide range of environmentally relevant concentrations. The new method can also give simultaneous identification of polar compounds that might occur as degradation products of gasoline oxygenates, such as TBA, TBF, TAA, methyl acetate, and acetone. When the method was applied to effluent from a column microcosm prepared with core material from an urban site in New Jersey, conversion of MTBE to TBA was observed after a lag period of 35 days. However, to date, analyses of water samples from six field sites using the DAI-GC/MS method have not produced evidence for the expected products of in situ degradation of MTBE.An analytical method is described that can detect the major alkyl ether compounds that are used as gasoline oxygenates (methyl tert-butyl ether, MTBE; ethyl tert-butyl ether, ETBE; and tert-amyl methyl ether, TAME) and their most characteristic degradation products (tert-butyl alcohol, TBA; tert-butyl formate, TBF; and tert-amyl alcohol, TAA) in water at sub-ppb concentrations. The new method involves gas chromatography (GC) with direct aqueous injection (DAI) onto a polar column via a splitless injector, coupled with detection by mass spectrometry (MS). DAI-GC/MS gives excellent agreement with conventional purge-and-trap methods for MTBE over a wide range of environmentally relevant concentrations. The new method can also give simultaneous identification of polar compounds that might occur as degradation products of gasoline oxygenates, such as TBA, TBF, TAA, methyl acetate, and acetone. When the method was applied to effluent from a column microcosm prepared with core material from an urban site in New Jersey, conversion of MTBE to TBA was observed after a lag period of 35 days. However, to date, analyses of water samples from six field sites using the DAI-GC/MS method have not produced evidence for the expected products of in situ degradation of MTBE.