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Sample records for pet cyclotron vault

  1. Spectra and Neutron Dosimetry Inside a PET Cyclotron Vault Room

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Mendez, Roberto; Iniguez, Maria Pilar; Marti-Climent, Joseph; Penuelas, Ivan; Barquero, Raquel

    2006-09-08

    The neutron field around a PET cyclotron was investigated during 18F radioisotope production with an 18 MeV proton beam. Pairs of thermoluminescent dosemeters, TLD600 and TLD700, were used as thermal neutron detector inside a Bonner Spheres Spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at three different positions inside the cyclotron's vault room. Neutron spectra were also determined by Monte Carlo calculations. The hardest spectrum was observed in front of cyclotron target and the softest was noticed at the antipode of target. Neutron doses derived from the measured spectra vary between 11 and 377 mSv/{mu}A-h of proton integrated current, Doses were also measured with a single-moderator remmeter, with an active thermal neutron detector, whose response in affected by the radiation field in the vault room.

  2. Predicting long-lived, neutron-induced activation of concrete in a cyclotron vault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, L. R.

    2001-07-01

    Many elements in concrete can become activated by neutrons in a cyclotron vault, but only a few of the activation products are long-lived. The most prominent of these are Eu-152, Eu-154, Co-60, and Cs-134 which build up over time from (n, γ) reactions in trace amounts of stable Europium, Cobalt, and Cesium that are normally present in concrete in concentrations of a few parts per million, or less, by weight. A retrospective analysis of data taken in connection with a previous decommissioning of a cyclotron vault, coupled with independent published data, gives us an estimate of the concentrations of these elements in concrete. With that estimate as a benchmark, we then employ a Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code to estimate the long-term activation profile in concrete for arbitrary irradiation conditions.

  3. Evaluation of the latent radiation dose from the activated radionuclides in a cyclotron vault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunduk; Cho, Gyuseong; Kim, Sun A.; Kang, Bo Sun

    2015-02-01

    The production of short-lived radioisotopes for the synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals typically takes advantage of a cyclotron that accelerates a proton beam up to a few tens of MeV. The number of cyclotrons has been continuously increasing since the first operation of the MC-50 for the production of radiopharmaceuticals at the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) in 1986, and currently 35 cyclotrons are under operation throughout the nation. As the number of operating cyclotrons has increased, concerns about radiation safety for the persons who are working at the facilities and dwelling in the vicinity of the facilities are becoming important issues. Radiation that could emit a time-dependent dose was shown to exist in a cyclotron vault after its shutdown. The calculation of the latent radiation dose rate was performed by using the MCNPX and the FISPACT. The calculated results for the activated long-lived radioisotopes in the concrete wall and the structural components of the cyclotron facility were compared with the measured data that were obtained by using gamma-ray spectroscopy with a HPGe detector.

  4. PET computer programs for use with the 88-inch cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, R.A.; Chlosta, L.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes in detail several offline programs written for the PET computer which provide an efficient data management system to assist with the operation of the 88-Inch Cyclotron. This function includes the capability to predict settings for all cyclotron and beam line parameters for all beams within the present operating domain of the facility. The establishment of a data base for operational records is also described from which various aspects of the operating history can be projected.

  5. Long-distance transport of radionuclides between PET cyclotron and PET radiochemistry.

    PubMed

    PreuscheS; Füchtner, F; Steinbach, J; Zessin, J; Krug, H; Neumann, W

    1999-12-01

    At the Rossendorf PET Centre the PET cyclotron and the radiochemical laboratories are 500 m away from each other. The distance is bridged by a radionuclide transport system (RATS) whose details such as layout, technical parameters, control system and radiation protection are described along with our experience in long-distance transport of radionuclides. PMID:10581677

  6. Distribution of thermal neutron flux around a PET cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshimune; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Mochizuki, Shingo; Ito, Kengo; Hatano, Kentaro; Abe, Junichiro; Miyahara, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime

    2011-05-01

    The number of positron emission tomography (PET) examinations has greatly increased world-wide. Since positron emission nuclides for the PET examinations have short half-lives, they are mainly produced using on-site cyclotrons. During the production of the nuclides, significant quantities of neutrons are generated from the cyclotrons. Neutrons have potential to activate the materials around the cyclotrons and cause exposure to the staff. To investigate quantities and distribution of the thermal neutrons, thermal neutron fluxes were measured around a PET cyclotron in a laboratory associating with a hospital. The cyclotron accelerates protons up to 18 MeV, and the mean particle current is 20 μA. The neutron fluxes were measured during both 18F production and C production. Gold foils and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges were used to measure the neutron fluxes. The neutron fluxes in the target box averaged 9.3 × 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.7 × 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) during 18F and 11C production, respectively. Those in the cyclotron room averaged 4.1 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.2 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1), respectively. Those outside the concrete wall shielding were estimated as being equal to or less than ∼3 cm s, which corresponded to 0.1 μSv h(-1) in effective dose. The neutron fluxes outside the concrete shielding were confirmed to be quite low compared to the legal limit. PMID:21451309

  7. Neutron spectra due (13)N production in a PET cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Benavente, J A; Vega-Carrillo, H R; Lacerda, M A S; Fonseca, T C F; Faria, F P; da Silva, T A

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo and experimental methods have been used to characterize the neutron radiation field around PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cyclotrons. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to estimate the neutron spectra, the neutron fluence rates and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) in seven locations around a PET cyclotron during (13)N production. In order to validate these calculations, H*(10) was measured in three sites and were compared with the calculated doses. All the spectra have two peaks, one above 0.1MeV due to the evaporation neutrons and another in the thermal region due to the room-return effects. Despite the relatively large difference between the measured and calculated H*(10) for one point, the agreement was considered good, compared with that obtained for (18)F production in a previous work. PMID:25699664

  8. Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Castillo, J.

    2007-10-26

    Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

  9. Cyclotrons for clinical and biomedical research with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to present some background material on cyclotrons and other particle accelerators particularly with a view toward the considerations behind acquiring and installing such a machine for purely clinical and/or biomedical research use.

  10. Design study of a 9 MeV compact cyclotron system for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeong-No; Shin, Seung-Wook; Song, Hoseung; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Chai, Jong-Seo

    2013-06-01

    A cyclotron is an accelerator which can be applied to both cancer diagnosis and treatment. Among commercially sold cyclotrons, the major energy is used for positron emission tomography (PET) ranges from 10 to 20 MeV. In this research, 9 MeV compact cyclotron for PET was designed. The research was conducted on the response cross section and the yield for the energy distribution to decide the design features. Also, it was determined the specifications on the basis of the fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) maximum dose. The machine, which has a 20 uA beam current, is designed to be installed in small-to-medium-sized hospitals in local cities because of its relatively light weight (6 tons). This compact cyclotron, which provides 9-MeV proton beams, is composed of a azimuthally varying field (AVF) electromagnet, 83-MHz RF systems with a 20 kW amplifier, a panning ion gauge (PIG) type ion-source for negative hydrogen, and a double-stage high-vacuum system. The basic model design was done by using 3-D CAD program, CATIA and all the field calculations were performed using commercial electromagnetic field analysis code, OPERA-3D TOSCA. From this research, we expect a time reduction for FDG production, a decrease of radioactive exposure for workers, and an equipment cost reduction.

  11. Effective dose to immuno-PET patients due to metastable impurities in cyclotron produced zirconium-89

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfuraih, Abdulrahman; Alzimami, Khalid; Ma, Andy K.; Alghamdi, Ali; Al Jammaz, Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    Immuno-PET is a nuclear medicine technique that combines positron emission tommography (PET) with radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for tumor characterization and therapy. Zirconium-89 (89Zr) is an emerging radionuclide for immuno-PET imaging. Its long half-life (78.4 h) gives ample time for the production, the administering and the patient uptake of the tagged radiopharmaceutical. Furthermore, the nuclides will remain in the tumor cells after the mAbs are catabolized so that time series studies are possible without incurring further administration of radiopharmarceuticals. 89Zr can be produced in medical cyclotrons by bombarding an yttrium-89 (89Y) target with a proton beam through the 89Y(p,n)89Zr reaction. In this study, we estimated the effective dose to the head and neck cancer patients undergoing 89Zr-based immune-PET procedures. The production of 89Zr and the impurities from proton irradiation of the 89Y target in a cyclotron was calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the nuclear reaction code TALYS. The cumulated activities of the Zr isotopes were derived from real patient data in literature and the effective doses were estimated using the MIRD specific absorbed fraction formalism. The estimated effective dose from 89Zr is 0.5±0.2 mSv/MBq. The highest organ dose is 1.8±0.2 mSv/MBq in the liver. These values are in agreement with those reported in literature. The effective dose from 89mZr is about 0.2-0.3% of the 89Zr dose in the worst case. Since the ratio of 89mZr to 89Zr depends on the cooling time as well as the irradiation details, contaminant dose estimation is an important aspect in optimizing the cyclotron irradiation geometry, energy and time.

  12. Low energy cyclotron production of multivalent transition metals for PET imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel

    Recent advances in high-resolution tomographs for small animals require the production of nonconventional long-lived positron emitters to label novel radiopharmaceuticals for PET-based molecular imaging. Radioisotopes with an appropriate half life to match the kinetics of slow biological processes will allow to researchers to study the phamacokinetics of PET ligands over several hours, or even days, on the same animal, with the injection of a single dose. In addition, radionuclides with a suitable half life can potentially be distributed from a central production site making them available in PET facilities that lack an in-house cyclotron. In the last few years there has been a growing interest in the use of PET ligands labeled with radiometals, particularly isotopes of copper, yttrium and zirconium. Future clinical applications of these tracers will require them to be produced reliably and efficiently. This thesis work deals with implementing and optimizing the production of the multivalent transition metals 61,64Cu, 86Y and 89Zr for molecular PET imaging and therapy. Our findings in the production of these radionuclides at high specific activity on an 11 MeV proton-only cyclotron are presented. Local applications of these tracers, including Cu-ATSM for in vivo quantification of hypoxia, synthesis of targeted radiopharmaceuticals using activated esters of DOTA, and a novel development of positron emitting resin microspheres, are also be discussed. As a result of this thesis work, metallic radionuclides are now efficiently produced on a weekly basis in sufficient quality and quantity for collaborating scientists at UW-Madison and external users in other Universities across the country.

  13. A solid target system with remote handling of irradiated targets for PET cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Siikanen, J; Tran, T A; Olsson, T G; Strand, S-E; Sandell, A

    2014-12-01

    A solid target system was developed for a PET cyclotron. The system is compatible with many different target materials in the form of foils and electroplated/sputtered targets which makes it useful for production of a wide variety of different PET radionuclides. The target material is manually loaded into the system. Remote handling of irradiated target material is managed with a pneumatic piston and a vacuum technique which allows the targets to be dropped into a shielded transport container. To test the target performance, proton irradiations (12.8 MeV, 45 μA) of monoisotopic yttrium foils (0.64 mm, direct water cooling) were performed to produce 89Zr. The yields were 2200±200 MBq (1 h, n=13) and 6300±65 MBq (3 h, n=3). PMID:25265518

  14. Optimization of A Commercial PET Cyclotron For Increased 18F- Production

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, Jan Olof; Eriksson, Tomas

    2003-08-26

    Commercial cyclotron systems used for 18F- production through 18O (p, n) 18F reaction face several conflicting requirements that include: reliability/uptime, quantity of consumables, safety, cost and yield. With commercialization of PET tracer distribution, higher yield has become one of the most important requirements. Maximizing yield for commercial cyclotrons require engineering trade-off amongst several requirements, and often, to be conservative, significant design margin is kept while field feedback is collected. With maturing of technology, substantial experience has been obtained for a commercial cyclotron (PETtrace, GE Medical Systems), which is in use for several years. In this paper, we describe key elements of PETtrace commercial cyclotron technology undergoing enhancements, and share our works-in-progress experiments in performing critical engineering trade-offs to improve 18F- yield. Three key parameters were tuned in this study within the design margin of the current equipment. First, we designed a second-generation target assembly with optimized 18O water volume for accepting increased beam currents while maintaining cooling performance. Second, we increased the beam current of the ion source. And finally, a new RF driver amplifier was designed to enhance the RF power ratings to enable higher beam currents. Initial tests performed in the factory indicate substantially higher yield performance (> 50%) reaching a peak yield of over 4 Ci per hour of bombardment in the new target. On dual targets, this extrapolates to 13.5 Ci/2hr of bombardment for a total target current of 120 {mu}A. A target current of 100 {mu}A is available in the existing design thus providing an 18F- production capacity exceeding 11 Ci/2hr. The preliminary experimental results are promising and illustrate successful exploitation of design margin to achieve increased yield for a commercial cyclotron. Long-term studies to assess impact on life of ion source are underway along with a

  15. The radioprotection management of a PET department with a cyclotron and radiopharmacy laboratory, in accordance with Italian legislation.

    PubMed

    Russo, A A; Ferrari, P; Casale, M; Delia, R

    2011-09-01

    The possibility of setting up a positron emission tomography (PET) facility with a cyclotron and radiopharmaceutical laboratory in situ, at a feasible price and in a very restricted space, has led to a steady increase both in the use of the PET technique in diagnostic clinical routine imaging and in the number of cyclotrons for drug production. Owing to the progress made in the PET procedures, it is now possible to have not only a highly innovative system of diagnostic examination, with a remarkable improvement in the diagnostic quality and patient care, but also a considerable increase in the number of daily examinations. In this paper, the authors show how the acquired know-how, with respect to radioprotection, has applied to the planning, running and management of the PET/CT unit, installed in the Imaging Diagnostic Department of the Policlinico Tor Vergata (PTV), at Tor Vergata University, Rome. PMID:22039292

  16. Beam tracking simulation in the central region of a 13 MeV PET cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggraita, Pramudita; Santosa, Budi; Taufik, Mulyani, Emy; Diah, Frida Iswinning

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the trajectories simulation of proton beam in the central region of a 13 MeV PET cyclotron, operating with negative proton beam (for easier beam extraction using a stripper foil), 40 kV peak accelerating dee voltage at fourth harmonic frequency of 77.88 MHz, and average magnetic field of 1.275 T. The central region covers fields of 240mm × 240mm × 30mm size at 1mm resolution. The calculation was also done at finer 0.25mm resolution covering fields of 30mm × 30mm × 4mm size to see the effects of 0.55mm horizontal width of the ion source window and the halted trajectories of positive proton beam. The simulations show up to 7 turns of orbital trajectories, reaching about 1 MeV of beam energy. The distribution of accelerating electric fields and magnetic fields inside the cyclotron were calculated in 3 dimension using Opera3D code and Tosca modules for static magnetic and electric fields. The trajectory simulation was carried out using Scilab 5.3.3 code.

  17. Electrophilic FLUORIDE-18 from AN 11 Mev Proton Cyclotron for Radiolabeling of Presynaptic Dopaminergic PET Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderland, John Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The reliable production of (^{18 }F) F_2 from an 11 MeV proton cyclotron has been achieved through the implementation of two accelerator targets built to exploit the copious ^{18}O(p,n)^ {18}F cross-section. Yields of electrophilic (^{18}F) F_2 from the targets reached deciCurie levels with specific activities approaching 3 Ci/mmole with 75 minute irradiations at 10 muA. Higher specific activities are expected with longer bombardments and increased beam current. The targets, one nickel, the other with a gold -plated target chamber, have been tested for (^ {18}F) F_2 production efficiency under two bombardment protocols. An economic two-step protocol cryogenically reclaims the precious enriched ^{18}O_{2 } target material following ^ {18}F production, followed by a second (^{18}F) F_2 recovery irradiation of Kr + F_2 . Studies of target performance using this protocol under variable irradiation conditions suggest a five compartment model governing the in-target kinetics. Similarly, the (^{18}F) F_2 yields have been tested using a single irradiation protocol consisting of bombardment of ^{18}O_{2} + F _2. Theoretical descriptions of beam induced phenomena in the irradiated target are also presented. The behavior of these targets cannot be judged solely on the amount of reactive ^{18 }F which elutes from the target; successful radiochemical synthesis utilizing this ^ {18}F activity in a model reaction is the true test. Synthesis of 6- (^{18 }F) fluoro-L-DOPA (6-FD) by the fluoro-demercuration method of Luxen served this purpose, testing the eletrophilic (^{18}F) F_2 gas from the two targets and two irradiation protocols. Elution of Kr + (^{18}F) F _2 from the two-step method achieved the expected 12% radiochemical yields from (^ {18}F) F_2, while experience with ^{18}F activity eluted with oxygen from the single irradiation protocol suffered lower yields. Solutions to problems associated with 6-FD studies for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are addressed. A

  18. On-line measurements of proton beam current from a PET cyclotron using a thin aluminum foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghithan, S.; do Carmo, S. J. C.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Simões, H.; Alves, F.; Crespo, P.

    2013-07-01

    The number of cyclotrons capable of accelerating protons to about 20 MeV is increasing throughout the world. Originally aiming at the production of positron emission tomography (PET) radionuclides, some of these facilities are equipped with several beam lines suitable for scientific research. Radiobiology, radiophysiology, and other dosimetric studies can be performed using these beam lines. In this work, we measured the Bragg peak of the protons from a PET cyclotron using a stacked target consisting of several aluminum foils interleaved with polyethylene sheets, readout by in-house made transimpedance electronics. The measured Bragg peak is consistent with simulations performed using the SRIM/TRIM simulation toolkit. Furthermore, we report on experimental results aiming at measuring proton beam currents down to 10 pA using a thin aluminum foil (20-μm-thick). The aluminum was chosen for this task because it is radiation hard, it has low density and low radiation activity, and finally because it is easily available at negligible cost. This method allows for calculating the dose delivered to a target during an irradiation with high efficiency, and with minimal proton energy loss and scattering.

  19. The new bern PET cyclotron, its research beam line, and the development of an innovative beam monitor detector

    SciTech Connect

    Braccini, Saverio

    2013-04-19

    The new Bern cyclotron laboratory aims at industrial radioisotope production for PET diagnostics and multidisciplinary research by means of a specifically conceived beam transfer line, terminated in a separate bunker. In this framework, an innovative beam monitor detector based on doped silica and optical fibres has been designed, constructed, and tested. Scintillation light produced by Ce and Sb doped silica fibres moving across the beam is measured, giving information on beam position, shape, and intensity. The doped fibres are coupled to commercial optical fibres, allowing the read-out of the signal far away from the radiation source. This general-purpose device can be easily adapted for any accelerator used in medical applications and is suitable either for low currents used in hadrontherapy or for currents up to a few {mu}A for radioisotope production, as well as for both pulsed and continuous beams.

  20. A real-time beam-profile monitor for a PET cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehr, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Verzilov, V.; English, W.; Buckley, K.; Gray, D.; Kellog, S.; Cameron, D.; Schaffer, P.

    2012-12-01

    Beam profiles in medical cyclotrons are traditionally measured using techniques that do not provide any information about short-term fluctuations of the beam shape or beam intensity. To overcome this, we have developed a real-time harp beam profile monitor which can withstand beam power in excess of 300 W. The monitor and electronics were constructed and applied toward a 13 MeV proton beam with current of up to 25 μA. Herein are reported preliminary beam-profile measurement results.

  1. A real-time beam-profile monitor for a PET cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehr, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Verzilov, V.; English, W.; Buckley, K.; Gray, D.; Kellog, S.; Cameron, D.; Schaffer, P.

    2012-12-19

    Beam profiles in medical cyclotrons are traditionally measured using techniques that do not provide any information about short-term fluctuations of the beam shape or beam intensity. To overcome this, we have developed a real-time harp beam profile monitor which can withstand beam power in excess of 300 W. The monitor and electronics were constructed and applied toward a 13 MeV proton beam with current of up to 25 {mu}A. Herein are reported preliminary beam-profile measurement results.

  2. PET - radiopharmaceutical facilities at Washington University Medical School - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Dence, C.S.; Welch, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    The PET program at Washington University has evolved over more than three decades of research and development in the use of positron-emitting isotopes in medicine and biology. In 1962 the installation of the first hospital cyclotron in the USA was accomplished. This first machine was an Allis Chalmers (AC) cyclotron and it was operated until July, 1990. Simultaneously with this cyclotron the authors also ran a Cyclotron Corporation (TCC) CS-15 cyclotron that was purchased in 1977. Both of these cyclotrons were maintained in-house and operated with a relatively small downtime (approximately 3.5%). After the dismantling of the AC machine in 1990, a Japanese Steel Works 16/8 (JSW-16/8) cyclotron was installed in the vault. Whereas the AC cyclotron could only accelerate deuterons (6.2 MeV), the JSW - 16/8 machine can accelerate both protons and deuterons, so all of the radiopharmaceuticals can be produced on either of the two presently owned accelerators. At the end of May 1993, the medical school installed the first clinical Tandem Cascade Accelerator (TCA) a collaboration with Science Research Laboratories (SRL) of Somerville, MA. Preliminary target testing, design and development are presently under way. In 1973, the University installed the first operational PETT device in the country, and at present there is a large basic science and clinical research program involving more than a hundred staff in nuclear medicine, radiation sciences, neurology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, cardiology, pulmonary medicine, oncology, and surgery.

  3. The vault complex.

    PubMed

    van Zon, A; Mossink, M H; Scheper, R J; Sonneveld, P; Wiemer, E A C

    2003-09-01

    Vaults are large ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells. They are composed of multiple copies of a Mr 100,000 major vault protein and two minor vault proteins of Mr 193,000 and 240,000, as well as small untranslated RNAs of 86-141 bases. The vault components are arranged into a highly characteristic hollow barrel-like structure of 35 x 65 nm in size. Vaults are predominantly localized in the cytoplasm where they may associate with cytoskeletal elements. A small fraction of vaults are found to be associated with the nucleus. As of yet, the precise cellular function of the vault complex is unknown. However, their distinct morphology and intracellular distribution suggest a role in intracellular transport processes. Here we review the current knowledge on the vault complex, its structure, components and possible functions. PMID:14523546

  4. The Digital Vaults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Suzanne; Potter, Lee Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the Digital Vaults and offers suggestions in introducing this site to students. The Digital Vaults, inspired by the permanent Public Vaults exhibition launched by the National Archives in 2004, is not just another website, but it designed to be an online exhibit and teaching tool, by offering both exposure to historical…

  5. The planning and design of a new PET radiochemistry facility.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Mark S; Hung, Joseph C; Mays, Trenton L; Mullan, Brian P

    2002-03-01

    The objectives of the Mayo positron emission tomography (PET) radiochemistry facility are the production of PET drugs for clinical service of our in-house patients, commercial distribution of PET drug products, and development of new PET drugs. The factors foremost in the planning and design phases were the current regulatory climate for PET drug production, radiation safety issues, and effective production flow. A medium-energy cyclotron was preferred for its small footprint to allow a compact vault, its high-proton energy to offer a higher product radioactivity; and its research capabilities. A vault installation was chosen instead of a self-shielded machine for improved access and ease of maintenance. Adjacent to the cyclotron is an area that houses the support equipment and a large dedicated workshop to support machine maintenance and targetry development. The total floor area of the PET radiochemistry facility is 344.2 m(2) (3,705.5 ft(2)), of which the radiochemistry laboratory occupies 130.7 m(2) (1,407 ft(2)). To reduce environmental contamination of PET drug products, the laboratory contains a controlled-air environment class 10,000 (M5.5) clean room with access via an interlocking entry change area. A fully shielded isolator (class 100 [M3.5]) is located in the clean room. The PET drugs are delivered via shielded tubing between the synthesizer and isolator. Inside the isolator, there is an automated device for dispensing the PET drug into either a bulk-activity vial or a unit-dose syringe. The dispensed PET radiopharmaceutical then passes through a hatch to a dedicated area where it is packaged for in-house use or commercial distribution. Unit doses for in-house patients are transported via pneumatic tube to the PET imaging area 76.2 m (250 ft) away. There is extensive radiation area monitoring throughout the facility that continuously measures radiation levels. We believe that our new PET radiochemistry facility not only meets overall objectives, but

  6. Interior of southwest vault, opened southwest vault door, closed southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of southwest vault, opened southwest vault door, closed southeast vault door, and evidence of forced entry in north interior wall. View from west interior wall of southwest vault. Facing east. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  7. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  8. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. 7, looking up flue - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, interior of Vault No. 7, view west - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 3 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 3 showing inside surface of outer door - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north (Vault Nos. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north (Vault Nos. 1-9 - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 5, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, Vault No. 5, showing inner set of doors on vault - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. The formation of vault-tubes: a dynamic interaction between vaults and vault PARP.

    PubMed

    van Zon, Arend; Mossink, Marieke H; Schoester, Martijn; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2003-11-01

    Vaults are barrel-shaped cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles that are composed of a major vault protein (MVP), two minor vault proteins [telomerase-associated protein 1 (TEP1), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP)] and small untranslated RNA molecules. Not all expressed TEP1 and VPARP in cells is bound to vaults. TEP1 is known to associate with the telomerase complex, whereas VPARP is also present in the nuclear matrix and in cytoplasmic clusters (VPARP-rods). We examined the subcellular localization and the dynamics of the vault complex in a non-small cell lung cancer cell line expressing MVP tagged with green fluorescent protein. Using quantitative fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) it was shown that vaults move temperature independently by diffusion. However, incubation at room temperature (21 degrees C) resulted in the formation of distinct tube-like structures in the cytoplasm. Raising the temperature could reverse this process. When the vault-tubes were formed, there were fewer or no VPARP-rods present in the cytoplasm, suggesting an incorporation of the VPARP into the vault-tubes. MVP molecules have to interact with each other via their coiled-coil domain in order to form vault-tubes. Furthermore, the stability of microtubules influenced the efficiency of vault-tube formation at 21 degrees C. The dynamics and structure of the tubes were examined using confocal microscopy. Our data indicate a direct and dynamic relationship between vaults and VPARP, providing further clues to unravel the function of vaults. PMID:13130096

  14. Inside the Vault, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffitts, Dawn

    2001-01-01

    This "Inside the Vault" newsletter contains two issues. Issue 1 contains a lead article, "Reading the Fed's Playbook," a question-and-answer section, and a bulletin board. The Federal Reserve's primary mission is to ensure that enough money and credit are available to sustain economic growth without inflation. The article explains the Federal…

  15. Structural stability of vault particles.

    PubMed

    Esfandiary, Reza; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell

    2009-04-01

    Vaults, at 13 MDa, are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles known. In vitro, expression of the major vault protein (MVP) alone in Sf9 insect cells results in the production of recombinant particles with characteristic vault structure. With the ultimate goal of using recombinant vaults as nanocapsules for the delivery of biomolecules, we have employed a variety of spectroscopic techniques (i.e., circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and light scattering) along with electron microscopy, to characterize the structural stability of vaults over a wide range of pH (3-8) and temperature (10-90 degrees C). Ten different conformational states of the vaults were identified over the pH and temperature range studied with the most stable region at pH 6-8 below 40 degrees C and least stable at pH 4-6 above 60 degrees C. A unique intermediate molten globulelike state was also identified at pH 6 and approximately 55 degrees C. EM imaging showed the opening of intact vaults into flowerlike structures when transitioning from neutral to acidic pH. This information has potential use in the development of recombinant vaults into nanocapsules for drug delivery since one mechanism by which therapeutic agents entrapped in vaults could be released is through an opening of the intact vault structure. PMID:18683860

  16. Vaginal Vault Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Uzoma, Azubuike; Farag, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Vaginal vault prolapse is a common complication following vaginal hysterectomy with negative impact on women's quality of life due to associated urinary, anorectal and sexual dysfunction. A clear understanding of the supporting mechanism for the uterus and vagina is important in making the right choice of corrective procedure. Management should be individualised, taking into consideration the surgeon's experience, patients age, comorbidities, previous surgery and sex life. Result. Preexisting pelvic floor defect prior to hysterectomy is the single most important risk factor for vault prolapse. Various surgical techniques have been advanced at hysterectomy to prevent vault prolapse. Studies have shown the McCall's culdoplasty under direct visualisation to be superior. Vault prolapse repair rely on either the use of patient's tissue or synthetic materials and can be carried out abdominally or vaginally. Sacrospinous fixation and abdominal sacrocolpopexy are the commonly performed procedures, with literature in favour of abdominal sacrocolpopexy over sacrospinous fixation due to its reported higher success rate of about 90%. Other less commonly performed procedures include uterosacral ligament suspension and illiococcygeal fixation, both of which are equally effective, with the former having a high risk of ureteric injury. Colpoclesis will play a greater role in the future as the aging population increases. Mesh procedures are gaining in popularity, and preliminary data from vaginal mesh procedures is encouraging. Laparoscopic techniques require a high level of skill and experience. There are many controversies on the mechanism of prolapse and management techniques, which we have tried to address in this article. Conclusion. As the aging population increases, the incidence of prolapse will also rise, older techniques using native tissue will continue, while new techniques using the mesh needs to be studied further. The later may well be the way forward

  17. Cyclotron Production of Medical Radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; Zarate-Morales, A.; Flores-Moreno, A.

    2010-08-04

    The cyclotron production of radioisotopes for medical applications is gaining increased significance in diagnostic molecular imaging techniques such as PET and SPECT. In this regard, radioisotope production has never been easier or more convenient until de introduction of compact medical cyclotrons in the last few decades, which allowed the use of short-lived radioisotopes in in vivo nuclear medicine studies on a routine basis. This review outlines some general considerations about the production of radioisotopes using charged particle accelerators.

  18. Accurate Monte Carlo modeling of cyclotrons for optimization of shielding and activation calculations in the biomedical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Angelo; Marengo, Mario; Baschetti, Serafina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Longo Vaschetto, Vittorio; Lucconi, Giulia; Massucci, Piera; Vichi, Sara; Zagni, Federico; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2015-11-01

    Biomedical cyclotrons for production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radionuclides and radiotherapy with hadrons or ions are widely diffused and established in hospitals as well as in industrial facilities and research sites. Guidelines for site planning and installation, as well as for radiation protection assessment, are given in a number of international documents; however, these well-established guides typically offer analytic methods of calculation of both shielding and materials activation, in approximate or idealized geometry set up. The availability of Monte Carlo codes with accurate and up-to-date libraries for transport and interactions of neutrons and charged particles at energies below 250 MeV, together with the continuously increasing power of nowadays computers, makes systematic use of simulations with realistic geometries possible, yielding equipment and site specific evaluation of the source terms, shielding requirements and all quantities relevant to radiation protection. In this work, the well-known Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to simulate two representative models of cyclotron for PET radionuclides production, including their targetry; and one type of proton therapy cyclotron including the energy selection system. Simulations yield estimates of various quantities of radiological interest, including the effective dose distribution around the equipment, the effective number of neutron produced per incident proton and the activation of target materials, the structure of the cyclotron, the energy degrader, the vault walls and the soil. The model was validated against experimental measurements and comparison with well-established reference data. Neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was measured around a GE PETtrace cyclotron: an average ratio between experimental measurement and simulations of 0.99±0.07 was found. Saturation yield of 18F, produced by the well-known 18O(p,n)18F reaction, was calculated and compared with the IAEA recommended

  19. Structural studies of large nucleoprotein particles, vaults.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideaki; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2012-01-01

    Vault is the largest nonicosahedral cytosolic nucleoprotein particle ever described. The widespread presence and evolutionary conservation of vaults suggest important biologic roles, although their functions have not been fully elucidated. X-ray structure of vault from rat liver was determined at 3.5 Å resolution. It exhibits an ovoid shape with a size of 40 × 40 × 67 nm(3). The cage structure of vault consists of a dimer of half-vaults, with each half-vault comprising 39 identical major vault protein (MVP) chains. Each MVP monomer folds into 12 domains: nine structural repeat domains, a shoulder domain, a cap-helix domain and a cap-ring domain. Interactions between the 42-turn-long cap-helix domains are key to stabilizing the particle. The other components of vaults, telomerase-associated proteins, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and small RNAs, are in location in the vault particle by electron microscopy. PMID:23060231

  20. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Gelbart, W. Z.; Johnson, Richard R.

    2013-04-01

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 μA to 1000 μA, depending on the cyclotron energy and application [1].

  1. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Johnson, Richard R.; Gelbart, W. Z.

    2013-04-19

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 {mu}A to 1000 {mu}A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application.

  2. Radiological dose assessment for vault storage concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, R.F.

    1997-02-25

    This radiological dose assessment presents neutron and photon dose rates in support of project W-460. Dose rates are provided for a single 3013 container, the ``infloor`` storage vault concept, and the ``cubicle`` storage vault concept.

  3. Movement Regulation of Handsprings on Vault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinen, Thomas; Vinken, Pia M.; Jeraj, Damian; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Visual information is utilized in gymnastics vaulting. The question remains as to which informational sources are used to regulate handspring performance. The purpose of this study was to examine springboard and vaulting table position as informational sources in gymnastics vaulting. The hypothesis tested was that the approach-run and…

  4. Vaults engineered for hydrophobic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Daniel C; Toso, Daniel B; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Zhou, Z Hong; Rome, Leonard H

    2011-05-23

    The vault nanoparticle is one of the largest known ribonucleoprotein complexes in the sub-100 nm range. Highly conserved and almost ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotes, vaults form a large nanocapsule with a barrel-shaped morphology surrounding a large hollow interior. These properties make vaults an ideal candidate for development into a drug delivery vehicle. In this study, the first example of using vaults towards this goal is reported. Recombinant vaults are engineered to encapsulate the highly insoluble and toxic hydrophobic compound all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) using a vault-binding lipoprotein complex that forms a lipid bilayer nanodisk. These recombinant vaults offer protection to the encapsulated ATRA from external elements. Furthermore, a cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) reconstruction shows the vault-binding lipoprotein complex sequestered within the vault lumen. Finally, these ATRA-loaded vaults show enhanced cytotoxicity against the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. The ability to package therapeutic compounds into the vault is an important achievement toward their development into a viable and versatile platform for drug delivery. PMID:21506266

  5. PRTR ion exchange vault column sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1995-03-14

    This report documents ion exchange column sampling and Non Destructive Assay (NDA) results from activities in 1994, for the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. The objective was to obtain sufficient information to prepare disposal documentation for the ion exchange columns found in the PRTR Ion exchange vault. This activity also allowed for the monitoring of the liquid level in the lower vault. The sampling activity contained five separate activities: (1) Sampling an ion exchange column and analyzing the ion exchange media for purpose of waste disposal; (2) Gamma and neutron NDA testing on ion exchange columns located in the upper vault; (3) Lower vault liquid level measurement; (4) Radiological survey of the upper vault; and (5) Secure the vault pending waste disposal.

  6. Structural Dynamics of the Vault Ribonucleoprotein Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casañas, Arnau; Querol, Jordi; Fita, Ignasi; Verdaguer, Núria

    Vaults are ubiquitous, highly conserved, 13 MDa ribonucleoprotein particles, involved in a diversity of cellular processes, including multidrug resistance, transport mechanisms and signal transmission. There are between 104 and 106 vault particles per mammalian cell and they do not trigger autoimmunity. The vault particle shows a hollow barrel-shaped structure organized in two identical moieties, each consisting of 39 copies of the major vault protein (MVP). Other data indicated that vault halves can dissociate at acidic pH. The high resolution, crystal structure of the of the seven N-terminal domains (R1-R7) of MVP, forming the central vault barrel, together with that of the native vault particle (solved at 8 Å resolution), revealed the interactions governing vault association and suggested a pH-dependent mechanism for a reversible dissociation induced by low pH. Vault particles posses many features making them very promising vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic agents including self-assembly, 100 nm size range, emerging atomic-level structural information, natural presence in humans ensuring biocompability, recombinant production system, existing features for targeting species to the large lumen and a dynamic structure that may be controlled for manipulation of drug release kinetics. All these attributes provide vaults with enormous potential as a drug/gene delivery platform.

  7. PRTR ion exchange vault water removal

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents the removal of radiologically contaminated water from the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. Approximately 57,000 liters (15,000 gallons) of water had accumulated in the vault due to the absence of a rain cover. The water was removed and the vault inspected for signs of leakage. No evidence of leakage was found. The removal and disposal of the radiologically contaminated water decreased the risk of environmental contamination.

  8. Derivation of the mammalian skull vault

    PubMed Central

    MORRISS-KAY, GILLIAN M.

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the evolutionary history of the mammalian skull vault as a basis for understanding its complex structure. Current information on the developmental tissue origins of the skull vault bones (mesoderm and neural crest) is assessed for mammals and other tetrapods. This information is discussed in the context of evolutionary changes in the proportions of the skull vault bones at the sarcopterygian-tetrapod transition. The dual tissue origin of the skull vault is considered in relation to the molecular mechanisms underlying osteogenic cell proliferation and differentiation in the sutural growth centres and in the proportionate contributions of different sutures to skull growth. PMID:11523816

  9. Smart vaults: thermally-responsive protein nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Nicholas M; Prabhakaran, Panchami; Rome, Leonard H; Maynard, Heather D

    2013-01-22

    Synthetic modification of a recombinant protein cage called a vault with stimuli-responsive smart polymers provides access to a new class of biohybrid materials; the polymer nanocapsules retain the structure of the protein cage and exhibit the responsive nature of the polymer. Vaults are naturally occurring ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein particles 41 × 41 × 72.5 nm composed of a protein shell enclosing multiple copies of two proteins and multiple copies of one or more small untranslated RNAs. Recombinant vaults are structurally identical but lack the vault content. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm), a polymer responsive to heat, was conjugated to recombinant vaults that were composed of ~78 copies of the major vault protein (MVP) modified to contain a cysteine rich region at the N-terminus (CP-MVP). The polymer was synthesized using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization to have a dansyl group at the alpha end and modified to have a thiol-reactive pyridyl disulfide at the omega end, which readily coupled to CP-MVP vaults. The resulting vault nanocapsules underwent reversible aggregation upon heating above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymer as determined by electron microscopy (EM), dynamic light scattering experiments, and UV-vis turbidity analysis. The vault structure remained entirely intact throughout the phase transition; suggesting its use in a myriad of biomedical and biotechnology applications. PMID:23259767

  10. Vaults. III. Vault ribonucleoprotein particles open into flower-like structures with octagonal symmetry.

    PubMed

    Kedersha, N L; Heuser, J E; Chugani, D C; Rome, L H

    1991-01-01

    The structure of rat liver vault ribonucleoprotein particles was examined using several different staining techniques in conjunction with EM and digestion with hydrolytic enzymes. Quantitative scanning transmission EM demonstrates that each vault particle has a total mass of 12.9 +/- 1 MD and contains two centers of mass, suggesting that each vault particle is a dimer. Freeze-etch reveals that each vault opens into delicate flower-like structures, in which eight rectangular petals are joined to a central ring, each by a thin hook. Vaults examined by negative stain and conventional transmission EM (CTEM) also reveal the flower-like structure. Trypsin treatment of vaults resulted exclusively in cleavage of the major vault protein (p104) and concurrently alters their structure as revealed by negative stain/CTEM, consistent with a localization of p104 to the flower petals. We propose a structural model that predicts the stoichiometry of vault proteins and RNA, defines vault dimer-monomer interactions, and describes two possible modes for unfolding of vaults into flowers. These highly dynamic structural variations are likely to play a role in vault function. PMID:1988458

  11. Vaults and the major vault protein: novel roles in signal pathway regulation and immunity.

    PubMed

    Berger, W; Steiner, E; Grusch, M; Elbling, L; Micksche, M

    2009-01-01

    The unique and evolutionary highly conserved major vault protein (MVP) is the main component of ubiquitous, large cellular ribonucleoparticles termed vaults. The 100 kDa MVP represents more than 70% of the vault mass which contains two additional proteins, the vault poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (vPARP) and the telomerase-associated protein 1 (TEP1), as well as several short untranslated RNAs (vRNA). Vaults are almost ubiquitously expressed and, besides chemotherapy resistance, have been implicated in the regulation of several cellular processes including transport mechanisms, signal transmissions and immune responses. Despite a growing amount of data from diverse species and systems, the definition of precise vault functions is still highly complex and challenging. Here we review the current knowledge on MVP and vaults with focus on regulatory functions in intracellular signal transduction and immune defence. PMID:18759128

  12. 49 CFR 192.749 - Vault maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vault maintenance. 192.749 Section 192.749 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.749 Vault maintenance. (a) Each...

  13. 49 CFR 192.185 - Vaults: Accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vaults: Accessibility. 192.185 Section 192.185 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: Accessibility. Each vault must be located in an accessible location and, so far as practical, away from:...

  14. Security analysis for fingerprint fuzzy vaults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartloff, Jesse; Bileschi, Maxwell; Tulyakov, Sergey; Dobler, Jimmy; Rudra, Atri; Govindaraju, Venu

    2013-05-01

    In this work we place some of the traditional biometrics work on fingerprint verification via the fuzzy vault scheme within a cryptographic framework. We show that the breaking of a fuzzy vault leads to decoding of Reed-Solomon codes from random errors, which has been proposed as a hard problem in the cryptography community. We provide a security parameter for the fuzzy vault in terms of the decoding problem, which gives context for the breaking of the fuzzy vault, whereas most of the existing literature measures the strength of the fuzzy vault in terms of its resistance to pre-defined attacks or by the entropy of the vault. We keep track of our security parameter, and provide it alongside ROC statistics. We also aim to be more aware of the nature of the fingerprints when placing them in the fuzzy vault, noting that the distribution of minutiae is far from uniformly random. The results we show provide additional support that the fuzzy vault can be a viable scheme for secure fingerprint verification.

  15. [Microeconomics of introduction of a PET system based on the revised Japanese National Insurance reimbursement system].

    PubMed

    Abe, Katsumi; Kosuda, Shigeru; Kusano, Shoichi; Nagata, Masayoshi

    2003-11-01

    It is crucial to evaluate an annual balance before-hand when an institution installs a PET system because the revised Japanese national insurance reimbursement system set the cost of a FDG PET study as 75,000 yen. A break-even point was calculated in an 8-hour or a 24-hour operation of a PET system, based on the total costs reported. The break-even points were as follows: 13.4, 17.7, 22.1 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The break-even points were 19.9, 25.5, 31.2 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in a full PET system operation of 24 hours. The results indicate no profit would accrue in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The annual profit and break-even point for the total cost including the initial investment would be respectively 530 million yen and 2.8 years in a 24-hour operation with 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system. PMID:14733110

  16. Development of a Medical Cyclotron Production Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Danny R.

    2003-08-01

    Development of a Cyclotron manufacturing facility begins with a business plan. Geographics, the size and activity of the medical community, the growth potential of the modality being served, and other business connections are all considered. This business used the customer base established by NuTech, Inc., an independent centralized nuclear pharmacy founded by Danny Allen. With two pharmacies in operation in Tyler and College Station and a customer base of 47 hospitals and clinics the existing delivery system and pharmacist staff is used for the cyclotron facility. We then added cyclotron products to contracts with these customers to guarantee a supply. We partnered with a company in the process of developing PET imaging centers. We then built an independent imaging center attached to the cyclotron facility to allow for the use of short-lived isotopes.

  17. Axonal transport of ribonucleoprotein particles (vaults).

    PubMed

    Li, J Y; Volknandt, W; Dahlstrom, A; Herrmann, C; Blasi, J; Das, B; Zimmermann, H

    1999-01-01

    RNA was previously shown to be transported into both dendritic and axonal compartments of nerve cells, presumably involving a ribonucleoprotein particle. In order to reveal potential mechanisms of transport we investigated the axonal transport of the major vault protein of the electric ray Torpedo marmorata. This protein is the major protein component of a ribonucleoprotein particle (vault) carrying a non-translatable RNA and has a wide distribution in the animal kingdom. It is highly enriched in the cholinergic electromotor neurons and similar in size to synaptic vesicles. The axonal transport of vaults was investigated by immunofluorescence, using the anti-vault protein antibody as marker, and cytofluorimetric scanning, and was compared to that of the synaptic vesicle membrane protein SV2 and of the beta-subunit of the F1-ATPase as a marker for mitochondria. Following a crush significant axonal accumulation of SV2 proximal to the crush could first be observed after 1 h, that of mitochondria after 3 h and that of vaults after 6 h, although weekly fluorescent traces of accumulations of vault protein were observed in the confocal microscope as early as 3 h. Within the time-period investigated (up to 72 h) the accumulation of all markers increased continuously. Retrograde accumulations also occurred, and the immunofluorescence for the retrograde component, indicating recycling, was weaker than that for the anterograde component, suggesting that more than half of the vaults are degraded within the nerve terminal. High resolution immunofluorescence revealed a granular structure-in accordance with the biochemical characteristics of vaults. Of interest was the observation that the increase of vault immunoreactivity proximal to the crush accelerated with time after crushing, while that of SV2-containing particles appeared to decelerate, indicating that the crush procedure with time may have induced perikaryal alterations in the production and subsequent export to the axon

  18. Assembly of vault-like particles in insect cells expressing only the major vault protein.

    PubMed

    Stephen, A G; Raval-Fernandes, S; Huynh, T; Torres, M; Kickhoefer, V A; Rome, L H

    2001-06-29

    Vaults are the largest (13 megadalton) cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles known to exist in eukaryotic cells. They have a unique barrel-shaped structure with 8-fold symmetry. Although the precise function of vaults is unknown, their wide distribution and highly conserved morphology in eukaryotes suggests that their function is essential and that their structure must be important for their function. The 100-kDa major vault protein (MVP) constitutes approximately 75% of the particle mass and is predicted to form the central barrel portion of the vault. To gain insight into the mechanisms for vault assembly, we have expressed rat MVP in the Sf9 insect cell line using a baculovirus vector. Our results show that the expression of the rat MVP alone can direct the formation of particles that have biochemical characteristics similar to endogenous rat vaults and display the distinct vault-like morphology when negatively stained and examined by electron microscopy. These particles are the first example of a single protein polymerizing into a non-spherically, non-cylindrically symmetrical structure. Understanding vault assembly will enable us to design agents that disrupt vault formation and hence aid in elucidating vault function in vivo. PMID:11349122

  19. 49 CFR 192.189 - Vaults: Drainage and waterproofing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Components § 192.189 Vaults: Drainage and waterproofing. (a) Each vault must be designed so as to minimize the entrance of water. (b) A vault containing gas piping may not be connected by means of a drain connection to any other underground structure. (c) Electrical equipment in vaults must conform to...

  20. CLOVERLEAF CYCLOTRON

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, E.M.; Judd, D.L.

    1959-02-01

    A cyclotron is presented embodying a unique magnetic field configuration, which configuration increases in intensity with radius and therefore compensates for the reltivistic mass effect, the field having further convolutions productive of axial stability in the particle beam. By reconciling the seemingly opposed requirements of mass increase compensation on one hand and anial stability on the other, the production of extremely high current particle beams in the relativistie energy range is made feasible. Certain further advantages inhere in the invention, notably an increase in the usable magnet gap, simplified and more efficient extraction of the beam from the accelerator, and ready adaptation to the use of multiply phased excitation as contrasted with the single phased systems herstofore utilized. General

  1. Pre-flight characteristics of Hecht vaults.

    PubMed

    Yeadon, M R; King, M A; Sprigings, E J

    1998-05-01

    This study reports the techniques used by gymnasts to perform the Hecht vault and compares them with techniques used for the handspring somersault vault (Takei and Kim, 1990). Our main aim was to establish how the pre-flight characteristics of the Hecht vault influence post-flight performance. Data were obtained on 27 elite gymnasts performing the Hecht vault at the 1993 Canadian National Championships using two-dimensional video analysis with the direct linear transformation (DLT) technique. The maximum height reached by the mass centre during post-flight was significantly correlated (P < 0.001) with the vertical velocity of the mass centre and the body angle at horse contact. The backwards rotation of the body was significantly correlated (P = 0.015) with the shoulder angle at horse contact. The competition score was significantly correlated (P = 0.043) with the body angle at horse contact and was also related to the maximum height of the mass centre during post-flight. For the Hecht vault, the gymnasts had longer, lower and faster pre-flights with slower rotation at horse contact compared with the handspring somersault vaults. PMID:9663959

  2. The vault exterior shell is a dynamic structure that allows incorporation of vault-associated proteins into its interior.

    PubMed

    Poderycki, Michael J; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Kaddis, Catherine S; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Johansson, Erik; Zink, Jeffrey I; Loo, Joseph A; Rome, Leonard H

    2006-10-01

    Vaults are 13 million Da ribonucleoprotein particles with a highly conserved structure. Expression and assembly by multimerization of an estimated 96 copies of a single protein, termed the major vault protein (MVP), is sufficient to form the minimal structure and entire exterior shell of the barrel-shaped vault particle. Multiple copies of two additional proteins, VPARP and TEP1, and a small untranslated vault RNA are also associated with vaults. We used the Sf9 insect cell expression system to form MVP-only recombinant vaults and performed a series of protein-mixing experiments to test whether this particle shell is able to exclude exogenous proteins from interacting with the vault interior. Surprisingly, we found that VPARP and TEP1 are able to incorporate into vaults even after the formation of the MVP vault particle shell is complete. Electrospray molecular mobility analysis and spectroscopic studies of vault-interacting proteins were used to confirm this result. Our results demonstrate that the protein shell of the recombinant vault particle is a dynamic structure and suggest a possible mechanism for in vivo assembly of vault-interacting proteins into preformed vaults. Finally, this study suggests that the vault interior may functionally interact with the cellular milieu. PMID:17002318

  3. Oak Ridge Isotope Production Cyclotron Facility and Target Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Eric Craig; Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Egle, Brian; Binder, Jeffrey L; Mirzadeh, Saed; Tatum, B Alan; Burgess, Thomas W; Devore, Joe; Rennich, Mark; Saltmarsh, Michael John; Caldwell, Benjamin Cale

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The Nuclear Science Advisory Committee issued in August 2009 an Isotopes Subcommittee report that recommended the construction and operation of a variable-energy, high-current, multiparticle accelerator for producing medical radioisotopes. To meet the needs identified in the report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a technical concept for a commercial 70 MeV dual-port-extraction, multiparticle cyclotron to be located at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The conceptual design of the isotope production facility as envisioned would provide two types of targets for use with this new cyclotron. One is a high-power target cooled by water circulating on both sides, and the other is a commercial target cooled only on one side. The isotope facility concept includes an isotope target vault for target irradiation and a shielded transfer station for radioactive target handling. The targets are irradiated in the isotope target vault. The irradiated targets are removed from the target vault and packaged in an adjoining shielded transfer station before being sent out for postprocessing. This paper describes the conceptual design of the target-handling capabilities required for dealing with these radioactive targets and for minimizing the contamination potential during operations.

  4. Detail of bricked up storage vault opening Central of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of bricked up storage vault opening - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Brick Storage Vaults under Jones Street, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  5. 27. RECORDS VAULT UNDER STAIRWAY IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. RECORDS VAULT UNDER STAIRWAY IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF MAIN MEETING ROOM. It is not known when this vault was built. It has cavity walls. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Cyclotrons as mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.

    1984-04-01

    The principles and design choices for cyclotrons as mass spectrometers are described. They are illustrated by examples of cyclotrons developed by various groups for this purpose. The use of present high energy cyclotrons for mass spectrometry is also described. 28 references, 12 figures.

  7. Hazard evaluation for 244-AR vault facility

    SciTech Connect

    BRAUN, D.J.

    1999-08-25

    This document presents the results of a hazard identification and evaluation performed on the 244-AR Vault Facility to close a USQ (USQ No.TF-98-0785, Potential Inadequacy in Authorization Basis (PIAB): To Evaluate Miscellaneous Facilities Listed In HNF-2503 And Not Addressed In The TWRS Authorization Basis) that was generated as part of an evaluation of inactive TWRS facilities. A hazard evaluation for the Hanford Site 244-AR Vault Facility was performed. The process and results of the hazard evaluation are provided in this document. A previous hazard evaluation was performed for the 244-AR Vault Facility in 1996 in support of the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The results of that evaluation are provided in the BIO. Upon review of those results it was determined that hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the 244-AR vaults due to flooding was not addressed in the original hazards evaluation. This supplemental hazard evaluation addresses this oversight of the original hazard evaluation. The results of the hazard evaluation were compared to the current TWRS BIO to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting changes to the AB. It is only intended to provide information about hazardous conditions associated with the condition and configuration of the 244-AR vault facility. The AB Control Decision process could be used to determine the applicability and adequacy of existing AB controls as well as any new controls that may be needed for the identified hazardous conditions associated with 244-AR vault flooding. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  8. Palmprint based multidimensional fuzzy vault scheme.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hailun; Sun, Dongmei; Xiong, Ke; Qiu, Zhengding

    2014-01-01

    Fuzzy vault scheme (FVS) is one of the most popular biometric cryptosystems for biometric template protection. However, error correcting code (ECC) proposed in FVS is not appropriate to deal with real-valued biometric intraclass variances. In this paper, we propose a multidimensional fuzzy vault scheme (MDFVS) in which a general subspace error-tolerant mechanism is designed and embedded into FVS to handle intraclass variances. Palmprint is one of the most important biometrics; to protect palmprint templates; a palmprint based MDFVS implementation is also presented. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme not only can deal with intraclass variances effectively but also could maintain the accuracy and meanwhile enhance security. PMID:24892094

  9. Palmprint Based Multidimensional Fuzzy Vault Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hailun; Sun, Dongmei; Xiong, Ke; Qiu, Zhengding

    2014-01-01

    Fuzzy vault scheme (FVS) is one of the most popular biometric cryptosystems for biometric template protection. However, error correcting code (ECC) proposed in FVS is not appropriate to deal with real-valued biometric intraclass variances. In this paper, we propose a multidimensional fuzzy vault scheme (MDFVS) in which a general subspace error-tolerant mechanism is designed and embedded into FVS to handle intraclass variances. Palmprint is one of the most important biometrics; to protect palmprint templates; a palmprint based MDFVS implementation is also presented. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme not only can deal with intraclass variances effectively but also could maintain the accuracy and meanwhile enhance security. PMID:24892094

  10. Rupture Loop Annex (RLA) ion exchange vault entry and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1996-01-04

    This engineering report documents the entry and characterization of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located near the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns were found in the vault. Some of which contained transuranics, Cs 137, and Co 60. The characterization information is necessary for future vault cleanout and column disposal.

  11. 41. MAIN SHEAVE VAULT 1955: Photocopy of June 1955 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. MAIN SHEAVE VAULT - 1955: Photocopy of June 1955 photograph of the main sheave vault below the southeast corner of the Washington and Mason powerhouse. View towards the southeast. Two of the deflecting sheaves in the vault are visible at the upper left and right rear of the photograph. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. 49 CFR 192.183 - Vaults: Structural design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vaults: Structural design requirements. 192.183... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.183 Vaults: Structural design requirements. (a) Each underground vault or pit for...

  13. 49 CFR 192.183 - Vaults: Structural design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vaults: Structural design requirements. 192.183... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.183 Vaults: Structural design requirements. (a) Each underground vault or pit for...

  14. 1. VIEW OF ONE OF THE INNER ROOMS WITHIN VAULT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF ONE OF THE INNER ROOMS WITHIN VAULT 996. THE UNDERGROUND VAULTS WERE USED TO STORE SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL AWAITING ON- AND OFF-SITE SHIPMENT. - Rocky Flats Plant, Storage Vault, Southeast corner of protected area, Northwest of Building 991, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 49 CFR 192.187 - Vaults: Sealing, venting, and ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... minimize the formation of combustible atmosphere in the vault or pit; and (3) The ducts must be high enough... explosive mixture might be ignited, and there must be a means for testing the internal atmosphere before... of ignition from reaching the vault atmosphere; or (3) If the vault or pit is ventilated,...

  16. 49 CFR 192.187 - Vaults: Sealing, venting, and ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... minimize the formation of combustible atmosphere in the vault or pit; and (3) The ducts must be high enough... explosive mixture might be ignited, and there must be a means for testing the internal atmosphere before... of ignition from reaching the vault atmosphere; or (3) If the vault or pit is ventilated,...

  17. Characterization of MVP and VPARP assembly into vault ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chun-Lei; Sumizawa, Tomoyuki; Che, Xiao-Fang; Tsuyama, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Haraguchi, Misako; Gao, Hui; Gotanda, Takenari; Jueng, Hei-Cheul; Murata, Fusayoshi; Akiyama, Shin-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Vaults are barrel-shaped cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles composed of three proteins: the major vault protein (MVP), the vault poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (VPARP), and the telomerase-associated protein 1, together with one or more small untranslated RNAs. To date, little is known about the process of vault assembly or about the stability of vault components. In this study, we analyzed the biosynthesis of MVP and VPARP, and their half-lives within the vault particle in human ACHN renal carcinoma cells. Using an immunoprecipitation assay, we found that it took more than 4h for newly synthesized MVPs to be incorporated into vault particles but that biosynthesized VPARPs were completely incorporated into vaults within 1.5h. Once incorporated into the vault complex, both MVP and VPARP were very stable. Expression of human MVP alone in Escherichia coli resulted in the formation of particles that had a distinct vault morphology. The C-terminal region of VPARP that lacks poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity co-sedimented with MVP particles. This suggests that the activity of VPARP is not essential for interaction with MVP-self-assembled vault-like particles. In conclusion, our findings provide an insight into potential mechanisms of physiological vault assembly. PMID:15567158

  18. Synchrotrons in cyclotron territory

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.; Gough, R.A.

    1986-10-01

    Synchrotrons and cyclotrons have an overlap in their particle and energy ranges. In proton radiotherapy, synchrotrons are proposed at 250 MeV, an energy usually served by cyclotrons. Heavy ion therapy has been synchrotron territory, but cyclotrons may be competitive. In nuclear science, heavy ion synchrotrons can be used in the cyclotron energy range of 10-200 MeV/u. Storage rings are planned to increase the flexibility of several cyclotrons. For atomic physics research, several storage rings are under construction for the energy range of 10 MeV/u and below.

  19. 36 CFR 910.70 - Vault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Vault. 910.70 Section 910.70 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE...

  20. 36 CFR 910.70 - Vault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vault. 910.70 Section 910.70 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE...

  1. 36 CFR 910.70 - Vault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vault. 910.70 Section 910.70 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE...

  2. 36 CFR 910.70 - Vault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vault. 910.70 Section 910.70 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE...

  3. 36 CFR 910.70 - Vault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vault. 910.70 Section 910.70 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE...

  4. Hazard Evaluation for 244-CR Vault

    SciTech Connect

    GRAMS, W.H.

    1999-08-19

    This document presents the results of a hazards identification and evaluation performed on the 244-CR Vault to close a USQ (USQ No.TF-98-0785, Potential Inadequacy in Authorization Basis (PIAB): To Evaluate Miscellaneous Facilities Listed In HNF-2503 And Not Addressed In The TWRS Authorization Basis) that was generated as part of an evaluation of inactive TWRS facilities.

  5. Postirradiation angiosarcoma of the vaginal vault

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.W.; SenGupta, S.K. )

    1991-05-01

    We describe a unique case of an angiosarcoma arising in the vaginal vault 21 years after hysterectomy and radiotherapy for stage I carcinoma of the cervix. We also review the literature regarding angiosarcomas arising after previous radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies.

  6. Dynamic soil pressures on rigid cylindrical vaults

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H )

    1993-02-01

    A critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and the associated forces induced by ground shaking on an upright, circular, rigid vault that is embedded in a uniform viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and infinite extent in the horizontal plane. Both the vault and the stratum are presumed to be supported on a non- deformable base undergoing a space-invariant, uniform horizontal motion. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. Simple approximate expressions for the responses of the system are formulated, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the underlying response mechanisms and the effects and relative importance of the various parameters involved. The parameters investigated include the height to radius ratio for the vault, the conditions at the vault-medium interface, and the material properties of the stratum. In addition to valuable insights into the response of the particular system being examined, the results presented provide a conceptual framework for the analysis and interpretation of solutions for more involved systems as well.

  7. Structural domains of vault proteins: a role for the coiled coil domain in vault assembly.

    PubMed

    van Zon, Arend; Mossink, Marieke H; Schoester, Martijn; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2002-03-01

    Vaults consist of multiple copies of three proteins (MVP, VPARP, and TEP1) and several untranslated RNAs. The function of vaults is unknown but the typical and evolutionary conserved structure indicates a role in intracellular transport. Although all vault components have been identified and characterized, not much is known about vault protein assembly. In this study we identified and analyzed structural domains involved in vault assembly with emphasis on protein-protein interactions. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, we demonstrate within MVP an intramolecular binding site and show that MVP molecules interact with each other via their coiled coil domain. We show that purified MVP is able to bind calcium, most likely at calcium-binding EF-hands. No interactions could be detected between TEP1 and other vault proteins. However, the N-terminal half of MVP binds to a specific domain in the C-terminus of VPARP. Furthermore, VPARP contains amino acid stretches mediating intramolecular binding. PMID:11855821

  8. Rupture loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.

  9. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac

  10. Targeting vault nanoparticles to specific cell surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Han, Muri; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Poderycki, Michael J; Moniz, Raymond J; Vaccari, Dana; Silvestry, Mariena; Stewart, Phoebe L; Kelly, Kathleen A; Rome, Leonard H

    2009-01-27

    As a naturally occurring nanocapsule abundantly expressed in nearly all-eukaryotic cells, the barrel-shaped vault particle is perhaps an ideal structure to engineer for targeting to specific cell types. Recombinant vault particles self-assemble from 96 copies of the major vault protein (MVP), have dimensions of 72.5 x 41 nm, and have a hollow interior large enough to encapsulate hundreds of proteins. In this study, three different tags were engineered onto the C-terminus of MVP: an 11 amino acid epitope tag, a 33 amino acid IgG-binding peptide, and the 55 amino acid epidermal growth factor (EGF). These modified vaults were produced using a baculovirus expression system. Our studies demonstrate that recombinant vaults assembled from MVPs containing C-terminal peptide extensions display these tags at the top and bottom of the vault on the outside of the particle and can be used to specifically bind the modified vaults to epithelial cancer cells (A431) via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), either directly (EGF modified vaults) or as mediated by a monoclonal antibody (anti-EGFR) bound to recombinant vaults containing the IgG-binding peptide. The ability to target vaults to specific cells represents an essential advance toward using recombinant vaults as delivery vehicles. PMID:19206245

  11. SU-D-BRE-07: Neutron Shielding Assessment for a Compact Proton Therapy Vault

    SciTech Connect

    Prusator, M; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform a neutron shielding assessment of a commercially available compact proton therapy system. Methods: TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation) beta release was used to model beam line components for Mevion S250 proton treatment system the design of which is that the cyclotron is present in the treatment room. Three neutron production sources were taken into account in the simulation. These are the cyclotron, the treatment nozzle and the patient itself, respectively. The cyclotron was modeled as a cylindrical iron target (r =5 cm, length = 8 cm). A water phantom (10 cm ×10 cm ×60 cm) was used to model the patient and various structures (scattering foils, range modulator wheel, applicator and compensator) defaulted in TOPAS were used to model the passive scattering treatment nozzle. Neutron fluences and energy spectra were counted in a spherical scoring geometry per incident proton in 18 angular bins (10 degree each). Fluence to dose conversion factors from ICRU publication 74 were used to acquire neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10). A point source line of sight model was then used to calculate neutron dose at eight locations beyond shielding barriers. Results: The neutron ambient dose equivalent was calculated at the 8 points of interest around the proton treatment vault. The highest dose was found to be less than 0.781 mSv/year outside south barrier wall. However, the dose is less than 0.05 mSv/year at the control room area of the proton vault. Conclusion: All Points of interest were well under annual dose limits. This suggests that the shielding design of this compact proton therapy system is sufficient for radiation protection purpose. However, it is important to note that the workload and the occupancy factors are direct multipliers for dose calculations beyond the barrier and must be accurately estimated for validation of our results.

  12. E-Area Vault Concrete Material Property And Vault Durability/Degradation Projection Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M. A.

    2014-03-11

    Subsequent to the 2008 E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC 2008), two additional E-Area vault concrete property testing programs have been conducted (Dixon and Phifer 2010 and SIMCO 2011a) and two additional E-Area vault concrete durability modeling projections have been made (Langton 2009 and SIMCO 2012). All the information/data from these reports has been evaluated and consolidated herein by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at the request of Solid Waste Management (SWM) to produce E-Area vault concrete hydraulic and physical property data and vault durability/degradation projection recommendations that are adequately justified for use within associated Special Analyses (SAs) and future PA updates. The Low Activity Waste (LAW) and Intermediate Level (IL) Vaults structural degradation predictions produced by Carey 2006 and Peregoy 2006, respectively, which were used as the basis for the 2008 ELLWF PA, remain valid based upon the results of the E-Area vault concrete durability simulations reported by Langton 2009 and those reported by SIMCO 2012. Therefore revised structural degradation predictions are not required so long as the mean thickness of the closure cap overlying the vaults is no greater than that assumed within Carey 2006 and Peregoy 2006. For the LAW Vault structural degradation prediction (Carey 2006), the mean thickness of the overlying closure cap was taken as nine feet. For the IL Vault structural degradation prediction (Peregoy 2006), the mean thickness of the overlying closure cap was taken as eight feet. The mean closure cap thicknesses as described here for both E-Area Vaults will be included as a key input and assumption (I&A) in the next revision to the closure plan for the ELLWF (Phifer et al. 2009). In addition, it has been identified as new input to the PA model to be assessed in the ongoing update to the new PA Information UDQE (Flach 2013). Once the UDQE is approved, the SWM Key I

  13. Development of polymer concrete vaults for natural gas regulator stations

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.J.; Miller, C.A.; Reams, W.; Elling, D.

    1990-08-01

    Vaults for natural gas regulator stations have traditionally been fabricated with steel-reinforced portland cement concrete. Since these vaults are installed below ground level, they are usually coated with a water-proofing material to prevent the ingress of moisture into the vault. In some cases, penetrations for piping that are normally cast into the vault do not line up with the gas lines in the streets. This necessitates off-setting the lines to line up with the penetrations in the vault or breaking out new penetrations which could weaken the structure and/or allow water ingress. By casting the vaults using a new material of construction such as polymer concrete, a longer maintenance free service life is possible because the physical and durability properties of polymer concrete composites are much superior to those of portland cement concrete. The higher strengths of polymer concrete allow the design engineer to reduce the wall, floor, and ceiling thicknesses making the vaults lighter for easier transportation and installation. Penetrations can be cut after casting to match existing street lines, thus making the vault more universal and reducing the number of vaults that are normally in stock. The authors developed a steel-fiber reinforced polymer concrete composite that could be used for regulator vaults. Based on the physical properties of his new composite, vaults were designed to replace the BUG PV-008 and Con Ed GR-6 regulator vaults made of reinforced portland cement concrete. Quarter-scale models of the polymer concrete vaults were tested and the results reaffirmed the reduced wall thickness design. Two sets of vaults, cast by Hardinge Bros., were inspected by representatives of the utilities and BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and were accepted for delivery. 6 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. 244-CR Vault Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    PARKMAN, D.B.

    2000-04-25

    The 244-CR Vault is a two-level, multi-cell structure of reinforced concrete constructed below grade. The lower cell contains four individual compartments, each containing a steel process storage tank and equipped with a concrete sump. The upper cell contains the piping and support equipment, and has two compartments for each of the tanks. The ''pump pit'' is accessed by the removal of concrete cover blocks, while the smaller ''riser pit'' is accessed by steel cover plates. The facility most recently was used as a double-contained receiver tank (DCRT). A DCRT is a type of waste transfer tank that together with its related equipment constitutes a short-term storage area for liquid waste and has a pump pit for waste transfer operations. This vault most recently was used for short-term storage and waste routing for saltwell liquid pumped from the 241-C Tank Farm in the 200 East Area. Waste transfer lines are connected inside the pump pit by a jumper installed between connecting nozzles. An active ventilation system is in operation at the 244-CR vault. Ventilation supply air enters the upper vault section through an inlet header with some leakage through the spaces between the cell cover blocks. The upper and lower vaults are connected by exhauster ports, which allow airflow between the two sections. Normal flow moves air from the upper cell to the lower cell where it is removed and routed into a filter plenum; there the air is treated by a bank of four prefilters and two banks of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters (each containing four HEPAs). The air is exhausted to the atmosphere through the 296-C-05 Stack. The stack is equipped with a record sampler and continuous air monitor. Two fans (each rated at 4,200 cubic feet per minute) installed downstream of the filtration system provide the motive force for exhausting the vaults and the tanks. As an active system, it is operated continuously with only one of the two fans required to operate at a time. A

  15. Vaults: a ribonucleoprotein particle involved in drug resistance?

    PubMed

    Mossink, Marieke H; van Zon, Arend; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2003-10-20

    Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles found in the cytoplasm of eucaryotic cells. The 13 MDa particles are composed of multiple copies of three proteins: an M(r) 100 000 major vault protein (MVP) and two minor vault proteins of M(r) 193 000 (vault poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase) and M(r) 240 000 (telomerase-associated protein 1), as well as small untranslated RNA molecules of approximately 100 bases. Although the existence of vaults was first reported in the mid-1980s no function has yet been attributed to this organelle. The notion that vaults might play a role in drug resistance was suggested by the molecular identification of the lung resistance-related (LRP) protein as the human MVP. MVP/LRP was found to be overexpressed in many chemoresistant cancer cell lines and primary tumor samples of different histogenetic origin. Several, but not all, clinico-pathological studies showed that MVP expression at diagnosis was an independent adverse prognostic factor for response to chemotherapy. The hollow barrel-shaped structure of the vault complex and its subcellular localization indicate a function in intracellular transport. It was therefore postulated that vaults contributed to drug resistance by transporting drugs away from their intracellular targets and/or the sequestration of drugs. Here, we review the current knowledge on the vault complex and critically discuss the evidence that links vaults to drug resistance. PMID:14576851

  16. Immobilization of recombinant vault nanoparticles on solid substrates.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yun; Ramgopal, Yamini; Li, Hai; Shang, Lei; Srinivas, Parisa; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H; Preiser, Peter R; Boey, Freddy; Zhang, Hua; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2010-03-23

    Native vaults are nanoscale particles found abundantly in the cytoplasm of most eukaryotic cells. They have a capsule-like structure with a thin shell surrounding a "hollow" interior compartment. Recombinant vault particles were found to self-assemble following expression of the major vault protein (MVP) in a baculovirus expression system, and these particles are virtually identical to native vaults. Such particles have been recently studied as potential delivery vehicles. In this study, we focus on immobilization of vault particles on a solid substrate, such as glass, as a first step to study their interactions with cells. To this end, we first engineered the recombinant vaults by fusing two different tags to the C-terminus of MVP, a 3 amino acid RGD peptide and a 12 amino acid RGD-strep-tag peptide. We have demonstrated two strategies for immobilizing vaults on solid substrates. The barrel-and-cap structure of vault particles was observed for the first time, by atomic force microscopy (AFM), in a dry condition. This work proved the feasibility of immobilizing vault nanoparticles on a material surface, and the possibility of using vault nanoparticles as localized and sustainable drug carriers as well as a biocompatible surface moiety. PMID:20146454

  17. Design Study Of Cyclotron Magnet With Permanent Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Chai, Jong Seo

    2011-06-01

    Low energy cyclotrons for Positron emission tomography (PET) have been wanted for the production of radio-isotopes after 2002. In the low energy cyclotron magnet design, increase of magnetic field between the poles is needed to make a smaller size of magnet and decrease power consumption. The Permanent magnet can support this work without additional electric power consumption in the cyclotron. In this paper the study of cyclotron magnet design using permanent magnet is shown and also the comparison between normal magnet and the magnet which is designed with permanent magnet is shown. Maximum energy of proton is 8 MeV and RF frequency is 79.3 MHz. 3D CAD design was done by CATIA P3 V5 R18 and the All field calculations had been performed by OPERA-3D TOSCA. The self-made beam dynamics program OPTICY is used for making isochronous field and other calculations.

  18. The La RNA-binding protein interacts with the vault RNA and is a vault-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Poderycki, Michael J; Chan, Edward K L; Rome, Leonard H

    2002-10-25

    Vaults are highly conserved ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein particles with an undefined function. Three protein species (p240/TEP1, p193/VPARP, and p100/MVP) and a small RNA comprise the 13-MDa vault particle. The expression of the unique 100-kDa major vault protein is sufficient to form the basic vault structure. Previously, we have shown that stable association of the vault RNA with the vault particle is dependent on its interaction with the p240/TEP1 protein. To identify other proteins that interact with the vault RNA, we used a UV-cross-linking assay. We find that a portion of the vault RNA is complexed with the La autoantigen in a separate smaller ribonucleoprotein particle. La interacts with the vault RNA (both in vivo and in vitro) presumably through binding to 3'-uridylates. Moreover, we also demonstrate that the La autoantigen is the 50-kDa protein that we have previously reported as a protein that co-purifies with vaults. PMID:12196535

  19. Cranial vault thickness in primates: Homo erectus does not have uniquely thick vault bones.

    PubMed

    Copes, Lynn E; Kimbel, William H

    2016-01-01

    Extremely thick cranial vaults have been noted as a diagnostic characteristic of Homo erectus since the first fossil of the species was identified, but relatively little work has been done on elucidating its etiology or variation across fossils, living humans, or extant non-human primates. Cranial vault thickness (CVT) is not a monolithic trait, and the responsiveness of its layers to environmental stimuli is unknown. We obtained measurements of cranial vault thickness in fossil hominins from the literature and supplemented those data with additional measurements taken on African fossil specimens. Total CVT and the thickness of the cortical and diploë layers individually were compared to measures of CVT in extant species measured from more than 500 CT scans of human and non-human primates. Frontal and parietal CVT in fossil primates was compared to a regression of CVT on cranial capacity calculated for extant species. Even after controlling for cranial capacity, African and Asian H. erectus do not have uniquely high frontal or parietal thickness residuals, either among hominins or extant primates. Extant primates with residual CVT thickness similar to or exceeding H. erectus (depending on the sex and bone analyzed) include Nycticebus coucang, Perodicticus potto, Alouatta caraya, Lophocebus albigena, Galago alleni, Mandrillus sphinx, and Propithecus diadema. However, the especially thick vaults of extant non-human primates that overlap with H. erectus values are composed primarily of cortical bone, while H. erectus and other hominins have diploë-dominated vault bones. Thus, the combination of thick vaults comprised of a thickened diploë layer may be a reliable autapomorphy for members of the genus Homo. PMID:26767964

  20. 15. VIEW LOOKING EAST AT UNDERGROUND VAULT, BUILDING 997, UNDER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW LOOKING EAST AT UNDERGROUND VAULT, BUILDING 997, UNDER CONSTRUCTION. THE VAULTS WERE USED TO STORE TRIGGERS AWAITING OFF-SITE SHIPMENT, OR RETURNED TRIGGERS AWAITING TO BE TRANSPORTED TO A BUILDING FOR RECOVERY OF THE PLUTONIUM. THE VAULT WALLS WERE CONSTRUCTED 14.5 FEET THICK. BUILDING 991, IN THE BACKGROUND, WAS THE FIRST OPERATIONAL BUILDING ON SITE (2/1/52). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  1. Radiological air quality in a depleted uranium storage vault

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, T.; Cucchiara, A.L.

    1999-03-01

    The radiological air quality of two storage vaults, one with depleted uranium (DU) and one without, was evaluated and compared. The intent of the study was to determine if the presence of stored DU would significantly contribute to the gaseous/airborne radiation level compared to natural background. Both vaults are constructed out of concrete and are dimensionally similar. The vaults are located on the first floor of the same building. Neither vault has air supply or air exhaust. The doors to both vaults remained closed during the evaluation period, except for brief and infrequent access by the operational group. One vault contained 700 KG of depleted uranium, and the other vault contained documents inside of file cabinets. Radon detectors and giraffe air samplers were used to gather data on the quantity of gaseous/airborne radionuclides in both vaults. The results of this study indicated that there was no significant difference in the quantity of gaseous/airborne radionuclides in the two vaults. This paper gives a discussion of the effects of the stored DU on the air quality, and poses several theories supporting the results.

  2. MVP and vaults: a role in the radiation response.

    PubMed

    Lara, Pedro C; Pruschy, Martin; Zimmermann, Martina; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Vaults are evolutionary highly conserved ribonucleoproteins particles with a hollow barrel-like structure. The main component of vaults represents the 110 kDa major vault protein (MVP), whereas two minor vaults proteins comprise the 193 kDa vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (vPARP) and the 240 kDa telomerase-associated protein-1 (TEP-1). Additionally, at least one small and untranslated RNA is found as a constitutive component. MVP seems to play an important role in the development of multidrug resistance. This particle has also been implicated in the regulation of several cellular processes including transport mechanisms, signal transmission and immune responses. Vaults are considered a prognostic marker for different cancer types. The level of MVP expression predicts the clinical outcome after chemotherapy in different tumour types. Recently, new roles have been assigned to MVP and vaults including the association with the insulin-like growth factor-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, and the two major DNA double-strand break repair machineries: non-homologous endjoining and homologous recombination. Furthermore, MVP has been proposed as a useful prognostic factor associated with radiotherapy resistance. Here, we review these novel actions of vaults and discuss a putative role of MVP and vaults in the response to radiotherapy. PMID:22040803

  3. Professor Pet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pet Information Bureau, New York, NY.

    This manual outlines ways in which observation and care of classroom pet animals may be used to enrich the education of elementary school children. Part one deals with the benefits of having pets in the classroom. Part two illustrates ways in which pets can serve as valuable teaching tools and gives examples of lessons in which the use of pets can…

  4. Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north, showing tops ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), east corridor, looking north, showing tops of individual vaults and vent housings - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. 62. VIEW TO NORTHWEST IN MAIN SHEAVE VAULT: View towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW TO NORTHWEST IN MAIN SHEAVE VAULT: View towards the northwest in the main sheave vault showing the Powell-Hyde and Powell-Mason inbound deflecting sheaves. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. 61. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST IN MAIN SHEAVE VAULT: View towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST IN MAIN SHEAVE VAULT: View towards the southeast in the main sheave vault under the southeast corner of the Washington and Mason Street powerhouse. Photograph shows the Powell-Mason and Powell-Hyde outbound deflecting sheaves. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. 63. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST IN MAIN SHEAVE VAULT: View towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST IN MAIN SHEAVE VAULT: View towards the southwest in the main sheave vault showing the double sheave used to deflect the California Street cable in and out of the powerhouse. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. A vault ribonucleoprotein particle exhibiting 39-fold dihedral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Koji; Tanaka, Hideaki; Sumizawa, Tomoyuki; Yoshimura, Masato; Yamashita, Eiki; Iwasaki, Kenji; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2008-05-01

    A vault from rat liver was crystallized in space group C2. Rotational symmetry searches indicated that the particle has 39-fold dihedral symmetry. Vault is a 12.9 MDa ribonucleoprotein particle with a barrel-like shape, two protruding caps and an invaginated waist structure that is highly conserved in a wide variety of eukaryotes. Multimerization of the major vault protein (MVP) is sufficient to assemble the entire exterior shell of the barrel-shaped vault particle. Multiple copies of two additional proteins, vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) and telomerase-associated protein 1 (TEP1), as well as a small vault RNA (vRNA), are also associated with vault. Here, the crystallization of vault particles is reported. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 708.0, b = 385.0, c = 602.9 Å, β = 124.8°. Rotational symmetry searches based on the R factor and correlation coefficient from noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) averaging indicated that the particle has 39-fold dihedral symmetry.

  9. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  10. Mechanical Stability and Reversible Fracture of Vault Particles

    PubMed Central

    Llauró, Aida; Guerra, Pablo; Irigoyen, Nerea; Rodríguez, José F.; Verdaguer, Núria; de Pablo, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Vaults are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells, with an unclear cellular function and promising applications as vehicles for drug delivery. In this article, we examine the local stiffness of individual vaults and probe their structural stability with atomic force microscopy under physiological conditions. Our data show that the barrel, the central part of the vault, governs both the stiffness and mechanical strength of these particles. In addition, we induce single-protein fractures in the barrel shell and monitor their temporal evolution. Our high-resolution atomic force microscopy topographies show that these fractures occur along the contacts between two major vault proteins and disappear over time. This unprecedented systematic self-healing mechanism, which enables these particles to reversibly adapt to certain geometric constraints, might help vaults safely pass through the nuclear pore complex and potentiate their role as self-reparable nanocontainers. PMID:24507609

  11. 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    LANEY, T.

    2000-03-24

    The 244-AR Vault Facility, constructed between 1966 and 1968, was designed to provide lag storage and treatment for the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) tank farm sludges. Tank farm personnel transferred the waste from the 244-AR Vault Facility to B Plant for recovery of cesium and strontium. B Plant personnel then transferred the treatment residuals back to the tank farms for storage of the sludge and liquids. The last process operations, which transferred waste supporting the cesium/strontium recovery mission, occurred in April 1978. After the final transfer in 1978, the 244-AR facility underwent a cleanout. However, 2,271 L (600 gal) of sludge were left in Tank 004AR from an earlier transfer from Tank 241-AX-104. When the cleanout was completed, the facility was placed in a standby status. The sludge had been transferred to Tank 004AR to support Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL] vitrification work. Documentation of waste transfers suggests that a portion of the sludge may have been moved from Tank 004AR to Tank 002AR in preparation for transfer back to the AX Tank Farm; however, quantities of the sludge that were moved to Tank 002AR from that transfer must be estimated.

  12. Cellular functions of vaults and their involvement in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Steiner, E; Holzmann, K; Elbling, L; Micksche, M; Berger, W

    2006-08-01

    Vaults are evolutionary highly conserved ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles with a hollow barrel-like structure. They are 41 x 73 nm in size and are composed of multiple copies of three proteins and small untranslated RNA (vRNA). The main component of vaults represents the 110 kDa major vault protein (MVP), whereas the two minor vault proteins comprise the 193 kDa vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) and the 240 kDa telomerase-associated protein-1 (TEP1). Vaults are abundantly present in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells and they were found to be associated with cytoskeletal elements as well as occasionally with the nuclear envelope. Vaults and MVP have been associated with several cellular processes which are also involved in cancer development like cell motility and differentiation. Due to the over-expression of MVP (also termed lung resistance-related protein or LRP) in several P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-negative chemoresistant cancer cell lines, vaults have been linked to multidrug resistance (MDR). Accordingly, high levels of MVP were found in tissues chronically exposed to xenobiotics. In addition, the expression of MVP correlated with the degree of malignancy in certain cancer types, suggesting a direct involvement in tumor development and/or progression. Based on the finding that MVP binds several phosphatases and kinases including PTEN, SHP-2 as well as Erk, evidence is accumulating that MVP might be involved in the regulation of important cell signalling pathways including the PI3K/Akt and the MAPK pathways. In this review we summarize the current knowledge concerning the vault particle and discuss its possible cellular functions, focusing on the role of vaults in chemotherapy resistance. PMID:16918321

  13. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunology projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry.

  14. Pet Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for your family. What is each ... Does anyone have pet allergies? What type of animal suits your lifestyle and budget? Once you own ...

  15. Vaults and telomerase share a common subunit, TEP1.

    PubMed

    Kickhoefer, V A; Stephen, A G; Harrington, L; Robinson, M O; Rome, L H

    1999-11-12

    Vaults are large cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes of undetermined function. Mammalian vaults have two high molecular mass proteins of 193 and 240 kDa. We have identified a partial cDNA encoding the 240-kDa vault protein and determined it is identical to the mammalian telomerase-associated component, TEP1. TEP1 is the mammalian homolog of the Tetrahymena p80 telomerase protein and has been shown to interact specifically with mammalian telomerase RNA and the catalytic protein subunit hTERT. We show that while TEP1 is a component of the vault particle, vaults have no detectable telomerase activity. Using a yeast three-hybrid assay we demonstrate that several of the human vRNAs interact in a sequence-specific manner with TEP1. The presence of 16 WD40 repeats in the carboxyl terminus of the TEP1 protein is a convenient number for this protein to serve a structural or organizing role in the vault, a particle with eight-fold symmetry. The sharing of the TEP1 protein between vaults and telomerase suggests that TEP1 may play a common role in some aspect of ribonucleoprotein structure, function, or assembly. PMID:10551828

  16. [Use of a cyclotron in the production of positron emitting radionuclides].

    PubMed

    Martí-Climent, J; Peñuelas, I; Calvo, R; Giménez, M; Gámez, C; Richter, J

    1999-08-01

    The experience acquired by our center during the first two years of using cyclotron 18/9 (IBA) dedicated to the production of clinical positron emission radionuclides is described. The cyclotron performance characteristics, production yields, quality control and synthesized radiotracers are analyzed. Cyclotron makes it possible to produce up to 3,300 mCi of 18F-, 270 mCi of 18F2, 3,100 mCi of 11C, 502 mCi of 13N (in 120, 60, 35 and 20 minutes respectively) and 540 mCi/min of 15O. In our center, about 85% of the PET studies are performed with 18F-FDG, whereas the remaining are done with 15O-water, 11C-bicarbonate, 11C-methionine, 13N-ammonia or 18F-. Cyclotron is included in the Radiopharmacy Unit of our PET facility and is subjected to a global quality control program. Follow-up of the bombardment parameters and periodic verifications of the cyclotron performance have made it possible to prevent equipment functioning problems, increase mean time between stoppage and decrease downtime. We conclude that cyclotron has high production capabilities and allows enough flexibility for a clinical and research positron emission tomography center; furthermore, it can also be used for regional distribution of 18F-FDG to satellite PET centers. PMID:10481107

  17. Spatial cyclotron damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, C. L.

    1970-01-01

    To examine spatial electron cyclotron damping in a uniform Vlasov plasma, it is noted that the plasma response to a steady-state transverse excitation consists of several terms (dielectric-pole, free-streaming, and branch-cut), but that the cyclotron-damped pole term is the dominant term for z l = c/w sub ce provided (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1. If the latter inequality does not hold, then the free-streaming and branch-cut terms persist well past z = c/w sub ce as w sub 1 approaches w sub ce, making experimental measurement of cyclotron damping essentially impossible. Considering only (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1, it is shown how collisional effects should be estimated and how a finite-width excitation usually has little effect on the cyclotron-damped part of the response. Criteria is established concerning collisional damping, measurable damping length sizes, and allowed uncertainty in the magnetic field Beta. Results of numerical calculations, showing the regions in the appropriate parameter spaces that meet these criteria, are presented. From these results, one can determine the feasibility of, or propose parameter values for, an experiment designed to measure spatial cyclotron damping. It is concluded that the electron temperature T sub e should be at least 1 ev., and preferably 10 ev. or higher, for a successful experiment.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Saltstone Vault 4 Vapor Sapce

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si Young

    2005-06-27

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns for vapor space inside the Saltstone Vault No.4 under different operating scenarios. The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations. A CFD model took three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the boundary conditions as provided by the customer. The present model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference baseline case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information.

  19. Encapsulation of Semiconducting Polymers in Vault Protein Cages

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, B.C.; Yu, M.; Gopal, A.; Rome, L.H.; Monbouquette, H.G.; Tolbert, S.H.

    2009-05-22

    We demonstrate that a semiconducting polymer [poly(2-methoxy-5-propyloxy sulfonate phenylene vinylene), MPS-PPV] can be encapsulated inside recombinant, self-assembling protein nanocapsules called 'vaults'. Polymer incorporation into these nanosized protein cages, found naturally at {approx}10,000 copies per human cell, was confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. Although vault cellular functions and gating mechanisms remain unknown, their large internal volume and natural prevalence within the human body suggests they could be used as carriers for therapeutics and medical imaging reagents. This study provides the groundwork for the use of vaults in encapsulation and delivery applications.

  20. Vault particles: a new generation of delivery nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Casañas, Arnau; Guerra, Pablo; Fita, Ignasi; Verdaguer, Núria

    2012-12-01

    Vault particles possess many attributes that can be exploited in nanobiotechnology, particularly in the creation of drug delivery nanodevices. These include self-assembly, 100 nm size range, a dynamic structure that may be controlled for manipulation of drug release kinetics and natural presence in humans ensuring biocompatibility. The flexibility and the adaptability of this system have been greatly enhanced by the emerging atomic-level information and improved comprehension of vault structure and dynamics. It seems likely that this information will allow their specific tailoring to the individual requirements of each drug and target tissue. These properties provide vaults with an enormous potential as a versatile delivery platform. PMID:22677067

  1. Intelligent low-level RF system by non-destructive beam monitoring device for cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi Asadi Malafeh, M. S.; Ghergherehchi, M.; Afarideh, H.; Chai, J. S.; Yoon, Sang Kim

    2016-04-01

    The project of a 10 MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of the cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work an Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF, suitable for most AVF cyclotron accelerators, is designed using a beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, the RF phase detection does not need signal processing by a microcontroller.

  2. New Regression Models to Evaluate the Relationship between Biomechanics of Gymnastic Vault and Initial Vault Difficulty Values.

    PubMed

    Atiković, Almir

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of this paper was to determine the relationship between biomechanical parameters of vault flights with respect to new models of initial vault difficulty values in men's artistic gymnastic. The study sample included vaults (n=64) and models (n=5) from the 2009 Code of Points (CoP) of the Federation International of Gymnastics (FIG). The dependent variable included all difficulty values ranging from 2-7.2 points, while the sample of independent variables included twelve biomechanical parameters. After implementing the regression analysis, it could be established that the best model derived only the second flight phase with 95% of explained variance. PMID:23487176

  3. Bright Angel stone vault, with HAER field team members Dominic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bright Angel stone vault, with HAER field team members Dominic Duran, Christopher Marston, and Michael Lee (l to r). - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  4. Detail of northeast stair entry with vaulted stair landing and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of northeast stair entry with vaulted stair landing and ghost of former stair arch below stepped rail, facing west. - Marine Barracks, Panama Canal, Barracks Building, 100' North of Thatcher Highway, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  5. 9. Interior of Building 1001 (administration building), Room 204, vault, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Interior of Building 1001 (administration building), Room 204, vault, looking east - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1001, Independence Street, .45 mile south of intersection of Texas State Highway & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  6. Vault Area (original section), south corridor, looking west Fort ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Vault Area (original section), south corridor, looking west - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. Interior view, barrel vaulted store room opening from the south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, barrel vaulted store room opening from the south side of the ground floors central east-west passage (PA-1622-A-51) looking northeast. - U. S. Naval Asylum, Biddle Hall, Gray's Ferry Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Radionuclide limits for vault disposal at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.R.

    1992-02-04

    The Savannah River Site is developing a facility called the E-Area Vaults which will serve as the new radioactive waste disposal facility beginning early in 1992. The facility will employ engineered below-grade concrete vaults for disposal and above-grade storage for certain long-lived mobile radionuclides. This report documents the determination of interim upper limits for radionuclide inventories and concentrations which should be allowed in the disposal structures. The work presented here will aid in the development of both waste acceptance criteria and operating limits for the E-Area Vaults. Disposal limits for forty isotopes which comprise the SRS waste streams were determined. The limits are based on total facility and vault inventories for those radionuclides which impact groundwater, and or waste package concentrations for those radionuclides which could affect intruders.

  9. Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation pump, Jennings vacuum heating pump, and misc. pipes and valves. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  10. Perspective of Bright Angel stone vault, view south, with HAER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective of Bright Angel stone vault, view south, with HAER field team measuring (Michael Lee and Dominic Duran foreground, Christopher Marston rear). - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  11. A quality control program for waste disposal vault closure

    SciTech Connect

    Benny, H.L.

    1994-07-01

    This paper provides a review of the quality control program employed for closure for a radioactive waste disposal vault at Hanford Washington. The major elements of the program are discussed, as well as the testing results and lessons learned.

  12. NORTH SIDE FACING TRACK, SHOWING ELECTRICAL BOX AND CONCRETE VAULT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH SIDE FACING TRACK, SHOWING ELECTRICAL BOX AND CONCRETE VAULT - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Electrical Distribution Station, South side of Sled Track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. View of a subsurface Concrete Vault (Feature 9), looking westsouthwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of a subsurface Concrete Vault (Feature 9), looking west-southwest - Orphan Lode Mine, North of West Rim Road between Powell Point and Maricopa Point, South Rim, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  14. 33. July 1958 PARABOLIC BRICK VAULT IN SERVICE MAGAZINE UNDER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. July 1958 PARABOLIC BRICK VAULT IN SERVICE MAGAZINE UNDER RAVELIN (CIVIL WAR PERIOD) - Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine, East Fort Avenue at Whetstone Point, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  15. Original blackandwhite print, VIEW OF UNFINISHED COURT AND VAULT ROOF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Original black-and-white print, VIEW OF UNFINISHED COURT AND VAULT ROOF AT ELEVENTH STREET - Internal Revenue Service Headquarters Building, 1111 Constitution Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. 4. View from chief clerk's office into clerk room. Vault ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View from chief clerk's office into clerk room. Vault at center in background. View to south. - Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road Company Shops, Office, Southwest of downtown Two Harbors, northwest of Agate Bay, Two Harbors, Lake County, MN

  17. 14. END VIEW OF THE PLUTONIUM STORAGE VAULT FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. END VIEW OF THE PLUTONIUM STORAGE VAULT FROM THE REMOTE CONTROL STATION. THE STACKER-RETRIEVER, A REMOTELY-OPERATED, MECHANIZED TRANSPORT SYSTEM, RETRIEVES CONTAINERS OF PLUTONIUM FROM SAFE GEOMETRY PALLETS STORED ALONG THE LENGTH OF THE VAULT. THE STACKER-RETRIEVER RUNS ALONG THE AISLE BETWEEN THE PALLETS OF THE STORAGE CHAMBER. (3/2/86) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  18. MTR BASEMENT. DOORWAY TO SOURCE STORAGE VAULT IS AT CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BASEMENT. DOORWAY TO SOURCE STORAGE VAULT IS AT CENTER OF VIEW; TO DECONTAMINATION ROOM, AT RIGHT. PART OF MAZE ENTRY IS VISIBLE INSIDE VAULT DOORWAY. INL NEGATIVE NO. 7763. Unknown Photographer, photo was dated as 3/30/1953, but this was probably an error. The more likely date is 3/30/1952. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Reversible PH Lability of Cross-Linked Vault Nanocapsules

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.; Ng, B.C.; Rome, L.H.; Tolbert, S.H.; Monbouquette, H.G.

    2009-05-28

    Vaults are ubiquitous, self-assembled protein nanocapsules with dimension in the sub-100 nm range that are conserved across diverse phyla from worms to humans. Their normal presence in humans at a copy number of over 10 000/cell makes them attractive as potential drug delivery vehicles. Toward this goal, bifunctional amine-reactive reagents are shown to be useful for the reversible cross-linking of recombinant vaults such that they may be closed and opened in a controllable manner.

  20. Properties of an ideal PET perfusion tracer: new PET tracer cases and data.

    PubMed

    Maddahi, Jamshid

    2012-02-01

    An ideal positron emission tomography (PET) tracer should be highly extractable by the myocardium and able to provide high-resolution images, should enable quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF), should be compatible with both pharmacologically induced and exercise-induced stress imaging, and should not require an on-site cyclotron. The PET radionuclides nitrogen-13 ammonia and oxygen-15 water require an on-site cyclotron. Rubidium-82 may be available locally due to the generator source, but greater utilization is limited because of its relatively low myocardial extraction fraction, long positron range, and generator cost. Flurpiridaz F 18, a novel PET tracer in development, has a high-extraction fraction, short positron range, and relatively long half-life (as compared to currently available tracers), and may be produced at regional cyclotrons. Results of early clinical trials suggest that both pharmacologically and exercise-induced stress PET imaging protocols can be completed more rapidly and with lower patient radiation exposure than with single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) tracers. As compared to SPECT images in the same patients, flurpiridaz F 18 PET images showed better defect contrast. Flurpiridaz F 18 is a potentially promising tracer for assessment of myocardial perfusion, measurement of absolute MBF, calculation of coronary flow reserves, and assessment of cardiac function at the peak of the stress response. PMID:22259007

  1. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals in NPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, M.; Kopička, K.; Hradilek, P.; Hanč, P.; Lebeda, O.; Pánek, J.; Vognar, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with some technical aspects of the development and production of cyclotronmade radiopharmaceuticals (excluding PET). In this field, nuclear chemistry and pharmacy are in a close contact; therefore, requirements of the both should be taken into account. The principles of cyclotron targetry, separation/recovery of materials and synthesis of active substances are given, as well as issues connected with formulation of pharmaceutical forms. As the radiopharmaceuticals should fulfil the requirements on in vivo preparations, there exist a variety of demands pertaining to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) concept, which is also briefly discussed. A typical production chain is presented and practical examples of real technologies based on cyclotron-made radionuclides are given as they have been used in Nuclear Physics Institute of CAS (NPI). Special attention is devoted to the technology of enriched cyclotron targets. Frequently used medicinal products employing cyclotron-produced active substances are characterised (Rb/Kr generators, 123I-labelled MIBG, OIH and MAB's). The cyclotron produced radioactive implants for transluminal coronary angioplasty (radioactive stents) are introduced as an example of a medical device developed for therapeutic application.

  2. Optimal technique for maximal forward rotating vaults in men's gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Hiley, Michael J; Jackson, Monique I; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2015-08-01

    In vaulting a gymnast must generate sufficient linear and angular momentum during the approach and table contact to complete the rotational requirements in the post-flight phase. This study investigated the optimization of table touchdown conditions and table contact technique for the maximization of rotation potential for forwards rotating vaults. A planar seven-segment torque-driven computer simulation model of the contact phase in vaulting was evaluated by varying joint torque activation time histories to match three performances of a handspring double somersault vault by an elite gymnast. The closest matching simulation was used as a starting point to maximize post-flight rotation potential (the product of angular momentum and flight time) for a forwards rotating vault. It was found that the maximized rotation potential was sufficient to produce a handspring double piked somersault vault. The corresponding optimal touchdown configuration exhibited hip flexion in contrast to the hyperextended configuration required for maximal height. Increasing touchdown velocity and angular momentum lead to additional post-flight rotation potential. By increasing the horizontal velocity at table touchdown, within limits obtained from recorded performances, the handspring double somersault tucked with one and a half twists, and the handspring triple somersault tucked became theoretically possible. PMID:26026290

  3. Exploratory Investigation of Impact Loads During the Forward Handspring Vault.

    PubMed

    Penitente, Gabriella; Sands, William A

    2015-06-27

    The purpose of this study was to examine kinematic and kinetic differences in low and high intensity hand support impact loads during a forward handspring vault. A high-speed video camera (500 Hz) and two portable force platforms (500 Hz) were installed on the surface of the vault table. Two-dimensional analyses were conducted on 24 forward handspring vaults performed by 12 senior level, junior Olympic program female gymnasts (16.9 ±1.4 yr; body height 1.60 ±0.1 m; body mass 56.7 ±7.8 kg). Load intensities at impact with the vault table were classified as low (peak force < 0.8 × body weight) and high (peak force > 0.8 × body weight). These vaults were compared via crucial kinetic and kinematic variables using independent t-tests and Pearson correlations. Statistically significant (p < 0.001) differences were observed in peak force (t(24) = 4.75, ES = 3.37) and time to peak force (t(24) = 2.07, ES = 1.56). Statistically significant relationships between the loading rate and time to peak force were observed for high intensity loads. Peak force, time to peak force, and a shoulder angle at impact were identified as primary variables potentially involved in the determination of large repetitive loading rates on the forward handspring vault. PMID:26240649

  4. Exploratory Investigation of Impact Loads During the Forward Handspring Vault

    PubMed Central

    Penitente, Gabriella; Sands, William A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine kinematic and kinetic differences in low and high intensity hand support impact loads during a forward handspring vault. A high-speed video camera (500 Hz) and two portable force platforms (500 Hz) were installed on the surface of the vault table. Two-dimensional analyses were conducted on 24 forward handspring vaults performed by 12 senior level, junior Olympic program female gymnasts (16.9 ±1.4 yr; body height 1.60 ±0.1 m; body mass 56.7 ±7.8 kg). Load intensities at impact with the vault table were classified as low (peak force < 0.8 × body weight) and high (peak force > 0.8 × body weight). These vaults were compared via crucial kinetic and kinematic variables using independent t-tests and Pearson correlations. Statistically significant (p < 0.001) differences were observed in peak force (t(24) = 4.75, ES = 3.37) and time to peak force (t(24) = 2.07, ES = 1.56). Statistically significant relationships between the loading rate and time to peak force were observed for high intensity loads. Peak force, time to peak force, and a shoulder angle at impact were identified as primary variables potentially involved in the determination of large repetitive loading rates on the forward handspring vault. PMID:26240649

  5. Design study of an ultra-compact superconducting cyclotron for isotope production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Vincent, J.

    2014-11-01

    A 12.5 MeV, 25 μA, proton compact superconducting cyclotron for medical isotope production has been designed and is currently in fabrication. The machine is initially aimed at producing 13N ammonia for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cardiology applications. With an ultra-compact size and cost-effective price point, this system will offer clinicians unprecedented access to the preferred radiopharmaceutical isotope for cardiac PET imaging. A systems approach that carefully balanced the subsystem requirements coupled to precise beam dynamics calculations was followed. The system is designed to irradiate a liquid target internal to the cyclotron and to minimize the need for radiation shielding. The main parameters of the cyclotron, its design, and principal steps of the development work are presented here.

  6. Hand placement techniques in long horse vaulting.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, D G; Harwood, M J; Yeadon, M R

    1993-08-01

    In this study, the effects of two different hand placement techniques used by gymnasts to perform Tsukahara and Kasamatsu long horse vaults were examined. Selected linear and angular flight descriptors were calculated to determine whether those gymnasts making initial hand contact on the end of the horse gained additional lift, range or rotation when compared to those gymnasts making the more traditional initial hand contact on top of the horse. Three-dimensional cine-film analysis using the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) was used to obtain data on 17 elite gymnasts competing in the 1991 World Student Games at Sheffield, UK. The gymnasts were divided into two groups according to the techniques used: group E in which the first hand contact was made on the vertical surface of the near end and the second on the top of the horse, and group T in which both hands were placed on top of the horse. The vertical and horizontal motion of each gymnast's mass centre and the somersault rotation during pre-flight (board take-off to horse contact) and post-flight (horse take-off to ground landing) were determined. The projections of linear displacements of each gymnast's mass centre onto a vertical plane were determined from the three-dimensional mass centre co-ordinates, and somersault angles were calculated using the line joining the midpoints of each gymnast's shoulders and knees. Whole body mass centre linear velocity and somersault angular velocity were determined using quintic splines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8230392

  7. PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    You may feel a sharp sting when the needle with the tracer is placed into your vein. A PET scan causes no pain. The table may be ... The amount of radiation used in a PET scan is about the same amount as used in most CT scans. These scans use ...

  8. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV`s) in S area. The FESV`s are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request.

  9. Neutron monitoring of plutonium at the ZPPR storage vault

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, J.T.; Kuckertz, T.H.; Bieri, J.M.; France, S.W.; Goin, R.W.; Hastings, R.D.; Pratt, J.C.; Shunk, E.R.

    1981-12-01

    We investigated a method for monitoring a typical large storage vault for unauthorized removal of plutonium. The method is based on the assumption that the neutron field in a vault produced by a particular geometric configuration of bulk plutonium remains constant in time and space as long as the configuration is undisturbed. To observe such a neutron field, we installed an array of 25 neutron detectors in the ceiling of a plutonium storage vault at Argonne National Laboratory West. Each neutron detector provided an independent spatial measurement of the vault neutron field. Data collected by each detector were processed to determine whether statistically significant changes had occurred in the neutron field. Continuous observation experiments measured the long-term stability of the system. Removal experiments were performed in which known quantities of plutonium were removed from the vault. Both types of experiments demonstrated that the neutron monitoring system can detect removal or addition of bulk plutonium (11% /sup 240/Pu) whose mass is as small as 0.04% of the total inventory.

  10. Data Vault: providing simple web access to NRAO data archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuPlain, Ron; Benson, John; Sessoms, Eric

    2008-08-01

    In late 2007, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) launched Data Vault, a feature-rich web application for simplified access to NRAO data archives. This application allows users to submit a Google-like free-text search, and browse, download, and view further information on matching telescope data. Data Vault uses the model-view-controller design pattern with web.py, a minimalist open-source web framework built with the Python Programming Language. Data Vault implements an Ajax client built on the Google Web Toolkit (GWT), which creates structured JavaScript applications. This application supports plug-ins for linking data to additional web tools and services, including Google Sky. NRAO sought the inspiration of Google's remarkably elegant user interface and notable performance to create a modern search tool for the NRAO science data archive, taking advantage of the rapid development frameworks of web.py and GWT to create a web application on a short timeline, while providing modular, easily maintainable code. Data Vault provides users with a NRAO-focused data archive while linking to and providing more information wherever possible. Free-text search capabilities are possible (and even simple) with an innovative query parser. NRAO develops all software under an open-source license; Data Vault is available to developers and users alike.

  11. Performance assessment of engineered barriers using the vault model

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.H.

    1993-12-31

    The Vault Model for assessing engineered barrier performance has been developed as part of the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement to be presented to a Federal Environmental Assessment Review Panel reviewing the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal concept. The model describes the behavior of titanium containers, radionuclide release from used fuel, and migration of radionuclides through buffer and backfill materials and into the surrounding geosphere. Vault Model simulations have shown that the release of radionuclides from the engineered barrier system is dominated by the release from the fuel-sheath gap and grain boundaries in used fuel. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses have illustrated how releases from the vault are affected by both the uncertainty in model parameters and the assumptions made in the development of the models. It is likely that the combined effects of a number of conservatisms in the model result in the releases from the engineered barrier system being overpredicted by several orders of magnitude.

  12. Inner and outer waste storage vaults with leak-testing accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Splinter, B.C.

    1985-04-23

    A storage arrangement for waste materials of the type which tend to pollute the environment consists of a waterproof reinforced concrete vault, preferably located underground, and a permanent reinforced concrete storage vault within the underground vault and spaced from the walls thereof by a water lock. Sealed containers filled with chemical or nuclear waste are deposited in the permanent storage vault and sealed therein with bitumen. The underground vault is provided with an access opening to the water lock to enable testing of the water periodically for contamination due to leakage from the permanent storage vault. If no leakage is evident after a predetermined time period has elapsed, the permanent storage vault is removed from the underground vault and shipped to a permanent storage site.

  13. Target foil rupture scenario and provision for handling different models of medical cyclotrons used in India

    PubMed Central

    Shaiju, V. S.; Sharma, S. D.; Kumar, Rajesh; Sarin, B.

    2009-01-01

    Medical cyclotron is a particle accelerator used in producing short lived radiotracers such as 18F, 11C, 15O, 13N etc. These radiotracers are labeled with suitable pharmaceuticals for use to gather information related to metabolic activity of the cell using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan. Target foil rupture is considered one of the major emergency situations during medical cyclotron operations because there is a potential of over exposure to the working personnel. Radiation protection survey of a self-shielded medical cyclotron installation was carried out during normal and emergency conditions. It is found that the induced activity in the target foil increases with its successive usages. As a case study, we have evaluated the emergency handling procedures of GE PETtrace-6 medical cyclotron. Recommendations have also been made to reduce personal exposure while handling the target foil rupture condition such as the use of L-Bench near the target area and participation of experienced personnel. PMID:20098564

  14. Lung PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2015: ...

  15. Seismic analysis of the mirror fusion test facility shielding vault

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielsen, B.L.; Tsai, K.

    1981-04-01

    This report presents a seismic analysis of the vault in Building 431 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which houses the mirror Fusion Test Facility. The shielding vault structure is approximately 120 ft long by 80 ft wide and is constructed of concrete blocks approximately 7 x 7 x 7 ft. The north and south walls are approximately 53 ft high and the east wall is approximately 29 ft high. These walls are supported on a monolithic concrete foundation that surrounds a 21-ft deep open pit. Since the 53-ft walls appeared to present the greatest seismic problem they were the first investigated.

  16. HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE GROUTS AND VAULT CONCRETES

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K; John Harbour, J; Mark Phifer, M

    2008-11-25

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone. Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement (dry premix) to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of three types of saltstone and two vault concretes. The saltstone formulations included saltstone premix batched with (1) Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), (2) Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), and (3) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60). The vault concrete formulations tested included the Vault 1/4 concrete and two variations of the Vault 2 concrete (Mix 1 and Mix 2). Wet properties measured for the saltstone formulations included yield stress, plastic viscosity, wet unit weight, bleed water volume, gel time, set time, and heat of hydration. Hydraulic and physical properties measured on the cured saltstone and concrete samples included saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention, compressive strength, porosity, particle density, and dry bulk density. These properties

  17. Vault lining for 340 waste handling facility, 300 area

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbeck, R.G.

    1997-04-28

    Coating systems by Protection Enterprises, Ameron, Carboline, and Steelcote were evaluated. Each manufacturer has a coating system that is acceptable for use in the 340 Vault (see Appendix A). The choice of which system to use will be made after in-place adhesion tests are complete. The Protection Enterprises coating has the greatest potential for acceptable adhesion with minimal surface preparation. Total project cost for engineering and construction is $1,220,000 including 50% for contingency (see Appendix B). If the existing vault coverblock access hatch can satisfy entry requirements, $95,000 can be saved from the removal of coverblocks and the erection and disassembly of the greenhouse.

  18. Seismic Behaviour of Masonry Vault-Slab Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chesi, Claudio; Butti, Ferdinando; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-07-08

    Spandrel walls typically play a structural role in masonry buildings, transferring load from a slab to the supporting vault. Some indications are given in the literature on the behaviour of spandrels under the effect of vertical loads, but little attention is given to the effect coming from lateral forces acting on the building. An opportunity to investigate this problem has come from the need of analyzing a monumental building which was damaged by the Nov. 24, 2004 Val Sabbia earthquake in the north of Italy. The finite element model set up for the analysis of the vault-spandrel-slab system is presented and the structural role resulting for the spandrels is discussed.

  19. Seismic Behaviour of Masonry Vault-Slab Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesi, Claudio; Butti, Ferdinando; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-07-01

    Spandrel walls typically play a structural role in masonry buildings, transferring load from a slab to the supporting vault. Some indications are given in the literature on the behaviour of spandrels under the effect of vertical loads, but little attention is given to the effect coming from lateral forces acting on the building. An opportunity to investigate this problem has come from the need of analyzing a monumental building which was damaged by the Nov. 24, 2004 Val Sabbia earthquake in the north of Italy. The finite element model set up for the analysis of the vault-spandrel-slab system is presented and the structural role resulting for the spandrels is discussed.

  20. Cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopička, K.; Fišer, M.; Hradilek, P.; Hanč, P.; Lebeda, O.

    2003-01-01

    Some of the cyclotron-produced radionuclides may serve as important materials for the production of radiopharmaceuticals. This lecture deals with basic information relating to various aspects of these compounds. In comparison with radionuclides/compounds used for non-medical purposes, radiopharmaceuticals are subject to a broader scale of regulations, both from the safety and efficacy point of view; besides that, there are both radioactive and medical aspects that must be taken into account for any radiopharmaceutical. According to the regulations and in compliance with general rules of work with radioactivity, radiopharmaceuticals should only be prepared/manufactured under special conditions, using special areas and special equipment and applying special procedures (e.g. sterilisation, disinfection, aseptic work). Also, there are special procedures for cleaning and maintenance. Sometimes the requirements for the product safety clash with those for the safety of the personnel; several examples of solutions pertaining to these cases are given in the lecture. Also, the specific role of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals is discussed.

  1. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  2. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  3. JSW's baby cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Toda, Y.; Kaneda, Y.; Satoh, Y.; Suzukawa, I.; Yamada, T.

    1983-04-01

    Designed by The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., specially for installation in a hospital's medical department and nuclear research laboratory, '' JSW BABY CYCLOTRON '' has been developed to produce short-lived radioisotopes such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F. JSW's Baby Cyclotron has some design features. 1) Fixed energy and four sector azimuthally varying field. 2) Compact figure desired for hospital's nuclear medical department 3) A bitter type magnet yoke shielding activity 4) Simple control and operation 5) Easy maintenance without skilled personnel. Type BC105 (P:10MeV, d:5MeV), BC107 (P:10MeV, d:7MeV), BC168 (P:16MeV, d:8MeV) and BC1710 (P:17MeV, d:10MeV) are available according to required amount of radioisotopes. In our radioisotope production test, yield and purity of 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F are usable to clinical diagnosis.

  4. 7. Photocopy of Elevations drawing (from the BPA Engineering Vault, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of Elevations drawing (from the BPA Engineering Vault, Drawing C13-J2-342-D1, Sheet 3, 13 March 1939) - Bonneville Power Administration South Bank Substation, I-84, South of Bonneville Dam Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  5. 49 CFR 192.183 - Vaults: Structural design requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vaults: Structural design requirements. 192.183 Section 192.183 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY...

  6. Storage Area (1942 section), looking east, showing all of Vault ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Storage Area (1942 section), looking east, showing all of Vault No. 1 door behind wall opening and sprinkler system - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. Spent fuel storage: Progress with modular vault dry storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, C.C.F.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses the Modular Vault Dry Store (MVDS) for spent fuels at the Wylfa nuclear power plant in North Wales and at Fort St Vrain in Colorado. It goes on to discuss Scottish Nuclear`s decision not to proceed with MVDS facilities. It concludes by discussing Paks NPP contract with GEC Alsthom for the design and safety case for MDVS.

  8. 2. EAST FACADE, ENTRANCE TO CATWALK OVER CONCRETE TANK VAULT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAST FACADE, ENTRANCE TO CATWALK OVER CONCRETE TANK VAULT. BUILDING 742 TO RIGHT OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Tank House, Quadrant 1, approximately 1000 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 2200 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  9. BASE OF BULLWHEEL DRIVE SHAFT IN VAULT MOTOR ROOM, CONNECTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASE OF BULLWHEEL DRIVE SHAFT IN VAULT MOTOR ROOM, CONNECTING TO REDUCTION GEAR SHAFTING. FERREL SPEED REDUCER IN FOREGROUND, FACING WEST. NOTE TWO DIAGONAL LINES: TORQUE CONVERTER CABLE (IN PIECE OF WHITE GUTTER), THROTTLE CABLE (IN LOWER STEEL TUBING). - Mad River Glen, Single Chair Ski Lift, 62 Mad River Glen Resort Road, Fayston, Washington County, VT

  10. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Special Nuclear Material vault upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.C.; Holloway, E.R.

    1992-06-24

    This document discusses storage space in a Special Nuclear Material (SNM) product storage vault at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which has been recently expanded by approximately 175%. This expansion required a minimum of space and funding and resulted in a large increase in net storage capacity. Security for the additional storage is provided by standard intrusion sensors and by a real-time monitoring system, which monitors the weight of the material as it rests on weight sensors (load cells). The monitoring system also feeds weight data to a Safeguards processor which provides further confidence to Safeguards personnel. The Department of Energy requirements for bimonthly inventories for SNM stored in a particular part of this facility have been eliminated because of the guarantees provided by a real-time monitoring system. A higher efficiency has been obtained by using the expensive real estate inside a hardened product storage vault. This project has provided the ICPP with a relatively inexpensive vault upgrade and when product material is placed in this area of the vault the manpower requirements to inventory it will be reduced, resulting in a net reduction in plant worker radiation exposure.

  11. 1. INTERIOR VIEW WITH NAVE, BARREL VAULTED SOLEA, ICONOSTAS WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. INTERIOR VIEW WITH NAVE, BARREL VAULTED SOLEA, ICONOSTAS WITH ICON AND SANCTUARY. IN ARCH ABOVE THE SANCTUARY IS THE TABLE OF ABRAHAM. THE ICONOSTAS INCLUDES ICONS OF THE ARCHANGEL MICHAEL, THE HOLY TRINITY, MOTHER OF GOD HOLDING THE CHRIST CHILD, JESUS. - Holy Trinity-Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Church, 200 Nineteenth Street South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. 3. View, piping and stack associated with the oxidizer vault ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View, piping and stack associated with the oxidizer vault storage area in foreground with Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28) in background, looking northwest. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  13. View west of the front of the brick vault built ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View west of the front of the brick vault built into the northern slope of Mount Zion Cemetery. - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. View north of the brick vault built into the northern ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north of the brick vault built into the northern slope of Mount Zion Cemetery with Rock Creek and Rock Creek Park beyond the trees. - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. 49 CFR 192.187 - Vaults: Sealing, venting, and ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline... minimize the formation of combustible atmosphere in the vault or pit; and (3) The ducts must be high enough above grade to disperse any gas-air mixtures that might be discharged. (b) When the internal volume...

  16. 49 CFR 192.187 - Vaults: Sealing, venting, and ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline... minimize the formation of combustible atmosphere in the vault or pit; and (3) The ducts must be high enough above grade to disperse any gas-air mixtures that might be discharged. (b) When the internal volume...

  17. 49 CFR 192.187 - Vaults: Sealing, venting, and ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline... minimize the formation of combustible atmosphere in the vault or pit; and (3) The ducts must be high enough above grade to disperse any gas-air mixtures that might be discharged. (b) When the internal volume...

  18. Assembly of nuclear pore complexes mediated by major vault protein.

    PubMed

    Vollmar, Friederike; Hacker, Christian; Zahedi, René-Peiman; Sickmann, Albert; Ewald, Andrea; Scheer, Ulrich; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine

    2009-03-15

    During interphase growth of eukaryotic cells, nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are continuously incorporated into the intact nuclear envelope (NE) by mechanisms that are largely unknown. De novo formation of NPCs involves local fusion events between the inner and outer nuclear membrane, formation of a transcisternal membranous channel of defined diameter and the coordinated assembly of hundreds of nucleoporins into the characteristic NPC structure. Here we have used a cell-free system based on Xenopus egg extract, which allows the experimental separation of nuclear-membrane assembly and NPC formation. Nuclei surrounded by a closed double nuclear membrane, but devoid of NPCs, were first reconstituted from chromatin and a specific membrane fraction. Insertion of NPCs into the preformed pore-free nuclei required cytosol containing soluble nucleoporins or nucleoporin subcomplexes and, quite unexpectedly, major vault protein (MVP). MVP is the main component of vaults, which are ubiquitous barrel-shaped particles of enigmatic function. Our results implicate MVP, and thus also vaults, in NPC biogenesis and provide a functional explanation for the association of a fraction of vaults with the NE and specifically with NPCs in intact cells. PMID:19240118

  19. Expression of the vault RNA protects cells from undergoing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Amort, Melanie; Nachbauer, Birgit; Tuzlak, Selma; Kieser, Arnd; Schepers, Aloys; Villunger, Andreas; Polacek, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Non-protein-coding RNAs are a functionally versatile class of transcripts exerting their biological roles on the RNA level. Recently, we demonstrated that the vault complex-associated RNAs (vtRNAs) are significantly upregulated in Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-infected human B cells. Very little is known about the function(s) of the vtRNAs or the vault complex. Here, we individually express latent EBV-encoded proteins in B cells and identify the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) as trigger for vtRNA upregulation. Ectopic expression of vtRNA1-1, but not of the other vtRNA paralogues, results in an improved viral establishment and reduced apoptosis, a function located in the central domain of vtRNA1-1. Knockdown of the major vault protein has no effect on these phenotypes revealing that vtRNA1-1 and not the vault complex contributes to general cell death resistance. This study describes a NF-κB-mediated role of the non-coding vtRNA1-1 in inhibiting both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. PMID:25952297

  20. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  2. Imaging quality of (44)Sc in comparison with five other PET radionuclides using Derenzo phantoms and preclinical PET.

    PubMed

    Bunka, Maruta; Müller, Cristina; Vermeulen, Christiaan; Haller, Stephanie; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; van der Meulen, Nicholas P

    2016-04-01

    PET is the favored nuclear imaging technique because of the high sensitivity and resolution it provides, as well as the possibility for quantification of accumulated radioactivity. (44)Sc (T1/2=3.97h, Eβ(+)=632keV) was recently proposed as a potentially interesting radionuclide for PET. The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality, which can be obtained with (44)Sc, and compare it with five other, frequently employed PET nuclides using Derenzo phantoms and a small-animal PET scanner. The radionuclides were produced at the medical cyclotron at CRS, ETH Zurich ((11)C, (18)F), at the Injector II research cyclotron at CRS, PSI ((64)Cu, (89)Zr, (44)Sc), as well as via a generator system ((68)Ga). Derenzo phantoms, containing solutions of each of these radionuclides, were scanned using a GE Healthcare eXplore VISTA small-animal PET scanner. The image resolution was determined for each nuclide by analysis of the intensity signal using the reconstructed PET data of a hole diameter of 1.3mm. The image quality of (44)Sc was compared to five frequently-used PET radionuclides. In agreement with the positron range, an increasing relative resolution was determined in the sequence of (68)Ga<(44)Sc<(89)Zr<(11)C<(64)Cu<(18)F. The performance of (44)Sc was in agreement with the theoretical expectations based on the energy of the emitted positrons. PMID:26774390

  3. Direct visualization of vaults within intact cells by electron cryo-tomography.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Cora L; Mendonça, Luiza M; Jensen, Grant J

    2015-09-01

    The vault complex is the largest cellular ribonucleoprotein complex ever characterized and is present across diverse Eukarya. Despite significant information regarding the structure, composition and evolutionary conservation of the vault, little is know about the complex's actual biological function. To determine if intracellular vaults are morphologically similar to previously studied purified and recombinant vaults, we have used electron cryo-tomography to characterize the vault complexes found in the thin edges of primary human cells growing in tissue culture. Our studies confirm that intracellular vaults are similar in overall size and shape to purified and recombinant vaults previously analyzed. Results from subtomogram averaging indicate that densities within the vault lumen are not ordered, but randomly distributed. We also observe that vaults located in the extreme periphery of the cytoplasm predominately associate with granule-like structures and actin. Our ultrastructure studies augment existing biochemical, structural and genetic information on the vault, and provide important intracellular context for the ongoing efforts to understand the biological function of the native cytoplasmic vault. PMID:25864047

  4. Draft crystal structure of the vault shell at 9-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Daniel H; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Sievers, Stuart A; Rome, Leonard H; Eisenberg, David

    2007-11-01

    Vaults are the largest known cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein structures and may function in innate immunity. The vault shell self-assembles from 96 copies of major vault protein and encapsulates two other proteins and a small RNA. We crystallized rat liver vaults and several recombinant vaults, all among the largest non-icosahedral particles to have been crystallized. The best crystals thus far were formed from empty vaults built from a cysteine-tag construct of major vault protein (termed cpMVP vaults), diffracting to about 9-A resolution. The asymmetric unit contains a half vault of molecular mass 4.65 MDa. X-ray phasing was initiated by molecular replacement, using density from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Phases were improved by density modification, including concentric 24- and 48-fold rotational symmetry averaging. From this, the continuous cryo-EM electron density separated into domain-like blocks. A draft atomic model of cpMVP was fit to this improved density from 15 domain models. Three domains were adapted from a nuclear magnetic resonance substructure. Nine domain models originated in ab initio tertiary structure prediction. Three C-terminal domains were built by fitting poly-alanine to the electron density. Locations of loops in this model provide sites to test vault functions and to exploit vaults as nanocapsules. PMID:18044992

  5. Structural and seismic analyses of waste facility reinforced concrete storage vaults

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1995-07-01

    Facility 317 of Argonne National Laboratory consists of several reinforced concrete waste storage vaults designed and constructed in the late 1940`s through the early 1960`s. In this paper, structural analyses of these concrete vaults subjected to various natural hazards are described, emphasizing the northwest shallow vault. The natural phenomenon hazards considered include both earthquakes and tornados. Because these vaults are deeply embedded in the soil, the SASSI (System Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction) code was utilized for the seismic calculations. The ultimate strength method was used to analyze the reinforced concrete structures. In all studies, moment and shear strengths at critical locations of the storage vaults were evaluated. Results of the structural analyses show that almost all the waste storage vaults meet the code requirements according to ACI 349--85. These vaults also satisfy the performance goal such that confinement of hazardous materials is maintained and functioning of the facility is not interrupted.

  6. NeuroVault.org: A repository for sharing unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwartz, Yannick; Sochat, Vanessa V; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, Thomas E; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    NeuroVault.org is dedicated to storing outputs of analyses in the form of statistical maps, parcellations and atlases, a unique strategy that contrasts with most neuroimaging repositories that store raw acquisition data or stereotaxic coordinates. Such maps are indispensable for performing meta-analyses, validating novel methodology, and deciding on precise outlines for regions of interest (ROIs). NeuroVault is open to maps derived from both healthy and clinical populations, as well as from various imaging modalities (sMRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, PET, etc.). The repository uses modern web technologies such as interactive web-based visualization, cognitive decoding, and comparison with other maps to provide researchers with efficient, intuitive tools to improve the understanding of their results. Each dataset and map is assigned a permanent Universal Resource Locator (URL), and all of the data is accessible through a REST Application Programming Interface (API). Additionally, the repository supports the NIDM-Results standard and has the ability to parse outputs from popular FSL and SPM software packages to automatically extract relevant metadata. This ease of use, modern web-integration, and pioneering functionality holds promise to improve the workflow for making inferences about and sharing whole-brain statistical maps. PMID:25869863

  7. NeuroVault.org: A repository for sharing unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwartz, Yannick; Sochat, Vanessa V.; Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, Thomas E.; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    NeuroVault.org is dedicated to storing outputs of analyses in the form of statistical maps, parcellations and atlases, a unique strategy that contrasts with most neuroimaging repositories that store raw acquisition data or stereotaxic coordinates. Such maps are indispensable for performing meta-analyses, validating novel methodology, and deciding on precise outlines for regions of interest (ROIs). NeuroVault is open to maps derived from both healthy and clinical populations, as well as from various imaging modalities (sMRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, PET, etc.). The repository uses modern web technologies such as interactive web-based visualization, cognitive decoding, and comparison with other maps to provide researchers with efficient, intuitive tools to improve the understanding of their results. Each dataset and map is assigned a permanent Universal Resource Locator (URL), and all of the data is accessible through a REST Application Programming Interface (API). Additionally, the repository supports the NIDM-Results standard, and has the ability to parse outputs from popular FSL and SPM software packages to automatically extract relevant metadata. This ease of use, modern web-integration, and pioneering functionality holds promise to improve the workflow for making inferences about and sharing whole-brain statistical maps. PMID:25869863

  8. Technical Note: Building a combined cyclotron and MRI facility: Implications for interference

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Mark B. M.; Kuijer, Joost P. A.; Ridder, Jan Willem de; Perk, Lars R.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: With the introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems, it has become more likely that the cyclotron and MRI systems will be located close to each other. This study considered the interference between a cyclotron and a superconducting MRI system. Methods: Interactions between cyclotrons and MRIs are theoretically considered. The main interference is expected to be the perturbation of the magnetic field in the MRI due to switching on or off the magnetic field of the cyclotron. MR imaging is distorted by a dynamic spatial gradient of an external inplane magnetic field larger than 0.5-0.04 {mu}T/m, depending on the specific MR application. From the design of a cyclotron, it is expected that the magnetic fringe field at large distances behaves as a magnetic dipolar field. This allows estimation of the full dipolar field and its spatial gradients from a single measurement. Around an 18 MeV cyclotron (Cyclone, IBA), magnetic field measurements were performed on 5 locations and compared with calculations based upon a dipolar field model. Results: At the measurement locations the estimated and measured values of the magnetic field component and its spatial gradients of the inplane component were compared, and found to agree within a factor 1.1 for the magnetic field and within a factor of 1.5 for the spatial gradients of the field. In the specific case of the 18 MeV cyclotron with a vertical magnetic field and a 3T superconducting whole body MR system, a minimum distance of 20 m has to be considered to prevent interference. Conclusions: This study showed that a dipole model is sufficiently accurate to predict the interference of a cyclotron on a MRI scanner, for site planning purposes. The cyclotron and a whole body MRI system considered in this study need to be placed more than 20 m apart, or magnetic shielding should be utilized.

  9. New Cyclotron Targetry to Enhance F-18 clinical Position Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michael Doster

    2008-12-19

    This project proposes to develop cyclotron targets that produce F-18 for clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at significantly higher rates than that available from current targetry. This production rate of 18F is directly proportional to the beam current. Higher beam currents would result in increased 18F production but would be accompanied by higher heat loads to the target. The beam power available in most commercial cyclotrons exceeds the heat removal capacity of current target technology by a factor of two to four, significantly limiting the production rate of Fluorine-18.

  10. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  11. EC-5 fifth international workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Lohr, J.

    1985-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: electron cyclotron emission measurements; electron cyclotron emission theory; electron cyclotron heating; gyrotron development; and ECH systems and waveguide development. These paper have been indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP).

  12. Special Analysis: Revision of Saltstone Vault 4 Disposal Limits (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J

    2005-05-26

    New disposal limits have been computed for Vault 4 of the Saltstone Disposal Facility based on several revisions to the models in the existing Performance Assessment and the Special Analysis issued in 2002. The most important changes are the use of a more rigorous groundwater flow and transport model, and consideration of radon emanation. Other revisions include refinement of the aquifer mesh to more accurately model the footprint of the vault, a new plutonium chemistry model accounting for the different transport properties of oxidation states III/IV and V/VI, use of variable infiltration rates to simulate degradation of the closure system, explicit calculation of gaseous releases and consideration of the effects of settlement and seismic activity on the vault structure. The disposal limits have been compared with the projected total inventory expected to be disposed in Vault 4. The resulting sum-of-fractions of the 1000-year disposal limits is 0.2, which indicates that the performance objectives and requirements of DOE 435.1 will not be exceeded. This SA has not altered the conceptual model (i.e., migration of radionuclides from the Saltstone waste form and Vault 4 to the environment via the processes of diffusion and advection) of the Saltstone PA (MMES 1992) nor has it altered the conclusions of the PA (i.e., disposal of the proposed waste in the SDF will meet DOE performance measures). Thus a PA revision is not required and this SA serves to update the disposal limits for Vault 4. In addition, projected doses have been calculated for comparison with the performance objectives laid out in 10 CFR 61. These doses are 0.05 mrem/year to a member of the public and 21.5 mrem/year to an inadvertent intruder in the resident scenario over a 10,000-year time-frame, which demonstrates that the 10 CFR 61 performance objectives will not be exceeded. This SA supplements the Saltstone PA and supersedes the two previous SAs (Cook et al. 2002; Cook and Kaplan 2003).

  13. FEL on slow cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Silivra, A.

    1995-12-31

    A physical mechanism of interaction of fast electromagnetic wave with slow cyclotron wave of relativistic electron beam in a FEL with helical wiggler field is described. It is shown that: (1) interaction is possible for both group of steady state electron trajectories (2) positive gain is achieved within certain interval of guide field strength (3) operation wavelength for group 1 trajectories ({Omega}{sub 0}/{gamma} < k{omega}{upsilon}{parallel}) is shorter than for the conventional FEL synchronism. A nonlinear analysis shows that efficiency of slow cyclotron FEL is restricted mainly by a breakdown of a single electron synchronism due to dependence of (modified) electron cyclotron frequency on an energy of electron. Nevertheless, as numerical simulation shows, typical efficiency of 15 % order is achieved in millimeter wavelength band for the midrelativistic ({gamma}= 3 {divided_by} 4) slow cyclotron wave FEL. Tapering of magnetic field results in a substantial increase of efficiency.

  14. Vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is associated with mammalian telomerase and is dispensable for telomerase function and vault structure in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yie; Snow, Bryan E; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Erdmann, Natalie; Zhou, Wen; Wakeham, Andrew; Gomez, Marla; Rome, Leonard H; Harrington, Lea

    2004-06-01

    Vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) was originally identified as a minor protein component of the vault ribonucleoprotein particle, which may be involved in molecular assembly or subcellular transport. In addition to the association of VPARP with the cytoplasmic vault particle, subpopulations of VPARP localize to the nucleus and the mitotic spindle, indicating that VPARP may have other cellular functions. We found that VPARP was associated with telomerase activity and interacted with exogenously expressed telomerase-associated protein 1 (TEP1) in human cells. To study the possible role of VPARP in telomerase and vault complexes in vivo, mVparp-deficient mice were generated. Mice deficient in mVparp were viable and fertile for up to five generations, with no apparent changes in telomerase activity or telomere length. Vaults purified from mVparp-deficient mouse liver appeared intact, and no defect in association with other vault components was observed. Mice deficient in mTep1, whose disruption alone does not affect telomere function but does affect the stability of vault RNA, showed no additional telomerase or telomere-related phenotypes when the mTep1 deficiency was combined with an mVparp deficiency. These data suggest that murine mTep1 and mVparp, alone or in combination, are dispensable for normal development, telomerase catalysis, telomere length maintenance, and vault structure in vivo. PMID:15169895

  15. Osseous expansion of the cranial vault by craniotasis.

    PubMed

    Remmler, D; McCoy, F J; O'Neil, D; Willoughby, L; Patterson, B; Gerald, K; Morris, D C

    1992-05-01

    A study of cranial vault lengthening using a custom expandable fixation-distraction (craniotatic) appliance was performed in the young-adult rabbit model. Ten 24-week-old rabbits underwent circumferential suturectomy plus expansion (expanded group), 10 underwent circumferential suturectomy without expansion (sham control group), and 10 served as normal controls. The appliance was lengthened at a rate of 2.5 mm per week for 5 weeks. Serial lateral cephalometry, comparative dry-skull anthropometric measurements, and histologic examinations were performed. The expanded group demonstrated a significantly longer skull, cranial vault, anterior cranial base, posterior face, and orbit as compared with the control groups (p less than 0.05). Callus bone filled the distracted suturectomy and united the frontofacial complex to the posterior cranium. In conclusion, skull lengthening by distraction osteogenesis is possible in the rabbit model and offers a new technique for future investigation in the treatment of coronal synostosis. PMID:1561249

  16. Pet Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know the signs of medical problems. Take your pet to the veterinarian if you notice: Loss of appetite Drinking a lot of water Gaining or losing a lot of weight quickly Strange behavior Being sluggish and tired Trouble getting up or down Strange lumps

  17. 60. VIEW OF THE CURRENT TRANSFORMER VAULT. THIS CURRENT TRANSFORMER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. VIEW OF THE CURRENT TRANSFORMER VAULT. THIS CURRENT TRANSFORMER WAS USED TO SENSE HIGH CURRENT BEING GENERATED ON GENERATOR NUMBER 3 AND REDUCE IT TO A LOWER, EXACT ANALOG VALUE THAT COULD BE SAFELY HANDLED AND MONITORED WITH THE CONTROL CIRCUITRY. THE CURRENT TRANSFORMER IS LOCATED IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE CONNECTING BUS ABOVE THE TRANSFORMER WAS REMOVED FOR SALVAGE. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  18. 20. Interior view of fuel storage pit or vault adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Interior view of fuel storage pit or vault adjacent to Test Cell 9 in Component Test Laboratory (T-27), looking west. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, tanks, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door at right. Projection area at center is equipped with automatic security drapes. Projection room uses a 45 degree mirror to reflect the image onto the frosted glass screen. Door on far left leads to display area senior battle staff viewing bridge, and the commander's quarters - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  20. Multimegawatt cyclotron autoresonance accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.; LaPointe, M.A.; Ganguly, A.K.; Yoder, R.B.; Wang, C.

    1996-05-01

    Means are discussed for generation of high-quality multimegawatt gyrating electron beams using rf gyroresonant acceleration. TE{sub 111}-mode cylindrical cavities in a uniform axial magnetic field have been employed for beam acceleration since 1968; such beams have more recently been employed for generation of radiation at harmonics of the gyration frequency. Use of a TE{sub 11}-mode waveguide for acceleration, rather than a cavity, is discussed. It is shown that the applied magnetic field and group velocity axial tapers allow resonance to be maintained along a waveguide, but that this is impractical in a cavity. In consequence, a waveguide cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA) can operate with near-100{percent} efficiency in power transfer from rf source to beam, while cavity accelerators will, in practice, have efficiency values limited to about 40{percent}. CARA experiments are described in which an injected beam of up to 25 A, 95 kV has had up to 7.2 MW of rf power added, with efficiencies of up to 96{percent}. Such levels of efficiency are higher than observed previously in any fast-wave interaction, and are competitive with efficiency values in industrial linear accelerators. Scaling arguments suggest that good quality gyrating megavolt beams with peak and average powers of 100 MW and 100 kW can be produced using an advanced CARA, with applications in the generation of high-power microwaves and for possible remediation of flue gas pollutants. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    SciTech Connect

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Weber, M.; Scampoli, P.; Bremen, K. von

    2013-07-18

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  2. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Scampoli, P.; von Bremen, K.; Weber, M.

    2013-07-01

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  3. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunology projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry.

  4. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase

  5. Interaction of vault particles with estrogen receptor in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Abbondanza, C; Rossi, V; Roscigno, A; Gallo, L; Belsito, A; Piluso, G; Medici, N; Nigro, V; Molinari, A M; Moncharmont, B; Puca, G A

    1998-06-15

    A 104-kD protein was coimmunoprecipitated with the estrogen receptor from the flowtrough of a phosphocellulose chromatography of MCF-7 cell nuclear extract. mAbs to this protein identified several cDNA clones coding for the human 104-kD major vault protein. Vaults are large ribonucleoprotein particles of unknown function present in all eukaryotic cells. They have a complex morphology, including several small molecules of RNA, but a single protein species, the major vault protein, accounts for >70% of their mass. Their shape is reminiscent of the nucleopore central plug, but no proteins of known function have been described to interact with them. Western blot analysis of vaults purified on sucrose gradient showed the presence of estrogen receptor co-migrating with the vault peak. The AER317 antibody to estrogen receptor coimmunoprecipitated the major vault protein and the vault RNA also in the 20,000 g supernatant fraction. Reconstitution experiments of estrogen receptor fragments with the major vault protein mapped the site of the interaction between amino acids 241 and 280 of human estrogen receptor, where the nuclear localization signal sequences are located. Estradiol treatment of cells increased the amount of major vault protein present in the nuclear extract and coimmunoprecipitated with estrogen receptor, whereas the anti-estrogen ICI182,780 had no effect. The hormone-dependent interaction of vaults with estrogen receptor was reproducible in vitro and was prevented by sodium molybdate. Antibodies to progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors were able to coimmunoprecipitate the major vault protein. The association of nuclear receptors with vaults could be related to their intracellular traffic. PMID:9628887

  6. Interaction of Vault Particles with Estrogen Receptor in the MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell

    PubMed Central

    Abbondanza, Ciro; Rossi, Valentina; Roscigno, Annarita; Gallo, Luigi; Belsito, Angela; Piluso, Giulio; Medici, Nicola; Nigro, Vincenzo; Molinari, Anna Maria; Moncharmont, Bruno; Puca, Giovanni A.

    1998-01-01

    A 104-kD protein was coimmunoprecipitated with the estrogen receptor from the flowtrough of a phosphocellulose chromatography of MCF-7 cell nuclear extract. mAbs to this protein identified several cDNA clones coding for the human 104-kD major vault protein. Vaults are large ribonucleoprotein particles of unknown function present in all eukaryotic cells. They have a complex morphology, including several small molecules of RNA, but a single protein species, the major vault protein, accounts for >70% of their mass. Their shape is reminiscent of the nucleopore central plug, but no proteins of known function have been described to interact with them. Western blot analysis of vaults purified on sucrose gradient showed the presence of estrogen receptor co-migrating with the vault peak. The AER317 antibody to estrogen receptor coimmunoprecipitated the major vault protein and the vault RNA also in the 20,000 g supernatant fraction. Reconstitution experiments of estrogen receptor fragments with the major vault protein mapped the site of the interaction between amino acids 241 and 280 of human estrogen receptor, where the nuclear localization signal sequences are located. Estradiol treatment of cells increased the amount of major vault protein present in the nuclear extract and coimmunoprecipitated with estrogen receptor, whereas the anti-estrogen ICI182,780 had no effect. The hormone-dependent interaction of vaults with estrogen receptor was reproducible in vitro and was prevented by sodium molybdate. Antibodies to progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors were able to coimmunoprecipitate the major vault protein. The association of nuclear receptors with vaults could be related to their intracellular traffic. PMID:9628887

  7. Cyclotron resonance in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Erik Alfred

    We present a study of cyclotron resonance in graphene. Graphene is a novel two-dimensional system consisting of a single sheet of atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, and exhibits a unique, linear low-energy dispersion. Bilayer graphene, two sheets stacked together, is an equally interesting system displaying a second unique, but hyperbolic, dispersion. In this work, we study the quantized Landau levels of these systems in strong magnetic fields, via Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We have fabricated large area single layer and bilayer graphene devices on infrared-transparent Si/SiO2 substrates, using standard electron beam lithography and thin-film liftoff techniques. At cryogenic temperatures and high magnetic fields, we measure the infrared transmission through these devices as a function of the back gate voltage, which changes the Fermi level and hence the carrier density. We analyze the normalized transmission traces, assigning the observed minima to the cyclotron resonance wherein carriers are excited between Landau levels. In single layer graphene, we study Landau level transitions near the charge neutral Dirac point, and find a set of particle-hole symmetric transitions, both within the conduction and valence band, and between the bands. These experiments confirm the unusual B- and n -dependencies of the LL energies, where B is the magnetic field and n the LL index. The CR selection rule is determined to be Delta n = |nfinal| -- |n initial| = +/-1. The ratio of the observed interband and intraband transitions exceeds the expected value by 5%, and this excess is interpreted as an additional contribution to the transition energy from many-particle effects. We explore several higher LL transitions for both electron and hole doping of single layer graphene. The data are consistent with a renormalization of the carrier band velocity near the Dirac point, and suggest that impurity scattering strengthens at low energies. We also study the CR at the

  8. Theory of relativistic cyclotron masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Latham, P. E.; Dumbrajs, O.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper we have made an attempt to review the present status of the theory of cyclotron masers with relativistic electron beams. After discussing the basic features of electron-cyclotron radiation under conditions of normal and anomalous Doppler frequency shifts, we consider particle deceleration by a constant amplitude electromagnetic wave in a constant magnetic field using the formalism developed earlier for cyclotron autoresonance acceleration of electrons. An optimal cyclotron resonance mismatch was found that corresponds to the possibility of complete deceleration of relativistic electrons. Then, interaction of relativistic electrons with resonator fields is considered and the efficiency increase due to electron prebunching is demonstrated in a simple model. Since an efficient interaction of relativistic electrons with the large amplitude electromagnetic field of a resonator occurs at a short distance, where electrons make a small number of electron orbits, the issue of the simultaneous interaction of electrons with the field at several cyclotron harmonics is discussed. Finally, we consider deceleration of a prebunched electron beam by a traveling electromagnetic wave in a tapered magnetic field. This simple modeling is illustrated with a number of simulations of relativistic gyroklystrons and gyrotwistrons (gyrodevices in which the bunching cavity of the gyroklystron is combined with the output waveguide of the gyro-traveling-wave-tube).

  9. Bioengineered vaults: self-assembling protein shell-lipophilic core nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Daniel C; Marsden, Matthew D; Shen, Sean; Toso, Daniel B; Wu, Xiaomeng; Loo, Joseph A; Zhou, Z Hong; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Wender, Paul A; Zack, Jerome A; Rome, Leonard H

    2014-08-26

    We report a novel approach to a new class of bioengineered, monodispersed, self-assembling vault nanoparticles consisting of a protein shell exterior with a lipophilic core interior designed for drug and probe delivery. Recombinant vaults were engineered to contain a small amphipathic α-helix derived from the nonstructural protein 5A of hepatitis C virus, thereby creating within the vault lumen a lipophilic microenvironment into which lipophilic compounds could be reversibly encapsulated. Multiple types of electron microscopy showed that attachment of this peptide resulted in larger than expected additional mass internalized within the vault lumen attributable to incorporation of host lipid membrane constituents spanning the vault waist (>35 nm). These bioengineered lipophilic vaults reversibly associate with a sample set of therapeutic compounds, including all-trans retinoic acid, amphotericin B, and bryostatin 1, incorporating hundreds to thousands of drug molecules per vault nanoparticle. Bryostatin 1 is of particular therapeutic interest because of its ability to potently induce expression of latent HIV, thus representing a preclinical lead in efforts to eradicate HIV/AIDS. Vaults loaded with bryostatin 1 released free drug, resulting in activation of HIV from provirus latency in vitro and induction of CD69 biomarker expression following intravenous injection into mice. The ability to preferentially and reversibly encapsulate lipophilic compounds into these novel bioengineered vault nanoparticles greatly advances their potential use as drug delivery systems. PMID:25061969

  10. Utilization of a protein "shuttle" to load vault nanocapsules with gold probes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Lisa E; Pupols, Melody; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H; Monbouquette, Harold G

    2009-10-27

    Vaults are large protein nanocapsules that may be useful as drug delivery vehicles due to their normal presence in humans, their large interior volume, their simple structural composition consisting of multiple copies of one protein, and a recombinant production system that also provides a means to tailor their structure. However, for vaults to be effective in such applications, efficient means to load the interiors of the capsules must be demonstrated. Here we describe the use of a domain derived from a vault lumen-associated protein as a carrier to target both gold nanoclusters and heterologous His-tagged proteins to specific binding sites on the vault interior wall. PMID:19775119

  11. Bioengineered Vaults: Self-Assembling Protein Shell–Lipophilic Core Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel approach to a new class of bioengineered, monodispersed, self-assembling vault nanoparticles consisting of a protein shell exterior with a lipophilic core interior designed for drug and probe delivery. Recombinant vaults were engineered to contain a small amphipathic α-helix derived from the nonstructural protein 5A of hepatitis C virus, thereby creating within the vault lumen a lipophilic microenvironment into which lipophilic compounds could be reversibly encapsulated. Multiple types of electron microscopy showed that attachment of this peptide resulted in larger than expected additional mass internalized within the vault lumen attributable to incorporation of host lipid membrane constituents spanning the vault waist (>35 nm). These bioengineered lipophilic vaults reversibly associate with a sample set of therapeutic compounds, including all-trans retinoic acid, amphotericin B, and bryostatin 1, incorporating hundreds to thousands of drug molecules per vault nanoparticle. Bryostatin 1 is of particular therapeutic interest because of its ability to potently induce expression of latent HIV, thus representing a preclinical lead in efforts to eradicate HIV/AIDS. Vaults loaded with bryostatin 1 released free drug, resulting in activation of HIV from provirus latency in vitro and induction of CD69 biomarker expression following intravenous injection into mice. The ability to preferentially and reversibly encapsulate lipophilic compounds into these novel bioengineered vault nanoparticles greatly advances their potential use as drug delivery systems. PMID:25061969

  12. Low current performance of the Bern medical cyclotron down to the pA range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Nesteruk, K. P.; Scampoli, P.

    2015-09-01

    A medical cyclotron accelerating H- ions to 18 MeV is in operation at the Bern University Hospital (Inselspital). It is the commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker. This feature is unique for a hospital-based facility and makes it possible to conduct routine radioisotope production for PET diagnostics in parallel with multidisciplinary research activities, among which are novel particle detectors, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. Several of these activities, such as radiobiology experiments for example, require low current beams down to the pA range, while medical cyclotrons are designed for high current operation above 10 μA. In this paper, we present the first results on the low current performance of a PET medical cyclotron obtained by ion source, radio-frequency and main coil tuning. With this method, stable beam currents down to (1.5+/- 0.5 ) pA were obtained and measured with a high-sensitivity Faraday cup located at the end of the beam transport line.

  13. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  14. Use of cyclotrons in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaim, S. M.

    2004-10-01

    Cyclotrons are versatile ion-accelerating machines which find many applications in medicine. In this short review their use in hadron therapy is briefly discussed. Proton therapy is gaining significance because of its capability to treat deep-lying tumours. A strong area of application of cyclotrons involves the production of short-lived neutron deficient radiotracers for use in emission tomography, especially positron emission tomography. This fast and quantitative in vivo diagnostic technique is being increasingly used in neurology, cardiology and oncology. Besides routine patient care, considerable interdisciplinary work on development of new positron emitters is under way. A short account of those efforts is given. The use of cyclotrons in the production of radionuclides for internal radiotherapy is also briefly described.

  15. Cyclotron radiation in hot magnetoplasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trulsen, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of thermal motions on the cyclotron radiation from test particles gyrating in a homogeneous magnetoplasma are studied. These effects take care of all singularities that exist in the theory of cyclotron radiation in cold magnetoplasma - e.g., the divergence in energy loss for small particle energies. Around the hybrid frequencies thermal corrections become of dominant importance. At these frequencies cold-plasma theory breaks down. Thermal effects arise in two ways: by modifying the wave modes known from cold plasma theory, and by the introduction of a new longitudinal wave mode, known as the Bernstein mode. All wave modes are damped (in stable plasmas).

  16. The Basic Principles of FDG-PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Hess, Søren; Nielsen Braad, Poul-Erik; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Inglev, Signe; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2014-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) forms the basis of molecular imaging. FDG-PET imaging is a multidisciplinary undertaking that requires close interdisciplinary collaboration in a broad team comprising physicians, technologists, secretaries, radio-chemists, hospital physicists, molecular biologists, engineers, and cyclotron technicians. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of important basic issues and considerations pivotal to successful patient examinations, including basic physics, instrumentation, radiochemistry, molecular and cell biology, patient preparation, normal distribution of tracer, and potential interpretive pitfalls. PMID:26050942

  17. Spreader flaps for middle vault contour and stabilization.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Milos; Wurm, Jochen

    2015-02-01

    Nasal hump excision is common during septorhinoplasty. Without appropriate restoration of the middle nasal vault, cosmetic and functional problems may ensue. Recently, spreader flaps have become an established alternative to traditional spreader grafts. Typical indications include primary rhinoplasty patients with hump noses, hump/tension noses, and moderately hooked or crooked noses. When suitable patients are selected, spreader flaps and their modifications represent a reliable alternative to the standard spreader graft, and when all of the necessary prerequisites are met, this technique obviates the need for additional cartilage grafting in most cases. PMID:25430925

  18. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  19. Pet Bonding and Pet Bereavement among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied adolescent-pet bonding and bereavement following pet loss (n=55). Hypothesized that highly-bonded adolescents experience more intense grief when a pet dies than do those less bonded; degree of bonding is greater for girls than for boys; and intensity of bereavement is greater for girls than for boys. Results supported the hypotheses. (RB)

  20. Evaluating secondary neutron doses of a refined shielded design for a medical cyclotron using the TLD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jye-Bin; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Liu, Wen-Shan; Lin, Ding-Bang; Hsieh, Teng-San; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2013-11-01

    An increasing number of cyclotrons at medical centers in Taiwan have been installed to generate radiopharmaceutical products. An operating cyclotron generates immense amounts of secondary neutrons from reactions such the 18O(p, n)18F, used in the production of FDG. This intense radiation can be hazardous to public health, particularly to medical personnel. To increase the yield of 18F-FDG from 4200 GBq in 2005 to 48,600 GBq in 2011, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital (CSMUH) has prolonged irradiation time without changing the target or target current to meet requirements regarding the production 18F. The CSMUH has redesigned the CTI Radioisotope Delivery System shield. The lack of data for a possible secondary neutron doses has increased due to newly designed cyclotron rooms. This work aims to evaluate secondary neutron doses at a CTI cyclotron center using a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-600). Two-dimensional neutron doses were mapped and indicated that neutron doses were high as neutrons leaked through self-shielded blocks and through the L-shaped concrete shield in vault rooms. These neutron doses varied markedly among locations close to the H218O target. The Monte Carlo simulation and minimum detectable dose are also discussed and demonstrated the reliability of using the TLD-600 approach. Findings can be adopted by medical centers to identify radioactive hot spots and develop radiation protection.

  1. Risk Management in the Original Extreme Sporting Event: The Pole Vault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemiller, Jim; Hardin, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The pole vault was considered the ultimate test of physical ability and daring before the advent of modern extreme sports such as skateboarding, snowboarding, and mountain biking. The inherent risks of the pole vault have been well documented. The National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research reported in 2007 that the catastrophic injury…

  2. 105. VIEW NORTH FROM SLC3W CABLE TUNNEL INTO CABLE VAULT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    105. VIEW NORTH FROM SLC-3W CABLE TUNNEL INTO CABLE VAULT AND SLC-3E CABLE TUNNEL. NOTE WOODEN PLANKING ON FLOOR OF TUNNEL AND CABLE TRAYS LINING TUNNEL WALLS. STAIRS ON EAST WALL OF CABLE VAULT LEAD INTO LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-7, 100-F Miscellaneous Hardware Storage Vault

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel

    2006-11-02

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-7, 100-F Miscellaneous Hardware Storage Vault. The site consisted of an inactive solid waste storage vault used for temporary storage of slightly contaminated reactor parts that could be recovered and reused for the 100-F Area reactor operations.

  4. Effect of Materials and Manufacturing on the Bending Stiffness of Vaulting Poles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, C. L.; Kukureka, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in the world record height achieved in pole vaulting can be related to the improved ability of the athletes, in terms of their fitness and technique, and to the change in materials used to construct the pole. For example in 1960 there was a change in vaulting pole construction from bamboo to glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP)…

  5. Vault nanoparticles containing an adenovirus-derived membrane lytic protein facilitate toxin and gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cheng-Yu; Wiethoff, Chris M; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H; Nemerow, Glen R

    2009-03-24

    Nonviral methods of gene delivery possess several advantages over that of viral-based vectors, including having increased safety. However, the ability to achieve effective transport of therapeutic molecules across host cell membranes via nonviral methods remains a significant goal. Cell-derived nanoparticles known as vaults have been proposed as novel candidate transfer vehicles for various foreign molecules. Recombinant vault particles enter cells via macropinocytosis or phagocytosis but lack demonstrable membrane penetrating activity. To explore the feasibility of improving vault penetration into target cells, we incorporated the membrane lytic domain of adenovirus protein VI (pVI) into the interior of recombinant vault particles via fusion to the vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) interaction domain. The membrane lytic activity of the pVI domain was retained upon incorporation into vault particles. Moreover, internalization of vault-pVI complexes into murine macrophages promoted co-delivery of a soluble ribotoxin or a cDNA plasmid encoding GFP. These findings indicate that vault particles can be modified to enhance cell transfer of selected biomolecules. PMID:19226129

  6. The structure of rat liver vault at 3.5 angstrom resolution.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideaki; Kato, Koji; Yamashita, Eiki; Sumizawa, Tomoyuki; Zhou, Yong; Yao, Min; Iwasaki, Kenji; Yoshimura, Masato; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2009-01-16

    Vaults are among the largest cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles and are found in numerous eukaryotic species. Roles in multidrug resistance and innate immunity have been suggested, but the cellular function remains unclear. We have determined the x-ray structure of rat liver vault at 3.5 angstrom resolution and show that the cage structure consists of a dimer of half-vaults, with each half-vault comprising 39 identical major vault protein (MVP) chains. Each MVP monomer folds into 12 domains: nine structural repeat domains, a shoulder domain, a cap-helix domain, and a cap-ring domain. Interactions between the 42-turn-long cap-helix domains are key to stabilizing the particle. The shoulder domain is structurally similar to a core domain of stomatin, a lipid-raft component in erythrocytes and epithelial cells. PMID:19150846

  7. Singular stress fields for masonry-like vaults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelillo, Maurizio; Babilio, Enrico; Fortunato, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    In the present paper, we apply the theorems of limit analysis to vaults modeled as masonry-like materials, that is, unilateral continuous bodies. On allowing for singular stresses, we consider statically admissible stress field concentrated on surfaces lying inside the masonry. Such structures are unilateral membranes, whose geometry is described a la Monge, and the equilibrium of them, under vertical loads, is formulated in the Pucher form. The problem is reduced to a singular partial differential equation of the second order where the shape f and the stress function F appear symmetrically. The unilateral restrictions require that the membrane surface lies in between the extrados and intrados surfaces of the vault and that the stress function be concave. Such a constraint is, in general, not satisfied on a given shape for given loads: in such a case, the shape has to be modified to fit the constraint. In a sense, the unilateral assumption renders the membrane an underdetermined structure that must adapt its shape in order to satisfy the unilateral restrictions. A number of simple examples are presented to illustrate how the method works.

  8. 25 CFR 543.18 - What are the minimum internal control standards for the cage, vault, kiosk, cash and cash...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cage, vault, kiosk, cash and cash equivalents? 543.18 Section 543.18 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING... § 543.18 What are the minimum internal control standards for the cage, vault, kiosk, cash and cash equivalents? (a) Supervision. Supervision must be provided as needed for cage, vault, kiosk, and...

  9. 25 CFR 543.18 - What are the minimum internal control standards for the cage, vault, kiosk, cash and cash...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cage, vault, kiosk, cash and cash equivalents? 543.18 Section 543.18 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING... § 543.18 What are the minimum internal control standards for the cage, vault, kiosk, cash and cash equivalents? (a) Supervision. Supervision must be provided as needed for cage, vault, kiosk, and...

  10. The development, past achievements, and future directions of brain PET

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Terry; Rabiner, Eugenii A

    2012-01-01

    The early developments of brain positron emission tomography (PET), including the methodological advances that have driven progress, are outlined. The considerable past achievements of brain PET have been summarized in collaboration with contributing experts in specific clinical applications including cerebrovascular disease, movement disorders, dementia, epilepsy, schizophrenia, addiction, depression and anxiety, brain tumors, drug development, and the normal healthy brain. Despite a history of improving methodology and considerable achievements, brain PET research activity is not growing and appears to have diminished. Assessments of the reasons for decline are presented and strategies proposed for reinvigorating brain PET research. Central to this is widening the access to advanced PET procedures through the introduction of lower cost cyclotron and radiochemistry technologies. The support and expertize of the existing major PET centers, and the recruitment of new biologists, bio-mathematicians and chemists to the field would be important for such a revival. New future applications need to be identified, the scope of targets imaged broadened, and the developed expertize exploited in other areas of medical research. Such reinvigoration of the field would enable PET to continue making significant contributions to advance the understanding of the normal and diseased brain and support the development of advanced treatments. PMID:22434067

  11. The development, past achievements, and future directions of brain PET.

    PubMed

    Jones, Terry; Rabiner, Eugenii A

    2012-07-01

    The early developments of brain positron emission tomography (PET), including the methodological advances that have driven progress, are outlined. The considerable past achievements of brain PET have been summarized in collaboration with contributing experts in specific clinical applications including cerebrovascular disease, movement disorders, dementia, epilepsy, schizophrenia, addiction, depression and anxiety, brain tumors, drug development, and the normal healthy brain. Despite a history of improving methodology and considerable achievements, brain PET research activity is not growing and appears to have diminished. Assessments of the reasons for decline are presented and strategies proposed for reinvigorating brain PET research. Central to this is widening the access to advanced PET procedures through the introduction of lower cost cyclotron and radiochemistry technologies. The support and expertize of the existing major PET centers, and the recruitment of new biologists, bio-mathematicians and chemists to the field would be important for such a revival. New future applications need to be identified, the scope of targets imaged broadened, and the developed expertize exploited in other areas of medical research. Such reinvigoration of the field would enable PET to continue making significant contributions to advance the understanding of the normal and diseased brain and support the development of advanced treatments. PMID:22434067

  12. Vault Nanoparticles Packaged with Enzymes as an Efficient Pollutant Biodegradation Technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Abad, Danny; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H; Mahendra, Shaily

    2015-11-24

    Vault nanoparticles packaged with enzymes were synthesized as agents for efficiently degrading environmental contaminants. Enzymatic biodegradation is an attractive technology for in situ cleanup of contaminated environments because enzyme-catalyzed reactions are not constrained by nutrient requirements for microbial growth and often have higher biodegradation rates. However, the limited stability of extracellular enzymes remains a major challenge for practical applications. Encapsulation is a recognized method to enhance enzymatic stability, but it can increase substrate diffusion resistance, lower catalytic rates, and increase the apparent half-saturation constants. Here, we report an effective approach for boosting enzymatic stability by single-step packaging into vault nanoparticles. With hollow core structures, assembled vault nanoparticles can simultaneously contain multiple enzymes. Manganese peroxidase (MnP), which is widely used in biodegradation of organic contaminants, was chosen as a model enzyme in the present study. MnP was incorporated into vaults via fusion to a packaging domain called INT, which strongly interacts with vaults' interior surface. MnP fused to INT and vaults packaged with the MnP-INT fusion protein maintained peroxidase activity. Furthermore, MnP-INT packaged in vaults displayed stability significantly higher than that of free MnP-INT, with slightly increased Km value. Additionally, vault-packaged MnP-INT exhibited 3 times higher phenol biodegradation in 24 h than did unpackaged MnP-INT. These results indicate that the packaging of MnP enzymes in vault nanoparticles extends their stability without compromising catalytic activity. This research will serve as the foundation for the development of efficient and sustainable vault-based bioremediation approaches for removing multiple contaminants from drinking water and groundwater. PMID:26493711

  13. PRODUCTION CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE CLASSICAL PET NUCLIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    FINN,R.; SCHLYER,D.

    2001-06-25

    Nuclear Medicine is the specialty of medical imaging, which utilizes a variety of radionuclides incorporated into specific compounds for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. During recent years, research efforts associated with this discipline have concentrated on the decay characteristics of particular radionuclides and the design of unique radiolabeled tracers necessary to achieve time-dependent molecular images. The specialty is expanding with specific Positron emission tomography (PET) and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals allowing for an extension from functional process imaging in tissue to pathologic processes and nuclide directed treatments. PET is an example of a technique that has been shown to yield the physiologic information necessary for clinical oncology diagnoses based upon altered tissue metabolism. Most PET drugs are currently produced using a cyclotron at locations that are in close proximity to the hospital or academic center at which the radiopharmaceutical will be administered. In November 1997, a law was enacted called the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 which directed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to establish appropriate procedures for the approval of PET drugs in accordance with section 505 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and to establish current good manufacturing practice requirements for such drugs. At this time the FDA is considering adopting special approval procedures and cGMP requirements for PET drugs. The evolution of PET radiopharmaceuticals has introduced a new class of ''drugs'' requiring production facilities and product formulations that must be closely aligned with the scheduled clinical utilization. The production of the radionuclide in the appropriate synthetic form is but one critical component in the manufacture of the finished radiopharmaceutical.

  14. Preliminary production of 211At at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute.

    PubMed

    Martin, Thomas Michael; Bhakta, Vihar; Al-Harbi, Abeer; Hackemack, Michael; Tabacaru, Gabriel; Tribble, Robert; Shankar, Sriram; Akabani, Gamal

    2014-07-01

    A feasibility study for the production of the alpha particle-emitting radionuclide At was performed at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute as part of the Interdisciplinary Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program. The mission of this program centers upon the production of radionuclides for use in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine with the primary focus on development of novel therapeutic strategies. As a first step in establishing this program, two goals were outlined: (i) verify production of At and compare results to published data, and (ii) evaluate shielding and radiological safety issues for large-scale implementation using an external target. The radionuclide At was produced via the Bi (α, 2n) At reaction using the K500 cyclotron. Two experiments were conducted, using beam energies of 27.8 MeV and 25.3 MeV, respectively. The resulting yields for At were found to be 36.0 MBq μA h and 12.4 MBq μA h, respectively, which fall within the range of published yield data. Strategies for increasing absolute yield and production efficiency were also evaluated, which focused chiefly on using a new target designed for use with the K150 cyclotron, which will enable the use of a higher beam current. Finally, neutron and gamma dose rates during production were evaluated by using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. It was determined that a simple structure consisting of 4-in thick borated polyethylene will reduce the neutron dose rate within the cyclotron production vault by approximately a factor of 2, thereby decreasing activation of equipment. PMID:24849899

  15. Cyclotron Resonance in Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    Cyclotron Resonance Absorption/Scattering features provide direct measurement of magnetic field strength in the line forming region. This has enabled the estimation of magnetic field strengths of nearly two dozen neutron stars in accreting high mass binary systems. With improved spectroscopic sensitivity, new X-ray observatories such as NuSTAR, Astrosat and Hitomi are opening the doors to studying detailed features such as the line shape and phase dependence with high significance. Such studies will help understand the nature of matter accumulation in, and outflow from, the magnetically confined accretion column on the neutron star. This talk will describe the results of MHD simulations of the matter flow in such systems, the diagnostics of such flows using cyclotron lines, and comparison with recent observations from NuSTAR and Astrosat.

  16. Initial experience with an 11 MeV self-shielded medical cyclotron on operation and radiation safety

    PubMed Central

    Pant, G. S.; Senthamizhchelvan, S.

    2007-01-01

    A self-shielded medical cyclotron (11 MeV) was commissioned at our center, to produce positron emitters, namely, 18F, 15O, 13N and 11C for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Presently the cyclotron has been exclusively used for the production of 18F- for 18F-FDG imaging. The operational parameters which influence the yield of 18F- production were monitored. The radiation levels in the cyclotron and radiochemistry laboratory were also monitored to assess the radiation safety status in the facility. The target material, 18O water, is bombarded with proton beam from the cyclotron to produce 18F- ion that is used for the synthesis of 18F-FDG. The operational parameters which influence the yield of 18F- were observed during 292 production runs out of a total of more than 400 runs. The radiation dose levels were also measured in the facility at various locations during cyclotron production runs and in the radiochemistry laboratory during 18F-FDG syntheses. It was observed that rinsing the target after delivery increased the number of production runs in a given target, as well as resulted in a better correlation between the duration of bombardment and the end of bombardment 18F- activity with absolutely clean target after being rebuilt. The radiation levels in the cyclotron and radiochemistry laboratory were observed to be well within prescribed limits with safe work practice. PMID:21157531

  17. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by vault nanoparticles expressing a chlamydial epitope

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ye; Jiang, Janina; Said-Sadier, Najwane; Boxx, Gale; Champion, Cheryl; Tetlow, Ashley; Kickhoefer, Valerie A.; Rome, Leonard H.; Ojcius, David M.; Kelly, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    The full potential of vaccines relies on development of effective delivery systems and adjuvants and is critical for development of successful vaccine candidates. We have shown that recombinant vaults engineered to encapsulate microbial epitopes are highly stable structures and are an ideal vaccine vehicle for epitope delivery which does not require the inclusion of an adjuvant. We studied the ability of vaults which were engineered for use as a vaccine containing an immunogenic epitope of C. trachomatis, polymorphic membrane protein G (PmpG), to be internalized into human monocytes and behave as a “natural adjuvant”. We here show that incubation of monocytes with the PmpG-1-vaults activates caspase-1 and stimulates IL-1β secretion through a process requiring the NLRP3 inflammasome and that cathepsin B and Syk are involved in the inflammasome activation. We also observed that the PmpG-1-vaults are internalized through a pathway that is transiently acidic and leads to destabilization of lysosomes. In addition, immunization of mice with PmpG-1-vaults induced PmpG-1 responsive CD4+ cells upon re-stimulation with PmpG peptide in vitro, suggesting that vault vaccines can be engineered for specific adaptive immune responses. We conclude that PmpG-1-vault vaccines can stimulate NLRP3 inflammasomes and induce PmpG-specific T cell responses. PMID:25448112

  18. In silico resurrection of the major vault protein suggests it is ancestral in modern eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Daly, Toni K; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J; Penny, David

    2013-01-01

    Vaults are very large oligomeric ribonucleoproteins conserved among a variety of species. The rat vault 3D structure shows an ovoid oligomeric particle, consisting of 78 major vault protein monomers, each of approximately 861 amino acids. Vaults are probably the largest ribonucleoprotein structures in eukaryote cells, being approximately 70 nm in length with a diameter of 40 nm--the size of three ribosomes and with a lumen capacity of 50 million Å(3). We use both protein sequences and inferred ancestral sequences for in silico virtual resurrection of tertiary and quaternary structures to search for vaults in a wide variety of eukaryotes. We find that the vault's phylogenetic distribution is widespread in eukaryotes, but is apparently absent in some notable model organisms. Our conclusion from the distribution of vaults is that they were present in the last eukaryote common ancestor but they have apparently been lost from a number of groups including fungi, insects, and probably plants. Our approach of inferring ancestral 3D and quaternary structures is expected to be useful generally. PMID:23887922

  19. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  20. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90`s

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. The authors also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA.

  1. Composite analysis E-area vaults and saltstone disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents the Composite Analysis (CA) performed on the two active Savannah River Site (SRS) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. The facilities are the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility and the E-Area Vaults (EAV) Disposal Facility. The analysis calculated potential releases to the environment from all sources of residual radioactive material expected to remain in the General Separations Area (GSA). The GSA is the central part of SRS and contains all of the waste disposal facilities, chemical separations facilities and associated high-level waste storage facilities as well as numerous other sources of radioactive material. The analysis considered 114 potential sources of radioactive material containing 115 radionuclides. The results of the CA clearly indicate that continued disposal of low-level waste in the saltstone and EAV facilities, consistent with their respective radiological performance assessments, will have no adverse impact on future members of the public.

  2. Surgical management and prevention of vaginal vault prolapse.

    PubMed

    Imparato, E; Aspesi, G; Rovetta, E; Presti, M

    1992-09-01

    From 1984 to 1988, we corrected and prevented the prolapse of the vaginal vault of patients who wanted to maintain a satisfactory sexual function. This was done by adopting two different surgical techniques. The first, generally favored technique, was performed upon 179 patients and consisted of a colposuspension to the sacrospinous ligaments. The second technique, a colposacropexis, was performed upon 71 patients, in which abdominal associated pathologic changes required an abdominal surgical approach. Colposacropexis was performed, whenever possible, directly to the anterior longitudinal vertebral ligament or using synthetic materials (Mersilene [polyester fiber], Teflon [polytetrafluoroethylene] and Gore-Tex [expanded, reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene]). Both colposacropexis and vaginal suspension to sacrospinous ligaments have had comparable results in vaginal accommodation and long term fixation. Vaginal approach has a lower incidence of operative complications than the abdominal approach and seems to ensure a lower risk of recurrent cystocele, even if simple and asymptomatic. PMID:1514157

  3. CSER 96-028: PFP vault number 2 storage racks

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.G., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-01

    A nuclear criticality safety analysis has been performed to increase the approved plutonium mass limit for the Vault {number_sign}2 storage racks at PFP. There are three racks in the room with separate cubicles used to hold cans of plutonium oxide (PuO,). The racks were approved to hold up to 2.5 Kg of plutonium in each storage cubicle. The purpose of this CSER is to increase the limit to 4.4 Kg plutonium in PuO, per storage cubicle in one rack. The highest k{sub eff} calculated for all possible scenarios was 0.893 {+-} 0.003, which is well below the criticality safety limit of k{sub eff}= 0.935. Consequently, an increase of plutonium mass to 4.4 Kg per can is within acceptable safety limits.

  4. RNA location and modeling of a WD40 repeat domain within the vault.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, L B; Siva, A C; Kickhoefer, V A; Rome, L H; Stewart, P L

    2000-01-01

    The vault complex is a ubiquitous 13-MDa ribonucleoprotein assembly, composed of three proteins (TEP1, 240 kDa; VPARP, 193 kDa; and MVP, 100 kDa) that are highly conserved in eukaryotes and an untranslated RNA (vRNA). The vault has been shown to affect multidrug resistance in cancer cells, and one particular component, MVP, is thought to play a role in the transport of drug from the nucleus. To locate the position of the vRNA, vaults were treated with RNases, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was performed on the resulting complexes. Using single-particle reconstruction techniques, 3,476 particle images were combined to generate a 22-A-resolution structure. Difference mapping between the RNase-treated vault and the previously calculated intact vault reconstructions reveals the vRNA to be at the ends of the vault caps. In this position, the vRNA may interact with both the interior and exterior environments of the vault. The finding of a 16-fold density ring at the top of the cap has allowed modeling of the WD40 repeat domain of the vault TEP1 protein within the cryo-EM vault density. Both stoichiometric considerations and the finding of higher resolution for the computationally selected and refined "barrel only" images indicate a possible symmetry mismatch between the barrel and the caps. The molecular architecture of the complex is emerging, with 96 copies of MVP composing the eightfold symmetric barrel, and the vRNA together with one copy of TEP1 and four predicted copies of VPARP comprising each cap. PMID:10864046

  5. RNA location and modeling of a WD40 repeat domain within the vault.

    PubMed

    Kong, L B; Siva, A C; Kickhoefer, V A; Rome, L H; Stewart, P L

    2000-06-01

    The vault complex is a ubiquitous 13-MDa ribonucleoprotein assembly, composed of three proteins (TEP1, 240 kDa; VPARP, 193 kDa; and MVP, 100 kDa) that are highly conserved in eukaryotes and an untranslated RNA (vRNA). The vault has been shown to affect multidrug resistance in cancer cells, and one particular component, MVP, is thought to play a role in the transport of drug from the nucleus. To locate the position of the vRNA, vaults were treated with RNases, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was performed on the resulting complexes. Using single-particle reconstruction techniques, 3,476 particle images were combined to generate a 22-A-resolution structure. Difference mapping between the RNase-treated vault and the previously calculated intact vault reconstructions reveals the vRNA to be at the ends of the vault caps. In this position, the vRNA may interact with both the interior and exterior environments of the vault. The finding of a 16-fold density ring at the top of the cap has allowed modeling of the WD40 repeat domain of the vault TEP1 protein within the cryo-EM vault density. Both stoichiometric considerations and the finding of higher resolution for the computationally selected and refined "barrel only" images indicate a possible symmetry mismatch between the barrel and the caps. The molecular architecture of the complex is emerging, with 96 copies of MVP composing the eightfold symmetric barrel, and the vRNA together with one copy of TEP1 and four predicted copies of VPARP comprising each cap. PMID:10864046

  6. Comparative Tests Between Shallow Downhole Installation and Classical Seismic Vaults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charade, Olivier; Vergne, Jérôme; Bonaimé, Sébastien; Bonnin, Mickaël; Louis-Xavier, Thierry; Beucler, Eric; Manhaval, Bertrand; Arnold, Benoît

    2016-04-01

    The French permanent broadband network is engaged in a major evolution with the installation of a hundred of new stations within the forthcoming years. Since most of them will be located in open field environments, we are looking for a standardized installation method able to provide good noise level performance at a reasonable cost. Nowadays, the use of posthole seismometers that can be deployed at the bottom of shallow boreholes appears to be an affordable and alternative solution to more traditional installation methods such as seismic vaults or dedicated underground cellars. Here we present some comparative tests performed at different sites (including two GEOSCOPE stations), spanning various geological conditions. On each site, posthole sensors were deployed for several weeks to months at various depths from 1.5m up to 20m. We compare the seismic noise levels measured in the different boreholes with the one for a reference sensor either directly buried or installed in a tunnel, a cellar or a seismic vault. Apart from the microseism frequency band, seismic noise level in most of the boreholes equals or outperforms the one obtained for the reference sensors. At periods higher than 20s we observe a strong reduction of the seismic noise on the horizontal components in the deepest boreholes compared to near surface installations. This improvement can reach up to 30dB and appears to be mostly due to a reduction in tilt noise induced by wind or local pressure variations. However, the absolute noise level that can be achieved strongly depends on the local geology.

  7. Breakdown of cyclotron resonance in semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, T.; Bhat, R.; Koza, M.; Hwang, D. M.; DeRosa, F.; Grabbe, P.; Allen, S. J.

    1988-03-01

    We have observed breakdown of cyclotron resonance in large magnetic fields oriented perpendicular to the growth direction in semiconductor superlattices. At small magnetic fields conventional cyclotron resonance is observed with the mass related to the miniband mass. At large magnetic fields, when the cyclotron diameter approaches the superlattice period, the resonance frequency appears to saturate and is determined by orbits impaled on the barrier. A model calculation gives good account of the magnetic field dependence of the resonance position and line width.

  8. Trends in PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2000-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT).

  9. Electroplated targets for production of unique PET radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, V.; Sheh, Y.; Finn, R.; Francesconi, L.; Cai, S.; Schlyer, D.; Wieland, B.

    1995-12-01

    The past decade has witnessed the applications of positron emission tomography (PET) evolving from a purely research endeavor to a procedure which has specific clinical applications in the areas of cardiology, neurology and oncology. The growth of PET has been facilitated by developments in both medical instrumentation and radiopharmaceutical chemistry efforts. Included in this latter effort has been the low energy accelerator production and processing of unique PET radionuclides appropriate for the radiolabeling of biomolecules, i.e. monoclonal antibodies and peptides. The development and application of electroplated targets of antimony and copper for the production of iodine-124 and gallium-66 respectively, utilizing the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) cyclotron are examples of target design and development applicable to many medical accelerators.

  10. Electroplating targets for production of unique PET radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, V.; Sheh, Y.; Finn, R.

    1994-12-31

    The past decade has witnessed the applications of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) evolving from a purely research endeavour to a procedure which has specific clinical applications in the areas of cardiology, neurology and oncology. The growth of PET has been facilitated by developments in medical instrumentation and radiopharmaceutical chemistry efforts. Included in this latter effort has been the low energy accelerator production and processing of unique PET radionuclides appropriate for the radiolabeling of biomolecules i.e. monoclonal antibodies and pepetides. The development and application of electroplated targets of antimony and copper for the production of iodine-124 and gallium-66 respectively, utilizing the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center cyclotron are examples of target design and development applicable to many medical accelerators.