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Sample records for pet imaging modality

  1. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  2. PET/MRI: THE NEXT GENERATION OF MULTI-MODALITY IMAGING?

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Bernd; Wehrl, Hans F; Kolb, Armin; Judenhofer, Martin S

    2009-01-01

    Multi-modal imaging is now well-established in routine clinical practice. Especially in the field of Nuclear Medicine, new PET installations are comprised almost exclusively of combined PET/CT scanners rather than PET-only systems. However, PET/CT has certain notable shortcomings, including the inability to perform simultaneous data acquisition and the significant radiation dose to the patient contributed by CT. MRI offers, compared to CT, better contrast among soft tissues as well as functional-imaging capabilities. Therefore, the combination of PET with MRI provides many advantages which go far beyond simply combining functional PET information with structural MRI information. Many technical challenges, including possible interference between these modalities, have to be solved when combining PET and MRI and various approaches have been adapted to resolving these issues. Here we present an overview of current working prototypes of combined PET/MRI scanners from different groups. In addition, besides PET/MR images of mice, the first such images of a rat PET/MR, acquired with the first commercial clinical PET/MRI scanner, are presented. The combination of PET and MR is a promising tool in pre-clinical research and will certainly progress to clinical application. PMID:18396179

  3. Carbon-11 radiolabeling of iron-oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality PET/MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Xu, Youwen; Kim, Sung Won; Schueller, Michael J.; Alexoff, David; Smith, S. David; Wang, Wei; Schlyer, David

    2013-07-01

    Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled SPIO NPs was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment.Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled

  4. Novel Strategy for Preparing Dual-Modality Optical/PET Imaging Probes via Photo-Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingyi; Ding, Jiule; Xing, Wei; Gai, Yongkang; Sheng, Jing; Zeng, Dexing

    2016-05-18

    Preparation of small molecule based dual-modality probes remains a challenging task due to the complicated synthetic procedure. In this study, a novel concise and generic strategy for preparing dual-modality optical/PET imaging probes via photo-click chemistry was developed, in which the diazole photo-click linker functioned not only as a bridge between the targeting-ligand and the PET imaging moiety, but also as the fluorophore for optical imaging. A dual-modality AE105 peptidic probe was successfully generated via this strategy and subsequently applied in the fluorescent staining of U87MG cells and the (68)Ga based PET imaging of mice bearing U87MG xenograft. In addition, dual-modality monoclonal antibody cetuximab has also been generated via this strategy and labeled with (64)Cu for PET imaging studies, broadening the application of this strategy to include the preparation of macromolecule based imaging probes. PMID:27098544

  5. Application of 18F-FDG PET and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in multiple myeloma: comparison of functional imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Mosebach, Jennifer; Freitag, Martin T; Wilhelm, Thomas; Mai, Elias K; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Haberkorn, Uwe; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Delorme, Stefan; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this prospective study was to assess the sensitivity of positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in detecting multiple myeloma (MM) lesions, using the well-established morphologic modalities magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) as the standard of reference (RS). The study included 24 MM patients (15 newly diagnosed, 9 pre-treated). All underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT and wholebody DWI. The findings in PET and DWI were compared to matching imaging findings in combined non-enhanced T1w, fat-saturated T2w (TIRM)- MRI, and low-dose CT. Patient-based analysis revealed that 15/24 patients (10 primary MM, 5 pre-treated) had myeloma lesions according to our RS. PET was positive in 13/24 patients (11 primary MM, 2 pre-treated) and DWI in 18/24 patients (12 primary MM, 6 pre-treated). Lesion-based analysis demonstrated 128 MM lesions, of which PET depicted 60/128 lesions (sensitivity 47%), while DWI depicted 99/128 lesions (sensitivity 77%). Further analysis including only the 15 untreated MM patients revealed a sensitivity of 90% for both PET and DWI and an overall concordance of PET and DWI of 72%. In conclusion, DWI was more sensitive than 18F-FDG PET in detecting myeloma lesions in a mixed population of primary and pre-treated MM patients. However, 18F-FDG PET and DWI demonstrated equivalent sensitivities in the sub-population of primary, untreated MM patients. This higher sensitivity of DWI in pre-treated patients may be due to the fact that 18F-FDG PET becomes negative earlier in the course of treatment in contrary to MRI, in which already treated lesions can remain visible. PMID:26550539

  6. Quantitative SPECT/CT: SPECT joins PET as a quantitative imaging modality.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dale L; Willowson, Kathy P

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of combined modality single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT cameras has revived interest in quantitative SPECT. Schemes to mitigate the deleterious effects of photon attenuation and scattering in SPECT imaging have been developed over the last 30 years but have been held back by lack of ready access to data concerning the density of the body and photon transport, which we see as key to producing quantitative data. With X-ray CT data now routinely available, validations of techniques to produce quantitative SPECT reconstructions have been undertaken. While still suffering from inferior spatial resolution and sensitivity compared to positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, SPECT scans nevertheless can be produced that are as quantitative as PET scans. Routine corrections are applied for photon attenuation and scattering, resolution recovery, instrumental dead time, radioactive decay and cross-calibration to produce SPECT images in units of kBq.ml(-1). Though clinical applications of quantitative SPECT imaging are lacking due to the previous non-availability of accurately calibrated SPECT reconstructions, these are beginning to emerge as the community and industry focus on producing SPECT/CT systems that are intrinsically quantitative. PMID:24037503

  7. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis: Three Case Reports Imaging Using a Tri-Modality PET/CT-MR System.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CT-MR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine.We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CT-MR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway.Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis.The reports emphasize the significance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD. PMID:26765477

  8. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-06-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  9. Trends in PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2000-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT).

  10. Dual-Modality Optical/PET Imaging of PARP1 in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Carlucci, Giuseppe; Carney, Brandon; Brand, Christian; Kossatz, Susanne; Irwin, Christopher P.; Carlin, Sean D.; Keliher, Edmund J.; Weber, Wolfgang; Reiner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The current study presents [18F]PARPi-FL as a bimodal fluorescent/positron emission tomography (PET) agent for PARP1 imaging. Procedures [18F]PARPi-FL was obtained by 19F/18F isotopic exchange and PET experiments, biodistribution studies, surface fluorescence imaging, and autoradiography carried out in a U87 MG glioblastoma mouse model. Results [18F]PARPi-FL showed high tumor uptake in vivo and ex vivo in small xenografts (<2 mm) with both PET and optical imaging technologies. Uptake of [18F]PARPi-FL in blocked U87 MG tumors was reduced by 84 % (0.12±0.02 %injected dose/gram (%ID/g)), showing high specificity of the binding. PET imaging showed accumulation in the tumor (1 h p.i.), which was confirmed by ex vivo phosphor autoradiography. Conclusions The fluorescent component of [18F]PARPi-FL enables cellular resolution optical imaging, while the radiolabeled component of [18F]PARPi-FL allows whole-body deep-tissue imaging of malignant growth. PMID:25895168

  11. Dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Bruce; Tang, H. Roger; Da Silva, Angela J.; Wong, Kenneth H.; Iwata, Koji; Wu, Max C.

    2001-09-01

    In comparison to conventional medical imaging techniques, dual-modality imaging offers the advantage of correlating anatomical information from X-ray computed tomography (CT) with functional measurements from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or with positron emission tomography (PET). The combined X-ray/radionuclide images from dual-modality imaging can help the clinician to differentiate disease from normal uptake of radiopharmaceuticals, and to improve diagnosis and staging of disease. In addition, phantom and animal studies have demonstrated that a priori structural information from CT can be used to improve quantification of tissue uptake and organ function by correcting the radionuclide data for errors due to photon attenuation, partial volume effects, scatter radiation, and other physical effects. Dual-modality imaging therefore is emerging as a method of improving the visual quality and the quantitative accuracy of radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of patients with cancer and heart disease.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    SciTech Connect

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  13. [Oncology PET imaging].

    PubMed

    Inubushi, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    At the beginning of this article, likening medical images to "Where is Waldo?" I indicate the concept of diagnostic process of PET/CT imaging, so that medical physics specialists could understand the role of each imaging modality and infer our distress for image diagnosis. Then, I state the present situation of PET imaging and the basics (e.g. health insurance coverage, clinical significance, principle, protocol, and pitfall) of oncology FDG-PET imaging which accounts for more than 99% of all clinical PET examinations in Japan. Finally, I would like to give a wishful prospect of oncology PET that will expand to be more cancer-specific in order to assess therapeutic effects of emerging molecular targeted drugs targeting the "hallmarks of cancer". PMID:25199271

  14. [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT in the localization of head and neck paragangliomas compared to other functional imaging modalities and CT/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Ingo; Taieb, David; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Millo, Corina M.; Adams, Karen; Nambuba, Joan; Chen, Clara C.; Herscovitch, Peter; Sadowski, Samira M.; Fojo, Antonio T.; Buchmann, Inga; Kebebew, Electron; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) overexpress somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) and recent studies have already shown excellent results in the localization of sympathetic succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit B (SDHB) mutation-related metastatic PHEOs/PGLs using [(68Ga)-DOTA0,Tyr3]Octreotate ([68Ga]-DOTATATE) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Therefore, the goal of our study was to assess the clinical utility of this functional imaging modality in parasympathetic head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) compared to anatomical imaging with CT/MRI and other functional imaging modalities, including [18F]-fluorohydroyphenylalanine ([18F]-FDOPA) PET/CT, currently the gold standard in the functional imaging of HNPGLs. Methods [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT was prospectively performed in 20 patients with HNPGLs. All patients also underwent [18F]-FDOPA PET/CT, [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) PET/CT, and CT/MRI, with 18 patients also receiving [18F]-fluorodopamine ([18F]-FDA) PET/CT. [18F]-FDOPA PET/CT and CT/MRI served as the imaging comparators. Results Thirty-eight lesions in 20 patients were detected, with [18F]-FDOPA PET/CT identifying 37 of 38 (37/38) and CT/MRI identifying 22 of 38 lesions (22/38, p<0.01). All 38 and additional 7 lesions (p=0.016) were detected on [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT. Significantly fewer lesions were identified by [18F]-FDG PET/CT (24/38, p<0.01) and [18F]-FDA PET/CT (10/34, p<0.01). Conclusion [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT identified more lesions than the other imaging modalities. Due to the results of the present study, including the increasing availability and use of DOTA-analogs in the therapy of neuroendocrine tumors, we expect that [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT will become the preferred functional imaging modality for HNPGLs in the near future. PMID:26564322

  15. PET/CT imaging artifacts.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Waheeda; Mawlawi, Osama

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the principles of PET/CT imaging and describe the artifacts associated with it. PET/CT is a new imaging modality that integrates functional (PET) and structural (CT) information into a single scanning session, allowing excellent fusion of the PET and CT images and thus improving lesion localization and interpretation accuracy. Moreover, the CT data can also be used for attenuation correction, ultimately leading to high patient throughput. These combined advantages have rendered PET/CT a preferred imaging modality over dedicated PET. Although PET/CT imaging offers many advantages, this dual-modality imaging also poses some challenges. CT-based attenuation correction can induce artifacts and quantitative errors that can affect the PET emission images. For instance, the use of contrast medium and the presence of metallic implants can be associated with focal radiotracer uptake. Furthermore, the patient's breathing can introduce mismatches between the CT attenuation map and the PET emission data, and the discrepancy between the CT and PET fields of view can lead to truncation artifacts. After reading this article, the technologist should be able to describe the principles of PET/CT imaging, identify at least 3 types of image artifacts, and describe the differences between PET/CT artifacts of different causes: metallic implants, respiratory motion, contrast medium, and truncation. PMID:16145223

  16. Multi-modality PET-CT imaging of breast cancer in an animal model using nanoparticle x-ray contrast agent and 18F-FDG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Ghaghada, K.; Espinosa, G.; Strong, L.; Annapragada, A.

    2011-03-01

    Multi-modality PET-CT imaging is playing an important role in the field of oncology. While PET imaging facilitates functional interrogation of tumor status, the use of CT imaging is primarily limited to anatomical reference. In an attempt to extract comprehensive information about tumor cells and its microenvironment, we used a nanoparticle xray contrast agent to image tumor vasculature and vessel 'leakiness' and 18F-FDG to investigate the metabolic status of tumor cells. In vivo PET/CT studies were performed in mice implanted with 4T1 mammary breast cancer cells.Early-phase micro-CT imaging enabled visualization 3D vascular architecture of the tumors whereas delayedphase micro-CT demonstrated highly permeable vessels as evident by nanoparticle accumulation within the tumor. Both imaging modalities demonstrated the presence of a necrotic core as indicated by a hypo-enhanced region in the center of the tumor. At early time-points, the CT-derived fractional blood volume did not correlate with 18F-FDG uptake. At delayed time-points, the tumor enhancement in 18F-FDG micro-PET images correlated with the delayed signal enhanced due to nanoparticle extravasation seen in CT images. The proposed hybrid imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and to be the basis for monitoring and evaluating anti-angiogenic and nano-chemotherapies.

  17. Superiority of [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT to other functional imaging modalities in the localization of SDHB-associated metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Ingo; Blanchet, Elise M.; Adams, Karen; Chen, Clara C.; Millo, Corina M.; Herscovitch, Peter; Taieb, David; Kebebew, Electron; Lehnert, Hendrik; Fojo, Antonio T.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patients with succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) mutation-related pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PHEO/PGL) are at a higher risk for metastatic disease than other hereditary PHEOs/PGLs. Current therapeutic approaches are limited but the best outcomes are based on the early and proper detection of as many lesions as possible. Because PHEOs/PGLs overexpress somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), the goal of our study was to assess the clinical utility of [68Ga]-DOTA(0)-Tyr(3)-octreotate ([68Ga]-DOTATATE) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and to evaluate its diagnostic utility in comparison to the currently recommended functional imaging modalities [18F]-fluorodopamine ([18F]-FDA), [18F]-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ([18F]-FDOPA), [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) PET/CT as well as CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Experimental Design [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT was prospectively performed in 17 patients with SDHB-related metastatic PHEOs/PGLs. All patients also underwent [18F]-FDG PET/CT and CT/MRI with 16 of the 17 patients also receiving [18F]-FDOPA and [18F]-FDA PET/CT scans. Detection rates of metastatic lesions were compared between all these functional imaging studies. A composite synthesis of all used functional and anatomical imaging studies served as the imaging comparator. Results [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT demonstrated a lesion-based detection rate of 98.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 96.5% to 99.5%), [18F]-FDG, [18F]-FDOPA, [18F]-FDA PET/CT, and CT/MRI showed detection rates of 85.8% (CI 81.3% to 89.4%) (p<0.01), 61.4% (CI 55.6% to 66.9%) (p<0.01), 51.9% (CI 46.1% to 57.7%) (p<0.01), and 84.8% (CI 80.0% to 88.5%) (p<0.01), respectively. Conclusions [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT showed a significantly superior detection rate compared to all other functional and anatomical imaging modalities and may represent the preferred future imaging modality in the evaluation of SDHB-related metastatic PHEO/PGL. PMID:25873086

  18. Use of the functional imaging modalities, f MRI r CBV and PET FDG, alters radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning in patients with malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzek, M.; Pardo, F.S.; Busierre, M.

    1995-12-31

    Malignant gliomas present one of the most difficult challenges to definitive radiation therapy, not only with respect to local control, but also with respect to clinical functional status. While tumor target volume definitions for malignant gliomas are often based on CT and conventional MRI, the functional imaging modalities, echo planar rCBV (regional cerebral blood volume mapping) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET, are more sensitive modalities for the detection of neovascularization, perhaps one of the earliest signs of glial tumor initiation and progression. In order to address the clinical utility of functional imaging in radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning, we compared tumor target volume definitions and overall dosimetry in patients either undergoing co-registration of conventional Gadolinium-enhanced MRI, or co-registration of functional imaging modalities, prior to radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning.

  19. PET/MR Imaging in Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid PET/MR imaging is a complex imaging modality that has raised high expectations not only for oncological and neurologic imaging applications, but also for cardiac imaging applications. Initially, physicians and physicists had to become accustomed to technical challenges including attenuation correction, gating, and more complex workflow and more elaborate image analysis as compared with PET/CT or standalone MR imaging. PET/MR imaging seems to be particularly valuable to assess inflammatory myocardial diseases (such as sarcoidosis), to cross-validate PET versus MR imaging data (eg, myocardial perfusion imaging), and to help validate novel biomarkers of various disease states (eg, postinfarction inflammation). PMID:27593250

  20. Aluminium hydroxide stabilised MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles as dual-modality contrasts agent for MRI and PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xianjin; Belo, Salome; Krüger, Dirk; Yan, Yong; de Rosales, Rafael T M; Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Ye, Haitao; Su, Shi; Mathe, Domokos; Kovács, Noémi; Horváth, Ildikó; Semjeni, Mariann; Sunassee, Kavitha; Szigeti, Krisztian; Green, Mark A; Blower, Philip J

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were stabilised by depositing an Al(OH)3 layer via a hydrolysis process. The particles displayed excellent colloidal stability in water and a high affinity to [(18)F]-fluoride and bisphosphonate groups. A high radiolabeling efficiency, 97% for (18)F-fluoride and 100% for (64)Cu-bisphosphonate conjugate, was achieved by simply incubating NPs with radioactivity solution at room temperature for 5 min. The properties of particles were strongly dependant on the thickness and hardness of the Al(OH)3 layer which could in turn be controlled by the hydrolysis method. The application of these Al(OH)3 coated magnetic NPs in molecular imaging has been further explored. The results demonstrated that these NPs are potential candidates as dual modal probes for MR and PET. In vivo PET imaging showed a slow release of (18)F from NPs, but no sign of efflux of (64)Cu. PMID:24768194

  1. Aluminium hydroxide stabilised MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles as dual-modality contrasts agent for MRI and PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xianjin; Belo, Salome; Krüger, Dirk; Yan, Yong; de Rosales, Rafael T.M.; Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Ye, Haitao; Su, Shi; Mathe, Domokos; Kovács, Noémi; Horváth, Ildikó; Semjeni, Mariann; Sunassee, Kavitha; Szigeti, Krisztian; Green, Mark A.; Blower, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were stabilised by depositing an Al(OH)3 layer via a hydrolysis process. The particles displayed excellent colloidal stability in water and a high affinity to [18F]-fluoride and bisphosphonate groups. A high radiolabeling efficiency, 97% for 18F-fluoride and 100% for 64Cu-bisphosphonate conjugate, was achieved by simply incubating NPs with radioactivity solution at room temperature for 5 min. The properties of particles were strongly dependant on the thickness and hardness of the Al(OH)3 layer which could in turn be controlled by the hydrolysis method. The application of these Al(OH)3 coated magnetic NPs in molecular imaging has been further explored. The results demonstrated that these NPs are potential candidates as dual modal probes for MR and PET. In vivo PET imaging showed a slow release of 18F from NPs, but no sign of efflux of 64Cu. PMID:24768194

  2. Biomedical Imaging: SPECT and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Lecomte, Roger

    2007-11-26

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are non-invasive nuclear imaging techniques relying on the use of tomographic reconstruction methods to provide 3D representations of the distribution of radiolabeled molecules in vivo. Differences in the underlying physical principles determine the achievable spatial resolution, sensitivity, specificity and observation time span of these two imaging modalities. Their specific characteristics are described and the current technology developments and design tradeoffs are reviewed.

  3. Comparison of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen–Based 18F-DCFBC PET/CT to Conventional Imaging Modalities for Detection of Hormone-Naïve and Castration-Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Ciarallo, Anthony; Mena, Esther; Blackford, Amanda; Nadal, Rosa; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Carducci, Michael A.; Ross, Ashley E.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Holt, Daniel P.; Dannals, Robert F.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.; Cho, Steve Y.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional imaging modalities (CIMs) have limited sensitivity and specificity for detection of metastatic prostate cancer. We examined the potential of a first-in-class radiofluorinated small-molecule inhibitor of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-18F-fluorobenzyl-l-cysteine (18F-DCFBC), to detect metastatic hormone-naïve (HNPC) and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods Seventeen patients were prospectively enrolled (9 HNPC and 8 CRPC); 16 had CIM evidence of new or progressive metastatic prostate cancer and 1 had high clinical suspicion of metastatic disease. 18F-DCFBC PET/CT imaging was obtained with 2 successive PET scans starting at 2 h after injection. Patients were imaged with CIM at approximately the time of PET. A lesion-by-lesion analysis of PET to CIM was performed in the context of either HNPC or CRPC. The patients were followed with available clinical imaging as a reference standard to determine the true nature of identified lesions on PET and CIM. Results On the lesion-by-lesion analysis, 18F-DCFBC PET was able to detect a larger number of lesions (592 positive with 63 equivocal) than CIM (520 positive with 61 equivocal) overall, in both HNPC and CRPC patients. 18F-DCFBC PET detection of lymph nodes, bone lesions, and visceral lesions was superior to CIM. When intrapatient clustering effects were considered, 18F-DCFBC PET was estimated to be positive in a large proportion of lesions that would be negative or equivocal on CIM (0.45). On follow-up, the sensitivity of 18F-DCFBC PET (0.92) was superior to CIM (0.71). 18F-DCFBC tumor uptake was increased at the later PET time point (∼2.5 h after injection), with background uptake showing a decreasing trend on later PET. Conclusion PET imaging with 18F-DCFBC, a small-molecule PSMA-targeted radiotracer, detected more lesions than CIM and promises to diagnose and stage patients with metastatic prostate cancer more accurately than current

  4. Fungal rhinosinusitis and imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Gorovoy, Ian R.; Kazanjian, Mia; Kersten, Robert C.; Kim, H. Jane; Vagefi, M. Reza

    2012-01-01

    This report provides an overview of fungal rhinosinusitis with a particular focus on acute fulminant invasive fungal sinusitis (AFIFS). Imaging modalities and findings that aid in diagnosis and surgical planning are reviewed with a pathophysiologic focus. In addition, the differential diagnosis based on imaging suggestive of AFIFS is considered. PMID:23961027

  5. FDG-PET imaging in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Valls, L; Badve, C; Avril, S; Herrmann, K; Faulhaber, P; O'Donnell, J; Avril, N

    2016-07-01

    The majority of aggressive lymphomas is characterized by an up regulated glycolytic activity, which enables the visualization by F-18 FDG-PET/CT. One-stop hybrid FDG-PET/CT combines the functional and morphologic information, outperforming both, CT and FDG-PET as separate imaging modalities. This has resulted in several recommendations using FDG-PET/CT for staging, restaging, monitoring during therapy, and assessment of treatment response as well as identification of malignant transformation. FDG-PET/CT may obviate the need for a bone marrow biopsy in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. FDG-PET/CT response assessment is recommended for FDG-avid lymphomas, whereas CT-based response evaluation remains important in lymphomas with low or variable FDG avidity. The treatment induced change in metabolic activity allows for assessment of response after completion of therapy as well as prediction of outcome early during therapy. The five-point scale Deauville Criteria allows the assessment of treatment response based on visual FDG-PET analysis. Although the use of FDG-PET/CT for prediction of therapeutic response is promising it should only be conducted in the context of clinical trials. Surveillance FDG-PET/CT after complete remission is discouraged due to the relative high number of false-positive findings, which in turn may result in further unnecessary investigations. Future directions include the use of new PET tracers such as F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT), a surrogate biomarker of cellular proliferation and Ga-68 CXCR4, a chemokine receptor imaging biomarker as well as innovative digital PET/CT and PET/MRI techniques. PMID:27090170

  6. Hybrid PET/MR imaging: physics and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shetal N; Huang, Steve S

    2015-08-01

    In just over a decade, hybrid imaging with FDG PET/CT has become a standard bearer in the management of cancer patients. An exquisitely sensitive whole-body imaging modality, it combines the ability to detect subtle biologic changes with FDG PET and the anatomic information offered by CT scans. With advances in MR technology and advent of novel targeted PET radiotracers, hybrid PET/MRI is an evolutionary technique that is poised to revolutionize hybrid imaging. It offers unparalleled spatial resolution and functional multi-parametric data combined with biologic information in the non-invasive detection and characterization of diseases, without the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. This article reviews the basic principles of FDG PET and MR imaging, discusses the salient technical developments of hybrid PET/MR systems, and provides an introduction to FDG PET/MR image acquisition. PMID:25985965

  7. Imaging modalities in spinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kricun, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an approach to the various imaging modalities used to view the spine. It discusses the indications, limitations and practical use of each in the diagnosis, work-up and staging of various spinal disorders, and compares each of them in various clinical settings. Topics covered include low back pain syndrome, disk disease, spinal cord lesions, congenital abnormalities, and trauma.

  8. Cerenkov imaging - a new modality for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thorek, Daniel LJ; Robertson, Robbie; Bacchus, Wassifa A; Hahn, Jaeseung; Rothberg, Julie; Beattie, Bradley J; Grimm, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is an emerging hybrid modality that utilizes the light emission from many commonly used medical isotopes. Cerenkov radiation (CR) is produced when charged particles travel through a dielectric medium faster than the speed of light in that medium. First described in detail nearly 100 years ago, CR has only recently applied for biomedical imaging purposes. The modality is of considerable interest as it enables the use of widespread luminescence imaging equipment to visualize clinical diagnostic (all PET radioisotopes) and many therapeutic radionuclides. The amount of light detected in CLI applications is significantly lower than other that in other optical imaging techniques such as bioluminescence and fluorescence. However, significant advantages include the use of approved radiotracers and lack of an incident light source, resulting in high signal to background ratios. As well, multiple subjects may be imaged concurrently (up to 5 in common bioluminescent equipment), conferring both cost and time benefits. This review summarizes the field of Cerenkov luminescence imaging to date. Applications of CLI discussed include intraoperative radionuclide-guided surgery, monitoring of therapeutic efficacy, tomographic optical imaging capabilities, and the ability to perform multiplexed imaging using fluorophores excited by the Cerenkov radiation. While technical challenges still exist, Cerenkov imaging has materialized as an important molecular imaging modality. PMID:23133811

  9. PET Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlbom, Magnus

    Positron Emission Tomography or PET is a noninvasive molecular imaging method used both in research to study biology and disease, and clinically as a routine diagnostic imaging tool. In PET imaging, the subject is injected with a tracer labeled with a positron-emitting isotope and is then placed in a scanner to localize the radioactive tracer in the body. The localization of the tracer utilizes the unique decay characteristics of isotopes decaying by positron emission. In the PET scanner, a large number of scintillation detectors use coincidence detection of the annihilation radiation that is emitted as a result of the positron decay. By collecting a large number of these coincidence events, together with tomographic image reconstruction methods, the 3-D distribution of the radioactive tracer in the body can be reconstructed. Depending on the type of tracer used, the distribution will reflect a particular biological process, such as glucose metabolism when fluoro-deoxyglucose is used. PET has evolved from a relatively inefficient single-slice imaging system with relatively poor spatial resolution to an efficient, high-resolution imaging modality which can acquire a whole-body scan in a few minutes. This chapter will describe the basic physics and instrumentation used in PET. The various corrections that are necessary to apply to the acquired data in order to produce quantitative images are also described. Finally, some of the latest trends in instrumentation development are also discussed.

  10. PET Imaging - from Physics to Clinical Molecular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Stan

    2008-03-01

    From the beginnings many years ago in a few physics laboratories and first applications as a research brain function imager, PET became lately a leading molecular imaging modality used in diagnosis, staging and therapy monitoring of cancer, as well as has increased use in assessment of brain function (early diagnosis of Alzheimer's, etc) and in cardiac function. To assist with anatomic structure map and with absorption correction CT is often used with PET in a duo system. Growing interest in the last 5-10 years in dedicated organ specific PET imagers (breast, prostate, brain, etc) presents again an opportunity to the particle physics instrumentation community to contribute to the important field of medical imaging. In addition to the bulky standard ring structures, compact, economical and high performance mobile imagers are being proposed and build. The latest development in standard PET imaging is introduction of the well known TOF concept enabling clearer tomographic pictures of the patient organs. Development and availability of novel photodetectors such as Silicon PMT immune to magnetic fields offers an exciting opportunity to use PET in conjunction with MRI and fMRI. As before with avalanche photodiodes, particle physics community plays a leading role in developing these devices. The presentation will mostly focus on present and future opportunities for better PET designs based on new technologies and methods: new scintillators, photodetectors, readout, software.

  11. MR-based Motion Correction for PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Li, Quanzheng; Fakhri, Georges El

    2012-01-01

    PET image quality is limited by patient motion. Emission data are blurred due to cardiac and/or respiratory motion. Although spatial resolution is 4 mm for standard clinical whole-body PET scanners, the effective resolution can be a low as 1 cm due to motion. Additionally, the deformation of attenuation medium causes image artifacts. Previously, gating is used to “freeze” the motion, but leads to significantly increased noise level. Simultaneous PET-MR modality offers a new way to perform PET motion correction. MR can be used to measure 3D motion fields, which can then be incorporated into the iterative PET reconstruction to obtain motion corrected PET images. In this report, we present MR imaging techniques to acquire dynamic images, a non-rigid image registration algorithm to extract motion fields from acquired MR images, and a PET reconstruction algorithm with motion correction. We also present results from both phantom and in-vivo animal PET-MR studies. We demonstrate that MR-based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR improves image quality and lesion detectability compared to gating and to no motion correction. PMID:23178089

  12. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  13. [Imaging modalities in psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hermann, K-G A; Ohrndorf, S; Werner, S G; Finzel, S; Backhaus, M

    2013-10-01

    This review presents an overview of the range of imaging modalities used in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Conventional radiography is used to detect structural changes of the joints and tendon attachments. These changes occur late in the course of PsA hence conventional radiography contributes little to the early detection of PsA; however, the detection of periosteal proliferations on radiographs allows a relatively specific diagnosis of PsA. Skeletal scintigraphy and computed tomography are rarely used in PsA. Arthrosonography (ultrasound of the joints) is gaining increasing importance in the early identification of inflammatory soft tissue signs of PsA in the peripheral joints. Sonography enables early detection of synovitis and tenosynovitis as well as superficial erosions and also inflammatory processes of the tendon attachments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for identifying possible involvement of the axial skeleton. Moreover, it allows good visualization of periostitis and arthritis. High resolution microcomputed tomography is an interesting novel diagnostic tool which allows highly sensitive evaluation of the bone structure and can detect very tiny bone lesions where typical signs of PsA are omega-shaped erosions and small corona-like spikes. Another interesting new diagnostic technique is fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) with the Xiralite system which is highly sensitive for detecting inflammatory processes of the hands. PMID:24085530

  14. Multi-modality systems for molecular tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingze; Bai, Jing

    2009-11-01

    In vivo small animal imaging is a cornerstone in the study of human diseases by providing important clues on the pathogenesis, progression and treatment of many disorders. Molecular tomographic imaging can probe complex biologic interactions dynamically and to study diseases and treatment responses over time in the same animal. Current imaging technique including microCT, microMRI, microPET, microSPECT, microUS, BLT and FMT has its own advantages and applications, however, none of them can provide structural, functional and molecular information in one context. Multi-modality imaging, which utilizes the strengths of different modalities to provide a complete understanding of the object under investigation, emerges as an important alternative in small animal imaging. This article is to introduce the latest development of multimodality systems for small animal tomographic imaging. After a systematic review of imaging principles, systems and commerical products for each stand-alone method, we introduce some multimodality strategies in the latest years. In particular, two dual-modality systems, i.e. FMT-CT and FMT-PET are presented in detail. The end of this article concludes that though most multimodality systems are still in a laboratory research stage, they will surely undergo deep development and wide application in the near future.

  15. PET/MR Imaging for Chest Diseases: Review of Initial Studies on Pulmonary Nodules and Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soon Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Sang Min; Park, Chang Min; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2015-05-01

    PET/MR imaging, a new hybrid modality, is thought to have great potential in oncologic imaging because it provides advantages of both PET, which allows functional imaging capability, and MR imaging, which allows high spatial resolution imaging without radiation exposure. Despite the inherent weakness of MR imaging in lung imaging, initial studies on lung cancer revealed that PET/MR imaging showed highly correlated standardized uptake values of lesions and equivalent performance in terms of lesion detection and staging compared with PET/computed tomography (CT). Thus, to affirm the actual clinical benefits of dedicated PET/MR imaging over PET/CT, prospective studies with more patients are warranted. PMID:25952518

  16. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew L; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Stortz, Greg; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Zhang, Xuezhu; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT) in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay) and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution. PMID:25120157

  17. Development of a PET scanner for simultaneously imaging small animals with MRI and PET.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew L; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Stortz, Greg; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Zhang, Xuezhu; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT) in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay) and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution. PMID:25120157

  18. PET Imaging of Inflammation Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chenxi; Li, Fang; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in many disease processes. Development in molecular imaging in recent years provides new insight into the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of various inflammatory diseases and diseases involving inflammatory process. Positron emission tomography using 18F-FDG has been successfully applied in clinical oncology and neurology and in the inflammation realm. In addition to glucose metabolism, a variety of targets for inflammation imaging are being discovered and utilized, some of which are considered superior to FDG for imaging inflammation. This review summarizes the potential inflammation imaging targets and corresponding PET tracers, and the applications of PET in major inflammatory diseases and tumor associated inflammation. Also, the current attempt in differentiating inflammation from tumor using PET is also discussed. PMID:23843893

  19. Multi-modality molecular imaging: pre-clinical laboratory configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanjun; Wellen, Jeremy W.; Sarkar, Susanta K.

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, the prevalence of in vivo molecular imaging applications has rapidly increased. Here we report on the construction of a multi-modality imaging facility in a pharmaceutical setting that is expected to further advance existing capabilities for in vivo imaging of drug distribution and the interaction with their target. The imaging instrumentation in our facility includes a microPET scanner, a four wavelength time-domain optical imaging scanner, a 9.4T/30cm MRI scanner and a SPECT/X-ray CT scanner. An electronics shop and a computer room dedicated to image analysis are additional features of the facility. The layout of the facility was designed with a central animal preparation room surrounded by separate laboratory rooms for each of the major imaging modalities to accommodate the work-flow of simultaneous in vivo imaging experiments. This report will focus on the design of and anticipated applications for our microPET and optical imaging laboratory spaces. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to maximize the daily throughput of animal scans through development of efficient experimental work-flows and the use of multiple animals in a single scanning session.

  20. Dual-modal whole eye photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; Ren, Qiushi; Li, Changhui

    2014-09-01

    We developed a prototype dual-modal ocular imaging system integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging modalities. This system can perform high-resolution ocular imaging from the anterior region down to the fundus area. The novel system successfully imaged the murine eyes in vivo, including iris, lens, retina, and retinal pigment epithelium. Our results demonstrated that this system has a great potential in the diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases.

  1. PET Imaging in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Roussakis, Andreas-Antonios; Piccini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    To date, little is known about how neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation propagate in Huntington's disease (HD). Unfortunately, no treatment is available to cure or reverse the progressive decline of function caused by the disease, thus considering HD a fatal disease. Mutation gene carriers typically remain asymptomatic for many years although alterations in the basal ganglia and cortex occur early on in mutant HD gene-carriers. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a functional imaging technique of nuclear medicine which enables in vivo visualization of numerous biological molecules expressed in several human tissues. Brain PET is most powerful to study in vivo neuronal and glial cells function as well as cerebral blood flow in a plethora of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's and HD. In absence of HD-specific biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, previous PET studies in HD were merely focused on the study of dopaminergic terminals, cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in manifest and premanifest HD-gene carriers. More recently, research interest has been exploring novel PET targets in HD including the state of phosphodiesterse expression and the role of activated microglia. Hence, a better understanding of the HD pathogenesis mechanisms may lead to the development of targeted therapies. PET imaging follow-up studies with novel selective PET radiotracers such as 11C-IMA-107 and 11C-PBR28 may provide insight on disease progression and identify prognostic biomarkers, elucidate the underlying HD pathology and assess novel pharmaceutical agents and over time. PMID:26683130

  2. Image reconstruction for PET/CT scanners: past achievements and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Shan; Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    PET is a medical imaging modality with proven clinical value for disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring. The integration of PET and CT on modern scanners provides a synergy of the two imaging modalities. Through different mathematical algorithms, PET data can be reconstructed into the spatial distribution of the injected radiotracer. With dynamic imaging, kinetic parameters of specific biological processes can also be determined. Numerous efforts have been devoted to the development of PET image reconstruction methods over the last four decades, encompassing analytic and iterative reconstruction methods. This article provides an overview of the commonly used methods. Current challenges in PET image reconstruction include more accurate quantitation, TOF imaging, system modeling, motion correction and dynamic reconstruction. Advances in these aspects could enhance the use of PET/CT imaging in patient care and in clinical research studies of pathophysiology and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21339831

  3. A method of image registration for small animal, multi-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Chow, Patrick L; Stout, David B; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Chatziioannou, Arion F

    2006-01-21

    Many research institutions have a full suite of preclinical tomographic scanners to answer biomedical questions in vivo. Routine multi-modality imaging requires robust registration of images generated by various tomographs. We have implemented a hardware registration method for preclinical imaging that is similar to that used in the combined positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners in the clinic. We designed an imaging chamber which can be rigidly and reproducibly mounted on separate microPET and microCT scanners. We have also designed a three-dimensional grid phantom with 1288 lines that is used to generate the spatial transformation matrix from software registration using a 15-parameter perspective model. The imaging chamber works in combination with the registration phantom synergistically to achieve the image registration goal. We verified that the average registration error between two imaging modalities is 0.335 mm using an in vivo mouse bone scan. This paper also estimates the impact of image misalignment on PET quantitation using attenuation corrections generated from misregistered images. Our technique is expected to produce PET quantitation errors of less than 5%. The methods presented are robust and appropriate for routine use in high throughput animal imaging facilities. PMID:16394345

  4. Multivariate Chemical Image Fusion of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging Modalities.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Aoife A; Dorrepaal, Ronan M

    2016-01-01

    Chemical image fusion refers to the combination of chemical images from different modalities for improved characterisation of a sample. Challenges associated with existing approaches include: difficulties with imaging the same sample area or having identical pixels across microscopic modalities, lack of prior knowledge of sample composition and lack of knowledge regarding correlation between modalities for a given sample. In addition, the multivariate structure of chemical images is often overlooked when fusion is carried out. We address these challenges by proposing a framework for multivariate chemical image fusion of vibrational spectroscopic imaging modalities, demonstrating the approach for image registration, fusion and resolution enhancement of chemical images obtained with IR and Raman microscopy. PMID:27384549

  5. PET/CT imaging in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, A; Lopci, E; Conte, M; Foppiani, L; Garaventa, A; Cabria, M; Villavecchia, G; Fanti, S; Cistaro, A

    2013-03-01

    123Iodine-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy is currently the tracer of choice for neuroblastoma (NB). It has high diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value for the assessment of patients after chemotherapy. A positive 123I-MIBG scan is also used for the basis of targeted radionuclide therapy with 131I-MIBG. I-123 MIBG scan however has some limitations which should be taken into account. Moreover the reasons for false negative MIBG results have not been entirely elucidated. Meticulous correlation with radiological examinations and recognition of the normal distribution pattern of 123I-MIBG in children is vital to obtain optimal results. With its technical superiorities, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can be successfully introduced into the diagnostic workup of NB. Different PET tracers have been offered for imaging in patients with NB, and the efficacy of this modality has been compared with that of 123I-MIBG scan. Our review aims to analyze the present role of PET/CT imaging and radiopharmaceuticals in NB. PMID:23474633

  6. Evolution of imaging in rectal cancer: multimodality imaging with MDCT, MRI, and PET.

    PubMed

    Raman, Siva P; Chen, Yifei; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), and positron emission tomography (PET) are complementary imaging modalities in the preoperative staging of patients with rectal cancer, and each offers their own individual strengths and weaknesses. MRI is the best available radiologic modality for the local staging of rectal cancers, and can play an important role in accurately distinguishing which patients should receive preoperative chemoradiation prior to total mesorectal excision. Alternatively, both MDCT and PET are considered primary modalities when performing preoperative distant staging, but are limited in their ability to locally stage rectal malignancies. This review details the role of each of these three modalities in rectal cancer staging, and how the three imaging modalities can be used in conjunction. PMID:25830037

  7. Evolution of imaging in rectal cancer: multimodality imaging with MDCT, MRI, and PET

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yifei; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), and positron emission tomography (PET) are complementary imaging modalities in the preoperative staging of patients with rectal cancer, and each offers their own individual strengths and weaknesses. MRI is the best available radiologic modality for the local staging of rectal cancers, and can play an important role in accurately distinguishing which patients should receive preoperative chemoradiation prior to total mesorectal excision. Alternatively, both MDCT and PET are considered primary modalities when performing preoperative distant staging, but are limited in their ability to locally stage rectal malignancies. This review details the role of each of these three modalities in rectal cancer staging, and how the three imaging modalities can be used in conjunction. PMID:25830037

  8. TU-C-BRD-01: Image Guided SBRT I: Multi-Modality 4D Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, J; Mageras, G; Pan, T

    2014-06-15

    Motion management is one of the critical technical challenges for radiation therapy. 4D imaging has been rapidly adopted as essential tool to assess organ motion associated with respiratory breathing. A variety of 4D imaging techniques have been developed and are currently under development based on different imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, PET, and CBCT. Each modality provides specific and complementary information about organ and tumor respiratory motion. Effective use of each different technique or combined use of different techniques can introduce a comprehensive management of tumor motion. Specifically, these techniques have afforded tremendous opportunities to better define and delineate tumor volumes, more accurately perform patient positioning, and effectively apply highly conformal therapy techniques such as IMRT and SBRT. Successful implementation requires good understanding of not only each technique, including unique features, limitations, artifacts, imaging acquisition and process, but also how to systematically apply the information obtained from different imaging modalities using proper tools such as deformable image registration. Furthermore, it is important to understand the differences in the effects of breathing variation between different imaging modalities. A comprehensive motion management strategy using multi-modality 4D imaging has shown promise in improving patient care, but at the same time faces significant challenges. This session will focuses on the current status and advances in imaging respiration-induced organ motion with different imaging modalities: 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, 4D-PET, and 4D-CBCT/DTS. Learning Objectives: Understand the need and role of multimodality 4D imaging in radiation therapy. Understand the underlying physics behind each 4D imaging technique. Recognize the advantages and limitations of each 4D imaging technique.

  9. Development of a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Hamamura, Fuka; Kato, Katsuhiko; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov-light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects visible photons from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. However, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging remains unclear. If a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system were developed, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging would be clarified by directly comparing these two imaging modalities. Methods: The authors developed and tested a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system that consists of a dual-head PET system, a reflection mirror located above the subject, and a high sensitivity charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The authors installed these systems inside a black box for imaging the Cerenkov-light. The dual-head PET system employed a 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm{sup 3} GSO arranged in a 33 × 33 matrix that was optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube to form a GSO block detector. The authors arranged two GSO block detectors 10 cm apart and positioned the subject between them. The Cerenkov-light above the subject is reflected by the mirror and changes its direction to the side of the PET system and is imaged by the high sensitivity CCD camera. Results: The dual-head PET system had a spatial resolution of ∼1.2 mm FWHM and sensitivity of ∼0.31% at the center of the FOV. The Cerenkov-light imaging system's spatial resolution was ∼275μm for a {sup 22}Na point source. Using the combined PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, the authors successfully obtained fused images from simultaneously acquired images. The image distributions are sometimes different due to the light transmission and absorption in the body of the subject in the Cerenkov-light images. In simultaneous imaging of rat, the authors found that {sup 18}F-FDG accumulation was observed mainly in the Harderian gland on the PET image, while the distribution of Cerenkov-light was observed in the eyes. Conclusions: The authors conclude that their developed PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid

  10. PET imaging: An overview and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Daghighian, F.; Sumida, R.; Phelps, M.E. )

    1990-03-01

    This is the first article of a four-part series on positron emission tomography (PET). Upon completing the article, the reader should be able to: (1) comprehend the basic principles of PET; (2) explain various technical aspects; and (3) identify radiopharmaceuticals used in PET imaging.

  11. Imaging modalities in cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Reema; Clifford, Sarah M; Ghanbari, Hamid; Schmidt, Martin; Segerson, Nathan M; Daccarett, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac imaging, both noninvasive and invasive, has become a crucial part of evaluating patients during the electrophysiology procedure experience. These anatomical data allow electrophysiologists to not only assess who is an appropriate candidate for each procedure, but also to determine the rate of success from these procedures. This article incorporates a review of the various cardiac imaging techniques available today, with a focus on atrial arrhythmias, ventricular arrhythmias and device therapy. PMID:20014991

  12. Monitoring proton radiation therapy with in-room PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuping; España, Samuel; Daartz, Juliane; Liebsch, Norbert; Ouyang, Jinsong; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas R; El Fakhri, Georges

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We used a mobile PET scanner positioned within the proton therapy treatment room to study the feasibility of proton range verification with an in-room, stand-alone PET system, and compared with off-line equivalent studies. Methods and materials Two subjects with adenoid cystic carcinoma were enrolled into a pilot study in which in-room PET scans were acquired in list-mode after a routine fractionated treatment session. The list-mode PET data were reconstructed with different time schemes to generate in-room short, in-room long and off-line equivalent (by skipping coincidences from the first 15 minutes during the list-mode reconstruction) PET images for comparison in activity distribution patterns. A phantom study was followed to evaluate the accuracy of range verification for different reconstruction time schemes quantitatively. Results The in-room PET has a higher sensitivity compared to the off-line modality so that the PET acquisition time can be greatly reduced from 30 min to <5 min. Features in deep-site, soft-tissue regions were better retained with in-room short PET acquisitions because of the collection of 15O component and lower biological washout. For soft tissue-equivalent material, the distal fall-off edge of an in-room short acquisition is deeper compared to an off-line equivalent scan, indicating a better coverage of the high-dose end of the beam. Conclusions In-room PET is a promising low cost, high sensitivity modality for the in vivo verification of proton therapy. Better accuracy in Monte Carlo predictions, especially for biological decay modeling, is necessary. PMID:21677366

  13. Engineering of radiolabeled iron oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Ai, Fanrong; Ferreira, Carolina A; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2016-07-01

    Over the last decade, radiolabeled iron oxide nanoparticles have been developed as promising contrast agents for dual-modality positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) or single-photon emission computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (SPECT/MRI). The combination of PET (or SPECT) with MRI can offer synergistic advantages for noninvasive, sensitive, high-resolution, and quantitative imaging, which is suitable for early detection of various diseases such as cancer. Here, we summarize the recent advances on radiolabeled iron oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality imaging, through the use of a variety of PET (and SPECT) isotopes by using both chelator-based and chelator-free radiolabeling techniques. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:619-630. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1386. PMID:26692551

  14. Accuracy and reproducibility of tumor positioning during prolonged and multi-modality animal imaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mutian; Huang, Minming; Le, Carl; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Claus, Filip; Kolbert, Katherine S.; Martin, Kyle; Ling, C. Clifton; Koutcher, Jason A.; Humm, John L.

    2008-10-01

    Dedicated small-animal imaging devices, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, are being increasingly used for translational molecular imaging studies. The objective of this work was to determine the positional accuracy and precision with which tumors in situ can be reliably and reproducibly imaged on dedicated small-animal imaging equipment. We designed, fabricated and tested a custom rodent cradle with a stereotactic template to facilitate registration among image sets. To quantify tumor motion during our small-animal imaging protocols, 'gold standard' multi-modality point markers were inserted into tumor masses on the hind limbs of rats. Three types of imaging examination were then performed with the animals continuously anesthetized and immobilized: (i) consecutive microPET and MR images of tumor xenografts in which the animals remained in the same scanner for 2 h duration, (ii) multi-modality imaging studies in which the animals were transported between distant imaging devices and (iii) serial microPET scans in which the animals were repositioned in the same scanner for subsequent images. Our results showed that the animal tumor moved by less than 0.2-0.3 mm over a continuous 2 h microPET or MR imaging session. The process of transporting the animal between instruments introduced additional errors of ~0.2 mm. In serial animal imaging studies, the positioning reproducibility within ~0.8 mm could be obtained.

  15. Inter-modality variation in gross tumor volume delineation in 18FDG-PET guided IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Yulin; Chan, Maria; Burman, Chandra; Cann, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Rapid advances in 18FDG-PET/CT technology and novel co-registration algorithms have created a strong interest in 18FDG-PET/CT's application in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Accurate target volume delineation, particularly identification of pathologically positive lymph nodes, could translate into favorable treatment outcome. However, gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation on both CT and 18FDG-PET is very sensitive to observer variation. The objectives of the study were to investigate the inter-modality variation in gross tumor volume delineation defined by two imaging modalities for lung cancer: CT and 18FDG-PET/CT and its dosimetric implications in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). PMID:17946204

  16. Feasibility and Initial Performance of Simultaneous SPECT-CT Imaging Using a Commercial Multi-Modality Preclinical Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Dustin R.; Austin, Derek W.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging provides coregistered PET-CT and SPECT-CT images; however such multi-modality workflows usually consist of sequential scans from the individual imaging components for each modality. This typical workflow may result in long scan times limiting throughput of the imaging system. Conversely, acquiring multi-modality data simultaneously may improve correlation and registration of images, improve temporal alignment of the acquired data, increase imaging throughput, and benefit the scanned subject by minimizing time under anesthetic. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility and procedure for modifying a commercially available preclinical SPECT-CT platform to enable simultaneous SPECT-CT acquisition. We also evaluate the performance of simultaneous SPECT-CT tomographic imaging with this modified system. Performance was accessed using a 57Co source and image quality was evaluated with 99mTc phantoms in a series of simultaneous SPECT-CT scans. PMID:26146568

  17. Noninvasive imaging modalities to visualize atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is becoming a major cause of death in the world due to global epidemic of diabetes and obesity. For the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, it is necessary to detect high-risk atherosclerotic plaques prior to events. Recent technological advances enable to visualize atherosclerotic plaques noninvasively. This ability of noninvasive imaging helps to refine cardiovascular risk assessment in various individuals, select optimal therapeutic strategy and evaluate the efficacy of medical therapies. In this review, we discuss the role of the currently available imaging modalities including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography. Advantages and disadvantages of each noninvasive imaging modality will be also summarized. PMID:27500092

  18. Noninvasive imaging modalities to visualize atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Shishikura, Daisuke

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is becoming a major cause of death in the world due to global epidemic of diabetes and obesity. For the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, it is necessary to detect high-risk atherosclerotic plaques prior to events. Recent technological advances enable to visualize atherosclerotic plaques noninvasively. This ability of noninvasive imaging helps to refine cardiovascular risk assessment in various individuals, select optimal therapeutic strategy and evaluate the efficacy of medical therapies. In this review, we discuss the role of the currently available imaging modalities including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography. Advantages and disadvantages of each noninvasive imaging modality will be also summarized. PMID:27500092

  19. Quantitative simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Whole-body PET is currently limited by the degradation due to patient motion. Respiratory motion degrades imaging studies of the abdomen. Similarly, both respiratory and cardiac motions significantly hamper the assessment of myocardial ischemia and/or metabolism in perfusion and viability cardiac PET studies. Based on simultaneous PET-MR, we have developed robust and accurate MRI methods allowing the tracking and measurement of both respiratory and cardiac motions during abdominal or cardiac studies. Our list-mode iterative PET reconstruction framework incorporates the measured motion fields into PET emission system matrix as well as the time-dependent PET attenuation map and the position dependent point spread function. Our method significantly enhances the PET image quality as compared to conventional methods.

  20. Principles of PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Disselhorst, Jonathan A; Bezrukov, Ilja; Kolb, Armin; Parl, Christoph; Pichler, Bernd J

    2014-05-12

    Hybrid PET/MR systems have rapidly progressed from the prototype stage to systems that are increasingly being used in the clinics. This review provides an overview of developments in hybrid PET/MR systems and summarizes the current state of the art in PET/MR instrumentation, correction techniques, and data analysis. The strong magnetic field requires considerable changes in the manner by which PET images are acquired and has led, among others, to the development of new PET detectors, such as silicon photomultipliers. During more than a decade of active PET/MR development, several system designs have been described. The technical background of combined PET/MR systems is explained and related challenges are discussed. The necessity for PET attenuation correction required new methods based on MR data. Therefore, an overview of recent developments in this field is provided. Furthermore, MR-based motion correction techniques for PET are discussed, as integrated PET/MR systems provide a platform for measuring motion with high temporal resolution without additional instrumentation. The MR component in PET/MR systems can provide functional information about disease processes or brain function alongside anatomic images. Against this background, we point out new opportunities for data analysis in this new field of multimodal molecular imaging. PMID:24819419

  1. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  2. Advances in multimodality imaging through a hybrid PET/MRI system.

    PubMed

    Fatemi-Ardekani, Ali; Samavati, Navid; Tang, Jin; Kamath, Markad V

    2009-01-01

    The development of integrated imaging systems for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) is currently being explored in a number of laboratories and industrial settings. PET/MRI scanners for both preclinical and human research applications are being developed. PET/MRI overcomes many limitations of PET/computed tomography (CT), such as limited tissue contrast and high radiation doses delivered to the patient or the animal being studied. In addition, recent PET/MRI designs allow for simultaneous rather than sequential acquisition of PET and MRI data, which could not have been achieved through a combination of PET and CT scanners. In a combined PET/CT scanner, while both scanners share a common patient bed, they are hard-wired back-to-back and therefore do not allow simultaneous data acquisition. While PET/MRI offers the possibility of novel imaging strategies, it also creates considerable challenges for acquiring artifact-free images from both modalities. In this review, we discuss motivations, challenges, and potential research applications of developing PET/MRI technology. A brief overview of both MRI and PET is presented and preclinical and clinical applications of PET/MRI are identified. Finally, issues and concerns about image quality, clinical practice, and economic feasibility are discussed. PMID:20565381

  3. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sogbein, Oyebola O.; Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Schindler, Thomas H.; Wei, Lihui; Wells, R. Glenn; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed. PMID:24901002

  4. Proton Therapy Verification with PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuping; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to uncertainties introduced during treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of proton induced positron emitter distributions is the only practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of proton therapy. This article reviews the current status of proton therapy verification with PET imaging. The different data detecting systems (in-beam, in-room and off-line PET), calculation methods for the prediction of proton induced PET activity distributions, and approaches for data evaluation are discussed. PMID:24312147

  5. Tri-modality small animal imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, B.K.; Stolin, A.V.; Pole, J.; Baumgart, L.; Fontaine, M.; Wojcik, R.; Kross, B.; Zorn, C.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M.B.

    2006-02-01

    Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

  6. Compton coincidence volumetric imaging: a new x-ray volumetric imaging modality based on Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochao

    2014-03-01

    Compton scattering is a dominant interaction during radiography and computed tomography x-ray imaging. However, the scattered photons are not used for extracting imaging information, but seriously degrade image quality. Here we introduce a new scheme that overcomes most of the problems associated with existing Compton scattering imaging schemes and allows Compton scattered photons to be effectively used for imaging. In our scheme, referred as Compton coincidence volumetric imaging (CCVI), a collimated monoenergetic x-ray beam is directed onto a thin semiconductor detector. A small portion of the photons is Compton scattered by the detector and their energy loss is detected. Some of the scattered photons intersect the imaging object, where they are Compton scattered a second time. The finally scattered photons are recorded by an areal energy resolving detector panel around the object. The two detectors work in coincidence mode. CCVI images the spatial electron density distribution in the imaging object. Similar to PET imaging, the event location can be located within a curve; therefore the imaging reconstruction algorithms are also similar to those of PET. Two statistical iterative imaging reconstruction algorithms are tested. Our study verifies the feasibility of CCVI in imaging acquisition and reconstruction. Various aspects of CCVI are discussed. If successfully implemented, it will offer a great potential for imaging dose reduction compared with x-ray CT. Furthermore, a CCVI modality will have no moving parts, which potentially offers cost reduction and faster imaging speed.

  7. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Minnie

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents. PMID:27398218

  8. MR Imaging-Guided Partial Volume Correction of PET Data in PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Dickson, John; Arridge, Simon; Atkinson, David; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hutton, Brian F

    2016-04-01

    Partial volume effects are caused by the limited spatial resolution of the PET system. There is increasing evidence that partial volume correction (PVC) is necessary to guarantee quantitative accuracy in PET; however, there is reluctance to apply PVC routinely in clinical practice, partly because of uncertainty regarding the method of choice. To perform accurate PVC, it is necessary to introduce information from high-resolution anatomic images, such as MR imaging. All the methods rely on accurate coregistration between the anatomic image and the PET image. PET/MR imaging offers clear advantages for PVC and can help alleviate the image registration issues. PMID:26952729

  9. PET Imaging of Skeletal Metastases and Its Role in Personalizing Further Management.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Abhishek; Azad, Gurdip Kaur; Cook, Gary J

    2016-07-01

    In oncology, the skeleton is one of the most frequently encountered sites for metastatic disease and thus early detection not only has an impact on an individual patient's management but also on the overall outcome. Multiparametric and multimodal hybrid PET/computed tomography and PET/MR imaging have revolutionized imaging for bone metastases, but irrespective of tumor biology or morphology of the bone lesion it remains unclear which imaging modality is the most clinically relevant to guide individualized cancer care. In this review, we highlight the current clinical challenges of PET imaging in evaluation and quantification of skeletal tumor burden and its impact on personalized cancer management. PMID:27321034

  10. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, C.; Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L.; Byars, L.; Michel, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N. J.

    2013-02-01

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner.

  11. Positron emission tomography: a technology assessment of PET imaging--past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Frazee, David

    2004-01-01

    Emerging from its origins in the basements of research laboratories, positron emission tomography (PET), has established itself as a premier clinical imaging modality. It just took 50 years to get there. PET and the ever-popular, dual imaging modality combination of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have taken hold of the spotlight at the national meetings of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM)--and they are not about to give it up. Many major imaging manufacturers--those companies that make up the majority of imaging sales in the US--now offer some type of PET and or PET/CT scanner. The technology of PET imaging continues to improve in image resolution, speed, and acceptance by its skeptical, but continually growing, referral base. With the increasing number of regional cyclotron facilities throughout the US each year, the abundance of mobile PET companies competing for business, and, most important, the number of clinical procedures that now qualify for reimbursement, more facilities now have the ability to implement PETimaging. This article discusses the progress of PET, from its beginnings 50 years ago, to where it is today--and the direction it is headed in the future. PMID:15633509

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of medical imaging modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.

    1998-09-01

    Because continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations can be nearly exact simulations of physical reality (within data limitations, geometric approximations, transport algorithms, etc.), it follows that one should be able to closely approximate the results of many experiments from first-principles computations. This line of reasoning has led to various MCNP studies that involve simulations of medical imaging modalities and other visualization methods such as radiography, Anger camera, computerized tomography (CT) scans, and SABRINA particle track visualization. It is the intent of this paper to summarize some of these imaging simulations in the hope of stimulating further work, especially as computer power increases. Improved interpretation and prediction of medical images should ultimately lead to enhanced medical treatments. It is also reasonable to assume that such computations could be used to design new or more effective imaging instruments.

  13. Diagnosing cardiac disease during pregnancy: imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Ntusi, Ntobeko A; Samuels, Petronella; Moosa, Sulaiman; Mocumbi, Ana O

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with known or suspected cardiovascular disease (CVD) often require cardiovascular imaging during pregnancy. The accepted maximum limit of ionising radiation exposure to the foetus during pregnancy is a cumulative dose of 5 rad. Concerns related to imaging modalities that involve ionising radiation include teratogenesis, mutagenesis and childhood malignancy. Importantly, no single imaging study approaches this cautionary dose of 5 rad (50 mSv or 50 mGy). Diagnostic imaging procedures that may be used in pregnancy include chest radiography, fluoroscopy, echocardiography, invasive angiography, cardiovascular computed tomography, computed tomographic pulmonary angiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear techniques. Echocardiography and CMR appear to be completely safe in pregnancy and are not associated with any adverse foetal effects, provided there are no general contra-indications to MR imaging. Concerns related to safety of imaging tests must be balanced against the importance of accurate diagnosis and thorough assessment of the pathological condition. Decisions about imaging in pregnancy are premised on understanding the physiology of pregnancy, understanding basic concepts of ionising radiation, the clinical manifestations of existent CVD in pregnancy and features of new CVD. The cardiologist/physician must understand the indications for and limitations of, and the potential harmful effects of each test during pregnancy. Current evidence suggests that a single cardiovascular radiological study during pregnancy is safe and should be undertaken at all times when clinically justified. In this article, the different imaging modalities are reviewed in terms of how they work, how safe they are and what their clinical utility in pregnancy is. Furthermore, the safety of contrast agents in pregnancy is also reviewed. PMID:27213857

  14. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  15. Advanced Imaging Modalities in the Detection of Cerebral Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jena N.; Mehta, Vivek; Russin, Jonathan; Amar, Arun P.; Rajamohan, Anandh; Mack, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is complex and is not entirely understood. Mechanistic insights have been gained through advances in the capabilities of diagnostic imaging. Core techniques have focused on the assessment of vessel caliber, tissue metabolism, and/or regional perfusion parameters. Advances in imaging have provided clinicians with a multifaceted approach to assist in the detection of cerebral vasospasm and the diagnosis of delayed ischemic neurologic deficits (DIND). However, a single test or algorithm with broad efficacy remains elusive. This paper examines both anatomical and physiological imaging modalities applicable to post-SAH vasospasm and offers a historical background. We consider cerebral blood flow velocities measured by Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD). Structural imaging techniques, including catheter-based Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), CT Angiography (CTA), and MR Angiography (MRA), are reviewed. We examine physiologic assessment by PET, HMPAO SPECT, 133Xe Clearance, Xenon-Enhanced CT (Xe/CT), Perfusion CT (PCT), and Diffusion-Weighted/MR Perfusion Imaging. Comparative advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:23476766

  16. Biomedical imaging modality classification using combined visual features and textual terms.

    PubMed

    Han, Xian-Hua; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2011-01-01

    We describe an approach for the automatic modality classification in medical image retrieval task of the 2010 CLEF cross-language image retrieval campaign (ImageCLEF). This paper is focused on the process of feature extraction from medical images and fuses the different extracted visual features and textual feature for modality classification. To extract visual features from the images, we used histogram descriptor of edge, gray, or color intensity and block-based variation as global features and SIFT histogram as local feature. For textual feature of image representation, the binary histogram of some predefined vocabulary words from image captions is used. Then, we combine the different features using normalized kernel functions for SVM classification. Furthermore, for some easy misclassified modality pairs such as CT and MR or PET and NM modalities, a local classifier is used for distinguishing samples in the pair modality to improve performance. The proposed strategy is evaluated with the provided modality dataset by ImageCLEF 2010. PMID:21912534

  17. Feasibility of using respiration-averaged MR images for attenuation correction of cardiac PET/MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hua; Pan, Tinsu

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac imaging is a promising application for combined PET/MR imaging. However, current MR imaging protocols for whole-body attenuation correction can produce spatial mismatch between PET and MR-derived attenuation data owing to a disparity between the two modalities' imaging speeds. We assessed the feasibility of using a respiration-averaged MR (AMR) method for attenuation correction of cardiac PET data in PET/MR images. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of motion imaging with MR, we used a 3T MR system and a two-dimensional fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (SPGR) sequence to obtain AMR images ofa moving phantom. Then, we used the same sequence to obtain AMR images of a patient's thorax under free-breathing conditions. MR images were converted into PET attenuation maps using a three-class tissue segmentation method with two sets of predetermined CT numbers, one calculated from the patient-specific (PS) CT images and the other from a reference group (RG) containing 54 patient CT datasets. The MR-derived attenuation images were then used for attenuation correction of the cardiac PET data, which were compared to the PET data corrected with average CT (ACT) images. In the myocardium, the voxel-by-voxel differences and the differences in mean slice activity between the AMR-corrected PET data and the ACT-corrected PET data were found to be small (less than 7%). The use of AMR-derived attenuation images in place of ACT images for attenuation correction did not affect the summed stress score. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using the proposed SPGR-based MR imaging protocol to obtain patient AMR images and using those images for cardiac PET attenuation correction. Additional studies with more clinical data are warranted to further evaluate the method. PMID:26218995

  18. Towards automatic determination of total tumor burden from PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renisch, Steffen; Opfer, Roland; Wiemker, Rafael

    2010-03-01

    Quantification of potentially cancerous lesions from imaging modalities, most prominently from CT or PET images, plays a crucial role both in diagnosing and staging of cancer as well as in the assessment of the response of a cancer to a therapy, e.g. for lymphoma or lung cancer. For PET imaging, several quantifications which might bear great discriminating potential (e.g. total tumor burden or total tumor glycolysis) involve the segmentation of the entirety of all of the cancerous lesions. However, this particular task of segmenting the entirety of all cancerous lesions might be very tedious if it has to be done manually, in particular if the disease is scattered or metastasized and thus consists of numerous foci; this is one of the reasons why only few clinical studies on those quantifications are available. In this work, we investigate a way to aid the easy determination of the entirety of cancerous lesions in a PET image of a human. The approach is designed to detect all hot spots within a PET image and rank their probability of being a cancerous lesion. The basis of this component is a modified watershed algorithm; the ranking is performed on a combination of several, primarily morphological measures derived from the individual basins. This component is embedded in a software suite to assess response to a therapy based on PET images. As a preprocessing step, potential lesions are segmented and indicated to the user, who can select the foci which constitute the tumor and discard the false positives. This procedure substantially simplifies the segmentation of the entire tumor burden of a patient. This approach of semi-automatic hot spot detection is evaluated on 17 clinical datasets.

  19. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Kross, Brain; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randy

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5×5×4 cm 3. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5×2.5×15 mm 3) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of ˜60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to ˜85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy .

  20. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S.; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanner. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present an LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3-D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the nonnegative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  1. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S.; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  2. Nuclear imaging modalities for cardiac amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bokhari, Sabahat; Shahzad, Reehan; Castaño, Adam; Maurer, Mathew S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by localized or systemic deposition of insoluble extracellular fibrillary proteins in organs and tissues. Several types of amyloid can infiltrate the heart resulting in a restrictive cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Scintigraphy is a noninvasive method that may facilitate early diagnosis, distinguish various forms of cardiac amyloid, and may be useful in following disease burden. The amyloid-specific tracers presented in this article have been used with planar imaging and/or single-photon emission computed tomography. To date, there are no approved cardiac amyloid tracers although investigational tracers are currently under examination. This article serves to review the current nuclear imaging modalities available in the detection of cardiac amyloid. PMID:24162886

  3. PET image reconstruction using kernel method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2015-01-01

    Image reconstruction from low-count positron emission tomography (PET) projection data is challenging because the inverse problem is ill-posed. Prior information can be used to improve image quality. Inspired by the kernel methods in machine learning, this paper proposes a kernel based method that models PET image intensity in each pixel as a function of a set of features obtained from prior information. The kernel-based image model is incorporated into the forward model of PET projection data and the coefficients can be readily estimated by the maximum likelihood (ML) or penalized likelihood image reconstruction. A kernelized expectation-maximization algorithm is presented to obtain the ML estimate. Computer simulations show that the proposed approach can achieve better bias versus variance trade-off and higher contrast recovery for dynamic PET image reconstruction than the conventional maximum likelihood method with and without post-reconstruction denoising. Compared with other regularization-based methods, the kernel method is easier to implement and provides better image quality for low-count data. Application of the proposed kernel method to a 4-D dynamic PET patient dataset showed promising results. PMID:25095249

  4. Novel Developments in Instrumentation for PET Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Joel

    2013-04-01

    Advances in medical imaging, in particular positron emission tomography (PET), have been based on technical developments in physics and instrumentation that have common foundations with detection systems used in other fields of physics. New detector materials are used in PET systems that maximize efficiency, timing characteristics and robustness, and which lead to improved image quality and quantitative accuracy for clinical imaging. Time of flight (TOF) techniques are now routinely used in commercial PET scanners that combine physiological imaging with anatomical imaging provided by x-ray computed tomography. Using new solid-state photo-sensors instead of traditional photo-multiplier tubes makes it possible to combine PET with magnetic resonance imaging which is a significant technical challenge, but one that is creating new opportunities for both research and clinical applications. An overview of recent advances in instrumentation, such as TOF and PET/MR will be presented, along with examples of imaging studies to demonstrate the impact on patient care and basic research of diseases.

  5. PET Image Reconstruction Using Kernel Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-01-01

    Image reconstruction from low-count PET projection data is challenging because the inverse problem is ill-posed. Prior information can be used to improve image quality. Inspired by the kernel methods in machine learning, this paper proposes a kernel based method that models PET image intensity in each pixel as a function of a set of features obtained from prior information. The kernel-based image model is incorporated into the forward model of PET projection data and the coefficients can be readily estimated by the maximum likelihood (ML) or penalized likelihood image reconstruction. A kernelized expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is presented to obtain the ML estimate. Computer simulations show that the proposed approach can achieve better bias versus variance trade-off and higher contrast recovery for dynamic PET image reconstruction than the conventional maximum likelihood method with and without post-reconstruction denoising. Compared with other regularization-based methods, the kernel method is easier to implement and provides better image quality for low-count data. Application of the proposed kernel method to a 4D dynamic PET patient dataset showed promising results. PMID:25095249

  6. PET and PET/CT imaging of skeletal metastases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone scintigraphy augmented with radiographs or cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has remained the commonest method to diagnose and follow up skeletal metastases. However, bone scintigraphy is associated with relatively poor spatial resolution, limited diagnostic specificity and reduced sensitivity for bone marrow disease. It also shows limited diagnostic accuracy in assessing response to therapy in a clinically useful time period. With the advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanners there has been an increasing interest in using various PET tracers to evaluate skeletal disease including [18F]fluoride (NaF) as a bone-specific tracer and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and [18F]choline as tumour-specific tracers. There is also early work exploring the receptor status of skeletal metastases with somatostatin receptor analogues. This review describes the potential utility of these tracers in the assessment of skeletal metastases. PMID:20663736

  7. Development of PhytoPET: A plant imaging PET system

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, H; Lee, S J; McKisson, J; Xi, W; Zorn, C; Howell, C R; Crowell, A S; Cumberbatch, L; Reid, C D; Smith, M F; Stolin, A

    2012-02-01

    The development and initial evaluation of a high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) system to image the biodistribution of positron emitting tracers in live plants is underway. The positron emitting {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer is used in plant biology research investigating carbon sequestration in biomass, optimization of plant productivity and biofuel development. This PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single 5 cm x 5 cm Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. Each H8500 is coupled to a LYSO:Ce scintillator array composed of 48 x 48 elements that are 10 mm thick arranged with a 1.0 mm pitch. An Ethernet based 12-bit flash analog to digital data acquisition system with onboard coincident matrix definition is under development to digitize the signals. The detector modules of the PhytoPET system can be arranged and stacked to accommodate various sized plants and plant structures.

  8. Modular Strategies for PET Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances In recent years, modular and simplified chemical and biological strategies have been developed for the synthesis and implementation of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers. New developments in bioconjugation and synthetic methodologies, in combination with advances in macromolecular delivery systems and gene-expression imaging, reflect a need to reduce radiosynthesis burden in order to accelerate imaging agent development. These new approaches, which are often mindful of existing infrastructure and available resources, are anticipated to provide a more approachable entry point for researchers interested in using PET to translate in vitro research to in vivo imaging. PMID:19880343

  9. Modular strategies for PET imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, , J.M.

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, modular and simplified chemical and biological strategies have been developed for the synthesis and implementation of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers. New developments in bioconjugation and synthetic methodologies, in combination with advances in macromolecular delivery systems and gene-expression imaging, reflect a need to reduce radiosynthesis burden in order to accelerate imaging agent development. These new approaches, which are often mindful of existing infrastructure and available resources, are anticipated to provide a more approachable entry point for researchers interested in using PET to translate in vitro research to in vivo imaging.

  10. Hybrid PET/MR Imaging and Brain Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, Marco; Cavaliere, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, brain connectivity is gaining ever-increasing interest from the interdisciplinary research community. The study of brain connectivity is characterized by a multifaceted approach providing both structural and functional evidence of the relationship between cerebral regions at different scales. Although magnetic resonance (MR) is the most established imaging modality for investigating connectivity in vivo, the recent advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/MR scanners paved the way for more comprehensive investigation of brain organization and physiology. Due to the high sensitivity and biochemical specificity of radiotracers, combining MR with PET imaging may enrich our ability to investigate connectivity by introducing the concept of metabolic connectivity and cometomics and promoting new insights on the physiological and molecular bases underlying high-level neural organization. This review aims to describe and summarize the main methods of analysis of brain connectivity employed in MR imaging and nuclear medicine. Moreover, it will discuss practical aspects and state-of-the-art techniques for exploiting hybrid PET/MR imaging to investigate the relationship of physiological processes and brain connectivity. PMID:26973446

  11. Hybrid PET/MR Imaging and Brain Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Marco; Cavaliere, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, brain connectivity is gaining ever-increasing interest from the interdisciplinary research community. The study of brain connectivity is characterized by a multifaceted approach providing both structural and functional evidence of the relationship between cerebral regions at different scales. Although magnetic resonance (MR) is the most established imaging modality for investigating connectivity in vivo, the recent advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/MR scanners paved the way for more comprehensive investigation of brain organization and physiology. Due to the high sensitivity and biochemical specificity of radiotracers, combining MR with PET imaging may enrich our ability to investigate connectivity by introducing the concept of metabolic connectivity and cometomics and promoting new insights on the physiological and molecular bases underlying high-level neural organization. This review aims to describe and summarize the main methods of analysis of brain connectivity employed in MR imaging and nuclear medicine. Moreover, it will discuss practical aspects and state-of-the-art techniques for exploiting hybrid PET/MR imaging to investigate the relationship of physiological processes and brain connectivity. PMID:26973446

  12. Imaging in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: the potential role of PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    In head and neck oncology, the information provided by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and MRI is often complementary because both the methods are based on different biophysical foundations. Therefore, combining diagnostic information from both modalities can provide additional diagnostic gain. Debates about integrated PET/MRI systems have become fashionable during the past few years, since the introduction and wide adoption of software-based multimodality image registration and fusion and the hardware implementation of integrated hybrid PET/MRI systems in pre-clinical and clinical settings. However, combining PET with MRI has proven to be technically and clinically more challenging than initially expected and, as such, research into the potential clinical role of PET/MRI in comparison with PET/CT, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW MRI) or the combination thereof is still ongoing. This review focuses on the clinical applications of PET/MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We first discuss current evidence about the use of combined PET/CT and DW MRI, and, then, we explain the rationale and principles of PET/MR image fusion before summarizing the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding the diagnostic performance of PET/MRI in HNSCC. Feasibility and quantification issues, diagnostic pitfalls and challenges in clinical settings as well as ongoing research and potential future applications are also discussed. PMID:24649835

  13. Bone metastases: assessment of therapeutic response through radiological and nuclear medicine imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, V; Andreopoulos, D; Frangos, S; Tselis, N; Giannopoulou, E; Lutz, S

    2011-11-01

    Radiological and nuclear medicine imaging modalities used for assessing bone metastases treatment response include plain and digitalised radiography (XR), skeletal scintigraphy (SS), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET/CT. Here we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assessment modalities as evident through different clinical trials. Additionally, we present the more established response criteria of the International Union Against Cancer and the World Health Organization and compare them with newer MD Anderson criteria. Even though serial XR and SS have been used to assess the therapeutic response for decades, several months are required before changes are evident. Newer techniques, such as MRI or PET, may allow an earlier evaluation of response that may be quantified through monitoring changes in signal intensity and standard uptake value, respectively. Moreover, the application of PET/CT, which can follow both morphological and metabolic changes, has yielded interesting and promising results that give a new insight into the natural history of metastatic bone disease. However, only a few studies have investigated the application of these newer techniques and further clinical trials are needed to corroborate their promising results and establish the most suitable imaging parameters and evaluation time points. Last, but not least, there is an absolute need to adopt uniform response criteria for bone metastases through an international consensus in order to better assess treatment response in terms of accuracy and objectivity. PMID:21530193

  14. FDG PET with contrast-enhanced CT: a critical imaging tool for laryngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mae Mae A Y; Kositwattanarerk, Arpakorn; Lee, David J; Makkar, Jasnit S; Genden, Eric M; Kao, Johnny; Packer, Stuart H; Som, Peter M; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2010-09-01

    Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved to be an essential imaging modality in the evaluation of laryngeal carcinoma. Although the modality has limited utility in assessing the extent of the primary tumor, FDG PET has proved to be superior to anatomic modalities in the detection of lymph node and distant metastases. The role of FDG PET in the evaluation of patients with laryngeal tumors that are clinically classified as N0 has not shown consistent usefulness because of the innate resolution limitations of the camera. In the posttherapy setting, however, FDG PET has consistently demonstrated a high negative predictive value in the identification of recurrent disease, both during the course of therapy and during long-term follow-up. In addition, contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in conjunction with FDG PET has demonstrated a complementary role by allowing for superior anatomic coregistration and therefore more definitive diagnosis. There is sufficient evidence that with further advances in PET technology, this modality will likely become more useful in the detection of small lesions and occult nodal disease, as well as in guiding the management of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:20833855

  15. Respiration-Averaged CT for Attenuation Correction of PET Images – Impact on PET Texture Features in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Nai-Ming; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Tsan, Din-Li

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared attenuation correction of PET images with helical CT (PET/HCT) and respiration-averaged CT (PET/ACT) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with the goal of investigating the impact of respiration-averaged CT on 18F FDG PET texture parameters. Materials and Methods A total of 56 patients were enrolled. Tumors were segmented on pretreatment PET images using the adaptive threshold. Twelve different texture parameters were computed: standard uptake value (SUV) entropy, uniformity, entropy, dissimilarity, homogeneity, coarseness, busyness, contrast, complexity, grey-level nonuniformity, zone-size nonuniformity, and high grey-level large zone emphasis. Comparisons of PET/HCT and PET/ACT were performed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, intraclass correlation coefficients, and Bland-Altman analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves as well as univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to identify the parameters significantly associated with disease-specific survival (DSS). A fixed threshold at 45% of the maximum SUV (T45) was used for validation. Results SUV maximum and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were significantly higher in PET/ACT. However, texture parameters obtained with PET/ACT and PET/HCT showed a high degree of agreement. The lowest levels of variation between the two modalities were observed for SUV entropy (9.7%) and entropy (9.8%). SUV entropy, entropy, and coarseness from both PET/ACT and PET/HCT were significantly associated with DSS. Validation analyses using T45 confirmed the usefulness of SUV entropy and entropy in both PET/HCT and PET/ACT for the prediction of DSS, but only coarseness from PET/ACT achieved the statistical significance threshold. Conclusions Our results indicate that 1) texture parameters from PET/ACT are clinically useful in the prediction of survival in NSCLC patients and 2) SUV entropy and entropy are robust to attenuation correction methods. PMID:26930211

  16. LIDAR image recovery by incorporating heterogeneous imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    As new imaging modalities arise, the problem of inpainting becomes increasing important. Typical techniques for inpainting are completely determined by the penalization term used in the optimization scheme. These methods range from minimizing over total variation to finding a sparsest solution in a given basis to minimizing the Ginzburg-Landau energy. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to inpainting of remote sensing images, which uses previous measurements taken from heterogeneous image soures in conjunction with these well studied penalization methods. These previous measurements could be images with different illumination or weather conditions, images with spatio-temporal changes, or even all together different imaging modalities. Our approach utilizes manifold learning techniques such as diffusion maps or Laplacian eigenmaps that are applied to each image. This is followed by learning a rotation between the two feature spaces in an effort to place data points from both images in a common feature space. Then, we apply a novel preimage algorithm to the fused data in conjunction with an inpainting penalization method to recreate the missing pixels.

  17. Quantitative preclinical PET imaging: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntner, Claudia; Stout, David

    2014-02-01

    PET imaging of metabolism involves many choices, from hardware settings, software options to animal handling considerations. How to decide what settings or conditions to use is not straightforward, as the experimental design is dependent on the particular science being investigated. There is no single answer, yet there are factors that are common to all experiments that are the subject of this review. From physics to physiology, there are many factors to consider, each of which can have a significant impact upon measurements of metabolism in vivo. This review examines the most common factors related to all types of quantitative PET imaging.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: PET Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent advances in the fundamental understanding of the complex biology of prostate cancer have provided an increasing number of potential targets for imaging and treatment. The imaging evaluation of prostate cancer needs to be tailored to the various phases of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. CONCLUSION In this article, I review the current state of affairs on a range of PET radiotracers for potential use in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer. PMID:22826388

  19. Comparative effectiveness of imaging modalities to determine metastatic breast cancer treatment response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Gold, Laura S; Nelson, Heidi D; Chou, Roger; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-02-01

    We performed a systematic review to address the comparative effectiveness of different imaging modalities in evaluating treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients. We searched seven multidisciplinary electronic databases for relevant publications (January 2003-December 2013) and performed dual abstraction of details and results for all clinical studies that involved stage IV breast cancer patients and evaluated imaging for detecting treatment response. Among 159 citations reviewed, 17 single-institution, non-randomized, observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Several studies demonstrate that changes in PET/CT standard uptake values are associated with changes in tumor volume as determined by bone scan, MRI, and/or CT. However, no studies evaluated comparative test performance between modalities or determined relationships between imaging findings and subsequent clinical decisions. Evidence for imaging's effectiveness in determining treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients is limited. More rigorous research is needed to address imaging's value in this patient population. PMID:25479913

  20. Pitfalls in PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondogianni, Ph; Papathanasiou, N.; Giannopoulou, Ch

    2011-09-01

    PET with 2-[fluorine 18] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG), has been a clinical tool for the evaluation of various cancers providing valuable metabolic information clinically helpful in the diagnosis, initial staging, therapy monitoring and restaging. However, FDG is not specific for neoplastic processes. Unless anatomic correlation is available to delineate normal structures, pathologic sites of FDG accumulation can easily be confused with normal physiological uptake, leading to false-positive or false-negative findings. Coregistration of PET scans (functional and morphologic information) with computed tomographic (CT) scans (anatomic information) using a combined PET-CT scanner improves the overall sensitivity and specificity of information provided by PET or CT alone. In this paper, we discuss the probable causes of false negative images and pitfalls due to technical reasons, inflammatory processes or benign lesions as well as the utility of PET-CT in differentiating malignant from inflammatory and benign processes, since in some cases such differentiation cannot be made, with certainty, using FDG PET alone.

  1. Imaging of Tumor Metabolism Using Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Wedel, Florian; Brenner, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging employing PET/CT enables in vivo visualization, characterization, and measurement of biologic processes in tumors at a molecular and cellular level. Using specific metabolic tracers, information about the integrated function of multiple transporters and enzymes involved in tumor metabolic pathways can be depicted, and the tracers can be directly applied as biomarkers of tumor biology. In this review, we discuss the role of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as an in vivo glycolytic marker which reflects alterations of glucose metabolism in cancer cells. This functional molecular imaging technique offers a complementary approach to anatomic imaging such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has found widespread application as a diagnostic modality in oncology to monitor tumor biology, optimize the therapeutic management, and guide patient care. Moreover, emerging methods for PET imaging of further biologic processes relevant to cancer are reviewed, with a focus on tumor hypoxia and aberrant tumor perfusion. Hypoxic tumors are associated with poor disease control and increased resistance to cytotoxic and radiation treatment. In vivo imaging of hypoxia, perfusion, and mismatch of metabolism and perfusion has the potential to identify specific features of tumor microenvironment associated with poor treatment outcome and, thus, contribute to personalized treatment approaches. PMID:27557539

  2. Impact of Medical Therapy on Atheroma Volume Measured by Different Cardiovascular Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Sinno, Mohamad C. N.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease that affects most vascular beds. The gold standard of atherosclerosis imaging has been invasive intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Newer noninvasive imaging modalities like B-mode ultrasound, cardiac computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to assess these vascular territories with high accuracy and reproducibility. These imaging modalities have lately been used for the assessment of the atherosclerotic plaque and the response of its volume to several medical therapies used in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease. To study the impact of these medications on atheroma volume progression or regression, imaging modalities have been used on a serial basis providing a unique opportunity to monitor the effect these antiatherosclerotic strategies exert on plaque burden. As a result, studies incorporating serial IVUS imaging, quantitative coronary angiography (QCA), B-mode ultrasound, electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging have all been used to evaluate the impact of therapeutic strategies that modify cholesterol and blood pressure on the progression/regression of atherosclerotic plaque. In this review, we intend to summarize the impact of different therapies aimed at halting the progression or even result in regression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease evaluated by different imaging modalities. PMID:20672024

  3. Combined Modality Treatment for PET-Positive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Favorable Outcomes of Combined Modality Treatment for Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Positive Interim or Postchemotherapy FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Jacene, Heather A.; Catalano, Paul J.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; LaCasce, Ann; Mauch, Peter M.; Ng, Andrea K.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes of patients treated for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with combined modality therapy based on [{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-2-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) response. Methods and Materials: We studied 59 patients with aggressive NHL, who received chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) from 2001 to 2008. Among them, 83% of patients had stage I/II disease. Patients with B-cell lymphoma received R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone)-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative anaplastic T-cell lymphoma received CHOP therapy. Interim and postchemotherapy FDG-PET or FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) scans were performed for restaging. All patients received consolidated involved-field RT. Median RT dose was 36 Gy (range, 28.8-50 Gy). Progression-free survival (PFS) and local control (LC) rates were calculated with and without a negative interim or postchemotherapy FDG-PET scan. Results: Median follow-up was 46.5 months. Thirty-nine patients had negative FDG-PET results by the end of chemotherapy, including 12 patients who had a negative interim FDG-PET scan and no postchemotherapy PET. Twenty patients were FDG-PET-positive, including 7 patients with positive interim FDG-PET and no postchemotherapy FDG-PET scans. The 3-year actuarial PFS rates for patients with negative versus positive FDG-PET scans were 97% and 90%, respectively. The 3-year actuarial LC rates for patients with negative versus positive FDG-PET scans were 100% and 90%, respectively. Conclusions: Patients who had a positive interim or postchemotherapy FDG-PET had a PFS rate of 90% at 3 years after combined modality treatment, suggesting that a large proportion of these patients can be cured with consolidated RT.

  4. RT_Image: an open-source tool for investigating PET in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Graves, Edward E; Quon, Andrew; Loo, Billy W

    2007-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a valuable imaging modality for the diagnosis and staging of cancer. However, despite evidence that PET may be useful for defining target volumes for radiation therapy, no standardized methodology for accomplishing this task exists. To facilitate the investigation of the utility of PET imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning and accelerate its integration into clinical radiation oncology, we have developed software for exploratory analysis and segmentation of functional imaging datasets. The application, RT_Image, allows display of multiple imaging datasets and associated three-dimensional regions-of-interest (ROIs) at arbitrary view angles and fields of view. It also includes semi-automated image segmentation tools for defining metabolically active tumor volumes that may aid creation of target volumes for treatment planning. RT_Image is DICOM compliant, permitting the transfer of imaging data and DICOM-RT structure sets between the application and treatment planning software. RT_Image has been used by radiation oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, and radiation physicists to analyze over 200 PET datasets. Novel segmentation techniques have been implemented within this programming framework for therapy planning and for evaluation of molecular imaging-derived parameters as prognostic indicators. RT_Image represents a freely-available software base on which further investigations of the utlity of PET and molecular imaging in radiation oncology may be built. The development of tools such as this is critical in order to realize the potential of molecular imaging-guided radiation therapy. PMID:17375973

  5. Hybrid PET/MR imaging in two sarcoma patients – clinical benefits and implications for future trials

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Sasan; Kohan, Andres A; Zipp, Lisa; Faulhaber, Peter; Kosmas, Christos; Ros, Pablo R; Robbin, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    PET/MRI is an evolving hybrid imaging modality which combines the inherent strengths of MRIs soft-tissue and contrast resolution and PETs functional metabolic capabilities. Bone and soft-tissue sarcoma are a relatively rare tumor entity, relying on MRI for local staging and often on PET/CT for lymph node involvement and metastatic spread evaluation. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the successful use of PET/MRI in two sarcoma patients. We also use these patients as a starting point to discuss how PET/MRI might be of value in sarcoma. Among its potential benefits are: superior TNM staging than either modality alone, decreased radiation dose, more sensitive and specific follow-up and better assessment of treatment response. These potentials need to be investigated in future PET/MRI soft-tissue sarcoma trials. PMID:24753758

  6. Radiolabeling of Nanoparticles and Polymers for PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stockhofe, Katharina; Postema, Johannes M.; Schieferstein, Hanno; Ross, Tobias L.

    2014-01-01

    Nanomedicine has become an emerging field in imaging and therapy of malignancies. Nanodimensional drug delivery systems have already been used in the clinic, as carriers for sensitive chemotherapeutics or highly toxic substances. In addition, those nanodimensional structures are further able to carry and deliver radionuclides. In the development process, non-invasive imaging by means of positron emission tomography (PET) represents an ideal tool for investigations of pharmacological profiles and to find the optimal nanodimensional architecture of the aimed-at drug delivery system. Furthermore, in a personalized therapy approach, molecular imaging modalities are essential for patient screening/selection and monitoring. Hence, labeling methods for potential drug delivery systems are an indispensable need to provide the radiolabeled analog. In this review, we describe and discuss various approaches and methods for the labeling of potential drug delivery systems using positron emitters. PMID:24699244

  7. Utility of Various Functional and Anatomic Imaging Modalities for Detection of Ectopic Adrenocorticotropin-Secreting Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zemskova, Marina S.; Gundabolu, Bhaskar; Sinaii, Ninet; Chen, Clara C.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Whatley, Millie; Chowdhury, Iffat; Gharib, Ahmed M.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Because ectopic ACTH-secreting (EAS) tumors are often occult, improved imaging is needed. Objective: Our objective was to evaluate the utility of [111In-DTPA-d-Phe]pentetreotide scintigraphy [octreotide (OCT)] imaging at 6 mCi [low OCT (LOCT)] and 18 mCi [high OCT (HOCT)], [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (F-DOPA)-PET scans, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Design and Setting: The study was a prospective evaluation at a clinical research center. Patients: Forty-one subjects participated, 30 (17 female) with resected EAS tumors and 11 (three female) with occult EAS, based on inferior petrosal sinus sampling results and imaging studies. Intervention: Intervention included CT and MRI of neck, chest, abdomen, LOCT (with or without HOCT) and FDG- or F-DOPA-PET without CT every 6–12 months. Main Outcome Measure: Tumor identification was the main outcome measure. Results: Most recent results were analyzed. Eighteen patients had tumor resected on the first visit; otherwise, surgery occurred 33 ± 25 (9–99) months later. Tumor size was 1.9 ± 1.7 (0.8–8.0) cm; 83% were intrathoracic. CT, MRI, LOCT, HOCT, FDG-PET, and F-DOPA-PET had sensitivities per patient of 93% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 79–98%], 90% (95% CI = 74–96%), 57% (95% CI = 39–73%), 50% (95% CI = 25–75%), 64% (95% CI = 35–85%), and 55% (95% CI = 28–79%) and positive predictive values (PPV) per lesion of 66, 74, 79, 89, 53, and 100%, respectively. LOCT and PET detected only lesions seen by CT/MRI; abnormal LOCT or F-DOPA-PET improved PPV of CT/MRI. By modality, the fraction of patients with one or more false-positive findings was 50% by CT, 31% by MRI, 18% by L/HOCT, and 18% by FDG-PET. Eight occult EAS patients had 64 ± 58 (9–198) months follow-up; others had none. Conclusions: High sensitivity and PPV suggest thoracic CT/MRI plus LOCT scans for initial imaging, with lesion

  8. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it. PMID:27618106

  9. Translational Coronary Atherosclerosis Imaging with PET.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Philip D; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2016-02-01

    Although still in its infancy, coronary atherosclerosis imaging with PET holds promise in improving understanding of the pathophysiologic processes that underlie plaque progression and adverse cardiovascular events. Fludeoxyglucose F 18 offers the potential to measure inflammatory activity within the plaque itself whereas fluoride F 18 allows detection of microcalcification, both of which are key characteristics of plaques at risk of rupture. Further work is required to improve these imaging techniques and to assess their ability to predict cardiac events prospectively. PMID:26590788

  10. Intraoperative Imaging-Guided Cancer Surgery: From Current Fluorescence Molecular Imaging Methods to Future Multi-Modality Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chongwei; Du, Yang; Ye, Jinzuo; Kou, Deqiang; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Tian, Jie; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a major threat to human health. Diagnosis and treatment using precision medicine is expected to be an effective method for preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Although anatomical and functional imaging techniques such as radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role for accurate preoperative diagnostics, for the most part these techniques cannot be applied intraoperatively. Optical molecular imaging is a promising technique that provides a high degree of sensitivity and specificity in tumor margin detection. Furthermore, existing clinical applications have proven that optical molecular imaging is a powerful intraoperative tool for guiding surgeons performing precision procedures, thus enabling radical resection and improved survival rates. However, detection depth limitation exists in optical molecular imaging methods and further breakthroughs from optical to multi-modality intraoperative imaging methods are needed to develop more extensive and comprehensive intraoperative applications. Here, we review the current intraoperative optical molecular imaging technologies, focusing on contrast agents and surgical navigation systems, and then discuss the future prospects of multi-modality imaging technology for intraoperative imaging-guided cancer surgery. PMID:25250092

  11. PET Imaging in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roussakis, Andreas-Antonios; Piccini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    To date, little is known about how neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation propagate in Huntington’s disease (HD). Unfortunately, no treatment is available to cure or reverse the progressive decline of function caused by the disease, thus considering HD a fatal disease. Mutation gene carriers typically remain asymptomatic for many years although alterations in the basal ganglia and cortex occur early on in mutant HD gene–carriers. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a functional imaging technique of nuclear medicine which enables in vivo visualization of numerous biological molecules expressed in several human tissues. Brain PET is most powerful to study in vivo neuronal and glial cells function as well as cerebral blood flow in a plethora of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s and HD. In absence of HD–specific biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, previous PET studies in HD were merely focused on the study of dopaminergic terminals, cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in manifest and premanifest HD–gene carriers. More recently, research interest has been exploring novel PET targets in HD including the state of phosphodiesterse expression and the role of activated microglia. Hence, a better understanding of the HD pathogenesis mechanisms may lead to the development of targeted therapies. PET imaging follow–up studies with novel selective PET radiotracers such as 11C-IMA–107 and 11C-PBR28 may provide insight on disease progression and identify prognostic biomarkers, elucidate the underlying HD pathology and assess novel pharmaceutical agents and over time. PMID:26683130

  12. Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases: Diagnostic Performance and Prognostic Value of PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Jeong Min; Hur, Bo Yun; Joo, Ijin; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Kang, Keon Wook; Han, Joon Koo

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic performance of combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonace (MR) imaging (hereafter, PET/MR imaging) in the detection of liver metastases and to assess its prognostic value in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLMs). Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study, with waiver of informed consent. A total of 55 patients with 98 CRLMs who underwent PET/MR imaging and multidetector computed tomography (CT) between January 2013 and June 2014 comprised the study population. Of these patients, 34 underwent hepatic resection, 18 of whom also underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Two board-certificated radiologists independently assessed the four image sets (ie, multidetector CT, whole-body PET, MR imaging with a liver-specific contrast agent [hereafter, EOB MR imaging], and PET/MR imaging). To compare the diagnostic performance of each imaging modality, jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic and generalized estimating equations were used. To assess prognostic value, recurrence-free survival of the 18 patients who underwent NAC followed by hepatic resection was analyzed by using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results The reader-averaged figure of merit of PET/MR imaging was significantly higher than that of either multidetector CT (P = .003) or PET (P = .020) in the detection of CRLMs. However, no significant difference was observed between figure of merit for PET/MR imaging and that for EOB MR imaging (P = .231). After NAC, six of the 18 patients had isometabolic CRLMs on PET images, and 12 patients had hypermetabolic CRLMs. The 1-year recurrence-free survival rate was 80% in patients with isometabolic CRLMs and 14% in patients with hypermetabolic CRLMs, showing a significant difference (P = .026). Conclusion PET/MR imaging can yield significantly higher diagnostic performance in the detection of CRLMs

  13. Molecular Platform for Design and Synthesis of Targeted Dual-Modality Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a versatile dendritic structure based platform for construction of targeted dual-modality imaging probes. The platform contains multiple copies of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) branching out from a 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N′,N″-triacetic acid (NOTA) core. The specific coordination chemistries of the NOTA and DOTA moieties offer specific loading of 68/67Ga3+ and Gd3+, respectively, into a common molecular scaffold. The platform also contains three amino groups which can potentiate targeted dual-modality imaging of PET/MRI or SPECT/MRI (PET: positron emission tomography; SPECT: single photon emission computed tomography; MRI: magnetic resonance imaging) when further functionalized by targeting vectors of interest. To validate this design concept, a bimetallic complex was synthesized with six peripheral Gd-DOTA units and one Ga-NOTA core at the center, whose ion T1 relaxivity per gadolinium atom was measured to be 15.99 mM–1 s–1 at 20 MHz. Further, the bimetallic agent demonstrated its anticipated in vivo stability, tissue distribution, and pharmacokinetic profile when labeled with 67Ga. When conjugated with a model targeting peptide sequence, the trivalent construct was able to visualize tumors in a mouse xenograft model by both PET and MRI via a single dose injection. PMID:25615011

  14. Current Status of Hybrid PET/MRI in Oncologic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Friedman, Kent; Chandarana, Hersh; Melsaether, Amy; Moy, Linda; Ding, Yu-Shin; Jhaveri, Komal; Beltran, Luis; Jain, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This review article explores recent advancements in PET/MRI for clinical oncologic imaging. CONCLUSION Radiologists should understand the technical considerations that have made PET/MRI feasible within clinical workflows, the role of PET tracers for imaging various molecular targets in oncology, and advantages of hybrid PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. To facilitate this understanding, we discuss clinical examples (including gliomas, breast cancer, bone metastases, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, gynecologic malignancy, and lymphoma) as well as future directions, challenges, and areas for continued technical optimization for PET/MRI. PMID:26491894

  15. Imaging of enzyme replacement therapy using PET

    PubMed Central

    Phenix, Christopher P.; Rempel, Brian P.; Colobong, Karen; Doudet, Doris J.; Adam, Michael J.; Clarke, Lorne A.; Withers, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    Direct enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been introduced as a means to treat a number of rare, complex genetic conditions associated with lysosomal dysfunction. Gaucher disease was the first for which this therapy was applied and remains the prototypical example. Although ERT using recombinant lysosomal enzymes has been shown to be effective in altering the clinical course of Gaucher disease, Fabry disease, Hurler syndrome, Hunter syndrome, Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, and Pompe disease, the recalcitrance of certain disease manifestations underscores important unanswered questions related to dosing regimes, tissue half-life of the recombinant enzyme and the ability of intravenously administered enzyme to reach critical sites of known disease pathology. We have developed an innovative method for tagging acid β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase), the recombinant enzyme formulated in Cerezyme® used to treat Gaucher disease, using an 18F-labeled substrate analogue that becomes trapped within the active site of the enzyme. Using micro-PET we show that the tissue distribution of injected enzyme can be imaged in a murine model and that the PET data correlate with tissue 18F counts. Further we show that PET imaging readily monitors pharmacokinetic changes effected by receptor blocking. The ability to 18F-label GCase to monitor the enzyme distribution and tissue half-life in vivo by PET provides a powerful research tool with an immediate clinical application to Gaucher disease and a clear path for application to other ERTs. PMID:20534487

  16. A graph-based approach for the retrieval of multi-modality medical images.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashnil; Kim, Jinman; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we address the retrieval of multi-modality medical volumes, which consist of two different imaging modalities, acquired sequentially, from the same scanner. One such example, positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT), provides physicians with complementary functional and anatomical features as well as spatial relationships and has led to improved cancer diagnosis, localisation, and staging. The challenge of multi-modality volume retrieval for cancer patients lies in representing the complementary geometric and topologic attributes between tumours and organs. These attributes and relationships, which are used for tumour staging and classification, can be formulated as a graph. It has been demonstrated that graph-based methods have high accuracy for retrieval by spatial similarity. However, naïvely representing all relationships on a complete graph obscures the structure of the tumour-anatomy relationships. We propose a new graph structure derived from complete graphs that structurally constrains the edges connected to tumour vertices based upon the spatial proximity of tumours and organs. This enables retrieval on the basis of tumour localisation. We also present a similarity matching algorithm that accounts for different feature sets for graph elements from different imaging modalities. Our method emphasises the relationships between a tumour and related organs, while still modelling patient-specific anatomical variations. Constraining tumours to related anatomical structures improves the discrimination potential of graphs, making it easier to retrieve similar images based on tumour location. We evaluated our retrieval methodology on a dataset of clinical PET-CT volumes. Our results showed that our method enabled the retrieval of multi-modality images using spatial features. Our graph-based retrieval algorithm achieved a higher precision than several other retrieval techniques: gray-level histograms as well as state

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/MRI for Lung Cancer Staging.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-07-01

    Tumor, lymph node, and metastasis (TNM) classification of lung cancer is typically performed with the TNM staging system, as recommended by the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). Radiologic examinations for TNM staging of lung cancer patients include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), and FDG-PET combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) and are used for pretherapeutic assessments. Recent technical advances in MR systems, application of fast and parallel imaging and/or introduction of new MR techniques, and utilization of contrast media have markedly improved the diagnostic utility of MRI in this setting. In addition, FDG-PET can be combined or fused with MRI (PET/MRI) for clinical practice. This review article will focus on these recent advances in MRI as well as on PET/MRI for lung cancer staging, in addition to a discussion of their potential and limitations for routine clinical practice in comparison with other modalities such as CT, FDG-PET, and PET/CT. PMID:27075745

  18. Graph cut based co-segmentation of lung tumor in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wei; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of pulmonary tumor is important for clinicians to make appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT) are two commonly used imaging technologies for image-guided radiation therapy. In this study, we present a graph-based method to integrate the two modalities to segment the tumor simultaneously on PET and CT images. The co-segmentation problem is formulated as an energy minimization problem. Two weighted sub-graphs are constructed for PET and CT. The characteristic information of the two modalities is encoded on the edges of the graph. A context cost is enforced by adding context arcs to achieve consistent results between the two modalities. An optimal solution can be achieved by solving a maximum flow problem. The proposed segmentation method was validated on 18 sets of PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The quantitative results show significant improvement of our method with a mean DSC value 0.82.

  19. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-03-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma.

  20. Image analysis in dual modality tomography for material classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basarab-Horwath, I.; Daniels, A. T.; Green, R. G.

    2001-08-01

    A dual modality tomographic system is described for material classification in a simulated multi-component flow regime. It combines two tomographic modalities, electrical current and light, to image the interrogated area. Derived image parameters did not allow material classification. PCA analysis was performed on this data set producing a new parameter set, which allowed material classification. This procedure reduces the dimensionality of the data set and also offers a pre-processing technique prior to analysis by another classifier.

  1. Current and Future Lymphatic Imaging Modalities for Tumor Staging

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kuo; Liu, Tiegang; Tariq, Imran; Sajjad, Ashif; Niu, Meiying; Liu, Guokai; Mehmood, Zahid; Tian, Guihua

    2014-01-01

    Tumor progression is supported by the lymphatic system which should be scanned efficiently for tumor staging as well as the enhanced therapeutic outcomes. Poor resolution and low sensitivity is a limitation of traditional lymphatic imaging modalities; thus new noninvasive approaches like nanocarriers, magnetic resonance imaging, positron-emission tomography, and quantum dots are advantageous. Some newer modalities, which are under development, and their potential uses will also be discussed in this review. PMID:24757671

  2. Current and future lymphatic imaging modalities for tumor staging.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Gao, Kuo; Liu, Tiegang; Tariq, Imran; Sajjad, Ashif; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Niu, Meiying; Liu, Guokai; Mehmood, Zahid; Tian, Guihua

    2014-01-01

    Tumor progression is supported by the lymphatic system which should be scanned efficiently for tumor staging as well as the enhanced therapeutic outcomes. Poor resolution and low sensitivity is a limitation of traditional lymphatic imaging modalities; thus new noninvasive approaches like nanocarriers, magnetic resonance imaging, positron-emission tomography, and quantum dots are advantageous. Some newer modalities, which are under development, and their potential uses will also be discussed in this review. PMID:24757671

  3. Alternative imaging modalities for polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirasek, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    This review summarizes recent work in the area of imaging polymer gel dosimeters using x-ray CT imaging, ultrasound, and radiation-induced changes in gel mechanical properties. In addition, recent work in the area of Raman tomographic imaging of canine bone, in conjunction with past efforts in Raman imaging of polymer gel dosimeters, raises new possibilities for new polymer gel imaging techniques.

  4. The Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT Integrated Imaging in Distinguishing Malignant from Benign Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yajuan; Yu, Hongjuan; Ma, Jingquan

    2016-01-01

    18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging compared with 18F-FDG PET imaging (Kappa = 0.881 and Kappa = 0.240, respectively). Conclusion 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging is a more reliable modality in distinguishing malignant from benign pleural effusion than 18F-FDG PET imaging and CT imaging alone. For image interpretation of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging, the PET and CT portions play a major diagnostic role in identifying metastatic effusion and benign effusion, respectively. PMID:27560933

  5. PET/SPECT molecular imaging in clinical neuroscience: recent advances in the investigation of CNS diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Feng-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an attractive technology widely used in clinical practice that greatly enhances our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment in central nervous system (CNS) diseases. It is a novel multidisciplinary technique that can be defined as real-time visualization, in vivo characterization and qualification of biological processes at the molecular and cellular level. It involves the imaging modalities and the corresponding imaging agents. Nowadays, molecular imaging in neuroscience has provided tremendous insights into disturbed human brain function. Among all of the molecular imaging modalities, positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have occupied a particular position that visualize and measure the physiological processes using high-affinity and high-specificity molecular radioactive tracers as imaging probes in intact living brain. In this review, we will put emphasis on the PET/SPECT applications in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) as major CNS disorders. We will first give an overview of the main classical molecular neuroimaging modalities. Then, the major clinical applications of PET and SPECT along with molecular probes in the fields of psychiatry and neurology will be discussed. PMID:26029646

  6. Inter-subject MR-PET image registration and integration

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, K.P.; Chen, T.S.; Yao, W.F.

    1996-12-31

    A MR-PET inter-subject image integration technique is developed to provide more precise anatomical location based on a template MR image, and to examine the anatomical variation in sensory-motor stimulation or to obtain cross-subject signal averaging to enhance the delectability of focal brain activity detected by different subject PET images. In this study, a multimodality intrasubject image registration procedure is firstly applied to align MR and PET images of the same subject. The second procedure is to estimate an elastic image transformation that can nonlinearly deform each 3D brain MR image and map them to the template MR image. The estimation procedure of the elastic image transformation is based on a strategy that searches the best local image match to achieve an optimal global image match, iteratively. The final elastic image transformation estimated for each subject will then be used to deform the MR-PET registered PET image. After the nonlinear PET image deformation, MR-PET intersubject mapping, averaging, and fusing are simultaneously accomplished. The developed technique has been implemented to an UNIX based workstation with Motif window system. The software named Elastic-IRIS has few requirements of user interaction. The registered anatomical location of 10 different subjects has a standard deviation of {approximately}2mm. in the x, y, and z directions. The processing time for one MR-PET inter-subject registration ranged from 20 to 30 minutes on a SUN SPARC-20.

  7. Multi-modal image matching based on local frequency information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Lei, Zhihui; Yu, Qifeng; Zhang, Xiaohu; Shang, Yang; Hou, Wang

    2013-12-01

    This paper challenges the issue of matching between multi-modal images with similar physical structures but different appearances. To emphasize the common structural information while suppressing the illumination and sensor-dependent information between multi-modal images, two image representations namely Mean Local Phase Angle (MLPA) and Frequency Spread Phase Congruency (FSPC) are proposed by using local frequency information in Log-Gabor wavelet transformation space. A confidence-aided similarity (CAS) that consists of a confidence component and a similarity component is designed to establish the correspondence between multi-modal images. The two representations are both invariant to contrast reversal and non-homogeneous illumination variation, and without any derivative or thresholding operation. The CAS that integrates MLPA with FSPC tightly instead of treating them separately can more weight the common structures emphasized by FSPC, and therefore further eliminate the influence of different sensor properties. We demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of our method by comparing it with those popular methods of multi-modal image matching. Experimental results show that our method improves the traditional multi-modal image matching, and can work robustly even in quite challenging situations (e.g. SAR & optical image).

  8. Fusion of PET and CT images using wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Shalchian, Bahareh; Rajabi, Hossein; Soltanian-zadeh, Hamid

    2009-01-01

    While information about anatomy is available in CT images, information about physiology and metabolism is available in PET images. To integrate both information, the two images are fused. Image fusion methods include simple methods like pixel averaging and sophisticated methods like wavelet transformation. An advantage of using wavelet transformation is that it preserves significant parts of each image. After creating lesions of 10, 8, 6 mm in a NURBS (non-uniform rational B-splines) based cardiac torso (NCAT) phantom, PET images were simulated using SimSET simulator. Attenuation maps of the activity phantom were used as CT images. Each of the PET and CT images was divided into an approximation image and three detailed images by the wavelet transform. The corresponding transformed images generated from the PET and CT images were fused in nine different ways to generate composite images, which were compared to the original images. The basis of comparison is the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image in comparison to the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the original PET and CT images. Our results showed that except for one method, the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image was higher than that of the CT images. In the first six methods, the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image was less than the contrast, in the PET image. In the other three methods, the contrast in the fused image was higher than in the PET image. This was true in cases of 10, 8, 6 mm lesions. In conclusion, we have show that the approximation image produced a better ultimate image and that the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image was also better than that of the original PET and CT images. This is because the approximation image is comprised of fundamental information of the signal (low frequency) that directly affects the image contrast. PMID:19936335

  9. Breast Cancer Imaging with Novel PET Tracers.

    PubMed

    Mankoff, David A; Lee, Jean H; Eubank, William B

    2009-10-01

    Whereas (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/computed tomography has proven to be valuable for breast cancer diagnosis and response evaluation, it is likely that PET radiopharmaceuticals beyond FDG will contribute further to the understanding of breast cancer and thereby further direct breast cancer care. Increasingly specific and quantitative approaches will help direct treatment selection from an ever-expanding and increasing array of targeted breast cancer therapies. This article highlights 4 areas of ongoing research where preliminary patient results look promising: (1) tumor perfusion and angiogenesis, (2) drug delivery and transport, (3) tumor receptor imaging, and (4) early response evaluation. For each area, the biologic background is reviewed and early results are highlighted. PMID:27157306

  10. Multi-Modal Imaging with a Toolbox of Influenza A Reporter Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Vy; Poole, Daniel S.; Jeffery, Justin J.; Sheahan, Timothy P.; Creech, Donald; Yevtodiyenko, Aleksey; Peat, Andrew J.; Francis, Kevin P.; You, Shihyun; Mehle, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Reporter viruses are useful probes for studying multiple stages of the viral life cycle. Here we describe an expanded toolbox of fluorescent and bioluminescent influenza A reporter viruses. The enhanced utility of these tools enabled kinetic studies of viral attachment, infection, and co-infection. Multi-modal bioluminescence and positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of infected animals revealed that antiviral treatment reduced viral load, dissemination, and inflammation. These new technologies and applications will dramatically accelerate in vitro and in vivo influenza virus studies. PMID:26473913

  11. Combining variational and model-based techniques to register PET and MR images in hand osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Derek; Tanner, Steven F.; Waller, Michael; Tan, Ai Lyn; McGonagle, Dennis; Jeavons, Alan P.

    2010-08-01

    Co-registration of clinical images acquired using different imaging modalities and equipment is finding increasing use in patient studies. Here we present a method for registering high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) data of the hand acquired using high-density avalanche chambers with magnetic resonance (MR) images of the finger obtained using a 'microscopy coil'. This allows the identification of the anatomical location of the PET radiotracer and thereby locates areas of active bone metabolism/'turnover'. Image fusion involving data acquired from the hand is demanding because rigid-body transformations cannot be employed to accurately register the images. The non-rigid registration technique that has been implemented in this study uses a variational approach to maximize the mutual information between images acquired using these different imaging modalities. A piecewise model of the fingers is employed to ensure that the methodology is robust and that it generates an accurate registration. Evaluation of the accuracy of the technique is tested using both synthetic data and PET and MR images acquired from patients with osteoarthritis. The method outperforms some established non-rigid registration techniques and results in a mean registration error that is less than approximately 1.5 mm in the vicinity of the finger joints.

  12. Review: comparison of PET rubidium-82 with conventional SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has for many years been focused on gamma camera technology. With ever improving cameras and software applications, this modality has developed into an important assessment tool for ischaemic heart disease. However, the development of new perfusion tracers has been scarce. While cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) so far largely has been limited to centres with on-site cyclotron, recent developments with generator produced perfusion tracers such as rubidium-82, as well as an increasing number of PET scanners installed, may enable a larger patient flow that may supersede that of gamma camera myocardial perfusion imaging. PMID:24028171

  13. Bimodal imaging probes for combined PET and OI: recent developments and future directions for hybrid agent development.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Uwe; Wängler, Björn; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Wängler, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging--and especially positron emission tomography (PET)--has gained increasing importance for diagnosis of various diseases and thus experiences an increasing dissemination. Therefore, there is also a growing demand for highly affine PET tracers specifically accumulating and visualizing target structures in the human body. Beyond the development of agents suitable for PET alone, recent tendencies aim at the synthesis of bimodal imaging probes applicable in PET as well as optical imaging (OI), as this combination of modalities can provide clinical advantages. PET, due to the high tissue penetration of the γ-radiation emitted by PET nuclides, allows a quantitative imaging able to identify and visualize tumors and metastases in the whole body. OI on the contrary visualizes photons exhibiting only a limited tissue penetration but enables the identification of tumor margins and infected lymph nodes during surgery without bearing a radiation burden for the surgeon. Thus, there is an emerging interest in bimodal agents for PET and OI in order to exploit the potential of both imaging techniques for the imaging and treatment of tumor diseases. This short review summarizes the available hybrid probes developed for dual PET and OI and discusses future directions for hybrid agent development. PMID:24822177

  14. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Kiel, K; Chu, J; Kadir, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further

  15. SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P; Bailey, D; Bailey, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: −5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.

  16. Advanced Tracers in PET Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Hua; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers by positron emission tomography (PET) allows for the noninvasive detection and characterization of biological changes at the molecular level, leading to earlier disease detection, objective monitoring of therapies, and better prognostication of cardiovascular diseases progression. Here we review, the current role of PET in cardiovascular disease, with emphasize on tracers developed for PET imaging of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25389529

  17. State of the art imaging of multiple myeloma: comparative review of FDG PET/CT imaging in various clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mesguich, Charles; Fardanesh, Reza; Tanenbaum, Lawrence; Chari, Ajai; Jagannath, Sundar; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2014-12-01

    18-Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have higher sensitivity and specificity than whole-body X-ray (WBXR) survey in evaluating disease extent in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Both modalities are now recommended by the Durie-Salmon Plus classification although the emphasis is more on MRI than PET/CT. The presence of extra-medullary disease (EMD) as evaluated by PET/CT imaging, initial SUVmax and number of focal lesions (FL) are deemed to be strong prognostic parameters at staging. MRI remains the most sensitive technique for the detection of diffuse bone marrow involvement in both the pre and post-therapy setting. Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI signal changes, for determining vertebroplasty candidates. While PET/CT allows for earlier and more specific evaluation of therapeutic efficacy compared to MRI, when signal abnormalities persist years after treatment. PET/CT interpretation, however, can be challenging in the vertebral column and pelvis as well as in cases with post-therapy changes. Hence, a reading approach combining the high sensitivity of MRI and superior specificity of FDG PET/CT would be preferred to increase the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, the established management methods in MM, mainly relying on biological tumor parameters should be complemented with functional imaging data, both at staging and restaging for optimal management of MM. PMID:25308249

  18. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  19. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  20. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  1. Imaging modalities in wounds and superficial skin infections.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, Robert B; Baker, Todd

    2007-02-01

    Open wounds and lacerations are the most commonly encountered problems in emergency medicine. Detection and removal of a foreign body is essential to avoid the many complications of a retained foreign body, which may include infection, inflammation, allergic reaction, and disability. Currently, there are several imaging modalities that the emergency medicine provider may use to aid in foreign body detection and wound management. Techniques and appropriate use of these imaging modalities for foreign bodies and soft tissue infections are discussed in this article. PMID:17400083

  2. Bimodal Imaging Probes for Combined PET and OI: Recent Developments and Future Directions for Hybrid Agent Development

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Uwe; Wängler, Björn; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Wängler, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging—and especially positron emission tomography (PET)—has gained increasing importance for diagnosis of various diseases and thus experiences an increasing dissemination. Therefore, there is also a growing demand for highly affine PET tracers specifically accumulating and visualizing target structures in the human body. Beyond the development of agents suitable for PET alone, recent tendencies aim at the synthesis of bimodal imaging probes applicable in PET as well as optical imaging (OI), as this combination of modalities can provide clinical advantages. PET, due to the high tissue penetration of the γ-radiation emitted by PET nuclides, allows a quantitative imaging able to identify and visualize tumors and metastases in the whole body. OI on the contrary visualizes photons exhibiting only a limited tissue penetration but enables the identification of tumor margins and infected lymph nodes during surgery without bearing a radiation burden for the surgeon. Thus, there is an emerging interest in bimodal agents for PET and OI in order to exploit the potential of both imaging techniques for the imaging and treatment of tumor diseases. This short review summarizes the available hybrid probes developed for dual PET and OI and discusses future directions for hybrid agent development. PMID:24822177

  3. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment. PMID:27593246

  4. Hybrid-modality high-resolution imaging: for diagnostic biomedical imaging and sensing for disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murukeshan, Vadakke M.; Hoong Ta, Lim

    2014-11-01

    Medical diagnostics in the recent past has seen the challenging trend to come up with dual and multi-modality imaging for implementing better diagnostic procedures. The changes in tissues in the early disease stages are often subtle and can occur beneath the tissue surface. In most of these cases, conventional types of medical imaging using optics may not be able to detect these changes easily due to its penetration depth of the orders of 1 mm. Each imaging modality has its own advantages and limitations, and the use of a single modality is not suitable for every diagnostic applications. Therefore the need for multi or hybrid-modality imaging arises. Combining more than one imaging modalities overcomes the limitation of individual imaging method and integrates the respective advantages into a single setting. In this context, this paper will be focusing on the research and development of two multi-modality imaging platforms. The first platform combines ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging for diagnostic applications in the eye. The second platform consists of optical hyperspectral and photoacoustic imaging for diagnostic applications in the colon. Photoacoustic imaging is used as one of the modalities in both platforms as it can offer deeper penetration depth compared to optical imaging. The optical engineering and research challenges in developing the dual/multi-modality platforms will be discussed, followed by initial results validating the proposed scheme. The proposed schemes offer high spatial and spectral resolution imaging and sensing, and is expected to offer potential biomedical imaging solutions in the near future.

  5. Detection of bladder metabolic artifacts in (18)F-FDG PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Roman-Jimenez, Geoffrey; Crevoisier, Renaud De; Leseur, Julie; Devillers, Anne; Ospina, Juan David; Simon, Antoine; Terve, Pierre; Acosta, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    Positron emission tomography using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG-PET) is a widely used imaging modality in oncology. It enables significant functional information to be included in analyses of anatomical data provided by other image modalities. Although PET offers high sensitivity in detecting suspected malignant metabolism, (18)F-FDG uptake is not tumor-specific and can also be fixed in surrounding healthy tissue, which may consequently be mistaken as cancerous. PET analyses may be particularly hampered in pelvic-located cancers by the bladder׳s physiological uptake potentially obliterating the tumor uptake. In this paper, we propose a novel method for detecting (18)F-FDG bladder artifacts based on a multi-feature double-step classification approach. Using two manually defined seeds (tumor and bladder), the method consists of a semi-automated double-step clustering strategy that simultaneously takes into consideration standard uptake values (SUV) on PET, Hounsfield values on computed tomography (CT), and the distance to the seeds. This method was performed on 52 PET/CT images from patients treated for locally advanced cervical cancer. Manual delineations of the bladder on CT images were used in order to evaluate bladder uptake detection capability. Tumor preservation was evaluated using a manual segmentation of the tumor, with a threshold of 42% of the maximal uptake within the tumor. Robustness was assessed by randomly selecting different initial seeds. The classification averages were 0.94±0.09 for sensitivity, 0.98±0.01 specificity, and 0.98±0.01 accuracy. These results suggest that this method is able to detect most (18)F-FDG bladder metabolism artifacts while preserving tumor uptake, and could thus be used as a pre-processing step for further non-parasitized PET analyses. PMID:26897070

  6. 89Zr-Labeled Paramagnetic Octreotide-Liposomes for PET-MR Imaging of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abou, Diane S.; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ramos, Nicholas N.; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Wolterbeek, Hubert T.; Carlin, Sean D.; Beattie, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dual-modality PET/MR platforms add a new dimension to patient diagnosis with high resolution, functional, and anatomical imaging. The full potential of this emerging hybrid modality could be realized by using a corresponding dual-modality probe. Here, we report pegylated liposome (LP) formulations, housing a MR T1 contrast agent (Gd) and the positron-emitting 89Zr (half-life: 3.27 days), for simultaneous PET and MR tumor imaging capabilities. Methods 89Zr oxophilicity was unexpectedly found advantageous for direct radiolabeling of preformed paramagnetic LPs. LPs were conjugated with octreotide to selectively target neuroendocrine tumors via human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTr2). 89Zr-Gd-LPs and octreotide-conjugated homolog were physically, chemically and biologically characterized. Results 89Zr-LPs showed reasonable stability over serum proteins and chelator challenges for proof-of-concept in vitro and in vivo investigations. Nuclear and paramagnetic tracking quantified superior SSTr2-recognition of octreotide-LP compared to controls. Conclusions This study demonstrated SSTr2-targeting specificity along with direct chelator-free 89Zr-labeling of LPs and dual PET/MR imaging properties. PMID:23224977

  7. Sensitivity of Quantified Intracranial Aneurysm Geometry to Imaging Modality

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Manasi; Retarekar, Rohini; Harbaugh, Robert E.; Hasan, David; Policeni, Bruno; Rosenwasser, Robert; Ogilvy, Christopher; Raghavan, Madhavan L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the sensitivity of intracranial aneurysm geometry to the modality of imaging. Four imaging modalities—3D rotational angiography (3DRA), computed tomography angiography (CTA), contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA), and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA)—were assessed using data from a flow phantom and human subjects. A silicone flow phantom of the head and neck arteries with a 10 mm ACOM aneurysm was imaged using all four modalities under steady flow conditions. Three human subjects with mid to large sized intracranial aneurysm who had a 3DRA scan and one of CTA, CE-MRA, or TOF-MRA performed within a day were also studied. The aneurysm and contiguous vasculature were segmented for all available scans and geometric measures of their size (5 indices) and shape (6 indices) were estimated and compared. Visually, the size and shape of segmented 3D models of the aneurysms were similar across scan modalities for both the human subjects and the flow phantom. Consequently, the computed indices were consistent across modalities in the key morphometric indices. In conclusion, quantified indices of 3D geometry of the mid to large sized intracranial aneurysms investigated in this small study population are not sensitive to scanning modality. PMID:24151529

  8. Stress echocardiography: what is new and how does it compare with myocardial perfusion imaging and other modalities?

    PubMed

    Tweet, Marysia S; Arruda-Olson, Adelaide M; Anavekar, Nandan S; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and noninvasive strategies to diagnose and risk stratify patients remain paramount in the evaluative process. Stress echocardiography is a well-established, versatile, real-time imaging modality with advantages including lack of radiation exposure, portability, and affordability. Innovative techniques in stress echocardiography include myocardial contrast echocardiography, deformation imaging, three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography, and assessment of coronary flow reserve. Myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) are imaging alternatives, and stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography, including CT perfusion imaging, are emerging as newer approaches. This review will discuss recent and upcoming developments in the field of stress testing, with an emphasis on stress echocardiography while highlighting comparisons with other modalities. PMID:25911442

  9. PET/MR Imaging in Vascular Disease: Atherosclerosis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    For imaging of atherosclerotic disease, lumenography using computed tomography, ultrasonography, or invasive angiography is still the backbone of evaluation. However, these methods are less effective to predict the likelihood of future thromboembolic events caused by vulnerability of plaques. PET and MR imaging have been used separately with success for plaque characterization. Where MR imaging has the ability to reveal plaque composition, PET has the ability to visualize plaque activity. Together this leads to a comprehensive evaluation of plaque vulnerability. In this review, the authors go through data and arguments that support increased use of PET/MR imaging in atherosclerotic imaging. PMID:27593251

  10. Invasive and non-invasive modalities of imaging carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, T Y; U-King-Im, J M; Walsh, S R; Young, V E; Sadat, U; Li, Z Y; Patterson, A J; Varty, K; Gillard, J H

    2009-12-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, acute ischemic complications of atherosclerosis remain the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries, with carotid atherosclerotic disease one of the major preventable causes of stroke. As the impact of this disease challenges our healthcare systems, we are becoming aware that factors influencing this disease are more complex than previously realized. In current clinical practice, risk stratification relies primarily on evaluation of the degree of luminal stenosis and patient symptomatology. Adequate investigation and optimal imaging are important factors that affect the quality of a carotid endarterectomy (CEA) service and are fundamental to patient selection. Digital subtraction angiography is still perceived as the most accurate imaging modality for carotid stenosis and historically has been the cornerstone of most of the major CEA trials but concerns regarding potential neurological complications have generated substantial interest in non-invasive modalities, such as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. The purpose of this review is to give an overview to the vascular specialist of the current imaging modalities in clinical practice to identify patients with carotid stenosis. Advantages and disadvantages of each technique are outlined. Finally, limitations of assessing luminal stenosis in general are discussed. This article will not cover imaging of carotid atheroma morphology, function and other emerging imaging modalities of assessing plaque risk, which look beyond simple luminal measurements. PMID:19935602

  11. Quantitative evaluation of PET image using event information bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hankyeol; Kwak, Shin Hye; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Woo, Sang-Keun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the effect in the PET image quality according to event bootstrap of small animal PET data. In order to investigate the time difference condition, realigned sinograms were generated from randomly sampled data set using bootstrap. List-mode data was obtained from small animal PET scanner for Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 20 min and Y-90 60 min. PET image was reconstructed by Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization(OSEM) 2D with the list-mode format. Image analysis was investigated by Signal to Noise Ratio(SNR) of Ge-68 and Y-90 image. Non-parametric resampled PET image SNR percent change for the Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 60 min, and Y-90 20 min was 1.69 %, 7.03 %, and 4.78 %, respectively. SNR percent change of non-parametric resampled PET image with time difference condition was 1.08 % for the Ge-68 30 sec, 6.74 % for the Y-90 60 min and 10.94 % for the Y-90 29 min. The result indicated that the bootstrap with time difference condition had a potential to improve a noisy Y-90 PET image quality. This method should be expected to reduce Y-90 PET measurement time and to enhance its accuracy.

  12. Site-specifically labeled CA19.9-targeted immunoconjugates for the PET, NIRF, and multimodal PET/NIRF imaging of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Jacob L.; Zeglis, Brian M.; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Aggeler, Robert; Sawada, Ritsuko; Agnew, Brian J.; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging agents for preoperative positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF)-guided delineation of surgical margins could greatly enhance the diagnosis, staging, and resection of pancreatic cancer. PET and NIRF optical imaging offer complementary clinical applications, enabling the noninvasive whole-body imaging to localize disease and identification of tumor margins during surgery, respectively. We report the development of PET, NIRF, and dual-modal (PET/NIRF) imaging agents, using 5B1, a fully human monoclonal antibody that targets CA19.9, a well-established pancreatic cancer biomarker. Desferrioxamine (DFO) and/or a NIRF dye (FL) were conjugated to the heavy-chain glycans of 5B1, using a robust and reproducible site-specific (ss) labeling methodology to generate three constructs (ssDFO-5B1, ssFL-5B1, and ssdual-5B1) in which the immunoreactivity was not affected by the conjugation of either label. Each construct was evaluated in a s.c. xenograft model, using CA19.9-positive (BxPC3) and -negative (MIAPaCa-2) human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Each construct showed exceptional uptake and contrast in antigen-positive tumors with negligible nonspecific uptake in antigen-negative tumors. Additionally, the dual-modal construct was evaluated in an orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, using the human pancreatic cancer cell line, Suit-2. The ssdual-5B1 demonstrated a remarkable capacity to delineate metastases and to map the sentinel lymph nodes via tandem PET-computed tomography (PET/CT) and NIRF imaging. Fluorescence microscopy, histopathology, and autoradiography were performed on representative sections of excised tumors to visualize the distribution of the constructs within the tumors. These imaging tools have tremendous potential for further preclinical research and for clinical translation. PMID:26668398

  13. Role of imaging modalities in diagnosis and management of pyomyositis

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Mulligan, G.M.; Young, C.S.; Schumann, E.M.; Bosworth, D.E.; Pringle, K.C.

    1982-08-01

    A case of tropical pyomyositis in a temperate climate is reported and 29 more cases are reviewed from the literature. Because of its rarity and deceiving clinical presentation, the disorder may go unrecognized for weeks in nontropical regions. The role of various imaging modalities in timely and accurate diagnosis and nonsurgical management of this disorder is discussed.

  14. Phantom validation of coregistration of PET and CT for image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lavely, William C; Scarfone, Christopher; Cevikalp, Hakan; Li, Rui; Byrne, Daniel W; Cmelak, Anthony J; Dawant, Benoit; Price, Ronald R; Hallahan, Dennis E; Fitzpatrick, J Michael

    2004-05-01

    Radiotherapy treatment planning integrating positron emission tomography (PET) and computerized tomography (CT) is rapidly gaining acceptance in the clinical setting. Although hybrid systems are available, often the planning CT is acquired on a dedicated system separate from the PET scanner. A limiting factor to using PET data becomes the accuracy of the CT/PET registration. In this work, we use phantom and patient validation to demonstrate a general method for assessing the accuracy of CT/PET image registration and apply it to two multi-modality image registration programs. An IAEA (International Atomic Energy Association) brain phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom were used. Internal volumes and externally mounted fiducial markers were filled with CT contrast and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). CT, PET emission, and PET transmission images were acquired and registered using two different image registration algorithms. CT/PET Fusion (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) is commercially available and uses a semi-automated initial step followed by manual adjustment. Automatic Mutual Information-based Registration (AMIR), developed at our institution, is fully automated and exhibits no variation between repeated registrations. Registration was performed using distinct phantom structures; assessment of accuracy was determined from registration of the calculated centroids of a set of fiducial markers. By comparing structure-based registration with fiducial-based registration, target registration error (TRE) was computed at each point in a three-dimensional (3D) grid that spans the image volume. Identical methods were also applied to patient data to assess CT/PET registration accuracy. Accuracy was calculated as the mean with standard deviation of the TRE for every point in the 3D grid. Overall TRE values for the IAEA brain phantom are: CT/PET Fusion = 1.71 +/- 0.62 mm, AMIR = 1.13 +/- 0.53 mm; overall TRE values for the anthropomorphic head phantom are: CT/PET

  15. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  16. Laser Illumination Modality of Photoacoustic Imaging Technique for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Peng, Yuan-yuan; Guo, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recently emerged as a promising imaging technique for prostate cancer. But there was still a lot of challenge in the PAI for prostate cancer detection, such as laser illumination modality. Knowledge of absorbed light distribution in prostate tissue was essential since the distribution characteristic of absorbed light energy would influence the imaging depth and range of PAI. In order to make a comparison of different laser illumination modality of photoacoustic imaging technique for prostate cancer, optical model of human prostate was established and combined with Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the light absorption distribution in the prostate tissue. Characteristic of light absorption distribution of transurethral and trans-rectal illumination case, and of tumor at different location was compared with each other.The relevant conclusions would be significant for optimizing the light illumination in a PAI system for prostate cancer detection.

  17. Optical tomography: Development of a new medical imaging modality

    SciTech Connect

    Hebden, Jeremy C.

    1998-08-28

    The demonstrated success of near-infrared spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in medicine has encouraged physicists to pursue the development of an imaging technique based on the transmittance of optical wavelengths through tissue. Potential clinical applications include a means of detecting breast disease, and a cerebral imaging modality for mapping oxygenation and haemodynamics in the brain of newborn infants. Imaging of tissues with light is severely restricted by the overwhelming scatter which occurs when optical radiation propagates through tissue. However, recent innovations in technology and the development of new tomographic reconstruction procedures suggest that a clinically viable imaging modality is achievable. In this paper the recent progress in this field of research is reviewed, and the prospects for ultimate success are discussed.

  18. (18)F-FLT PET imaging of cellular proliferation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamarca, Angela; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Manoharan, Prakash; McNamara, Mairéad G; Trigonis, Ioannis; Hubner, Richard; Saleem, Azeem; Valle, Juan W

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is known for its poor prognosis. Since the development of computerized tomography, magnetic resonance and endoscopic ultrasound, novel imaging techniques have struggled to get established in the management of patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma for several reasons. Thus, imaging assessment of pancreatic cancer remains a field with scope for further improvement. In contrast to cross-sectional anatomical imaging methods, molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) can provide information on tumour function. Particularly, tumour proliferation may be assessed by measurement of intracellular thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) activity level using thymidine analogues radiolabelled with a positron emitter for use with PET. This approach, has been widely explored with [(18)F]-fluoro-3'-deoxy-3'-l-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) PET. This manuscript reviews the rationale and physiology behind (18)F-FLT PET imaging, with special focus on pancreatic cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies. Potential benefit and challenges of this imaging technique for diagnosis, staging and assessment of treatment response in abdominal malignancies are discussed. PMID:26778585

  19. (68)Ga PET Ventilation and Perfusion Lung Imaging-Current Status and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dale L; Eslick, Enid M; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Roach, Paul J

    2016-09-01

    Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) is a positron-emitting radionuclide suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging that has a number of convenient features-it has a physical half life of 68 minutes, it is generator produced at the PET facility and needs no local cyclotron, and being a radiometal is able to be chelated to a number of useful molecules for diagnostic imaging with PET. (68)Ga has recently been investigated as a radiotracer for ventilation and perfusion (V/Q) lung imaging. It is relatively easy to produce both V/Q radiopharmaceuticals labeled with (68)Ga for PET studies, it offers higher spatial resolution than equivalent SPECT studies, the short half life allows for multiple (repeated) scans on the same day, and low amounts of radiotracer can be used thus limiting the radiation dose to the subject. In the usual clinical setting requiring a V/Q scan, that of suspected pulmonary embolism, the role of (68)Ga V/Q PET may be limited from a logistical perspective, however, in nonacute applications such as lung function evaluation, radiotherapy treatment planning, and respiratory physiology investigations it would appear to be an ideal modality to employ. PMID:27553468

  20. Seeing it through: translational validation of new medical imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Melissa B.; Marshall, Milton V.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Lanza, Greg; Kotyk, John; Culver, Joseph; Wang, Lihong V.; Uddin, Jashim; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Liao, Joseph C.; Contag, Chris; Crawford, James M.; Wang, Ken; Reisdorph, Bill; Appelman, Henry; Turgeon, D. Kim; Meyer, Charles; Wang, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging is an invaluable tool for diagnosis, surgical guidance, and assessment of treatment efficacy. The Network for Translational Research (NTR) for Optical Imaging consists of four research groups working to “bridge the gap” between lab discovery and clinical use of fluorescence- and photoacoustic-based imaging devices used with imaging biomarkers. While the groups are using different modalities, all the groups face similar challenges when attempting to validate these systems for FDA approval and, ultimately, clinical use. Validation steps taken, as well as future needs, are described here. The group hopes to provide translational validation guidance for itself, as well as other researchers. PMID:22574264

  1. Multi-modal Ultrasound Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Valdés, L.; Pérez-Liva, M.; Camacho, J.; Udías, J. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; González-Salido, N.

    This work describes preliminary results of a two-modality imaging system aimed at the early detection of breast cancer. The first technique is based on compounding conventional echographic images taken at regular angular intervals around the imaged breast. The other modality obtains tomographic images of propagation velocity using the same circular geometry. For this study, a low-cost prototype has been built. It is based on a pair of opposed 128-element, 3.2 MHz array transducers that are mechanically moved around tissue mimicking phantoms. Compounded images around 360° provide improved resolution, clutter reduction, artifact suppression and reinforce the visualization of internal structures. However, refraction at the skin interface must be corrected for an accurate image compounding process. This is achieved by estimation of the interface geometry followed by computing the internal ray paths. On the other hand, sound velocity tomographic images from time of flight projections have been also obtained. Two reconstruction methods, Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and 2D Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (2D OSEM), were used as a first attempt towards tomographic reconstruction. These methods yield useable images in short computational times that can be considered as initial estimates in subsequent more complex methods of ultrasound image reconstruction. These images may be effective to differentiate malignant and benign masses and are very promising for breast cancer screening.

  2. Development of a triple modality small animal planar imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    A. G. Weisenberger, Z. Lee, S. Majewski, B. Kross, V. Popov, B. Welch, R. Wojcik, C. Zorn

    2006-02-01

    Recently small animal research utilizing nuclear medicine based imaging has been combined with structural anatomical imaging from x-ray radiography providing a powerful tool for animal researchers. The addition of a third modality is the goal of our instrumentation development. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Case Western Reserve University have been collaborating on the development of a planar imaging system which in addition to radiopharmaceutical based functional imaging and x-ray radiography structural imaging also allows for the in vivo bioluminescence imaging thus providing another functional imaging modality. For the gamma camera we use is a Hamamatsu position sensitive photomultiplier tube coupled to a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillator array with individual crystal elements 1 mm × 1 mm × 5 mm in size and a 0.25 mm septum between each element. The gamma camera has a 10 cm diameter active area and can be used for 125I, 99mT and 111In radionuclide imaging. To acquire anatomical information we are using a Rad-Icon Shad-o-Box X-ray detector that provides a field of view of 5 cm × 10 cm. The x-ray source is a Source-Ray compact x-ray generator. We are using a Princeton Instruments cooled CCD based detector for the imaging of the bio-distribution of bioluminescence. All three imaging instruments will be integrated into a single light tight / x-ray tight enclosure.

  3. Assessment of Geometrical Accuracy of Multimodal Images Used for Treatment Planning in Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery: CT, MRI and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Celis, M. A.; Suarez-Campos, J. J.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.

    2006-09-08

    An acrylic phantom was designed and constructed to assess the geometrical accuracy of CT, MRI and PET images for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and radiosurgery (SRS) applications. The phantom was suited for each image modality with a specific tracer and compared with CT images to measure the radial deviation between the reference marks in the phantom. It was found that for MRI the maximum mean deviation is 1.9 {+-} 0.2 mm compared to 2.4 {+-} 0.3 mm reported for PET. These results will be used for margin outlining in SRS and SRT treatment planning.

  4. Whole-body FDG-PET imaging for staging of Hodgkin`s disease and lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoh, C.K.; Glaspy, J.; Rosen, P.

    1997-03-01

    Accurate staging of Hodgkin`s disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (NHL) is important for treatment management. In this study, the utility of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) wholebody PET was evaluated as an imaging modality for initial staging or restaging of 7 HD and 11 NHL patients. Whole-body PET-based staging results were compared to the patient`s clinical stage based on conventional staging studies, which included combinations of CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis, MRI scans, gallium scans, lymphangiograms, staging laparatomies and bone scans. Accurate staging was performed in 17 of 18 patients using a whole-body PET-based staging algorithm compared to the conventional staging algorithm in 15 of 18 patients. In 5 of 18 patients, whole-body PET-based staging showed additional lesions not detected by conventional staging modalities, whereas conventional staging demonstrated additional lesions in 4 of 18 patients not detected by whole-body PET. The total cost of conventional staging was $66,292 for 16 CT chest scans, 16 CT abdominal/pelvis scans, three limited MRI scans, four bone scans, give gallium scans, two laparotomies and one lymphangiogram. In contrast, scans cost $36,250 for 18 whole-body PET studies and additional selected correlative studies: one plain film radiograph, one limited CT, one bone marrow san, one upper GI and one endoscopy. A whole-body FDG-PET-based staging algorithm may be an accurate and cost-effective method for staging or restaging HD and NHL. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Sparsity-constrained PET image reconstruction with learned dictionaries.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Bao; Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    PET imaging plays an important role in scientific and clinical measurement of biochemical and physiological processes. Model-based PET image reconstruction such as the iterative expectation maximization algorithm seeking the maximum likelihood solution leads to increased noise. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate removes divergence at higher iterations. However, a conventional smoothing prior or a total-variation (TV) prior in a MAP reconstruction algorithm causes over smoothing or blocky artifacts in the reconstructed images. We propose to use dictionary learning (DL) based sparse signal representation in the formation of the prior for MAP PET image reconstruction. The dictionary to sparsify the PET images in the reconstruction process is learned from various training images including the corresponding MR structural image and a self-created hollow sphere. Using simulated and patient brain PET data with corresponding MR images, we study the performance of the DL-MAP algorithm and compare it quantitatively with a conventional MAP algorithm, a TV-MAP algorithm, and a patch-based algorithm. The DL-MAP algorithm achieves improved bias and contrast (or regional mean values) at comparable noise to what the other MAP algorithms acquire. The dictionary learned from the hollow sphere leads to similar results as the dictionary learned from the corresponding MR image. Achieving robust performance in various noise-level simulation and patient studies, the DL-MAP algorithm with a general dictionary demonstrates its potential in quantitative PET imaging. PMID:27494441

  6. Sparsity-constrained PET image reconstruction with learned dictionaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Bao; Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    PET imaging plays an important role in scientific and clinical measurement of biochemical and physiological processes. Model-based PET image reconstruction such as the iterative expectation maximization algorithm seeking the maximum likelihood solution leads to increased noise. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate removes divergence at higher iterations. However, a conventional smoothing prior or a total-variation (TV) prior in a MAP reconstruction algorithm causes over smoothing or blocky artifacts in the reconstructed images. We propose to use dictionary learning (DL) based sparse signal representation in the formation of the prior for MAP PET image reconstruction. The dictionary to sparsify the PET images in the reconstruction process is learned from various training images including the corresponding MR structural image and a self-created hollow sphere. Using simulated and patient brain PET data with corresponding MR images, we study the performance of the DL-MAP algorithm and compare it quantitatively with a conventional MAP algorithm, a TV-MAP algorithm, and a patch-based algorithm. The DL-MAP algorithm achieves improved bias and contrast (or regional mean values) at comparable noise to what the other MAP algorithms acquire. The dictionary learned from the hollow sphere leads to similar results as the dictionary learned from the corresponding MR image. Achieving robust performance in various noise-level simulation and patient studies, the DL-MAP algorithm with a general dictionary demonstrates its potential in quantitative PET imaging.

  7. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  8. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  9. Characterization of coronary atherosclerosis by intravascular imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Satoshi; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Noguchi, Teruo; Ogawa, Hisao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is highly prevalent in Western countries and is associated with morbidity, mortality, and a significant economic burden. Despite the development of anti-atherosclerotic medical therapies, many patients still continue to suffer from coronary events. This residual risk indicates the need for better risk stratification and additional therapies to achieve more reductions in cardiovascular risk. Recent advances in imaging modalities have contributed to visualizing atherosclerotic plaques and defining lesion characteristics in vivo. This innovation has been applied to refining revascularization procedure, assessment of anti-atherosclerotic drug efficacy and the detection of high-risk plaques. As such, intravascular imaging plays an important role in further improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CAD. The current article reviews available intravascular imaging modalities with regard to its method, advantage and disadvantage. PMID:27500094

  10. 3-Dimensional Imaging Modalities for Phenotyping Genetically Engineered Mice

    PubMed Central

    Powell, K. A.; Wilson, D.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of 3-dimensional (3D) digital imaging modalities are available for whole-body assessment of genetically engineered mice: magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), X-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT), optical projection tomography (OPT), episcopic and cryoimaging, and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Embryo and adult mouse phenotyping can be accomplished at microscopy or near microscopy spatial resolutions using these modalities. MRM and microCT are particularly well-suited for evaluating structural information at the organ level, whereas episcopic and OPT imaging provide structural and functional information from molecular fluorescence imaging at the cellular level. UBM can be used to monitor embryonic development longitudinally in utero. Specimens are not significantly altered during preparation, and structures can be viewed in their native orientations. Technologies for rapid automated data acquisition and high-throughput phenotyping have been developed and continually improve as this exciting field evolves. PMID:22146851

  11. Characterization of coronary atherosclerosis by intravascular imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Honda, Satoshi; Kataoka, Yu; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Noguchi, Teruo; Ogawa, Hisao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is highly prevalent in Western countries and is associated with morbidity, mortality, and a significant economic burden. Despite the development of anti-atherosclerotic medical therapies, many patients still continue to suffer from coronary events. This residual risk indicates the need for better risk stratification and additional therapies to achieve more reductions in cardiovascular risk. Recent advances in imaging modalities have contributed to visualizing atherosclerotic plaques and defining lesion characteristics in vivo. This innovation has been applied to refining revascularization procedure, assessment of anti-atherosclerotic drug efficacy and the detection of high-risk plaques. As such, intravascular imaging plays an important role in further improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CAD. The current article reviews available intravascular imaging modalities with regard to its method, advantage and disadvantage. PMID:27500094

  12. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Christiaan Ja; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim Tm; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2015-12-18

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  13. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim TM; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino MMJ

    2015-01-01

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  14. Contrast-enhanced [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography as an initial imaging modality in patients presenting with metastatic malignancy of undefined primary origin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Avani; Srivastava, Madhur Kumar; Pawaskar, Alok Suresh; Shelley, Simon; Elangovan, Indirani; Jain, Hasmukh; Pandey, Somnath; Kalal, Shilpa; Amalachandran, Jaykanth

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the advantages of contrast enhanced F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-contrast enhanced CT [CECT]) when used as an initial imaging modality in patients presenting with metastatic malignancy of undefined primary origin (MUO). Materials and Methods: A total of 243 patients with fine needle aspiration cytology/biopsy proven MUO were included in this prospective study. Patients who were thoroughly evaluated for primary or primary tumor was detected by any other investigation were excluded from the analysis. Totally, 163 patients with pathological diagnosis of malignancy but no apparent sites of the primary tumor were finally selected for analysis. The site of probable primary malignancy suggested by PET-CECT was confirmed by biopsy/follow-up. Results: PET-CECT suggested probable site of primary in 128/163 (78.52%) patients. In 30/35 remaining patients, primary tumor was not detected even after extensive work-up. In 5 patients, where PET-CECT was negative, primary was found on further extensive investigations or follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the study were 95.76%, 66.67%, 88.28% and 85.71% respectively. Conclusions: F-18 FDG PET-CECT aptly serves the purpose of initial imaging modality owing to high sensitivity, negative and positive predictive value. PET-CECT not only surveys the whole body for the primary malignancy but also stages the disease accurately. Use of contrast improves the diagnostic utility of modality as well as help in staging of the primary tumor. Although benefits of using PET-CECT as initial diagnostic modality are obvious from this study, there is a need for a larger study comparing conventional methods for diagnosing primary in patients with MUO versus PET-CECT. PMID:26170563

  15. Utility of Combining PET and MR Imaging of Carotid Plaque.

    PubMed

    Vesey, Alex T; Dweck, Marc R; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-02-01

    By harnessing the versatility and soft tissue imaging capabilities of MR imaging alongside the unmatched sensitivity and biomolecular flexibility of PET, the potential to provide detailed multiparametric plaque characterization in the carotid arteries is clear. The ability to acquire simultaneous, and dynamic multimodal data is perhaps PET/MR's greatest strength that will be of major interest to researchers investigating carotid and coronary atherosclerosis alike. This review summarizes the current status of dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging; to crystallize the rationale for and advantages of this technique with respect to carotid atherosclerosis; and to discuss current limitations, challenges, and future directions. PMID:26610660

  16. Improving PET imaging for breast cancer using virtual pinhole PET half-ring insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Aswin John; Komarov, Sergey; Wu, Heyu; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2013-09-01

    A PET insert with detector having smaller crystals and placed near a region of interest in a conventional PET scanner can improve image resolution locally due to the virtual-pinhole PET (VP-PET) effect. This improvement is from the higher spatial sampling of the imaging area near the detector. We have built a prototype half-ring PET insert for head-and-neck cancer imaging applications. In this paper, we extend the use of the insert to breast imaging and show that such a system provides high resolution images of breast and axillary lymph nodes while maintaining the full imaging field of view capability of a clinical PET scanner. We characterize the resolution and contrast recovery for tumors across the imaging field of view. First, we model the system using Monte Carlo methods to determine its theoretical limit of improvement. Simulations were conducted with hot spherical tumors embedded in background activity at tumor-to-background contrast ranging from 3:1 to 12:1. Tumors are arranged in a Derenzo-like pattern with their diameters ranging from 2 to 12 mm. Experimental studies were performed using a chest phantom with cylindrical breast attachment. Tumors of different sizes arranged in a Derenzo-like pattern with tumor-to-background ratio of 6:1 are inserted into the breast phantom. Imaging capability of mediastinum and axillary lymph nodes is explored. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experiment show clear improvement in image resolution and contrast recovery with VP-PET half-ring insert. The degree of improvement in resolution and contrast recovery depends on location of the tumor. The full field of view imaging capability is shown to be maintained. Minor artifacts are introduced in certain regions.

  17. A practical salient region feature based 3D multi-modality registration method for medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Dieter A.; Wolz, Gabriele; Sun, Yiyong; Hornegger, Joachim; Sauer, Frank; Kuwert, Torsten; Xu, Chenyang

    2006-03-01

    We present a novel representation of 3D salient region features and its integration into a hybrid rigid-body registration framework. We adopt scale, translation and rotation invariance properties of those intrinsic 3D features to estimate a transform between underlying mono- or multi-modal 3D medical images. Our method combines advantageous aspects of both feature- and intensity-based approaches and consists of three steps: an automatic extraction of a set of 3D salient region features on each image, a robust estimation of correspondences and their sub-pixel accurate refinement with outliers elimination. We propose a region-growing based approach for the extraction of 3D salient region features, a solution to the problem of feature clustering and a reduction of the correspondence search space complexity. Results of the developed algorithm are presented for both mono- and multi-modal intra-patient 3D image pairs (CT, PET and SPECT) that have been acquired for change detection, tumor localization, and time based intra-person studies. The accuracy of the method is clinically evaluated by a medical expert with an approach that measures the distance between a set of selected corresponding points consisting of both anatomical and functional structures or lesion sites. This demonstrates the robustness of the proposed method to image overlap, missing information and artefacts. We conclude by discussing potential medical applications and possibilities for integration into a non-rigid registration framework.

  18. Imaging Breast Density: Established and Emerging Modalities1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Gulsen, Gultekin; Su, Min-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density has been proven as an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Women with dense breast tissue visible on a mammogram have a much higher cancer risk than women with little density. A great research effort has been devoted to incorporate breast density into risk prediction models to better estimate each individual’s cancer risk. In recent years, the passage of breast density notification legislation in many states in USA requires that every mammography report should provide information regarding the patient’s breast density. Accurate definition and measurement of breast density are thus important, which may allow all the potential clinical applications of breast density to be implemented. Because the two-dimensional mammography-based measurement is subject to tissue overlapping and thus not able to provide volumetric information, there is an urgent need to develop reliable quantitative measurements of breast density. Various new imaging technologies are being developed. Among these new modalities, volumetric mammographic density methods and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging are the most well studied. Besides, emerging modalities, including different x-ray–based, optical imaging, and ultrasound-based methods, have also been investigated. All these modalities may either overcome some fundamental problems related to mammographic density or provide additional density and/or compositional information. The present review article aimed to summarize the current established and emerging imaging techniques for the measurement of breast density and the evidence of the clinical use of these density methods from the literature. PMID:26692524

  19. A statistical method for lung tumor segmentation uncertainty in PET images based on user inference.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chaojie; Wang, Xiuying; Feng, Dagan

    2015-01-01

    PET has been widely accepted as an effective imaging modality for lung tumor diagnosis and treatment. However, standard criteria for delineating tumor boundary from PET are yet to develop largely due to relatively low quality of PET images, uncertain tumor boundary definition, and variety of tumor characteristics. In this paper, we propose a statistical solution to segmentation uncertainty on the basis of user inference. We firstly define the uncertainty segmentation band on the basis of segmentation probability map constructed from Random Walks (RW) algorithm; and then based on the extracted features of the user inference, we use Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to formulate the statistical model for labeling the uncertainty band. We validated our method on 10 lung PET-CT phantom studies from the public RIDER collections [1] and 16 clinical PET studies where tumors were manually delineated by two experienced radiologists. The methods were validated using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) to measure the spatial volume overlap. Our method achieved an average DSC of 0.878 ± 0.078 on phantom studies and 0.835 ± 0.039 on clinical studies. PMID:26736741

  20. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    Significance. Respiratory motion has been shown to cause artifacts in PET/CT imaging. This breathing artifact can have a significant impact on PET quantification and it can lead to large uncertainties when using PET for radiation therapy planning. We have demonstrated a promising solution to resolve the breathing artifact by acquiring respiration-averaged CT (ACT) for PET/CT. The purpose of this work was to optimize the ACT acquisition for clinical implementation and to evaluate the impact of ACT on PET/CT quantification. The hypothesis was that ACT is an effective method in removing the breathing artifact when compared to our current clinical protocol. Methods. Phase and cine approaches for acquiring ACT were investigated and the results of these two approaches were compared to the ACT generated from clinical 4DCT data sets (abbreviated as ACT10phs ). In the phase approach, ACT was generated based on combinations of selected respiratory phases; in the cine approach, ACT was generated based on cine images acquired over a fixed cine duration. The phase combination and cine duration that best approximated the ACT10phs were determined to be the optimized scanning parameters. 216 thoracic PET/CT patients were scanned with both current clinical and the ACT protocols. The effects of ACT on PET/CT quantification were assessed by comparing clinical PET/CT and ACT PET/CT using 3 metrics: PET/CT image alignment, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and threshold segmented gross tumor volume (GTV). Results. ACT10phs can be best approximated to within 2% of SUV variation by phase averaging based on 4 representative phases, and to within 3% by cine image averaging based on >3s of cine duration. We implemented the cine approach on the PET/CT scanners and acquired 216 patient data sets. 68% of patients had breathing artifacts in their clinical PET/CT and the artifacts were removed/reduced in all corresponding ACT PET/CT. PET/CT quantification for lesions <50 cm3 and

  1. Image and Dose Simulation in Support of New Mammography Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruvilla Verghese

    2002-04-05

    This report summarizes the highlights of the research performed under the 2-year NEER grant from the Department of Energy. The primary outcome of the work was a new Monte Carlo code, MCMIS-DS, for Monte Carlo for Mammography Image Simulation including Differential Sampling. The code was written to generate simulated images and dose distributions from two different new digital x-ray imaging modalities, namely, synchrotron imaging (SI) and a slot geometry digital mammography system called Fisher Senoscan. A differential sampling scheme was added to the code to generate multiple images that included variations in the parameters of the measurement system and the object in a single execution of the code. The code is to serve multiple purposes; (1) to answer questions regarding the contribution of scattered photons to images, (2) for use in design optimization studies, and (3) to do up to second-order perturbation studies to assess the effects of design parameter variations and/or physical parameters of the object (the breast) without having to re-run the code for each set of varied parameters. The accuracy and fidelity of the code were validated by a large variety of benchmark studies using published data and also using experimental results from mammography phantoms on both imaging modalities.

  2. PET IMAGING STUDIES IN DRUG ABUSE RESEARCH.

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Ding, Y.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J.

    2001-01-29

    There is overwhelming evidence that addiction is a disease of the brain (Leshner, 1997). Yet public perception that addiction is a reflection of moral weakness or a lack of willpower persists. The insidious consequence of this perception is that we lose sight of the fact that there are enormous medical consequences of addiction including the fact that a large fraction of the total deaths from cancer and heart disease are caused by smoking addiction. Ironically the medical school that educates physicians in addiction medicine and the cancer hospital that has a smoking cessation clinic are vanishingly rare and efforts at harm reduction are frequently met with a public indignation. Meanwhile the number of people addicted to substances is enormous and increasing particularly the addictions to cigarettes and alcohol. It is particularly tragic that addiction usually begins in adolescence and becomes a chronic relapsing problem and there are basically no completely effective treatments. Clearly we need to understand how drugs of abuse affect the brain and we need to be creative in using this information to develop effective treatments. Imaging technologies have played a major role in the conceptualization of addiction as a disease of the brain (Fowler et al., 1998a; Fowler et al., 1999a). New knowledge has been driven by advances in radiotracer design and chemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation and the integration of these scientific tools with the tools of biochemistry, pharmacology and medicine. This topic cuts across the medical specialties of neurology, psychiatry, cancer and heart disease because of the high medical, social and economic toll that drugs of abuse, including and especially the legal drugs, cigarettes and alcohol, take on society. In this chapter we will begin by highlighting the important role that chemistry has played in making it possible to quantitatively image the movement of drugs as well as their effects on the human brain

  3. Current image acquisition options in PET/MR.

    PubMed

    Boellaard, Ronald; Quick, Harald H

    2015-05-01

    Whole-body PET/MR hybrid imaging combines excellent soft tissue contrast and various functional imaging parameters provided by MR with high sensitivity and quantification of radiotracer uptake provided by PET. Although clinical evaluation now is under way, PET/MR demands for new technologies and innovative solutions, currently subject to interdisciplinary research. Attenuation correction (AC) of human soft tissues and of hardware components has to be MR based to maintain quantification of PET imaging as CT attenuation information is missing. MR-based AC is inherently associated with the following challenges: patient tissues are segmented into only few tissue classes, providing discrete attenuation coefficients; bone is substituted as soft tissue in MR-based AC; the limited field of view in MRI leads to truncations in body imaging and, consequently, in MR-based AC; and correct segmentation of lung tissue may be hampered by breathing artifacts. Use of time of flight during PET image acquisition and reconstruction, however, may improve the accuracy of AC. This article provides a status of current image acquisition options in PET/MR hybrid imaging. PMID:25841274

  4. HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING VIA MODAL CONVERGENCE OF DEFORMABLE MIRROR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Feiling

    2012-06-01

    For extremely high contrast imaging, such as direct observation of faint stellar companions, an adaptive optics system is required to produce low-halo and low-speckle regions in the focal plane. A method for deformable mirror control is proposed to achieve this goal. The method relies on a modal convergence of the deformable mirror driven by a focal-plane metric. The modal sets are derived from the Walsh functions. The Walsh-function modes serve two purposes: the expansion of the actuator displacements and the expansion of the phase functions. Taking advantage of the unique properties of the modal functions, a universal control algorithm is devised for the realization of high-contrast focal planes with and without the help of conventional coronagraphy. Numerical modeling is conducted to simulate complete imaging systems under various scenarios. It is shown that the proposed method reliably produces high-contrast focal planes using either a segmented or a membrane mirror. In the presence of random aberration the method is shown to be able to maintain high-contrast focal planes. Requiring neither retrieval of electric fields nor detailed knowledge of the deformable mirrors, this technique may allow high-contrast imaging in real time.

  5. Radiological Evaluation of Ambiguous Genitalia with Various Imaging Modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, N.; Bindushree, Kadakola

    2012-07-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital conditions in which the development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex is atypical. These can be classified broadly into four categories on the basis of gonadal histologic features: female pseudohermaphroditism (46,XX with two ovaries); male pseudohermaphroditism (46,XY with two testes); true hermaphroditism (ovotesticular DSD) (both ovarian and testicular tissues); and gonadal dysgenesis, either mixed (a testis and a streak gonad) or pure (bilateral streak gonads). Imaging plays an important role in demonstrating the anatomy and associated anomalies. Ultrasonography is the primary modality for demonstrating internal organs and magnetic resonance imaging is used as an adjunct modality to assess for internal gonads and genitalia. Early and appropriate gender assignment is necessary for healthy physical and psychologic development of children with ambiguous genitalia. Gender assignment can be facilitated with a team approach that involves a pediatric endocrinologist, geneticist, urologist, psychiatrist, social worker, neonatologist, nurse, and radiologist, allowing timely diagnosis and proper management. We describe case series on ambiguous genitalia presented to our department who were evaluated with multiple imaging modalities.

  6. Imaging quality assessment of multi-modal miniature microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junwon; Rogers, Jeremy; Descour, Michael; Hsu, Elizabeth; Aaron, Jesse; Sokolov, Konstantin; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2003-06-16

    We are developing a multi-modal miniature microscope (4M device) to image morphology and cytochemistry in vivo and provide better delineation of tumors. The 4M device is designed to be a complete microscope on a chip, including optical, micro-mechanical, and electronic components. It has advantages such as compact size and capability for microscopic-scale imaging. This paper presents an optics-only prototype 4M device, the very first imaging system made of sol-gel material. The microoptics used in the 4M device has a diameter of 1.3 mm. Metrology of the imaging quality assessment of the prototype device is presented. We describe causes of imaging performance degradation in order to improve the fabrication process. We built a multi-modal imaging test-bed to measure first-order properties and to assess the imaging quality of the 4M device. The 4M prototype has a field of view of 290 microm in diameter, a magnification of -3.9, a working distance of 250 microm and a depth of field of 29.6+/-6 microm. We report the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the 4M device as a quantitative metric of imaging quality. Based on the MTF data, we calculated a Strehl ratio of 0.59. In order to investigate the cause of imaging quality degradation, the surface characterization of lenses in 4M devices is measured and reported. We also imaged both polystyrene microspheres similar in size to epithelial cell nuclei and cervical cancer cells. Imaging results indicate that the 4M prototype can resolve cellular detail necessary for detection of precancer. PMID:19466016

  7. Future image acquisition trends for PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Boss, Andreas; Weiger, Markus; Wiesinger, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Hybrid PET/MRI scanners have become commercially available in the past years but are not yet widely distributed. The combination of a state-of-the-art PET with a state-of-the-art MRI scanner provides numerous potential advantages compared with the established PET/CT hybrid systems, namely, increased soft tissue contrast; functional information from MRI such as diffusion, perfusion, and blood oxygenation level-dependent techniques; true multiplanar data acquisition; and reduced radiation exposure. On the contrary, current PET/MRI technology is hampered by several shortcomings compared with PET/CT, the most important issues being how to use MR data for PET attenuation correction and the low sensitivity of MRI for small-scale pulmonary pathologies compared with high-resolution CT. Moreover, the optimal choice for hybrid PET/MRI acquisition protocols needs to be defined providing the highest possible degree of sensitivity and specificity within the constraints of the available measurement time. A multitude of new acquisition strategies of PET and MRI not only offer to overcome current obstacles of hybrid PET/MRI but also provide deeper insights into the pathophysiology of oncological, inflammatory, or degenerative diseases from the combination of molecular and functional imaging techniques. PMID:25841275

  8. A generalized method of converting CT image to PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution in PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Wu, Li-Wei; Wei, Le; Gao, Juan; Sun, Cui-Li; Chai, Pei; Li, Dao-Wu

    2014-02-01

    The accuracy of attenuation correction in positron emission tomography scanners depends mainly on deriving the reliable 511-keV linear attenuation coefficient distribution in the scanned objects. In the PET/CT system, the linear attenuation distribution is usually obtained from the intensities of the CT image. However, the intensities of the CT image relate to the attenuation of photons in an energy range of 40 keV-140 keV. Before implementing PET attenuation correction, the intensities of CT images must be transformed into the PET 511-keV linear attenuation coefficients. However, the CT scan parameters can affect the effective energy of CT X-ray photons and thus affect the intensities of the CT image. Therefore, for PET/CT attenuation correction, it is crucial to determine the conversion curve with a given set of CT scan parameters and convert the CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. A generalized method is proposed for converting a CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. Instead of some parameter-dependent phantom calibration experiments, the conversion curve is calculated directly by employing the consistency conditions to yield the most consistent attenuation map with the measured PET data. The method is evaluated with phantom experiments and small animal experiments. In phantom studies, the estimated conversion curve fits the true attenuation coefficients accurately, and accurate PET attenuation maps are obtained by the estimated conversion curves and provide nearly the same correction results as the true attenuation map. In small animal studies, a more complicated attenuation distribution of the mouse is obtained successfully to remove the attenuation artifact and improve the PET image contrast efficiently.

  9. A dual-modal retinal imaging system with adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Meadway, Alexander; Girkin, Christopher A.; Zhang, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) is adapted to provide optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The AO-SLO function is unchanged. The system uses the same light source, scanning optics, and adaptive optics in both imaging modes. The result is a dual-modal system that can acquire retinal images in both en face and cross-section planes at the single cell level. A new spectral shaping method is developed to reduce the large sidelobes in the coherence profile of the OCT imaging when a non-ideal source is used with a minimal introduction of noise. The technique uses a combination of two existing digital techniques. The thickness and position of the traditionally named inner segment/outer segment junction are measured from individual photoreceptors. In-vivo images of healthy and diseased human retinas are demonstrated. PMID:24514529

  10. LMA fibers modal decomposition using image factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Gauvreau, Bertrand; Sévigny, Benoit; Faucher, Mathieu

    2011-02-01

    A new method is presented for the analysis of the modal content of a beam travelling in a waveguide. This method uses a simple optical set up to record beam images. Depending on the application, the source can be broad band (BBS) or a tunable laser. The method uses the eigenmode profiles of the waveguide under test, either theoretical or experimental ones. In this case, the technique is applied to characterize the modal content of few moded large mode area (LMA) fibers. Such LMA fibers are typically used in high power fiber lasers and amplifiers to reduce sensitivity to non-linear effects. By calculating the scalar products of the unfolded experimental and theoretical 2D profiles, the modal content is obtained. Access to such cost effective and easy to implement diagnosis tool will greatly help improving modal quality preservation in components and systems based on the fundamental mode operation of few moded LMA fibers. The high precision and performance of the method is evaluated using both computer generated and experimental data sets.

  11. A versatile clearing agent for multi-modal brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Irene; Ghobril, Jean-Pierre; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Onofri, Leonardo; Conti, Valerio; Vanzi, Francesco; Sacconi, Leonardo; Guerrini, Renzo; Markram, Henry; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2015-01-01

    Extensive mapping of neuronal connections in the central nervous system requires high-throughput µm-scale imaging of large volumes. In recent years, different approaches have been developed to overcome the limitations due to tissue light scattering. These methods are generally developed to improve the performance of a specific imaging modality, thus limiting comprehensive neuroanatomical exploration by multi-modal optical techniques. Here, we introduce a versatile brain clearing agent (2,2'-thiodiethanol; TDE) suitable for various applications and imaging techniques. TDE is cost-efficient, water-soluble and low-viscous and, more importantly, it preserves fluorescence, is compatible with immunostaining and does not cause deformations at sub-cellular level. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in different applications: in fixed samples by imaging a whole mouse hippocampus with serial two-photon tomography; in combination with CLARITY by reconstructing an entire mouse brain with light sheet microscopy and in translational research by imaging immunostained human dysplastic brain tissue. PMID:25950610

  12. PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of tumor hypoxia: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lopci, Egesta; Grassi, Ilaria; Chiti, Arturo; Nanni, Cristina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Toschi, Luca; Fonti, Cristina; Lodi, Filippo; Mattioli, Sandro; Fanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pathological condition arising in living tissues when oxygen supply does not adequately cover the cellular metabolic demand. Detection of this phenomenon in tumors is of the utmost clinical relevance because tumor aggressiveness, metastatic spread, failure to achieve tumor control, increased rate of recurrence, and ultimate poor outcome are all associated with hypoxia. Consequently, in recent decades there has been increasing interest in developing methods for measurement of oxygen levels in tumors. Among the image-based modalities for hypoxia assessment, positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most extensively investigated based on the various advantages it offers, i.e., broad range of radiopharmaceuticals, good intrinsic resolution, three-dimensional tumor representation, possibility of semiquantification/quantification of the amount of hypoxic tumor burden, overall patient friendliness, and ease of repetition. Compared with the other non-invasive techniques, the biggest advantage of PET imaging is that it offers the highest specificity for detection of hypoxic tissue. Starting with the 2-nitroimidazole family of compounds in the early 1980s, a great number of PET tracers have been developed for the identification of hypoxia in living tissue and solid tumors. This paper provides an overview of the principal PET tracers applied in cancer imaging of hypoxia and discusses in detail their advantages and pitfalls. PMID:24982822

  13. Optical imaging modalities: From design to diagnosis of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korde, Vrushali Raj

    This study investigates three high resolution optical imaging modalities to better detect and diagnose skin cancer. The ideal high resolution optical imaging system can visualize pre-malignant tissue growth non-invasively with resolution comparable to histology. I examined 3 modalities which approached this goal. The first method examined was high magnification microscopy of thin stained tissue sections, together with a statistical analysis of nuclear chromatin patterns termed Karyometry. This method has subcellular resolution, but it necessitates taking a biopsy at the desired tissue site and imaging the tissue ex-vivo. My part of this study was to develop an automated nuclear segmentation algorithm to segment cell nuclei in skin histology images for karyometric analysis. The results of this algorithm were compared to hand segmented cell nuclei in the same images, and it was concluded that the automated segmentations can be used for karyometric analysis. The second optical imaging modality I investigated was Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT is analogous to ultrasound, in which sound waves are delivered into the body and the echo time and reflected signal magnitude are measured. Due to the fast speed of light and detector temporal integration times, low coherence interferometry is needed to gate the backscattered light. OCT acquires cross sectional images, and has an axial resolution of 1-15 mum (depending on the source bandwidth) and a lateral resolution of 10-20 mum (depending on the sample arm optics). While it is not capable of achieving subcellular resolution, it is a non-invasive imaging modality. OCT was used in this study to evaluate skin along a continuum from normal to sun damaged to precancer. I developed algorithms to detect statistically significant differences between images of sun protected and sun damaged skin, as well as between undiseased and precancerous skin. An Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) endoscope was developed in the third

  14. Dual-modality imaging system combined fast photoacoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Yuan, Yi

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we have developed a fast dual-modality imaging system for reconstruction photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging based on a novel digital phased array. The scanning mode and image reconstruction algorithms were modified from our previous work to improve the image quality. A 128-element linear transducer array is connected to a multichannel signal acquisition and digital beam-formation system providing techniques of dynamic receiving focus and dynamic receiving apodization to process the signal. We use the linear transducer array with combined scanning mode to detect signals at multiple locations on a circle around the sample. It makes our dual-modality imaging own the ability of imaging complicated structures of objects. An improved limited-field filtered back projection algorithm with directivity factors was applied in photoacoustic imaging to further improve the lateral resolution. Phase-controlled imaging algorithm was applied to reconstruct acoustical impedance difference in the pure ultrasound imaging. The experiments on phantoms and in vivo early breast cancer detection in a mouse model were performed. The images are clearly, accurately provided.

  15. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles – Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma. PMID:24675806

  16. Tumor lysing genetically engineered T cells loaded with multi-modal imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-01-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-(64)Cu). This can now be potentially used for (64)Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR(+)SPION(pos) T cells effectively target in vitro CD19(+) lymphoma. PMID:24675806

  17. Towards optimal imaging with PET: an in silico feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, A. L.; Toghyani, M.; Gillam, J. E.; Wu, K.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging relies fundamentally on the ability of the system to accurately identify true coincidence events. With existing systems, this is currently accomplished with an energy acceptance criterion followed by correction techniques to remove suspected false coincidence events. These corrections generally result in signal and contrast loss and thus limit the PET system’s ability to achieve optimum image quality. A key property of annihilation radiation is that the photons are polarised with respect to each other. This polarisation correlation offers a potentially powerful discriminator, independent of energy, to accurately identify true events. In this proof of concept study, we investigate how photon polarisation information can be exploited in PET imaging by developing a method to discriminate true coincidences using the polarisation correlation of annihilation pairs. We implement this method using a Geant4 PET simulation of a GE Advance/Discovery LS system and demonstrate the potential advantages of the polarisation coincidence selection method over a standard energy criterion method. Current PET ring detectors are not capable of exploiting the polarisation correlation of the photon pairs. Compton PET systems, however are promising candidates for this application. We demonstrate the feasibility of a two-component Compton camera system in identifying true coincidences with Monte Carlo simulations. Our study demonstrates the potential of improving signal gain using polarisation, particularly for high photon emission rates. We also demonstrate the ability of the Compton camera at exploiting this polarisation correlation in PET.

  18. Development of single-channel stereoscopic video imaging modality for real-time retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radfar, Edalat; Park, Jihoon; Lee, Sangyeob; Ha, Myungjin; Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    Stereoscopic retinal image can effectively help doctors. Most of stereo imaging surgical microscopes are based on dual optical channels and benefit from dual cameras in which left and right cameras capture corresponding left and right eye views. This study developed a single-channel stereoscopic retinal imaging modality based on a transparent rotating deflector (TRD). Two different viewing angles are generated by imaging through the TRD which is mounted on a motor synchronized with a camera and is placed in single optical channel. Because of the function of objective lens in the imaging modality which generate stereo-image from an object at its focal point, and according to eye structure, the optical set up of the imaging modality can compatible for retinal imaging when the cornea and eye lens are engaged in objective lens.

  19. Imaging of prostate cancer with PET/CT using 18F-Fluorocholine

    PubMed Central

    Vali, Reza; Loidl, Wolfgang; Pirich, Christian; Langesteger, Werner; Beheshti, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    While 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) has limited value in prostate cancer (PCa), it may be useful for specific subgroups of PCa patients with hormone-resistant poorly differentiated cell types. 18F-Fluorocholine (18F-FCH) PET/CT has been increasingly used in primary and recurrent PCa and has been shown to add valuable information. Although there is a correlation between the foci of activity and the areas of malignancy in the prostate gland, the clinical value of 18F-FCH is still controversial for detection of the malignant focus in the prostate. For the T-staging of PCa at diagnosis the value of 18F-FCH is limited. This is probably due to limited resolution of PET system and positive findings in benign prostate diseases. Conversely, 18F-FCH PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the delineation of local and distant nodal recurrence and bone metastases and is poised to have an impact on therapy management. In this review, recent studies of 18F-FCH PET/CT in PCa are summarized. PMID:25973332

  20. Dual PET and Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging Probes as Tools for Imaging in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    An, Fei-Fei; Chan, Mark; Kommidi, Harikrishna; Ting, Richard

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to summarize advances in PET fluorescence resolution, agent design, and preclinical imaging that make a growing case for clinical PET fluorescence imaging. CONCLUSION Existing SPECT, PET, fluorescence, and MRI contrast imaging techniques are already deeply integrated into the management of cancer, from initial diagnosis to the observation and management of metastases. Combined positron-emitting fluorescent contrast agents can convey new or substantial benefits that improve on these proven clinical contrast agents. PMID:27223168

  1. Denoising of Multi-Modal Images with PCA Self-Cross Bilateral Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yu; Urahama, Kiichi

    We present the PCA self-cross bilateral filter for denoising multi-modal images. We firstly apply the principal component analysis for input multi-modal images. We next smooth the first principal component with a preliminary filter and use it as a supplementary image for cross bilateral filtering of input images. Among some preliminary filters, the undecimated wavelet transform is useful for effective denoising of various multi-modal images such as color, multi-lighting and medical images.

  2. Acoustic angiography: a new imaging modality for assessing microvasculature architecture.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Ryan C; Frederick, C Brandon; Foster, F Stuart; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the biomedical imaging community with details of a new high resolution contrast imaging approach referred to as "acoustic angiography." Through the use of dual-frequency ultrasound transducer technology, images acquired with this approach possess both high resolution and a high contrast-to-tissue ratio, which enables the visualization of microvascular architecture without significant contribution from background tissues. Additionally, volumetric vessel-tissue integration can be visualized by using b-mode overlays acquired with the same probe. We present a brief technical overview of how the images are acquired, followed by several examples of images of both healthy and diseased tissue volumes. 3D images from alternate modalities often used in preclinical imaging, contrast-enhanced micro-CT and photoacoustics, are also included to provide a perspective on how acoustic angiography has qualitatively similar capabilities to these other techniques. These preliminary images provide visually compelling evidence to suggest that acoustic angiography may serve as a powerful new tool in preclinical and future clinical imaging. PMID:23997762

  3. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  4. Enhancing image classification models with multi-modal biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caban, Jesus J.; Liao, David; Yao, Jianhua; Mollura, Daniel J.; Gochuico, Bernadette; Yoo, Terry

    2011-03-01

    Currently, most computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems rely on image analysis and statistical models to diagnose, quantify, and monitor the progression of a particular disease. In general, CAD systems have proven to be effective at providing quantitative measurements and assisting physicians during the decision-making process. As the need for more flexible and effective CADs continues to grow, questions about how to enhance their accuracy have surged. In this paper, we show how statistical image models can be augmented with multi-modal physiological values to create more robust, stable, and accurate CAD systems. In particular, this paper demonstrates how highly correlated blood and EKG features can be treated as biomarkers and used to enhance image classification models designed to automatically score subjects with pulmonary fibrosis. In our results, a 3-5% improvement was observed when comparing the accuracy of CADs that use multi-modal biomarkers with those that only used image features. Our results show that lab values such as Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and Fibrinogen, as well as EKG measurements such as QRS and I:40, are statistically significant and can provide valuable insights about the severity of the pulmonary fibrosis disease.

  5. Thresholding in PET images of static and moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaremko, Brian; Riauka, Terence; Robinson, Don; Murray, Brad; Alexander, Abraham; McEwan, Alexander; Roa, Wilson

    2005-12-01

    Continued therapeutic gain in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will depend upon our ability to escalate the dose to the primary tumour while minimizing normal tissue toxicity. Both these objectives are facilitated by the accurate definition of a target volume that is as small as possible. To this end, both tumour immobilizations via deep inspiratory breath-hold, along with positron emission tomography (PET), have emerged as two promising approaches. Though PET is an excellent means of defining the general location of a tumour focus, its ability to define exactly the geometric extent of such a focus strongly depends upon selection of an appropriate image threshold. However, in clinical practice, the image threshold is typically not chosen according to consistent, well-established criteria. This study explores the relationship between image threshold and the resultant PET-defined volume using a series of F-18 radiotracer-filled hollow spheres of known internal volumes, both static and under oscillatory motion. The effects of both image threshold and tumour motion on the resultant PET image are examined. Imaging data are further collected from a series of simulated gated PET acquisitions in order to test the feasibility of a patient-controlled gating mechanism during deep inspiratory breath-hold. This study illustrates quantitatively considerable variability in resultant PET-defined tumour volumes depending upon numerous factors, including image threshold, size of the lesion, the presence of tumour motion and the scanning protocol. In this regard, when using PET in treatment planning for NSCLC, the radiation oncologist must select the image threshold very carefully to avoid either under-dosing the tumour or overdosing normal tissues.

  6. PET/CT image registration: Preliminary tests for its application to clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Banos-Capilla, M. C.; Garcia, M. A.; Bea, J.; Pla, C.; Larrea, L.; Lopez, E.

    2007-06-15

    The quality of dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment requires the accurate delimitation of the gross tumor volume. This can be achieved by complementing the anatomical detail provided by CT images through fusion with other imaging modalities that provide additional metabolic and physiological information. Therefore, use of multiple imaging modalities for radiotherapy treatment planning requires an accurate image registration method. This work describes tests carried out on a Discovery LS positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) system by General Electric Medical Systems (GEMS), for its later use to obtain images to delimit the target in radiotherapy treatment. Several phantoms have been used to verify image correlation, in combination with fiducial markers, which were used as a system of external landmarks. We analyzed the geometrical accuracy of two different fusion methods with the images obtained with these phantoms. We first studied the fusion method used by the PET/CT system by GEMS (hardware fusion) on the basis that there is satisfactory coincidence between the reconstruction centers in CT and PET systems; and secondly the fiducial fusion, a registration method, by means of least-squares fitting algorithm of a landmark points system. The study concluded with the verification of the centroid position of some phantom components in both imaging modalities. Centroids were estimated through a calculation similar to center-of-mass, weighted by the value of the CT number and the uptake intensity in PET. The mean deviations found for the hardware fusion method were: vertical bar {delta}x vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=3.3 mm{+-}1.0 mm and vertical bar {delta}y vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=3.6 mm{+-}1.0 mm. These values were substantially improved upon applying fiducial fusion based on external landmark points: vertical bar {delta}x vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=0.7 mm{+-}0.8 mm and vertical bar {delta}y vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=0.3 mm{+-}1.7 mm. We also noted that differences

  7. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  8. Multi-technique hybrid imaging in PET/CT and PET/MR: what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    de Galiza Barbosa, F; Delso, G; Ter Voert, E E G W; Huellner, M W; Herrmann, K; Veit-Haibach, P

    2016-07-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most important imaging techniques to have emerged in oncological practice in the last decade. Hybrid imaging, in general, remains a rapidly growing field, not only in developing countries, but also in western industrialised healthcare systems. A great deal of technological development and research is focused on improving hybrid imaging technology further and introducing new techniques, e.g., integrated PET and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Additionally, there are several new PET tracers on the horizon, which have the potential to broaden clinical applications in hybrid imaging for diagnosis as well as therapy. This article aims to highlight some of the major technical and clinical advances that are currently taking place in PET/CT and PET/MRI that will potentially maintain the position of hybrid techniques at the forefront of medical imaging technologies. PMID:27108800

  9. Preliminary assessment of the imaging capability of the YAP (S)PET small animal scanner in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Antonietta; Belcari, Nicola; Stark, Daniela; Höhnemann, Sabine; Piel, Markus; Jennewein, Marc; Schmitt, Ulrich; Tillmanns, Julia; Thews, Oliver; Hiemke, Christoph; Roesch, Frank; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2006-12-01

    The new and fully engineered version of the YAP-(S)PET small animal scanner has been tested at the University of Mainz for preliminary assessment of its imaging capability for studies related to neuropharmacology and psychiatry. The main feature of the scanner is the capability to combine PET and SPECT techniques. It allows the development of new and interesting protocols for the investigation of many biological phenomena, more effectively than with PET or SPECT modalities alone. The scanner is made up of four detector heads, each one composed of a 4×4 cm 2 of YAlO 3:Ce (or YAP:Ce) matrix, and has a field of view (FOV) of 4 cm axially×4 cm ∅ transaxially. In PET mode, the volume resolution is less than 8 mm 3 and is nearly constant over the whole FOV, while the sensitivity is about 2%. The SPECT performance is not so good, due to the presence of the multi-hole lead collimator in front of each head. Nevertheless, the YAP-PET scanner offers excellent resolution and sensitivity for performing on the availability of D2-like dopamine receptors on mice and rats in both PET and SPECT modalities.

  10. Intraobserver and Interobserver Variability in GTV Delineation on FDG-PET-CT Images of Head and Neck Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, Stephen L. |. E-mail: Stephen.Breen@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Publicover, Julia; De Silva, Shiroma; Pond, Greg; Brock, Kristy |; O'Sullivan, Brian |; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Waldron, John |; Keller, Anne |; Yu, Eugene; Hendler, Aaron |

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine if the addition of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data changes primary site gross tumor volumes (GTVs) in head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT), contrast-enhanced CT, and FDG-PET-CT scans were obtained in 10 patients with head and neck cancers. Eight experienced observers (6 head and neck oncologists and 2 neuro-radiologists) with access to clinical and radiologic reports outlined primary site GTVs on each modality. Three cases were recontoured twice to assess intraobserver variability. The magnitudes of the GTVs were compared. Intra- and interobserver variability was assessed by a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Inter- and intraobserver reliability were calculated. Results: There were no significant differences in the GTVs across the image modalities when compared as ensemble averages; the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test showed that CT volumes were larger than PET-CT. Observers demonstrated the greatest consistency and were most interchangeable on contrast-enhanced CT; they performed less reliably on PET-CT. Conclusions: The addition of PET-CT to primary site GTV delineation of head and neck cancers does not change the volume of the GTV defined by this group of expert observers in this patient sample. An FDG-PET may demonstrate differences in neck node delineation and in other disease sites.

  11. Gallium-68 PET: A Powerful Generator-based Alternative to Infection and Inflammation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Vorster, Mariza; Maes, Alex; Wiele, Christophe van de; Sathekge, Mike

    2016-09-01

    The process of inflammation (with or without infection) forms part of essentially every major debilitating disease. Early detection and accurate distinction of inflammation from infection are important to optimize and individualize therapy. Nuclear medicine is ideally suited for the detection of pathologic changes early on and is able to target a magnitude of role players involved in the aforementioned processes. Hybrid modalities such as PET/CT and PET/MRI offer high spatial resolution that combines morphologic and pathophysiological changes and add various quantification possibilities that are preferable in these settings. It follows then that the development of PET radiopharmaceuticals is imperative to make use of these latest advances. Gallium-68 (Ga-68)-based tracers are exceptionally well suited to these indications, considering the year-round availability from a single generator, the relative cost-effectiveness, and relative ease of labeling. Over the past few years, the development of Ga-68-based tracers has understandably exploded with a recent growing interest in infection and inflammation imaging. This review aims to highlight some of the most important and interesting advances made with Ga-68-based PET/CT in the field of infection and inflammation imaging. PMID:27553469

  12. Bayesian PET image reconstruction incorporating anato-functional joint entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2009-12-01

    We developed a maximum a posterior (MAP) reconstruction method for positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction incorporating magnetic resonance (MR) image information, with the joint entropy between the PET and MR image features serving as the regularization constraint. A non-parametric method was used to estimate the joint probability density of the PET and MR images. Using realistically simulated PET and MR human brain phantoms, the quantitative performance of the proposed algorithm was investigated. Incorporation of the anatomic information via this technique, after parameter optimization, was seen to dramatically improve the noise versus bias tradeoff in every region of interest, compared to the result from using conventional MAP reconstruction. In particular, hot lesions in the FDG PET image, which had no anatomical correspondence in the MR image, also had improved contrast versus noise tradeoff. Corrections were made to figures 3, 4 and 6, and to the second paragraph of section 3.1 on 13 November 2009. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version.

  13. Manganese doped fluorescent paramagnetic nanocrystals for dual-modal imaging.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Gokyar, Sayim; Kelestemur, Yusuf; Erdem, Talha; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-12-10

    In this work, dual-modal (fluorescence and magnetic resonance) imaging capabilities of water-soluble, low-toxicity, monodisperse Mn-doped ZnSe nanocrystals (NCs) with a size (6.5 nm) below the optimum kidney cutoff limit (10 nm) are reported. Synthesizing Mn-doped ZnSe NCs with varying Mn(2+) concentrations, a systematic investigation of the optical properties of these NCs by using photoluminescence (PL) and time resolved fluorescence are demonstrated. The elemental properties of these NCs using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inductive coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy confirming Mn(2+) doping is confined to the core of these NCs are also presented. It is observed that with increasing Mn(2+) concentration the PL intensity first increases, reaching a maximum at Mn(2+) concentration of 3.2 at% (achieving a PL quantum yield (QY) of 37%), after which it starts to decrease. Here, this high-efficiency sample is demonstrated for applications in dual-modal imaging. These NCs are further made water-soluble by ligand exchange using 3-mercaptopropionic acid, preserving their PL QY as high as 18%. At the same time, these NCs exhibit high relaxivity (≈2.95 mM(-1) s(-1)) to obtain MR contrast at 25 °C, 3 T. Therefore, the Mn(2+) doping in these water-soluble Cd-free NCs are sufficient to produce contrast for both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. PMID:25111198

  14. Improving cross-modal face recognition using polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Short, Nathaniel; Hu, Shuowen; Gurram, Prudhvi; Gurton, Kristan; Chan, Alex

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the performance of polarimetric imaging in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectrum for cross-modal face recognition. For this work, polarimetric imagery is generated as stacks of three components: the conventional thermal intensity image (referred to as S0), and the two Stokes images, S1 and S2, which contain combinations of different polarizations. The proposed face recognition algorithm extracts and combines local gradient magnitude and orientation information from S0, S1, and S2 to generate a robust feature set that is well-suited for cross-modal face recognition. Initial results show that polarimetric LWIR-to-visible face recognition achieves an 18% increase in Rank-1 identification rate compared to conventional LWIR-to-visible face recognition. We conclude that a substantial improvement in automatic face recognition performance can be achieved by exploiting the polarization-state of radiance, as compared to using conventional thermal imagery. PMID:25768137

  15. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  16. Vision 20/20: Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction in PET/MRI: Challenges, solutions, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Arabi, Hossein; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-03-01

    Attenuation correction is an essential component of the long chain of data correction techniques required to achieve the full potential of quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems mandated the widespread interest in developing novel strategies for deriving accurate attenuation maps with the aim to improve the quantitative accuracy of these emerging hybrid imaging systems. The attenuation map in PET/MRI should ideally be derived from anatomical MR images; however, MRI intensities reflect proton density and relaxation time properties of biological tissues rather than their electron density and photon attenuation properties. Therefore, in contrast to PET/computed tomography, there is a lack of standardized global mapping between the intensities of MRI signal and linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. Moreover, in standard MRI sequences, bones and lung tissues do not produce measurable signals owing to their low proton density and short transverse relaxation times. MR images are also inevitably subject to artifacts that degrade their quality, thus compromising their applicability for the task of attenuation correction in PET/MRI. MRI-guided attenuation correction strategies can be classified in three broad categories: (i) segmentation-based approaches, (ii) atlas-registration and machine learning methods, and (iii) emission/transmission-based approaches. This paper summarizes past and current state-of-the-art developments and latest advances in PET/MRI attenuation correction. The advantages and drawbacks of each approach for addressing the challenges of MR-based attenuation correction are comprehensively described. The opportunities brought by both MRI and PET imaging modalities for deriving accurate attenuation maps and improving PET quantification will be elaborated. Future prospects and potential clinical applications of these techniques and their integration in commercial

  17. Choice of imaging modality in the diagnosis of sciatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Labib, Peter L. Z.; Malik, Sohail N.

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic hernias are one of the rarest types of hernia and often pose diagnostic difficulty to clinicians. We report a case of an 80-year-old lady with a sciatic hernia who had a falsely negative computed tomography (CT) but was found to have a colonic hernia on ultrasonography. The authors recommend that for patients in which there is a high degree of clinical suspicion for a sciatic hernia and a negative CT, ultrasonography may be considered as a useful imaging modality to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:24968433

  18. 4D PET iterative deconvolution with spatiotemporal regularization for quantitative dynamic PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Reilhac, Anthonin; Charil, Arnaud; Wimberley, Catriona; Angelis, Georgios; Hamze, Hasar; Callaghan, Paul; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boisson, Frederic; Ryder, Will; Meikle, Steven R; Gregoire, Marie-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative measurements in dynamic PET imaging are usually limited by the poor counting statistics particularly in short dynamic frames and by the low spatial resolution of the detection system, resulting in partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we present a fast and easy to implement method for the restoration of dynamic PET images that have suffered from both PVE and noise degradation. It is based on a weighted least squares iterative deconvolution approach of the dynamic PET image with spatial and temporal regularization. Using simulated dynamic [(11)C] Raclopride PET data with controlled biological variations in the striata between scans, we showed that the restoration method provides images which exhibit less noise and better contrast between emitting structures than the original images. In addition, the method is able to recover the true time activity curve in the striata region with an error below 3% while it was underestimated by more than 20% without correction. As a result, the method improves the accuracy and reduces the variability of the kinetic parameter estimates calculated from the corrected images. More importantly it increases the accuracy (from less than 66% to more than 95%) of measured biological variations as well as their statistical detectivity. PMID:26080302

  19. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  20. Dual Modality Noncontact Photoacoustic and Spectral Domain OCT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Leiss-Holzinger, Elisabeth; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Hochreiner, Armin; Hollinger, Philipp; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We developed a multimodal imaging system, combining noncontact photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Photoacoustic signals are recorded without contact to the specimens’ surface by using an interferometric technique. The interferometer is realized within a fiber-optic network using a fiber laser at 1550 nm as source. The fiber-optic network allows the integration of a fiber-based OCT system operating at a wavelength region around 1310 nm. Light from the fiber laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into one fiber using wavelength-division multiplexing. The same focusing optics is used for both modalities. Back-reflected light from the sample is demultiplexed and guided to the respective imaging systems. As the same optical components are used for OCT and photoacoustic imaging, the obtained images are co-registered intrinsically in lateral direction. Three-dimensional imaging is implemented by hybrid galvanometer and mechanical scanning. To allow fast B-scan measurements, scanning of the interrogation beam along one dimension is executed by a galvanometer scanner. Slow-axis scanning, perpendicular to the fast axis, is performed utilizing a linear translational stage. We demonstrate two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging on agarose phantoms. PMID:25900968

  1. Dual Modality Noncontact Photoacoustic and Spectral Domain OCT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Leiss-Holzinger, Elisabeth; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Hochreiner, Armin; Hollinger, Philipp; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We developed a multimodal imaging system, combining noncontact photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Photoacoustic signals are recorded without contact to the specimens' surface by using an interferometric technique. The interferometer is realized within a fiber-optic network using a fiber laser at 1550 nm as source. The fiber-optic network allows the integration of a fiber-based OCT system operating at a wavelength region around 1310 nm. Light from the fiber laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into one fiber using wavelength-division multiplexing. The same focusing optics is used for both modalities. Back-reflected light from the sample is demultiplexed and guided to the respective imaging systems. As the same optical components are used for OCT and photoacoustic imaging, the obtained images are co-registered intrinsically in lateral direction. Three-dimensional imaging is implemented by hybrid galvanometer and mechanical scanning. To allow fast B-scan measurements, scanning of the interrogation beam along one dimension is executed by a galvanometer scanner. Slow-axis scanning, perpendicular to the fast axis, is performed utilizing a linear translational stage. We demonstrate two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging on agarose phantoms. PMID:25900968

  2. Joint model of motion and anatomy for PET image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao Feng; Pan Tinsu; Clark, John W. Jr.; Mawlawi, Osama

    2007-12-15

    Anatomy-based positron emission tomography (PET) image enhancement techniques have been shown to have the potential for improving PET image quality. However, these techniques assume an accurate alignment between the anatomical and the functional images, which is not always valid when imaging the chest due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a joint model of both motion and anatomical information by integrating a motion-incorporated PET imaging system model with an anatomy-based maximum a posteriori image reconstruction algorithm. The mismatched anatomical information due to motion can thus be effectively utilized through this joint model. A computer simulation and a phantom study were conducted to assess the efficacy of the joint model, whereby motion and anatomical information were either modeled separately or combined. The reconstructed images in each case were compared to corresponding reference images obtained using a quadratic image prior based maximum a posteriori reconstruction algorithm for quantitative accuracy. Results of these studies indicated that while modeling anatomical information or motion alone improved the PET image quantitation accuracy, a larger improvement in accuracy was achieved when using the joint model. In the computer simulation study and using similar image noise levels, the improvement in quantitation accuracy compared to the reference images was 5.3% and 19.8% when using anatomical or motion information alone, respectively, and 35.5% when using the joint model. In the phantom study, these results were 5.6%, 5.8%, and 19.8%, respectively. These results suggest that motion compensation is important in order to effectively utilize anatomical information in chest imaging using PET. The joint motion-anatomy model presented in this paper provides a promising solution to this problem.

  3. Ready for prime time? Dual tracer PET and SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Georges El

    2012-01-01

    Dual isotope single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and dual tracer positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have great potential in clinical and molecular applications in the pediatric as well as the adult populations in many areas of brain, cardiac, and oncologic imaging as it allows the exploration of different physiological and molecular functions (e.g., perfusion, neurotransmission, metabolism, apoptosis, angiogenesis) under the same physiological and physical conditions. This is crucial when the physiological functions studied depend on each other (e.g., perfusion and metabolism) hence requiring simultaneous assessment under identical conditions, and can reduce greatly the quantitation errors associated with physical factors that can change between acquisitions (e.g., human subject or animal motion, change in the attenuation map as a function of time) as is detailed in this editorial. The clinical potential of simultaneous dual isotope SPECT, dual tracer PET and dual SPECT/PET imaging are explored and summarized. In this issue of AJNMMI (http://www.ajnmmi.us), Chapman et al. explore the feasibility of simultaneous and sequential SPECT/PET imaging and conclude that down-scatter and crosstalk from 511 keV photons preclude obtaining useful SPECT information in the presence of PET radiotracers. They report on an alternative strategy that consists of performing sequential SPECT and PET studies in hybrid microPET/SPECT/CT scanners, now widely available for molecular imaging. They validate their approach in a phantom consisting of a 96-well plate with variable 99mTc and 18F concentrations and illustrate the utility of such approaches in two sequential SPECT-PET/CT studies that include 99mTc-MAA/18F-NaF and 99mTc-Pentetate/18F-NaF. These approaches will need to be proven reproducible, accurate and robust to variations in the experimental conditions before they can be accepted by the molecular imaging community and be implemented in routine molecular

  4. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  5. The Basic Principles of FDG-PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Hess, Søren; Nielsen Braad, Poul-Erik; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Inglev, Signe; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2014-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) forms the basis of molecular imaging. FDG-PET imaging is a multidisciplinary undertaking that requires close interdisciplinary collaboration in a broad team comprising physicians, technologists, secretaries, radio-chemists, hospital physicists, molecular biologists, engineers, and cyclotron technicians. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of important basic issues and considerations pivotal to successful patient examinations, including basic physics, instrumentation, radiochemistry, molecular and cell biology, patient preparation, normal distribution of tracer, and potential interpretive pitfalls. PMID:26050942

  6. Innovations in Small-Animal PET/MR Imaging Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Visvikis, Dimitris; Loudos, George

    2016-04-01

    Multimodal imaging has led to a more detailed exploration of different physiologic processes with integrated PET/MR imaging being the most recent entry. Although the clinical need is still questioned, it is well recognized that it represents one of the most active and promising fields of medical imaging research in terms of software and hardware. The hardware developments have moved from small detector components to high-performance PET inserts and new concepts in full systems. Conversely, the software focuses on the efficient performance of necessary corrections without the use of CT data. The most recent developments in both directions are reviewed. PMID:26952725

  7. A Comparison of Techniques for 90Y PET/CT Image-Based Dosimetry Following Radioembolization with Resin Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bourgeois, Austin C.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2014-01-01

    90Y PET/CT following radioembolization has recently been established as a viable diagnostic tool, capable of producing images that are both quantitative and have superior image quality than alternative 90Y imaging modalities. Because radioembolization is assumed to be a permanent implant, it is possible to convert quantitative 90Y PET image sets into data representative of spatial committed absorbed-dose. Multiple authors have performed this transformation using dose-point kernel (DPK) convolution to account for the transport of the high-energy 90Y β-particles. This article explores a technique called the Local Deposition Method (LDM), an alternative to DPK convolution for 90Y image-based dosimetry. The LDM assumes that the kinetic energy from each 90Y β-particle is deposited locally, within the voxel where the decay occurred. Using the combined analysis of phantoms scanned using 90Y PET/CT and ideal mathematical phantoms, an accuracy comparison of DPK convolution and the LDM has been performed. Based on the presented analysis, DPK convolution provides no detectible accuracy benefit over the LDM for 90Y PET-based dosimetry. For PET systems with 90Y resolution poorer than 3.25 mm at full-width and half-max using a small voxel size, the LDM may produce a dosimetric solution that is more accurate than DPK convolution under ideal conditions; however, image noise can obscure some of the perceived benefit. As voxel size increases and resolution decreases, differences between the LDM and DPK convolution are reduced. The LDM method of post-radioembolization dosimetry has the advantage of not requiring additional post-processing. The provided conversion factors can be used to determine committed absorbed-dose using conventional PET image analysis tools. The LDM is a recommended option for routine post-radioembolization 90Y dosimetry based on PET/CT imaging. PMID:24904832

  8. MR imaging and PET/CT in diagnosis and management of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Regan; Agarwal, Ankit; Martin-Macintosh, Erica L; Peller, Patrick J; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a common hematologic malignancy among the elderly population. Although there have been many advances in treatment over the past few decades, the overall prognosis for the disease remains poor. Conventional radiography has long been the standard of reference for the imaging of multiple myeloma. However, 10%-20% of patients with multiple myeloma do not have evidence of disease at conventional radiography. There is a growing body of evidence supporting use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis and management of multiple myeloma. MR imaging is useful in detection of bone marrow infiltration, a finding often missed at conventional radiography. FDG PET/CT is especially sensitive for the detection of extramedullary disease and can help detect the metabolically active lesions that often precede evidence of osseous destruction at conventional radiography. MR imaging and FDG PET/CT are useful tools that can provide essential information for diagnosis and management of patients with multiple myeloma. Both modalities allow accurate localization of disease after chemotherapy or autologous stem cell transplantation and can provide important prognostic information that can influence further clinical decision making regarding therapy, particularly when tumor serum markers may be a less reliable indicator of disease burden after repeated treatments. PMID:25763728

  9. PET and NIR optical imaging using self-illuminating (64)Cu-doped chelator-free gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Huang, Peng; Weiss, Orit Jacobson; Yan, Xuefeng; Yue, Xuyi; Zhang, Molly Gu; Tang, Yuxia; Nie, Liming; Ma, Ying; Niu, Gang; Wu, Kaichun; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-12-01

    Self-illuminating fluorescence imaging without autofluorescence background interference has recently aroused more research interests in molecular imaging. Currently, only a few self-illuminating probes were developed, based mainly on toxic quantum dots such as CdSe, CdTe. Herein, we report a novel design of nontoxic self-illuminating gold nanocluster ((64)Cu-doped AuNCs) for dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging based on Cerenkov resonance energy transfer (CRET). PET radionuclide (64)Cu was introduced by a chelator-free doping method, which played dual roles as the energy donor and the PET imaging source. Meanwhile, AuNCs acted as the energy acceptor for NIR fluorescence imaging. (64)Cu-doped AuNCs exhibited efficient CRET-NIR and PET imaging both in vitro and in vivo. In a U87MG glioblastoma xenograft model, (64)Cu-doped AuNCs showed high tumor uptake (14.9 %ID/g at 18 h) and produced satisfactory tumor self-illuminating NIR images in the absence of external excitation. This self-illuminating nanocluster with non-toxicity and good biocompatibility can be employed as a novel imaging contrast agent for biomedical applications, especially for molecular imaging. PMID:25224367

  10. Automated techniques for quality assurance of radiological image modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, David J.; Atkins, Frank B.; Dyer, Stephen M.

    1991-05-01

    This paper will attempt to identify many of the important issues for quality assurance (QA) of radiological modalities. It is of course to be realized that QA can span many aspects of the diagnostic decision making process. These issues range from physical image performance levels to and through the diagnostic decision of the radiologist. We will use as a model for automated approaches a program we have developed to work with computed tomography (CT) images. In an attempt to unburden the user, and in an effort to facilitate the performance of QA, we have been studying automated approaches. The ultimate utility of the system is its ability to render in a safe and efficacious manner, decisions that are accurate, sensitive, specific and which are possible within the economic constraints of modern health care delivery.

  11. Nonrigid PET motion compensation in the lower abdomen using simultaneous tagged-MRI and PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, B.; Cho, S.; Chun, S. Y.; Zhu, X.; Alpert, N. M.; El Fakhri, G.; Reese, T.; Catana, C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We propose a novel approach for PET respiratory motion correction using tagged-MRI and simultaneous PET-MRI acquisitions.Methods: We use a tagged-MRI acquisition followed by motion tracking in the phase domain to estimate the nonrigid deformation of biological tissues during breathing. In order to accurately estimate motion even in the presence of noise and susceptibility artifacts, we regularize the traditional HARP tracking strategy using a quadratic roughness penalty on neighboring displacement vectors (R-HARP). We then incorporate the motion fields estimated with R-HARP in the system matrix of an MLEM PET reconstruction algorithm formulated both for sinogram and list-mode data representations. This approach allows reconstruction of all detected coincidences in a single image while modeling the effect of motion both in the emission and the attenuation maps. At present, tagged-MRI does not allow estimation of motion in the lungs and our approach is therefore limited to motion correction in soft tissues. Since it is difficult to assess the accuracy of motion correction approaches in vivo, we evaluated the proposed approach in numerical simulations of simultaneous PET-MRI acquisitions using the NCAT phantom. We also assessed its practical feasibility in PET-MRI acquisitions of a small deformable phantom that mimics the complex deformation pattern of a lung that we imaged on a combined PET-MRI brain scanner.Results: Simulations showed that the R-HARP tracking strategy accurately estimated realistic respiratory motion fields for different levels of noise in the tagged-MRI simulation. In simulations of tumors exhibiting increased uptake, contrast estimation was 20% more accurate with motion correction than without. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was more than 100% greater when performing motion-corrected reconstruction which included all counts, compared to when reconstructing only coincidences detected in the first of eight gated frames. These results were

  12. PET imaging in ectopic Cushing syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Prasanna; Taieb, David; Giovanella, Luca; Treglia, Giorgio

    2015-11-01

    Cushing syndrome due to endogenous hypercortisolism may cause significant morbidity and mortality. The source of excess cortisol may be adrenal, pituitary, or ectopic. Ectopic Cushing syndrome is sometimes difficult to localize on conventional imaging like CT and MRI. After performing a multilevel thoracoabdominal imaging with CT, the evidence regarding the use of radiotracers for PET imaging is unclear due to significant molecular and etiological heterogeneity of potential causes of ectopic Cushing's syndrome. In our systematic review of literature, it appears that GalLium-based (Ga68) somatostatin receptor analogs have better sensitivity in diagnosis of bronchial carcinoids causing Cushing syndrome and FDG PET appears superior for small-cell lung cancers and other aggressive tumors. Further large-scale studies are needed to identify the best PET tracer for this condition. PMID:26206753

  13. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gargiulo, Sara; Greco, Adelaide; Gramanzini, Matteo; Petretta, Maria Piera; Ferro, Adele; Larobina, Michele; Panico, Mariarosaria; Brunetti, Arturo; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT), high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing. PMID:22505813

  14. PET/CT imaging in mouse models of myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Sara; Greco, Adelaide; Gramanzini, Matteo; Petretta, Maria Piera; Ferro, Adele; Larobina, Michele; Panico, Mariarosaria; Brunetti, Arturo; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT), high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing. PMID:22505813

  15. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, David C. Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  16. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  17. Diagnostic imaging to detect and evaluate response to therapy in bone metastases from prostate cancer: current modalities and new horizons.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Laura; Bertoldo, Francesco; Boccardo, Francesco; Conti, Giario; Menchi, Ilario; Mungai, Francesco; Ricardi, Umberto; Bombardieri, Emilio

    2016-07-01

    Different therapeutic options for the management of prostate cancer (PC) have been developed, and some are successful in providing crucial improvement in both survival and quality of life, especially in patients with metastatic castration-resistant PC. In this scenario, diverse combinations of radiopharmaceuticals (for targeting bone, cancer cells and receptors) and nuclear medicine modalities (e.g. bone scan, SPECT, SPECT/CT, PET and PET/CT) are now available for imaging bone metastases. Some radiopharmaceuticals are approved, currently available and used in the routine clinical setting, while others are not registered and are still under evaluation, and should therefore be considered experimental. On the other hand, radiologists have other tools, in addition to CT, that can better visualize bone localization and medullary involvement, such as multimodal MRI. In this review, the authors provide an overview of current management of advanced PC and discuss the choice of diagnostic modality for the detection of metastatic skeletal lesions in different phases of the disease. In addition to detection of bone metastases, the evaluation of response to therapy is another critical issue, since it remains one of the most important open questions that a multidisciplinary team faces when optimizing the management of PC. The authors emphasize the role of nuclear modalities that can presently be used in clinical practice, and also look at future perspectives based on relevant clinical data with novel radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26956538

  18. Localized Prostate Cancer Detection with 18F FACBC PET/CT: Comparison with MR Imaging and Histopathologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Shih, Joanna; Pinto, Peter A.; Merino, Maria J.; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Bernardo, Marcelino; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Adler, Stephen; Owenius, Rikard; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize uptake of 1-amino-3-fluorine 18-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (18F FACBC) in patients with localized prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal prostate tissue and to evaluate its potential utility in delineation of intraprostatic cancers in histopathologically confirmed localized prostate cancer in comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study. Twenty-one men underwent dynamic and static abdominopelvic 18F FACBC combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) and multiparametric (MP) 3-T endorectal MR imaging before robotic-assisted prostatectomy. PET/CT and MR images were coregistered by using pelvic bones as fiducial markers; this was followed by manual adjustments. Whole-mount histopathologic specimens were sliced with an MR-based patient-specific mold. 18F FACBC PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were compared with those at MR imaging and histopathologic analysis for lesion- and sector-based (20 sectors per patient) analysis. Positive and negative predictive values for each modality were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with logit link function and working independence correlation structure. Results 18F FACBC tumor uptake was rapid but reversible. It peaked 3.6 minutes after injection and reached a relative plateau at 15–20 minutes (SUVmax[15–20min]). Mean prostate tumor SUVmax(15–20min) was significantly higher than that of the normal prostate (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 2.7 ± 0.5) (P < .001); however, it was not significantly different from that of BPH (4.3 ± 0.6) (P = .27). Sector-based comparison with histopathologic analysis, including all tumors, revealed sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 66%, respectively, for 18F FACBC PET/CT and 73% and 79%, respectively, for T2-weighted MR imaging. 18F FACBC PET/CT and MP MR

  19. The evolving role of response-adapted PET imaging in Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Michael; Kostakoglu, Lale; Evens, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with (FDG-PET) has a well-established role in the pre- and post-treatment staging of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), however its use as a predictive therapeutic tool via responded-adapted therapy continues to evolve. There have been a multitude of retrospective and noncontrolled clinical studies showing that early (or interim) FDG-PET is highly prognostic in HL, particularly in the advanced-stage setting. Response-adapted treatment approaches in HL are attempting to diminish toxicity for low-risk patients by minimizing therapy, and conversely, intensify treatment for high-risk patients. Results from phase III noninferiority studies in early-stage HL with negative interim FDG-PET that randomized patients to chemotherapy alone versus combined modality therapy showed a continued small improvement in progression-free survival for patients who did not receive radiation. Preliminary reports of data escalating therapy for positive interim FDG-PET in early-stage HL and for de-escalation of therapy [i.e. bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine and prednisone (BEACOPP)] for negative interim FDG-PET in advanced stage HL (i.e. deletion of bleomycin) have demonstrated improved outcomes. Maturation of these studies and continued follow up of all response-adapted studies are needed. Altogether, the treatment of HL remains an individualized clinical management choice for physicians and patients. Continued refinement and optimization of FDG-PET is needed, including within the context of targeted therapeutic agents. In addition, a number of new and novel techniques of functional imaging, including metabolic tumor volume and tumor proliferation, are being explored in order to enhance staging, characterization, prognostication and ultimately patient outcome. PMID:27054026

  20. The evolving role of response-adapted PET imaging in Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Michael; Kostakoglu, Lale; Evens, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with (FDG-PET) has a well-established role in the pre- and post-treatment staging of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), however its use as a predictive therapeutic tool via responded-adapted therapy continues to evolve. There have been a multitude of retrospective and noncontrolled clinical studies showing that early (or interim) FDG-PET is highly prognostic in HL, particularly in the advanced-stage setting. Response-adapted treatment approaches in HL are attempting to diminish toxicity for low-risk patients by minimizing therapy, and conversely, intensify treatment for high-risk patients. Results from phase III noninferiority studies in early-stage HL with negative interim FDG-PET that randomized patients to chemotherapy alone versus combined modality therapy showed a continued small improvement in progression-free survival for patients who did not receive radiation. Preliminary reports of data escalating therapy for positive interim FDG-PET in early-stage HL and for de-escalation of therapy [i.e. bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine and prednisone (BEACOPP)] for negative interim FDG-PET in advanced stage HL (i.e. deletion of bleomycin) have demonstrated improved outcomes. Maturation of these studies and continued follow up of all response-adapted studies are needed. Altogether, the treatment of HL remains an individualized clinical management choice for physicians and patients. Continued refinement and optimization of FDG-PET is needed, including within the context of targeted therapeutic agents. In addition, a number of new and novel techniques of functional imaging, including metabolic tumor volume and tumor proliferation, are being explored in order to enhance staging, characterization, prognostication and ultimately patient outcome. PMID:27054026

  1. Simultaneous imaging using Si-PM-based PET and MRI for development of an integrated PET/MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Imaizumi, Masao; Kanai, Yasukazu; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photo-detector for PET for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems because it has high gain and is insensitive to static magnetic fields. Recently we developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction PET system for small animals and performed simultaneous measurements by combining the Si-PM-based PET and the 0.15 T permanent MRI to test the interferences between the Si-PM-based PET and an MRI. When the Si-PM was inside the MRI and installed around the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI, significant noise from the RF sequence of the MRI was observed in the analog signals of the PET detectors. However, we did not observe any artifacts in the PET images; fluctuation increased in the count rate of the Si-PM-based PET system. On the MRI side, there was significant degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in the MRI images compared with those without PET. By applying noise reduction procedures, the degradation of the S/N was reduced. With this condition, simultaneous measurements of a rat brain using a Si-PM-based PET and an MRI were made with some degradation in the MRI images. We conclude that simultaneous measurements are possible using Si-PM-based PET and MRI.

  2. Influence of Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms on PET Image Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpetas, G. E.; Michail, C. M.; Fountos, G. P.; Valais, I. G.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess image quality of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction. The simulated PET scanner was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution (1MBq). Image quality was assessed in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). MTF curves were estimated from transverse reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL, the ordered subsets separable paraboloidal surrogate (OSSPS), the median root prior (MRP) and OSMAPOSL with quadratic prior, algorithms. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using fixed subsets and various iterations, as well as by using various beta (hyper) parameter values. MTF values were found to increase with increasing iterations. MTF also improves by using lower beta values. The simulated PET evaluation method, based on the TLC plane source, can be useful in the resolution assessment of PET scanners.

  3. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    SciTech Connect

    Demi, Libertario Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  4. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  5. Direct Estimation of Kinetic Parametric Images for Dynamic PET

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) can monitor spatiotemporal distribution of radiotracer in vivo. The spatiotemporal information can be used to estimate parametric images of radiotracer kinetics that are of physiological and biochemical interests. Direct estimation of parametric images from raw projection data allows accurate noise modeling and has been shown to offer better image quality than conventional indirect methods, which reconstruct a sequence of PET images first and then perform tracer kinetic modeling pixel-by-pixel. Direct reconstruction of parametric images has gained increasing interests with the advances in computing hardware. Many direct reconstruction algorithms have been developed for different kinetic models. In this paper we review the recent progress in the development of direct reconstruction algorithms for parametric image estimation. Algorithms for linear and nonlinear kinetic models are described and their properties are discussed. PMID:24396500

  6. Impact of FDG-PET/CT Imaging on Nodal Staging for Head-And-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Ryuji . E-mail: murakami@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Uozumi, Hideaki; Hirai, Toshinori; Nishimura, Ryuichi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Ota, Kazutoshi D.D.S.; Murakami, Daizo; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Oya, Natsuo; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging on nodal staging for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 23 patients with head-and-neck SCC who were evaluated with FDG-PET/CT and went on to neck dissection. Two observers consensually determined the lesion size and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and compared the results with pathologic findings on nodal-level involvement. Two different observers (A and B) independently performed three protocols for clinical nodal staging. Methods 1, 2, and 3 were based on conventional modalities, additional visual information from FDG-PET/CT images, and FDG-PET/CT imaging alone with SUV data, respectively. Results: All primary tumors were visualized with FDG-PET/CT. Pathologically, 19 positive and 93 negative nodal levels were identified. The SUV{sub max} overlapped in negative and positive nodes <15 mm in diameter. According to receiver operating characteristics analysis, the size-based SUV{sub max} cutoff values were 1.9, 2.5, and 3.0 for lymph nodes <10 mm, 10-15 mm, and >15 mm, respectively. These cutoff values yielded 79% sensitivity and 99% specificity for nodal-level staging. For Observer A, the sensitivity and specificity in Methods 1, 2, and 3 were 68% and 94%, 68% and 99%, and 84% and 99%, respectively, and Method 3 yielded significantly higher accuracy than Method 1 (p = 0.0269). For Observer B, Method 3 yielded the highest sensitivity (84%) and specificity (99%); however, the difference among the three protocols was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Imaging with FDG-PET/CT with size-based SUV{sub max} cutoff values is an important modality for radiation therapy planning.

  7. Pulmonary imaging using respiratory motion compensated simultaneous PET/MR

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Joyita; Huang, Chuan; Li, Quanzheng; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is confounded by blurring artifacts caused by respiratory motion. These artifacts degrade both image quality and quantitative accuracy. In this paper, the authors present a complete data acquisition and processing framework for respiratory motion compensated image reconstruction (MCIR) using simultaneous whole body PET/magnetic resonance (MR) and validate it through simulation and clinical patient studies. Methods: The authors have developed an MCIR framework based on maximum a posteriori or MAP estimation. For fast acquisition of high quality 4D MR images, the authors developed a novel Golden-angle RAdial Navigated Gradient Echo (GRANGE) pulse sequence and used it in conjunction with sparsity-enforcing k-t FOCUSS reconstruction. The authors use a 1D slice-projection navigator signal encapsulated within this pulse sequence along with a histogram-based gate assignment technique to retrospectively sort the MR and PET data into individual gates. The authors compute deformation fields for each gate via nonrigid registration. The deformation fields are incorporated into the PET data model as well as utilized for generating dynamic attenuation maps. The framework was validated using simulation studies on the 4D XCAT phantom and three clinical patient studies that were performed on the Biograph mMR, a simultaneous whole body PET/MR scanner. Results: The authors compared MCIR (MC) results with ungated (UG) and one-gate (OG) reconstruction results. The XCAT study revealed contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improvements for MC relative to UG in the range of 21%–107% for 14 mm diameter lung lesions and 39%–120% for 10 mm diameter lung lesions. A strategy for regularization parameter selection was proposed, validated using XCAT simulations, and applied to the clinical studies. The authors’ results show that the MC image yields 19%–190% increase in the CNR of high-intensity features of interest affected by

  8. SU-E-QI-20: A Review of Advanced PET and CT Image Features for the Evaluation of Tumor Response

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using quantitative PET and CT image features for the evaluation of tumor response. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than fifty papers that use advanced, quantitative PET/CT image features for the evaluation of tumor response. We also discussed future works on extracting disease-specific features, combining multiple and complementary features in response modeling, delineating tumor in multimodality images, and exploring biological explanations of these advanced features. Results: Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features (characterizing spatial distribution of FDG uptake) have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Conclusions: Advanced, quantitative FDG PET/CT image features have been shown promising for the evaluation of tumor response. With the emerging multi-modality imaging performed at multiple time points for each patient, it becomes more important to analyze the serial images quantitatively, select and combine both complementary and contradictory information from various sources, for accurate and personalized evaluation of tumor response to therapy.

  9. Use of multiple imaging modalities to detect ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanter, Elizabeth; Walker, Ross; Marion, Sam; Hoyer, Patricia; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2005-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is not a common cancer-approximately 25,000 new cases in 2004-but it is the fifth leading cause of death from cancer in women (over 16,000 in 2004). Little is known about the precursors and early stages of ovarian cancer partially due to the lack of human samples at the early stages. A cohesive model that incorporates ovarian cancer induction into a menopausal rodent would be well suited for comprehensive studies of ovarian cancer. Non-destructive imaging would allow carcinogenesis to be followed. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) and Light-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) are minimally invasive optical modalities that allow both structural and biochemical changes to be noted. Rat ovaries were exposed to 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) for 20 days in order to destroy the primordial follicles. Plain sutures and sutures coated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were implanted in the right ovary, in order to produce epithelial based ovarian cancers (a plain suture was inserted in the control). Rats were sacrificed at 4 weeks and ovaries were harvested and imaged with a combined OCT/LIF system and with the OCM. Histology was preformed on the harvested ovaries and any pathology determined. Two of the ovaries were visually abnormal; the OCT/LIF imaging confirmed these abnormalities. The normal ovary OCM and OCT images show the organized structure of the ovary, the follicles, bursa and corpus lutea are visible. The OCM images show the disorganized structure of one of the abnormal ovaries. Overall this pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of both the animal model and optical imaging.

  10. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Sunny; Miller, Avraham; Agarwal, Chirag; Zakin, Elina; Acholonu, Michael; Gidwani, Umesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Kulbak, Guy; Shani, Jacob; Chen, On

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level. PMID:26798515