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Sample records for petawatt laser pulse

  1. Interaction physics of multipicosecond Petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A J; Divol, L

    2012-11-01

    We study the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma over several picoseconds, using two- and three-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. Sustained irradiation with non-diffraction-limited pulses at relativistic intensities yields conditions that differ qualitatively from what is experimentally available today. Nonlinear saturation of laser-driven density perturbations at the target surface causes recurrent emissions of plasma, which stabilize the surface and keep absorption continuously high. This dynamics leads to the acceleration of three distinct groups of electrons up to energies many times the laser ponderomotive potential. We discuss their energy distribution for applications like the fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion. PMID:23215393

  2. Laser wakefield acceleration by petawatt ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunov, L.M.; Kalmykov, S.Yu.; Mora, P.

    2004-12-07

    An ultra-short (about 30 fs) petawatt laser pulse focused in a wide focal spot (about 100{mu}m) in rarefied plasma (n0 {approx} 1017cm-3) excites a nonlinear plasma wakefield which can accelerate injected electrons up to a GeV energy without pulse channelling. In these conditions, the laser pulse with an over-critical power for relativistic self-focusing propagates as in vacuum. The nonlinear quasi-plane wake plasma wave, whose amplitude and phase velocity vary along the laser path, effectively traps and accelerates injected electrons with a wide range of initial energies. Electrons accelerated along two Rayleigh lengths (about eight centimeters) gain the energy up to 1 GeV. In particular, the electrons trapped from quite a long ({tau}b {approx} 330 fs) non-resonant electron beamlet of 1 MeV particles eventually form a low emittance bunch with the energies in the range 900 {+-} 50 MeV. All these conclusions follow from the two-dimensional simulations performed in cylindrical geometry by fully relativistic time-averaged particle code WAKE.

  3. Plasma lenses for ultrashort multi-petawatt laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Palastro, J. P.; Gordon, D.; Hafizi, B.; Johnson, L. A.; Peñano, J.; Hubbard, R. F.; Helle, M.; Kaganovich, D.

    2015-12-15

    An ideal plasma lens can provide the focusing power of a small f-number, solid-state focusing optic at a fraction of the diameter. An ideal plasma lens, however, relies on a steady-state, linear laser pulse-plasma interaction. Ultrashort multi-petawatt (MPW) pulses possess broad bandwidths and extreme intensities, and, as a result, their interaction with the plasma lens is neither steady state nor linear. Here, we examine nonlinear and time-dependent modifications to plasma lens focusing, and show that these result in chromatic and phase aberrations and amplitude distortion. We find that a plasma lens can provide enhanced focusing for 30 fs pulses with peak power up to ∼1 PW. The performance degrades through the MPW regime, until finally a focusing penalty is incurred at ∼10 PW.

  4. Plasma lenses for ultrashort multi-petawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Gordon, D.; Hafizi, B.; Johnson, L. A.; Peñano, J.; Hubbard, R. F.; Helle, M.; Kaganovich, D.

    2015-12-01

    An ideal plasma lens can provide the focusing power of a small f-number, solid-state focusing optic at a fraction of the diameter. An ideal plasma lens, however, relies on a steady-state, linear laser pulse-plasma interaction. Ultrashort multi-petawatt (MPW) pulses possess broad bandwidths and extreme intensities, and, as a result, their interaction with the plasma lens is neither steady state nor linear. Here, we examine nonlinear and time-dependent modifications to plasma lens focusing, and show that these result in chromatic and phase aberrations and amplitude distortion. We find that a plasma lens can provide enhanced focusing for 30 fs pulses with peak power up to ˜1 PW. The performance degrades through the MPW regime, until finally a focusing penalty is incurred at ˜10 PW.

  5. Improved pulse contrast on the Texas Petawatt Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, E.; Toncian, T.; Martinez, M.; Gordon, J.; Spinks, M.; Dyer, G.; Truong, N.; Wagner, C.; Tiwari, G.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    We have completed a pulse contrast upgrade on the Texas Petawatt Laser. This improvement enables the use of thin and reduced mass targets for ion acceleration, and reduces pre-plasma effects on all experiments. The new design starts with two BBO-based OPCPA stages pumped by an optically synchronized 8-ps laser. These stages amplify slightly chirped few ps pulses by six orders of magnitude. Next there are two LBO-based OPCPA stages that are pumped by 4 ns pulses. With much less gain than before, parametric fluorescence has been reduced by about three orders of magnitude. Prior to the upgrade, lenses caused pencil beam prepulses. Since tilting or wedging lenses was not a viable option, we replaced all lenses in the glass amplifiers with off-axis parabolic mirrors. There are still weak prepulses that we attribute to surface scattering. We eliminated thin transmissive optics to avoid post pulses that would result in prepulses by nonlinear (B-integral) conversion. This required us to reduce from eight to four passes in the 64-mm glass amplifier and to add a two-pass 25-mm “booster amplifier.” As a final upgrade we added an Acousto-Optic Programmable Dispersive-Filter (AOPDF) to improve higher order dispersion and steepen the rising edge of the compressed pulse.

  6. Production of picosecond, kilojoule, and petawatt laser pulses via Raman amplification of nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Trines, R M G M; Fiúza, F; Bingham, R; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Cairns, R A; Norreys, P A

    2011-09-01

    Raman amplification in plasma has been promoted as a means of compressing picosecond optical laser pulses to femtosecond duration to explore the intensity frontier. Here we show for the first time that it can be used, with equal success, to compress laser pulses from nanosecond to picosecond duration. Simulations show up to 60% energy transfer from pump pulse to probe pulse, implying that multikilojoule ultraviolet petawatt laser pulses can be produced using this scheme. This has important consequences for the demonstration of fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion. PMID:21981507

  7. Ultra-Intense Short-Pulse Pair Creation Using the Texas Petawatt Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Edison; Henderson, Alexander; Clarke, Taylor; Taylor, Devin; Chaguine, Petr; Serratto, Kristina; Riley, Nathan; Dyer, Gilliss; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd

    2013-10-01

    We report results from the 2012 pair creation experiment using the Texas Petawatt Laser. Up to 1011 positrons per steradian were detected using 100 Joule pulses from the Texas Petawatt Laser to irradiate gold targets, with peak laser intensities up to 1.9 × 1021W/cm2 and pulse durations as short as 130 fs. Positron-to-electron ratios exceeding 20% were measured on some shots. The positron energy, positron yield per unit laser energy, and inferred positron density are significantly higher than those reported in previous experiments. This confirms that, for a given laser energy, higher intensity and shorter pulses irradiating thicker targets are more favorable for pair creation. Narrow-band high-energy positrons up to 23 MeV were observed from thin targets. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC-0001481 and Rice FIF.

  8. SPECTRAL AMPLITUDE AND PHASE EVOLUTION IN PETAWATT LASER PULSES

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, C V

    2010-11-22

    The influence of the active gain medium on the spectral amplitude and phase of amplified pulses in a CPA system is studied. Results from a 10-PW example based on Nd-doped mixed glasses are presented. In conclusion, this study shows that, by using spectral shaping and gain saturation in a mixed-glass amplifier, it is possible to produce 124 fs, 1.4 kJ laser pulses. One detrimental effect, the pulse distortion due to resonant amplification medium, has been investigated and its magnitude as well as its compensation calculated.

  9. Envelope Model Simulation of Laser Wakefield Acceleration with Realistic Laser Pulses from the Texas Petawatt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Kathleen; Higuera, Adam; Abell, Dan; Cowan, Ben; Fazel, Neil; Cary, John; Downer, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA), diffraction of an over-focused laser pulse can provide localized electron injection, leading to the production of a monoenergetic electron bunch. While electron energies up to several GeV have been reported at the Texas Petawatt Laser facility, near-Gaussian beam simulations predict energies higher than have been observed. Experimentally measured laser profiles are non-Gaussian, indicating that closer agreement with experimental conditions is needed to predictively model this experiment. The implementation of the envelope model in the particle-in-cell code VORPAL lowers the computational cost of capturing injection dynamics during the early evolution of laser wakefields. We compare VORPAL envelope model simulations using laser pulses based on experimentally measured profiles versus a corresponding a two-Gaussian approximation. We acknowledge DOE Grants No. DE-SC0011617 and DE-SC0012444, DOE/NSF Grant No. DE-SC0012584, and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. KW is supported by the DOE CSGF under Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER25308.

  10. High density collimated beams of relativistic ions produced by petawatt laser pulses in plasmas

    PubMed

    Sentoku; Liseikina; Esirkepov; Califano; Naumova; Ueshima; Vshivkov; Kato; Mima; Nishihara; Pegoraro; Bulanov

    2000-11-01

    Under optimal interaction conditions ions can be accelerated up to relativistic energies by a petawatt laser pulse in both underdense and overdense plasmas. Two-dimensional particle in cell simulations show that the laser pulse drills a channel through an underdense plasma slab due to relativistic self-focusing. Both ions and electrons are accelerated in the head region of the channel. However, ion acceleration is more effective at the end of the slab. Here electrons from the channel expand in vacuum and are followed by the ions dragged by the Coulomb force arising from charge separation. A similar mechanism of ion acceleration occurs when a superintense laser pulse interacts with a thin slab of overdense plasma and the pulse ponderomotive pressure moves all the electrons away from a finite-diameter spot. PMID:11102086

  11. Production of petawatt laser pulses by backward Raman amplification in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaohui; Zuo, Yanlei; Su, Jingqin; Liu, Lanqin; Jiao, Zhihong; Wei, Xiaofeng

    2015-02-01

    Backward Raman amplification (BRA) in plasma has been demonstrated an effective way to produce high power laser pulses. However, most experiments of BRA are carried out around the pump wavelength of 800 nm. In recent years, the 1053 nm pump pulse becomes more and more essential as the development of the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) around this wavelength. Here we design an experiment of BRA with a 1053 nm, 20 ps pump pulse and a 1200 nm, 50 fs seed pulse based on the facility of XG III. The simulation results obtained by a 1-d particle-in-cell (PIC) code show that the amplified peak seed intensity of ˜ 5 × 1016 W/cm2 is obtained, with an energy transfer up to 16.8%. An output pulse of petawatt power is theoretically demonstrated feasible.

  12. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  13. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  14. Characteristics of High Energy Ka and Bremsstrahlung Sources Generated by Short Pulse Petawatt Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Izumi, N; Key, M H; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Patel, P K; Phillips, T W; Zhang, B B

    2004-04-13

    We have measured the characteristics of high energy K{alpha} sources created with the Vulcan Petawatt laser at RAL and the JanUSP laser at LLNL. High energy x-ray backlighters will be essential for radiographing High-Energy-Density Experimental Science (HEDES) targets for NIF projects especially to probe implosions and high areal density planar samples. Hard K{alpha} x-ray photons are created through relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after irradiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. For our Vulcan experiment, we employed a CsI scintillator/CCD camera for imaging and a CCD camera for single photon counting. We measured the Ag K{alpha} source (22 keV) size using a pinhole array and the K{alpha} flux using a single photon counting method. We also radiographed a high Z target using the high energy broadband x-rays generated from these short pulse lasers. This paper will present results from these experiments.

  15. Acceleration of electrons under the action of petawatt-class laser pulses onto foam targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugachev, L. P.; Andreev, N. E.; Levashov, P. R.; Rosmej, O. N.

    2016-09-01

    Optimization study for future experiments on interaction of petawatt laser pulses with foam targets was done by 3D PIC simulations. Densities in the range 0.5nc-nc and thicknesses in the range 100 - 500 μm of the targets were considered corresponding to those which are currently available. It is shown that heating of electrons mainly occurs under the action of the ponderomotive force of a laser pulse in which amplitude increases up to three times because of self-focusing effect in underdense plasma. Accelerated electrons gain additional energy directly from the high-frequency laser field at the betatron resonance in the emerging plasma density channels. For thicker targets a higher number of electrons with higher energies are obtained. The narrowing of the angular distribution of electrons for thicker targets is explained by acceleration in multiple narrow filaments. Obtained energies of accelerated electrons can be approximated by Maxwell distribution with the temperature 8.5 MeV. The charge carried by electrons with energies higher than 30 MeV is about 30 nC, that is 3-4 order of magnitude higher than the charge predicted by the ponderomotive scaling for the incident laser amplitude.

  16. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Wilks, Scott; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen; Baring, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top relativistic particle accelerators, ultrafast charged particle imaging systems and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. In this presentation, using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show how to derive the theoretical maximum and minimum of f. These boundaries constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. Close agreement is shown with several dozens of published experimental data points and simulation results, helping to confirm the theory. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  17. Electron, Photon, and Ion Beams from the Relativistic Interaction of Petawatt Laser Pulses with Solid Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, S.P.; Brown, C.G.; Cowan, T.E.; Henry, E.A.; Johnson, J.; Key, M.H.; Koch, J.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lee, R.W.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Phillips, T.W.; Roth, M.; Sangster, T.C.; Singh, M.S.; Snavely, R.A.; Stoyer, M.A.; Wilks, S.C.; Yasuike, K.

    1999-11-12

    In our Petawatt laser experiments several hundred joules of 1 {micro}m laser light in 0.5-5.0 ps pulses with intensities up to 3 x 10{sup 20}Wcm{sup -2} were incident on solid targets producing a strongly relativistic interaction. The energy content, spectra, and angular patterns of the photon, electron, and ion radiations were diagnosed in a number of ways, including several novel (to laser physics) nuclear activation techniques. From the beamed bremsstrahlung we infer that about 40-50% of the laser energy is converted to broadly beamed hot electrons. Their direction centroid varies from shot to shot, but the beam has a consistent width. Extraordinarily luminous ion beams almost precisely normal to the rear of various targets are seen--up to 3 x 10{sup 13} protons with kT{sub ion} {approx} several MeV representing {approx}6% of the laser energy. We observe ion energies up to at least 55 MeV. The ions appear to originate from the rear target surfaces. The edge of the ion beam is very sharp, and collimation increases with ion energy. At the highest energies, a narrow feature appears in the ion spectra, and the apparent size of the emitting spot is smaller than the full back surface area. Any ion emission from the front of the targets is much less than from the rear and is not sharply beamed. The hot electrons generate a Debye sheath with electrostatic fields of order MV per micron which apparently accelerate the ions.

  18. Electron, photon, and ion beams from the relativistic interaction of Petawatt laser pulses with solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, Stephen P.; Brown, Curtis G.; Cowan, Thomas E.; Henry, Eugene A.; Johnson, Joy S.; Key, Michael H.; Koch, Jeffrey A.; Langdon, A. Bruce; Lasinski, Barbara F.; Lee, Richard W.

    2000-05-01

    In recent Petawatt laser experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, several hundred joules of 1 {mu}m laser light in 0.5-5.0-ps pulses with intensities up to 3x10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2} were incident on solid targets and produced a strongly relativistic interaction. The energy content, spectra, and angular patterns of the photon, electron, and ion radiations have all been diagnosed in a number of ways, including several novel (to laser physics) nuclear activation techniques. About 40%-50% of the laser energy is converted to broadly beamed hot electrons. Their beam centroid direction varies from shot to shot, but the resulting bremsstrahlung beam has a consistent width. Extraordinarily luminous ion beams (primarily protons) almost precisely normal to the rear of various targets are seen--up to 3x10{sup 13} protons with kT{sub ion}{approx}several MeV representing {approx}6% of the laser energy. Ion energies up to at least 55 MeV are observed. The ions appear to originate from the rear target surfaces. The edge of the ion beam is very sharp, and collimation increases with ion energy. At the highest energies, a narrow feature appears in the ion spectra, and the apparent size of the emitting spot is smaller than the full back surface area. Any ion emission from the front of the targets is much less than from the rear and is not sharply beamed. The hot electrons generate a Debye sheath with electrostatic fields of order MV per micron, which apparently accelerate the ions. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Polarization-encoded chirped pulse amplification in Ti:sapphire: a way toward few-cycle petawatt lasers.

    PubMed

    Kalashnikov, Mikhail; Cao, Huabao; Osvay, Károly; Chvykov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The bandwidth of titanium sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser amplifiers can be greatly broadened with shaping the spectral gain via engineering the spectral polarization of amplified pulses and using both π- and σ-cross-sections. In a proof-of-principle experiment, an amplification bandwidth exceeding 85 nm at a gain of 200 was demonstrated. The accompanying computer modeling revealed that a polarization-encoded chirped pulse amplification scheme can be scaled to higher energies and thus can produce multijoule pulses with bandwidth close to 200 nm, making few-cycle petawatt Ti:Sa systems feasible. PMID:26696149

  20. Engineering the Petawatt Laser into Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Bell, P.M.; Hamilton, R.M.

    1997-12-23

    The engineering process of integrating the Petawatt (10{sup 15} watts) laser system into the existing 30 kJ (UV) Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described in detail. The nanosecond-long, chirped Petawatt laser pulse is initially generated in a separate master oscillator room and then injected into one of Nova`s 10 beamlines. There, the pulse is further amplified and enlarged to {approximately}{phi}60 cm, temporally compressed under vacuum to <500 fs using large diameter diffraction gratings, and then finally focused onto targets using a parabolic mirror. The major Petawatt components are physically large which created many significant engineering challenges in design, installation and implementation. These include the diffraction gratings and mirrors, vacuum compressor chamber, target chamber, and parabolic focusing mirror. Other Petawatt system components were also technically challenging and include: an injection beamline, transport spatial filters, laser diagnostics, alignment components, motor controls, interlocks, timing and synchronization systems, support structures, and vacuum systems. The entire Petawatt laser system was designed, fabricated, installed, and activated while the Nova laser continued its normal two-shift operation. This process required careful engineering and detailed planning to prevent experimental downtime and to complete the project on schedule.

  1. Ion acceleration by petawatt class laser pulses and pellet compression in a fast ignition scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, C.; Londrillo, P.; Liseykina, T. V.; Macchi, A.; Sgattoni, A.; Turchetti, G.

    2009-07-01

    Ion drivers based on standard acceleration techniques have faced up to now several difficulties. We consider here a conceptual alternative to more standard schemes, such as HIDIF (Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion), which are still beyond the present state of the art of particle accelerators, even though the requirements on the total beam energy are lowered by fast ignition scenarios. The new generation of petawatt class lasers open new possibilities: acceleration of electrons or protons for the fast ignition and eventually light or heavy ions acceleration for compression. The pulses of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) lasers allow ions acceleration with very high efficiency at reachable intensities ( I˜1021 W/cm2), if circularly polarized light is used since we enter in the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) regime. We analyze the possibility of accelerating carbon ion bunches by interaction of a circularly polarized pulses with an ultra-thin target. The advantage would be compactness and modularity, due to identical accelerating units. The laser efficiency required to have an acceptable net gain in the inertial fusion process is still far from the presently achievable values both for CPA short pulses and for long pulses used for direct illumination. Conversely the energy conversion efficiency from the laser pulse to the ion bunch is high and grows with the intensity. As a consequence the energy loss is not the major concern. For a preliminary investigation of the ions bunch production we have used the PIC code ALaDyn developed to analyze the results of the INFN-CNR PLASMONX experiment at Frascati National Laboratories (Rome, Italy) where the 0.3 PW laser FLAME will accelerate electrons and protons. We present the results of some 1D simulations and parametric scan concerning the acceleration of carbon ions that we suppose to be fully ionized. Circularly polarized laser pulses of 50 J and 50-100 fs duration, illuminating a 100 μm2 area of a 20 nm thick carbon

  2. Petawatt laser pulses for proton-boron high gain fusion with avalanche reactions excluding problems of nuclear radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Lalousis, Paraskevas; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Margarone, Daniele; Korn, Georg; Eliezer, Shalom; Miley, George H.; Moustaizis, Stavros; Mourou, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    An alternative way may be possible for igniting solid density hydrogen-11B (HB11) fuel. The use of >petawatt-ps laser pulses from the non-thermal ignition based on ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks by the nonlinear (ponderomotive) force, has to be combined with the measured ultrahigh magnetic fields in the 10 kilotesla range for cylindrical trapping. The evaluation of measured alpha particles from HB11 reactions arrives at the conclusion that apart from the usual binary nuclear reactions, secondary reactions by an avalanche multiplication may cause the high gains, even much higher than from deuterium tritium fusion. This may be leading to a concept of clean economic power generation.

  3. Gratings for High-Energy Petawatt Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H T; Britten, J A; Carlson, T C; Nissen, J D; Summers, L J; Hoaglan, C R; Aasen, M D; Peterson, J E; Jovanovic, I

    2005-11-08

    To enable high-energy petawatt laser operation we have developed the processing methods and tooling that produced both the world's largest multilayer dielectric reflection grating and the world's highest laser damage resistant gratings. We have successfully delivered the first ever 80 cm aperture multilayer dielectric grating to LLNL's Titan Intense Short Pulse Laser Facility. We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings.

  4. Petawatt pulsed-power accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Stygar, William A.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Headley, Daniel I.; Ives, Harry C.; Ives, legal representative; Berry Cottrell; Leeper, Ramon J.; Mazarakis, Michael G.; Olson, Craig L.; Porter, John L.; Wagoner; Tim C.

    2010-03-16

    A petawatt pulsed-power accelerator can be driven by various types of electrical-pulse generators, including conventional Marx generators and linear-transformer drivers. The pulsed-power accelerator can be configured to drive an electrical load from one- or two-sides. Various types of loads can be driven; for example, the accelerator can be used to drive a high-current z-pinch load. When driven by slow-pulse generators (e.g., conventional Marx generators), the accelerator comprises an oil section comprising at least one pulse-generator level having a plurality of pulse generators; a water section comprising a pulse-forming circuit for each pulse generator and a level of monolithic triplate radial-transmission-line impedance transformers, that have variable impedance profiles, for each pulse-generator level; and a vacuum section comprising triplate magnetically insulated transmission lines that feed an electrical load. When driven by LTD generators or other fast-pulse generators, the need for the pulse-forming circuits in the water section can be eliminated.

  5. Dynamics of the wakefield of a multi-petawatt, femtosecond laser pulse in a configuration with ultrarelativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, D.; Fedele, R.; Belić, M.

    2014-08-01

    The wakefield excitation in an unmagnetized plasma by a multi-petawatt, femtosecond, pancake-shaped laser pulse is described both analytically and numerically in the regime with ultrarelativistic electron jitter velocities, when the plasma electrons are almost expelled from the pulse region. This is done, for the first time, in fluid theory, using a novel mathematical model that does not break down for very intense pump strengths, in contrast to the standard approach that uses the laser field envelope and the ponderomotive guiding center averaging. A three-timescale description is introduced, with the intermediate scale associated with the nonlinear phase of the electromagnetic wave and with the bending of its wave front. The evolution of the pulse and of its electrostatic wake are studied by the numerical solution in a two-dimensional geometry, with the spot diameter \\gtrsim 100\\ \\mu \\text{m} . It has revealed that the nonlocal plasma response stretches very short pulses and that those with the length of 1-2 laser wavelengths, favored by the analytic estimates obtained in the local limit, are unstable. The optimum initial pulse length exceeds 1.5{\\text{-}}2\\ \\mu \\text{m} .

  6. Radiation pressure acceleration of protons to 93 MeV with circularly polarized petawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Hyung Taek; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Kim, Chul Min; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    The radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of charged particles has been a challenging task in laser-driven proton/ion acceleration due to its stringent requirements in laser and target conditions. The realization of radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration requires irradiating ultrathin targets with an ultrahigh contrast and ultraintense laser pulses. We report the generation of 93-MeV proton beams achieved by applying 800-nm 30-fs circularly polarized laser pulses with an intensity of 6.1 × 10 20 W / cm 2 to 15-nm-thick polymer targets. The radiation pressure acceleration was confirmed from the obtained optimal target thickness, quadratic energy scaling, polarization dependence, and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We expect this clear demonstration of RPA to facilitate the realization of laser-driven proton/ion sources delivering energetic and short-pulse particle beams for novel applications.

  7. Enhancement of electron energy to the multi-GeV regime by a dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator pumped by petawatt laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Pae, Ki Hong; Cha, Hyuk Jin; Kim, I Jong; Yu, Tae Jun; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-10-18

    Laser-wakefield acceleration offers the promise of a compact electron accelerator for generating a multi-GeV electron beam using the huge field gradient induced by an intense laser pulse, compared to conventional rf accelerators. However, the energy and quality of the electron beam from the laser-wakefield accelerator have been limited by the power of the driving laser pulses and interaction properties in the target medium. Recent progress in laser technology has resulted in the realization of a petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser, which offers new capabilities for research on laser-wakefield acceleration. Here, we present a significant increase in laser-driven electron energy to the multi-GeV level by utilizing a 30-fs, 1-PW laser system. In particular, a dual-stage laser-wakefield acceleration scheme (injector and accelerator scheme) was applied to boost electron energies to over 3 GeV with a single PW laser pulse. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the multi-GeV electron generation from the dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator driven by PW laser pulses. PMID:24182273

  8. Petawatt laser-driven wakefield accelerator: All-optical electron injection via collision of laser pulses and radiation cooling of accelerated electron bunches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Avitzour, Yoav; Yi, S. Austin; Shvets, Gennady

    2007-11-01

    We explore an electron injection into the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) using nearly head-on collision of the petawatt ultrashort (˜30 fs) laser pulse (driver) with a low- amplitude laser (seed) beam of the same duration and polarization. To eliminate the threat to the main laser amplifier we consider two options: (i) a frequency-shifted seed and (ii) a seed pulse propagating at a small angle to the axis. We show that the emission of synchrotron radiation due to betatron oscillations of trapped and accelerated electrons results in significant transverse cooling of quasi- monoenergetic accelerated electrons (with energies above 1 GeV). At the same time, the energy losses due to the synchrotron emission preserve the final energy spread of the electron beam. The ``dark current'' due to the electron trapping in multiple wake buckets and the effect of beam loading (wake destruction at the instant of beams collision) are discussed.

  9. Development of high damage threshold optics for petawatt-class short-pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Brent C.; Perry, Michael D.; Boyd, Robert D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Shore, Bruce W.; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    1995-04-01

    We report laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations, (tau) , ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Damage thresholds of gold coatings are limited to 500 mJ/cm2 in the subpicosecond range from 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated (tau) 1/2 scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for (tau) 50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

  10. Development of high damage threshold optics for petawatt-class short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Boyd, R.D.

    1995-02-22

    The authors report laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations, {tau}, ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Damage thresholds of gold coatings are limited to 500 mJ/cm{sup 2} in the subpicosecond range for 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}1/2 scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for {tau}>50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

  11. Demonstration of a double chirped-pulse-amplification front-end system to improve the temporal contrast at a sub-petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Na; Zhou, Kainan; Huang, Wanqing; Wang, Xiaodong; Sun, Li; Guo, Yi; Li, Qing

    2012-02-01

    The temporal contrast is an important factor affecting the application of ultra-intense and ultra-short lasers. In this paper, we develop a double chirped-pulse-amplification (CPA) front-end system with an intermediate nonlinear temporal pulse filter to improve the temporal contrast at a sub-petawatt Ti:sapphire laser facility, i.e. the super intense laser for experiment on the extremes (SILEX-I). The temporal pulse filter employs cross-polarized wave (XPW) generation to suppress the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The design output energy is 320 mJ for the front-end system. The experimental results show that the output energy of the double CPA system is 360 mJ. The ASE pedestal is suppressed significantly and the temporal contrast is improved by around three orders of magnitude.

  12. Petawatt Laser - Physics Today article

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1997-07-02

    The development of small scale multiterawatt and now pentawatt lasers is described. The intent was to develop a laser capable of producing pentawatt pulses in order to examine the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion. This application requires high pulse energy in addition to the short pulse duration. The essential idea is to pre-implode a deuterium-tritium capsule to an isochoric condition.

  13. Optimization of the dynamic wavefront control of a pulsed kilojoule/nanosecond-petawatt laser facility.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ji-Ping; Sautivet, Anne-Marie; Fils, Jérôme; Martin, Luc; Abdeli, Kahina; Sauteret, Christian; Wattellier, Benoit

    2008-02-10

    The wavefront aberrations in a large-scale, flash-lamp-pumped, high-energy, high-power glass laser system can degrade considerably the quality of the final focal spot, and limit severely the repetition rate. The various aberrations induced on the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), laser facility (LULI2000) throughout the amplification are identified and analyzed in detail. Based on these analyses, an optimized procedure for dynamic wavefront control is then designed and implemented. The lower-order Zernike aberrations can be effectively reduced by combining an adaptive-optics setup, comprising a bimorph deformable mirror and a four-wave lateral shearing interferometer, with a precise alignment system. This enables the laser chain to produce a reproducible focal spot close to the diffraction limit (Strehl ratio approximately 0.7). This allows also to increase the repetition rate, initially limited by the recovery time of the laser amplifiers, by a factor of 2 (one shot per hour). The proposed procedure provides an attractive alternative for dynamic correction of the wavefront aberrations of a laser facility as complex as the LULI2000. PMID:18268782

  14. Optimization of the dynamic wavefront control of a pulsed kilojoule/nanosecond-petawatt laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ji-Ping; Sautivet, Anne-Marie; Fils, Jérôme; Martin, Luc; Abdeli, Kahina; Sauteret, Christian; Wattellier, Benoit

    2008-02-01

    The wavefront aberrations in a large-scale, flash-lamp-pumped, high-energy, high-power glass laser system can degrade considerably the quality of the final focal spot, and limit severely the repetition rate. The various aberrations induced on the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), laser facility (LULI2000) throughout the amplification are identified and analyzed in detail. Based on these analyses, an optimized procedure for dynamic wavefront control is then designed and implemented. The lower-order Zernike aberrations can be effectively reduced by combining an adaptive-optics setup, comprising a bimorph deformable mirror and a four-wave lateral shearing interferometer, with a precise alignment system. This enables the laser chain to produce a reproducible focal spot close to the diffraction limit (Strehl ratio ~0.7). This allows also to increase the repetition rate, initially limited by the recovery time of the laser amplifiers, by a factor of 2 (one shot per hour). The proposed procedure provides an attractive alternative for dynamic correction of the wavefront aberrations of a laser facility as complex as the LULI2000.

  15. Laser Wakefield Acceleration in the PetaWatt Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Katsouleas, T.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2003-10-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration with multi-terawatt lasers has demonstrated impressive results in experiments around the world-- e.g., energy gains up to 700 MeV in mm-scale gas jets has recently been reported. With a number of petawatt class lasers planned for operation in the near future, we examine with 2-D and 3-D PIC simulations the potential energy gain and new physics of laser wakefield acceleration in this regime. These lasers will operated for a variety of pulse lengths. We consider both 35 fs and 600 fs pulses, but will emphasize the 35 fs results for this poster. Prospects for producing GeV electron beams in underdense plasmas will be described. In addition, the differences in physics between terawatt and petawatt regimes will be explored. Preliminary results for the 35 fs class lasers indicate that there are two acceleration stages in the petawatt regime -- with the early electrons dephasing due to elongation of the laser wake as the laser pump evolves. The later stage produces a long beam of electrons several times the initial plasma wake wavelength with a fairly defined energy in the GeV range. For the 600 fs class lasers, 2D simulations indicate that the acceleration process is much more complicated and it involves an interaction between the fields in the wake and the laser.

  16. Development of diagnostics for high-energy petawatt pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Hernandez, J; Appel, G; Barker, D; Betts, S; Brewer, W; Brown, C; Chang, J; Chrisp, M; Crane, J; Haefner, C; Lucianetti, A; Rushford, M; Semenov, V; Seppala, L; Shverdin, M; Siders, C; Taranowski, M; Tietbohl, G; Barty, C J

    2006-06-15

    Applications accessed by high energy petawatt (HEPW) lasers require complete, single-shot characterization of pulse spatial, temporal, and energy characteristics. We describe techniques that enable single-shot characterization of the temporal shape and pulse contrast of HEPW pulses with >10{sup 8} dynamic range over a ns-temporal window. Approaches to measure pulse durations that span two orders of magnitude will be discussed. Finally, we describe a novel implementation of spectrally dispersed two-beam interferometry for measurement of the phase difference between two HEPW pulses. This technique can be applied to dispersion and B-integral measurements in a HEPW system, as well as to achieve precise timing of nanosecond pulses. Lastly, spectrally dispersed interferometry represents an ideal technique to enable coherent addition of HEPW pulses for production of ultrahigh intensities.

  17. Multi-GeV electron beams from capillary discharge guided sub-petawatt class laser pulses in the self-trapping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, Wim

    2014-10-01

    Laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) can produce acceleration gradients on the order of tens to hundreds of GV/m, making them attractive as compact particle accelerators. During the past decade, quasi-monochromatic electron beams at the 1 GeV energy level have been produced using laser pulses at the 40-50 TW peak power level. With the availability of petawatt class lasers, beams up to 2 GeV have been produced from 7 cm long gas cells at UT Austin using 150 J laser pulses and at the 1 GeV level with tails extending to 3 GeV at the GIST facility in Korea. In this talk we present experimental results using the 1 Hz petawatt class BELLA laser at LBNL of the generation of multi-GeV electron beams with center energy up to 4.2 GeV, 6% rms energy spread, charge approximately 10 pC and an rms divergence around 0.3 mrad. The beams were produced from 9 cm long capillary discharge waveguide structure with a plasma density of ~ 7 ×1017cm-3 , powered by laser pulses with peak power up to 0.3 PW. Preformed plasma waveguides allow the use of lower laser power compared to unguided plasma structures to achieve the same beam energy. Detailed comparison between experiment and simulation indicates the importance of the near-field laser transverse mode quality on guiding and acceleration in the LPA. By tuning the plasma density, regimes were found where laser beams with a top hat near-field profile were guided well, and where high energy electron beams can be produced, with narrow divergence [ <0.8 mrad (FWHM)], and relatively small integrated energy spread (<10%). Provided that the slice energy spread and emittance are sufficiently low, electron beams with this energy could power x-ray free electron lasers. Future experiments will aim at increasing the beam energy to the 10 GeV level. Work supported by Office of Science, Office of HEP, US DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  18. The Texas petawatt laser and current experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mikael; Bang, Woosuk; Dyer, Gilliss; Wang Xiaoming; Gaul, Erhard; Borger, Teddy; Ringuette, Martin; Spinks, Michael; Quevedo, Hernan; Bernstein, Aaron; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd

    2012-12-21

    The Texas Petawatt Laser is operational with experimental campaigns executed in both F/40 and F3 target chambers. Recent improvements have resulted in intensities of >2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} on target. Experimental highlights include, accelerated electron energies of >2 GeV, DD fusion ion temperatures >25 keV and isochorically heated solids to 10-50 eV.

  19. Laser-induced damage of intrinsic and extrinsic defects by picosecond pulses on multilayer dielectric coatings for petawatt-class lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Negres, Raluca A.; Carr, Christopher W.; Laurence, Ted A.; Stanion, Ken; Guss, Gabe; Cross, David A.; Wegner, Paul J.; Stolz, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we describe a damage testing system and its use in investigating laser-induced optical damage initiated by both intrinsic and extrinsic precursors on multilayer dielectric coatings suitable for use in high-energy, large-aperture petawatt-class lasers. We employ small-area damage test methodologies to evaluate the intrinsic damage resistance of various coatings as a function of deposition methods and coating materials under simulated use conditions. In addition, we demonstrate that damage initiation by raster scanning at lower fluences and growth threshold testing are required to probe the density of extrinsic defects, which will limit large-aperture optics performance.

  20. Generation of Nonlinear Force Driven Blocks from Skin Layer Interaction of Petawatt-Picosecond Laser Pulses for ICF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Hora; Cang, Yu; He, Xiantu; Zhang, Jie; F, Osman; J, Badziak; F, P. Boody; S, Gammino; R, Höpfl; K, Jungwirth; B, Kralikova; J, Kraska; L, Laska; Liu, Hong; G, H. Miley; P, Parys; Peng, Hansheng; M, Pfeifer; K, Rohlena; J, Skala; Z, Skladanowski; L, Torrisi; J, Ullschmied; J, Wolowski; Zhang, Weiyan

    2004-02-01

    The discovery of the essential difference of maximum ion energy for TW - ps laser plasma interaction compared with the 100 ns laser pulses [1] led to the theory of a skin layer model [2] where the control of prepulses suppressed the usual relativistic self-focusing. The subsequent generation of two nonlinear force driven blocks has been demonstrated experimentally and in extensive numerical studies where one block moves against the laser light and the other block into the irradiated target. These blocks of nearly solid state density DT plasma correspond to ion beam current densities [3] exceeding 1010 A/cm2 where the ion velocity can be chosen up to highly relativistic values. Using the results of the expected ignition of DT fuel by light ion beams, a self-sustained fusion reaction front may be generated even into uncompressed solid DT fuel similar to the Nuckolls-Wood [4] scheme where 10 kJ laser pulses produce 100 MJ fusion energy. This new and simplified scheme of laser-ICF needs and optimisation of the involved parameters.

  1. Fast scaling of energetic protons generated in the interaction of linearly polarized femtosecond petawatt laser pulses with ultrathin targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    Laser-driven proton/ion acceleration is a rapidly developing research field attractive for both fundamental physics and applications such as hadron therapy, radiography, inertial confinement fusion, and nuclear/particle physics. Laser-driven proton/ion beams, compared to those obtained in conventional accelerators, have outstanding features such as low emittance, small source size, ultra-short duration and huge acceleration gradient of ∼1 MeV μm-1. We report proton acceleration from ultrathin polymer targets irradiated with linearly polarized, 30-fs, 1-PW Ti:sapphire laser pulses. A maximum proton energy of 45 MeV with a broad and modulated profile was obtained when a 10-nm-thick target was irradiated at a laser intensity of 3.3 × 1020 W/cm2. The transition from slow (I1/2) to fast scaling (I) of maximum proton energy with respect to laser intensity I was observed and explained by the hybrid acceleration mechanism including target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration in the acceleration stage and Coulomb-explosion-assisted free expansion in the post acceleration stage.

  2. Development of a sub-petawatt ultrashort laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Qihua; Su, Jingqin; Xie, Na; Jiang, Dongbin; Zhou, Kainan; Huang, Xiaojun; Zeng, Xiaoming; Guo, Yi; Sun, Li; Li, Qing

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the development of a sub-petawatt ultrashort laser facility, i.e. the upgraded super intense laser for experiment on the extremes (SILEX-I). The facility is a multi-stage Ti:sapphire chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system. Cross-polarized wave generation was used to improve the temporal contrast. An adaptive optical system was utilized to correct wavefront aberrations and to improve focusability before each shot. After upgrading, the maximum energy is 20.1 J, the recompressed pulse width is 26.8 fs and the peak power is up to 750 TW. The temporal contrast is around 109. The on-target focal spot size (full width at half maximum (FWHM)) is Φ6.5 μm and the focused intensity is greater than 4x1020 W/cm2.

  3. Fiber laser front end for high energy petawatt laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H; Mitchell, S; Drobshoff, A; Beach, R J; Siders, C; Lucianetti, A; Crane, J K; Barty, C J

    2006-06-15

    We are developing a fiber laser front end suitable for high energy petawatt laser systems on large glass lasers such as NIF. The front end includes generation of the pulses in a fiber mode-locked oscillator, amplification and pulse cleaning, stretching of the pulses to >3ns, dispersion trimming, timing, fiber transport of the pulses to the main laser bay and amplification of the pulses to an injection energy of 150 {micro}J. We will discuss current status of our work including data from packaged components. Design detail such as how the system addresses pulse contrast, dispersion trimming and pulse width adjustment and impact of B-integral on the pulse amplification will be discussed. A schematic of the fiber laser system we are constructing is shown in figure 1 below. A 40MHz packaged mode-locked fiber oscillator produces {approx}1nJ pulses which are phase locked to a 10MHz reference clock. These pulses are down selected to 100kHz and then amplified while still compressed. The amplified compressed pulses are sent through a non-linear polarization rotation based pulse cleaner to remove background amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The pulses are then stretched by a chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) and then sent through a splitter. The splitter splits the signal into two beams. (From this point we follow only one beam as the other follows an identical path.) The pulses are sent through a pulse tweaker that trims dispersion imbalances between the final large optics compressor and the CFBG. The pulse tweaker also permits the dispersion of the system to be adjusted for the purpose of controlling the final pulse width. Fine scale timing between the two beam lines can also be adjusted in the tweaker. A large mode area photonic crystal single polarization fiber is used to transport the pulses from the master oscillator room to the main laser bay. The pulses are then amplified a two stage fiber amplifier to 150mJ. These pulses are then launched into the main amplifier

  4. Preparation For Laser Wakefield Experiments Driven by the Texas Petawatt Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S. A.; Kalmykov, S.; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Henderson, W.; Dong, P.; Gao, X.; Sanders, J. C.; Wang, X.; Shvets, G.; Ditmire, T.; Downer, M.

    2009-01-22

    Laboratories around the world are planning petawatt laser driven experiments. The Texas petawatt laser offers the ability to demonstrate laser wake field acceleration (LWFA) in a unique regime with pulse duration ({approx}160 fs) shorter than other petawatt scale systems currently in operation or under development. By focusing the 1.25 PW, 200 J, 160 fs pulses to peak intensity {approx}10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, multi-GeV electron bunches can be produced from a low density He gas jet. The rarefied plasma density (5x10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) required for near-resonant LWFA minimizes plasma lensing and offers long dephasing length for electron acceleration over distances ({approx}10 cm) exceeding the Rayleigh range. Because of the high power, the laser can be focused to a spot (r{sub 0}{approx}100 microns) greater than the plasma wavelength (r{sub 0}>{lambda}{sub p}), thus minimizing radial propagation effects. Together these properties enable the laser pulse to self-guide without the use of a preformed channel lending simplicity and stability to the overall acceleration process. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show the laser experiences self-focusing which, because of ultrashort pulse duration, does not lead to a collapse of the wakefield and can generate over 3 GeV electron energy. The presented material will include details of initial measurements of the Texas petawatt laser system, simulations of laser wakefield acceleration for the given laser parameters and the experimental setup currently under construction.

  5. Generation of high-quality petawatt pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mourou, G; Bado, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    CPA sources need a front-end capable of generating very short seed pulses. To meet this requirement, present CPA sources rely on actively modelocked solid-state oscillators used in conjunction with non-linear fiber stages. This approach generates pulses with a residual frequency chirp, resulting in a limited peak-to-background intensity contrast ratio. The availability of an oscillator capable of producing directly (i.e. without fiber stage) picosecond or sub-picosecond pulses would significantly improve the quality of CPA sources. We have pursued different approaches to replace the standard modelocked oscillator front-end. In an initial phase, we investigated the possible use of Additive Pulse Modelocking (APM) color-center lasers as oscillators for CPA Nd:glass sources. Lately we have developed a Ti:Sapphire modelocked oscillator operating in the one-micron range. In order to generate pulses with very high peak to background contrast ratio, we have built a non-linear coupled-cavity oscillator generating 200-fs pulses. This color-center laser operates in the 1.5--1.6 micron range. A diagram of the oscillator is shown in Fig. 1. The laser is pumped with a modelocked Nd:YAG source. Both KCl and NaCl crystals were tested as gain media. NaCl was found to have a larger tuning range and to generate a higher average power (up to 150 mW). When synchronously mode-locked, the color-center generates pulses in the 10--20 ps range. Once interferometrically coupled to non-linear external-cavity, this oscillator produces very short pulses (85 to 260 fs). This oscillator was first operated with a 2 mm birefringent plate. 85 fs, near transform-limited pulses were generated at 1.54 micron. As the laser was tuned to longer wavelength, the pulse duration increased, as well as the bandwidth-duration product. With a 4 mm birefringent plate, 125 fs, transform-limited pulses were generated over the full tuning range.

  6. Selective deuterium ion acceleration using the Vulcan petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krygier, A. G.; Morrison, J. T.; Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Clarke, R.; Fuchs, J.; Green, A.; Jung, D.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Notley, M.; Oliver, M.; Roth, M.; Vassura, L.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Freeman, R. R.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the successful demonstration of selective acceleration of deuterium ions by target-normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) with a high-energy petawatt laser. TNSA typically produces a multi-species ion beam that originates from the intrinsic hydrocarbon and water vapor contaminants on the target surface. Using the method first developed by Morrison et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 030707 (2012)], an ion beam with >99% deuterium ions and peak energy 14 MeV/nucleon is produced with a 200 J, 700 fs, > 10 20 W / cm 2 laser pulse by cryogenically freezing heavy water (D2O) vapor onto the rear surface of the target prior to the shot. Within the range of our detectors (0°-8.5°), we find laser-to-deuterium-ion energy conversion efficiency of 4.3% above 0.7 MeV/nucleon while a conservative estimate of the total beam gives a conversion efficiency of 9.4%.

  7. Multilayer Dielectric Gratings for Petawatt-Class Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J A; Molander, W; Komashko, A M; Barty, C P J

    2003-12-03

    Existing Petawatt class lasers today based on Nd:glass architectures operating at nominally 500 J, 0.5 ps use meter-scale aperture, gold-overcoated master photoresist gratings to compress the amplified chirped pulse. Many lasers operating in the >lkJ, >Ips regime are in the planning stages around the world. These will require multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings to handle larger peak powers than can be accommodated with gold gratings. Models of the electric field distribution in the solid material of these gratings suggest that high aspect-ratio structures used at high incidence angles will have better laser damage resistance. New tooling for transfer etching these submicron-grating patterns and for nondestructive critical-dimension measurement of these features on meter-scale substrates will be described.

  8. Integrated Laser-Target Interaction Experiments on the RAL Petawatt Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, P K; Key, M H; Mackinnon, A J; Berry, R; Borghesi, M; Chambers, D M; Chen, H; Clarke, R; Damian, C; Eagleton, R; Freeman, R; Glenzer, S; Gregori, G; Heathcote, R; Hey, D; Izumi, N; Kar, S; King, J; Nikroo, A; Niles, A; Park, H S; Pasley, J; Patel, N; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R A; Steinman, D; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Town, R; Van Maren, R; Theobald, W; Wilks, S C; Zhang, B

    2006-10-11

    Since the construction of the first Petawatt laser on the Nova laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory we are witnessing the emergence of similar Petawatt-class laser systems at laboratories all around the world. This new generation of lasers, able to deliver several hundred joules of energy in a sub-picosecond pulse, has enabled a host of new discoveries to be made and continues to provide a valuable tool to explore new regimes in relativistic laser-plasma physics--encompassing high energy X-rays and -rays, relativistic electrons, intense ion beams, and superstrong magnetic fields. The coupling in the near-future of multi-kiloJoule Petawatt-class lasers with large-scale fusion lasers.including the NIF and Omega EP (US), LIL (France), and FIREX (Japan)--will further expand opportunities in fast ignition, high energy X-ray radiography, and high energy density physics research. The 500 J Petawatt laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory is currently the highest energy short-pulse laser in the world. In this paper we describe a recent experimental campaign carried out on the facility. The campaign, performed by a large collaborative team from eight different laboratories, was designed to study a variety of relativistic laser-interaction phenomena including laser absorption, fast electron transport, proton heating, and high-brightness x-ray generation. The wide scope of the experiment necessitated the deployment of a very large set of diagnostics--in total twenty-five separate instruments. In order to obtain the most comprehensive set of measurements all twenty-five diagnostics were fielded simultaneously on every shot.

  9. High-Energy Petawatt Capability for the Omega Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Waxer, L.J.; Maywar, D.N.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Loucks, S.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2005-07-25

    The 60-beam Omega laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) has been a workhorse on the frontier of laser fusion and high-energy-density physics for more than a decade. LLE scientists are currently extending the performance of this unique, direct-drive laser system by adding high-energy petawatt capabilities.

  10. Laser Wakefield Acceleration in the PetaWatt Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsouleas, Tom; Tsung, Frank; Mori, Warren

    2002-11-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration with multi-terawatt lasers has demonstrated impressive results in experiments around the world-- e.g., energy gains up to 200 MeV in mm-scale gas jets. With the prospects good for a number of petawatt class lasers in the near future, we examine with 2-D and 3-D PIC simulations the potential energy gain and new physics of laser wakefield acceleration in this regime. Prospects for producing GeV electron beams in underdense plasmas will be described. In addition, the differences in physics between terawatt and petawatt regimes will be explored. Preliminary results indicate that there are two acceleration stages in the petawatt regime -- with the early electrons dephasing due to elongation of the laser wake as the laser pump evolves. The later stage produces a long beam of electrons several times the initial plasma wake wavelength with a fairly defined energy in the GeV range.

  11. Characterization of the backscattered radiation from petawatt laser matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, Edwina D.; Musgrave, Ian O.; Green, James; Heathcote, Robert; Lancaster, Kate L.; Mendes, Cedric; Hawkes, Steve J.; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Pepler, Dave A

    2008-06-20

    The development of high peak power and energy laser systems require the assurance that any backscattered radiation will not lead to damage of the laser system. We present the characterization of the backscattered radiation for different target types and conditions at petawatt power levels and intensities (>10{sup 20}W/cm{sup 2}). We observe that radiation is generated between 700 and 900 nm, as well as the expected self emission and laser fundamental. The percentage of the incident light backscattered reduces as a function of the incident energy and is typically <1% for petawatt laser interactions.

  12. Alignment of a petawatt-class pulse compressor with the third-order dispersion completely compensated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yanlei; Zhou, Kainan; Wu, Zhaohui; Wang, Xiao; Xie, Na; Su, Jingqin; Zeng, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    It is necessary to eliminate third-order dispersion to acquire an ultrashort pulse of less than 30 fs. We demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the alignment of a petawatt-class laser compressor using the equiphase lines in the spatial and spectral interference patterns. Third-order dispersion has been completely eliminated and a Fourier-transform-limited pulsewidth of 19.6 fs has been approached.

  13. Simulations of the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with dense Z-pinch plasmas : final report LDRD 39670.

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Dale Robert; MacFarlane, Joseph John; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Campbell, Robert B.

    2004-11-01

    We have studied the feasibility of using the 3D fully electromagnetic implicit hybrid particle code LSP (Large Scale Plasma) to study laser plasma interactions with dense, compressed plasmas like those created with Z, and which might be created with the planned ZR. We have determined that with the proper additional physics and numerical algorithms developed during the LDRD period, LSP was transformed into a unique platform for studying such interactions. Its uniqueness stems from its ability to consider realistic compressed densities and low initial target temperatures (if required), an ability that conventional PIC codes do not possess. Through several test cases, validations, and applications to next generation machines described in this report, we have established the suitability of the code to look at fast ignition issues for ZR, as well as other high-density laser plasma interaction problems relevant to the HEDP program at Sandia (e.g. backlighting).

  14. Multi-GeV electron acceleration driven by the Texas Petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Du, D.; Yi, S. A.; D'Avignon, E.; Kalmykov, S.; Reed, S.; Henderson, W.; Dong, P.; Zgadzaj, R.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Ditmire, T.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M.

    2010-03-01

    We present the preparation for high energy (multi-GeV) electron generation in underdense plasmas interacting with 1PW, 150fs Texas Petawatt laser pulses. Electron laser wakefield acceleration experiments have demonstrated that 1GeV electron beams can be produced with multi-TW class laser systems. Scaling laws and simulations have predicted that 3-10GeV electrons can be generated with a short pulse PW laser system without any external guiding mechanism. The Texas Petawatt system has an F /40 focusing geometry, which along with laser self-guiding creates a long laser plasma interaction length while still maintaining intensity above 10^19W/cm^2. This configuration also creates an opportunity to ``visualize'' the plasma wakefield structures using the single shot frequency-domain holography (FDH) technique. This presentation includes the Texas Petawatt laser, laser wakefield experimental setup, plasma diagnostic setup and anticipated preliminary experimental results during 2010. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of laser wakefield electron acceleration and the FDH diagnostic are also presented.

  15. Development of the PETawatt Aquitaine Laser system and new perspectives in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Koenig, M.; Miquel, J. L.; Ducret, J. E.; d'Humieres, E.; Hulin, S.; Caron, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolai, Ph; Tikhonchuk, V.; Serani, L.; Blanchot, N.; Raffestin, D.; Thfoin-Lantuejoul, I.; Rosse, B.; Reverdin, C.; Duval, A.; Laniesse, F.; Chancé, A.; Dubreuil, D.; Gastineau, B.; Guillard, J. C.; Harrault, F.; Lebœuf, D.; Le Ster, J.-M.; Pès, C.; Toussaint, J.-C.; Leboeuf, X.; Lecherbourg, L.; Szabo, C. I.; Dubois, J.-L.; Lubrano-Lavaderci, F.

    2014-05-01

    The paper describes the preparation of the short-pulse high-energy laser PETawatt Aquitaine Laser (PETAL), which will be coupled to the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) laser of CEA. The LMJ/PETAL facility will be opened for the academic access of European researchers. In parallel, diagnostics are being developed within the PETAL + project and many physical problems are being addressed ranging from the study of the problems of radiation generation and activation issues to the problem of generation of large electromagnetic pulses.

  16. High energy mode locked fiber oscillators for high contrast, high energy petawatt laser seed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; An, J; Kim, D; Barty, C J

    2006-06-15

    In a high-energy petawatt laser beam line the ASE pulse contrast is directly related to the total laser gain. Thus a more energetic input pulse will result in increased pulse contrast at the target. We have developed a mode-locked fiber laser with high quality pulses and energies exceeding 25nJ. We believe this 25nJ result is scalable to higher energies. This oscillator has no intra-cavity dispersion compensation, which yields an extremely simple, and elegant laser configuration. We will discuss the design of this laser, our most recent results and characterization of all the key parameters relevant to it use as a seed laser. Our oscillator is a ring cavity mode-locked fiber laser [1]. These lasers operate in a self-similar pulse propagation regime characterized by a spectrum that is almost square. This mode was found theoretically [2] to occur only in the positive dispersion regime. Further increasing positive dispersion should lead to increasing pulse energy [2]. We established that the positive dispersion required for high-energy operation was approximately that of 2m of fiber. To this end, we constructed a laser cavity similar to [1], but with no gratings and only 2m of fiber, which we cladding pumped in order to ensure sufficient pump power was available to achieve mode-locked operation. A schematic of the laser is shown in figure 1 below. This laser produced low noise 25nJ pulses with a broad self similar spectrum (figure 2) and pulses that could be de-chirped to <100fs (figure 3). Pulse contrast is important in peta-watt laser systems. A major contributor to pulse contrast is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which is proportional to the gain in the laser chain. As the oscillator strength is increased, the required gain to reach 1PW pulses is decreased, reducing ASE and improving pulse contrast. We believe these lasers can be scaled in a stable fashion to pulse energies as high as 100nJ and have in fact seen 60nJ briefly in our lab, which is work still

  17. Selective deuterium ion acceleration using the Vulcan petawatt laser

    SciTech Connect

    Krygier, A. G.; Morrison, J. T.; Kar, S. Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Jung, D.; Clarke, R.; Notley, M.; Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Freeman, R. R.

    2015-05-15

    We report on the successful demonstration of selective acceleration of deuterium ions by target-normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) with a high-energy petawatt laser. TNSA typically produces a multi-species ion beam that originates from the intrinsic hydrocarbon and water vapor contaminants on the target surface. Using the method first developed by Morrison et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 030707 (2012)], an ion beam with >99% deuterium ions and peak energy 14 MeV/nucleon is produced with a 200 J, 700 fs, >10{sup 20}W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse by cryogenically freezing heavy water (D{sub 2}O) vapor onto the rear surface of the target prior to the shot. Within the range of our detectors (0°–8.5°), we find laser-to-deuterium-ion energy conversion efficiency of 4.3% above 0.7 MeV/nucleon while a conservative estimate of the total beam gives a conversion efficiency of 9.4%.

  18. Measurements of electron and proton heating temperatures from extreme-ultraviolet light images at 68 eV in petawatt laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Peimin; Zhang, B.; Key, M. H.; Hatchett, S. P.; Barbee, T.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K.; Hey, D.; King, J. A.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Snavely, R. A.; Stephens, R. B.

    2006-11-15

    A 68 eV extreme-ultraviolet light imaging diagnostic measures short pulse isochoric heating by electrons and protons in petawatt laser experiments. Temperatures are deduced from the absolute intensities and comparison with modeling using a radiation hydrodynamics code.

  19. OMEGA EP: High-Energy Petawatt Capability for the OMEGA Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.H.; Waxer, L.J.; Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Bromage, J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Kessler, T.J.; Loucks, S.J.; Maywar, D.N.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Oliver, J.B.; Rigatti, A.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Stoeckl, C.; Dalton, S.; Folnsbee, L.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jungquist, R.; Puth, J.; Shoup III, M.J.; Weiner, D.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-06-28

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a petawatt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. When completed, it will consist of four beamlines, each capable of producing up to 6.5 kJ at 351 nm in a 1 to 10 ns pulse. Two of the beamlines will produce up to 2.6 kJ in a pulse-width range of 1 to 100 ps at 1053 nm using chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). This paper reviews both the OMEGA EP performance objectives and the enabling technologies required to meet these goals.

  20. Production of Gratings for High-Energy Petawatt-Class Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H T; Carlson, T C; Hoaglan, C R; Nissen, J D; Aasen, M D; Peterson, J E; Jovanovic, I; Brewer, S W; Britten, J A

    2006-06-14

    At the time of this writing, we have manufactured and delivered more than 25 multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings from 470-800 mm in long aperture for pulse compression on Petawatt-class,1-micron laser systems being built at government and university facilities in the U.S and elsewhere. We present statistics of diffraction efficiency and its spatial uniformity, diffracted wavefront, and laser damage results on witness gratings. We also discuss yield, failure modes, and manufacturing improvements necessary to improve upon the current state of the art.

  1. Progress in fast ignitor research with the Nova petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Michael H.

    1997-11-01

    The concept of isochoric fast ignition developed at LLNL by Tabak et at [1] is of importance through its potential to give higher gain than isobaric central spark ignition and thereby to relax the driver efficiency required for inertial fusion energy . The physics of fast ignition is new and challenging involving strongly relativistic laser plasma interactions and transport of energy by MeV electrons where self generated magnetic fields may strongly modify the transport . A petawatt laser beam line developed by Perry et al [ 2] at the Nova facility has recently come into operation and is being deployed in a goal oriented program to evaluate fast ignition . This laser is an order of magnitude more energetic than comparable facilities elsewhere. Theory and modeling work with PIC and fluid codes is being used to guide and interpret the experiments [1] which are emphasizing characterization of the hot electron source from Ka fluorescence of buried layers and the heating produced at depth by hot electrons from X-ray spectroscopy and fusion yield of buried layers . A related study concerns the penetration of laser radiation by hole boring in supercritical density targets . [1] M Tabak J Hammer M E Glinsky W L Kruer S C Wilks J Woodworth E M Campbell M D Perry . Ignition and high gain with Ultra powerful lasers . Phys Plasmas, 1, 1626, (1994) [2] M. D. Perry, "Crossing the Petawatt Threshold" Science & Technology Review page 4, December 1996.

  2. Generation of multi-hundred petawatt pulses by resonant Raman amplification in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaohui; Zuo, Yanlei; Su, Jingqin; Liu, Lanqin; Zhang, Zhimeng; Li, Zhilin; Jiao, Zhihong; Wei, Xiaofeng

    2015-03-01

    Backward Raman amplification (BRA) in plasma has been proposed to produce overcritical high-power laser pulses. In this paper, an application based on CPA and BRA is promoted to generate multi-hundred petawatt laser pulses. The compression of short-wavelength (around 351 nm) and picosecond pulses has been proposed for high output intensity and short plasma length. This principle was employed in an application and a scheme is demonstrated using a full-kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The PIC code is also used to optimize key parameters in the resonant interaction. According to the simulated result using optimized parameters, the output seed fluence is amplified to 6.5 kJ/cm2 and the full-width at half-maximum duration is compressed to 13 fs, showing an energy transfer over 60%. Extending the result to the multidimensional case, a total energy of 3.9 kJ and a laser power of 300 PW are achievable, in a 0.6 cm2 interaction spot. This result is helpful for the improvement of high-energy density physics.

  3. Precision damage tests of multilayer dielectric gratings for high-energy petawatt lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Brown, C G; Stuart, B C; Molander, W; Nielsen, N; Wattellier, B; Britten, J; Pennington, D M; Barty, C J

    2004-11-08

    The next generation of high-energy petawatt (HEPW)-class lasers will utilize multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings for pulse compression due to their high efficiency and high damage threshold for picosecond pulses. We have developed a short-pulse damage test station for accurate determination of the damage threshold of the optics used on future HEPW lasers. The design and performance of the damage test laser source, based on a highly stable, high-beam-quality optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier, is presented. Our short-pulse damage measurement methodology and results are discussed. The damage initiation is attributed to multiphoton-induced avalanche ionization, strongly dependent on the electric field enhancement in the grating groove structure and surface defects. Measurement results of the dependence of damage threshold on the pulse width, angular dependence of damage threshold of diffraction gratings, and an investigation of short-pulse conditioning effects are presented. We report record >4 J/cm{sup 2} right section surface damage thresholds obtained on multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings at 76.5 incidence angles for 10-ps pulses.

  4. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  5. Measuring 8–250 ps short pulses using a high-speed streak camera on kilojoule, petawatt-class laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, J.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Boni, R.; Bromage, J.; Hill, E.

    2013-07-15

    Short-pulse measurements using a streak camera are sensitive to space-charge broadening, which depends on the pulse duration and shape, and on the uniformity of photocathode illumination. An anamorphic-diffuser-based beam-homogenizing system and a space-charge-broadening calibration method were developed to accurately measure short pulses using an optical streak camera. This approach provides a more-uniform streak image and enables one to characterize space-charge-induced pulse-broadening effects.

  6. Production of exotic states of matter with the use of X-rays generated by focusing a petawatt laser pulse onto a solid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz (Jr. , S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya; Fortov, V. E.; Skobelev, I. Yu

    2014-07-01

    The possibility is discussed of using optical laser radiation with an intensity of >1020~W cm -2 to create an ultraintense X-ray source capable of producing polychromatic radiation with a power flux of 1019~W cm -2 or higher. X-ray radiation of so high an intensity permits not only transforming a condensed matter of the target into a plasma state but also obtaining an exotic plasma state with a high density of hollow ions. Currently not yet in wide use and available in only a few laboratories in the world, lasers with a radiation intensity of about 1020~W cm -2 are more compact and less expensive than free-electron X-ray lasers or lasers used for the indirect heating of fusion targets. The source under discussion can produce by far higher X-ray intensities than plasma X-ray lasers of a similar scale.

  7. LULI 100-TW Ti:sapphire/Nd:glass laser: a first step toward a high-performance petawatt facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jiping; Descamps, Denise; Audebert, Patrick; Baton, S. D.; Paillard, J. L.; Pesme, Denis; Michard, Alain; Sautivet, A. M.; Timsit, H.; Migus, Arnold

    1999-07-01

    We have implemented a Ti:sapphire/mixed Nd:glass laser syste at LULI producing sub-picosecond pulses in the 100 TW power range. Focusing to a 1.5-times diffraction-limited spot results in a peak intensity on target over 1019 W/cm2. Significant experiments in particle acceleration, X-ray laser and other basic plasma physics researchers have been carried out since this implementation. This paper details the characteristics of the present set-up and the main path of progress towards a high performance petawatt facility.

  8. Simulations of radiation pressure ion acceleration with the VEGA Petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhausen, Luca C.; Torres, Ricardo; Conejero Jarque, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The Spanish Pulsed Laser Centre (CLPU) is a new high-power laser facility for users. Its main system, VEGA, is a CPA Ti:Sapphire laser which, in its final phase, will be able to reach Petawatt peak powers in pulses of 30 fs with a pulse contrast of 1 :1010 at 1 ps. The extremely low level of pre-pulse intensity makes this system ideally suited for studying the laser interaction with ultrathin targets. We have used the particle-in-cell (PIC) code OSIRIS to carry out 2D simulations of the acceleration of ions from ultrathin solid targets under the unique conditions provided by VEGA, with laser intensities up to 1022 W cm-2 impinging normally on 20 - 60 nm thick overdense plasmas, with different polarizations and pre-plasma scale lengths. We show how signatures of the radiation pressure-dominated regime, such as layer compression and bunch formation, are only present with circular polarization. By passively shaping the density gradient of the plasma, we demonstrate an enhancement in peak energy up to tens of MeV and monoenergetic features. On the contrary linear polarization at the same intensity level causes the target to blow up, resulting in much lower energies and broader spectra. One limiting factor of Radiation Pressure Acceleration is the development of Rayleigh-Taylor like instabilities at the interface of the plasma and photon fluid. This results in the formation of bubbles in the spatial profile of laser-accelerated proton beams. These structures were previously evidenced both experimentally and theoretically. We have performed 2D simulations to characterize this bubble-like structure and report on the dependency on laser and target parameters.

  9. Simulations of ion acceleration from ultrathin targets with the VEGA petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhausen, Luca C.; Torres, Ricardo; Conejero Jarque, Enrique

    2015-05-01

    The Spanish Pulsed Laser Centre (CLPU) is a new high-power laser facility for users. Its main system, VEGA, is a CPA Ti:Sapphire laser which, in its final phase, will be able to reach petawatt peak powers in pulses of 30 fs with a pulse contrast of 1 : 1010 at 1 ps. The extremely low level of pre-pulse intensity makes this system ideally suited for studying the laser interaction with ultrathin targets. We have used the particle-in-cell (PIC) code OSIRIS to carry out 2D simulations of the acceleration of ions from ultrathin solid targets under the unique conditions provided by VEGA, with laser intensities up to 1022Wcm-2 impinging normally on 5 - 40 nm thick overdense plasmas, with different polarizations and pre-plasma scale lengths. We show how signatures of the radiation pressure dominated regime, such as layer compression and bunch formation, are only present with circular polarization. By passively shaping the density gradient of the plasma, we demonstrate an enhancement in peak energy up to tens of MeV and monoenergetic features. On the contrary linear polarization at the same intensity level causes the target to blow up, resulting in much lower energies and broader spectra. One limiting factor of Radiation Pressure Acceleration is the development of Rayleigh-Taylor like instabilities at the interface of the plasma and photon fluid. This results in the formation of bubbles in the spatial profile of laser-accelerated proton beams. These structures were previously evidenced both experimentally and theoretically. We have performed 2D simulations to characterize this bubble-like structure and report on the dependency on laser and target parameters.

  10. All Fiber Technology for High-Energy Petawatt Front End Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Liao, Z M; Jovanovic, I; Wattellier, B; Beach, R; Payne, S A; Barty, C P J

    2003-09-05

    We are developing an all fiber front end for the next generation high-energy petawatt (HEPW) laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The ultimate goal of the LLNL HEPW effort is to generate 5-kJ pulses capable of compression to 5ps at 1053nm, enabling advanced x-ray backlighters and possible demonstration of fast ignition. We discuss the front-end of the laser design from the fiber master oscillator, which generates the mode-locked 20nm bandwidth initial pulses through the 10mJ output of the large flattened mode (LFM) fiber amplifier. Development of an all fiber front end requires technological breakthroughs in the key areas of the master oscillator and fiber amplification. Chirped pulse amplification in optical fibers has been demonstrated to 1mJ. Further increase is limited by the onset of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). We have recently demonstrated a new flattened mode fiber technology, which reduces peak power for a given energy and thus the onset of SRS. Controlled experiments with 1st generation fibers yielded 0.5mJ of energy while significantly increasing the point at which nonlinear optical effects degrade the amplified pulse. In this paper we will discuss our efforts to extend this work to greater than 20mJ using our large flattened mode fiber amplifier.

  11. A Focal-Spot Diagnostic for On-Shot Characterization of High-Energy Petawatt Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bromage, J.; Bahk, S.-W.; Irwin, D.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Pruyne, A.; Millecchia, M.; Moore, M.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2008-10-07

    An on-shot focal-spot diagnostic for characterizing high-energy, petawatt-class laser systems is presented. Accurate measurements at full energy are demonstrated using high-resolution wavefront sensing in combination with techniques to calibrate on-shot measurements with low-power sample beams. Results are shown for full-energy activation shots of the OMEGA EP Laser System.

  12. Dense blocks of energetic ions driven by multi-petawatt lasers.

    PubMed

    Weng, S M; Liu, M; Sheng, Z M; Murakami, M; Chen, M; Yu, L L; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ion accelerators have the advantages of compact size, high density, and short bunch duration over conventional accelerators. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to simultaneously enhance the yield and quality of laser-driven ion beams for practical applications. Here we propose a scheme to address this challenge via the use of emerging multi-petawatt lasers and a density-modulated target. The density-modulated target permits its ions to be uniformly accelerated as a dense block by laser radiation pressure. In addition, the beam quality of the accelerated ions is remarkably improved by embedding the target in a thick enough substrate, which suppresses hot electron refluxing and thus alleviates plasma heating. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that almost all ions in a solid-density plasma of a few microns can be uniformly accelerated to about 25% of the speed of light by a laser pulse at an intensity around 10(22) W/cm(2). The resulting dense block of energetic ions may drive fusion ignition and more generally create matter with unprecedented high energy density. PMID:26924793

  13. Dense blocks of energetic ions driven by multi-petawatt lasers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, S. M.; Liu, M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.; Chen, M.; Yu, L. L.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ion accelerators have the advantages of compact size, high density, and short bunch duration over conventional accelerators. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to simultaneously enhance the yield and quality of laser-driven ion beams for practical applications. Here we propose a scheme to address this challenge via the use of emerging multi-petawatt lasers and a density-modulated target. The density-modulated target permits its ions to be uniformly accelerated as a dense block by laser radiation pressure. In addition, the beam quality of the accelerated ions is remarkably improved by embedding the target in a thick enough substrate, which suppresses hot electron refluxing and thus alleviates plasma heating. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that almost all ions in a solid-density plasma of a few microns can be uniformly accelerated to about 25% of the speed of light by a laser pulse at an intensity around 1022 W/cm2. The resulting dense block of energetic ions may drive fusion ignition and more generally create matter with unprecedented high energy density. PMID:26924793

  14. Dense blocks of energetic ions driven by multi-petawatt lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, S. M.; Liu, M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.; Chen, M.; Yu, L. L.; Zhang, J.

    2016-02-01

    Laser-driven ion accelerators have the advantages of compact size, high density, and short bunch duration over conventional accelerators. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to simultaneously enhance the yield and quality of laser-driven ion beams for practical applications. Here we propose a scheme to address this challenge via the use of emerging multi-petawatt lasers and a density-modulated target. The density-modulated target permits its ions to be uniformly accelerated as a dense block by laser radiation pressure. In addition, the beam quality of the accelerated ions is remarkably improved by embedding the target in a thick enough substrate, which suppresses hot electron refluxing and thus alleviates plasma heating. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that almost all ions in a solid-density plasma of a few microns can be uniformly accelerated to about 25% of the speed of light by a laser pulse at an intensity around 1022 W/cm2. The resulting dense block of energetic ions may drive fusion ignition and more generally create matter with unprecedented high energy density.

  15. Ultra-intense Pair Creation using the Texas Petawatt Laser and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Edison; Henderson, Alexander; Clarke, Taylor; Lo, Willie; Chaguine, Petr; Dyer, Gilliss; Riley, Nathan; Serratto, Kristina; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd

    2014-10-01

    Pair plasmas and intense gamma-ray sources are ubiquitous in the high-energy universe, from pulser winds to gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Their study can be greatly enhanced if such sources can be recreated in the laboratory under controlled conditions. In 2012 and 2013, a joint Rice-University of Texas team performed over 130 laser shots on thick gold and platinum targets using the 100 Joule Texas Petawatt Laser in Austin. The laser intensity of many shots exceeded 1021 W.cm-2 with pulses as short as 130 fs. These experiments probe a new extreme regime of ultra-intense laser - high-Z solid target interactions never achieved before. In addition to creating copious pairs with the highest density (>1015/cc) and emergent e +/e- ratio exceeding 20% in many shots, these experiments also created the highest density multi-MeV gamma-rays, comparable in absolute numbers to those found inside a gamma-ray burst (GRB). Potential applications of such intense pair and gamma-ray sources to laboratory astrophysics and innovative technologies will be discussed. Work supported by DOE HEDLP program.

  16. ICAN as a new laser paradigm for high energy, high average power femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocklesby, W. S.; Nilsson, J.; Schreiber, T.; Limpert, J.; Brignon, A.; Bourderionnet, J.; Lombard, L.; Michau, V.; Hanna, M.; Zaouter, Y.; Tajima, T.; Mourou, Gérard

    2014-05-01

    The application of petawatt lasers to scientific and technological problems is advancing rapidly. The usefulness of these applications will depend on being able to produce petawatt pulses at much higher repetition rates than is presently possible. The International Coherent Amplification Network (ICAN) consortium seeks to design high repetition rate petawatt lasers using large scale coherent beam combination of femtosecond pulse amplifiers built from optical fibres. This combination of technologies has the potential to overcome many of the hurdles to high energy, high average power pulsed lasers, opening up applications and meeting societal challenges.

  17. Short-pulse Laser Capability on the Mercury Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C; Armstrong, P; Bayramian, A; Barty, C J; Bibeau, C; Britten, J; Caird, J; Campbell, R; Chai, B; Crane, J; Cross, R; Erlandson, A; Fei, Y; Freitas, B; Jovanovic, I; Liao, Z; Molander, B; Schaffers, K; Stuart, B; Sutton, S; Ladran, T; Telford, S; Thelin, P; Utterback, E

    2006-06-22

    Applications using high energy ''petawatt-class'' laser drivers operating at repetition rates beyond 0.01 Hz are only now being envisioned. The Mercury laser system is designed to operate at 100 J/pulse at 10 Hz. We investigate the potential of configuring the Mercury laser to produce a rep-rated, ''petawatt-class'' source. The Mercury laser is a prototype of a high energy, high repetition rate source (100 J, 10 Hz). The design of the Mercury laser is based on the ability to scale in energy through scaling in aperture. Mercury is one of several 100 J, high repetition rate (10 Hz) lasers sources currently under development (HALNA, LUCIA, POLARIS). We examine the possibility of using Mercury as a pump source for a high irradiance ''petawatt-class'' source: either as a pump laser for an average power Ti:Sapphire laser, or as a pump laser for OPCPA based on YCa{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (YCOB), ideally producing a source approaching 30 J /30 fs /10 Hz--a high repetition rate petawatt. A comparison of the two systems with nominal configurations and efficiencies is shown in Table 1.

  18. Calibration of the neutron detectors for the cluster fusion experiment on the Texas Petawatt Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Dyer, G.; Rougk, J.; Kim, I.; McCormick, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2012-06-15

    Three types of neutron detectors (plastic scintillation detectors, indium activation detectors, and CR-39 track detectors) were calibrated for the measurement of 2.45 MeV DD fusion neutron yields from the deuterium cluster fusion experiment on the Texas Petawatt Laser. A Cf-252 neutron source and 2.45 MeV fusion neutrons generated from laser-cluster interaction were used as neutron sources. The scintillation detectors were calibrated such that they can detect up to 10{sup 8} DD fusion neutrons per shot in current mode under high electromagnetic pulse environments. Indium activation detectors successfully measured neutron yields as low as 10{sup 4} per shot and up to 10{sup 11} neutrons. The use of a Cf-252 neutron source allowed cross calibration of CR-39 and indium activation detectors at high neutron yields ({approx}10{sup 11}). The CR-39 detectors provided consistent measurements of the total neutron yield of Cf-252 when a modified detection efficiency of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} was used. The combined use of all three detectors allowed for a detection range of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 11} neutrons per shot.

  19. Characterizing relativistic petawatt-laser-generated particle beams on Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Matthew; Allan, Peter; Brown, Colin; Edwards, Ray; Gumbrell, Edward; Hoarty, David; Hobbs, Lauren; James, Steven; Chen, Hui; Hazi, Andy; Marley, Edward; Shepherd, Ronnie; Williams, Jackson

    2014-10-01

    The Orion laser facility at AWE has been used to irradiate a variety of metal and plastic targets with up to 600 J of 1.054 μm laser light at pulse lengths ranging from 0.5 ps to 8 ps and intensities above 1021 W/cm2. The particle beams produced from these targets include considerable numbers of relativistic electrons (up to 250 MeV) as well as positrons, protons and heavy ions (up to 60 MeV). Magnetic spectrometers, radiochromic film stacks and a Thomson parabola suggest strong sheath field acceleration of both positrons and ions, as well as very hot electron distributions (Thot >18 MeV) indicating efficient laser-plasma coupling at high intensities. Simultaneous proton radiography and heating have been accomplished on metal foils and foams, showing promise for diagnosing short-pulse laser-plasma interactions as well as fields within extended target objects. We report on the latest progress in charged particle diagnostics systems and experimental platforms on the Orion facility. Supporting work performed at LLNL under the auspices of the U.S. DoE under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. A focal-spot diagnostic for on-shot characterization of high-energy petawatt lasers.

    PubMed

    Bromage, J; Bahk, S-W; Irwin, D; Kwiatkowski, J; Pruyne, A; Millecchia, M; Moore, M; Zuegel, J D

    2008-10-13

    An on-shot focal-spot diagnostic for characterizing high-energy, petawatt-class laser systems is presented. Accurate measurements at full energy are demonstrated using high-resolution wavefront sensing in combination with techniques to calibrate on-shot measurements with low-power sample beams. Results are shown for full-energy activation shots of the OMEGA EP Laser System. PMID:18852765

  1. Contrast and Intensity upgrades to the Texas Petawatt laser for hadron generation and non-linear QED experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, Bjorn M.; Arefiev, Alexey; Ditmire, Todd; Donovan, Michael E.; Dyer, Gillis; Gaul, Erhard; Labun, Lance; Luedtke, Scott; Martinez, Mikael; McCarry, Edward; Stark, David; Pomerantz, Ishay; Tiwari, Ganesh; Toncian, Toma

    2015-11-01

    Advances in laser-based hadron generation, especially with respect to particle energy, as well as reaching the new regime of radiation dominated plasmas and non-linear QED, require laser fields of Petavolts per meter that preferably interact with very high density, overcritical plasmas. To achieve these conditions we are upgrading the Texas Petawatt Laser both respect to on-target laser intensity and laser-contrast, aiming to reach intensities of ~ 5x1022 W/cm2 and pulse contrast parameters allowing the interaction with overcritical, yet ultrathin, sub-micron targets. We will report on the planned experiments aimed at ion acceleration, neutron generation and the first experimental measurement of radiation reactions to motivate the chosen upgrade parameters. We will further report on the technical changes to the laser and present first measurements of the achieved intensity and contrast parameters. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's PULSE program (12-63-PULSE-FP014), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-14-1-0045) and the National Institute of Health SBIR.

  2. Compton MeV Gamma-ray Source on Texas Petawatt Laser-Driven GeV Electron Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph M.; Tsai, Hai-En; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Chang, Vincent; Fazel, Neil; Henderson, Watson; Downer, M. C.; Texas Petawatt Laser Team

    2015-11-01

    Compton Backscatter (CBS) from laser wakefield accelerated (LWFA) electron bunches is a promising compact, femtosecond (fs) source of tunable high-energy photons. CBS x-rays have been produced from LWFAs using two methods: (1) retro-reflection of the LWFA drive pulse via an in-line plasma mirror (PM); (2) scattering of a counter-propagating secondary pulse split from the drive pulse. Previously MeV photons were only demonstrated by the latter method, but the former method is self-aligning. Here, using the Texas Petawatt (TPW) laser and a self-aligned near-retro-reflecting PM, we generate bright CBS γ-rays with central energies higher than 10 MeV. The 100 μm focus of TPW delivers 100 J in 100 fs pulses, with intensity 6x1018 W/cm2 (a0 =1.5), to the entrance of a 6-cm long Helium gas cell. A thin, plastic PM immediately following the gas cell exit retro-reflects the LWFA driving pulse into the oncoming 0.5 - 2 GeV electron beam to produce a directional beam of γ-rays without significant bremsstrahlung background. A Pb-filter pack on a thick, pixelated, CsI(Tl) scintillator is used to estimate the spectrum via differential transmission and to observe the beam profile. Recorded beam profiles indicate a low divergence. Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin

  3. Blast wave diagnostic for the petawatt laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K. S., LLNL

    1998-06-03

    We report on a diagnostic to measure the trajectory of a blast wave propagating through a plastic target 400 {micro}m thick. This blast wave is generated by the irradiation of the front surface of the target with {approximately} 400 J of 1 {micro}m laser radiation in a 20 ps pulse focused to a {approximately} 50 {micro}m diameter spot, which produces an intensity in excess of 1O{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. These conditions approximate a point explosion and a blast wave is predicted to be generated with an initial pressure nearing 1 Gbar which decays as it travels approximately radially outward from the interaction region We have utilized streaked optical pyrometry of the blast front to determine its time of arrival at the rear surface of the target Applications of a self-similar Taylor-Sedov blast wave solution allows the amount of energy deposited to be estimated The experiment, LASNEX design simulations and initial results are discussed.

  4. Petawatt-laser direct heating of uniformly imploded deuterated-polystyrene shell target.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Akamatsu, Shin; Sakamoto, Wataru; Tanaka, Kazuo A; Kodama, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Watari, Takeshi; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    A uniformly imploded deuterated polystyrene (CD) shell target is fast-heated by a Petawatt (PW) laser without cone guide. The best illumination timing is found to be in a narrow region around 80+/-20 picoseconds from the onset of the stagnation phase, where thermal neutrons are enhanced four to five times by the PW laser of energy less than 10% of the implosion laser. The timing agrees with the timings of enhancement of the x-ray emission from the core and reduction of the bremsstrahlung radiation from scattered hot electrons. The PW laser, focused to the critical density point, generates the energetic electrons within as narrow an angle as 30 degrees , which then heats the imploded CD shell to enhance thermal neutrons. These results first demonstrate that the PW laser directly heats the imploded core without any conelike laser guide. PMID:15697731

  5. Observation of Synchrotron Radiation from Electrons Accelerated in a Petawatt-Laser-Generated Plasma Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kneip, S.; Nagel, S. R.; Bellei, C.; Dangor, A. E.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Nilson, P. M.; Willingale, L.; Najmudin, Z.; Bourgeois, N.; Marques, J. R.; Gopal, A.; Heathcote, R.; Maksimchuk, A.; Reed, S.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Rousse, A.; Tzoufras, M.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Krushelnick, K.

    2008-03-14

    The dynamics of plasma electrons in the focus of a petawatt laser beam are studied via measurements of their x-ray synchrotron radiation. With increasing laser intensity, a forward directed beam of x rays extending to 50 keV is observed. The measured x rays are well described in the synchrotron asymptotic limit of electrons oscillating in a plasma channel. The critical energy of the measured synchrotron spectrum is found to scale as the Maxwellian temperature of the simultaneously measured electron spectra. At low laser intensity transverse oscillations are negligible as the electrons are predominantly accelerated axially by the laser generated wakefield. At high laser intensity, electrons are directly accelerated by the laser and enter a highly radiative regime with up to 5% of their energy converted into x rays.

  6. Large-scale proton radiography with micrometer spatial resolution using femtosecond petawatt laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, H.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Yu, L. H.; Chu, Y. X.; Li, Y. Y.; Xu, T. J.; Zhang, H.; Zhai, S. H.; Leng, Y. X.; Liang, X. Y.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2015-10-01

    An image of dragonfly with many details is obtained by the fundamental property of the high-energy proton source on a femtosecond petawatt laser system. Equal imaging of the dragonfly and high spatial resolution on the micrometer scale are simultaneously obtained. The head, wing, leg, tail, and even the internal tissue structures are clearly mapped in detail by the proton beam. Experiments show that image blurring caused by multiple Coulomb scattering can be reduced to a certain extent and the spatial resolution can be increased by attaching the dragonfly to the RCFs, which is consistent with theoretical assumptions.

  7. Large-scale proton radiography with micrometer spatial resolution using femtosecond petawatt laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F. Zhang, H.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Yu, L. H.; Chu, Y. X.; Li, Y. Y.; Xu, T. J.; Zhang, H.; Zhai, S. H.; Leng, Y. X.; Liang, X. Y.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2015-10-15

    An image of dragonfly with many details is obtained by the fundamental property of the high-energy proton source on a femtosecond petawatt laser system. Equal imaging of the dragonfly and high spatial resolution on the micrometer scale are simultaneously obtained. The head, wing, leg, tail, and even the internal tissue structures are clearly mapped in detail by the proton beam. Experiments show that image blurring caused by multiple Coulomb scattering can be reduced to a certain extent and the spatial resolution can be increased by attaching the dragonfly to the RCFs, which is consistent with theoretical assumptions.

  8. Studies of the Relativistic Electron Source and Related Phenomena in Petawatt Laser Matter Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Cowen, T.E.; Hatchett, S.P.; Jenary, E.A.; Koch, J.A.; Langson, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lee, W.; Mackinnon, A.; Offenberger, A.A.; Perry, M.D.; Phillips, T.J.; Roth, M.; Sangster, T.C.; Singh, M.S.; Snavely, R.; Stoyer, M.A.; Wilks, S.C.; Yaskire, K.Y.

    1999-11-11

    The interaction of laser radiation with solid targets at 1 petawatt power and intensity up to 3 x 10{sup 20} Wcm{sup -2} has been studied with emphasis on relativistic electrons and high-energy ions. Secondary effects including Bremsstrahlung radiation, nuclear interactions and heating have been characterized. A collimated beam of protons with up to 55 MeV energy is emitted normal to the rear surface of thin targets and its characteristics and origin are discussed. The significance of the data for radiography, fast ignition and proton beam applications is summarized.

  9. Studies of the relativistic electron source and related phenomena in Petawatt Laser matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M H; Campbell, E M; Cowan, T E; Hatchett, S P; Henry, E A; Koch, J A; Landgon, A B; Lasinski, B F; Lee, R W; MacKinnon, A; Offenberger, A; Pennington, D M; Perry, M D; Sangster, T C; Yasuike, K; Snavely, R; Roth, M; Phillips, T W; Stoyer, M A; Wilks, S C; Singh, M S

    1999-09-27

    The interaction of laser radiation with solid targets at 1 petawatt power and intensity up to 3x10{sup 20} Wcm{sup -2} has been studied with emphasis on relativistic electrons and high energy ions. Secondary effects including Bremsstrahlung radiation, nuclear interactions and heating have been characterized. A collimated beam of protons with up to 55 MeV energy is emitted normal to the rear surface of thin targets and its characteristics and origin are discussed. The significance of the data for radiography, fast ignition and proton beam applications is summarized.

  10. High energy electrons, positrons and photonuclear reactions in petawatt laser-solid experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T E; Hunt, A W; Johnson, J; Perry, M D; Fountain, W; Hatchett, S; Key, M H; Kuehl, T; Parnell, T; Pennington, D M; Phillips, T W; Roth, M; Takahashi, Y; Wilks, S C

    1999-09-09

    The Petawatt laser at LLNL has opened a new regime of high-energy laser-matter interactions in which the quiver motion of plasma electrons is fully relativistic with energies extending well above the threshold for nuclear processes. We have observed that, in addition to the large flux of several MeV electrons ponderomotively expelled from the ultra-intense laser focus, there is a high energy component of electrons extending to -100 MeV, apparently from relativistic self-focusing and plasma acceleration in the underdense pre-formed plasma. The generation of hard bremsstrahlung cascade as these electrons traverse the solid target material, and the resulting photo-nuclear reactions, nuclear fission, and positron-electron pair production are described.

  11. Progress in fast ignitor research with the Nova petawatt laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T E; Hammel , B A; Hatchett, S P; Henry, E A; Key, M H; Kilkenny, J D; Koch, J A; Langdon, A B; Lasinski, B F; Lee, R W; Moody, J D; Mora, M J; Offenberger, A A; Pennington, D M; Perry, M D; Phillips, T J; Sangster, T C; Singh, M S; Stoyer, M A; Tabak, M; Tsukamoto, M; Wharton, K; Wilks, S C

    1998-11-10

    The physics of fast ignition is being studied using a petawatt laser facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Performance of the PW laser with deformable mirror wavefront control giving intensities up to 3x10{sup 20} Wcm{sup {minus}2} is described. Measurements of the efficiency of conversion of laser energy to relativistic electrons and of their energy spectrum and angular distribution including an observed narrow beam angle of {+-}15{degree}, are reported. Heating by the electrons to near 1keV in solid density CD{sub 2} is inferred from the thermo-nuclear neutron yield. Estimates suggest an optimized gain of 300x if the National Ignition Facility were to be adapted for fast ignition.

  12. The Potential of Fast Ignition and Related Experiments with A Petawatt Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Cowan, T.E.; Hatchett, S.P.; Henry, E.A.; Koch, J.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; MacKinnon, A.; Offenberger, A.A.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M. D.; Phillips, T.J.; Sangster, T.C.; Singh, M.S.; Snavely, R.A.; Stoyer, M.A.; Tsukamoto, M.; Wharton, K.B.; Wilks, S.C.

    2000-04-06

    A model of energy gain induced by fast ignition of thermonuclear burn in compressed deuterium-tritium fuel, is used to show the potential for 300x gain with a driver energy of 1 M J, if the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were to be adapted for fast ignition. The physics of fast ignition has been studied using a petawatt laser facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Laser plasma interaction in a preformed plasma on a solid target leads to relativistic self-focusing evidenced by x-ray images. Absorption of the laser radiation transfers energy to an intense source of relativistic electrons. Good conversion efficiency into a wide angular distribution is reported. Heating by the electrons in solid density CD{sub 2} produces 0.5 to 1/keV temperature, inferred from the D-D thermo-nuclear neutron yield.

  13. Hot surface ionic line emission and cold K-inner shell emission from petawatt-laser irradiated Cu foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W; Akli, K; Clarke, R; Delettrez, J A; Freeman, R R; Glenzer, S; Green, J; Gregori, G; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; King, J A; Koch, J A; Kuba, J; Lancaster, K; MacKinnon, A J; Key, M; Mileham, C; Myatt, J; Neely, D; Norreys, P A; Park, H; Pasely, J; Patel, P; Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Zhang, B; Sangster, T C

    2005-12-13

    A hot, T{sub e} {approx} 2- to 3-keV surface plasma was observed in the interaction of a 0.7-ps petawatt laser beam with solid copper-foil targets at intensities >10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Copper K-shell spectra were measured in the range of 8 to 9 keV using a single-photon-counting x-ray CCD camera. In addition to K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell lines, the emission contained the Cu He{sub {alpha}} and Ly{sub {alpha}} lines, allowing the temperature to be inferred. These lines have not been observed previously with ultrafast laser pulses. For intensities less than 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, only the K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell emissions are detected. Measurements of the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield as a function of the laser intensity are in agreement with a model that includes refluxing and confinement of the suprathermal electrons in the target volume.

  14. Progress in the growth of large scale Ti:sapphire crystals by the heat exchanger method (HEM) for petawatt class lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, David B.; Schmid, Frederick

    2010-04-01

    In modelocked laser systems, the shortest possible pulse width is determined by the Fourier transform of the spectral bandwidth of the pulse; the wider the spectral bandwidth, the shorter the pulse. Titanium-doped sapphire (Ti:sapphire) offers the widest gain bandwidth of any currently available laser gain material, enabling systems to deliver pulse widths shorter than 10 fs (10 -14 s). Because of the short pulse durations, the peak power can be extremely high, and therefore Ti:sapphire lasers have been at the forefront of research into ultrafast, ultrahigh power lasers. These intense ultrashort laser pulses are the light source for fundamental studies of light-matter interactions. Interesting scientific results have been achieved with these lasers in the fields of high order harmonic and short pulse X-ray generations, high density plasmas, relativistic acceleration, relativistic nonlinear optics, time resolved X-ray diffraction with unprecedented time resolution and others. Researchers have recently achieved near petawatt (10 15 W) peak power laser operation using large diameter Ti:sapphire amplifiers, and are developing higher power lasers for research into high energy physics. However, the saturation fluence of the Ti:sapphire gain medium is limited to about 1 J/cm 2. Thus, continued scale up in peak laser energy requires the scale up of high-quality Ti:sapphire crystals for laser amplifiers. Current demand is for 100 mm diameter crystals, and this requirement is projected to grow up to 250 mm diameter crystals in a few years. To address this technological bottleneck, Crystal Systems has upgraded its heat exchanger method (HEM) furnaces and fabrication and metrology to scale up the production of Ti:sapphire crystals. Currently, 175 mm diameter Ti:sapphire amplifier crystals are being fabricated from high-quality 208 mm boules.

  15. An ultra short pulse reconstruction software applied to the GEMINI high power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, Mario; Galimberti, Marco; Hooker, Chris; Chekhlov, Oleg; Tang, Yunxin; Bisesto, Fabrizio Giuseppe; Curcio, Alessandro; Anania, Maria Pia; Giulietti, Danilo

    2016-09-01

    The GRENOUILLE traces of Gemini pulses (15 J, 30 fs, PW, shot per 20 s) were acquired in the Gemini Target Area PetaWatt at the Central Laser Facility (CLF), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). A comparison between the characterizations of the laser pulse parameters made using two different types of algorithms: Video Frog and GRenouille/FrOG (GROG), was made. The temporal and spectral parameters came out to be in great agreement for the two kinds of algorithms. In this experimental campaign it has been showed how GROG, the developed algorithm, works as well as VideoFrog algorithm with the PetaWatt pulse class.

  16. High-energy electron, positron, ion and nuclear spectroscopy in ultra-intense laser-solid experiments on the petawatt

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C; Christl, M; Cowan, T E; Fakahashi, Y; Fountain, W; Hatchett, S; Henry, E A; Hunt, A W; Johnson, J; Key, M; Kuehl, T; Moody, J; Moran, M; Patterson, W S; Pennington, D M; Perry, M D; Phillips, T C; Roth, M; Sefcik, J; Singh, M; Snavely, R; Syoyer, M; Wilks, S C; Young, P

    1999-09-16

    The LLNL Petawatt Laser has achieved focused intensities up to 6 x 20 W/cm{sup 2}, which has opened a new, higher energy regime of relativistic laser-plasma interactions in which the quiver energies of the target electrons exceed the energy thresholds for many nuclear phenomena. We will describe recent experiments in which we have observed electrons accelerated to 100 MeV, photo-nuclear fission, and positron-electron pair creation.

  17. Shielding activation of petawatt laser facilities in Romania: a FLUKA preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Florescu, Gabriela M; Duliu, O G

    2016-03-01

    The FLUKA 2011.2c code was used to evaluate the activity induced in the irradiation chamber walls by secondary charged particles emitted during the interaction of 1 petawatt laser beam with the targets. The results have shown that, even in the most conservative approaches, i.e. 300 and 100 MeV secondary electrons and protons, respectively, the maximum equivalent dose rate, at 1 cm in front of the chamber wall, 1 min after the end of irradiation, was of ∼23 nSv h(-1). Three minutes later, it falls at ∼60 pSv h(-1), negligible with respect to the environmental radiation background of 90-110 nSv h(-1), as reported for Romania. PMID:26224739

  18. Proton Beam Focusing and Heating in Petawatt Laser-Solid Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Snavely, R A; Gu, P; King, J; Hey, D; Akli, K; Zhang, B B; Freeman, R; Hatchett, S; Key, M H; Koch, J; Langdon, A B; Lasinsky, B; MacKinnon, A; Patel, P; Town, R; Wilks, S; Stephens, R; Tsutsumi, T; Chen, Z; Yabuuchi, T; Kurahashi, T; Sato, T; Adumi, K; Toyama, Y; Zheng, J; Kodama, R; Tanaka, K A; Yamanaka, T

    2003-08-13

    It has recently been demonstrated that femtosecond-laser generated proton beams may be focused. These protons, following expansion of the Debye sheath, emit off the inner concave surface of hemispherical shell targets irradiated at their outer convex pole. The sheath normal expansion produces a rapidly converging proton beam. Such focused proton beams provide a new and powerful means to achieve isochoric heating to high temperatures. They are potentially important for measuring the equation of state of materials at high energy density and may provide an alternative route to fast ignition. We present the first results of proton focusing and heating experiments performed at the Petawatt power level at the Gekko XII Laser Facility at ILE Osaka Japan. Solid density Aluminum slabs are placed in the proton focal region at various lengths. The degree of proton focusing is measured via XUV imaging of Planckian emission of the heated zone. Simultaneous with the XUV measurement a streaked optical imaging technique, HISAK, gave temporal optical emission images of the focal region. Results indicate excellent coupling between the laser-proton conversion and subsequent heating.

  19. Sub-picosecond laser induced damage test facility for petawatt reflective optical components characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozet, Martin; Néauport, Jérôme; Lavastre, Eric; Roquin, Nadja; Gallais, Laurent; Lamaignère, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    While considering long pulse or short pulse high power laser facilities, optical components performances and in particular laser damage resistance are always factors limiting the overall system performances. Consequently, getting a detailed knowledge of the behavior of these optical components under irradiations with large beam in short pulse range is of major importance. In this context, a Laser Induced Damage Threshold test facility called DERIC has been developed at the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Bordeaux. It uses an Amplitude Systemes laser source which delivers Gaussian pulses of 500 fs at 1053 nm. 1-on-1, S-on-1 and RasterScan test procedures are implemented to study the behavior of monolayer and multilayer dielectric coatings.

  20. Validation of modelled imaging plates sensitivity to 1-100 keV x-rays and spatial resolution characterisation for diagnostics for the "PETawatt Aquitaine Laser"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutoux, G.; Batani, D.; Burgy, F.; Ducret, J.-E.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Hulin, S.; Rabhi, N.; Duval, A.; Lecherbourg, L.; Reverdin, C.; Jakubowska, K.; Szabo, C. I.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Consoli, F.; Curcio, A.; De Angelis, R.; Ingenito, F.; Baggio, J.; Raffestin, D.

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to their high dynamic range and ability to withstand electromagnetic pulse, imaging plates (IPs) are commonly used as passive detectors in laser-plasma experiments. In the framework of the development of the diagnostics for the Petawatt Aquitaine Laser facility, we present an absolute calibration and spatial resolution study of five different available types of IP (namely, MS-SR-TR-MP-ND) performed by using laser-induced K-shell X-rays emitted by a solid silver target irradiated by the laser ECLIPSE at CEntre Lasers Intenses et Applications. In addition, IP sensitivity measurements were performed with a 160 kV X-ray generator at CEA DAM DIF, where the absolute response of IP SR and TR has been calibrated to X-rays in the energy range 8-75 keV with uncertainties of about 15%. Finally, the response functions have been modeled in Monte Carlo GEANT4 simulations in order to reproduce experimental data. Simulations enable extrapolation of the IP response functions to photon energies from 1 keV to 1 GeV, of interest, e.g., for laser-driven radiography.

  1. Validation of modelled imaging plates sensitivity to 1-100 keV x-rays and spatial resolution characterisation for diagnostics for the "PETawatt Aquitaine Laser".

    PubMed

    Boutoux, G; Batani, D; Burgy, F; Ducret, J-E; Forestier-Colleoni, P; Hulin, S; Rabhi, N; Duval, A; Lecherbourg, L; Reverdin, C; Jakubowska, K; Szabo, C I; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Consoli, F; Curcio, A; De Angelis, R; Ingenito, F; Baggio, J; Raffestin, D

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to their high dynamic range and ability to withstand electromagnetic pulse, imaging plates (IPs) are commonly used as passive detectors in laser-plasma experiments. In the framework of the development of the diagnostics for the Petawatt Aquitaine Laser facility, we present an absolute calibration and spatial resolution study of five different available types of IP (namely, MS-SR-TR-MP-ND) performed by using laser-induced K-shell X-rays emitted by a solid silver target irradiated by the laser ECLIPSE at CEntre Lasers Intenses et Applications. In addition, IP sensitivity measurements were performed with a 160 kV X-ray generator at CEA DAM DIF, where the absolute response of IP SR and TR has been calibrated to X-rays in the energy range 8-75 keV with uncertainties of about 15%. Finally, the response functions have been modeled in Monte Carlo GEANT4 simulations in order to reproduce experimental data. Simulations enable extrapolation of the IP response functions to photon energies from 1 keV to 1 GeV, of interest, e.g., for laser-driven radiography. PMID:27131655

  2. X-ray backlight measurement of preformed plasma by kJ-class petawatt LFEX laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Shinji; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nagatomo, Hideo; Matsuo, Satoshi; Morio, Noboru; Kawanaka, Jyunji; Nakata, Yoshiki; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Sunahara, Atsushi; Johzaki, Tomoyuki

    2012-09-15

    Foot and pedestal pulses that precede the main pulse from a high-intensity laser greatly affect laser-plasma interactions. Especially in fast ignition schemes, preceding pulses generate a plasma prior to irradiation by the main pulse. This results in a too energetic and divergent electron beam being generated in the preformed plasma, which reduces the energy coupling efficiency from the heating laser to the dense fuel core. A preformed plasma with a density scale length of 40-60 {mu}m was observed by a time- and space-resolved x-ray backlight technique using the LFEX laser system at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. Preceding pulses (i.e., the foot and pedestal) of the LFEX were characterized by comparing observations with calculations results obtained using a two-dimension (2D) radiation-hydrodynamic simulation code. In a separate experiment, the 2D code was benchmarked with the experimentally observed hydrodynamic behavior of a gold plasma produced by a nanosecond laser pulse that mimicked foot and pedestal pulses (intensity: 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}). The preceding pulses were estimated to have an intensity of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13}W/cm{sup 2}, a duration of 2.0 ns, and a spot diameter at the target of 200-600 {mu}m by comparing the measured hydrodynamics of the preformed plasma with that calculated by the 2D hydrodynamic simulation code.

  3. A dual-channel, curved-crystal spectrograph for petawatt laser, x-ray backlighter source studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Nilson, P. M.; Storm, M.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Hey, D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Shepherd, R.; Snavely, R. A.; Key, M. H.; King, J. A.; Zhang, B.; Stephens, R. B.; Akli, K. U.; Highbarger, K.; Daskalova, R. L.; Van Woerkom, L.; Freeman, R. R.; Green, J. S.; Gregori, G.; Lancaster, K.; Norreys, P. A.

    2009-08-01

    A dual-channel, curved-crystal spectrograph was designed to measure time-integrated x-ray spectra in the ˜1.5 to 2 keV range (6.2-8.2 Å wavelength) from small-mass, thin-foil targets irradiated by the VULCAN petawatt laser focused up to 4×1020 W/cm2. The spectrograph consists of two cylindrically curved potassium-acid-phthalate crystals bent in the meridional plane to increase the spectral range by a factor of ˜10 compared to a flat crystal. The device acquires single-shot x-ray spectra with good signal-to-background ratios in the hard x-ray background environment of petawatt laser-plasma interactions. The peak spectral energies of the aluminum Heα and Lyα resonance lines were ˜1.8 and ˜1.0 mJ/eV sr (˜0.4 and 0.25 J/Å sr), respectively, for 220 J, 10 ps laser irradiation.

  4. A Dual-Channel, Curved-Crystal Spectrograph for Petawatt Laser, X-Ray Backlighter Source Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Nilson, P.M.; Storm, M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.; Hey, D.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P.K.; Shepherd, R.; Snavely, R.A.; Key, M.H.; King, J.A.; Zhang, B.; Stephens, R.B.; Akli, K.U.; Highbarger, K.; Daskalova, R.L.; VanWoerkom, L.; Freeman, R.R.; Green, J.S.; Gregori, G.; Lancaster, K.; Norreys, P.A.

    2009-08-19

    A dual-channel, curved-crystal spectrograph was designed to measure time-integrated x-ray spectra in the ~1.5 to 2 keV range (6.2–8.2 Å wavelength) from small-mass, thin-foil targets irradiated by the VULCAN petawatt laser focused up to 4 x 10^20 W/cm^2. The spectrograph consists of two cylindrically curved potassium-acid-phthalate crystals bent in the meridional plane to increase the spectral range by a factor of ~10 compared to a flat crystal. The device acquires single-shot x-ray spectra with good signal-to-background ratios in the hard x-ray background environment of petawatt laser-plasma interactions. The peak spectral energies of the aluminum He-alpha and Ly-alpha resonance lines were ~1.8 and ~1.0 mJ/eV sr (~0.4 and 0.25 J/Å sr), respectively, for 220 J, 10 ps laser irradiation.

  5. A dual-channel, curved-crystal spectrograph for petawatt laser, x-ray backlighter source studies

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Nilson, P. M.; Storm, M.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Hey, D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Shepherd, R.; Snavely, R. A.; Key, M. H.; King, J. A.; Zhang, B.; Stephens, R. B.; Akli, K. U.; Highbarger, K.; Daskalova, R. L.; and others

    2009-08-15

    A dual-channel, curved-crystal spectrograph was designed to measure time-integrated x-ray spectra in the {approx}1.5 to 2 keV range (6.2-8.2 A wavelength) from small-mass, thin-foil targets irradiated by the VULCAN petawatt laser focused up to 4x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. The spectrograph consists of two cylindrically curved potassium-acid-phthalate crystals bent in the meridional plane to increase the spectral range by a factor of {approx}10 compared to a flat crystal. The device acquires single-shot x-ray spectra with good signal-to-background ratios in the hard x-ray background environment of petawatt laser-plasma interactions. The peak spectral energies of the aluminum He{sub {alpha}} and Ly{sub {alpha}} resonance lines were {approx}1.8 and {approx}1.0 mJ/eV sr ({approx}0.4 and 0.25 J/A sr), respectively, for 220 J, 10 ps laser irradiation.

  6. Phased-array grating compression for high-energy chirped pulse amplification lasers.

    PubMed

    Cotel, A; Castaing, M; Pichon, P; Le Blanc, C

    2007-03-01

    The development of phased-array grating compressor is a crucial issue for high-energy, ultra-short pulse petawatt-class lasers. We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of two-grating phasing in a broadband pulse mosaic compressor. The phase defaults induced by misaligned gratings are studied. Monochromatic grating phasing is experimentally achieved with an interferometric technique and pulse compression is demonstrated with a two-phased-array grating system. PMID:19532511

  7. Improving temporal contrast by cross-polarized wave generation at a sub-petawatt laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Na; Wang, Xiaodong; Huang, Wanqing; Sun, Li; Guo, Yi; Li, Qing; Zhao, Runchang; Su, Jingqin

    2011-10-01

    Temporal contrast is an important factor affecting the application of ultraintense and ultrashort laser systems. In this paper, we employ cross-polarized wave (XPW) generation to improve the temporal contrast for ultraintense and ultrashort pulses in a 300 TW Ti:Sapphire laser facility, i.e. the super intense laser for experiment on the extremes (SILEX-I). We designed a double chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) system with an intermediate nonlinear temporal pulse filter based on XPW generation and the estimated output energy is more than 300 mJ for the new front-end system. The experimental results show that the output energy of the double CPA system is greater than 370 mJ. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) pedestal is suppressed significantly and the temporal contrast is improved by more than two orders of magnitude.

  8. Fast magnetic field annihilation driven by two laser pulses in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Kumar, D.; Weber, S.; Korn, G.; Klimo, O.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.

    2015-10-15

    Fast magnetic annihilation is investigated by using 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of two parallel ultra-short petawatt laser pulses co-propagating in underdense plasma. The magnetic field generated by the laser pulses annihilates in a current sheet formed between the pulses. Magnetic field energy is converted to an inductive longitudinal electric field, which efficiently accelerates the electrons of the current sheet. This new regime of collisionless relativistic magnetic field annihilation with a timescale of tens of femtoseconds can be extended to near-critical and overdense plasma with the ultra-high intensity femtosecond laser pulses.

  9. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter.

  10. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  11. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  12. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-07-11

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency rejection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multi-layer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.

  13. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-05-26

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency reflection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multilayer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.

  14. Control of the shape of laser pulses amplified in the strong saturation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaykin, A A

    2014-05-30

    A new criterion for estimating the distortions of quasirectangular pulses in high-power amplifiers is proposed together with a method that allows generation of quasi-rectangular pulses at the output of a high-efficiency amplifier, i. e., in the regime of strong saturation. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of calculating the neodymium glass amplifier, used for pumping the petawatt parametric amplifier. (lasers)

  15. Space and Time Resolved Measurements of the Heating of Solids to Ten Million Kelvin by a Petawatt Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Davies, J.R.; Kodama, R.; Green, J.S.; Lancaster, K.L.; Akli, K.U.; Beg, F.N.; Chen, S.N.; Clark, D.; Freeman, R.R.; Gregory, C.D.; Habara, H.; Heathcote, R.; Hey, D.S.; Highbarger, K.; Jaanimagi, P.; Key, M.H.; Krushelnick, K.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Nakamura, H.; Stephens, R.B.; Storm, M.; Tampo, M.; Theobald, W.; Van Woerkom, L.; Weber, R.L.; Wei, M.S.; Woolsey, N.C.; Norreys, P.A.

    2008-04-29

    The heating of plane solid targets by the Vulcan petawatt laser at powers of 0.32-0.73 PW and intensities of up to 4 x 10^20 W cm^-2 has been diagnosed with a temporal resolution of 17 ps and a spatial resolution of 30 um, by measuring optical emission from the opposite side of the target to the laser with a streak camera. Second harmonic emission was filtered out and the target viewed at an angle to eliminate optical transition radiation. Spatial resolution was obtained by imaging the emission onto a bundle of fibre optics, arranged into a one-dimensional array at the camera entrance. The results show that a region 160 um in diameter can be heated to a temperature of ~10^7 K (kT/e ~ keV) in solid targets from 10 to 20 um thick and that this temperature is maintained for at least 20 ps, confirming the utility of PW lasers in the study of high energy density physics. Hybrid code modelling shows that magnetic field generation prevents increased target heating by electron refluxing above a certain target thickness and that the absorption of laser energy into electrons entering the solid target was between 15-30%, and tends to increase with laser energy.

  16. Multi-GeV electron acceleration by a periodic frequency chirped radially polarized laser pulse in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Ghotra, Harjit; Kant, Niti

    2016-06-01

    Linear and periodic effects of frequency chirp on electron acceleration by radially polarized (RP) laser pulse in vacuum have been investigated. A frequency chirp influences the electron dynamics, betatron resonance, and energy gain by electron during interaction with the RP laser pulse and ensures effective electron acceleration with high energy gain (~GeV). The electron energy gain with a periodic frequency chirped laser pulse is about twice as high as with a linear chirp. Our observations reveal electron energy gain of about 10.5 GeV with a periodic chirped RP petawatt laser pulse in vacuum.

  17. An Overview of High Energy Short Pulse Technology for Advanced Radiography of Laser Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Key, M; Britten, J; Beach, R; Beer, G; Brown, C; Bryan, S; Caird, J; Carlson, T; Crane, J; Dawson, J; Erlandson, A C; Fittinghoff, D; Hermann, M; Hoaglan, C; Iyer, A; Jones, L; Jovanovic, I; Komashko, A; Landen, O; Liao, Z; Molander, W; Mitchell, A; Moses, E; Nielsen, N; Nguyen, H; Nissen, J; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Risinger, L; Rushford, M; Skulina, K; Spaeth, M; Stuart, B; Tietbohl, G; Wattellier, B

    2004-06-18

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF-class, Nd:glass laser systems are reviewed. High energy short pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on the NIF. Development of meter-scale, high efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of HEPW pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fiber-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for high energy petawatt pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  18. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  19. Fast Ignition Realization Experiment with High-Contrast Kilo-Joule Peta-Watt Laser ``LFEX'' and Strong External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    We report on progresses of the Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX) project that has been curried out at the Institute of Laser Engineering to assess the feasibility of high density core heating with a high-power, short-pulse laser including the construction of the Kilo-Joule, Petawatt class LFEX laser system. Our recent studies identify three scientific challenges to achieve high heating efficiency in the fast ignition (FI) scheme with the current GEKKO and LFEX laser systems: (i) control of energy distribution of relativistic electron beam (REB), (ii) guiding and focusing of REB to a fuel core, and (iii) formation of a high areal-density core. The control of the electron energy distribution has been experimentally confirmed by improving the intensity contrast of the LFEX laser up to >109 and an ultra-high contrast of 1011 with a plasma mirror. After the contrast improvement, 50% of the total REB energy is carried by a low energy component of the REB, which slope temperature is close to the ponderomotive scaling value (~ 1 MeV). To guide the electron beam, we apply strong external magnetic field to the REB transport region. Guiding of the REB by 0.6 kT field in a planar geometry has already been demonstrated at LULI 2000 laser facility in a collaborative experiment lead by CELIA-Univ. Bordeaux. Considering more realistic FI scenario, we have performed a similar experiment using the Kilo-Joule LFEX laser to study the effect of guiding and magnetic mirror on the electron beam. A high density core of a laser-imploded 200 μm-diameter solid CD ball was radiographed with picosecond LFEX-produced K-alpha backlighter. Comparisons of the experimental results and integrated simulations using hydrodynamic and electron transport codes suggest that 10% of the efficiency can be achievable with the current GEKKO and LFEX laser system with the success of the above challenges. This work is supported by NIFS (Japan), MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI (Japan), JSPS Fellowship (Japan), ANR

  20. System Modeling of kJ-class Petawatt Lasers at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Rushford, M; Henesian, M A; Boley, C; Haefner, C; Heebner, J E; Crane, J K; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-14

    Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) project at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energetic, ultrafast x-rays in the range of 70-100 keV for backlighting NIF targets. The chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system will deliver kilo-Joule pulses at an adjustable pulse duration from 1 ps to 50 ps. System complexity requires sophisticated simulation and modeling tools for design, performance prediction, and comprehension of experimental results. We provide a brief overview of ARC, present our main modeling tools, and describe important performance predictions. The laser system (Fig. 1) consists of an all-fiber front end, including chirped-fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) stretchers. The beam after the final fiber amplifier is split into two apertures and spatially shaped. The split beam first seeds a regenerative amplifier and is then amplified in a multi-pass Nd:glass amplifier. Next, the preamplified chirped pulse is split in time into four identical replicas and injected into one NIF Quad. At the output of the NIF beamline, each of the eight amplified pulses is compressed in an individual, folded, four-grating compressor. Compressor grating pairs have slightly different groove densities to enable compact folding geometry and eliminate adjacent beam cross-talk. Pulse duration is adjustable with a small, rack-mounted compressor in the front-end. We use non-sequential ray-tracing software, FRED for design and layout of the optical system. Currently, our FRED model includes all of the optical components from the output of the fiber front end to the target center (Fig. 2). CAD designed opto-mechanical components are imported into our FRED model to provide a complete system description. In addition to incoherent ray tracing and scattering analysis, FRED uses Gaussian beam decomposition to model coherent beam propagation. Neglecting nonlinear effects, we can obtain a nearly complete frequency domain description of the ARC beam at different stages

  1. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabashin, A. V.; Delaporte, Ph.; Pereira, A.; Grojo, D.; Torres, R.; Sarnet, Th.; Sentis, M.

    2010-03-01

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser-matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics.

  2. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser–matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics. PMID:20672069

  3. Pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Louis W.; Fitzsimmons, William A.

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

  4. Pulsed atomic soliton laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, L.D.; Brand, J.

    2004-09-01

    It is shown that simultaneously changing the scattering length of an elongated, harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate from positive to negative and inverting the axial portion of the trap, so that it becomes expulsive, results in a train of self-coherent solitonic pulses. Each pulse is itself a nondispersive attractive Bose-Einstein condensate that rapidly self-cools. The axial trap functions as a waveguide. The solitons can be made robustly stable with the right choice of trap geometry, number of atoms, and interaction strength. Theoretical and numerical evidence suggests that such a pulsed atomic soliton laser can be made in present experiments.

  5. Short spatial filters with spherical lenses for high-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Burdonov, K F; Soloviev, A A; Shaikin, A A; Potemkin, A K; Egorov, A S

    2013-11-30

    We report possible employment of short spatial filters based on spherical lenses in a pulsed laser source (neodymium glass, 300 J, 1 ns). The influence of the spherical aberration on the quality of output radiation and coefficient of conversion to the second harmonics is studied. The ultra-short aberration spatial filter of length 1.9 m with an aperture of 122 mm is experimentally tested. A considerable shortening of multi-cascade pump lasers for modern petawatt laser systems is demonstrated by the employment of short spatial filters without expensive aspherical optics. (elements of laser systems)

  6. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.; Demchuk, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H2 – F2(NF3 or SF66) and He(Ne) – H2 – F2(NF3 or SF6) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% – 6%.

  7. Laser pulse sampler

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera.

  8. Laser pulse sampler

    DOEpatents

    Vann, C.

    1998-03-24

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera. 5 figs.

  9. Laser pulse detector

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.; Akerman, M.A.

    1979-08-13

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  10. Laser pulse detector

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Akerman, M. Alfred

    1981-01-01

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  11. Multi-meter fiber-delivery and pulse self-compression of milli-Joule femtosecond laser and fiber-aided laser-micromachining.

    PubMed

    Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Vincetti, L; Husakou, A; Fourcade-Dutin, C; Hoenninger, C; Mottay, E; Gérôme, F; Benabid, F

    2014-05-01

    We report on damage-free fiber-guidance of milli-Joule energy-level and 600-femtosecond laser pulses into hypocycloid core-contour Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. Up to 10 meter-long fibers were used to successfully deliver Yb-laser pulses in robustly single-mode fashion. Different pulse propagation regimes were demonstrated by simply changing the fiber dispersion and gas. Self-compression to ~50 fs, and intensity-level nearing petawatt/cm(2) were achieved. Finally, free focusing-optics laser-micromachining was also demonstrated on different materials. PMID:24921775

  12. Progress on developing a PW ultrashort laser facility with ns, ps, and fs outputting pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qihua; Huang, Xiaojun; Wang, Xiao; Zeng, Xiaoming; Xie, Xudong; Wang, Fang; Wang, Fengrui; Lin, Donghui; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Kainan; Jiang, Dongbin; Deng, Wu; Zuo, Yanlei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Ying; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xiaomin; Fan, Dianyuan

    2008-03-01

    A petawatt laser facility with three beams for fast ignition research and strong-field physics applications has been designed and is being constructed. The first beam (referred as SILEX-I) is a Ti:sapphire femto-second laser which pulse width is 30 fs, and till now, output power has reached to 330 TW. The other two beams are Nd 3+:glass lasers which output energy are larger than 1kJ and pulse width are about 1ps and 1ns respectively. By using the technology of OPA pumped by 800nm femtosecond laser and seeded by super-continuum spectrum white light, the three beams are synchronized with each other without jitter time. By using the seeds from OPA pumped by femtosecond laser, and by using the pre-amplification stage of OPCPA, the signal to noise ratio of the Nd 3+:glass petawatt laser will reach to 10 8. Active methods are taken to control the gain narrowing effect of the Nd 3+:glass amplifiers, giving the option to compress the chirped pulse to ultrashort pulse with width less than 400fs. Tiled multilayer dielectric coating gratings are used for the compressor of the PW beam, which has been successfully demonstrated on a 100J picosecond Nd 3+:glass laser system.

  13. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.; Bailey, J. E.; Rovang, D. C.

    2015-11-30

    Here, we have developed conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators: Z 300 and Z 800. The designs are based on an accelerator architecture that is founded on two concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression and impedance matching [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)]. The prime power source of each machine consists of 90 linear-transformer-driver (LTD) modules. Each module comprises LTD cavities connected electrically in series, each of which is powered by 5-GW LTD bricks connected electrically in parallel. (A brick comprises a single switch and two capacitors in series.) Six water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers transport the power generated by the modules to a six-level vacuum-insulator stack. The stack serves as the accelerator’s water-vacuum interface. The stack is connected to six conical outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs), which are joined in parallel at a 10-cm radius by a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the six outer MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a single short inner MITL. The inner MITL transmits the combined current to the accelerator’s physics-package load. Z 300 is 35 m in diameter and stores 48 MJ of electrical energy in its LTD capacitors. The accelerator generates 320 TW of electrical power at the output of the LTD system, and delivers 48 MA in 154 ns to a magnetized-liner inertial-fusion (MagLIF) target [Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF target is 870 TW, which is the highest power throughout the accelerator. Power amplification is accomplished by the centrally located vacuum section, which serves as an intermediate inductive-energy-storage device. The principal goal of Z 300 is to achieve thermonuclear ignition; i.e., a fusion yield that exceeds the energy transmitted by the accelerator to the liner. 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD

  14. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bailey, J. E.; Bennett, N. L.; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Rovang, D. C.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators: Z 300 and Z 800. The designs are based on an accelerator architecture that is founded on two concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression and impedance matching [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)]. The prime power source of each machine consists of 90 linear-transformer-driver (LTD) modules. Each module comprises LTD cavities connected electrically in series, each of which is powered by 5-GW LTD bricks connected electrically in parallel. (A brick comprises a single switch and two capacitors in series.) Six water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers transport the power generated by the modules to a six-level vacuum-insulator stack. The stack serves as the accelerator's water-vacuum interface. The stack is connected to six conical outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs), which are joined in parallel at a 10-cm radius by a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the six outer MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a single short inner MITL. The inner MITL transmits the combined current to the accelerator's physics-package load. Z 300 is 35 m in diameter and stores 48 MJ of electrical energy in its LTD capacitors. The accelerator generates 320 TW of electrical power at the output of the LTD system, and delivers 48 MA in 154 ns to a magnetized-liner inertial-fusion (MagLIF) target [Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF target is 870 TW, which is the highest power throughout the accelerator. Power amplification is accomplished by the centrally located vacuum section, which serves as an intermediate inductive-energy-storage device. The principal goal of Z 300 is to achieve thermonuclear ignition; i.e., a fusion yield that exceeds the energy transmitted by the accelerator to the liner. 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations

  15. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; et al

    2015-11-30

    Here, we have developed conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators: Z 300 and Z 800. The designs are based on an accelerator architecture that is founded on two concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression and impedance matching [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)]. The prime power source of each machine consists of 90 linear-transformer-driver (LTD) modules. Each module comprises LTD cavities connected electrically in series, each of which is powered by 5-GW LTD bricks connected electrically in parallel. (A brick comprises a single switch and two capacitors in series.) Six water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers transport the power generated bymore » the modules to a six-level vacuum-insulator stack. The stack serves as the accelerator’s water-vacuum interface. The stack is connected to six conical outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs), which are joined in parallel at a 10-cm radius by a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the six outer MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a single short inner MITL. The inner MITL transmits the combined current to the accelerator’s physics-package load. Z 300 is 35 m in diameter and stores 48 MJ of electrical energy in its LTD capacitors. The accelerator generates 320 TW of electrical power at the output of the LTD system, and delivers 48 MA in 154 ns to a magnetized-liner inertial-fusion (MagLIF) target [Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF target is 870 TW, which is the highest power throughout the accelerator. Power amplification is accomplished by the centrally located vacuum section, which serves as an intermediate inductive-energy-storage device. The principal goal of Z 300 is to achieve thermonuclear ignition; i.e., a fusion yield that exceeds the energy transmitted by the accelerator to the liner. 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD

  16. Optical damage performance measurements of multilayer dielectric gratings for high energy short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, D.; Carr, C. W.; Negres, R. A.; Hackel, R. P.; Stanion, K. A.; Cross, D. A.; Guss, G.; Nissen, J. D.; Luthi, R.; Fair, J. E.; Britten, J. A.; Haefner, C.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the laser damage resistance of multilayer dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings used in the pulse compressors for high energy, high peak power laser systems such as the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) Petawatt laser on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our study includes measurements of damage threshold and damage density (ρ(Φ)) with picosecond laser pulses at 1053 nm under relevant operational conditions. Initial results indicate that sparse defects present on the optic surface from the manufacturing processes are responsible for damage initiation at laser fluences below the damage threshold indicated by the standard R-on-1 test methods, as is the case for laser damage with nanosecond pulse durations. As such, this study supports the development of damage density measurements for more accurate predictions on the damage performance of large area optics.

  17. CW-pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J. C.

    1981-09-01

    An apparatus for generating a spatially coherent laser beam having both CW and pulsed modes is disclosed. The modes are generated in differing volumetric regions of a single gain medium excited by a continuous energy pump. The CW portion of the output beam passes from the gain medium through a partially transmissive output coupling. The pulsed modes in the output beam are created in the respective region of the gain medium when transition materials from a selected group are stimulated to undergo an abrupt change between their reflective and transmissive states. Either cavity dumped or Q-switched configurations can be created by selective and patterned location of the transition materials at the ends of the gain medium. Symmetric organization of the volumetric regions within the gain medium allows temporal superposition of the two modes while maintaining spatial distinctiveness within the laser beam generated.

  18. Pulsed laser microtomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, V. B.; Bonch-Bruevich, A. M.; Vasil'Ev, V. I.; Ionov, L. N.; Nikolaev, S. D.; Starobogatov, I. O.

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes a pulsed laser tomographic apparatus that has been implemented in practice and has a spatial resolution of 2-5 microns in the transverse direction and approximately 70 microns in the probe-radiation propagation direction. Experiments have been performed with model objects. Results have been obtained that confirm the possibility of early diagnosis of skin mycoses that cannot be diagnosed by existing methods.

  19. Electron Acceleration in Cavitated Channels Formed by a Petawatt Laser in Low-Density Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mangles, S.P.D.; Walton, B.R.; Najmudin, Z.; Dangor, A.E.; Gopal, A.; Rozmus, W.; Tatarakis, M.; Thomas, A.G.R.; Wei, M.S.; Krushelnick, K.; Tzoufras, M.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.S.; Clarke, R.J.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Evans, R.G.; Fritzler, S.

    2005-06-24

    The spectra of energetic electrons produced by a laser interaction with underdense plasma have been measured at intensities >3x10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2}. Electron energies in excess of 300 MeV have been observed. Measurements of the transmitted laser spectrum indicate that there is no correlation between the acceleration of electrons and plasma wave production. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the laser ponderomotive force produces an ion channel. The interaction of the laser field with the nonlinear focusing force of the channel leads to electron acceleration. The majority of the electrons never reach the betatron resonance but those which gain the highest energies do so. The acceleration process exhibits a strong sensitivity to initial conditions with particles that start within a fraction of a laser wavelength following completely different trajectories and gaining markedly different energies.

  20. Making relativistic positrons using ultraintense short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Bonlie, J. D.; Chen, S. N.; Cone, K. V.; Elberson, L. N.; Price, D. F.; Schneider, M. B.; Shepherd, R.; Stafford, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Van Maren, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gregori, G.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper describes a new positron source using ultraintense short pulse lasers. Although it has been theoretically studied since the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2x10{sup 10} positrons/s ejected at the back of approximately millimeter thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short (approx1 ps) ultraintense (approx1x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser-based positron source with its unique characteristics may complement the existing sources based on radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  1. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  2. An overview of LLNL high-energy short-pulse technology for advanced radiography of laser fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.; Key, M.; Britten, J.; Beach, R.; Beer, G.; Brown, C.; Bryan, S.; Caird, J.; Carlson, T.; Crane, J.; Dawson, J.; Erlandson, A. C.; Fittinghoff, D.; Hermann, M.; Hoaglan, C.; Iyer, A.; Jones, L., II; Jovanovic, I.; Komashko, A.; Landen, O.; Liao, Z.; Molander, W.; Mitchell, S.; Moses, E.; Nielsen, N.; Nguyen, H.-H.; Nissen, J.; Payne, S.; Pennington, D.; Risinger, L.; Rushford, M.; Skulina, K.; Spaeth, M.; Stuart, B.; Tietbohl, G.; Wattellier, B.

    2004-12-01

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF and possibly other large-scale Nd : glass lasers are reviewed. High-energy short-pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on NIF. Development of metre-scale, high-efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of high energy petawatt (HEPW) pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fibre-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for HEPW pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  3. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  4. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  5. Micro pulse laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  6. Versatile shaping of a relativistic laser pulse from a nonuniform overdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Min Sup; Kim, Young-Kuk; Kulagin, Victor V.; Nam, Inhyuk; Suk, Hyyong

    2012-07-15

    We studied the versatile shaping of a petawatt laser pulse using its relativistic transparency in a thin overdense plasma slab. The novel concept here is to use the nonuniformity of the plasma slab in its density or thickness in the transverse direction to control the pulse shaping in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. From 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we succeeded in fabricating a front shape concave to the propagation direction, an extreme case of transverse shaping. A 1-dimensional analytic formula was then applied to predict the transverse shape, which showed good agreement with the simulations.

  7. Fast ignition realization experiment with high-contrast kilo-joule peta-watt LFEX laser and strong external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Kojima, Sadaoki; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sawada, Hiroshi; Lee, Seung Ho; Shiroto, Takashi; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Morace, Alessio; Vaisseau, Xavier; Sakata, Shohei; Abe, Yuki; Matsuo, Kazuki; Farley Law, King Fai; Tosaki, Shota; Yogo, Akifumi; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Zhang, Zhe; Sunahara, Atsushi; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Mima, Kunioki; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yamanoi, Kohei; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Tokita, Shigeki; Nakata, Yoshiki; Kawanaka, Junji; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Kotaro; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathieu; Bellei, Claudio; Santos, João Jorge; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    A petawatt laser for fast ignition experiments (LFEX) laser system [N. Miyanaga et al., J. Phys. IV France 133, 81 (2006)], which is currently capable of delivering 2 kJ in a 1.5 ps pulse using 4 laser beams, has been constructed beside the GEKKO-XII laser facility for demonstrating efficient fast heating of a dense plasma up to the ignition temperature under the auspices of the Fast Ignition Realization EXperiment (FIREX) project [H. Azechi et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104024 (2009)]. In the FIREX experiment, a cone is attached to a spherical target containing a fuel to prevent a corona plasma from entering the path of the intense heating LFEX laser beams. The LFEX laser beams are focused at the tip of the cone to generate a relativistic electron beam (REB), which heats a dense fuel core generated by compression of a spherical deuterized plastic target induced by the GEKKO-XII laser beams. Recent studies indicate that the current heating efficiency is only 0.4%, and three requirements to achieve higher efficiency of the fast ignition (FI) scheme with the current GEKKO and LFEX systems have been identified: (i) reduction of the high energy tail of the REB; (ii) formation of a fuel core with high areal density using a limited number (twelve) of GEKKO-XII laser beams as well as a limited energy (4 kJ of 0.53-μm light in a 1.3 ns pulse); (iii) guiding and focusing of the REB to the fuel core. Laser-plasma interactions in a long-scale plasma generate electrons that are too energetic to efficiently heat the fuel core. Three actions were taken to meet the first requirement. First, the intensity contrast of the foot pulses to the main pulses of the LFEX was improved to >109. Second, a 5.5-mm-long cone was introduced to reduce pre-heating of the inner cone wall caused by illumination of the unconverted 1.053-μm light of implosion beam (GEKKO-XII). Third, the outside of the cone wall was coated with a 40-μm plastic layer to protect it from the pressure caused by imploding

  8. Proton acceleration by single-cycle laser pulses offers a novel monoenergetic and stable operating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M. L.; Yan, X. Q.; Mourou, G.; Wheeler, J. A.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.

    2016-04-01

    Prompted by the possibility to produce high energy, single-cycle laser pulses with tens of Petawatt (PW) power, we have investigated laser-matter interactions in the few optical cycle and ultra relativistic intensity regimes. A particularly interesting instability-free regime for ion production was revealed leading to the efficient coherent generation of short (femtosecond; 10 - 15 s ) monoenergetic ion bunches with a peak energy greater than GeV. Of paramount importance, the interaction is absent of the Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities and hole boring that plague techniques such as target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration.

  9. Picosecond-petawatt laser-block ignition for avalanche fusion of boron by ultrahigh acceleration and ultrahigh magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Lalousis, P.; Giuffrida, L.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.; Eliezer, S.; Miley, G. H.; Moustaizis, S.; Mourou, G.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion energy from reacting hydrogen (protons) with the boron isotope 11 (HB11) resulting in three stable helium nuclei, is without problem of nuclear radiation in contrast to DT fusion. But the HB11 reaction driven by nanosecond laser pulses with thermal compression and ignition by lasers is extremely difficult. This changed radically when irradiation with picosecond laser pulses produces a non-thermal plasma block ignition with ultrahigh acceleration. This uses the nonlinear (ponderomotive) force to surprizingly resulting in same thresholds as DT fusion even under pessimistic assumption of binary reactions. After evaluation of reactions trapped cylindrically by kilotesla magnetic fields and using the measured highly increased HB11 fusion gains for the proof of an avalanche of the three alphas in secondary reactions, possibilities for an absolutely clean energy source at comptitive costs were concluded.

  10. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  11. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Comstock, Matthew

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  12. Lasers for ultrashort light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, J.; Wilhelmi, B.

    1987-01-01

    The present rapid expansion of research work on picosecond lasers and their application makes it difficult to survey and comprehend the large number of publications in this field. This book aims to provide an introduction to the field starting with the very basic and moving on to an advanced level. Contents: Fundamentals of the interaction between light pulses and matter; Fundamentals of lasers for ultrashort light pulses; Methods of measurement; Active modelocking; Synchronously pumped lasers; Passive modelocking of dye lasers; Passive modelocking of solid state lasers; Nonstationary nonlinear optical processes; Ultrafast spectroscopy.

  13. Design and construction of a PW ultrashort laser facility with ns, ps, and fs outputting pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qihua; Huang, Xiaojun; Wang, Xiao; Zeng, Xiaoming; Xie, Xudong; Wang, Fang; Wang, Fengrui; Lin, Donghui; Jiang, Dongbin; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Kainan; Zuo, Yanlei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Ying; Wei, Xiaofeng; Fan, Dianyuan

    2007-06-01

    A petawatt laser facility with three beams for fast ignition research and strong-field physics applications has been designed and is being constructed. The first beam (referred as SILEX-I) is a Ti:sapphire femto-second laser which pulse width is 30 fs, and till now, output power has reached to 330 TW. The other two beams are Nd 3+:glass lasers which output energy are larger than 1kJ and pulse width are about 1ps and 1ns respectively. By using the technology of OPA pumped by 800nm femtosecond laser and seeded by super-continuum white light (SWL), the three beams are synchronized with each other without jitter time. Tiled multilayer dielectric coating gratings are used for the compressor of the PW beam.

  14. Calorimeters for pulsed lasers: calibration.

    PubMed

    Thacher, P D

    1976-07-01

    A calibration technique is developed and tested in which a calorimeter used for single-shot laser pulse energy measurements is calibrated with reference to a cw power standard using a chopped cw laser beam. A pulsed laser is required only to obtain the relative time response of the calorimeter to a pulse. With precautions as to beam alignment and wavelength, the principal error of the technique is that of the cw standard. Calibration of two thermopiles with cone receivers showed -2.5% and -3.5% agreement with previous calibrations made by the National Bureau of Standards. PMID:20165270

  15. Dual-Laser-Pulse Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Early, James W.; Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.

    2006-01-01

    A dual-pulse laser (DPL) technique has been demonstrated for generating laser-induced sparks (LIS) to ignite fuels. The technique was originally intended to be applied to the ignition of rocket propellants, but may also be applicable to ignition in terrestrial settings in which electric igniters may not be suitable.

  16. Pulsed Single Frequency Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibin

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed single frequency fiber lasers with mJ level near 1 micron, 1.55 micron and 2 micron wavelengths were demonstrated by using our proprietary highly doped fibers. These fiber lasers exhibit excellent long term stable operation with M2<1.2.

  17. Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang Jie; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-11-22

    We study the direct acceleration of a free electron in infinite vacuum along the axis of a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam. We find that net energy transfer from laser pulse to electron is maximized with the tightest focusing. We show that the net energy gain of an electron initially moving at a relativistic velocity may exceed more than half the theoretical limit of energy transfer, which is not possible with an initially stationary electron in the parameter space studied. We determine and analyze the power scaling of maximum energy gain, extending our study to include a relatively unexplored regime of low powers and revealing that substantial acceleration is already possible without the use of petawatt peak-power laser technology. PMID:21164849

  18. Frequency conversion of high-intensity, femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S

    1997-06-01

    Almost since the invention of the laser, frequency conversion of optical pulses via non- linear processes has been an area of active interest. However, third harmonic generation using ~(~1 (THG) in solids is an area that has not received much attention because of ma- terial damage limits. Recently, the short, high-intensity pulses possible with chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems allow the use of intensities on the order of 1 TW/cm2 in thin solids without damage. As a light source to examine single-crystal THG in solids and other high field inter- actions, the design and construction of a Ti:sapphire-based CPA laser system capable of ultimately producing peak powers of 100 TW is presented. Of special interest is a novel, all-reflective pulse stretcher design which can stretch a pulse temporally by a factor of 20,000. The stretcher design can also compensate for the added material dispersion due to propagation through the amplifier chain and produce transform-limited 45 fs pulses upon compression. A series of laser-pumped amplifiers brings the peak power up to the terawatt level at 10 Hz, and the design calls for additional amplifiers to bring the power level to the 100 TW level for single shot operation. The theory for frequency conversion of these short pulses is presented, focusing on conversion to the third harmonic in single crystals of BBO, KD*P, and d-LAP (deuterated I-arginine phosphate). Conversion efficiencies of up to 6% are obtained with 500 fs pulses at 1053 nm in a 3 mm thick BBO crystal at 200 GW/cm 2. Contributions to this process by unphasematched, cascaded second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are shown to be very significant. The angular relationship between the two orders is used to measure the tensor elements of C = xt3)/4 with Crs = -1.8 x 1O-23 m2/V2 and .15Cri + .54Crs = 4.0 x 1O-23 m2/V2. Conversion efficiency in d-LAP is about 20% that in BBO and conversion efficiency in KD*P is 1% that of BBO. It is calculated

  19. Amplification and generation of ultra-intense twisted laser pulses via stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Vieira, J; Trines, R M G M; Alves, E P; Fonseca, R A; Mendonça, J T; Bingham, R; Norreys, P; Silva, L O

    2016-01-01

    Twisted Laguerre-Gaussian lasers, with orbital angular momentum and characterized by doughnut-shaped intensity profiles, provide a transformative set of tools and research directions in a growing range of fields and applications, from super-resolution microcopy and ultra-fast optical communications to quantum computing and astrophysics. The impact of twisted light is widening as recent numerical calculations provided solutions to long-standing challenges in plasma-based acceleration by allowing for high-gradient positron acceleration. The production of ultra-high-intensity twisted laser pulses could then also have a broad influence on relativistic laser-matter interactions. Here we show theoretically and with ab initio three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that stimulated Raman backscattering can generate and amplify twisted lasers to petawatt intensities in plasmas. This work may open new research directions in nonlinear optics and high-energy-density science, compact plasma-based accelerators and light sources. PMID:26817620

  20. Amplification and generation of ultra-intense twisted laser pulses via stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Alves, E. P.; Fonseca, R. A.; Mendonça, J. T.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    Twisted Laguerre-Gaussian lasers, with orbital angular momentum and characterized by doughnut-shaped intensity profiles, provide a transformative set of tools and research directions in a growing range of fields and applications, from super-resolution microcopy and ultra-fast optical communications to quantum computing and astrophysics. The impact of twisted light is widening as recent numerical calculations provided solutions to long-standing challenges in plasma-based acceleration by allowing for high-gradient positron acceleration. The production of ultra-high-intensity twisted laser pulses could then also have a broad influence on relativistic laser-matter interactions. Here we show theoretically and with ab initio three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that stimulated Raman backscattering can generate and amplify twisted lasers to petawatt intensities in plasmas. This work may open new research directions in nonlinear optics and high-energy-density science, compact plasma-based accelerators and light sources.

  1. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors. (auth)

  2. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  3. Pulsed DF laser effects study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. B.; Maher, W. E.; Nichols, D. B.

    1981-07-01

    This study of DF laser interaction with materials investigated the amount of energy coupled to targets. Large focal spot dimensions were obtained with the Boeing photo-initiated 50-1 pulsed chemical laser with a stable resonator. Effects experiments emphasized metallic targets, especially aluminum. The single pulse coupling results yielded absorbed fluence values greater than those obtained with comparable energies at 10.6 micrometer wavelength. Ambient pressure and angle of incidence were varied. Research results also showed multiple-pulse effect at DF wavelength. Multiple-pulse thermal coupling experiments with aluminum demonstrated that, after 10 shots on the same spot, the coupled fluence per pulse doubled. Because of target melting and vaporization, both the intrinsic absorptivity and the plasma enhanced coupled fluence of succeeding pulses is greatly increased. In general, the multiple pulse effect is intensity-dependent and is small at either low or high intensities. Energy deposition was tested for uniformity by measuring the rises in temperature at five locations within the focal spot with an array of thermocouples.

  4. Ultrarelativistic laser systems based on coherent beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Trunov, V. I.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Frolov, S. A.; Leschenko, V. E.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Kokh, A. E.; Petrov, V. V.; Vasiliev, V. A.

    2012-07-01

    Conceptual design for femtosecond laser system of exawatt class, based on multi-channel amplifier and coherent field combining of petawatt amplifier channels with phase-frequency controlled radiation by optical clock are discussed. The scheme of start petawatt level few-cycle laser system with stable phase-frequency parameters determinated by the accuracy of the optical standard based on parametric amplification in big-size LBO crystals pumped by picosecond pulses is analyzed.

  5. Ultrashort-pulse laser machining

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S; Feit, M D; Nguyen, H T; Perry, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Sefcik, J A; Stuart, B C

    1998-09-01

    A new type of material processing is enabled with ultrashort (t < 10 ps) laser pulses. Cutting, drilling, sculpting of all materials (biologic materials, ceramics, sapphire, silicon carbide, diamond, metals) occurs by new mechanisms that eliminate thermal shock or collateral damage. High-precision machining to submicron tolerances is enabled resulting in high surface quality and negligible heat affected zone.

  6. Ultrashort-pulse lasers machining

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S; Feit, M D; Nguyen, H T; Perry, M D, Stuart, B C

    1999-01-22

    A new type of material processing is enabled with ultrashort (t < 10 psec) laser pulses. Cutting, drilling, sculpting of all materials (biologic materials, ceramics, sapphire, silicon carbide, diamond, metals) occurs by new mechanisms which eliminate thermal shock or collateral damage. High precision machining to submicron tolerances is enabled resulting in high surface quality and negligible heat affected zone.

  7. Amplification and generation of ultra-intense twisted laser pulses via stimulated Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, J.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Alves, E. P.; Fonseca, R. A.; Mendonça, J. T.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    Twisted Laguerre–Gaussian lasers, with orbital angular momentum and characterized by doughnut-shaped intensity profiles, provide a transformative set of tools and research directions in a growing range of fields and applications, from super-resolution microcopy and ultra-fast optical communications to quantum computing and astrophysics. The impact of twisted light is widening as recent numerical calculations provided solutions to long-standing challenges in plasma-based acceleration by allowing for high-gradient positron acceleration. The production of ultra-high-intensity twisted laser pulses could then also have a broad influence on relativistic laser–matter interactions. Here we show theoretically and with ab initio three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that stimulated Raman backscattering can generate and amplify twisted lasers to petawatt intensities in plasmas. This work may open new research directions in nonlinear optics and high–energy-density science, compact plasma-based accelerators and light sources. PMID:26817620

  8. Phase-Locked Control of Tiled-Grating Assemblies for Chirped-Pulse-Amplified Lasers Using a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bunkenburg, J.; Kessler, T.J.; Skulski, W.; Huang, H.

    2006-04-27

    Multikilojoule petawatt lasers using chirped-pulse amplification are being constructed worldwide. Several systems have adopted a tiled-grating approach to meet the size requirements for the compression gratings. Grating tiles need to be precisely phased to ensure a transform-limited focal spot when focusing high-energy laser pulses in the target plane. A computer-control test system that uses a Mach-Zehnder interferometer capable of monitoring and correcting drift in the tiled-grating assemblies within the compressor is described.

  9. Nanosecond component in a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Semak, V. V.; Zhang Zhili

    2012-11-15

    Experimental and computational results show that the coherent microwave scattering from a laser-induced plasma can be used for measuring the quality of a fs laser pulse. The temporal dynamics of the microwave scattered signal from the fs-laser induced plasma can be related to the effect of nanosecond tail of the fs laser pulse.

  10. Pulse transformer for GaAs laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    High-radiance gallium arsenide (GaAs) laser operating at room temperature is utilized in optical navigation system. For efficient transformer-to-laser impedance match, laser should be connected directly to pulse transformer secondary winding.

  11. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability.

  12. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  13. FY07 LDRD Final Report Precision, Split Beam, Chirped-Pulse, Seed Laser Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-11-12

    The goal of this LDRD ER was to develop a robust and reliable technology to seed high-energy laser systems with chirped pulses that can be amplified to kilo-Joule energies and recompressed to sub-picosecond pulse widths creating extremely high peak powers suitable for petawatt class physics experiments. This LDRD project focused on the development of optical fiber laser technologies compatible with the current long pulse National Ignition Facility (NIF) seed laser. New technologies developed under this project include, high stability mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber based techniques for reduction of compressed pulse pedestals and prepulses, new compact stretchers based on chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs), new techniques for manipulation of chirped pulses prior to amplification and new high-energy fiber amplifiers. This project was highly successful and met virtually all of its goals. The National Ignition Campaign has found the results of this work to be very helpful. The LDRD developed system is being employed in experiments to engineer the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) front end and the fully engineered version of the ARC Front End will employ much of the technology and techniques developed here.

  14. Investigation of Laser Parameters in Silicon Pulsed Laser Conduction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Khoshnoud, Afsaneh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser welding of silicon in conduction mode is investigated numerically. In this study, the effects of laser beam characteristics on the welding have been studied. In order to model the welding process, heat conduction equation is solved numerically and laser beam energy is considered as a boundary condition. Time depended heat conduction equation is used in our calculations to model pulsed laser welding. Thermo-physical and optical properties of the material are considered to be temperature dependent in our calculations. Effects of spatial and temporal laser beam parameters such as laser beam spot size, laser beam quality, laser beam polarization, laser incident angle, laser pulse energy, laser pulse width, pulse repetition frequency and welding speed on the welding characteristics are assessed. The results show that how the temperature dependent thermo-physical and optical parameters of the material are important in laser welding modeling. Also the results show how the parameters of the laser beam influence the welding characteristics.

  15. Ultrashort-pulse laser calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weijia; Kazansky, Peter G.; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2008-10-01

    Control of structural modifications inside silica glass by changing the front tilt of an ultrashort pulse is demonstrated, achieving a calligraphic style of laser writing. The phenomena of anisotropic bubble formation at the boundary of an irradiated region and modification transition from microscopic bubbles formation to self-assembled form birefringence are observed, and the physical mechanisms are discussed. The results provide the comprehensive evidence that the light beam with centrosymmetric intensity distribution can produce noncentrosymmetric material modifications.

  16. Wakefield generation via two color laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Saroch, Akanksha; Kumar Verma, Nirmal

    2013-05-15

    The analytical study for the evolution of longitudinal as well as transverse electric wakefields, generated via passage of two color laser pulses through uniform plasma, has been presented in the mildly relativistic regime. The frequency difference between the two laser pulses is assumed to be equal to the plasma frequency, in the present analysis. The relative angle between the directions of polarization of the two laser pulses is varied and the wakefield amplitudes are compared. Further, the amplitude of the excited wakes by two color pulses are compared with those generated by a single laser pulse.

  17. Chirped pulse amplification: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Maine, P.; Strickland, D.; Pessot, M.; Squier, J.; Bado, P.; Mourou, G.; Harter, D.

    1988-01-01

    Short pulses with ultrahigh peak powers have been generated in Nd: glass and Alexandrite using the Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA) technique. This technique has been successful in producing picosecond terawatt pulses with a table-top laser system. In the near future, CPA will be applied to large laser systems such as NOVA to produce petawatt pulses (1 kJ in a 1 ps pulse) with focused intensities exceeding 10/sup /plus/21/ W/cm/sup 2/. These pulses will be associated with electric fields in excess of 100 e/a/sub o//sup 2/ and blackbody energy densities equivalent to 3 /times/ 10/sup 10/ J/cm/sup 3/. This petawatt source will have important applications in x-ray laser research and will lead to fundamentally new experiments in atomic, nuclear, solid-state, plasma, and high-energy density physics. A review of present and future designs are discussed. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Pulse shaping on the Nova laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.K.; Speck, D.R.; Bibeau, C.; Weiland, T.L.

    1989-02-06

    Inertial confinement fusion requires temporally shaped pulses to achieve high gain efficiency. Recently, we demonstrated the ability to produce complex temporal pulse shapes at high power at 0.35 microns on the Nova laser system. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Photoemission using femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Fischer, J.

    1991-10-01

    Successful operation of short wavelength FEL requires an electron bunch of current >100 A and normalized emittance < 1 mm-mrad. Recent experiments show that RF guns with photocathodes as the electron source may be the ideal candidate for achieving these parameters. To reduce the emittance growth due to space charge and RF dynamics effects, the gun may have to operate at high field gradient (hence at high RF frequency) and a spot size small compared to the aperture. This may necessitate the laser pulse duration to be in the subpicosecond regime to reduce the energy spread. We will present the behavior of metal photocathodes upon irradiation with femtosecond laser beams, comparison of linear and nonlinear photoemission, and scalability to high currents. Theoretical estimate of the intrinsic emittance at the photocathode in the presence of the anomalous heating of the electrons, and the tolerance on the surface roughness of the cathode material will be discussed.

  20. Hot electron production in laser solid interactions with a controlled pre-pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Culfa, O.; Tallents, G. J.; Wagenaars, E.; Ridgers, C. P.; Dance, R. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Brown, C. D. R.; James, S. F.; Hoarty, D. J.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Lancaster, K. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Kampfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.

    2014-04-15

    Hot electron generation plays an important role in the fast ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and other applications with ultra-intense lasers. Hot electrons of temperature up to 10–20 MeV have been produced by high contrast picosecond duration laser pulses focussed to intensities of ∼10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2} with a deliberate pre-pulse on solid targets using the Vulcan Petawatt Laser facility. We present measurements of the number and temperature of hot electrons obtained using an electron spectrometer. The results are correlated to the density scale length of the plasma produced by a controlled pre-pulse measured using an optical probe diagnostic. 1D simulations predict electron temperature variations with plasma density scale length in agreement with the experiment at shorter plasma scale lengths (<7.5μm), but with the experimental temperatures (13–17 MeV) dropping below the simulation values (20–25 MeV) at longer scale lengths. The experimental results show that longer interaction plasmas produced by pre-pulses enable significantly greater number of hot electrons to be produced.

  1. Short-pulse photolytic iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Ralph F.; Harris, Melvin; Anderson, Brian T.; Hager, Gordon D.

    2000-08-01

    A compact, short pulse photolytic iodine laser (PIL) system designed for use as a source in Raman conversion experiments is described. The single-shot, flashlamp-pumped laser outputs 10 Joules in a 3 microsecond(s) FWHM pulse at a wavelength of 1.315 micrometer and uses n-C3F7I as the renewable laser fuel. Laser design and performance characteristics are presented.

  2. Dynamic pulsing of a MOPA fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Rosa; Guerreiro, Paulo T.; Hendow, Sami T.; Salcedo, José R.

    2011-05-01

    Dynamic Pulsing is demonstrated using a pulsed MOPA fiber laser at 1064nm. The output of the MOPA laser is a pulsed profile consisting of a burst of closely spaced pulses. Tests were performed under several materials with pulse bursts ranging from 10ns to 1μs and operating from 500kHz down to single shot. In particular, percussion drilling in stainless steel is demonstrated showing improvements in quality and speed of the process. These profiles allow high flexibility and optimization of the process addressing the specificity of the end application. Dynamic Pulsing allows the same MOPA fiber laser to be used in diverse materials as well as different processes such us marking, drilling, scribing and engraving. The pulsed fiber laser used in this study is a MOPA-DY by Multiwave Photonics. It is based on a modulated seed laser followed by a series of fiber amplifiers and ending with an optically isolated collimator. This pulsed laser model has an output in such a way that each trigger produces a fast burst of pulses, with a repetition frequency within the burst of the order of tens of MHz. Within the burst it is possible to change the number of pulses, the individual pulse profile, burst pulse period and even to generate non-periodic burst pulse separations. The laser allows full freedom for all these combinations. The study here reported compares the impact of pulse peak power, number of pulses within a burst and the pulse burst period, on process quality (heat affected zone, debris, hole uniformity) and drilling yield.

  3. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  4. Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Effects from Short-Pulse Lasers and Fusion Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D C; Throop, A; Brown, Jr., C G; Kimbrough, J; Stowell, M L; White, D A; Song, P; Back, N; MacPhee, A; Chen, H; DeHope, W; Ping, Y; Maddox, B; Lister, J; Pratt, G; Ma, T; Tsui, Y; Perkins, M; O'Brien, D; Patel, P

    2009-03-06

    Our research focused on obtaining a fundamental understanding of the source and properties of EMP at the Titan PW(petawatt)-class laser facility. The project was motivated by data loss and damage to components due to EMP, which can limit diagnostic techniques that can be used reliably at short-pulse PW-class laser facilities. Our measurements of the electromagnetic fields, using a variety of probes, provide information on the strength, time duration, and frequency dependence of the EMP. We measure electric field strengths in the 100's of kV/m range, durations up to 100 ns, and very broad frequency response extending out to 5 GHz and possibly beyond. This information is being used to design shielding to mitigate the effects of EMP on components at various laser facilities. We showed the need for well-shielded cables and oscilloscopes to obtain high quality data. Significant work was invested in data analysis techniques to process this data. This work is now being transferred to data analysis procedures for the EMP diagnostics being fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition to electromagnetic field measurements, we measured the spatial and energy distribution of electrons escaping from targets. This information is used as input into the 3D electromagnetic code, EMSolve, which calculates time dependent electromagnetic fields. The simulation results compare reasonably well with data for both the strength and broad frequency bandwidth of the EMP. This modeling work required significant improvements in EMSolve to model the fields in the Titan chamber generated by electrons escaping the target. During dedicated Titan shots, we studied the effects of varying laser energy, target size, and pulse duration on EMP properties. We also studied the effect of surrounding the target with a thick conducting sphere and cube as a potential mitigation approach. System generated EMP (SGEMP) in coaxial cables does not appear to be a significant at Titan. Our results

  5. K-(alpha) Radiography at 20-100 keV Using Short-Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H S; Chambers, D; Clarke, R; Eagleton, R; Giraldez, E; Goldsack, T; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; Key, M; King, J; Koch, J; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A; Nikroo, A; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Remington, B; Robey, H; Snavely, R; Steinman, D; Stephenson, R; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Town, R J

    2005-08-29

    X-ray radiography is an important tool for diagnosing and imaging planar and convergent hydrodynamics phenomena for laser experiments. Until now, hydrodynamics experiments at Omega and NIF utilize E{sub x-ray} < 9 keV backlighter x-rays emitted by thermal plasmas. However, future experiments will need to diagnose larger and denser targets and will require x-ray probes of energies from 20-100 keV and possibly up to 1 MeV. Hard K-{alpha} x-ray photons can be created through high-energy electron interactions in the target material after irradiation by petawatt-class high-intensity-short-pulse lasers with > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We have performed several experiments on the JanUSP, and the Vulcan 100TW, and Vulcan Petawatt lasers to understand K-{alpha} sources and to test radiography concepts. 1-D radiography using an edge-on foil and 2-D radiography using buried wires and cone-fiber targets were tested. We find that 1-D thin edge-on foils can have imaging resolution better than 10 {micro}m. Micro volume targets produce bright sources with measured conversion efficiency from laser energy to x-ray photons of {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. This level of conversion may not be enough for 2-D point projection radiography. A comparison of our experimental measurements of small volume sources with the LSP/PIC simulation show similar K-{alpha} creation profiles but discrepancy in absolute yields.

  6. Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Physics and Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Naskrecki, Ryszard

    2007-11-26

    Study of physical and chemical events accompanying light-matter interaction in pico- and femtosecond time scale have become possible with the use of ultrashort laser pulses. With the progress in generation of ultrashort laser pulses, the ultrafast optical spectroscopy, as a tool for dynamic study, is still evolving rapidly.

  7. Progress on converting a NIF quad to eight, petawatt beams for advanced radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. K.; Tietbohl, G.; Arnold, P.; Bliss, E. S.; Boley, C.; Britten, G.; Brunton, G.; Clark, W.; Dawson, J. W.; Fochs, S.; Hackel, R.; Haefner, C.; Halpin, J.; Heebner, J.; Henesian, M.; Hermann, M.; Hernandez, J.; Kanz, V.; McHale, B.; McLeod, J. B.; Nguyen, H.; Phan, H.; Rushford, M.; Shaw, B.; Shverdin, M.; Sigurdsson, R.; Speck, R.; Stolz, C.; Trummer, D.; Wolfe, J.; Wong, J. N.; Siders, G. C.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-08-01

    We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

  8. Progress on Converting a NIF Quad to Eight, Petawatt Beams for Advanced Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J K

    2009-10-19

    We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

  9. Flexible pulse-controlled fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Controlled flexible pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber telecommunication, optical sensing, metrology, and microscopy. Here, we report a compact pulse-controlled all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity fiber Bragg grating (FBG) system as a flexible filter. The width and wavelength of pulses can be tuned independently by vertically and horizontally translating a cantilever beam, respectively. The pulse width of the laser can be tuned flexibly and accurately from ~7 to ~150 ps by controlling the bandwidth of FBG. The wavelength of pulse can be tuned precisely with the range of >20 nm. The flexible laser is precisely controlled and insensitive to environmental perturbations. This fiber-based laser is a simple, stable, and low-cost source for various applications where the width-tunable and/or wavelength-tunable pulses are necessary. PMID:25801546

  10. Flexible pulse-controlled fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Controlled flexible pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber telecommunication, optical sensing, metrology, and microscopy. Here, we report a compact pulse-controlled all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity fiber Bragg grating (FBG) system as a flexible filter. The width and wavelength of pulses can be tuned independently by vertically and horizontally translating a cantilever beam, respectively. The pulse width of the laser can be tuned flexibly and accurately from ~7 to ~150 ps by controlling the bandwidth of FBG. The wavelength of pulse can be tuned precisely with the range of >20 nm. The flexible laser is precisely controlled and insensitive to environmental perturbations. This fiber-based laser is a simple, stable, and low-cost source for various applications where the width-tunable and/or wavelength-tunable pulses are necessary. PMID:25801546

  11. Heating of solid targets with laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the heat-conduction equation are obtained for the heating of absorbing media with pulsed lasers. The spatial and temporal form of the temperature is determined using several different models of the laser irradiance. Both surface and volume generation of heat are discussed. It is found that if the depth of thermal diffusion for the laser-pulse duration is large compared to the optical-attenuation depth, the surface- and volume-generation models give nearly identical results. However, if the thermal-diffusion depth for the laser-pulse duration is comparable to or less than the optical-attenuation depth, the surface-generation model can give significantly different results compared to the volume-generation model. Specific numerical results are given for a tungsten target irradiated by pulses of different temporal durations and the implications of the results are discussed with respect to the heating of metals by picosecond laser pulses.

  12. Relativistic laser pulse compression in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yun; Sang, Hai-Bo Wan, Feng; Lv, Chong; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-07-15

    The self-compression of a weak relativistic Gaussian laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the laser pulse amplitude evolution, is deduced and solved numerically. The pulse compression is observed in the cases of both left- and right-hand circular polarized lasers. It is found that the compressed velocity is increased for the left-hand circular polarized laser fields, while decreased for the right-hand ones, which is reinforced as the enhancement of the external magnetic field. We find a 100 fs left-hand circular polarized laser pulse is compressed in a magnetized (1757 T) plasma medium by more than ten times. The results in this paper indicate the possibility of generating particularly intense and short pulses.

  13. Formation of short high-power laser radiation pulses in excimer mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losev, V. F., Sr.; Ivanov, N. G.; Panchenko, Yu. N.

    2007-06-01

    Presently an excimer mediums continue are examined as one of variants for formation of powerful and over powerful pulses of laser radiation with duration from units of nanosecond up to tens femtosecond. The researches on such powerful installations as "NIKE" (USA) and << SUPER ASHURA >>, Japan) proceed in this direction. The main advantage of excimer mediums is the opportunity to work in a frequency mode, absence of restriction on the size of active area, high uniformity of a gas working medium, high efficiency (up to 10 %) and wide spectral range of laser radiation (KrF, XeCl ~ 2nm, XeF (C-A), Xe IICl ~ 50-100 nanometers). Research in area of high quality laser beams formation in excimer mediums and its amplification in high power amplifiers are carried out the long time in Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, Russia. The wide aperture XeCl laser system of MELS-4k is used for these investigations. Last time we take part in program on development of high power excimer laser system with a petawatt level of power. This system supposes the formation and amplification high quality laser beams with different pulse duration from units of nanosecond up to tens femtosecond. We research the possibility of laser beams formation in excimer mediums with ps-ns pulse duration having the low noise and divergence near to diffraction limit. In other hand, we are developing the wide aperture XeF(C-A) amplifier with optical pump on base electron accelerator. According to our estimations of the XeF(C-A) amplifier based on the converter of e-beam energy to the Xe II* fluorescence at 172 nm will allow to obtain up to 100 TW peak power in a 30 fs pulse.

  14. Electron-Heated Target Temperature Measurements in Petawatt Laser Experiments Based on Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging and Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T; Beg, F; Macphee, A; Chung, H; Key, M; Mackinnon, A; Patel, P; Hatchett, S; Akli, K; Stephens, R; Chen, C; Freeman, R; Link, A; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; VanWoerkom, L; Zhang, B

    2008-05-02

    Three independent methods (XUV spectroscopy, imaging at 68 eV and 256 eV) have been used to measure planar target rear surface plasma temperature due to heating by hot electrons. The hot electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser plasma interactions using the 150 J, 0.5 ps Titan laser. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in the 50-400 eV region and imaging at the 68 eV and 256 eV photon energies were used to determine the rear surface temperature of planar CD targets. Temperatures were found to be in the 60-150 eV range, with good agreement between the three diagnostics.

  15. Stimulated light forces using picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Immanuel; Goepfert, A.; Haubrich, D.; Lison, F.; Schuetze, R.; Wynands, Robert; Meschede, Dieter

    1997-05-01

    Using the stimulated force exerted by counterpropagating picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser we were able to focus a beam of laser-cooled cesium atoms along one dimension to about 57% of its original width in the detection zone. The force profile was measured outside and inside the overlap region of the pulses and found to be in agreement with an earlier theoretical prediction. A brief theoretical account of the interaction of atoms with pulsed laser light based on the optical Bloch equations is given.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of additive pulse modelocked lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sucha, G.; Bolton, S.R.; Chemla, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamics have been studied in a number of modelocked laser systems, primarily in actively modelocked systems. However, less attention has been paid to the dynamics of passively modelocked laser systems. With the recent revolutionary advances in femtosecond modelocked laser technology, the understanding of instabilities and dynamics in passively modelocked lasers is an important issue. Here, the authors present experimental and numerical studies of the dynamics of an additive-pulse modelocked (APM) color-center laser.

  17. Nd : glass rod laser with an output energy of 500 J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaykin, A. A.; Kuzmin, A. A.; Shaikin, I. A.; Burdonov, K. F.; Khazanov, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The energy of two orthogonally polarised pulses injected into an available multistage amplifier based on neodymium phosphate glass rods was increased from 300 to 500 J (in both pulses). The second output pulse with an energy of 200 J will be used to pump an additional parametric amplifier of a petawatt laser.

  18. Semianalytical study of the propagation of an ultrastrong femtosecond laser pulse in a plasma with ultrarelativistic electron jitter

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanović, Dušan; Fedele, Renato; Belić, Milivoj; De Nicola, Sergio

    2015-04-15

    The interaction of a multi-petawatt, pancake-shaped laser pulse with an unmagnetized plasma is studied analytically and numerically in a regime with ultrarelativistic electron jitter velocities, in which the plasma electrons are almost completely expelled from the pulse region. The study is applied to a laser wakefield acceleration scheme with specifications that may be available in the next generation of Ti:Sa lasers and with the use of recently developed pulse compression techniques. A set of novel nonlinear equations is derived using a three-timescale description, with an intermediate timescale associated with the nonlinear phase of the electromagnetic wave and with the spatial bending of its wave front. They describe, on an equal footing, both the strong and the moderate laser intensity regimes, pertinent to the core and to the edges of the pulse. These have fundamentally different dispersive properties since in the core the electrons are almost completely expelled by a very strong ponderomotive force, and the electromagnetic wave packet is imbedded in a vacuum channel, thus having (almost) linear properties. Conversely, at the pulse edges, the laser amplitude is smaller, and the wave is weakly nonlinear and dispersive. New nonlinear terms in the wave equation, introduced by the nonlinear phase, describe without the violation of imposed scaling laws a smooth transition to a nondispersive electromagnetic wave at very large intensities and a simultaneous saturation of the (initially cubic) nonlocal nonlinearity. The temporal evolution of the laser pulse is studied both analytically and by numerically solving the model equations in a two-dimensional geometry, with the spot diameter presently used in some laser acceleration experiments. The most stable initial pulse length is estimated to exceed ≳1.5–2 μm. Moderate stretching of the pulse in the direction of propagation is observed, followed by the development of a vacuum channel and of a very large

  19. Extremely Nonsinusoidal Emissions from Strong Laser Pulses Obliquely P-Incident on Sharp-Edged Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyshetskiy, Y.; Nikolic, L.; Johnston, T. W.; Vidal, F.

    2006-10-01

    Extremely high laser harmonics emissions [1] emerge from the Vulcan petawatt laser's sub-picosecond laser pulses obliquely incident on slab targets with extremely low pre-pulse energy. Similar studies are to be made using the ALLS 200 TW Ti-Saph laser (24 fs at 10 Hz with 10-10 contrast even without plasma mirrors). We discuss our 2-D PIC simulations using the OSIRIS code with a view to (a) understanding the basic mechanism(s) for the production of the harmonics and (b) establishing the effect of density gradients. Typical results resemble those of Naumova et al. [2], including the presence of a very large and asymmetric electromagnetic ``spikes'' which account for the high harmonic content. [1] B. Dromey, M. Zepf, A. Gopal, K. Lancaster, M. S. Wei, K. Krushelnick, M. Tatarakis, N. Vakakis, S. Moustaizis, R. Kodama, M. Tampo, C. Stoeckl, R. Clarke, H. Habara, D. Neely, S. Karsch and P. Norreys, Nature Phys. Lett., 2, 456-459 (2006) [2] N. Naumova, I. Sokolov, J. Nees,1 A. Maksimchuk, V. Yanovsky, and G. Mourou Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 195003 (2004)

  20. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  1. Intense isolated attosecond pulse generation from relativistic laser plasmas using few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guangjin; Dallari, William; Borot, Antonin; Krausz, Ferenc; Yu, Wei; Tsakiris, George D.; Veisz, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    We have performed a systematic study through particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the generation of attosecond pulse from relativistic laser plasmas when laser pulse duration approaches the few-cycle regime. A significant enhancement of attosecond pulse energy has been found to depend on laser pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and plasma scale length. Based on the results obtained in this work, the potential of attaining isolated attosecond pulses with ˜100 μJ energy for photons >16 eV using state-of-the-art laser technology appears to be within reach.

  2. Intense isolated attosecond pulse generation from relativistic laser plasmas using few-cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Guangjin; Dallari, William; Borot, Antonin; Tsakiris, George D.; Veisz, Laszlo; Krausz, Ferenc; Yu, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We have performed a systematic study through particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the generation of attosecond pulse from relativistic laser plasmas when laser pulse duration approaches the few-cycle regime. A significant enhancement of attosecond pulse energy has been found to depend on laser pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and plasma scale length. Based on the results obtained in this work, the potential of attaining isolated attosecond pulses with ∼100 μJ energy for photons >16 eV using state-of-the-art laser technology appears to be within reach.

  3. Generation of laser pulse trains for tests of multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalloo, R. J.; Corner, L.; Arran, C.; Cowley, J.; Cheung, G.; Thornton, C.; Walczak, R.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    In multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration (MP-LWFA) a plasma wave is driven by a train of low-energy laser pulses separated by the plasma period, an approach which offers a route to driving plasma accelerators with high efficiency and at high pulse repetition rates using emerging technologies such as fibre and thin-disk lasers. Whilst these laser technologies are in development, proof-of-principle tests of MP-LWFA require a pulse train to be generated from a single, high-energy ultrafast pulse. Here we demonstrate the generation of trains of up to 7 pulses with pulse separations in the range 150-170 fs from single 40 fs pulses produced by a Ti:sapphire laser.

  4. MOPA pulsed fiber laser for silicon scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Limei; Huang, Wei; Deng, Mengmeng; Li, Feng

    2016-06-01

    A 1064 nm master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) pulsed fiber laser is developed with flexible control over the pulse width, repetition frequency and peak power, and it is used to investigate the dependence of mono-crystalline silicon scribe depth on the laser pulse width, scanning speed and repeat times. Experimental results indicate that long pulses with low peak powers lead to deep ablation depths. We also demonstrate that the ablation depth grows fast with the scanning repeat times at first and progressively tends to be saturated when the repeat times reach a certain level. A thermal model considering the laser pulse overlapping effect that predicts the silicon temperature variation and scribe depth is employed to verify the experimental conclusions with reasonably close agreement. These conclusions are of great benefits to the optimization of the laser material processing with high efficiency.

  5. Relativistic plasma shutter for ultraintense laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Stephen A.; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Bulanov, Stepan; Tampo, Motonobu; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Yanovsky, Victor; Kodama, Ryousuke; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Krushelnick, Karl; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2009-01-01

    A relativistic plasma shutter technique is proposed and tested to remove the sub-100 ps pedestal of a high-intensity laser pulse. The shutter is an ultrathin foil placed before the target of interest. As the leading edge of the laser ionizes the shutter material it will expand into a relativistically underdense plasma allowing for the peak pulse to propagate through while rejecting the low intensity pedestal. An increase in the laser temporal contrast is demonstrated by measuring characteristic signatures in the accelerated proton spectra and directionality from the interaction of 30 TW pulses with ultrathin foils along with supporting hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:19654882

  6. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1988-01-01

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  7. Pulse front tilt measurement of femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Stoyanov, Lyubomir; Stefanov, Ivan; Dreischuh, Alexander; Hansinger, Peter; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we report experimental investigations of an intentionally introduced pulse front tilt on femtosecond laser pulses by using an inverted field correlator/interferometer. A reliable criterion for the precision in aligning (in principle) dispersionless systems for manipulating ultrashort pulses is developed, specifically including cases when the pulse front tilt is a result of a desired spatio-temporal coupling. The results obtained using two low-dispersion diffraction gratings are in good qualitative agreement with the data from a previously developed analytical model and from an independent interferometric measurement.

  8. Simulation of Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R.; Itina, Tatian E.

    2010-10-08

    We investigate the physical reasons of a strange decrease in the ablation depth observed in femtosecond double-pulse experiments with increasing delay between the pulses. Two ultrashort pulses of the same energy produce the crater which is less than that created by a single pulse. Hydrodynamic simulation shows that the ablation mechanism is suppressed when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The modeling of the double-pulse ablation for different delays between pulses confirms this explanation.

  9. Laser lithotripsy using double pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfmann, Juergen; Doerschel, Klaus; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1990-07-01

    There are currntly several methods in the field of laser lithotripsy which operate not only at different wavelengths and pulse lengths but also with various types of optical front ends and various irrigation fluids'6. The methods can be divided into two main groups: First, those which utilize stone absorption and plasma formation on the stone surface to initiate stone fragmentation, such as dye lasers. Second, those which generate shock waves and caviatation in the surrounding fluid and which require additional means to produce aplasma (e.g. irrigation, focussing fiber end or metal surfaces). The pulsed Nd:YAG laser belongs to this group. The method presented here is the double pulse technique which is a combination of both methods. It uses two laser pulses with a short time delay transmitted by means of a fiber to destroy body concrements. The first pulse is the first harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser (532nm) which improves the coupling efficiency of the laser radiation with the stone. The second pulse is in the fundamental mode of the laser (1064 nm) delivering the high energy for the stone disruption.

  10. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

    2007-06-21

    We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

  11. Pulsed Laser Ablation of Soft Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Alfred; Venugopalan, Vasan

    In this chapter we focus on the key elements that form our current understanding of the mechanisms of pulsed laser ablation of soft biological tissues. We present a conceptual framework providing mechanistic links between various ablation applications and the underlying thermodynamic and phase change processes [1]. We define pulsed laser ablation as the use of laser pulses with duration of ~1 ms or less for the incision or removal of tissue regardless of the photophysical or photochemical processes involved. However, we will confine this presentation to pulsed ablation performed on a tissue level that does not involve laser-induced plasma formation. Ablation processes within transparent tissues or cells resulting from non-linear absorption have been considered in reviews by Vogel and Venugopalan [1] and by Vogel and co-workers [2].

  12. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Cormier-Michel, E.

    2010-11-04

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA). In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  13. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations [8]. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  14. Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures.

  15. The dynamics of compact laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, S.; Tucker, R. W.; Walton, T. J.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the use of a class of exact finite energy solutions to the vacuum source-free Maxwell equations as models for multi- and single cycle laser pulses in classical interaction with relativistic charged point particles. These compact solutions are classified in terms of their chiral content and their influence on particular charge configurations in space. The results of such classical interactions motivate a phenomenological quantum description of a propagating laser pulse in a medium in terms of an effective quantum Hamiltonian.

  16. Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.

    1998-05-26

    Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures. 18 figs.

  17. Pulsed lasers in dentistry: sense or nonsense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.; Frentzen, Matthias

    1991-05-01

    The great interest in the field of laser applications in dentistry provokes the question, if all these new techniques may really fulfill advantages, which are expected after initial in-vitro studies. Whereas laser surgery of soft oral tissues has been developed to a standard method, laser treatment of dental hard tissues and the bone are attended with many unsolved problems. Different laser types, especially pulsed lasers in a wide spectrum of wavelengths have been proofed for dental use. Today neither the excimer lasers, emitting in the far uv-range from 193 to 351 nm, nor the mid-infrared lasers like Nd:YAG (1,064 μm), Ho:YAG (2,1 μm) and Er:YAG (2,96 μm) or the C02-laser (10,6 μm) show mechanism of interaction more carefully and faster than a preparation of teeth with diamond drillers. The laser type with the most precise and considerate treatment effects in the moment is the short pulsed (15 ns) ArF-excimer laser with a wavelength of 193 nm. However this laser type has not yet the effectivity of mechanical instruments and it needs a mirror system to deliver the radiation. Histological results point out, that this laser shows no significant pathological alterations in the adjacent tissues. Another interesting excimer laser, filled with XeCI and emitting at a wavelength of 308 nm has the advantage to be good to deliver through quartz fibers. A little more thermal influence is to be seen according to the longer wavelength. Yet the energy density, necessary to cut dental hard tissues will not be reached with the laser systems available now. Both the pulsed Er:YAG- (2,94 μm, pulse duration 250 s) and the Ho:YAG -laser (2,1 μm, pulse duration 250 μs) have an effective coupling of the laser energy to hydrogeneous tissues, but they do not work sufficient on healthy enamel and dentine. The influence to adjacent healthy tissue is not tolerable, especially in regard of the thermal damage dentine and pulp tissues. Moreover, like the 193 nm ArF-excimer laser

  18. Pulsed Laser Illumination of Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland; Jenkins, Philip; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. The induction FEL and the radio-frequency (RF) FEL both produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work, we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format, producing 50 ps pulses at a frequency of 78 MHz. A variety of Si, GaAs, CaSb and CdInSe2 (CIS) solar cells are tested at average incident powers between 4 mW/sq cm and 425 mW/sq cm. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced by using a pulsed laser source compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. Because the pulse separation is less than or approximately equal to the minority carrier lifetime, the illumination conditions are effectively those of a continuous wave laser. The time dependence of the voltage and current response of the cells are also measured using a sampling oscilloscope equipped with a high frequency voltage probe and current transformer. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments shows that the RF FEL pulse format yields much more efficient photovoltaic conversion of light than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  19. Pulse-shaping circuit for laser excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Narrower, impedence-matched pulses initiate stabler electric discharges for gas lasers. Discharges are more efficient, more compact, capable of high repetition rate, and less expensive than conventional electron-beam apparatus, but gas tends to break down and form localized arcs. Pulse-shaping circuit compresses width of high-voltage pulses from relatively-slow rise-time voltage generator and gradually grades circuit impedance from inherent high impedance of generator to low impedence of gas.

  20. Pressure wave charged repetitively pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarny, Vijay A.

    1982-01-01

    A repetitively pulsed gas laser in which a system of mechanical shutters bracketing the laser cavity manipulate pressure waves resulting from residual energy in the cavity gas following a lasing event so as to draw fresh gas into the cavity and effectively pump spent gas in a dynamic closed loop.

  1. Feedback control of pulsed laser deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, S. J. P.; Stark, E. F.

    1993-10-01

    Implementation of closed loop feedback on PLD (pulsed laser deposition) requires actuators and sensors. Improvements in quality and reproducibility of material depositions are achieved by actuating the process towards desired operating regions. Empirical relationships are experimentally determined for describing the complex dynamical interactions of laser parameters. Feedback control based on this description can then be implemented to reduce process disorder.

  2. PULSED LASER ABLATION OF CEMENT AND CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was investigated as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete from nuclear facilities. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam...

  3. Modeling of pulsed lasers for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2005-01-01

    Pulsed lasers are useful for remote sensing of wind and greenhouse gases to better understand the atmosphere and its impact on weather patterns and the environment. It is not always practical to develop and optimize new laser systems empirically due to the time and expense associated with such endeavors. A practical option is to use a laser model to predict various performance parameters and compare these with the needs required for a particular remote sensing application. This approach can be very useful in determining the efficacy of potential laser systems, saving both time and money before proceeding with the actual construction of a laser device. As a pedagogical example, the modeling of diode pumped Tm:Ho:YLF and Tm:Ho:LuLF lasers are examined. Tm:Ho lasers operating around 2.0 μm have been used for wind measurements such as clear air turbulence and wake vortices. The model predictions for the laser systems examined here are compared to the actual laser performance, validating the usefulness of the modeling approach. While Tm:Ho fluoride lasers are used as a pedagogical example, the model is applicable to any lanthanide series pulsed laser system. This provides a useful tool for investigating potential laser systems that meet the requirements desired for a variety of remote sensing applications.

  4. Quantifying pulsed laser induced damage to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Marc; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Bezares, Francisco J.; Robinson, Jeremy; Anderson, Travis; Chun, Hayden; Tadjer, Marko

    2011-11-21

    As an emerging optical material, graphene's ultrafast dynamics are often probed using pulsed lasers yet the region in which optical damage takes place is largely uncharted. Here, femtosecond laser pulses induced localized damage in single-layer graphene on sapphire. Raman spatial mapping, SEM, and AFM microscopy quantified the damage. The resulting size of the damaged area has a linear correlation with the optical fluence. These results demonstrate local modification of sp{sup 2}-carbon bonding structures with optical pulse fluences as low as 14 mJ/cm{sup 2}, an order-of-magnitude lower than measured and theoretical ablation thresholds.

  5. Laser pulse shaping for high gradient accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Galletti, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Moreno, M.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    In many high gradient accelerator schemes, i.e. with plasma or dielectric wakefield induced by particles, many electron pulses are required to drive the acceleration of one of them. Those electron bunches, that generally should have very short duration and low emittance, can be generated in photoinjectors driven by a train of laser pulses coming inside the same RF bucket. We present the system used to shape and characterize the laser pulses used in multibunch operations at Sparc_lab. Our system gives us control over the main parameter useful to produce a train of up to five high brightness bunches with tailored intensity and time distribution.

  6. Pulse-to-pulse polarization-switching method for high-repetition-rate lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahne, Steffen; Johnston, Benjamin F.; Withford, Michael J.

    2007-02-01

    We report a method that enables dynamic switching of the pulse-to-pulse linear polarization orientation of a high-pulse-rate laser. The implications for laser micromachining, where polarization direction can be important, are also discussed.

  7. Pulsed solid state lasers for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertesz, Ivan; Danileiko, A. Y.; Denker, Boris I.; Kroo, Norbert; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.

    1994-02-01

    The effect on living tissues of different pulsed solid state lasers: Nd:YAG ((lambda) equals 1.06 micrometers ) Er:glass (1.54 micrometers ), Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers ) and Er:YAG (2.94 micrometers ) is compared with the continuous wave Nd:YAG- and CO2-lasers used in operating theaters. Portable Er:glass- and Er:YAG-lasers are developed for surgery/cosmetics and HIV-safe blood testing.

  8. Classical dynamics of free electromagnetic laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, S.; Tucker, R. W.; Walton, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a class of exact finite energy solutions to the vacuum source-free Maxwell field equations as models for multi- and single cycle laser pulses in classical interaction with relativistic charged test particles. These solutions are classified in terms of their chiral content based on their influence on particular charge configurations in space. Such solutions offer a computationally efficient parameterization of compact laser pulses used in laser-matter simulations and provide a potential means for experimentally bounding the fundamental length scale in the generalized electrodynamics of Bopp, Landé and Podolsky.

  9. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived. PMID:24921828

  10. Numerical studies of petawatt laser-driven proton generation from two-species targets using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domański, J.; Badziak, J.; Jabloński, S.

    2016-04-01

    Laser-driven generation of high-energy ion beams has recently attracted considerable interest due to a variety of potential applications including proton radiography, ICF fast ignition, nuclear physics or hadron therapy. The ion beam parameters depend on both laser pulse and target parameters, and in order to produce the ion beam of properties required for a particular application the laser and target parameters must be carefully selected, and the mechanism of the ion beam generation should be well understood and controlled. Convenient and commonly used tools for studies of the ion acceleration process are particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. Using two-dimensional PIC simulations, the properties of a proton beam generated from a thin erbium hydride (ErH3) target irradiated by a 25fs laser pulse of linear or circular polarization and of intensity ranging from 1020 to 1021 W/cm2 are investigated and compared with the features of a proton beam produced from a hydrocarbon (CH) target. It has been found that using erbium hydride targets instead of hydrocarbon ones creates an opportunity to generate more compact proton beams of higher mean energy, intensity and of better collimation. This is especially true for the linear polarization of the laser beam, for which the mean proton energy, the amount of high energy protons and the intensity of the proton beam generated from the hydride target is by an order of magnitude higher than for the hydrocarbon target. For the circular polarization, the proton beam parameters are lower than those for the linear one, and the effect of target composition on the acceleration process is weaker.

  11. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL provide FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  12. High Power Pulsed Gas Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witteman, W. J.

    1987-09-01

    Gas lasers have shown to be capable of delivering tens of terrawatt aspeak power or tens of kilowatt as average power. The efficiencies of most high power gas lasers are relatively high compared with other types of lasers. For instance molecular lasers, oscillating on low lying vibrational levels, and excimer lasers may have intrinsic efficiencies above 10%.The wavelengths of these gas lasers cover the range from the far infrared to the ultra-violet region, say from 12000 to 193 nm. The most important properties are the scalability, optical homogeneity of the excited medium, and the relatively low price per watt of output power. The disadvantages may be the large size of the systems and the relatively narrow line width with limited tunability compared with solid state systems producing the same peak power. High power gas lasers group into three main categories depending on the waste-heat handling capacity.

  13. Scaling to Ultra-High Intensities by High-Energy Petawatt Beam Combining

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C W; Jovanovic, I; Crane, J; Rushford, M; Lucianetti, A; Barty, C J

    2006-06-23

    The output pulse energy from a single-aperture high-energy laser amplifier (e.g. fusion lasers such as NIF and LMJ) are critically limited by a number of factors including optical damage, which places an upper bound on the operating fluence; parasitic gain, which limits together with manufacturing costs the maximum aperture size to {approx} 40-cm; and non-linear phase effects which limits the peak intensity. For 20-ns narrow band pulses down to transform-limited sub-picosecond pulses, these limiters combine to yield 10-kJ to 1-kJ maximum pulse energies with up to petawatt peak power. For example, the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) project at NIF is designed to provide kilo-Joule pulses from 0.75-ps to 50-ps, with peak focused intensity above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Using such a high-energy petawatt (HEPW) beamline as a modular unit, they discuss large-scale architectures for coherently combining multiple HEPW pulses from independent apertures, called CAPE (Coherent Addition of Pulses for Energy), to significantly increase the peak achievable focused intensity. Importantly, the maximum intensity achievable with CAPE increases non-linearly. Clearly, the total integrated energy grows linearly with the number of apertures N used. However, as CAPE combines beams in the focal plane by increasing the angular convergence to focus (i.e. the f-number decreases), the foal spot diameter scales inversely with N. Hence the peak intensity scales as N{sup 2}. Using design estimates for the focal spot size and output pulse energy (limited by damage fluence on the final compressor gratings) versus compressed pulse duration in the ARC system, Figure 2 shows the scaled focal spot intensity and total energy for various CAPE configurations from 1,2,4, ..., up to 192 total beams. They see from the fixture that the peak intensity for event modest 8 to 16 beam combinations reaches the 10{sup 21} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} regime. With greater number of apertures, or with

  14. Overview of repetitively pulsed photolytic iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlie, L. A. V.

    1996-02-01

    The performance of a repetitively pulsed, 70 joule, closed cycle 1.3 (mu) M photolytic atomic iodine laser with excellent beam quality (BQ equals 1.15) is presented. This BQ was exhibited in the fundamental mode from a M equals 3.1 confocal unstable resonator at a 0.5 Hz repetition rate. A closed cycle scrubber/laser fuel system consisting of a condensative- evaporative section, two Cu wool I2 reactor regions, and an internal turbo-blower enabled the laser to operate very reliably with low maintenance. The fuel system provided C3F7I gas at 10 - 60 torr absent of the photolytic quenching by-product I2. Using a turbo- molecular blower longitudinal flow velocities greater than 10 m/s were achieved through the 150 cm long by 7.5 multiplied by 7.5 cm2 cross sectional photolytic iodine gain region. In addition to the high laser output and excellent BQ, the resulting 8 - 12 microsecond laser pulse had a coherence length greater than 45 meters and polarization extinction ratio better than 100:1. Projections from this pulsed photolytic atomic iodine laser technology to larger energies, higher repetition rates, and variable pulse widths are discussed.

  15. Nonequilibrium Interlayer Transport in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Eres, Gyula; Larson, Ben C; Rouleau, Christopher M; Zschack, P.; Lowndes, Douglas H

    2006-01-01

    We use time-resolved surface x-ray diffraction measurements with microsecond range resolution to study the growth kinetics of pulsed laser deposited SrTiO3. Time-dependent surface coverages corresponding to single laser shots were determined directly from crystal truncation rod intensity transients. Analysis of surface coverage evolution shows that extremely fast nonequilibrium interlayer transport, which occurs concurrently with the arrival of the laser plume, dominates the deposition process. A much smaller fraction of material, which is governed by the dwell time between successive laser shots, is transferred by slow, thermally driven interlayer transport processes.

  16. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Alger, Terry W.

    1985-01-01

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  17. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Alger, T.W.

    1982-09-29

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  18. Ophthalmic applications of ultrashort pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Tibor; Spooner, Greg; Sacks, Zachary S.; Suarez, Carlos G.; Raksi, Ferenc; Zadoyan, Ruben; Sarayba, Melvin; Kurtz, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses can be used to create high precision incision in transparent and translucent tissue with minimal damage to adjacent tissue. These performance characteristics meet important surgical requirements in ophthalmology, where femtosecond laser flap creation is becoming a widely used refractive surgery procedure. We summarize clinical findings with femtosecond laser flaps as well as early experiments with other corneal surgical procedures such as corneal transplants. We also review laser-tissue interaction studies in the human sclera and their consequences for the treatment of glaucoma.

  19. Extremely Nonsinusoidal Emissions and Fast Electron Phenomena from Strong Laser Pulses Obliquely P-Incident on Sharp-Edged Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, T. W.; Nikolic, L.; Tyshetskiy, Y.; Vidal, F.

    2007-11-01

    High laser harmonic light [1] emerges when the Vulcan petawatt laser's sub-ps laser pulses are obliquely incident on slab targets with extremely low pre-pulse energy. Similar work is in progress with the ALLS 200 TW Ti-Saph laser at INRS EMT. (Pulses are 24 fs at 10 Hz with 10-10 contrast, even without plasma mirrors). 2-D PIC (OSIRIS code at INRS) results on basic mechanism(s) resemble those of Gibbon [2], Naumova et al. [3] and Thaury et al. [4]. The very large and asymmetric electromagnetic ``spikes'' which account for the high harmonic content are produced by extremely concentrated 2D plasma surface currents. The connection between our 2D PIC results (also those in [3] and 1D PIC results [2,4] using the Gibbon-Bourdier moving 1D formalism[2] is also discussed, as are the fast electrons, including some related quasi-steady magnetic fields. [1] B. Dromey et al Nature Phys. Lett., 2, 456-459 (2006) [2] Paul Gibbon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 50 (1996) [3] N. Naumova, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 195003 (2004). [4] C. Thaury, et al., Nature Phys. 3, 424 (2007)

  20. Cornea surgery with nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Wang, Bagui; Riemann, Iris; Kobow, Jens

    2005-04-01

    We report on a novel optical method for (i) flap-generation in LASIK procedures as well as (ii) for flap-free intrastromal refractive surgery based on nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses. The near infrared 200 fs pulses for multiphoton ablation have been provided by ultracompact turn-key MHz laser resonators. LASIK flaps and intracorneal cavities have been realized with high precision within living New Zealand rabbits using the system FemtoCutO (JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany) at 800 nm laser wavelength. Using low-energy sub-2 nJ laser pulses, collateral damage due to photodisruptive and self-focusing effects was avoided. The laser ablation system consists of fast galvoscanners, focusing optics of high numerical aperture as well as a sensitive imaging system and provides also the possibility of 3D multiphoton imaging of fluorescent cellular organelles and SHG signals from collagen. Multiphoton tomography of the cornea was used to determine the exact intratissue beam position and to visualize intraocular post-laser effects. The wound healing process has been investigated up to 90 days after instrastromal laser ablation by histological analysis. Regeneration of damaged collagen structures and the migration of inflammation cells have been detected.

  1. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL format.

  2. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. T.; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Tremaine, A.; Musumeci, P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200 MV /m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti :Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100 fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  3. Energy distribution of fast electrons accelerated by high intensity laser pulse depending on laser pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Morace, Alessio; Hata, Masayasu; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sakata, Shohei; Lee, Seung Ho; Matsuo, Kazuki; Farley Law, King Fai; Tosaki, Shota; Yogo, Akifumi; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The dependence of high-energy electron generation on the pulse duration of a high intensity LFEX laser was experimentally investigated. The LFEX laser (λ = 1.054 and intensity = 2.5 – 3 x 1018 W/cm2) pulses were focused on a 1 mm3 gold cubic block after reducing the intensities of the foot pulse and pedestal by using a plasma mirror. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) duration of the intense laser pulse could be set to either 1.2 ps or 4 ps by temporally stacking four beams of the LFEX laser, for which the slope temperature of the high-energy electron distribution was 0.7 MeV and 1.4 MeV, respectively. The slope temperature increment cannot be explained without considering pulse duration effects on fast electron generation.

  4. An empirical model for the interaction of ultraintense laser pulses with fully ionized plasmas including electrostatic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jeong-Hoon

    The fast ignitor approach to inertial confinement fusion offers an efficient route to produce higher energy gain for less driver energy and compressed fuel density than the conventional hydrodynamic ignition scheme. Over the last decade, serious efforts have been expended towards the goal of achieving controlled fusion using this new approach. However, until now no simple physical plasma model for this idea has been available and the feasibility of the fast ignition project by petawatt laser pulses is not yet clear. We have investigated the capability of ultrafast lasers with irradiance I > 1018 W cm-2 to produce highly energetic electron beams both in a planar wave and in a Gaussian focus in a low-density plasma and within a physical model of electrostatic effects in relativistic plasmas. The trajectory of a free electron in a plane wave with arbitrary initial conditions has been derived. From the complete solutions for the particle trajectory, we have also determined the initial velocities required to produce figure-of-eight motions for arbitrary initial particle positions. A new expression for the relativistic ponderomotive force has been developed. It compares very well with earlier work by Quesnel and Mora. The new expression promises to speed up particle-in-cell simulations. It has been found that free electrons escape from the Gaussian focal region of a 10-ps petawatt laser pulse very quickly before the field reaches its maximum amplitude. In this case very small net energy transfer occurs during the complete interaction of the electrons with the laser beam, indicating that (in the absence of collective electrostatic effects) free electrons cannot extract enough energy from the ignition laser pulse for ignition. This thesis presents a novel simulation model for predicting the large-scale dynamic behavior of the high intensity laser-plasma interaction. We have developed a simple particle simulation code to explore collective electrostatic effects in plasmas

  5. Ultrashort pulsed laser technology development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manke, Gerald C.

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Navy has been pursuing a technology development program for advanced, all-fiber, Ultra Short Pulsed Laser (USPL) systems via Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) programs. Multiple topics have been published to promote and fund research that encompasses every critical component of a standard USPL system and enable the demonstration of mJ/pulse class systems with an all fiber architecture. This presentation will summarize published topics and funded programs.

  6. Polyethylene welding by pulsed visible laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Caridi, F.; Visco, A. M.; Campo, N.

    2011-01-01

    Laser welding of plastics is a relatively new process that induces locally a fast polymer heating. For most applications, the process involves directing a pulsed beam of visible light at the weld joint by going through one of the two parts. This is commonly referred to as “through transmission visible laser welding”. In this technique, the monochromatic visible light source uses a power ns pulsed laser in order to irradiate the joint through one part and the light is absorbed in the vicinity of the other part. In order to evaluate the mechanical resistance of the welded joint, mass quadrupole spectrometry, surface profilometry, microscopy techniques and mechanical shear tests were employed. The welding effect was investigated as a function of the laser irradiation time, nature of the polyethylene materials and temperature.

  7. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.

  8. Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Banks, Paul S.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2002-01-01

    Short pulse PLD is a viable technique of producing high quality films with properties very close to that of crystalline diamond. The plasma generated using femtosecond lasers is composed of single atom ions with no clusters producing films with high Sp.sup.3 /Sp.sup.2 ratios. Using a high average power femtosecond laser system, the present invention dramatically increases deposition rates to up to 25 .mu.m/hr (which exceeds many CVD processes) while growing particulate-free films. In the present invention, deposition rates is a function of laser wavelength, laser fluence, laser spot size, and target/substrate separation. The relevant laser parameters are shown to ensure particulate-free growth, and characterizations of the films grown are made using several diagnostic techniques including electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Trident Pair Production in Strong Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ilderton, Anton

    2011-01-14

    We calculate the trident pair production amplitude in a strong laser background. We allow for finite pulse durations, while still treating the laser fields nonperturbatively in strong-field QED. Our approach reveals explicitly the individual contributions of the one-step and two-step processes. We also expose the role gauge invariance plays in the amplitudes and discuss the relation between our results and the optical theorem.

  10. Compact pulsed laser having improved heat conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A highly efficient, compact pulsed laser having high energy to weight and volume ratios is provided. The laser utilizes a cavity reflector that operates as a heat sink and is essentially characterized by having a high heat conductivity, by being a good electrical insulator and by being substantially immune to the deleterious effects of ultra-violet radiation. Manual portability is accomplished by eliminating entirely any need for a conventional circulating fluid cooling system.